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Sample records for models comparing activities

  1. Comparing Active Vision Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  2. Comparing active vision models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  3. Activity Modelling and Comparative Evaluation of WSN MAC Security Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawar, Pranav M.; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2012-01-01

    Applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are growing tremendously in the domains of habitat, tele-health, industry monitoring, vehicular networks, home automation and agriculture. This trend is a strong motivation for malicious users to increase their focus on WSNs and to develop and initi......Applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are growing tremendously in the domains of habitat, tele-health, industry monitoring, vehicular networks, home automation and agriculture. This trend is a strong motivation for malicious users to increase their focus on WSNs and to develop...... and initiate security attacks that disturb the normal functioning of the network in a severe manner. Such attacks affect the performance of the network by increasing the energy consumption, by reducing throughput and by inducing long delays. Of all existing WSN attacks, MAC layer attacks are considered...... the most harmful as they directly affect the available resources and thus the nodes’ energy consumption. The first endeavour of this paper is to model the activities of MAC layer security attacks to understand the flow of activities taking place when mounting the attack and when actually executing it...

  4. Comparing droplet activation parameterisations against adiabatic parcel models using a novel inverse modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Daniel; Morales, Ricardo; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many previous studies have compared droplet activation parameterisations against adiabatic parcel models (e.g. Ghan et al., 2001). However, these have often involved comparisons for a limited number of parameter combinations based upon certain aerosol regimes. Recent studies (Morales et al., 2014) have used wider ranges when evaluating their parameterisations, however, no study has explored the full possible multi-dimensional parameter space that would be experienced by droplet activations within a global climate model (GCM). It is important to be able to efficiently highlight regions of the entire multi-dimensional parameter space in which we can expect the largest discrepancy between parameterisation and cloud parcel models in order to ascertain which regions simulated by a GCM can be expected to be a less accurate representation of the process of cloud droplet activation. This study provides a new, efficient, inverse modelling framework for comparing droplet activation parameterisations to more complex cloud parcel models. To achieve this we couple a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (Partridge et al., 2012) to two independent adiabatic cloud parcel models and four droplet activation parameterisations. This framework is computationally faster than employing a brute force Monte Carlo simulation, and allows us to transparently highlight which parameterisation provides the closest representation across all aerosol physiochemical and meteorological environments. The parameterisations are demonstrated to perform well for a large proportion of possible parameter combinations, however, for certain key parameters; most notably the vertical velocity and accumulation mode aerosol concentration, large discrepancies are highlighted. These discrepancies correspond for parameter combinations that result in very high/low simulated values of maximum supersaturation. By identifying parameter interactions or regimes within the multi-dimensional parameter space we hope to guide

  5. Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (MCBIOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Jie Liu1,2, Richard Judson1, Matthew T. Martin1, Huixiao Hong3, Imran Shah1 1National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT), US EPA, RTP, NC...

  6. Simultaneous measurement of two enzyme activities using infrared spectroscopy: A comparative evaluation of PARAFAC, TUCKER and N-PLS modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Andreas; Hansen, Per Waaben; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    are active on specific substrates generating a multitude of products. In this paper we use the plant polymer, pectin, to present a method to quantify enzyme activity of two pectolytic enzymes by monitoring their superimposed spectral evolutions simultaneously. The data is analyzed by three chemometric...... multiway methods, namely PARAFAC, TUCKER3 and N-PLS, to establish simultaneous enzyme activity assays for pectin lyase and pectin methyl esterase. Correlation coefficients Rpred2 for prediction test sets are 0.48, 0.96 and 0.96 for pectin lyase and 0.70, 0.89 and 0.89 for pectin methyl esterase......, respectively. The retrieved models are compared and prediction test sets show that especially TUCKER3 performs well, even in comparison to the supervised regression method N-PLS....

  7. Comparative effects of traditional Chinese and Western migraine medicines in an animal model of nociceptive trigeminovascular activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonglie; Martins-Oliveira, Margarida; Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling disorder of the brain with limited therapeutic options, particularly for preventive treatment. There is a need to identify novel targets and test their potential efficacy in relevant preclinical migraine models. Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for millennia and may offer avenues for exploration. Methods We evaluated two traditional Chinese medicines, gastrodin and ligustrazine, and compared them to two Western approaches with propranolol and levetiracetam, one effective and one ineffective, in an established in vivo rodent model of nociceptive durovascular trigeminal activation. Results Intravenous gastrodin (30 and 100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the trigeminocervical complex. Ligustrazine (10 mg/kg) and propranolol (3 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited dural-evoked trigeminocervical complex responses, although the timing of responses of ligustrazine does not match its pharmacokinetic profile. Levetiracetam had no effects on trigeminovascular responses. Conclusion Our data suggest gastrodin has potential as an anti-migraine treatment, whereas ligustrazine seems less promising. Interestingly, in line with clinical trial data, propranolol was effective and levetiracetam not. Exploration of the mechanisms and modelling effects of Chinese traditional therapies offers novel route for drug discovery in migraine.

  8. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions.Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music. Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course.Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .02. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [(F(1, 56 = 3.0, p = .09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being [r = 0.31, p = .02] and decreased clinical symptoms [r = -0.29, p = .03].Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing.

  9. Comparing root architectural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  10. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = -0.29, p = 0.03). Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future research with a fully randomized design will be

  11. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = −0.29, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future

  12. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Multiple Myeloma: An Activity-based Costing Analysis, Comparing a Total Inpatient Model Versus an Early Discharge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Console, Giuseppe; Russo, Letteria; Meliado', Antonella; Meliambro, Nicola; Moscato, Tiziana; Irrera, Giuseppe; Messina, Giuseppe; Pontari, Antonella; Morabito, Fortunato

    2017-08-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) was developed and advocated as a means of overcoming the systematic distortions of traditional cost accounting. We calculated the cost of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma using the ABC method, through 2 different care models: the total inpatient model (TIM) and the early-discharge outpatient model (EDOM) and compared this with the approved diagnosis related-groups (DRG) Italian tariffs. The TIM and EDOM models involved a total cost of €28,615.15 and €16,499.43, respectively. In the TIM model, the phase with the greatest economic impact was the posttransplant (recovery and hematologic engraftment) with 36.4% of the total cost, whereas in the EDOM model, the phase with the greatest economic impact was the pretransplant (chemo-mobilization, apheresis procedure, cryopreservation, and storage) phase, with 60.4% of total expenses. In an analysis of each episode, the TIM model comprised a higher absorption than the EDOM. In particular, the posttransplant represented 36.4% of the total costs in the TIM and 17.7% in EDOM model, respectively. The estimated reduction in cost per patient using an EDOM model was over €12,115.72. The repayment of the DRG in Calabrian Region for the ASCT procedure is €59,806. Given the real cost of the transplant, the estimated cost saving per patient is €31,190.85 in the TIM model and €43,306.57 in the EDOM model. In conclusion, the actual repayment of the DRG does not correspond to the real cost of the ASCT procedure in Italy. Moreover, using the EDOM, the cost of ASCT is approximately the half of the TIM model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models for accretion of terrestrial bodies involve metal-silicate equilibrium as the metallic core formed during growth. Most elements considered are either refractory or well studied elements for which effects of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metallic liquid composition are well known. There are a large number of elements that are both siderophile and volatile, whose fate in such models is unknown, largely due to a lack of data at comparable conditions and com-positions (FeNi core with light elements such as S, C, Si, and O). We have focused on Ge, In, As, Sb and determined the effect of Si and C on metal-silicate partitioning, and developed a thermo-dynamic model that allows application of these new data to a wide range of planetary bodies. New experiments: We have previously carried out experiments with FeSi metallic liquid at C-saturated conditions at 1600 and 1800 C [4]. In a new series of experiments we investigate the effect of Si in carbon-free systems at 1600 C for comparison. Experiments were carried out at 1 GPa in MgO capsules using the same basaltic starting composition as in previous studies. The MgO capsule reacts with the silicate melt to form more MgO-rich liquids that have 22-26 wt% MgO. Experimental met-als and silicates were analyzed using a combination of electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS. Results: The new results can be interpreted by considering Ge as an example, in the simple exchange equilibrium Fe + GeO = FeO + Ge, where the equilibrium constant Kd can be examined as a function of Si content of the metal. The slope of lnKd vs. (1-XSi) for this new series allows derivation of the epsilon interaction parameter for each of these four elements and Si (both C-saturated and C-free).All four elements have positive epsilon values, indicating that Si causes a decrease in the partition coefficients; values are 6.6, 6.5, 27.8 and 25.2 for In, Ge, As, and Sb, respectively, at 1 GPa and 1600 C. As an example of

  14. Variance components models for physical activity with age as modifier: a comparative twin study in seven countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vink, Jacqueline M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Medland, Sarah E

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity is influenced by genetic factors whose expression may change with age. We employed an extension to the classical twin model that allows a modifier variable, age, to interact with the effects of the latent genetic and environmental factors. The model was applied to self......-reported data from twins aged 19 to 50 from seven countries that collaborated in the GenomEUtwin project: Australia, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom. Results confirmed the importance of genetic influences on physical activity in all countries and showed an age-related decrease...... into account when exploring the genetic and environmental contribution to physical activity. It also suggests that the power of genome-wide association studies to identify the genetic variants contributing to physical activity may be larger in young adult cohorts....

  15. Comparing and modeling organic micro-pollutant adsorption onto powdered activated carbon in different drinking waters and WWTP effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietzschmann, Frederik; Aschermann, Geert; Jekel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of organic micro-pollutants (OMP) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was compared between regionally different waters within two groups, namely five drinking waters and seven wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. In all waters, OMP were spiked to adjust similar ratios of the initial OMP and DOC concentrations (c0,OMP/c0,DOC). PAC was dosed specific to the respective DOC (e.g. 2 mg PAC/per mg DOC). Liquid chromatography with online carbon detection shows differences of the background organic matter (BOM) compositions. The OMP removals at given DOC-specific PAC doses vary by ±15% (drinking waters) and ±10% (WWTP effluents). Similar BOM-induced adsorption competition in the waters of the respective group results in overall relationships between the PAC loadings and the liquid phase concentrations of each OMP (in the case of strong adsorbates). Weaker adsorbates show no overall relationships because of the strong BOM-induced adsorption competition near the initial OMP concentration. Correlations between OMP removals and UV254 removals were independent of the water (within the respective group). The equivalent background compound (EBC) model was applied to the experimental data. Using global EBC Freundlich coefficients, the initial EBC concentration correlates with the DOC (both water groups separately) and the low molecular weight (LMW) organics concentrations (all waters combined). With these correlations, the EBC could be initialized by using the DOC or the LMW organics concentration of additional drinking water, WWTP effluent, and surface water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity.

  17. Activated sludge model 2d calibration with full-scale WWTP data: comparing model parameter identifiability with influent and operational uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vinicius Cunha; Lafuente, Javier; Baeza, Juan Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The present work developed a model for the description of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Manresa, Catalonia, Spain) for further plant upgrades based on the systematic parameter calibration of the activated sludge model 2d (ASM2d) using a methodology based on the Fisher information matrix. The influent was characterized for the application of the ASM2d and the confidence interval of the calibrated parameters was also assessed. No expert knowledge was necessary for model calibration and a huge available plant database was converted into more useful information. The effect of the influent and operating variables on the model fit was also studied using these variables as calibrating parameters and keeping the ASM2d kinetic and stoichiometric parameters, which traditionally are the calibration parameters, at their default values. Such an "inversion" of the traditional way of model fitting allowed evaluating the sensitivity of the main model outputs regarding the influent and the operating variables changes. This new approach is able to evaluate the capacity of the operational variables used by the WWTP feedback control loops to overcome external disturbances in the influent and kinetic/stoichiometric model parameters uncertainties. In addition, the study of the influence of operating variables on the model outputs provides useful information to select input and output variables in decentralized control structures.

  18. Comparative therapeutic activities of Ciprofloxacin, Amoxicillin, Ceftriaxone and Cotrimoxazole in a new model of experimental infection with Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Hof, H.; Christen, A.; Hacker, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    A new mouse model for systemic infection with Escherichia coli is presented. Whereas in other models 107_108 bacteria have to be injected into an animal to induce toxic effects resulting in death within 24 hours, now, only 103_104 bacteria of an appropriate strain are required to produce a genuine infection characterized by an increase in the bacterial load over several days. The quantitative determination of bacterial counts per liver allows a more sensitive measurement than recording death ...

  19. Comparative Study of Metaheuristics for the Curve-Fitting Problem: Modeling Neurotransmitter Diffusion and Synaptic Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Montes

    2015-01-01

    data, though a deeper analysis from a biological perspective reveals that some are better suited for this purpose, as they represent more accurately the biological process. Based on the results of this analysis, we propose a set of mathematical equations and a methodology, adequate for modeling several aspects of biochemical synaptic behavior.

  20. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Sylvia; Herting, Frank; Mundigl, Olaf; Waldhauer, Inja; Weinzierl, Tina; Fauti, Tanja; Muth, Gunter; Ziegler-Landesberger, Doris; Van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Lang, Sabine; Duong, Minh Ngoc; Reslan, Lina; Gerdes, Christian A; Friess, Thomas; Baer, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidner, Michael; Dumontet, Charles; Umana, Pablo; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We report the first preclinical in vitro and in vivo comparison of GA101 (obinutuzumab), a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 monoclonal antibody, with rituximab and ofatumumab, the two currently approved type I CD20 antibodies. The three antibodies were compared in assays measuring direct cell death (AnnexinV/PI staining and time-lapse microscopy), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP), and internalization. The models used for the comparison of their activity in vivo were SU-DHL4 and RL xenografts. GA101 was found to be superior to rituximab and ofatumumab in the induction of direct cell death (independent of mechanical manipulation required for cell aggregate disruption formed by antibody treatment), whereas it was 10 to 1,000 times less potent in mediating CDC. GA101 showed superior activity to rituximab and ofatumumab in ADCC and whole-blood B-cell depletion assays, and was comparable with these two in ADCP. GA101 also showed slower internalization rate upon binding to CD20 than rituximab and ofatumumab. In vivo, GA101 induced a strong antitumor effect, including complete tumor remission in the SU-DHL4 model and overall superior efficacy compared with both rituximab and ofatumumab. When rituximab-pretreated animals were used, second-line treatment with GA101 was still able to control tumor progression, whereas tumors escaped rituximab treatment. Taken together, the preclinical data show that the glyoengineered type II CD20 antibody GA101 is differentiated from the two approved type I CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab by its overall preclinical activity, further supporting its clinical investigation. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of the carboxylate and amide forms of the HLDF-6 peptide in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachouk, Anna P; Storozheva, Zinaida I; Solovjeva, Olga A; Sherstnev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotarev, Yury A; Azev, Vyacheslav N; Rodionov, Igor L; Surina, Elena A; Lipkin, Valery M

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of two pharmaceutical substances, the HLDF-6 peptide (HLDF-6-OH) and its amide form (HLDF-6-NH2), was conducted. The study was performed in male rats using two models of a neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive deficit in rats was induced by injection of the beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (βA 25-35) into the giant-cell nucleus basalis of Meynert or by coinjection of βA 25-35 and ibotenic acid into the hippocampus. To evaluate cognitive functions in animals, three tests were used: the novel object recognition test, the conditioned passive avoidance task and the Morris maze. Comparative analysis of the data demonstrated that the neuroprotective activity of HLDF-6-NH2, evaluated by improvement of cognitive functions in animals, surpassed that of the native HLDF-6-OH peptide. The greater cognitive/ behavioral effects can be attributed to improved kinetic properties of the amide form of the peptide, such as the character of biodegradation and the half-life time. The effects of HLDF-6-NH2 are comparable to, or exceed, those of the reference compounds. Importantly, HLDF-6-NH2 exerts its effects at much lower doses than the reference compounds. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Comparative response of platelet fV and plasma fV to activated protein C and relevance to a model of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Campbell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC has been linked to an increase in activated protein C (aPC from 40 pM in healthy individuals to 175 pM. aPC exerts its activity primarily through cleavage of active coagulation factor Va (fVa. Platelets reportedly possess fVa which is more resistant to aPC cleavage than plasma fVa; this work examines the hypothesis that normal platelets are sufficient to maintain coagulation in the presence of elevated aPC. METHODS: Coagulation responses of normal plasma, fV deficient plasma (fVdp, and isolated normal platelets in fVdp were conducted: prothrombin (PT tests, turbidimetry, and thromboelastography (TEG, including the dose response of aPC on the samples. RESULTS: PT and turbidimetric assays demonstrate that normal plasma is resistant to aPC at doses much higher than those found in ATC. Additionally, an average physiological number of washed normal platelets (200,000 platelets/mm3 was sufficient to eliminate the anti-coagulant effects of aPC up to 10 nM, nearly two orders of magnitude above the ATC concentration and even the steady-state pharmacological concentration of human recombinant aPC, as measured by TEG. aPC also demonstrated no significant effect on clot lysis in normal plasma samples with or without platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Although platelet fVa shows slightly superior resistance to aPC's effects compared to plasma fVa in static models, neither fVa is sufficiently cleaved in simulations of ATC or pharmacologically-delivered aPC to diminish coagulation parameters. aPC is likely a correlative indicator of ATC or may play a cooperative role with other activity altering products generated in ATC.

  4. The active site and substrate-binding mode of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase determined by site-directed mutagenesis and comparative modelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Sam; Yoo, Ahrim; Jung, Jinwon; Sung, Soon-Kee; Yang, Dae Ryook; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Weontae

    2004-01-01

    The active site and substrate-binding mode of MD-ACO1 (Malus domestica Borkh. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase) have been determined using site-directed mutagenesis and comparative modelling methods. The MD-ACO1 protein folds into a compact jelly-roll motif comprised of eight a-helices, 12 b-strands and several long loops. The active site is well defined as a wide cleft near the C-terminus. The co-substrate ascorbate is located in cofactor Fe2+-binding pocket, the so-called '2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad'. In addition, our results reveal that Arg244 and Ser246 are involved in generating the reaction product during enzyme catalysis. The structure agrees well with the biochemical and site-directed mutagenesis results. The three-dimensional structure together with the steady-state kinetics of both the wild-type and mutant MD-ACO1 proteins reveal how the substrate specificity of MD-ACO1 is involved in the catalytic mechanism, providing insights into understanding the fruit ripening process at atomic resolution. PMID:14972027

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Task Modeling Notations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Entender la forma de cómo realizar el trabajo en las organizaciones es parte importante para alcanzar los objetivos, los modelos de tareas ayudan a realizar esta tarea. Estos modelos son la intersección entre el diseño de la interfaz de usuario y enfoques sistemáticos. Existen diferentes niveles de abstracción para representar un modelo de tarea. Cuando los diseñadores requieren sólo especificar los requisitos con respecto a cómo las actividades se deben realizar, consideran sólo las tareas de alto nivel. Por otro lado, cuando los diseñadores tienen por objeto proporcionar indicaciones precisas entonces las actividades están representadas con mayor granularidad, incluidos los aspectos relacionados con el modelo de diálogo de una interfaz de usuario (que define cómo las acciones del sistema y el usuario pueden ser secuenciados. En este artículo se presenta un análisis comparativo de modelos de tareas con el fin de identificar conceptos comunes. Este análisis comparativo se basa en tres criterios: información, la cobertura conceptual y expresividad. La fusión de los resultados derivó en un meta-modelo robusto que cubre la mayoría de las situaciones concernientes al modelado de tareas, incluyendo: la interacción de varios usuarios, los sistemas de información, el flujo de trabajo, y CSCW.Task Models describe how to perform activities to reach users' goals. Task models represent the intersection between user interface design and more systematic approaches. Task models can be represented at various abstraction levels. When designers want to specify only requirements regarding how activities should be performed, they consider only the main high-level tasks. On the other hand, when designers aim to provide precise design indications then the activities are represented at a small granularity, thus including aspects related to the dialogue model of a user interface (which defines how system and user actions can be sequenced. In this

  6. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC 50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases

  7. Neutron activation analysis-comparative (NAAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    A software system for the reduction of comparative neutron activation analysis data is presented. Libraries are constructed to contain the elemental composition and isotopic nuclear data of an unlimited number of standards. Ratios to unknown sample data are performed by standard calibrations. Interfering peak corrections, second-order activation-product corrections, and deconvolution of multiplets are applied automatically. Passive gamma-energy analysis can be performed with the same software. 3 figures

  8. Activities in dementia care: A comparative assessment of activity types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokon, Elizabeth; Sauer, Philip E; Li, Yue

    2016-12-05

    This exploratory study compares the impact of five activity types on the well-being of institutionalized people with dementia: the intergenerational art program Opening Minds through Art, art and music therapies, creative activities, non-creative activities, and no activities at all. We validated the Scripps Modified Greater Cincinnati Chapter Well-Being Observational Tool, and used that instrument to systematically observe N = 67 people with dementia as they participated in different activity types. People with dementia showed the highest well-being scores during Opening Minds through Art compared to all other activities. No significant well-being differences were found between creative activities led by licensed art/music therapist versus regular activity staff. Furthermore, no significant well-being differences were found between creative and non-creative activities that were both led by regular activity staff. Overall, people with dementia benefit from participating in activities, regardless of the type (creative or non-creative), or who conducts them (licensed therapists or activity staff). However, in order for people with dementia to reach significantly high levels of overall well-being, we recommend that activities are specifically designed for people with dementia and incorporate a 1:1 ratio between people with dementia and well-trained volunteers/staff members. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Examining Attitudes, Enjoyment, Flow, and Physical Activity Levels in Pre-Service Teachers Utilizing the BLISS Model Compared to Traditional Dance Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christa Ann

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes two studies, based on data collection within a pre-existing collegiate course for pre-service teachers in a children's dance setting at a northwest public university. The overall purpose of these experimental studies was to compare traditional movement/dance with the influence of a relevance-based instructional model,…

  10. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons

  11. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  12. Migration of antimony from PET bottles into beverages: determination of the activation energy of diffusion and migration modelling compared with literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, F; Franz, R

    2011-01-01

    Plastics bottles made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are increasingly used for soft drinks, mineral water, juices and beer. In this study a literature review is presented concerning antimony levels found both in PET materials as well as in foods and food simulants. On the other hand, 67 PET samples from the European bottle market were investigated for their residual antimony concentrations. A mean value of 224 ± 32 mg kg(-1) was found, the median was 220 mg kg(-1). Diffusion coefficients for antimony in PET bottle materials were experimentally determined at different temperature between 105 and 150°C. From these data, the activation energy of diffusion for antimony species from the PET bottle wall into beverages and food simulants was calculated. The obtained value of 189 kJ mol(-1) was found to be in good agreement with published data on PET microwave trays (184 kJ mol(-1)). Based on these results, the migration of antimony into beverages was predicted by mathematical migration modelling for different surface/volume ratios and antimony bottle wall concentrations. The results were compared with literature data as well as international legal limits and guidelines values for drinking water and the migration limit set from food packaging legislation. It was concluded that antimony levels in beverages due to migration from PET bottles manufactured according to the state of the art can never reach or exceed the European-specific migration limit of 40 microg kg(-1). Maximum migration levels caused by room-temperature storage even after 3 years will never be essentially higher than 2.5 microg kg(-1) and in any case will be below the European limit of 5 microg kg(-1) for drinking water. The results of this study confirm that the exposure of the consumer by antimony migration from PET bottles into beverages and even into edible oils reaches approximately 1% of the current tolerable daily intake (TDI) established by World Health Organisation (WHO). Having

  13. Is it Worth Comparing Different Bankruptcy Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Dolejšová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the performance of small enterprises in the Zlín and Olomouc Regions. These enterprises were assessed using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model, the Zmijewski model and the Springate model. The batch selected for this analysis included 16 enterprises from the Zlín Region and 16 enterprises from the Olomouc Region. Financial statements subjected to the analysis are from 2006 and 2010. The statistical data analysis was performed using the one-sample z-test for proportions and the paired t-test. The outcomes of the evaluation run using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model and the Springate model revealed the enterprises to be financially sound, but the Zmijewski model identified them as being insolvent. The one-sample z-test for proportions confirmed that at least 80% of these enterprises show a sound financial condition. A comparison of all models has emphasized the substantial difference produced by the Zmijewski model. The paired t-test showed that the financial performance of small enterprises had remained the same during the years involved. It is recommended that small enterprises assess their financial performance using two different bankruptcy models. They may wish to combine the Zmijewski model with any bankruptcy model (the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model or the Springate model to ensure a proper method of analysis.

  14. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  15. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  16. Biochemical characterization of the venom of the coral snake Micrurus tener and comparative biological activities in the mouse and a reptile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard-Valle, Melisa; Carbajal-Saucedo, Alejandro; de Roodt, Adolfo; López-Vera, Estuardo; Alagón, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the venom components that could play a relevant role during envenomation caused by the coral snake Micrurus tener, through its biochemical characterization as well as the analysis of its effects on a murine model. Furthermore, it aimed to evaluate crude venom, in addition to its components, for possible specificity of action on a natural prey model (Conopsis lineata). The toxicity of the crude venom (delivered subcutaneously) showed a significant difference between the Median Lethal Dose (LD₅₀) in mice (4.4 μg/g) and in Conopsis lineata (12.1 μg/g) that was not observed when comparing the Median Paralyzing Dose (PD₅₀) values (mice = 4.7 μg/g; snakes = 4.1 μg/g). These results are evidence that the choice of study model strongly influences the apparent effects of crude venom. Moreover, based on the observed physical signs in the animal models, it was concluded that the most important physical effect caused by the venom is flaccid paralysis, which facilitates capture and subduing of prey regardless of whether it is alive; death is a logical consequence of the lack of oxygenation. Venom fractionation using a C18 reverse phase column yielded 35 fractions from which 16.6% caused paralysis and/or death to both animal models, 21.9% caused paralysis and/or death only to C. lineata and 1.6% were murine specific. Surprisingly, the diversity of snake-specific fractions did not reflect a difference between the PD₅₀s of the crude venom in mice and snakes, making it impossible to assume some type of specificity for either of the study models. Finally, the great diversity and abundance of fractions with no observable effect in snakes or mice (42.7%) suggested that the observed lethal fractions are not the only relevant toxic fractions within the venom and emphasized the possible relevance of interaction between components to generate the syndrome caused by the venom as a whole. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. Comparing flood loss models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Kai; Kreibich, Heidi; Vogel, Kristin; Riggelsen, Carsten; Scherbaum, Frank; Merz, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Any deliberation on flood risk requires the consideration of potential flood losses. In particular, reliable flood loss models are needed to evaluate cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures, to assess vulnerability, for comparative risk analysis and financial appraisal during and after floods. In recent years, considerable improvements have been made both concerning the data basis and the methodological approaches used for the development of flood loss models. Despite of that, flood loss models remain an important source of uncertainty. Likewise the temporal and spatial transferability of flood loss models is still limited. This contribution investigates the predictive capability of different flood loss models in a split sample cross regional validation approach. For this purpose, flood loss models of different complexity, i.e. based on different numbers of explaining variables, are learned from a set of damage records that was obtained from a survey after the Elbe flood in 2002. The validation of model predictions is carried out for different flood events in the Elbe and Danube river basins in 2002, 2005 and 2006 for which damage records are available from surveys after the flood events. The models investigated are a stage-damage model, the rule based model FLEMOps+r as well as novel model approaches which are derived using data mining techniques of regression trees and Bayesian networks. The Bayesian network approach to flood loss modelling provides attractive additional information concerning the probability distribution of both model predictions and explaining variables.

  18. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  19. A Comparative Oncology Study of Iniparib Defines Its Pharmacokinetic Profile and Biological Activity in a Naturally-Occurring Canine Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Saba

    Full Text Available Development of iniparib as an anti-cancer agent was hindered in part by lingering questions regarding its mechanism of action, the activity of its metabolites, and their potential accumulation in tumors. Due to strong similarities in metabolism of iniparib between humans and dogs, a veterinary clinical trial in pet dogs with spontaneous cancers was designed to answer specific questions pertaining to pharmacokinetic exposures and tolerability of iniparib. Dogs were treated with iniparib alone and in combination with carboplatin chemotherapy. Iniparib doses ranged between 10-70 mg/kg intravenously (IV. Plasma, tumor and normal tissue samples were collected before and at various time points scheduled after exposure for pharmacokinetic and biologic analysis. The primary endpoints included characterization of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT and determination of the drug exposures that could be achieved in both normal and tumor tissues. Nineteen dogs were treated. DLT included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia; most effects were attributable to carboplatin based on the timing of adverse event onset. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of iniparib was not identified. Moderate to high variability in plasma exposure was noted for iniparib and all metabolites between animals. When quantifiable, iniparib and metabolite plasma:tumor ratios were < 0.088 and <1.7, respectively. In this study, iniparib was well tolerated as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin over a range of doses. However, clinically relevant concentrations of the parent drug and selected metabolites were not detectable in canine tumor tissues at any studied dose, thus eliminating expectations for clinical responses in dogs or humans. Negative clinical trials in humans, and the uncertainties of its mechanism of action, ultimately led to the decision to stop clinical development of the drug. Nevertheless, the questions that can be asked and answered within

  20. Comparative study of void fraction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.; Freitas, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some models for the calculation of void fraction in water in sub-cooled boiling and saturated vertical upward flow with forced convection have been selected and compared with experimental results in the pressure range of 1 to 150 bar. In order to know the void fraction axial distribution it is necessary to determine the net generation of vapour and the fluid temperature distribution in the slightly sub-cooled boiling region. It was verified that the net generation of vapour was well represented by the Saha-Zuber model. The selected models for the void fraction calculation present adequate results but with a tendency to super-estimate the experimental results, in particular the homogeneous models. The drift flux model is recommended, followed by the Armand and Smith models. (F.E.) [pt

  1. Comparative Study of Bancruptcy Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isye Arieshanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Early indication of bancruptcy is important for a company. If companies aware of  potency of their bancruptcy, they can take a preventive action to anticipate the bancruptcy. In order to detect the potency of a bancruptcy, a company can utilize a a model of bancruptcy prediction. The prediction model can be built using a machine learning methods. However, the choice of machine learning methods should be performed carefully. Because the suitability of a model depends on the problem specifically. Therefore, in this paper we perform a comparative study of several machine leaning methods for bancruptcy prediction. According to the comparative study, the performance of several models that based on machine learning methods (k-NN, fuzzy k-NN, SVM, Bagging Nearest Neighbour SVM, Multilayer Perceptron(MLP, Hybrid of MLP + Multiple Linear Regression, it can be showed that fuzzy k-NN method achieve the best performance with accuracy 77.5%

  2. Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ulrich; Karlson, Kristian Bernt; Holm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general decomposi......In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general...

  3. Comparative analysis between two models of active aging and its influence on body composition, strength levels and quality of life: long-distance runners versus bodybuilders practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Izquierdo-Sánchez, Jose Manuel; Salas-Sánchez, Jesús; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the body composition, strength level, and the quality of life related to the health (QoL) in veteran sportsmen (>35 years old) in relation to sedentary ones (S), and to compare the result in the mentioned variables between two models of sports practice, long-distance runners (LDR) and bodybuilding practitioners (BBP). One hundred forty-eight male participants took part and were distributed into three groups: 47 LDR (age=42.01±6.96 years), 49 BBP (age=45.14±7.04 years), and 47 S (age=43.71±8.75 years). Body composition, upper- and lower-limb strength level, and QoL were assessed. The LDR and BBP obtained better performance in countermovement jump (CMJ) than the S ones (+0.06 m, paging on body composition, the muscle mass is reduced in all groups controlled (LDR, BBP, and S). Additionally, the %fat mass is increased only in S group (pactive aging showed healthier values in BMI and %fat mass as well as greater results in QoL than BBP and S groups. Nevertheless, the LDR group showed similar values to S ones in muscle mass. The regression analysis performed showed that the sedentary habit predicts the %fat mass and CMJ performance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Protein synthesis inhibiting clindamycin improves outcome in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis compared with the cell wall active ceftriaxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeh, Ivo; Gerber, Joachim; Wellmer, Andreas; Wellhausen, Malte; Koenig, Brigitte; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-07-01

    The release of proinflammatory components from bacteria depends on the mode of action of the antibacterial therapy used. We studied whether this influences mortality in experimental sepsis. In a lethal murine model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, animals were randomly assigned to receive the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin (CLI) or the beta-lactam ceftriaxone (CRO). Therapy was introduced subcutaneously 5 hrs after intraperitoneal injection of 10 colony forming units of S. aureus American Type Culture Collection 29213 and was continued every 8 hrs for 3 days. Survival was higher in mice receiving CLI (29/50 animals [58%]) than in mice receiving CRO (16/50 animals [32%]; p =.015). Mice treated with CRO died earlier than mice receiving CLI (p =.002). Eight hours after the first antibiotic dose, the motor performance of mice receiving CRO had deteriorated more than it did for mice receiving CLI (p =.009). Higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured in serum (p =.027) and peritoneal fluid (p =.001) of CRO-treated mice. In vitro, CLI released smaller amounts of staphylococcal enterotoxin A than CRO. Antibiotic treatment of Gram-positive sepsis with a protein synthesis inhibitor decreases morbidity and mortality compared with a bacteriolytic compound. This may be caused by a reduction of the concentrations of proinflammatory/toxic bacterial components and cytokines.

  5. MARR: active vision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, Lubov N.; Gusakova, Valentina I.; Shaposhnikov, Dmitry G.; Faure, Alain; Golovan, Alexander V.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.

    1997-09-01

    Earlier, the biologically plausible active vision, model for multiresolutional attentional representation and recognition (MARR) has been developed. The model is based on the scanpath theory of Noton and Stark and provides invariant recognition of gray-level images. In the present paper, the algorithm of automatic image viewing trajectory formation in the MARR model, the results of psychophysical experiments, and possible applications of the model are considered. Algorithm of automatic image viewing trajectory formation is based on imitation of the scanpath formed by operator. Several propositions about possible mechanisms for a consecutive selection of fixation points in human visual perception inspired by computer simulation results and known psychophysical data have been tested and confirmed in our psychophysical experiments. In particular, we have found that gaze switch may be directed (1) to a peripheral part of the vision field which contains an edge oriented orthogonally to the edge in the point of fixation, and (2) to a peripheral part of the vision field containing crossing edges. Our experimental results have been used to optimize automatic algorithm of image viewing in the MARR model. The modified model demonstrates an ability to recognize complex real world images invariantly with respect to scale, shift, rotation, illumination conditions, and, in part, to point of view and can be used to solve some robot vision tasks.

  6. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  7. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  8. Comparative analysis of Goodwin's business cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S.; Todorov, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the behavior of solutions of Goodwin's business cycle equation in the form of neutral delay differential equation with fixed delay (NDDE model) and in the form of the differential equations of 3rd, 4th and 5th orders (ODE model's). Such ODE model's (Taylor series expansion of NDDE in powers of θ) are proposed in N. Dharmaraj and K. Vela Velupillai [6] for investigation of the short periodic sawthooth oscillations in NDDE. We show that the ODE's of 3rd, 4th and 5th order may approximate the asymptotic behavior of only main Goodwin's mode, but not the sawthooth modes. If the order of the Taylor series expansion exceeds 5, then the approximate ODE becomes unstable independently of time lag θ.

  9. Comparative Adsorption of Spiramycin on Veegum , Activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-21

    Jan 21, 2015 ... The adsorption data obtained for the three adsorbents were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich's plots. Results: At neutral pH, drug adsorprtion by Garcinia kola, activated charcoal and Veegum® were 67,. 54 and 71 %, respectively; differences in adsorption was not significant (p = 0.09). However, the ...

  10. Comparative Immunologic Activities of Polyclonal Antibodies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three types of Vibrio cholerae (El tor, Ogawa) whole cell antigens constituted with liquid paraffin adjuvant (LPA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) and physiological saline (SA) were used for polyclonal antisera production in adult rabbits. Antisera were compared for serologic reactivities with homologous and ...

  11. Oriented active shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2009-04-01

    Active shape models (ASM) are widely employed for recognizing anatomic structures and for delineating them in medical images. In this paper, a novel strategy called oriented active shape models (OASM) is presented in an attempt to overcome the following five limitations of ASM: 1) lower delineation accuracy, 2) the requirement of a large number of landmarks, 3) sensitivity to search range, 4) sensitivity to initialization, and 5) inability to fully exploit the specific information present in the given image to be segmented. OASM effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the boundary orientedness property and the globally optimal delineation capability of the live wire methodology of boundary segmentation. The latter characteristics allow live wire to effectively separate an object boundary from other nonobject boundaries with similar properties especially when they come very close in the image domain. The approach leads to a two-level dynamic programming method, wherein the first level corresponds to boundary recognition and the second level corresponds to boundary delineation, and to an effective automatic initialization method. The method outputs a globally optimal boundary that agrees with the shape model if the recognition step is successful in bringing the model close to the boundary in the image. Extensive evaluation experiments have been conducted by utilizing 40 image (magnetic resonance and computed tomography) data sets in each of five different application areas for segmenting breast, liver, bones of the foot, and cervical vertebrae of the spine. Comparisons are made between OASM and ASM based on precision, accuracy, and efficiency of segmentation. Accuracy is assessed using both region-based false positive and false negative measures and boundary-based distance measures. The results indicate the following: 1) The accuracy of segmentation via OASM is considerably better than that of ASM; 2) The number of landmarks

  12. Comparative Response of Platelet fV and Plasma fV to Activated Protein C and Relevance to a Model of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-12

    2008) The coagulopathy of trauma: a review of mechanisms. J Trauma 65: 748 754. 5. Pidcoke HF, Aden JK, Mora AG, Borgman MA, Spinella PC, et al...factor pathway inhibitor in patients with congenital factor V deficiency. Blood 112: 3615 3623. 47. Gruber A, Griffin JH, Harker LA, Hanson SR (1989... SR , Kelly AB, Griffin JH (1991) Antithrombotic effects of combining activated protein C and urokinase in nonhuman primates. Circulation 84: 2454 2462

  13. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  14. Generic active appearance models revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Alabort-i-Medina, Joan; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Active Orientation Models (AOMs) are gen- erative models of facial shape and appearance. Their main dierences with the well-known paradigm of Active Appearance Models (AAMs) are (i) they use a dierent statistical model of appearance, (ii) they are accompanied by a robust algorithm for

  15. Modeling of active beam units with Modelica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Hultmark, Göran; Vorre, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . Measurements from a full-scale experiment are used to compare the thermal behavior of the active beam with the one predicted by simulations. The simulation results show that the model corresponds closely with the actual operation. The model predicts the outlet water temperature of the active beam...... with a maximum mean absolute error of 0.18 °C. In term of maximum mean absolute percentage error, simulation results differ by 0.9%. The methodology presented is general enough to be applied for modeling other active beam units. Modeling of active beam units with Modelica. Available from: https...

  16. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on free radical scavenging activity of immunosuppressants used in lung transplantation and comparative electron paramagnetic resonance study of kinetics of their interactions with model free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanjek-Cichoracka, A; Żegleń, S; Ramos, P; Pilawa, B; Wojarski, J

    2018-01-27

    The immunosuppressive drugs used in solid organ transplantation or autoimmunological processes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to estimate their free radical scavenging activity. The interactions of immunosuppressants with free radicals were examined by an X-band (9.3 GHz) EPR spectroscopy and a model of DPPH free radicals. The EPR spectra of DPPH and DPPH interacting with individual drugs were compared. Kinetic studies were performed, and the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the free radical scavenging activity of the tested drugs was determined. The free radical scavenging activity of non-irradiated drugs decreased in the order: rapamycin > mycophenolate mofetil > ciclosporin > tacrolimus. UV irradiation increased the free radical scavenging activity of all the tested immunosuppressive drugs, and the effect was highest for tacrolimus. For the non-irradiated samples, the speed of free radical interactions decreased in the order: ciclosporin > tacrolimus > mycophenolate mofetil > rapamycin. UV irradiation only slightly affected the speed of interactions of the immunosuppressive drugs with the model DPPH free radicals. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is useful for obtaining information on interactions of immunosuppressive drugs with free radicals. We hypothesized that the long-term immunosuppressive effects of these drugs after transplantation or during autoimmune disorders may be mediated by anti-inflammatory action in addition to the known receptor/cell cycle inhibition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Activated sludge model No. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gujer, W.; Henze, M.; Mino, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) can predict oxygen consumption, sludge production, nitrification and denitrification of activated sludge systems. It relates to the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) and corrects for some defects of ASM I. In addition to ASM1, ASM3 includes storage...

  18. Comparative study of physical activity patterns among school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of the timing and patterns of daily activity are crucial in understanding when children accumulate the highest levels of physical activity. The objectives of this study were to examine moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) patterns accrued by time of day among Kenyan children, and compare activity ...

  19. Comparing holographic dark energy models with statefinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Fei

    2014-01-01

    We apply the statefinder diagnostic to the holographic dark energy models, including the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model, the new holographic dark energy model, the new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model, and the Ricci dark energy model. In the low-redshift region the holographic dark energy models are degenerate with each other and with the ΛCDM model in the H(z) and q(z) evolutions. In particular, the HDE model is highly degenerate with the ΛCDM model, and in the HDE model the cases with different parameter values are also in strong degeneracy. Since the observational data are mainly within the low-redshift region, it is very important to break this lowredshift degeneracy in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics by using some quantities with higher order derivatives of the scale factor. It is shown that the statefinder diagnostic r(z) is very useful in breaking the low-redshift degeneracies. By employing the statefinder diagnostic the holographic dark energy models can be differentiated efficiently in the low-redshift region. The degeneracy between the holographic dark energy models and the ΛCDM model can also be broken by this method. Especially for the HDE model, all the previous strong degeneracies appearing in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics are broken effectively. But for the NADE model, the degeneracy between the cases with different parameter values cannot be broken, even though the statefinder diagnostic is used. A direct comparison of the holographic dark energy models in the r-s plane is also made, in which the separations between the models (including the ΛCDM model) can be directly measured in the light of the current values {r 0 , s 0 } of the models. (orig.)

  20. Comparative antibacterial activity of some Nigerian honey and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antibacterial activity of some Nigerian honey and commonly used antiseptic agents against strains of MRSA and other multidrug resistant staphylococci isolates from surgical wound infections.

  1. Comparative structural modeling of six old yellow enzymes (OYEs from the necrotrophic fungus Ascochyta rabiei: insight into novel OYE classes with differences in cofactor binding, organization of active site residues and stereopreferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Nizam

    Full Text Available Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE1 was the first flavin-dependent enzyme identified and characterized in detail by the entire range of physical techniques. Irrespective of this scrutiny, true physiological role of the enzyme remains a mystery. In a recent study, we systematically identified OYE proteins from various fungi and classified them into three classes viz. Class I, II and III. However, there is no information about the structural organization of Class III OYEs, eukaryotic Class II OYEs and Class I OYEs of filamentous fungi. Ascochyta rabiei, a filamentous phytopathogen which causes Ascochyta blight (AB in chickpea possesses six OYEs (ArOYE1-6 belonging to the three OYE classes. Here we carried out comparative homology modeling of six ArOYEs representing all the three classes to get an in depth idea of structural and functional aspects of fungal OYEs. The predicted 3D structures of A. rabiei OYEs were refined and evaluated using various validation tools for their structural integrity. Analysis of FMN binding environment of Class III OYE revealed novel residues involved in interaction. The ligand para-hydroxybenzaldehyde (PHB was docked into the active site of the enzymes and interacting residues were analyzed. We observed a unique active site organization of Class III OYE in comparison to Class I and II OYEs. Subsequently, analysis of stereopreference through structural features of ArOYEs was carried out, suggesting differences in R/S selectivity of these proteins. Therefore, our comparative modeling study provides insights into the FMN binding, active site organization and stereopreference of different classes of ArOYEs and indicates towards functional differences of these enzymes. This study provides the basis for future investigations towards the biochemical and functional characterization of these enigmatic enzymes.

  2. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  3. Event-Based Activity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2004-01-01

    We present and discuss a modeling approach that supports event-based modeling of information and activity in information systems. Interacting human actors and IT-actors may carry out such activity. We use events to create meaningful relations between information structures and the related...

  4. Similitude Modeling in RDC Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli Darmawan

    2015-01-01

    Research and development activities would involve the scaled modelling activities in order to investigate theory, facts, thesis or concepts. In commercialisation activities, scaling-up proses is necessary for the development of pilot plants or prototypes. The issue with scaled modelling is the similarity between the small scaled model and the full scaled prototype in all aspects of the system such as physical appearance, dimension and the system behaviour. Similarly, for scaling-up process, physical parameters and behaviour of a smaller model need to be developed into a bigger prototype with similar system. Either way, the modelling process must be able to produce a reliable representation of the system or process so that the objectives or functions of the system can be achieved. This paper discusses a modelling method which may be able to produce similar representation of any system or process either in scaled-model testing or scaling-up processes. (author)

  5. Activity-based DEVS modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alshareef, Abdurrahman; Sarjoughian, Hessam S.; Zarrin, Bahram

    2018-01-01

    architecture and the UML concepts. In this paper, we further this work by grounding Activity-based DEVS modeling and developing a fully-fledged modeling engine to demonstrate applicability. We also detail the relevant aspects of the created metamodel in terms of modeling and simulation. A significant number...

  6. Comparative antimicrobial activity of clove and fennel essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bactericidal activity of culinary spices was evaluated against five food spoilage bacteria namely: Pseudomonas syringae, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus sp., and Aeromicrobium erythreum. Fennel oil was found fairly active against bacterial strains as compared to clove oil with highest antibacterial activity ...

  7. Comparing models of offensive cyber operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grant, T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available would be needed by a Cyber Security Operations Centre in order to perform offensive cyber operations?". The analysis was performed, using as a springboard seven models of cyber-attack, and resulted in the development of what is described as a canonical...

  8. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  9. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, Henrik

    1999-07-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project `Active Control of Wind Turbines`. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to design controllers. This report describes the model developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This has been done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model validation as well as parameter estimation. The model includes a simple model of the structure of the turbine including tower and flapwise blade bending, a detailed model of the gear box and induction generator, a linearized aerodynamic model including modelling of induction lag and actuator and sensor models. The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated through comparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch controlled wind turbine. The model and the measurements corresponds well in the relevant frequency range. The developed model is therefore applicable for controller design. (au) EFP-91. 18 ills., 22 refs.

  10. Comparing models of offensive cyber operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grant, T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available system, few represent target selection, attack planning, and Denial of Service attacks, and none specifically represent attack coordination within distributed groups. Finally, a canonical model has been constructed by rational reconstruction (Habermas... logical form? (Habermas, 1976). RR has been applied in computing research to redesign a seminal expert system (Cendrowski & Bramer, 1984) and to formalise Boyd?s (1996) Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (OODA) loop (Grant & Kooter, 2005). In the research...

  11. Active control: Wind turbine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch controlled wind...

  12. Fast Newton active appearance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kossaifi, Jean; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Active Appearance Models (AAMs) are statistical models of shape and appearance widely used in computer vision to detect landmarks on objects like faces. Fitting an AAM to a new image can be formulated as a non-linear least-squares problem which is typically solved using iterative methods. Owing to

  13. Comparing National Water Model Inundation Predictions with Hydrodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, R. J.; Shastry, A.; Aristizabal, F.; Luo, C.

    2017-12-01

    The National Water Model (NWM) simulates the hydrologic cycle and produces streamflow forecasts, runoff, and other variables for 2.7 million reaches along the National Hydrography Dataset for the continental United States. NWM applies Muskingum-Cunge channel routing which is based on the continuity equation. However, the momentum equation also needs to be considered to obtain better estimates of streamflow and stage in rivers especially for applications such as flood inundation mapping. Simulation Program for River NeTworks (SPRNT) is a fully dynamic model for large scale river networks that solves the full nonlinear Saint-Venant equations for 1D flow and stage height in river channel networks with non-uniform bathymetry. For the current work, the steady-state version of the SPRNT model was leveraged. An evaluation on SPRNT's and NWM's abilities to predict inundation was conducted for the record flood of Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 along the Neuse River in North Carolina. This event was known to have been influenced by backwater effects from the Hurricane's storm surge. Retrospective NWM discharge predictions were converted to stage using synthetic rating curves. The stages from both models were utilized to produce flood inundation maps using the Height Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) method which uses the local relative heights to provide a spatial representation of inundation depths. In order to validate the inundation produced by the models, Sentinel-1A synthetic aperture radar data in the VV and VH polarizations along with auxiliary data was used to produce a reference inundation map. A preliminary, binary comparison of the inundation maps to the reference, limited to the five HUC-12 areas of Goldsboro, NC, yielded that the flood inundation accuracies for NWM and SPRNT were 74.68% and 78.37%, respectively. The differences for all the relevant test statistics including accuracy, true positive rate, true negative rate, and positive predictive value were found

  14. Comparative profiling of biomarker psoralen in antioxidant active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative profiling of biomarker psoralen in antioxidant active extracts of different species of genus Ficus by validated HPTLC method. ... an important tool to assure the therapeutic dose of active ingredients in herbal formulations as well as for standardization and quality control of bulk drugs and in-process formulations.

  15. Comparative examination of two methods for modeling autoimmune uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Aksenova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Uveitis is a disease of the uveal tract, characterized by a variety of causes and clinical manifestations. The internal antigens prevail often in the pathogenesis of the disease and develop the so-called autoimmune reactions. The uveitis treatment has an important medico-social significance because of the high prevalence of uveitis, the significant rate of the disease in young people, and high disability. The article compares the efficiency of two methods for modeling autoimmune uveitis. Materials and Methods: The research was conducted on 6 rabbits of the Chinchilla breed (12 eyes. Two models of experimental uveitis were reproduced on rabbits using normal horse serum during the research. A clinical examination of the inflammatory process course in the eyes was carried out by biomicroscopy using a slit lamp, and a direct ophthalmoscope. Histological and immunological examinations were conducted by the authors of the article. Results: The faster-reproducing and vivid clinical picture of the disease was observed in the second group. The obvious changes in the immunological status of the animals were noted also: an increase in the number of leukocytes, neutrophils, HCT-active neutrophils, and activation of phagocytosis. Discussion and Conclusions: The research has showed that the second model of uveitis is the most convenient working variant, which is characterized by high activity and duration of the inflammatory process in the eye.

  16. Comparison of activity coefficient models for electrolyte systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yi; ten Kate, Antoon; Mooijer, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Three activity coefficient models for electrolyte solutions were evaluated and compared. The activity coefficient models are: The electrolyte NRTL model (ElecNRTL) by Aspentech, the mixed solvent electrolyte model (MSE) by OLI Systems Inc., and the Extended UNIQUAC model from the Technical Univer...

  17. Active Learning for Player Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Learning models of player behavior has been the focus of several studies. This work is motivated by better understanding of player behavior, a knowledge that can ultimately be employed to provide player-adapted or personalized content. In this paper, we propose the use of active learning for player...... experience modeling. We use a dataset from hundreds of players playing Infinite Mario Bros. as a case study and we employ the random forest method to learn mod- els of player experience through the active learning approach. The results obtained suggest that only part of the dataset (up to half the size...

  18. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MAIN SOLVENCY ASSESSMENT MODELS FOR INSURANCE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nicoleta SAHLIAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recent financial crisis of insurance domain, there were imposed new aspects that have to be taken into account concerning the risks management and surveillance activity. The insurance societies could develop internal models in order to determine the minimum capital requirement imposed by the new regulations that are to be adopted on 1 January 2016. In this respect, the purpose of this research paper is to offer a real presentation and comparing with the main solvency regulation systems used worldwide, the accent being on their common characteristics and current tendencies. Thereby, we would like to offer a better understanding of the similarities and differences between the existent solvency regimes in order to develop the best regime of solvency for Romania within the Solvency II project. The study will show that there are clear differences between the existent Solvency I regime and the new approaches based on risk and will also point out the fact that even the key principles supporting the new solvency regimes are convergent, there are a lot of approaches for the application of these principles. In this context, the question we would try to find the answer is "how could the global solvency models be useful for the financial surveillance authority of Romania for the implementation of general model and for the development of internal solvency models according to the requirements of Solvency II" and "which would be the requirements for the implementation of this type of approach?". This thing makes the analysis of solvency models an interesting exercise.

  20. Comparing pharmacophore models derived from crystallography and NMR ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanakota, Phani; Carlson, Heather A.

    2017-11-01

    NMR and X-ray crystallography are the two most widely used methods for determining protein structures. Our previous study examining NMR versus X-Ray sources of protein conformations showed improved performance with NMR structures when used in our Multiple Protein Structures (MPS) method for receptor-based pharmacophores (Damm, Carlson, J Am Chem Soc 129:8225-8235, 2007). However, that work was based on a single test case, HIV-1 protease, because of the rich data available for that system. New data for more systems are available now, which calls for further examination of the effect of different sources of protein conformations. The MPS technique was applied to Growth factor receptor bound protein 2 (Grb2), Src SH2 homology domain (Src-SH2), FK506-binding protein 1A (FKBP12), and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Pharmacophore models from both crystal and NMR ensembles were able to discriminate between high-affinity, low-affinity, and decoy molecules. As we found in our original study, NMR models showed optimal performance when all elements were used. The crystal models had more pharmacophore elements compared to their NMR counterparts. The crystal-based models exhibited optimum performance only when pharmacophore elements were dropped. This supports our assertion that the higher flexibility in NMR ensembles helps focus the models on the most essential interactions with the protein. Our studies suggest that the "extra" pharmacophore elements seen at the periphery in X-ray models arise as a result of decreased protein flexibility and make very little contribution to model performance.

  1. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aloe vera gel and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative antimicrobial activities of the gel and leaf of Aloe vera were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Trichophyton mentagraphytes, T. schoeleinii, Microsporium canis and Candida albicans. Ethanol was used for the extraction of the leaf after obtaining the gel from it. Antimicrobial ...

  2. Comparative antimalarial and cytotoxic activities of two Vernonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antimalarial and cytotoxic activities of two Vernonia species: V. amygdalina from the Democratic Republic of Congo and V. cinerea subsp vialis endemic to Madagascar. KN Ngbolua, H Rakotoarimanana, H Rafatro, US Ratsimamanga, V Mudogo, PT Mpiana, DST Tshibangu ...

  3. Efficacy of behavioural graded activity compared with conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The relative efficacy of conventional exercise therapy (CET) and behavioural graded activity (BGA) has not been fully established to inform the preference in clinical practice. Objective: To compare CET and BGA on the treatment outcome of chronic non-specific low back pain (LBP). Methodology: Participants ...

  4. Comparative anthelmintic activity investigation of selected ethno-medicinal weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueblos, Kirstin Rhys S.; Bajalla, Mark; Pacheco, Dixie; Ganot, Sheila; Paig, Daisy; Tapales, Radyn; Lagare, Jeanne; Quimque, Mark Tristan J.

    2017-01-01

    Helminth infections are one of the seriously neglected potent diseases in many parts of the world. The problems of parasitic helminthes becoming resistant to currently available anthelmintic drugs pose a challenge for the search - relying on natural products - for new and better anthelmintics. In this paper, four abundant Philippine weeds: Chrysopogon aciculatus Trin. Cyperus brevifolius Rottb., Ruellia tuberosa Linn. and Saccharum spontaneum Linn. were investigated for their anthelmintic activities to establish basis of their folkloric claim. The hexane-soluble and chloroform-soluble extracts were obtained through sequential solvent partitioning of the crude ethanolic extract of the air-dried aerial part of each plant sample. Meanwhile, the decoction was obtained from fresh aerial part of the plant samples. All extracts were then subjected to in vitro anthelmintic screening at different concentration as per method of Ghosh, et al. against African nightcrawler earthworms (Eudrillus euginiae) in which the activity of the extracts was determined by correlation with time. The anthelmintic bioassay results revealed a dose-dependent toxicity relationship. It indicated relatively low anthelmintic activities of the decoction of the four plant samples as compared to their corresponding crude ethanol extracts. Among the crude ethanol extracts, C. brevifolius (CBE) gave fastest time to bring about paralysis and death to the test organisms at all concentrations tested. For the hexane extracts, R. tuberosa (RTH) gave better activity among other plant samples. Lastly, among the chloroform-soluble extracts, both that of C. brevifolius (CBC) and R. tuberosa (RTC) comparably showed strongest anthelmintic activities at all tested concentrations, thus, exhibited best anthelmintic activity that is remarkably comparable to the positive control, Mebendazole at the highest concentration tested. In fact, CBC and RTC showed highest anthelmintic potential compared to all extracts tested in

  5. Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the Framework of Modified Strömgren Filters ... The study conveys a good agreement of GALEV models with modified Strömgren colours but with poor UV model predictions and observed globular cluster data, while the spectroscopic models perform badly because of ...

  6. Comparative analysis of design models for concrete corbels

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, D. L.; Silva Neto, A. P.; Lobo, F. A.; Debs, M. K. El

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The main objective of this paper is performing a comparative analysis of some design models for precast concrete corbels. For this, it was analyzed design models from Brazilian (NBR 9062) and European (EUROCODE 2) Codes and a US design handbook (PCI). Moreover, three analytical models showed in the literature are analyzed. The objective of this comparative is identifying the best design models to represent the failure load of concrete corbels by the tie yields or by the concrete crus...

  7. Emphasis: an active management model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management was founded and has grown on the basis of promoting professionalism in the nuclear industry. This paper is concerned with professional management of nuclear material. The paper introduces the reader to Emphasis, an active management model. The management model provides the framework to assist a manager in directing his available resources. Emphasis provides for establishing goals, identifying and selecting objectives, matching objectives to specific personnel, preparing and monitoring action plans, and evaluating results. The model stresses crisis prevention by systematically administering and controlling resources. A critical requirement for implementation of the model is the desire to manage, to be in charge of the situation. The nuclear industry does need managers - people who realize the sensitive nature of the industry, professionals who insist on improved performance

  8. MODEL OF ACTIVITY OF THE ENTERPRISE AS MODEL OF ACTIVITY OF THE HUMAN: SEARCH ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Flerovich Vildanov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Actualized demand of manufactury company's efficiency from the point of quality charachteristics. Reveal unbreakable connection of man and organisation, on example of the comparative analysis of man's and manufacture company's activities. Studing models of company's and men's activities in order to reveal similarity. In order of their implementation to the economics assumes opportunity of using scientific methods, which use for studying functions, vital activities and behavior of the men.

  9. Comparing herbaceous plant communities in active and passive riparian restoration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Gornish

    Full Text Available Understanding the efficacy of passive (reduction or cessation of environmental stress and active (typically involving planting or seeding restoration strategies is important for the design of successful revegetation of degraded riparian habitat, but studies explicitly comparing restoration outcomes are uncommon. We sampled the understory herbaceous plant community of 103 riparian sites varying in age since restoration (0 to 39 years and revegetation technique (active, passive, or none to compare the utility of different approaches on restoration success across sites. We found that landform type, percent shade, and summer flow helped explain differences in the understory functional community across all sites. In passively restored sites, grass and forb cover and richness were inversely related to site age, but in actively restored sites forb cover and richness were inversely related to site age. Native cover and richness were lower with passive restoration compared to active restoration. Invasive species cover and richness were not significantly different across sites. Although some of our results suggest that active restoration would best enhance native species in degraded riparian areas, this work also highlights some of the context-dependency that has been found to mediate restoration outcomes. For example, since the effects of passive restoration can be quite rapid, this approach might be more useful than active restoration in situations where rapid dominance of pioneer species is required to arrest major soil loss through erosion. As a result, we caution against labeling one restoration technique as better than another. Managers should identify ideal restoration outcomes in the context of historic and current site characteristics (as well as a range of acceptable alternative states and choose restoration approaches that best facilitate the achievement of revegetation goals.

  10. Comparability of measured acceleration from accelerometry-based activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Alex V; Fraysse, FranÇois; Catt, Mike; Stiles, Victoria H; Stanley, Rebecca M; Eston, Roger G; Olds, Tim S

    2015-01-01

    Accelerometers that provide triaxial measured acceleration data are now available. However, equivalence of output between brands cannot be assumed and testing is necessary to determine whether features of the acceleration signal are interchangeable. This study aimed to establish the equivalence of output between two brands of monitor in a laboratory and in a free-living environment. For part 1, 38 adults performed nine laboratory-based activities while wearing an ActiGraph GT3X+ and GENEActiv (Gravity Estimator of Normal Everyday Activity) at the hip. For part 2, 58 children age 10-12 yr wore a GT3X+ and GENEActiv at the hip for 7 d in a free-living setting. For part 1, the magnitude of time domain features from the GENEActiv was greater than that from the GT3X+. However, frequency domain features compared well, with perfect agreement of the dominant frequency for 97%-100% of participants for most activities. For part 2, mean daily acceleration measured by the two brands was correlated (r = 0.93, P acceleration values. The strong relation between accelerations measured by the two brands suggests that habitual activity level and activity patterns assessed by the GENE and GT3X+ may compare well if analyzed appropriately.

  11. Comparing Productivity Simulated with Inventory Data Using Different Modelling Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopf, M.; Pietsch, S. A.; Hasenauer, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Lime Stone National Park in Austria was established in 1997 to protect sensible lime stone soils from degradation due to heavy forest management. Since 1997 the management activities were successively reduced and standing volume and coarse woody debris (CWD) increased and degraded soils began to recover. One option to study the rehabilitation process towards natural virgin forest state is the use of modelling technology. In this study we will test two different modelling approaches for their applicability to Lime Stone National Park. We will compare standing tree volume simulated resulting from (i) the individual tree growth model MOSES, and (ii) the species and management sensitive adaptation of the biogeochemical-mechanistic model Biome-BGC. The results from the two models are compared with filed observations form repeated permanent forest inventory plots of the Lime Stone National Park in Austria. The simulated CWD predictions of the BGC-model were compared with dead wood measurements (standing and lying dead wood) recorded at the permanent inventory plots. The inventory was established between 1994 and 1996 and remeasured from 2004 to 2005. For this analysis 40 plots of this inventory were selected which comprise the required dead wood components and are dominated by a single tree species. First we used the distance dependant individual tree growth model MOSES to derive the standing timber and the amount of mortality per hectare. MOSES is initialized with the inventory data at plot establishment and each sampling plot is treated as forest stand. The Biome-BGC is a process based biogeochemical model with extensions for Austrian tree species, a self initialization and a forest management tool. The initialization for the actual simulations with the BGC model was done as follows: We first used spin up runs to derive a balanced forest vegetation, similar to an undisturbed forest. Next we considered the management history of the past centuries (heavy clear cuts

  12. COMPARING OF DEPOSIT MODEL AND LIFE INSURANCE MODEL IN MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA ATANASOVA-PACHEMSKA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of the continuous decline of the interest rates for bank deposits, and at a time when uncertainty about the future is increasing, physical and legal persons have doubts how to secure their future or how and where to invest their funds and thus to “fertilize” and increase their savings. Individuals usually choose to put their savings in the bank for a certain period, and for that period to receive certain interest, or decide to invest their savings in different types of life insurance and thus to "take care" of their life, their future and the future of their families. In mathematics are developed many models that relate to the compounding and the insurance. This paper is a comparison of the deposit model and the model of life insurance

  13. Comparing Numerical and Analog Models of Oblique Convergence With Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, K.; Haq, S. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Relative plate motion at convergent plate boundaries is rarely perfectly margin-normal, instead it typically exhibits some obliquity to the overlying plate. The resulting margin-parallel component of plate motion can have a considerable influence in determining the distribution and style of large-scale deformation at the margin. In accretionary prisms and fold and thrust belts oblique plate motion and the resulting deformation frequently results in spatially segregated dip-slip and strike-slip faulting in the deforming wedge. Analog modeling has demonstrated that the type of shearing structures that occur in response to this motion is strongly correlated with the vertical variation in rheology, where ductile layers at depth will localize strike-slip deformation. Additionally, we have performed numerical simulations where we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow for oblique wedges with similar geometries and rheologies using the finite element software COMSOL. Using frictional and layered, frictional over viscous, rheologies we further constrain the role that rheological complexity plays in determining the style and distribution of deformation and of stress. In our numerical models, we have simulated a range of obliquities as well as layered rheologies to determine internal stresses in actively deforming wedges. Results from our numerical experiments are in agreement with available kinematic data from comparable analog experiments, suggesting our numerical method is also viable and suitable for modeling natural settings. Numerical models that simulated frictional wedges were characterized by diffusely distributed shear throughout the pro-wedge at low obliquities, and weakly partitioned strain, similar to analog results. However, the localization of shear in rheologically complex numerical models occurred across a narrower zone at comparable obliquities in both numerical and analog results, corresponding to the location where there the transition in basal

  14. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  15. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  16. Increased motor activity in cycloid psychosis compared to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sebastian; Horn, Helge; Koschorke, Philipp; Müller, Thomas J; Strik, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Although cycloid psychoses share psychopathological features with schizophrenia, their course and outcome are comparable to those seen in bipolar affective disorder. The diagnostic category is of interest because it has been demonstrated that cycloid psychoses can be diagnosed reliably and distinguished from other psychoses based on treatment response and neurophysiology. Despite this, only few studies have investigated the neurobiological differences between cycloid psychoses and schizophrenia, and although hyper- and hypoactivity have been observed in patients with cycloid psychoses, no studies have investigated motor activity in this group to date. Therefore, we aimed to quantify motor activity during the waking hours of the day as assessed by wrist actigraphy in 16 patients with cycloid psychosis and 16 patients with paranoid schizophrenia. All patients were matched for gender and age, and wrist actigraphic assessment took place during acute episodes. The level of activity and proportion of active vs. inactive periods during waking hours were significantly higher in patients with cycloid psychosis. The results of the present study are interpreted in light of a previously reported general arousal in cycloid psychoses that is expressed in motor activity. Our data support the concept of cycloid psychoses as a syndrome with distinct symptomatology and pathophysiology.

  17. Comparative activity of carbapenem testing (the COMPACT study in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leblebicioglu Hakan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence indicates that Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, the most common of which are Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, are frequent causes of hospital-acquired infections. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro activity of doripenem and comparator carbapenem antibiotics against Gram-negative clinical isolates collected from COMParative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT study centres in Turkey. Methods Ten centres in Turkey were invited to submit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and other Gram-negative isolates from intensive care unit (ICU/non-ICU patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections, bloodstream infections, or nosocomial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, between May and October 2008. Susceptibility was determined by each centre using E-test. A central laboratory performed species confirmation as well as limited susceptibility and quality-control testing. Results Five hundred and ninety six isolates were collected. MIC90 values for doripenem, meropenem, and imipenem, respectively, were 32, ≥ 64, and ≥ 64 mg/L against Pseudomonas spp.; 0.12, 0.12, and 0.5 mg/L against Enterobacteriaceae; and ≥ 64 mg/L for each against other Gram-negative isolates. In determining the susceptibility of hospital isolates of selected Gram-negative pathogens to doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem, we found that against all pathogens combined, the MIC90 for ICU compared with non-ICU isolates was higher. Conclusions Doripenem showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against the Gram-negative pathogens collected in Turkey.

  18. Comparative activity of carbapenem testing (the COMPACT study) in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, the most common of which are Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, are frequent causes of hospital-acquired infections. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro activity of doripenem and comparator carbapenem antibiotics against Gram-negative clinical isolates collected from COMParative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) study centres in Turkey. Methods Ten centres in Turkey were invited to submit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and other Gram-negative isolates from intensive care unit (ICU)/non-ICU patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections, bloodstream infections, or nosocomial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, between May and October 2008. Susceptibility was determined by each centre using E-test. A central laboratory performed species confirmation as well as limited susceptibility and quality-control testing. Results Five hundred and ninety six isolates were collected. MIC90 values for doripenem, meropenem, and imipenem, respectively, were 32, ≥ 64, and ≥ 64 mg/L against Pseudomonas spp.; 0.12, 0.12, and 0.5 mg/L against Enterobacteriaceae; and ≥ 64 mg/L for each against other Gram-negative isolates. In determining the susceptibility of hospital isolates of selected Gram-negative pathogens to doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem, we found that against all pathogens combined, the MIC90 for ICU compared with non-ICU isolates was higher. Conclusions Doripenem showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against the Gram-negative pathogens collected in Turkey. PMID:22340940

  19. Comparative Study of Smeared Cracking Models for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Silva Penna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article shows how the constitutive modeling of concrete has evolved since the initial attempts to characterize the medium cracked as continuous, moving from smeared cracking, damage and microplane models, until the current tendency to design different models according to a single theoretical framework. A generic formulation for smeared cracking models, including fixed and rotational models, as well as degradation in tension and in compression, is provided. Using this formulation, three models are generated by specifying the laws of degradation. A comparative study of models, based on computer simulations of a beam subjected to shear at four points, is presented. The results are compared, between themselves and with experimental results, providing a critical analysis of the models.

  20. Comparative study of different activation treatments for the preparation of activated carbon: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Muhammad Imran; Ashraf, Sania; Intisar, Azeem

    2017-09-01

    In this review, various methods of preparation of activated carbon from agricultural and commercial waste material are reviewed. In addition, we also discuss various activation treatments using a comparative approach. The data are organised in tabulated form for ease of comparative study. A review of numerous characterisation techniques is also provided. The effect of time and temperature, activation conditions, carbonisation conditions and impregnation ratios are explained and several physical and chemical activation treatments of raw materials and their impact on the micro- and mesoporous volumes and surface area are discussed. Lastly, a review of adsorption mechanisms of activated carbon (AC) is also provided.

  1. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework

  2. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out the...

  3. Colistin Increases the Cidal Activity of Antibiotic Combinations Against Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: An In Vitro Model Comparing Multiple Combination Bactericidal Testing at One Peak Serum Concentration and Time-Kill Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Caio, Carla; Gona, Floriana; Zingali, Tiziana; Salerno, Iasmine; Stefani, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    The lack of treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae often leads to the use of double or triple antibiotic combinations to increase the option of clinical success. This study analyzes multiple combination bactericidal testing (MCBT) to screen double and triple antibiotic combinations, at standard peak serum concentration, for bactericidal activity against 21 MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. This method was compared with time-killing curves. The full bactericidal activity against all strains was obtained only by adding colistin. MCBT has a potential to become a rapid method for testing multiple antibiotic combinations for MDR microorganisms when colistin is used, providing clinicians with in vitro cidal data within 48 hr of strain isolation.

  4. Family models: comparing and contrasting the Olson Circumplex Model with the Beavers Systems Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, W R; Voeller, M N

    1983-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in and need for family models. One such model is the Olson Circumplex Model, previously reported in this journal (18). This model is compared and contrasted with the Beavers Systems Model, which was also developed from empirical data and has had extensive use in family assessment. Though both are cross-sectional, process-oriented, and capable of providing structure for family research, we believe there are certain short-comings in the Olson model that make it less clinically useful than the Beavers Systems Model. These include definitional problems and a total reliance on curvilinear dimensions with a grid approach to family typology that does not acknowledge a separation/individuation continuum. Our model avoids these deficiencies and includes a continuum of functional competence that reflects the development and differentiation of many living systems, including the family.

  5. Comparing Pedophile Activity in Different P2P Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Fournier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-peer (P2P systems are widely used to exchange content over the Internet. Knowledge of pedophile activity in such networks remains limited, despite having important social consequences. Moreover, though there are different P2P systems in use, previous academic works on this topic focused on one system at a time and their results are not directly comparable. We design a methodology for comparing KAD and eDonkey, two P2P systems among the most prominent ones and with different anonymity levels. We monitor two eDonkey servers and the KAD network during several days and record hundreds of thousands of keyword-based queries. We detect pedophile-related queries with a previously validated tool and we propose, for the first time, a large-scale comparison of pedophile activity in two different P2P systems. We conclude that there are significantly fewer pedophile queries in KAD than in eDonkey (approximately 0.09% vs. 0.25%.

  6. Comparative analysis of design models for concrete corbels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The main objective of this paper is performing a comparative analysis of some design models for precast concrete corbels. For this, it was analyzed design models from Brazilian (NBR 9062 and European (EUROCODE 2 Codes and a US design handbook (PCI. Moreover, three analytical models showed in the literature are analyzed. The objective of this comparative is identifying the best design models to represent the failure load of concrete corbels by the tie yields or by the concrete crushing. Moreover, it is intended to evaluate the contribution of horizontal stirrups to resistance of concrete corbels. For this, a database was assembled from test results of concrete corbels carried out by several researchers and they are showed in the literature. The design models were applied to this database and from statistical tools, adjustments coefficients are recommended to be applied on these design models to take into account the results dispersion found in the analysis.

  7. Development Of The Computer Code For Comparative Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwadi, Mohammad Dhandhang

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis with Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is an importance utilization of a nuclear research reactor, and this should be accelerated and promoted in application and its development to raise the utilization of the reactor. The application of Comparative NAA technique in GA Siwabessy Multi Purpose Reactor (RSG-GAS) needs special (not commercially available yet) soft wares for analyzing the spectrum of multiple elements in the analysis at once. The application carried out using a single spectrum software analyzer, and comparing each result manually. This method really degrades the quality of the analysis significantly. To solve the problem, a computer code was designed and developed for comparative NAA. Spectrum analysis in the code is carried out using a non-linear fitting method. Before the spectrum analyzed, it was passed to the numerical filter which improves the signal to noise ratio to do the deconvolution operation. The software was developed using the G language and named as PASAN-K The testing result of the developed software was benchmark with the IAEA spectrum and well operated with less than 10 % deviation

  8. Methods and models used in comparative risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative risk studies make use of a large number of methods and models based upon a set of assumptions incompletely formulated or of value judgements. Owing to the multidimensionality of risks and benefits, the economic and social context may notably influence the final result. Five classes of models are briefly reviewed: accounting of fluxes of effluents, radiation and energy; transport models and health effects; systems reliability and bayesian analysis; economic analysis of reliability and cost-risk-benefit analysis; decision theory in presence of uncertainty and multiple objectives. Purpose and prospect of comparative studies are assessed in view of probable diminishing returns for large generic comparisons [fr

  9. Comparative Safety of Needle, EndoActivator, and Laser-Activated Irrigation in Overinstrumented Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc Sen, Ozgur; Kaya, Melih

    2017-12-21

    To evaluate the safety of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation using three different techniques during the final rinse in overinstrumented root canals. The effect of irrigant activation on irrigant extrusion from overinstrumented root canals is still unclear. A total of 30 single-rooted teeth were decoronated. The working lengths were determined and the roots were divided into two groups of 15 teeth each: group 1, instrumentation 0.5 mm short of the apical foramen and group 2, instrumentation 0.5 mm beyond the apical foramen (overinstrumented). Needle irrigation (NI), sonic irrigation with EndoActivator (EAI), and laser-activated irrigation (LAI) were used for the final rinse in each group; each root underwent the three irrigation procedures in a randomized crossover manner. A modified container-foam model was used to collect apically extruded NaOCl. The weight of the extruded NaOCl was calculated by subtracting the initial weights of the containers from their final weights. All data were statistically analyzed. The amount of NaOCl extrusion was similar with all three irrigation systems in group 1. In group 2, the amount of extruded NaOCl was significantly greater with EAI than with NI and LAI. EAI and LAI caused significantly greater extrusion in group 2 than in group 1. EAI, NI, and LAI are equally safe for irrigating canals with intact apices. However, the risk of irrigant extrusion can increase in overinstrumented canals, with EAI associated with a greater risk compared with NI and LAI.

  10. Modeling Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, T., Jr.; Farough, A.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini's mass spectrometer data and gravitational field measurements imply water-rock interactions around the porous core of Enceladus. Using such data we characterize global heat and fluid transport properties of the core and model the ongoing hydrothermal activity on Enceladus. We assume that within the global ocean beneath the surface ice, seawater percolates downward into the core where it is heated and rises to the oceanfloor where it emanates in the form of diffuse discharge. We utilize the data from Hsu et al., [2015] with models of diffuse flow in seafloor hydrothermal systems by Lowell et al., [2015] to characterize the global heat transport properties of the Enceladus's core. Based on direct observations the gravitational acceleration (g) is calculated 0.123 m s-2. We assume fluid's density (ρ) is 10­3 kg m-3 and the specific heat of the fluid (cf) is 4000 Jkg-1 °C-1. From these values effective thermal diffusivity (a*) is calculated as 10­-6 m2 s-1. We also assume the coefficient of thermal expansion of fluid (αf) and the kinematic viscosity of fluid (ν) to be 10-4 °C-1 and 10­-6 m2 s-1 respectively. The estimated Rayleigh number (Ra) ranges between 0.11-2468.0, for core porosity (φ) of 5-15%, permeability (k) between 10-12-10-8 m2 and temperature between 90-200 °C and the depth of fluid circulation of 100 m. High values of Rayleigh number, cause vigorous convection within the core of Enceladus. Numerical modeling of reactive transport in multicomponent, multiphase systems is required to obtain a full understanding of the characteristics and evolution of the hydrothermal system on Enceladus, but simple scaling laws can provide insight into the physics of water-rock interactions.

  11. Comparative histochemical studies of glycosidase activity in some helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, T; Ishii, Y

    1986-03-01

    Comparative histochemical studies of glycosidase activity were carried out in Clonorchis sinensis, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Fasciola hepatica, Dipylidium caninum, Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris suum, Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Trichuris vulpis and Dirofilaria immitis. The enzymes examined were: N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30), beta-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) and beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23). There were variations in enzyme distribution and intensity among the species and also between trematodes and nematodes; no marked positive reaction for these enzymes occurred in cestodes. In some trematodes, the caeca, especially in the brush border, and the tegument, subtegumental cells and testes, were reactive to the enzymes. In nematodes, although there was variation in reactions among species, N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and beta-galactosidase were localized in the hypodermis and lateral cords excluding the excretory canal, and coelomocytes, intestinal epithelium and the walls of the reproductive systems.

  12. A comparative review of radiation-induced cancer risk models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seok Jung [Risk and Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    With the need for a domestic level 3 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), it is essential to develop a Korea-specific code. Health effect assessments study radiation-induced impacts; in particular, long-term health effects are evaluated in terms of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to analyze the latest cancer risk models developed by foreign organizations and to compare the methodology of how they were developed. This paper also provides suggestions regarding the development of Korean cancer risk models. A review of cancer risk models was carried out targeting the latest models: the NUREG model (1993), the BEIR VII model (2006), the UNSCEAR model (2006), the ICRP 103 model (2007), and the U.S. EPA model (2011). The methodology of how each model was developed is explained, and the cancer sites, dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) and mathematical models are also described in the sections presenting differences among the models. The NUREG model was developed by assuming that the risk was proportional to the risk coefficient and dose, while the BEIR VII, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and U.S. EPA models were derived from epidemiological data, principally from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The risk coefficient does not consider individual characteristics, as the values were calculated in terms of population-averaged cancer risk per unit dose. However, the models derived by epidemiological data are a function of sex, exposure age, and attained age of the exposed individual. Moreover, the methodologies can be used to apply the latest epidemiological data. Therefore, methodologies using epidemiological data should be considered first for developing a Korean cancer risk model, and the cancer sites and DDREF should also be determined based on Korea-specific studies. This review can be used as a basis for developing a Korean cancer risk model in the future.

  13. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF BACTERIOSTATIC ACTIVITY OF SYNTHETIC HYDROXYLATED FLAVONOIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivella Mónica S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other properties, flavonoids present a notable bacteriostatic activity. In this paper, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of 5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavanone (naringenin, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone and 2',4',4- trihydroxychalcone (isoliquitirigenin against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25 923 were determined and compared to values obtained for other chalcones and flavanones previously investigated. Specific growth rates and MICs were determined by a turbidimetric kinetic method. The observed sequence MICflavanone (inactive >MIC7-hidroxyflavanone (197.6 µgml-1>MIC5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavanone (120 µgml-1 showed that the introduction of an electron donating group (-OH causes an increase in bioactivity. On the other hand, the comparisons MIC5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavanone (120 µgml-1 >>> MIC2',4',4-trihydroxychalcone (29 µgml-1 and MIC5,7-dihydroxyflavone (105 µgml-1 >>> MIC2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (28.8 µgml-1 indicated that the chalcone structure is the most favourable for bacteriostatic activity within the flavonoid family.

  14. Comparing GPS, Log, Survey, and Accelerometry to Measure Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Weissman, Jennifer; Wolf, Jean; Mumford, Karen; Contant, Cheryl K; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Taylor, Lynne; Glanz, Karen

    2016-01-01

    We explored how objectively measured global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data match with travel logs and questionnaires in predicting trip duration and physical activity (PA). 99 participants wore GPS devices and accelerometers, and recorded all trips in a log for 5 consecutive days. Participants also completed a self-administered questionnaire on PA and travel behaviors. There was good agreement between GPS and log for assessment of trip duration, although log measures overestimated trip duration (concordance correlation coefficient 0.53 [0.47, 0.59]; Bland-Altman estimate 0.76 [0.16, 3.71] comparing GPS to log). Log measures underestimated light PA and overestimated moderate PA compared to accelerometry when greater than zero moderate PA was reported. It is often not feasible to deploy accelerometry or GPS devices in population research because these devices are expensive and require technical expertise and data processing. Questionnaires and logs provide inexpensive tools to assess PA and travel with reasonable concordance with objective measures. However, they have shortcomings in evaluating the presence and amount of light and moderate PA. Future questionnaires and logs should be developed to evaluate sensitivity to light and moderate PA.

  15. Disaggregation of Rainy Hours: Compared Performance of Various Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haha, M.; Hingray, B.; Musy, A.

    In the urban environment, the response times of catchments are usually short. To de- sign or to diagnose waterworks in that context, it is necessary to describe rainfall events with a good time resolution: a 10mn time step is often necessary. Such in- formation is not always available. Rainfall disaggregation models have thus to be applied to produce from rough rainfall data that short time resolution information. The communication will present the performance obtained with several rainfall dis- aggregation models that allow for the disaggregation of rainy hours into six 10mn rainfall amounts. The ability of the models to reproduce some statistical character- istics of rainfall (mean, variance, overall distribution of 10mn-rainfall amounts; ex- treme values of maximal rainfall amounts over different durations) is evaluated thanks to different graphical and numerical criteria. The performance of simple models pre- sented in some scientific papers or developed in the Hydram laboratory as well as the performance of more sophisticated ones is compared with the performance of the basic constant disaggregation model. The compared models are either deterministic or stochastic; for some of them the disaggregation is based on scaling properties of rainfall. The compared models are in increasing complexity order: constant model, linear model (Ben Haha, 2001), Ormsbee Deterministic model (Ormsbee, 1989), Ar- tificial Neuronal Network based model (Burian et al. 2000), Hydram Stochastic 1 and Hydram Stochastic 2 (Ben Haha, 2001), Multiplicative Cascade based model (Olsson and Berndtsson, 1998), Ormsbee Stochastic model (Ormsbee, 1989). The 625 rainy hours used for that evaluation (with a hourly rainfall amount greater than 5mm) were extracted from the 21 years chronological rainfall series (10mn time step) observed at the Pully meteorological station, Switzerland. The models were also evaluated when applied to different rainfall classes depending on the season first and on the

  16. Comparing Intrinsic Connectivity Models for the Primary Auditory Cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Khairiah Abdul; Yusoff, Ahmad Nazlim; Mohamad, Mazlyfarina; Hamid, Aini Ismafairus Abd; Manan, Hanani Abd

    2010-07-01

    This fMRI study is about modeling the intrinsic connectivity between Heschl' gyrus (HG) and superior temporal gyrus (STG) in human primary auditory cortices. Ten healthy male subjects participated and required to listen to white noise stimulus during the fMRI scans. Two intrinsic connectivity models comprising bilateral HG and STG were constructed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Group Bayes factor (GBF), positive evidence ratio (PER) and Bayesian model selection (BMS) for group studies were used in model comparison. Group results indicated significant bilateral asymmetrical activation (puncorr < 0.001) in HG and STG. Comparison results showed strong evidence of Model 2 as the preferred model (STG as the input center) with GBF value of 5.77 × 1073 The model is preferred by 6 out of 10 subjects. The results were supported by BMS results for group studies. One-sample t-test on connection values obtained from Model 2 indicates unidirectional parallel connections from STG to bilateral HG (p<0.05). Model 2 was determined to be the most probable intrinsic connectivity model between bilateral HG and STG when listening to white noise.

  17. A comparative study of seven human cochlear filter models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, Amin; Beutelmann, Rainer; Dietz, Mathias; Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Verhulst, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Auditory models have been developed for decades to simulate characteristics of the human auditory system, but it is often unknown how well auditory models compare to each other or perform in tasks they were not primarily designed for. This study systematically analyzes predictions of seven publicly-available cochlear filter models in response to a fixed set of stimuli to assess their capabilities of reproducing key aspects of human cochlear mechanics. The following features were assessed at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz: cochlear excitation patterns, nonlinear response growth, frequency selectivity, group delays, signal-in-noise processing, and amplitude modulation representation. For each task, the simulations were compared to available physiological data recorded in guinea pigs and gerbils as well as to human psychoacoustics data. The presented results provide application-oriented users with comprehensive information on the advantages, limitations and computation costs of these seven mainstream cochlear filter models.

  18. Comparing the staffing models of outsourcing in selected companies

    OpenAIRE

    Chaloupková, Věra

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with problems of takeover of employees in outsourcing. The capital purpose is to compare the staffing model of outsourcing in selected companies. To compare in selected companies I chose multi-criteria analysis. This thesis is dividend into six chapters. The first charter is devoted to the theoretical part. In this charter describes the basic concepts as outsourcing, personal aspects, phase of the outsourcing projects, communications and culture. The rest of thesis is devote...

  19. Bayesian models for comparative analysis integrating phylogenetic uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncertainty in comparative analyses can come from at least two sources: a) phylogenetic uncertainty in the tree topology or branch lengths, and b) uncertainty due to intraspecific variation in trait values, either due to measurement error or natural individual variation. Most phylogenetic comparative methods do not account for such uncertainties. Not accounting for these sources of uncertainty leads to false perceptions of precision (confidence intervals will be too narrow) and inflated significance in hypothesis testing (e.g. p-values will be too small). Although there is some application-specific software for fitting Bayesian models accounting for phylogenetic error, more general and flexible software is desirable. Methods We developed models to directly incorporate phylogenetic uncertainty into a range of analyses that biologists commonly perform, using a Bayesian framework and Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses. Results We demonstrate applications in linear regression, quantification of phylogenetic signal, and measurement error models. Phylogenetic uncertainty was incorporated by applying a prior distribution for the phylogeny, where this distribution consisted of the posterior tree sets from Bayesian phylogenetic tree estimation programs. The models were analysed using simulated data sets, and applied to a real data set on plant traits, from rainforest plant species in Northern Australia. Analyses were performed using the free and open source software OpenBUGS and JAGS. Conclusions Incorporating phylogenetic uncertainty through an empirical prior distribution of trees leads to more precise estimation of regression model parameters than using a single consensus tree and enables a more realistic estimation of confidence intervals. In addition, models incorporating measurement errors and/or individual variation, in one or both variables, are easily formulated in the Bayesian framework. We show that BUGS is a useful, flexible general purpose tool for

  20. Proliferative activity in oral pyogenic granuloma: A comparative immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvani Gita

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pyogenic granuloma (PG is one of the most common reactive vascular lesions in the oral mucosa, which has been divided into the lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH and the non lobular type (non-LCH as two distinct entities, on the basis of some investigations. Aims: This study aims to compare the proliferative and angiogenic activity of two histological types of PG to determine whether they have two distinct types of biological behavior. Settings and Design: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, immunostaining was performed on 10 cases of each type of PG. Materials and Methods: About 4μm sections were cut from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks and each specimen was stained with both anti-CD31 and anti-Ki-67 antibodies simultaneously. Labeling index (LI was determined for both types by counting Ki-67 and CD31 positive cells separately and simultaneously in 1000 stromal and luminal cells. Micro vessel count (MVC, the mean number of micro vessels in five areas at Χ200 magnification, was also determined for both groups. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Ki-67 LI in LCH (5.4 ± 2.4 was higher than non-LCH (3.9 ± 3.9. The percentage of CD31 positive cells in LCH (28.5 ± 22 was lower than non-LCH (37.1 ± 20.8 and simultaneously immunostaining for both markers in LCH type (2.4 ± 2.1 was higher than non-LCH (1.2 ± 1. The MVC was approximately 77.35 ± 34.6 and 82.6 ± 42.7 in the lobular areas of LCH and central areas of non-LCH PG, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: These results demonstrate a higher proliferation activity in endothelial cells of LCH PG than in non-LCH.

  1. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth’s surface and it’s related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India. This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can’t do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good

  2. Comparative evaluation of enzyme activities and phenol content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interestingly, biochemical analyses showed the highest phenolic content and PME activity in plants treated with EM Bokashi. All treatments significantly increased POX activity while they decreased PPO activity. In addition, significant and positive correlations (P < 0.01) were observed between stem length and PME activity ...

  3. A comparative study on the antioxidant activity of fringe tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... reducing activity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging and ferrous metal chelating activities were for used antioxidant evaluation of MEFT and EEFT. The both extracts neutralized the activities of radicals and inhibited the peroxidation reactions of linoleic acid emulsion. Total antioxidant activity was.

  4. Comparative assessment of PV plant performance models considering climate effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tina, Giuseppe; Ventura, Cristina; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    . The methodological approach is based on comparative tests of the analyzed models applied to two PV plants installed respectively in north of Denmark (Aalborg) and in the south of Italy (Agrigento). The different ambient, operating and installation conditions allow to understand how these factors impact the precision...

  5. a comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    significance. Next, several subsets of predictors are compared through the AIC criterion, whenever applicable. Key words/phrases: Beta-binomial, bootstrap, correlated binary data, model selection, overdispersion. *. Current address: University of Hannover, Bioinformatic Unit, Herrenhauser Strasse 2, D-30419 Hannover, ...

  6. A comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various methods of modeling correlated binary data are compared as applied to data from health services research. The methods include the standard logistic regression, a simple adjustment of the standard errors of logistic regression by a single inflator, the weighted logistic regression, the generalized estimating equation ...

  7. Design of thermolabile bacteriophage repressor mutants by comparative molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, A; vandenBurg, B; Karsens, H; Venema, G; Kok, J; Burg, Bertus van den

    1997-01-01

    Comparative molecular modeling was performed with repressor protein Rro of the temperate Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage r1t using the known 3D-structures of related repressors in order to obtain thermolabile derivatives of Rro. Rro residues presumed to stabilize a nonhomologous but structurally

  8. Conceptualizations of Creativity: Comparing Theories and Models of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angie L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews seven different theories of giftedness that include creativity as a component, comparing and contrasting how each one conceptualizes creativity as a part of giftedness. The functions of creativity vary across the models, suggesting that while the field of gifted education often cites the importance of creativity, the…

  9. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We compare three different numerical schemes of treating the Moho density contrast in gravimetric inverse problems for finding the Moho depths. The results are validated using the global crustal model. CRUST2.0, which is determined based purely on seismic data. Firstly, the gravimetric recovery of the. Moho depths is ...

  10. A comparison of rofecoxib versus celecoxib in treating pain after dental surgery: a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-comparator-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose study using the dental impaction pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Fricke, James R; Kotey, Paul; Kress, Barbara; Morrison, Briggs

    2002-10-01

    Rofecoxib and celecoxib, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, have analgesic efficacy similar to that of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study was designed to confirm earlier findings that the overall analgesic efficacy of rofecoxib 50 mg was superior to that of celecoxib 200 mg and to extend the comparison to include celecoxib 400 mg. In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-comparator-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose study, patients who experienced moderate or severe pain after surgical extraction of at least 2 third molars received a single oral dose of either rofecoxib 50 mg, celecoxib 400 mg, celecoxib 200 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. Patients recorded scores of pain intensity, pain relief, and global assessment at prespecified time intervals throughout the 24-hour period after dosing. The end points were total pain relief (TOPAR) score over 8 hours (TOPAR8; primary end point), TOPAR score over 12 hours (TOPAR12), sum of pain intensity difference (SPID) over 8 and 12 hours (SPID8 and SPID12), patient's global assessment of study drug at 8 hours, time to confirmed perceptible pain relief (ie, time to onset of analgesic effect), peak pain intensity difference (PID), peak pain relief, time to first dose of rescue medication (ie, duration of analgesic effect), and percentage of patients using rescue medication. A total of 482 patients (358 females, 124 males; mean age, 22.1 years) were enrolled. Rofecoxib 50 mg (n = 151 patients) demonstrated significantly greater overall analgesic efficacy compared with celecoxib 400 mg (n = 151), as measured by TOPAR8 (least squares mean [SE] 17.2 [0.8] vs 15.0 [0.8]; P TOPAR12 (25.3 [1.2] vs 21.0 [1.2]; P TOPAR8 scores (17.2 [0.8] vs 11.5 [1.1]; P TOPAR8, TOPAR12, SPID8, SPID12, and patient's global assessment] for all study drugs). The adverse-events (AE) profile was generally similar in all treatment groups. The 3 most common AEs were nausea, postextraction

  11. Mathematical modelling of human growth: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shumei; Siervogel, Roger M; Roche, Alex F; Chumlea, Wm Cameron

    1992-01-01

    Kernel regression is a nonparametric procedure that provides good approximations to individual serial data. The method is useful and flexible when a parametric method is inappropriate due to restricted assumptions on the shape of the curve. In the present study, we compared kernel regression in fitting human stature growth with two models, one of which incorporates the possible existence of the midgrowth spurt while the other does not. Two families of mathematical functions and a nonparametric kernel regression were fitted to serial measures of stature on 227 participants enrolled in the Fels Longitudinal Study. The growth parameters that describe the timing, magnitude, and duration of the growth spurt, such as midgrowth spurt and pubertal spurts, were derived from the fitted models and kernel regression for each participant. The two parametric models and kernel regression were compared in regard to their overall goodness of fit and their capabilities to quantify the timing, rate of increase, and duration of the growth events. The Preece-Baines model does not describe the midgrowth spurt. The dervied growth parameters from the Preece-Baines model show an earlier onset and a longer duration of the pubertal spurt, and a slower increase in velocity. The kernel regression with bandwidth 2 years and a second-order polynomial kernel function yields relatively good fits compared with the triple logistic model. The derived biological parameters for the pubertal spurt are similar between the kernel regression and the triple logistic model. Kernel regression estimates an earlier onset and a more rapid increase of velocity for the midgrowth spurt. Copyright © 1992 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  12. Comparative in vitro activity of piperacillinl tazobactam against Gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tables V and VI. Against the Enterobacteriaceae tested, which excluded. Enterobacter spp., the most active agents overall were. SAMJ. ARTICLES ciprofloxacin, the carbapenems (biapenem and imipenem), and the new cephalosporins (cefepime and cefpirome). PiperacillinJtazobactam demonstrated good activity against.

  13. Comparative anticancer activity of dolaborane diterpenes from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at investigating the anticancer activity of tagalsins A, B, C, D, E, F and G isolated from the roots of Ceriops tagal. Their structures were established based on the IR, MS and NMR spectral data. Anticancer activity was evaluated using caspase-3 colourimetric assays and the minimum activation concentrations ...

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of After-School Programs to Increase Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina B. Gesell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a comparative effectiveness analysis to evaluate the difference in the amount of physical activity children engaged in when enrolled in a physical activity-enhanced after-school program based in a community recreation center versus a standard school-based after-school program. Methods. The study was a natural experiment with 54 elementary school children attending the community ASP and 37 attending the school-based ASP. Accelerometry was used to measure physical activity. Data were collected at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks, with 91% retention. Results. At baseline, 43% of the multiethnic sample was overweight/obese, and the mean age was 7.9 years (SD = 1.7. Linear latent growth models suggested that the average difference between the two groups of children at Week 12 was 14.7 percentage points in moderate-vigorous physical activity (P<.001. Cost analysis suggested that children attending traditional school-based ASPs—at an average cost of $17.67 per day—would need an additional daily investment of $1.59 per child for 12 weeks to increase their moderate-vigorous physical activity by a model-implied 14.7 percentage points. Conclusions. A low-cost, alternative after-school program featuring adult-led physical activities in a community recreation center was associated with increased physical activity compared to standard-of-care school-based after-school program.

  15. Measurements by activation foils and comparative computations by MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyncl, J.

    2008-01-01

    Systematic study of the radioactive waste minimisation problem is subject of the SPHINX project. Its idea is that burning or transmutation of the waste inventory problematic part will be realized in a nuclear reactor the fuel of which is in the form of liquid fluorides. In frame of the project, several experiments have been performed with so-called inserted experimental channel. The channel was filled up by the fluorides mixture, surrounded by six fuel assemblies with moderator and placed into LR-0 reactor vessel. This formation was brought to critical state and measurement with activation foil detectors were carried out at selected positions of the inserted channel. Main aim of the measurements was to determine reaction rates for the detectors mentioned. For experiment evaluation, comparative computations were accomplished by code MCNP4a. The results obtained show that very often, computed values of reaction rates differ substantially from the values that were obtained from the experiment. This contribution deals with analysis of the reasons of these differences from the point of view of computations by Monte Carlo method. The analysis of concrete cases shows that the inaccuracy of reaction rate computed is caused mostly by three circumstances:-space region that is occupied by detector is relatively very small;- microscopic effective cross-section R(E) of the reaction changes strongly with energy just in the energy interval that gives the greatest contribution to the reaction; - in the energy interval that gives the greatest contribution to reaction rate, the error of the computed neutron flux is great. These circumstances evoke that the computation of reaction rate with casual accuracy submits extreme demands on computing time. (Author)

  16. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  17. How Do Sociodemographics and Activity Participations Affect Activity-Travel? Comparative Study between Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-travel behaviors of women and men are different because they have different social and household responsibilities. However, studies concerning gender differences are mainly limited in developed countries. This paper concentrates on gender role-based differences in activity-travel behavior in a typical developing country, namely, China. Using data from 3656 cases collected through surveys conducted in Shangyu, data processing, method choice, and descriptive analysis were conducted. Binary and ordered logistic regression models segmented by gender were developed to evaluate the mechanism through which individual sociodemographics, household characteristics, and activity participations affect the number of trip chain types and activities for women and men. The results show that women aged 30 to 50 perform less subsistence activities. However, the difference between the different age groups of men is not as significant. In addition, men with bicycles and electric bicycles have more subsistence and maintenance activities, whereas women do not have these attributes. Moreover, women with children under schooling age make more maintenance trip chains but less leisure trip chains and activities, whereas men are free from this influence. Furthermore, both women and men perform more subsistence activities if the duration increases, and men have less influences than women do.

  18. Comparing Neural Networks and ARMA Models in Artificial Stock Market

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtek, Jiří; Vošvrda, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 28 (2011), s. 53-65 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : neural networks * vector ARMA * artificial market Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/E/krtek-comparing neural networks and arma models in artificial stock market.pdf

  19. Comparing physical activity of Malaysian Malay men before, during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    during this time of the year, most Muslims will live an inactive and sedentary lifestyle. However, no empirical data exist to substantiate this assumption among Malay Muslims. Study showed that minimum of 10,000 steps per day is required to achieve an active lifestyle status. The active lifestyle status is recommended ...

  20. Comparative Study of Antioxidant Activities of the Leaves and Stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves and stem extracts of Ipomoea aquatic Forsk were analysed for their antioxidant activities. Folin-Ciocalteu and AlCl3 methods were used to quantify total phenolic and flavonoid contents while 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay was used to examine the antioxidant activity of the extracts.

  1. Comparative study of biological activity of glutathione, sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione (GSH) and sodium tungstate (Na2WO4) are important pharmacological agents. They provide protection to cells against cytotoxic agents and thus reduce their cytotoxicity. It was of interest to study the biological activity of these two pharmacological active agents. Different strains of bacteria were used and the ...

  2. Comparative study of in vitro antioxidant activity of foliar endophytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endophytic fungi that reside in plant tissues are a potential source of secondary metabolites with biological activities. In our study, we investigated the detection of the antioxidant activity of the crude fungal extract of the genera Cladosporium, Alternaria, Aspergillus and Penicillium: endophytic fungi isolated from the leaves of ...

  3. Comparative Antioxidant Activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Ascorbic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Lipid peroxidation is becoming a popular biological marker of oxidative stress. Hibiscus sabdariffa has been reported to serve as a herbal remedy for various disease conditions, but studies on its antioxidant activity and the extent to which it acts remain scarce. The antioxidant activity of H. sabdariffa aqueous extracts, an.

  4. Comparative in-vitro activity of Imipenem and Doripenem against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Doripenem is a recent carbapenem not commercially available in Nigeria with broad spectrum antibacterial activity against various clinical infections. Carbapenems have been shown to be the last line of agents against ESBL producing organisms. Objective: To determine the in-vitro activity of Imipenem and ...

  5. Comparative Antioxidant Activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Ascorbic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid peroxidation is becoming a popular biological marker of oxidative stress. Hibiscus sabdariffa has been reported to serve as a herbal remedy for various disease conditions, but studies on its antioxidant activity and the extent to which it acts remain scarce. The antioxidant activity of H. sabdariffa aqueous extracts, ...

  6. Comparative study of the antifungal activity of some essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the antimould activity of oregano, thyme, rosemary and clove essential oils and some of their main constituents: eugenol, carvacrol and thymol against Aspergillus niger. This antifungal activity was assessed using broth dilution, disc diffusion and micro atmosphere methods. In both agar diffusion ...

  7. Comparative analgesic activity of the root bark, stem bark, leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic activity of the water extracts (50,100 and150 mg/Kg body weight) of the root bark, stem bark, leaves, fruits and seeds of Carissa edulis were evaluated in mice using the mechanical method (tail-chip method) and chemical method (acetic acid induced writhing). The plant was found to have analgesic activity, ...

  8. Building v/s Exploring Models: Comparing Learning of Evolutionary Processes through Agent-based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Aditi

    modalities, with students who built models not incorporating slippage explanations in responses. Study 3 compares these modalities with a control using traditional activities. Pre and posttests reveal that the two modalities manifested greater facility with accessing and assembling rules than the control. The dissertation offers implications for the design of learning environments for evolutionary change, design of the two modalities based on their strengths and weaknesses, and teacher training for the same.

  9. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism: a comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Karathia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model organisms are used for research because they provide a framework on which to develop and optimize methods that facilitate and standardize analysis. Such organisms should be representative of the living beings for which they are to serve as proxy. However, in practice, a model organism is often selected ad hoc, and without considering its representativeness, because a systematic and rational method to include this consideration in the selection process is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we propose such a method and apply it in a pilot study of strengths and limitations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The method relies on the functional classification of proteins into different biological pathways and processes and on full proteome comparisons between the putative model organism and other organisms for which we would like to extrapolate results. Here we compare S. cerevisiae to 704 other organisms from various phyla. For each organism, our results identify the pathways and processes for which S. cerevisiae is predicted to be a good model to extrapolate from. We find that animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are some of the non-fungal organisms for which S. cerevisiae is likely to be a good model in which to study a significant fraction of common biological processes. We validate our approach by correctly predicting which organisms are phenotypically more distant from S. cerevisiae with respect to several different biological processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method we propose could be used to choose appropriate substitute model organisms for the study of biological processes in other species that are harder to study. For example, one could identify appropriate models to study either pathologies in humans or specific biological processes in species with a long development time, such as plants.

  11. Atterberg Limits Prediction Comparing SVM with ANFIS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Murtaza Sherzoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Support Vector Machine (SVM and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy inference Systems (ANFIS both analytical methods are used to predict the values of Atterberg limits, such as the liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index. The main objective of this study is to make a comparison between both forecasts (SVM & ANFIS methods. All data of 54 soil samples are used and taken from the area of Peninsular Malaysian and tested for different parameters containing liquid limit, plastic limit, plasticity index and grain size distribution and were. The input parameter used in for this case are the fraction of grain size distribution which are the percentage of silt, clay and sand. The actual and predicted values of Atterberg limit which obtained from the SVM and ANFIS models are compared by using the correlation coefficient R2 and root mean squared error (RMSE value.  The outcome of the study show that the ANFIS model shows higher accuracy than SVM model for the liquid limit (R2 = 0.987, plastic limit (R2 = 0.949 and plastic index (R2 = 0966. RMSE value that obtained for both methods have shown that the ANFIS model has represent the best performance than SVM model to predict the Atterberg Limits as a whole.

  12. Synthesis and comparing the antibacterial activities of pyrimidine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    triazol-3-yl)-6-methyl-4- phenyl pyrimidin-2(1H)-one have been synthesized. Among the synthesized derivatives, triazole substituted compounds have shown higher antibacterial inhibition when compared to the thiadiazole derivatives. All the.

  13. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  14. Comparative assessment of antioxidant activity of chicory products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Badretdinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods for determining the antioxidant activity. They are differing by the source of oxidation, oxidized compounds and methods for the measurement of oxidized compounds. Methods for determination of antioxidant activity provide a wide range of results, so the evaluation of the antioxidant activity should be carried out in several ways, and the results should be interpreted with caution. In assessing antioxidant capacity is necessary to consider not only the nature and content of the reducing agent in the test facility, but also the possibility of their mutual influence. The objects of research in this research work were Instant chicory (Leroux, Fried chicory (Leroux, Instant chicory (LLC Favorit, Instant chicory (LLC SlavKofe, Instant chicory with hawthorn (Iceberg Ltd and K, Instant chicory (LLC Flagistom, Instant chicory (Ltd. Around the World, Instant chicory (LLC Beta +, Chicory flour (Leroux, Chicory flour. Antioxidant activity of the products of chicory determined by spectrophotometric (using adrenaline and 2,2 – diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl, and amperometric methods. These results indicate that chicory products possess antioxidant activity but not give fully correlated with each other results. The highest antioxidant activity have fried products from chicory – Instant chicory (LLC SlavKofe and Instant chicory with hawthorn (Iceberg Ltd and K. No fried products from chicory (Chicory flour (Leroux have lower antioxidant activity then fried products from chicory. Because during frying new compounds are formed – chikoreol, which comprises acetic and valeric acid, acrolein and furfural, furfuryl alcohol, diacetyl. Best convergence results provide spectrophotometric methods using epinephrine and 2,2 – diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl.

  15. A Data Mining Approach for Exploring Correlates of Self-Reported Comparative Physical Activity Levels of Urban Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Co, Manuel C; Suero-Tejeda, Niurka; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    We applied data mining techniques to a community-based behavioral dataset to build prediction models to gain insights about physical activity levels as the foundation for future interventions for urban Latinos. Our application of data mining strategies identified environment factors including having a convenient location for physical activity and psychological factors including depression as the strongest correlates of self-reported comparative physical activity among hundreds of variables. The data mining methods were useful to build prediction models to gain insights about perceptions of physical activity behavior as compared to peers.

  16. Students’ mathematical learning in modelling activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Blomhøj, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Ten years of experience with analyses of students’ learning in a modelling course for first year university students, led us to see modelling as a didactical activity with the dual goal of developing students’ modelling competency and enhancing their conceptual learning of mathematical concepts...... create and help overcome hidden cognitive conflicts in students’ understanding; that reflections within modelling can play an important role for the students’ learning of mathematics. These findings are illustrated with a modelling project concerning the world population....

  17. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  18. Domain analysis and modeling to improve comparability of health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M; Hashimoto, H; Ohida, T

    2001-01-01

    Health statistics is an essential element to improve the ability of managers of health institutions, healthcare researchers, policy makers, and health professionals to formulate appropriate course of reactions and to make decisions based on evidence. To ensure adequate health statistics, standards are of critical importance. A study on healthcare statistics domain analysis is underway in an effort to improve usability and comparability of health statistics. The ongoing study focuses on structuring the domain knowledge and making the knowledge explicit with a data element dictionary being the core. Supplemental to the dictionary are a domain term list, a terminology dictionary, and a data model to help organize the concepts constituting the health statistics domain.

  19. A comparative study of changes of autophagy in rat models of CLP versus LPS induced sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binglun; Liu, Chunfeng; Yang, Ni; Wang, Xiangdie

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, two different rat models of sepsis, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were established. Changes in autophagy in both models were compared using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. Consequently, TEM analysis revealed autophagic bodies in the CLP and LPS sepsis models. In addition, autophagy-related protein LC3 A-specific staining was detected in the cytoplasm. However, analysis of protein and gene expression levels revealed a statistically significant increase in autophagic activity 12 and 24 h following induction of the CLP group, and 2 h following induction of the LPS group. Thus, it was concluded that both models of sepsis exhibited increased autophagic activity of the cardiomyocytes over time. The LPS model was superior to the CLP model in perturbation of molecular biological mechanisms, while the latter would be more likely suited for the study of physiological functions.

  20. Challenges of Reliable, Realistic and Comparable Active Learning Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottke, Daniel; Calma, Adrian; Huseljic, Denis; Krempl, G.M.; Sick, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Active learning has the potential to save costs by intelligent use of resources in form of some expert’s knowledge. Nevertheless, these methods are still not established in real-world applications as they can not be evaluated properly in the specific scenario because evaluation data is missing. In

  1. Comparative evaluation of inhibitory activity of Epiphgram from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted on evaluation of inhibitory activity of epiphgram from albino and normal skinned giant African land snail (Archachatina marginata). After aestivation, epiphgram were collected from twenty snails (10, albino and 10 normal skinned). The epiphgram were washed, air dried and ground into powder form.

  2. Comparative in vitro activity of piperacillinl tazobactam against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the agents, with the exception of ampicillin (MIC90 4 mg/l) and chloramphenicol (MIC90 4 mg/l), were highly active against the Haemophilus influenzae isolates tested. All Bacteroides fragilis strains were susceptible to piperacillinllazobaclam (MIC90 8/4 mgll), as well as 10 co-amoxiclav (MIC90 4/2 mg/I), biapenem and ...

  3. Comparative evaluation of active learning and the traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    learning to Physiology teaching of medial laboratory students to confirm worldwide reports that active learning environments offer better learning opportunities over the traditional methods which is the predominant teaching method in Nigerian universities. Our findings indicate that Problem-based learning increases ...

  4. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: Maturation and activation methods compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, D.Y.S.; Glim, J.E.; Stavenuiter, A.W.D.; Breur, M.; Heijnen, P.; Amor, S.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Beelen, R.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro

  5. Comparative Study on Liver Enzymes Activity and Blood Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to determine the activities of some selected liver enzymes amongst apparently healthy subjects of different blood groups. The study involved 95 apparently healthy students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria, between the ages of 18-30, and distributed as follows; blood group O ...

  6. Comparative Study on Antimicrobial Activity of Vitex negundo var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The powdered leaf materials of both varieties were extracted using methanol in soxhlet assembly. The content of total phenolics and flavonoids were estimated by Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and Aluminium chloride colorimetric estimation method respectively. Antibacterial activity of extracts was determined against five drug ...

  7. Comparative Study of Antibacterial Activities of the Fresh and Dried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fresh and dried fruit extracts of Capsicum species were screened for antibacterial activities against Staph. aureus, S. typhi and B. subtilis using two assay methods. The filter disk and agar plate diffusion were the assay methods employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that the extracts obtained from the ...

  8. Comparative activity of polyphenol oxidase produced In vivo by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to produce polyphenol oxidase in vivo by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus seed-borne storage molds of rice (Oryzae sativa> L.) was investigated. Also, was the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of the above enzyme secreted by each of the above seed-borne storage molds of rice. The result of ...

  9. A Comparative Study of Active Play on Differently Designed Playgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Antje; Fikus, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The physical and social environment of children in cities is continuously changing. Knowledge about the positive effects of natural play experiences within the child's development is becoming widely known. Affordances of diverse landscape elements and especially loose parts for play in natural environments influence play activities. New concepts…

  10. Comparative nonlinear modeling of renal autoregulation in rats: Volterra approach versus artificial neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, K H; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, feedforward neural networks with two types of activation functions (sigmoidal and polynomial) are utilized for modeling the nonlinear dynamic relation between renal blood pressure and flow data, and their performance is compared to Volterra models obtained by use of the leading...... kernel estimation method based on Laguerre expansions. The results for the two types of artificial neural networks and the Volterra models are comparable in terms of normalized mean square error (NMSE) of the respective output prediction for independent testing data. However, the Volterra models obtained...... via the Laguerre expansion technique achieve this prediction NMSE with approximately half the number of free parameters relative to either neural-network model. However, both approaches are deemed effective in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems and their cooperative use is recommended in general....

  11. Comparative antioxidant activity, total phenol and total flavonoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidants are compounds which act as a major defense against oxidative stress caused by free radicals. In this study, a comparative evaluation of the antioxidant properties, phenolic and flavonoid contents of the methanolic extracts of Ocimum gratissimum Linn and Ocimum canum Sims was carried out. Crude extracts of ...

  12. A comparative study on the aphrodisiac activity of food plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Any substance that increases erectile function, sexual performance and enjoyment is considered an aphrodisiac. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of food plants Mondia whitei, Chenopodium album, Cucurbita pepo and Sclerocarya birrea extracts at a fixed dose of 200mg/kg body weight on ...

  13. Sourcing for a New Oytocic Agent: Comparative Activities of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Extracts of both fresh and dried sheep placenta have been employed in traditional obstetric practice in Nigeria to facilitate labour. The comparative oxytocin effects of an extracts of the pulverized dried sheep placenta with normal saline and a normal saline infusion of the fresh placenta were investigated on ...

  14. MEG Source Localization of Spatially Extended Generators of Epileptic Activity: Comparing Entropic and Hierarchical Bayesian Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Lina, Jean Marc; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG) or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG) signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i) brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii) brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP) method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM) and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm2 to 30 cm2, whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered. PMID:23418485

  15. MEG source localization of spatially extended generators of epileptic activity: comparing entropic and hierarchical bayesian approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheda Arman Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Localizing the generators of epileptic activity in the brain using Electro-EncephaloGraphy (EEG or Magneto-EncephaloGraphy (MEG signals is of particular interest during the pre-surgical investigation of epilepsy. Epileptic discharges can be detectable from background brain activity, provided they are associated with spatially extended generators. Using realistic simulations of epileptic activity, this study evaluates the ability of distributed source localization methods to accurately estimate the location of the generators and their sensitivity to the spatial extent of such generators when using MEG data. Source localization methods based on two types of realistic models have been investigated: (i brain activity may be modeled using cortical parcels and (ii brain activity is assumed to be locally smooth within each parcel. A Data Driven Parcellization (DDP method was used to segment the cortical surface into non-overlapping parcels and diffusion-based spatial priors were used to model local spatial smoothness within parcels. These models were implemented within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean (MEM and the Hierarchical Bayesian (HB source localization frameworks. We proposed new methods in this context and compared them with other standard ones using Monte Carlo simulations of realistic MEG data involving sources of several spatial extents and depths. Detection accuracy of each method was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analysis and localization error metrics. Our results showed that methods implemented within the MEM framework were sensitive to all spatial extents of the sources ranging from 3 cm(2 to 30 cm(2, whatever were the number and size of the parcels defining the model. To reach a similar level of accuracy within the HB framework, a model using parcels larger than the size of the sources should be considered.

  16. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  17. Respirometry techniques and activated sludge models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, O.; Spanjers, H.; Holba, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to explain results of respirometry experiments using Activated Sludge Model No. 1. In cases of insufficient fit of ASM No. 1, further modifications to the model were carried out and the so-called "Enzymatic model" was developed. The best-fit method was used to determine the effect of

  18. COGNITIVE COMPETENCE COMPARED TO COGNITIVE INDEPENDENCE AND COGNITIVE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Shmigirilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at identifying the essence of the cognitive competence concept in comparison with the concepts of cognitive independence and activity.Methods: The methodology implies a theoretical analysis of psychopedagogical and methodological materials on the cognitive competence formation; generalized teaching experience; empirical methods of direct observations of educational process in the secondary school classrooms; interviews with school teachers and pupils.Results: The research outcomes reveal a semantic intersection between the cognitive competence, independence and activity, and their distinctive features. The paper emphasizes the importance of cognitive competence as an adaptive mechanism in situations of uncertainty and instability.Scientific novelty: The author clarifies the concept of cognitive competence regarding it as a multi-component and systematic characteristic of a personality.Practical significance: The research findings can be used by specialists in didactics developing the teaching techniques of cognitive competence formation for schoolchildren.

  19. Features for voice activity detection: a comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Simon; Herbig, Tobias; Buck, Markus; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    In many speech signal processing applications, voice activity detection (VAD) plays an essential role for separating an audio stream into time intervals that contain speech activity and time intervals where speech is absent. Many features that reflect the presence of speech were introduced in literature. However, to our knowledge, no extensive comparison has been provided yet. In this article, we therefore present a structured overview of several established VAD features that target at different properties of speech. We categorize the features with respect to properties that are exploited, such as power, harmonicity, or modulation, and evaluate the performance of some dedicated features. The importance of temporal context is discussed in relation to latency restrictions imposed by different applications. Our analyses allow for selecting promising VAD features and finding a reasonable trade-off between performance and complexity.

  20. Dynamic Models of Insurgent Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    IKENET  and  the   Enron  e-­‐ mail  datasets.  We  show  that  the  self-­‐exciting  models  adequately  capture  major...the  West  Point  and   Enron   networks.  This  work  is  under  review  at  J.  Amer.  Stat.  Assoc.   Agent

  1. Comparative profiling of biomarker psoralen in antioxidant active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    The regression equation and r2 for psoralen was found to be ... was reported to posses little activity against free radical reaction (Yi et al., 2013) but found in higher qunatity in the leaves of Ficus carica (Zaynoun .... Mobile phases prepared from toluene: methanol in different proportions (9:1, v/v; 9.5:0.5, v/v; 8.5:1.5, v/v; 10:0, ...

  2. Comparism of xanthine oxidase activities in cow and goat milks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities of xanthine oxidase were studied in cow and goat milks. The optimum temperature and pH values were 10 oC and 7.5; and 20 oC and 7.2 – 7.4 for cow and goat milk samples respectively. The substrate effect on xanthine oxidase from both milk samples followed the popular Michealis Menten's (Km) equation.

  3. Comparative analysis of actuator concepts for active gear pair vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuan H.; Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C.; Shepard, W. Steve

    2004-01-01

    Four actuation concepts for the active suppression of gearbox housing mesh frequency vibrations due to transmission error excitation from the gear pair system are modelled and compared by computing the required actuation forces and amplifier power spectra. The proposed designs studied consist of (1) active inertial actuators positioned tangentially on the gear body to produce a pair of reactive force and moment, (2) semi-active gear-shaft torsional coupling to provide tuned vibration isolation and suppression, (3) active bearing vibration control to reduce vibration transmissibility, and (4) active shaft transverse vibration control to suppress/tune gearbox casing or shaft response. Numerical simulations that incorporate a transmission error term as the primary excitation are performed using a finite element model of the geared rotor system (dynamic plant) constructed from beam and lumped mass/stiffness elements. Several key comparison criteria including the required actuation effort, control robustness and implementation cost are examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of each concept are discussed. Based on the simulated data, the active shaft transverse vibration control scheme is identified as the most suitable approach for this application.

  4. Comparative efficacy of switching to natalizumab in active multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spelman, Timothy; Kalincik, Tomas; Zhang, Annie

    2015-01-01

    treatment groups by propensity score matching at treatment initiation. Relapse, persistence, and disability measures were compared between matched treatment arms in the total population (n = 869/group) and in subgroups defined by prior treatment history (IFNβ only [n = 578/group], GA only [n = 165/group.......001). In the total population, switching to natalizumab reduced the risk of confirmed disability progression by 26% (P = 0.036) and decreased the total disability burden by 1.54 EDSS-years (P

  5. Comparing Visual-Interactive Labeling with Active Learning: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jurgen; Hutter, Marco; Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Fellner, Dieter; Sedlmair, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Labeling data instances is an important task in machine learning and visual analytics. Both fields provide a broad set of labeling strategies, whereby machine learning (and in particular active learning) follows a rather model-centered approach and visual analytics employs rather user-centered approaches (visual-interactive labeling). Both approaches have individual strengths and weaknesses. In this work, we conduct an experiment with three parts to assess and compare the performance of these different labeling strategies. In our study, we (1) identify different visual labeling strategies for user-centered labeling, (2) investigate strengths and weaknesses of labeling strategies for different labeling tasks and task complexities, and (3) shed light on the effect of using different visual encodings to guide the visual-interactive labeling process. We further compare labeling of single versus multiple instances at a time, and quantify the impact on efficiency. We systematically compare the performance of visual interactive labeling with that of active learning. Our main findings are that visual-interactive labeling can outperform active learning, given the condition that dimension reduction separates well the class distributions. Moreover, using dimension reduction in combination with additional visual encodings that expose the internal state of the learning model turns out to improve the performance of visual-interactive labeling.

  6. THE FLAT TAX - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EXISTING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiau (Macavei Laura - Liana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the two last decades the flat tax systems have spread all around the globe from East and Central Europe to Asia and Central America. Many specialists consider this phenomenon a real fiscal revolution, but others see it as a mistake as long as the new systems are just a feint of the true flat tax designed by the famous Stanford University professors Robert Hall and Alvin Rabushka. In this context this paper tries to determine which of the existing flat tax systems resemble the true flat tax model by comparing and contrasting their main characteristics with the features of the model proposed by Hall and Rabushka. The research also underlines the common features and the differences between the existing models. The idea of this kind of study is not really new, others have done it but the comparison was limited to one country. For example Emil Kalchev from New Bulgarian University has asses the Bulgarian income system, by comparing it with the flat tax and concluding that taxation in Bulgaria is not simple, neutral and non-distortive. Our research is based on several case studies and on compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative methods. The study starts form the fiscal design drawn by the two American professors in the book The Flat Tax. Four main characteristics of the flat tax system were chosen in order to build the comparison: fiscal design, simplicity, avoidance of double taxation and uniformity of the tax rates. The jurisdictions chosen for the case study are countries all around the globe with fiscal systems which are considered flat tax systems. The results obtained show that the fiscal design of Hong Kong is the only flat tax model which is built following an economic logic and not a legal sense, being in the same time a simple and transparent system. Others countries as Slovakia, Albania, Macedonia in Central and Eastern Europe fulfill the requirement regarding the uniformity of taxation. Other jurisdictions avoid the double

  7. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  8. Legal regime of lobby activities. A comparative view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu-Horia MAICAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A very important aspect is that countries with specific rules and regulations regulating the activities of lobbyists and interest groups are more the exception than the rule. The interest groups are pursuing their goals in the political arena by lobbying, or attempting to influence policy-making, are consistent with the spirit of democracy. In practice, interest group influence can sometimes lead to political corruption, the inequality of representation, and the overcrowding of political institutions. As a consequence, some political systems find it appropriate to regulate interest representation.

  9. Increased prefrontal activity and reduced motor cortex activity during imagined eccentric compared to concentric muscle actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C.-J.; Hedlund, M.; Sojka, P.; Lundström, R.; Lindström, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine differences in recruited brain regions during the concentric and the eccentric phase of an imagined maximum resistance training task of the elbow flexors in healthy young subjects. The results showed that during the eccentric phase, pre-frontal cortex (BA44) bilaterally was recruited when contrasted to the concentric phase. During the concentric phase, however, the motor and pre-motor cortex (BA 4/6) was recruited when contrasted to the eccentric phase. Interestingly, the brain activity of this region was reduced, when compared to the mean activity of the session, during the eccentric phase. Thus, the neural mechanisms governing imagined concentric and eccentric contractions appear to differ. We propose that the recruitment of the pre-frontal cortex is due to an increased demand of regulating force during the eccentric phase. Moreover, it is possible that the inability to fully activate a muscle during eccentric contractions may partly be explained by a reduction of activity in the motor and pre-motor cortex. PMID:22973217

  10. Comparative efficacy of switching to natalizumab in active multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelman, Timothy; Kalincik, Tomas; Zhang, Annie; Pellegrini, Fabio; Wiendl, Heinz; Kappos, Ludwig; Tsvetkova, Larisa; Belachew, Shibeshih; Hyde, Robert; Verheul, Freek; Grand-Maison, Francois; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grammond, Pierre; Duquette, Pierre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Hupperts, Raymond; Petersen, Thor; Barnett, Michael; Trojano, Maria; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare treatment efficacy and persistence in patients who switched to natalizumab versus those who switched between glatiramer acetate (GA) and interferon-beta (IFNβ) after an on-treatment relapse on IFNβ or GA using propensity score matched real-world datasets. Methods Patients included were registered in MSBase or the TYSABRI Observational Program (TOP), had relapsed on IFNβ or GA within 12 months prior to switching to another therapy, and had initiated natalizumab or IFNβ/GA treatment ≤6 months after discontinuing prior therapy. Covariates were balanced across post switch treatment groups by propensity score matching at treatment initiation. Relapse, persistence, and disability measures were compared between matched treatment arms in the total population (n = 869/group) and in subgroups defined by prior treatment history (IFNβ only [n = 578/group], GA only [n = 165/group], or both IFNβ and GA [n = 176/group]). Results Compared to switching between IFNβ and GA, switching to natalizumab reduced annualized relapse rate in year one by 65–75%, the risk of first relapse by 53–82% (mean follow-up 1.7–2.2 years) and treatment discontinuation events by 48–65% (all P ≤ 0.001). In the total population, switching to natalizumab reduced the risk of confirmed disability progression by 26% (P = 0.036) and decreased the total disability burden by 1.54 EDSS-years (P < 0.0001) over the first 24 months post switch. Interpretation Using large, real-world, propensity-matched datasets we demonstrate that after a relapse on IFNβ or GA, switching to natalizumab (rather than between IFNβ and GA) led to superior outcomes for patients in all measures assessed. Results were consistent regardless of the prior treatment identity. PMID:25909083

  11. Discursive positionings and emotions in modelling activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their participation in the modelling activity changed as the activity proceeded. Overall, it can be said that three of the four group members acted as insiders, while the fourth acted as an outsider, and only, towards the end of the group's work on the activity, he acted as an insider. Moreover, the research findings point at four factors that affected the group members' positionings and emotions during the modelling activity: the member's characteristics, the member's history of learning experiences, the activity characteristics and the modelling phases. Furthermore, the different positionings of the group members in the different modelling phases were accompanied by different emotions experienced by them, where being an insider and a collaborator resulted in positive emotions, while being an outsider resulted in negative emotions.

  12. Comparing Transformation Possibilities of Topological Functioning Model and BPMN in the Context of Model Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomencevs Artūrs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach called “Topological Functioning Model for Software Engineering” (TFM4SE applies the Topological Functioning Model (TFM for modelling the business system in the context of Model Driven Architecture. TFM is a mathematically formal computation independent model (CIM. TFM4SE is compared to an approach that uses BPMN as a CIM. The comparison focuses on CIM modelling and on transformation to UML Sequence diagram on the platform independent (PIM level. The results show the advantages and drawbacks the formalism of TFM brings into the development.

  13. A comparative study of machine learning models for ethnicity classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Advait; Bessie Amali, D. Geraldine

    2017-11-01

    This paper endeavours to adopt a machine learning approach to solve the problem of ethnicity recognition. Ethnicity identification is an important vision problem with its use cases being extended to various domains. Despite the multitude of complexity involved, ethnicity identification comes naturally to humans. This meta information can be leveraged to make several decisions, be it in target marketing or security. With the recent development of intelligent systems a sub module to efficiently capture ethnicity would be useful in several use cases. Several attempts to identify an ideal learning model to represent a multi-ethnic dataset have been recorded. A comparative study of classifiers such as support vector machines, logistic regression has been documented. Experimental results indicate that the logical classifier provides a much accurate classification than the support vector machine.

  14. Medaka: a promising model animal for comparative population genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Koji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within-species genome diversity has been best studied in humans. The international HapMap project has revealed a tremendous amount of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among humans, many of which show signals of positive selection during human evolution. In most of the cases, however, functional differences between the alleles remain experimentally unverified due to the inherent difficulty of human genetic studies. It would therefore be highly useful to have a vertebrate model with the following characteristics: (1 high within-species genetic diversity, (2 a variety of gene-manipulation protocols already developed, and (3 a completely sequenced genome. Medaka (Oryzias latipes and its congeneric species, tiny fresh-water teleosts distributed broadly in East and Southeast Asia, meet these criteria. Findings Using Oryzias species from 27 local populations, we conducted a simple screening of nonsynonymous SNPs for 11 genes with apparent orthology between medaka and humans. We found medaka SNPs for which the same sites in human orthologs are known to be highly differentiated among the HapMap populations. Importantly, some of these SNPs show signals of positive selection. Conclusion These results indicate that medaka is a promising model system for comparative population genomics exploring the functional and adaptive significance of allelic differentiations.

  15. Static response of deformable microchannels: a comparative modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Christov, Ivan C.

    2018-02-01

    We present a comparative modelling study of fluid–structure interactions in microchannels. Through a mathematical analysis based on plate theory and the lubrication approximation for low-Reynolds-number flow, we derive models for the flow rate-pressure drop relation for long shallow microchannels with both thin and thick deformable top walls. These relations are tested against full three-dimensional two-way-coupled fluid–structure interaction simulations. Three types of microchannels, representing different elasticity regimes and having been experimentally characterized previously, are chosen as benchmarks for our theory and simulations. Good agreement is found in most cases for the predicted, simulated and measured flow rate-pressure drop relationships. The numerical simulations performed allow us to also carefully examine the deformation profile of the top wall of the microchannel in any cross section, showing good agreement with the theory. Specifically, the prediction that span-wise displacement in a long shallow microchannel decouples from the flow-wise deformation is confirmed, and the predicted scaling of the maximum displacement with the hydrodynamic pressure and the various material and geometric parameters is validated.

  16. Comparative aspects of adult neural stem cell activity in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandel, Heiner; Brand, Michael

    2013-03-01

    At birth or after hatching from the egg, vertebrate brains still contain neural stem cells which reside in specialized niches. In some cases, these stem cells are deployed for further postnatal development of parts of the brain until the final structure is reached. In other cases, postnatal neurogenesis continues as constitutive neurogenesis into adulthood leading to a net increase of the number of neurons with age. Yet, in other cases, stem cells fuel neuronal turnover. An example is protracted development of the cerebellar granular layer in mammals and birds, where neurogenesis continues for a few weeks postnatally until the granular layer has reached its definitive size and stem cells are used up. Cerebellar growth also provides an example of continued neurogenesis during adulthood in teleosts. Again, it is the granular layer that grows as neurogenesis continues and no definite adult cerebellar size is reached. Neuronal turnover is most clearly seen in the telencephalon of male canaries, where projection neurons are replaced in nucleus high vocal centre each year before the start of a new mating season--circuitry reconstruction to achieve changes of the song repertoire in these birds? In this review, we describe these and other examples of adult neurogenesis in different vertebrate taxa. We also compare the structure of the stem cell niches to find common themes in their organization despite different functions adult neurogenesis serves in different species. Finally, we report on regeneration of the zebrafish telencephalon after injury to highlight similarities and differences of constitutive neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration.

  17. Modeling and control of active twist aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Nicholas Bryan

    The Wright Brothers marked the beginning of powered flight in 1903 using an active twist mechanism as their means of controlling roll. As time passed due to advances in other technologies that transformed aviation the active twist mechanism was no longer used. With the recent advances in material science and manufacturability, the possibility of the practical use of active twist technologies has emerged. In this dissertation, the advantages and disadvantages of active twist techniques are investigated through the development of an aeroelastic modeling method intended for informing the designs of such technologies and wind tunnel testing to confirm the capabilities of the active twist technologies and validate the model. Control principles for the enabling structural technologies are also proposed while the potential gains of dynamic, active twist are analyzed.

  18. Activation and extinction models for platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T; Walker, P G

    2002-01-01

    Adherent platelets are an important part of both thrombus formation and in certain stages of atherogenesis. Platelets can be activated by potent chemicals released from adherent platelets and adhere far more readily than unactivated ones. An analytical and numerical model is presented utilising high Peclet number for the activation and adhesion of platelets in shear flows. The model uses a similarity transformation, which characterises the relationship between convective, diffusive transport and the bulk platelet activating reaction mechanism. A first order surface reaction mechanism is used to model platelet adhesion at the wall (cell) surface. The reduced Damköhler number, M, characterises the importance of the bulk reaction and includes both convective and diffusive terms. For a high rate of blood flow (M-->0) the activation of platelets can effectively be terminated. In contrast, for (M-->infinity) an inner layer of activated platelets exists with an infinitesimally thin reaction sheet separating activated and non-activated platelets. This characterisation by the Damköhler number highlights results found clinically, in that thrombus forms in areas of low shear (high M) and in some cases an increased blood flow (low M) can inhibit the activation of platelets completely. The model shows the critical balance that exists between convection, diffusion and reaction.

  19. Comparing and Validating Machine Learning Models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thomas; Russo, Daniel P; Zorn, Kimberley M; Clark, Alex M; Korotcov, Alexandru; Tkachenko, Valery; Reynolds, Robert C; Perryman, Alexander L; Freundlich, Joel S; Ekins, Sean

    2018-04-26

    Tuberculosis is a global health dilemma. In 2016, the WHO reported 10.4 million incidences and 1.7 million deaths. The need to develop new treatments for those infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb) has led to many large-scale phenotypic screens and many thousands of new active compounds identified in vitro. However, with limited funding, efforts to discover new active molecules against Mtb needs to be more efficient. Several computational machine learning approaches have been shown to have good enrichment and hit rates. We have curated small molecule Mtb data and developed new models with a total of 18,886 molecules with activity cutoffs of 10 μM, 1 μM, and 100 nM. These data sets were used to evaluate different machine learning methods (including deep learning) and metrics and to generate predictions for additional molecules published in 2017. One Mtb model, a combined in vitro and in vivo data Bayesian model at a 100 nM activity yielded the following metrics for 5-fold cross validation: accuracy = 0.88, precision = 0.22, recall = 0.91, specificity = 0.88, kappa = 0.31, and MCC = 0.41. We have also curated an evaluation set ( n = 153 compounds) published in 2017, and when used to test our model, it showed the comparable statistics (accuracy = 0.83, precision = 0.27, recall = 1.00, specificity = 0.81, kappa = 0.36, and MCC = 0.47). We have also compared these models with additional machine learning algorithms showing Bayesian machine learning models constructed with literature Mtb data generated by different laboratories generally were equivalent to or outperformed deep neural networks with external test sets. Finally, we have also compared our training and test sets to show they were suitably diverse and different in order to represent useful evaluation sets. Such Mtb machine learning models could help prioritize compounds for testing in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Prediction of Anticancer Activity of 2-phenylindoles: Comparative Molecular Field Analysis Versus Ridge Regression using Mathematical Molecular Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Subhash C; Zhu, Qianhong; Mills, Denise

    2010-09-01

    Topological indices (TIs) and atom pairs (APs) were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for anticancer activity for a set of 43 derivatives of 2-phenylindole. Results show that QSARs formulated using TI+AP outperform those using either TI or AP alone. The q2 of the ridge regression model using TI+AP was 0.867 as compared to 0.705 reported in the literature using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) method.

  1. Modelling the Active Hearing Process in Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Daniele; Homer, Martin; Jackson, Joe; Robert, Daniel; Champneys, Alan

    2011-11-01

    A simple microscopic mechanistic model is described of the active amplification within the Johnston's organ of the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments. New results are presented using mathematical homogenization techniques to derive a mesoscopic model as a simple oscillator with nonlinear force and damping characteristics. It is shown how the results from this new model closely resemble those from the microscopic model as the number of threads approach physiologically correct values.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Some Crop Yield Prediction Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computer program was adopted from the work of Hill et al. (1982) to calibrate and test three of the existing yield prediction models using tropical cowpea yieldÐweather data. The models tested were Hanks Model (first and second versions). Stewart Model (first and second versions) and HallÐButcher Model. Three sets of ...

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Some Crop Yield Prediction Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (1982) to calibrate and test three of the existing yield prediction models using tropical cowpea yieldÐweather data. The models tested were Hanks Model (first and second versions). Stewart Model (first and second versions) and HallÐButcher Model. Three sets of cowpea yield-water use and weather data were collected.

  4. Comparing interval estimates for small sample ordinal CFA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2015-01-01

    Robust maximum likelihood (RML) and asymptotically generalized least squares (AGLS) methods have been recommended for fitting ordinal structural equation models. Studies show that some of these methods underestimate standard errors. However, these studies have not investigated the coverage and bias of interval estimates. An estimate with a reasonable standard error could still be severely biased. This can only be known by systematically investigating the interval estimates. The present study compares Bayesian, RML, and AGLS interval estimates of factor correlations in ordinal confirmatory factor analysis models (CFA) for small sample data. Six sample sizes, 3 factor correlations, and 2 factor score distributions (multivariate normal and multivariate mildly skewed) were studied. Two Bayesian prior specifications, informative and relatively less informative were studied. Undercoverage of confidence intervals and underestimation of standard errors was common in non-Bayesian methods. Underestimated standard errors may lead to inflated Type-I error rates. Non-Bayesian intervals were more positive biased than negatively biased, that is, most intervals that did not contain the true value were greater than the true value. Some non-Bayesian methods had non-converging and inadmissible solutions for small samples and non-normal data. Bayesian empirical standard error estimates for informative and relatively less informative priors were closer to the average standard errors of the estimates. The coverage of Bayesian credibility intervals was closer to what was expected with overcoverage in a few cases. Although some Bayesian credibility intervals were wider, they reflected the nature of statistical uncertainty that comes with the data (e.g., small sample). Bayesian point estimates were also more accurate than non-Bayesian estimates. The results illustrate the importance of analyzing coverage and bias of interval estimates, and how ignoring interval estimates can be misleading

  5. National Models of Technological Development: a Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V. Balatskiy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, suggestions are made for the development of methodological approaches to using factor analysis of technological development of countries and revealing the related weaknesses. The article presents an overview of the ideas for the study of such categories as national innovation system, its elements – the scientific and technological sector and approaches to efficiency measurement and comparative analysis of national innovation systems of different countries. For the purposes of assessing the scientific and technological potential of countries, a method of constructing a scientific-technological balance which links the efficiency of the national economy to the sphere of generation of knowledge and technologies, is proposed. Analysis of the relative scientific and technological parameters showed that each country has its advantages and disadvantages for research and technological development. In particular, in China, the scale of research sector is not adequate to the scale of the national economy and its growth rate; Poland has been experiencing low returns from the sphere of applied research; in Russia the bottleneck for scientific and technological development is low efficiency of the scientific work expressed in the publication activity. Overall, the study showed that the scientific and technological balance constructing method is a successful one in assessing the impact of knowledge generation and technology development on the level of productivity in the economy.

  6. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of activity coefficient and prediction of solubility: Part 1. Predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmehrabi, Mahmoud; Rohani, Sohrab; Perry, Luisa

    2006-04-01

    A new activity coefficient model was developed from excess Gibbs free energy in the form G(ex) = cA(a) x(1)(b)...x(n)(b). The constants of the proposed model were considered to be function of solute and solvent dielectric constants, Hildebrand solubility parameters and specific volumes of solute and solvent molecules. The proposed model obeys the Gibbs-Duhem condition for activity coefficient models. To generalize the model and make it as a purely predictive model without any adjustable parameters, its constants were found using the experimental activity coefficient and physical properties of 20 vapor-liquid systems. The predictive capability of the proposed model was tested by calculating the activity coefficients of 41 binary vapor-liquid equilibrium systems and showed good agreement with the experimental data in comparison with two other predictive models, the UNIFAC and Hildebrand models. The only data used for the prediction of activity coefficients, were dielectric constants, Hildebrand solubility parameters, and specific volumes of the solute and solvent molecules. Furthermore, the proposed model was used to predict the activity coefficient of an organic compound, stearic acid, whose physical properties were available in methanol and 2-butanone. The predicted activity coefficient along with the thermal properties of the stearic acid were used to calculate the solubility of stearic acid in these two solvents and resulted in a better agreement with the experimental data compared to the UNIFAC and Hildebrand predictive models.

  8. Time-driven activity based costing: a comparative study with the activity based costing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Battistella Luna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity-based costing (ABC emerged in the 1980s to meet the new necessities of cost information facing companies, the result of continuous changes in the business environment. In the 2000s, a new costing method, known as time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC was introduced in order to simplify the ABC. This paper compares these methods in order to provide information to assist managers to decide which of these methods better suits the reality of their companies. Therefore, they were analyzed based on information obtained through a systematic search in the Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases, as well as papers from the annals of the Congresso Brasileiro de Custos, Congresso de Controladoria e Contabilidade da USP and Encontro Nacional de Engenharia de Produção (considering scientific papers published between 2004 and 2016. From this analysis, in most cases it was concluded that TDABC is a simpler and more practical option than ABC. However, it was also apparent that managers, before choosing a particular method, must verify whether the conditions that enable its applicability exist.

  9. `Dem DEMs: Comparing Methods of Digital Elevation Model Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezza, C.; Phillips, C. B.; Cable, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Topographic details of Europa's surface yield implications for large-scale processes that occur on the moon, including surface strength, modification, composition, and formation mechanisms for geologic features. In addition, small scale details presented from this data are imperative for future exploration of Europa's surface, such as by a potential Europa Lander mission. A comparison of different methods of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation and variations between them can help us quantify the relative accuracy of each model and improve our understanding of Europa's surface. In this work, we used data provided by Phillips et al. (2013, AGU Fall meeting, abs. P34A-1846) and Schenk and Nimmo (2017, in prep.) to compare DEMs that were created using Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), SOCET SET, and Paul Schenk's own method. We began by locating areas of the surface with multiple overlapping DEMs, and our initial comparisons were performed near the craters Manannan, Pwyll, and Cilix. For each region, we used ArcGIS to draw profile lines across matching features to determine elevation. Some of the DEMs had vertical or skewed offsets, and thus had to be corrected. The vertical corrections were applied by adding or subtracting the global minimum of the data set to create a common zero-point. The skewed data sets were corrected by rotating the plot so that it had a global slope of zero and then subtracting for a zero-point vertical offset. Once corrections were made, we plotted the three methods on one graph for each profile of each region. Upon analysis, we found relatively good feature correlation between the three methods. The smoothness of a DEM depends on both the input set of images and the stereo processing methods used. In our comparison, the DEMs produced by SOCET SET were less smoothed than those from ASP or Schenk. Height comparisons show that ASP and Schenk's model appear similar, alternating in maximum height. SOCET SET has more topographic variability due to its

  10. Comparing Entrepreneurship Intention: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is one of the main social and economic problems that many countries face nowadays. One strategic way to overcome this problem is by fostering entrepreneurship spirit especially for unem-ployment graduates. Entrepreneurship is becoming an alternative Job for students after they graduate. This is because entrepreneurship of fers major benefits, such as setting up one’s own business and the pos sibility of having significant financial rewards than working for others. Entrepreneurship is then offered by many universities. This research applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB by incorporating attitude toward success as an antecedent variable of the attitude to examine students’ intention to become an entrepreneur. The objective of this research is to compare entrepreneurship intention between business students and non-business students. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to respondents by applying the drop-off/pick-up method. A number of 294 by questionnaires were used in the analysis. Data were analyzed by using structural equation modeling. Two out of four hypotheses were confirmed. These hypotheses are the relationship between the attitude toward becoming an entrepreneur and the intention to try becoming an entrepreneur, and the relationship perceived behavioral control and intention to try becoming an entrepreneur. This paper also provides a discussion and offers directions for future research.

  11. Comparing Entrepreneurship Intention: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is one of the main social and economic problems that many countries face nowadays. One strategic way to overcome this problem is by fostering entrepreneurship spirit especially for unem ployment graduates. Entrepreneurship is becoming an alternative Job for students after they graduate. This is because entrepreneurship of-fers major benefits, such as setting up one’s own business and the pos-sibility of having significant financial rewards than working for others. Entrepreneurship is then offered by many universities. This research applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB by incorporating attitude toward success as an antecedent variable of the attitude to examine students’ intention to become an entrepreneur. The objective of this research is to compare entrepreneurship intention between business students and non-business students. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to respondents by applying the drop-off/pick-up method. A number of 294 by questionnaires were used in the analysis. Data were analyzed by using structural equation modeling. Two out of four hypotheses were confirmed. These hypotheses are the relationship between the attitude toward becoming an entrepreneur and the intention to try becoming an entrepreneur, and the relationship perceived behavioral control and intention to try becoming an entrepreneur. This paper also provides a discussion and offers directions for future research.

  12. Comparative analysis of business rules and business process modeling languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Rima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During developing an information system is important to create clear models and choose suitable modeling languages. The article analyzes the SRML, SBVR, PRR, SWRL, OCL rules specifying language and UML, DFD, CPN, EPC and IDEF3 BPMN business process modeling language. The article presents business rules and business process modeling languages theoretical comparison. The article according to selected modeling aspects of the comparison between different business process modeling languages ​​and business rules representation languages sets. Also, it is selected the best fit of language set for three layer framework for business rule based software modeling.

  13. GEOQUIMICO : an interactive tool for comparing sorption conceptual models (surface complexation modeling versus K[D])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Within reactive geochemical transport, several conceptual models exist for simulating sorption processes in the subsurface. Historically, the K D approach has been the method of choice due to ease of implementation within a reactive transport model and straightforward comparison with experimental data. However, for modeling complex sorption phenomenon (e.g. sorption of radionuclides onto mineral surfaces), this approach does not systematically account for variations in location, time, or chemical conditions, and more sophisticated methods such as a surface complexation model (SCM) must be utilized. It is critical to determine which conceptual model to use; that is, when the material variation becomes important to regulatory decisions. The geochemical transport tool GEOQUIMICO has been developed to assist in this decision-making process. GEOQUIMICO provides a user-friendly framework for comparing the accuracy and performance of sorption conceptual models. The model currently supports the K D and SCM conceptual models. The code is written in the object-oriented Java programming language to facilitate model development and improve code portability. The basic theory underlying geochemical transport and the sorption conceptual models noted above is presented in this report. Explanations are provided of how these physicochemical processes are instrumented in GEOQUIMICO and a brief verification study comparing GEOQUIMICO results to data found in the literature is given

  14. Comparing Three-Dimensional Geophysical Models of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, K. C.; Ulberg, C. W.; Vidale, J. E.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Abers, G. A.; Crosbie, K.; Mann, M. E.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Thelen, W. A.; Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Schultz, A.; Bowles-martinez, E.; Bedrosian, P.; Peacock, J.; Hill, G.

    2017-12-01

    The iMUSH project integrates active- and passive-source seismic experiments with magnetotelluric (MT) observations and petrology to better understand the structure and dynamics of the Mount St. Helens (MSH) magmatic system from the subducted plate to the surface. The geophysical experiments included a two-year, 70-element broadband array with 10-km station spacing within 50 km of the MSH edifice, 23 shots recorded by geophones at 6000 sites including 900 Nodal stations, and 147 wideband MT stations with 6-km nominal station spacing. We have determined 3-D models of P-wave, S-wave and P/S-wave velocity as well as 3-D electrical resistivity. Our models from independent data sets and methodologies exhibit remarkable similarity. A narrow low-VP and VS anomaly as well as a high VP/VS and conductivity anomaly is well imaged by nearly all methods at about 6-15 km beneath MSH and coincides with a previously inferred magma storage volume. The St. Helens seismic zone (SHZ), which cuts through MSH with a NNW-SSE orientation, coincides with a narrow, vertical, planar zone of high electrical conductivity and low VP from the near surface to 15 km depth where we lose resolution. The continental Moho shows strong reflectivity east of the SHZ, but is weak to non-existent to the west, perhaps because this marks the eastern edge of hydrous mineral stability in the cold mantle wedge. Farther north, a similar high-conductivity feature is imaged along the west Rainer seismic zone. High Vp/Vs and high electrical conductivity extend under the Indian Heaven volcanic field at depths of 5-15 km, potentially associated with regions of partial melt and/or fluids. Mid- to lower-crustal velocities are generally fast to the west of MSH, consistent with the presence of the accreted Siletz terrane, and slow to the east suggesting both a change in composition and higher temperatures. Moderate lower-crustal resistivity is also present to the east, and is consistent with a small degree of partial melt

  15. A Comparative Energetic Analysis of Active and Passive Emission Control Systems Adopting Standard Emission Test Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Algieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at analysing and comparing the thermal performances of active and passive aftertreatment systems. A one-dimensional transient model has been developed in order to evaluate the heat exchange between the solid and the exhaust gas and to estimate the energy effectiveness of the apparatus. Furthermore, the effect of the engine operating conditions on the performances of emission control systems has been investigated considering standard emission test cycles. The analysis has demonstrated that the active flow control presents the higher thermal inertia and it appears more suitable to maintain the converter initial temperature level for a longer time after variations in engine load. Conversely, the traditional passive flow control is preferable when rapid “cooling” or “heating” of the solid phase is requested. Moreover, the investigation has highlighted the significant influence of the cycle time and converter length on the energetic performances of the aftertreatment apparatus.

  16. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 μm, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated

  17. Predicting the fate of biodiversity using species' distribution models: enhancing model comparability and repeatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genoveva Rodríguez-Castañeda

    Full Text Available Species distribution modeling (SDM is an increasingly important tool to predict the geographic distribution of species. Even though many problems associated with this method have been highlighted and solutions have been proposed, little has been done to increase comparability among studies. We reviewed recent publications applying SDMs and found that seventy nine percent failed to report methods that ensure comparability among studies, such as disclosing the maximum probability range produced by the models and reporting on the number of species occurrences used. We modeled six species of Falco from northern Europe and demonstrate that model results are altered by (1 spatial bias in species' occurrence data, (2 differences in the geographic extent of the environmental data, and (3 the effects of transformation of model output to presence/absence data when applying thresholds. Depending on the modeling decisions, forecasts of the future geographic distribution of Falco ranged from range contraction in 80% of the species to no net loss in any species, with the best model predicting no net loss of habitat in Northern Europe. The fact that predictions of range changes in response to climate change in published studies may be influenced by decisions in the modeling process seriously hampers the possibility of making sound management recommendations. Thus, each of the decisions made in generating SDMs should be reported and evaluated to ensure conclusions and policies are based on the biology and ecology of the species being modeled.

  18. A Comparative Metroscope Model for Urban Information Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J. H.; Shandas, V.; Beaudoin, F.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve global sustainability goals of climate stabilization, poverty reduction, and biodiversity preservation is to make the world's cities more efficient, equitable, and healthful. While each city must follow a unique and somewhat idiosyncratic path toward these linked goals based on its history, geography, demography, and politics, movement in this direction can accelerate if cities can learn from each other more effectively. Such learning requires the identification of common characteristics and methodologies. We have created a framework for organizing and applying urban information flows, which we refer to as "Metroscopes." Metroscopes, which are analogous to the large instruments that have advanced the physical and life sciences, integrate six elements: data collection and input; classification through the use of metrics; data storage and retrieval; analytics and modeling; decision support including visualization and scenario generation; and assessment of the effectiveness of policy choices. Standards for each of these elements can be agreed upon by relevant urban science and policy sub-communities, and then can evolve as technologies and practices advance. We are implementing and calibrating this approach using data and relationships from Portland (OR), Phoenix (AZ) and London (UK). Elements that are being integrated include the Global City Indicators Facility at University of Toronto, the J-Earth database system and Decision Theater from Arizona State University, urban mobility analyses performed by the SENSEable City Lab at MIT, and Portland's Ecodistrict approach for urban management. Individual Metroscopes can be compared directly from one city to another, or with larger assemblages of cities like those being classified by ICLEI's STAR program, the Clinton Climate Initiative's C40, and Siemens Green Cities Index. This large-scale integration of urban data sets and approaches and its systematic comparison are key steps

  19. Comparative evaluation of kinetic, equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models for biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buragohain, Buljit [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Chakma, Sankar; Kumar, Peeush [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Mahanta, Pinakeswar [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Moholkar, Vijayanand S. [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India)

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of biomass gasification has been an active area of research for past two decades. In the published literature, three approaches have been adopted for the modeling of this process, viz. thermodynamic equilibrium, semi-equilibrium and kinetic. In this paper, we have attempted to present a comparative assessment of these three types of models for predicting outcome of the gasification process in a circulating fluidized bed gasifier. Two model biomass, viz. rice husk and wood particles, have been chosen for analysis, with gasification medium being air. Although the trends in molar composition, net yield and LHV of the producer gas predicted by three models are in concurrence, significant quantitative difference is seen in the results. Due to rather slow kinetics of char gasification and tar oxidation, carbon conversion achieved in single pass of biomass through the gasifier, calculated using kinetic model, is quite low, which adversely affects the yield and LHV of the producer gas. Although equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models reveal relative insensitivity of producer gas characteristics towards temperature, the kinetic model shows significant effect of temperature on LHV of the gas at low air ratios. Kinetic models also reveal volume of the gasifier to be an insignificant parameter, as the net yield and LHV of the gas resulting from 6 m and 10 m riser is same. On a whole, the analysis presented in this paper indicates that thermodynamic models are useful tools for quantitative assessment of the gasification process, while kinetic models provide physically more realistic picture.

  20. Activity of a social dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2015-10-01

    Axelrod's model was proposed to study interactions between agents and the formation of cultural domains. It presents a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural steady state which has been studied in the literature by evaluation of the relative size of the largest cluster. In this article, we propose new measurements based on the concept of activity per agent to study the Axelrod's model on the square lattice. We show that the variance of system activity can be used to indicate the critical points of the transition. Furthermore the frequency distribution of the system activity is able to show a coexistence of phases typical of a first order phase transition. Finally, we verify a power law dependence between cluster activity and cluster size for multicultural steady state configurations at the critical point.

  1. Lithium-ion battery models: a comparative study and a model-based powerline communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saidani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, various Lithium-ion (Li-ion battery models are evaluated according to their accuracy, complexity and physical interpretability. An initial classification into physical, empirical and abstract models is introduced. Also known as white, black and grey boxes, respectively, the nature and characteristics of these model types are compared. Since the Li-ion battery cell is a thermo-electro-chemical system, the models are either in the thermal or in the electrochemical state-space. Physical models attempt to capture key features of the physical process inside the cell. Empirical models describe the system with empirical parameters offering poor analytical, whereas abstract models provide an alternative representation. In addition, a model selection guideline is proposed based on applications and design requirements. A complex model with a detailed analytical insight is of use for battery designers but impractical for real-time applications and in situ diagnosis. In automotive applications, an abstract model reproducing the battery behavior in an equivalent but more practical form, mainly as an equivalent circuit diagram, is recommended for the purpose of battery management. As a general rule, a trade-off should be reached between the high fidelity and the computational feasibility. Especially if the model is embedded in a real-time monitoring unit such as a microprocessor or a FPGA, the calculation time and memory requirements rise dramatically with a higher number of parameters. Moreover, examples of equivalent circuit models of Lithium-ion batteries are covered. Equivalent circuit topologies are introduced and compared according to the previously introduced criteria. An experimental sequence to model a 20 Ah cell is presented and the results are used for the purposes of powerline communication.

  2. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.

    2015-01-01

    . These extend several tens of kilometres downwind e.g. 70 km. Other SAR wind maps show near-field fine scale details of wake behind rows of turbines. The satellite SAR wind farm wake cases are modelled by different wind farm wake models including the PARK microscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting...... (WRF) model in high resolution and WRF with coupled microscale parametrization....

  3. A comparative analysis of pricing models for enterprise cloud platforms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, P

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available virtual enterprise (VE)-enabled cloud enterprise architecture for small medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) against EC2 pricing model to prove that our pricing model is more suitable for small medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs). This model is based...

  4. The model FT-3106 nuclide activity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianming

    1999-01-01

    The author describes the important role of the nuclide activity meter in scientific research, production, medicine and health and its general situation of development in the country. The working principle, structure and feature of the new model FT-3106 nuclide activity meter are presented through description of the measures to improve the properties and quality in research and design. Finally the situation of its popularization and application are given

  5. Comparative performance of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy: Are all models effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We performed a comparative study of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy (URS. Our objective was to determine whether high-fidelity non-virtual reality (VR models are as effective as the VR model in teaching flexible URS skills. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one trained urologists without clinical experience of flexible URS underwent dry lab simulation practice. After a warm-up period of 2 h, tasks were performed on a high-fidelity non-VR (Uro-scopic Trainer TM ; Endo-Urologie-Modell TM and a high-fidelity VR model (URO Mentor TM . The participants were divided equally into three batches with rotation on each of the three stations for 30 min. Performance of the trainees was evaluated by an expert ureteroscopist using pass rating and global rating score (GRS. The participants rated a face validity questionnaire at the end of each session. Results: The GRS improved statistically at evaluation performed after second rotation (P<0.001 for batches 1, 2 and 3. Pass ratings also improved significantly for all training models when the third and first rotations were compared (P<0.05. The batch that was trained on the VR-based model had more improvement on pass ratings on second rotation but could not achieve statistical significance. Most of the realistic domains were higher for a VR model as compared with the non-VR model, except the realism of the flexible endoscope. Conclusions: All the models used for training flexible URS were effective in increasing the GRS and pass ratings irrespective of the VR status.

  6. Towards consensus in comparative chemical characterization modeling for LCIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bachmann, Till; Huijbregts, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The Task Force on Toxic Impacts under the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative is developing recommendations on characterization models and characterization factors for human toxicity and ecotoxicity impacts in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). Building on experience from earlier model development...... unnecessary differences. Based on the adapted set of models and their outcomes, and on the earlier guidelines for fate modeling, overall guidelines for toxicity modeling in LCIA were developed. In line with these overall guidelines, a simple consensus model was developed. This model is collectively owned...... and to be the basis of the “recommended practice” for calculation of characterization factors for chemicals under authority of the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative....

  7. Comparative biochemical responses and antioxidant activities of the rabbit urinary bladder to whole grapes versus resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Johdi-Ann; Leggett, Robert E; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the antioxidant activity of a whole-grape suspension with the antioxidant activity or pure resveratrol on the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on malondialdehyde (MDA) generation, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, calcium ATPase activity, and sarcoendoplasmic reticular ATPase (SERCA) of the male rabbit urinary bladder. MDA was used as a model for the effect of H2O2 on lipid peroxidation. ChAT, SERCA, and calcium ATPase were evaluated based on their importance in urinary bladder physiology and pathology. Four male rabbit bladders were used. Each bladder was separated into muscle and mucosa, frozen under liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C for biochemical evaluation. The effect of H2O2 on the enzymes listed above was determined in the presence and absence of either resveratrol or a whole-grape suspension. (1) Resveratrol was significantly more effective than the grape suspension at protecting the bladder muscle and mucosa against peroxidation as quantitated by MDA formation. (2) The grape suspension was significantly more effective at protecting ChAT activity against oxidative stress of the muscle than resveratrol. (3) Neither the grape suspension nor resveratrol were particularly effective at protecting the bladder muscle or mucosa calcium ATPase or SERCA against oxidative stress. (4) ChAT was significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress than either calcium ATPase or SERCA. These data support the idea that the grape suspension protects the mitochondria and nerve terminals to a significantly greater degree than resveratrol which suggests that the activities of the grape suspension are due to the combination of active components found in the grape suspension and not just resveratrol alone.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Tuberculosis Granuloma Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M. Ruggiero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. It is estimated that one-third of the world’s population is infected with TB. Most have the latent stage of the disease that can later transition to active TB disease. TB is spread by aerosol droplets containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Mtb bacteria enter through the respiratory system and are attacked by the immune system in the lungs. The bacteria are clustered and contained by macrophages into cellular aggregates called granulomas. These granulomas can hold the bacteria dormant for long periods of time in latent TB. The bacteria can be perturbed from latency to active TB disease in a process called granuloma activation when the granulomas are compromised by other immune response events in a host, such as HIV, cancer, or aging. Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1 has been recently implicated in granuloma activation through experimental studies, but the mechanism is not well understood. Animal and human studies currently cannot probe the dynamics of activation, so a computational model is developed to fill this gap. This dynamic mathematical model focuses specifically on the latent to active transition after the initial immune response has successfully formed a granuloma. Bacterial leakage from latent granulomas is successfully simulated in response to the MMP-1 dynamics under several scenarios for granuloma activation.

  9. Integrating coalescent and ecological niche modeling in comparative phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Bryan C; Richards, Corinne L

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to the formation of population genetic structure is a central goal of phylogeographic research, but achieving this goal can be complicated by the stochastic variance inherent to genetic processes. Statistical approaches to testing phylogeographic hypotheses accommodate this stochasticity by evaluating competing models of putative historical population structure, often by simulating null distributions of the expected variance. The effectiveness of these tests depends on the biological realism of the models. Information from the fossil record can aid in reconstructing the historical distributions of some taxa. However, for the majority of taxa, which lack sufficient fossils, paleodistributional modeling can provide valuable spatial-geographic data concerning ancestral distributions. Paleodistributional models are generated by projecting ecological niche models, which predict the current distribution of each species, onto a model of past climatic conditions. Here, we generate paleodistributional models describing the suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum for lineages from the mesic forests of the Pacific Northwest of North America, and use these models to generate alternative phylogeographic hypotheses. Coalescent simulations are then used to test these hypotheses to improve our understanding of the historical events that promoted the formation of population genetic structure in this ecosystem. Results from Pacific Northwest mesic forest organisms demonstrate the utility of these combined approaches. Paleodistribution models and population genetic structure are congruent across three amphibian lineages, suggesting that they have responded in a concerted manner to environmental change. Two other species, a willow and a water vole, despite being currently codistributed and having similar population genetic structure, were predicted by the paleodistributional model to have had markedly different distributions during

  10. Mathematical model comparing of the multi-level economics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykalov, S. M.; Kryanev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The mathematical model (scheme) of a multi-level comparison of the economic system, characterized by the system of indices, is worked out. In the mathematical model of the multi-level comparison of the economic systems, the indicators of peer review and forecasting of the economic system under consideration can be used. The model can take into account the uncertainty in the estimated values of the parameters or expert estimations. The model uses the multi-criteria approach based on the Pareto solutions.

  11. IAEA inspection activities in the model country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madueme, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the activities undertaken by IAEA inspectors at the model research reactor and research laboratories is given. The basic philosophy behind nuclear material stratification and the concepts of Material Balance Areas and Key Measurement Points are explained. Diversion routes and plausible diversion scenarios are analysed. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs., poster presentations included

  12. Modeling of activity landscapes for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Activity landscapes (ALs) are graphical representations that integrate compound structure and potency relationships. These computer-generated models enable the interactive large-scale analysis of structure-activity relationships (SARs) and complement traditional approaches to study SARs of individual compound series in a qualitative or quantitative manner. A variety of AL designs have been reported. The concept of activity landscapes is introduced and different methodologies to represent 2D or 3D AL representations of large compound data sets are described on the basis of original literature references. Several AL variants and extensions have been generated for special applications in medicinal chemistry. These include, for example, AL views of evolving data sets with constant topology, selectivity landscapes and multi-target ALs, or molecular mechanism and multi-property maps. Furthermore, the applicability domain of the AL concept is discussed including specific requirements for practical utility in medicinal chemistry opportunities for further developments. AL modeling has substantially extended conventional ways to study SARs. The AL concept is inseparable from the notion of activity cliffs that are of high interest in SAR analysis. AL design is an area of active research at the interface between chemoinformatics and medicinal chemistry with potential for further growth. Special emphasis must be put on increasing the usability of AL models for practicing medicinal chemists.

  13. comparative analysis of two mathematical models for prediction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A mathematical modeling for prediction of compressive strength of sandcrete blocks was performed using statistical analysis for the sandcrete block data ob- tained from experimental work done in this study. The models used are Scheffes and Osadebes optimization theories to predict the compressive strength of ...

  14. Comparative homology modeling of human rhodopsin with several ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molecular structure of rhodopsin has been studied by cryo-electron microscopic, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and X-ray crystallographic techniques in bovine. A humble effort has been ... Key words: Homology modeling, human rhodopsin, bovine templates, sequence alignment, model building, energy profiles.

  15. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    global gravity model and the DTM2006.0 global topographic/bathymetric model are used to generate the isostatic gravity anomalies. The comparison of numerical results reveals that the optimal isostatic inverse scheme should take into consideration both the variable depth and density of compensation. This is achieved by ...

  16. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  17. A comparative study of click models for web search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotov, A.; Chuklin, A.; Markov, I.; Stout, L.; Xumara, F.; de Rijke, M.; Mothe, J.; Savoy, J.; Kamps, J.; Pinel-Sauvagnat, K.; Jones, G.J.F.; SanJuan, E.; Cappellato, L.; Ferro, N.

    2015-01-01

    Click models have become an essential tool for understanding user behavior on a search engine result page, running simulated experiments and predicting relevance. Dozens of click models have been proposed, all aiming to tackle problems stemming from the complexity of user behavior or of contemporary

  18. Criteria for comparing economic impact models of tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, J.; Heijman, W.J.M.; Korteweg Maris, D.; Bryon, J.

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial differences between models of the economic impacts of tourism. Not only do the nature and precision of results vary, but data demands, complexity and underlying assumptions also differ. Often, it is not clear whether the models chosen are appropriate for the specific situation

  19. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further, for both speaker identification and verification tasks the explicit modelling provides relatively more complimentary information to the state-of-the-art vocal tract features. The contribution of the explicit features is relatively more robust against noise. We suggest that the explicit approach can be used to model the ...

  20. Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Strömgren photometry to measure reliable parameter-sensitive colours and estimate precise model ages and metallicities. The assessment of. Rakos/Schulz ... Overall, the assessment finds modified Strömgren photometry ... The history of stellar population modelling dates back to the attempts by Crampin.

  1. Comparative study of Moore and Mealy machine models adaptation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communications Technology has influenced the need for automated machines that can carry out important production procedures and, automata models are among the computational models used in design and construction of industrial processes. The production process of the popular African Black Soap ...

  2. comparative study of moore and mealy machine models adaptation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Information and Communications Technology has influenced the need for automated machines that can carry out important production procedures and, automata models are among the computational models used in design and construction of industrial processes. The production process of the popular African Black Soap ...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Two Mathematical Models for Prediction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical modeling for prediction of compressive strength of sandcrete blocks was performed using statistical analysis for the sandcrete block data obtained from experimental work done in this study. The models used are Scheffe's and Osadebe's optimization theories to predict the compressive strength of sandcrete ...

  4. Comparative Analysis of Biopsy Upgrading in Four Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Lin, Daniel W; Newcomb, Lisa F; Leonardson, Amy S; Ankerst, Donna; Gulati, Roman; Carter, H Ballentine; Trock, Bruce J; Carroll, Peter R; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Cowan, Janet E; Klotz, Laurence H; Mamedov, Alexandre; Penson, David F; Etzioni, Ruth

    2018-01-02

    Active surveillance (AS) is increasingly accepted for managing low-risk prostate cancer, yet there is no consensus about implementation. This lack of consensus is due in part to uncertainty about risks for disease progression, which have not been systematically compared or integrated across AS studies with variable surveillance protocols and dropout to active treatment. To compare risks for upgrading from a Gleason score (GS) of 6 or less to 7 or more across AS studies after accounting for differences in surveillance intervals and competing treatments and to evaluate tradeoffs of more versus less frequent biopsies. Joint statistical model of longitudinal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and risks for biopsy upgrading. Johns Hopkins University (JHU); Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study (PASS); University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); and University of Toronto (UT) AS studies. 2576 men aged 40 to 80 years with a GS between 2 and 6 and clinical stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer enrolled between 1995 and 2014. PSA levels and biopsy GSs. After variable surveillance intervals and competing treatments were accounted for, estimated risks for biopsy upgrading were similar in the PASS and UT studies but higher in UCSF and lower in JHU studies. All cohorts had a delay of 3 to 5 months in detecting upgrading with biennial biopsies starting after a first confirmatory biopsy versus annual biopsies. The model does not account for possible misclassification of biopsy GS. Men in different AS studies have different risks for biopsy upgrading after variable surveillance protocols and competing treatments are accounted for. Despite these differences, the consequences of more versus less frequent biopsies seem to be similar across cohorts. Biennial biopsies seem to be an acceptable alternative to annual biopsies. National Cancer Institute.

  5. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  6. ON SKEW-NORMAL MODEL FOR ECONOMICALLY ACTIVE POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLOSUNDE AKINLOLU A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature related to skew-symmetric distribution have grown rapidly in recent years but at the moment no publication on its applications concerning the description of economically active data with this type of probability models. In this paper, we provided an extension to this skew-normal distribution, which is also part of the family of skewed class of normal but with additional shape parameters δ. Some properties of this distribution are presented and finally, we considered fitting it to economically active population data. The model exhibited a better behaviour when compared to normal and skew normal distributions.

  7. Computational Models for Analysis of Illicit Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat

    to describe the phenomenon of contagious public outrage, which eventually leads to the spread of violence following a disclosure of some unpopular political decisions and/or activity. The results shed a new light on terror activity and provide some hint on how to curb the spreading of violence within...... result in a fully evolved network. This method of network evolution can help intelligence security analysts to understand the structure of the network. For suspicious emails detection and email author identification, a cluster-based text classification model has been proposed. The model outperformed...... traditional models for both of the tasks. Apart from these globally organized crimes and cybercrimes, there happen specific world issues which affect geographic locations and take the form of bursts of public violence. These kinds of issues have received little attention by the academicians. These issues have...

  8. Patterns of Activity in A Global Model of A Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Viall, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of frequencies. What differs is the average frequency of the distributions. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes with a magnetic field extrapolation to create a model active region and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is not to reproduce a particular set of observations in detail, but to recover some typical properties and patterns observed in active regions. Our key findings are the following. (1) Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. (2) Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. (3) All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line of sight passes through coronal loop footpoints. (4) There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a timescale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies are operating across active regions. (5) Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  9. Microscopic modelling circadian and bursty pattern of human activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Kim

    Full Text Available Recent studies for a wide range of human activities such as email communication, Web browsing, and library visiting, have revealed the bursty nature of human activities. The distribution of inter-event times (IETs between two consecutive human activities exhibits a heavy-tailed decay behavior and the oscillating pattern with a one-day period, reflective of the circadian pattern of human life. Even though a priority-based queueing model was successful as a basic model for understanding the heavy-tailed behavior, it ignored important ingredients, such as the diversity of individual activities and the circadian pattern of human life. Here, we collect a large scale of dataset which contains individuals' time stamps when articles are posted on blog posts, and based on which we construct a theoretical model which can take into account of both ignored ingredients. Once we identify active and inactive time intervals of individuals and remove the inactive time interval, thereby constructing an ad hoc continuous time domain. Therein, the priority-based queueing model is applied by adjusting the arrival and the execution rates of tasks by comparing them with the activity data of individuals. Then, the obtained results are transferred back to the real-time domain, which produces the oscillating and heavy-tailed IET distribution. This microscopic model enables us to develop theoretical understanding towards more empirical results.

  10. Microscopic modelling circadian and bursty pattern of human activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhong; Lee, Deokjae; Kahng, Byungnam

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies for a wide range of human activities such as email communication, Web browsing, and library visiting, have revealed the bursty nature of human activities. The distribution of inter-event times (IETs) between two consecutive human activities exhibits a heavy-tailed decay behavior and the oscillating pattern with a one-day period, reflective of the circadian pattern of human life. Even though a priority-based queueing model was successful as a basic model for understanding the heavy-tailed behavior, it ignored important ingredients, such as the diversity of individual activities and the circadian pattern of human life. Here, we collect a large scale of dataset which contains individuals' time stamps when articles are posted on blog posts, and based on which we construct a theoretical model which can take into account of both ignored ingredients. Once we identify active and inactive time intervals of individuals and remove the inactive time interval, thereby constructing an ad hoc continuous time domain. Therein, the priority-based queueing model is applied by adjusting the arrival and the execution rates of tasks by comparing them with the activity data of individuals. Then, the obtained results are transferred back to the real-time domain, which produces the oscillating and heavy-tailed IET distribution. This microscopic model enables us to develop theoretical understanding towards more empirical results.

  11. Mathematical model of radon activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Zambianchi, Pedro, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Present work describes a mathematical model that quantifies the time dependent amount of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn altogether and their activities within an ionization chamber as, for example, AlphaGUARD, which is used to measure activity concentration of Rn in soil gas. The differential equations take into account tree main processes, namely: the injection of Rn into the cavity of detector by the air pump including the effect of the traveling time Rn takes to reach the chamber; Rn release by the air exiting the chamber; and radioactive decay of Rn within the chamber. Developed code quantifies the activity of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn isotopes separately. Following the standard methodology to measure Rn activity in soil gas, the air pump usually is turned off over a period of time in order to avoid the influx of Rn into the chamber. Since {sup 220}Rn has a short half-life time, approximately 56s, the model shows that after 7 minutes the activity concentration of this isotope is null. Consequently, the measured activity refers to {sup 222}Rn, only. Furthermore, the model also addresses the activity of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny, which being metals represent potential risk of ionization chamber contamination that could increase the background of further measurements. Some preliminary comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations is presented. Obtained transient and steady-state solutions could be used for planning of Rn in soil gas measurements as well as for accuracy assessment of obtained results together with efficiency evaluation of chosen measurements procedure. (author)

  12. Comparative study of stability in different TCP/RED models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, J.H.C.; Iu, H.H.C.; Ling, S.H.; Lam, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the stability issue of the average queue length of a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) model when interacting with Random Early Detection (RED). The model used for the study has shown period doubling bifurcation (PDB) and border collision bifurcation (BCB) in the average queue size at certain values of parameters when original RED is deployed. In this paper, we adopt a gentle version of RED and a newly derived RED algorithm into the model to study the improvement in stability of average queue size of the system

  13. Comparing artificial neural networks, general linear models and support vector machines in building predictive models for small interfering RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A McQuisten

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs induce a gene knockdown effect in cells by interacting with naturally occurring RNA processing machinery. However not all siRNAs induce this effect equally. Several heterogeneous kinds of machine learning techniques and feature sets have been applied to modeling siRNAs and their abilities to induce knockdown. There is some growing agreement to which techniques produce maximally predictive models and yet there is little consensus for methods to compare among predictive models. Also, there are few comparative studies that address what the effect of choosing learning technique, feature set or cross validation approach has on finding and discriminating among predictive models.Three learning techniques were used to develop predictive models for effective siRNA sequences including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, General Linear Models (GLMs and Support Vector Machines (SVMs. Five feature mapping methods were also used to generate models of siRNA activities. The 2 factors of learning technique and feature mapping were evaluated by complete 3x5 factorial ANOVA. Overall, both learning techniques and feature mapping contributed significantly to the observed variance in predictive models, but to differing degrees for precision and accuracy as well as across different kinds and levels of model cross-validation.The methods presented here provide a robust statistical framework to compare among models developed under distinct learning techniques and feature sets for siRNAs. Further comparisons among current or future modeling approaches should apply these or other suitable statistically equivalent methods to critically evaluate the performance of proposed models. ANN and GLM techniques tend to be more sensitive to the inclusion of noisy features, but the SVM technique is more robust under large numbers of features for measures of model precision and accuracy. Features found to result in maximally predictive models are

  14. Comparative flood damage model assessment: towards a European approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, B.; Kreibich, H.; Apel, H.; Barredo, J. I.; Bates, P. D.; Feyen, L.; Gericke, A.; Neal, J.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Ward, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    There is a wide variety of flood damage models in use internationally, differing substantially in their approaches and economic estimates. Since these models are being used more and more as a basis for investment and planning decisions on an increasingly large scale, there is a need to reduce the uncertainties involved and develop a harmonised European approach, in particular with respect to the EU Flood Risks Directive. In this paper we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of seven flood damage models, using two case studies of past flood events in Germany and the United Kingdom. The qualitative analysis shows that modelling approaches vary strongly, and that current methodologies for estimating infrastructural damage are not as well developed as methodologies for the estimation of damage to buildings. The quantitative results show that the model outcomes are very sensitive to uncertainty in both vulnerability (i.e. depth-damage functions) and exposure (i.e. asset values), whereby the first has a larger effect than the latter. We conclude that care needs to be taken when using aggregated land use data for flood risk assessment, and that it is essential to adjust asset values to the regional economic situation and property characteristics. We call for the development of a flexible but consistent European framework that applies best practice from existing models while providing room for including necessary regional adjustments.

  15. A Comparative Study of Three Methodologies for Modeling Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, L.; Rhee, M.; Tung, C.; ZibiBailly, J.; LeBalleur, J. C.; Blaise, D.; Rouzaud, O.

    2002-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been an increased reliance on the use of computational fluid dynamics methods for modeling rotors in high speed forward flight. Computational methods are being developed for modeling the shock induced loads on the advancing side, first-principles based modeling of the trailing wake evolution, and for retreating blade stall. The retreating blade dynamic stall problem has received particular attention, because the large variations in lift and pitching moments encountered in dynamic stall can lead to blade vibrations and pitch link fatigue. Restricting to aerodynamics, the numerical prediction of dynamic stall is still a complex and challenging CFD problem, that, even in two dimensions at low speed, gathers the major difficulties of aerodynamics, such as the grid resolution requirements for the viscous phenomena at leading-edge bubbles or in mixing-layers, the bias of the numerical viscosity, and the major difficulties of the physical modeling, such as the turbulence models, the transition models, whose both determinant influences, already present in static maximal-lift or stall computations, are emphasized by the dynamic aspect of the phenomena.

  16. PROJECT ACTIVITY ANALYSIS WITHOUT THE NETWORK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Munapo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This paper presents a new procedure for analysing and managing activity sequences in projects. The new procedure determines critical activities, critical path, start times, free floats, crash limits, and other useful information without the use of the network model. Even though network models have been successfully used in project management so far, there are weaknesses associated with the use. A network is not easy to generate, and dummies that are usually associated with it make the network diagram complex – and dummy activities have no meaning in the original project management problem. The network model for projects can be avoided while still obtaining all the useful information that is required for project management. What are required are the activities, their accurate durations, and their predecessors.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die navorsing beskryf ’n nuwerwetse metode vir die ontleding en bestuur van die sekwensiële aktiwiteite van projekte. Die voorgestelde metode bepaal kritiese aktiwiteite, die kritieke pad, aanvangstye, speling, verhasing, en ander groothede sonder die gebruik van ’n netwerkmodel. Die metode funksioneer bevredigend in die praktyk, en omseil die administratiewe rompslomp van die tradisionele netwerkmodelle.

  17. Comparative Analysis Of Three Largest World Models Of Business Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Samardžija

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Business excellence has become the strongest means of achieving competitive advantage of companies while total management of quality has become the road that ensures support of excellent results recognized by many world companies. Despite many differences, we can conclude that models have many common elements. By the audit in 2005, the DP and MBNQA moved the focus from excellence of product, i.e service, onto the excellence of quality of the entire organization process. Thus, the quality got strategic dimension instead of technical one and the accent passed from the technical quality on the total excellence of all organization processes. The joint movement goes to the direction of good management and appreciation of systems thinking. The very structure of EFOM model criteria itself is adjusted to strategic dimension of quality and that is why the model underwent only short audits within the criteria themselves. Essentially, the model remained unchanged. In all models, the accent is on the satisfaction of buyers, employees and community. National rewards for quality have an important role in promotion and giving a prize to excellence in organization performances. Moreover, they raise quality standards of companies and the country profile as a whole. Considering the GDP per capita and the percentage of certification level of companies, Croatia has all the predispositions for introduction the EFQM model of business excellence with the basic aim of deficit decrease in foreign trade balance and strengthening of competitiveness as the necessary preliminary work for the entrance in the competitive market of the EU. Quality management was introduced in many organizations. The methods used at that time developed in the course of years, and what are to predict is the continuation of the evolution road model as well as the method of business excellence.

  18. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF COMMERCIAL AND SEWAGE SLUDGE BASED ACTIVATED CARBONS FOR THE REMOVAL OF TEXTILE DYES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sreedhar Reddy, B. Kotaiah

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dyes from aqueous solutions on to sludge-based activated carbon have been studied and compared with commercial activated carbon. Adsorption parameters for the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were determined and the effects of effluent pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial dye concentration were studied. A pseudo-second order kinetic model has been proposed to correlate the experimental data.

  19. Application of Mathematical Modeling Activities in Costarican High School Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Porras-Lizano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experience gained in implementing mathematical modeling activities as a methodological strategy in teaching issues such as proportions, with a group of eighth year of an academic-day-school, located in the province of San Jose, Costa Rica in 2012. Different techniques for gathering information were applied, such as participant observation and questionnaires. Among the relevant results are the cyclical development of mathematical thinking of students in the stages of mathematical modeling (description, manipulation, prediction and validation for solving the problem; developing of teamwork skills; and appreciation of mathematics as a useful and effective discipline. To resolve the activities proposed in this study, social interactions such as sharing information, thoughts and ideas, were generated, stimulating the zone of proximal development of the participating students. Likewise, the mathematical modeling activities allowed students to have a positive role in mathematics classes, stimulating, in turn, a different attitude compared to regular classes.

  20. River suspended sediment modelling using the CART model: A comparative study of machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubin, Bahram; Darabi, Hamid; Rahmati, Omid; Sajedi-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2018-02-15

    Suspended sediment load (SSL) modelling is an important issue in integrated environmental and water resources management, as sediment affects water quality and aquatic habitats. Although classification and regression tree (CART) algorithms have been applied successfully to ecological and geomorphological modelling, their applicability to SSL estimation in rivers has not yet been investigated. In this study, we evaluated use of a CART model to estimate SSL based on hydro-meteorological data. We also compared the accuracy of the CART model with that of the four most commonly used models for time series modelling of SSL, i.e. adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network and two kernels of support vector machines (RBF-SVM and P-SVM). The models were calibrated using river discharge, stage, rainfall and monthly SSL data for the Kareh-Sang River gauging station in the Haraz watershed in northern Iran, where sediment transport is a considerable issue. In addition, different combinations of input data with various time lags were explored to estimate SSL. The best input combination was identified through trial and error, percent bias (PBIAS), Taylor diagrams and violin plots for each model. For evaluating the capability of the models, different statistics such as Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), Kling-Gupta efficiency (KGE) and percent bias (PBIAS) were used. The results showed that the CART model performed best in predicting SSL (NSE=0.77, KGE=0.8, PBIAS<±15), followed by RBF-SVM (NSE=0.68, KGE=0.72, PBIAS<±15). Thus the CART model can be a helpful tool in basins where hydro-meteorological data are readily available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. comparative analysis of some existing kinetic models with proposed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IGNATIUS NWIDI

    combination of active and passive mechanisms, starting with the diffusion of the metal ion to the surface of ... filters and air-lift reactors, have been proposed and investigated for their industrial practicality [9, 10]. Most of ... treatment units have sieves (in this case, whatman filter paper) to limit the quantity of biosorbents that.

  2. Comparative evaluation of adsorption kinetics of diclofenac and isoproturon by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Escudero, Gabriel O; Martín, José María G; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption mechanism of diclofenac and isoproturon onto activated carbon has been proposed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption capacity and optimum adsorption isotherms were predicted by nonlinear regression method. Different kinetic equations, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion model and Bangham kinetic model, were applied to study the adsorption kinetics of emerging contaminants on activated carbon in two aqueous matrices.

  3. Microbial comparative pan-genomics using binomial mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Snipen, L; Almøy, T

    2009-01-01

    The size of the core- and pan-genome of bacterial species is a topic of increasing interest due to the growing number of sequenced prokaryote genomes, many from the same species. Attempts to estimate these quantities have been made, using regression methods or mixture models. We extend the latter...... occurring genes in the population. CONCLUSION: Analyzing pan-genomics data with binomial mixture models is a way to handle dependencies between genomes, which we find is always present. A bottleneck in the estimation procedure is the annotation of rarely occurring genes....

  4. Energy modeling and comparative assessment beyond the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.-H.; Langlois, L.; McDonald, A.; Jalal, I.

    2004-01-01

    Market participants engage in constant comparative assessment of prices, available supplies, consumer options. Such implicit comparative assessment is a sine qua non for decision making in, and the smooth function of, competitive markets, but it is not always sufficient for policy makers who make decisions based on priorities other than or in addition to market prices. Supplementary mechanisms are needed to make explicit, to expose for consideration and to incorporate into their decision making processes, broader factors that are not necessarily reflected directly in the market price of a good or service. These would include, for example, employment, environment, national security or trade considerations. They would include long-term considerations, e.g., global warming or greatly diminished future supplies of oil and gas. This paper explores different applications of comparative assessment beyond the market, reviews different approaches for accomplishing such evaluations, and presents some tools available for conducting various types of extra-market comparative assessment, including those currently in use by Member States of the IAEA.(author)

  5. Object tracking using active appearance models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2001-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that (near) real-time object tracking can be accomplished by the deformable template model; the Active Appearance Model (AAM) using only low-cost consumer electronics such as a PC and a web-camera. Successful object tracking of perspective, rotational and translational...... transformations was carried out using a training set of five images. The tracker was automatically initialised by a described multi-scale initialisation method and achieved a performance in the range of 7-10 frames per second....

  6. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE ACTIVITY OF ALANIN-AMINOTRANSFERASE IN HYPOPHTHALMICHTHYS MOLITRIX AND ARISTICHTHYS NOBILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vasile

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper represents a comparative study on the activity of one aminotransferase - alaninaminotransferase, in the digestive tube of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (silver carp and Aristichthys nobilis (bighead carp. The enzymatic activity has been determined colorimetrically, with 2, 4 - dinitrophenyl hydrazine, the results obtained being expressed as UE / g / min. It was observed that, comparatively with the alanin-aminotransferase activity recorded in silver carp, in the case of bighead carp, the values recorded are much lower.

  7. A comparative study of the active force control schemes applied to robot arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa Mailah; Hewit, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of three different types of active force control (AFC) schemes applied to a robotic arm is described. The study particularly focuses on the techniques to compute the estimated inertia matrix (ΙΝ) of a robotic manipulator necessary for the execution of the AFC strategy since the computation of (ΙΝ) is the common central theme to all AFC-based schemes. The first of the three AFC schemes is based on the conventional method of obtaining (ΙΝ), the second uses artificial neural network while the third incorporates an iterative learning algorithm. The study also discusses the characteristics of the (ΙΝ) curves obtained, the trajectory track performance of the schemes and the effects of the modelled disturbances. The robustness of all the AFC schemes are also ascertained in the study. (Author)

  8. Comparative Study between Two Schemes of Active-Control-Based Mechatronic Inerter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Lingduo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on force-current analogy and velocity-voltage analogy in the theory of electromechanical analogy, the inerter is a device that corresponded to the capacitor completely where conquers the nature restriction of mass, what’s more, it is significant to improve the ratio of the inerter’s inertance to its mass for mechanical networks synthesis. And according to the principle of active-control-based mechatronic inerter, we present two implementation schemes. One was based on linear motor, and the other was based on the ball screw and rotary motor. We introduced the implementation methods and established theoretical model of the two schemes, then compared the ratio of the inerter’s inertance to its mass for the two schemes. Finally, we consider the scheme is better which was based on the ball screw and rotary motor.

  9. Comparing observed and modelled growth of larval herring (Clupea harengusz: Testing individual-based model parameterisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Hauss

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that directly test larval fish individual-based model (IBM growth predictions are uncommon since it is difficult to simultaneously measure all relevant metabolic and behavioural attributes. We compared observed and modelled somatic growth of larval herring (Clupea harengus in short-term (50 degree-day laboratory trials conducted at 7 and 13°C in which larvae were either unfed or fed ad libitum on different prey sizes (~100 to 550 µm copepods, Acartia tonsa. The larval specific growth rate (SGR, % DW d-1 was generally overestimated by the model, especially for larvae foraging on large prey items. Model parameterisations were adjusted to explore the effect of 1 temporal variability in foraging of individuals, and 2 reduced assimilation efficiency due to rapid gut evacuation at high feeding rates. With these adjustments, the model described larval growth well across temperatures, prey sizes, and larval sizes. Although the experiments performed verified the growth model, variability in growth and foraging behaviour among larvae shows that it is necessary to measure both the physiology and feeding behaviour of the same individual. This is a challenge for experimentalists but will ultimately yield the most valuable data to adequately model environmental impacts on the survival and growth of marine fish early life stages.

  10. Comparing the performance of species distribution models of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valle , M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; de Jong, D.J.; Bouma, T.; Schipper, A.M.; Chust, G.; Benito, B.M.; Garmendia, J.M.; Borja, A.

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal seagrasses show high variability in their extent and location, with local extinctions and (re-)colonizations being inherent in their population dynamics. Suitable habitats are identified usually using Species Distribution Models (SDM), based upon the overall distribution of the species;

  11. Modeling blood pressure: Comparative study of seemingly unrelated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most authors have focused on Systolic Blood Pressure(SBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure(DBP) separately. The effect of some identified risk factors on SBP and DBP can be estimated separately since they are affected by different factors.This study is aimed at developing a model that can appropriately capture the ...

  12. A Mathematical Model for the Comparative Study of the Blast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a mathematical model of the study of the blast response of aluminium and steel panels. These panels are deemed sufficient to provided protective barrier against explosions, especially from terrorists. With the maximum deflection being the damage criteria used, the behaviour of both panel is studied.

  13. Comparing State SAT Scores Using a Mixture Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungKoung Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Presented at the national conference for AERA (American Educational Research Association) in April 2009. The large variability of SAT taker population across states makes state-by-state comparisons of the SAT scores challenging. Using a mixture modeling approach, therefore, the current study presents a method of identifying subpopulations in terms…

  14. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion to the state-of-the-art vocal tract features. The contribution of the explicit features is relatively more robust against noise. We suggest that the explicit approach can be used to model the subsegmental excitation information for speaker recognition. Keywords. Speaker-specific excitation source information; subsegmental; ...

  15. comparative analysis of path loss prediction models for urban

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Obota, O. Simeonb, J. Afolayanc. Department of Electrical/Electronics & Computer Engineering, University of Uyo, Akwa. Ibom State .... assignments, proper determination of electric field strength, interference analysis, handover .... model based on extensive drive test measure- ments made in Japan at several frequencies.

  16. Classifying and comparing spatial models of fire dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Robert E. Keane; Mike D. Flannigan

    2007-01-01

    Wildland fire is a significant disturbance in many ecosystems worldwide and the interaction of fire with climate and vegetation over long time spans has major effects on vegetation dynamics, ecosystem carbon budgets, and patterns of biodiversity. Landscape-Fire-Succession Models (LFSMs) that simulate the linked processes of fire and vegetation development in a spatial...

  17. Locating Pleistocene Refugia: Comparing Phylogeographic and Ecological Niche Model Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    how well ‘back- casting ’ of ecological niche models can complement phylogeo- graphic approaches in identifying refugia. A clear advantage of the ENM...records: a test case using cryptic geckos in Madagascar. Journal of Biogeography 34: 102–117. 47. Araújo MB, Whittaker RJ, Ladle RJ, Erhard M (2005

  18. Nature of Science and Models: Comparing Portuguese Prospective Teachers' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joana; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite the relevance of nature of science and scientific models in science education, studies reveal that students do not possess adequate views regarding these topics. Bearing in mind that both teachers' views and knowledge strongly influence students' educational experiences, the main scope of this study was to evaluate Portuguese prospective…

  19. A comparative study of independent particle model based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find that among these three independent particle model based methods, the ss-VSCF method provides most accurate results in the thermal averages followed by t-SCF and the v-VSCF is the least accurate. However, the ss-VSCF is found to be computationally very expensive for the large molecules. The t-SCF gives ...

  20. Landfill leachate characterization for simulation of biological treatment with Activated Sludge Model No. 1 and Activated Sludge Model No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleguillos, Marcelo; Vasel, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Landfill leachates can be characterized correctly in terms of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) and Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) variables. The wastewater characterization of leachate from a Luxembourg landfill was based on a physical-chemical method combined with a BOD analysis for the COD fractions and on standard analysis for forms of nitrogen. The results show important differences compared with municipal wastewater. High amounts of organic matter with low biodegradability were found, as well as a high concentration of ammonium nitrogen. Based on average values, a generic ASM characterization is proposed for landfill leachates. It can be directly employed in the early stages of the simulation of landfill leachate treatment with activated sludge models.

  1. By our bootstraps: Comparing methods for measuring auditory 40 Hz steady-state neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J Christopher; Fisk, Charles L; Chen, Yu-Han; Stone-Howell, Breannan; Hunter, Michael A; Huang, Mingxiong; Bustillo, Juan R; Cañive, José M; Miller, Gregory A

    2017-08-01

    Although the 40 Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) is of clinical interest, the construct validity of EEG and MEG measures of 40 Hz ASSR cortical microcircuits is unclear. This study evaluated several MEG and EEG metrics by leveraging findings of (a) an association between the 40 Hz ASSR and age in the left but not right hemisphere, and (b) right- > left-hemisphere differences in the strength of the 40 Hz ASSR. The contention is that, if an analysis method does not demonstrate a left 40 Hz ASSR and age relationship or hemisphere differences, then the obtained measures likely have low validity. Fifty-three adults were presented 500 Hz stimuli modulated at 40 Hz while MEG and EEG were collected. ASSR activity was examined as a function of phase similarity (intertrial coherence) and percent change from baseline (total power). A variety of head models (spherical and realistic) and a variety of dipole source modeling strategies (dipole source localization and dipoles fixed to Heschl's gyri) were compared. Several sensor analysis strategies were also tested. EEG sensor measures failed to detect left 40 Hz ASSR and age associations or hemisphere differences. A comparison of MEG and EEG head-source models showed similarity in the 40 Hz ASSR measures and in estimating age and left 40 Hz ASSR associations, indicating good construct validity across models. Given a goal of measuring the 40 Hz ASSR cortical microcircuits, a source-modeling approach was shown to be superior in measuring this construct versus methods that rely on EEG sensor measures. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  2. Comparative study of various models of experimental hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S; Hirayama, A; Yamasaki, S; Shirataki, K; Fujiwara, K

    1975-01-01

    The authors present morphological findings in the brains of rabbits, dogs, cats, rats, and mice that have been used as experimental hydrocephalic models. The methods used were as follows: (1) silicone oil injection into the cisterna magna and the neighboring basal cisterns in rabbits by the method of Wisniewski; (2) kaolin administration into the cisterna magna in rabbits and dogs (Dixon); (3) ballooning method with Foley's catheter into the 4th ventricle in rabbits (Milho-rat); (4) plug formation with small pieces of laminalia into the cisterna magna in rabbits by our method; (5) Hy-3 hereditary hydrocephalic mouse bred by Gruenberg; (6) ligation of the placental vessels of the pregnant rat at 13 days of gestation by our method, and (7) transplacental intraperitoneal administration of ethylnitrosourea in a pregnant rat at 9.5 days of gestation. The models with silicone oil, kaolin, laminalia, and ballooning methods produced obstructive hydrocephalus with various grades of ventricular dilatation. The models with the ethylnitrosourea-induced method, ligation of placental vessels, and Hy-3 mouse produced prenatal hydrocephalus. Dilatation of the ventricular system and histological abnormalities do not occur as a uniform process.

  3. Achieving interoperability for metadata registries using comparative object modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Ju Han

    2010-01-01

    Achieving data interoperability between organizations relies upon agreed meaning and representation (metadata) of data. For managing and registering metadata, many organizations have built metadata registries (MDRs) in various domains based on international standard for MDR framework, ISO/IEC 11179. Following this trend, two pubic MDRs in biomedical domain have been created, United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and cancer Data Standards Registry and Repository (caDSR), from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and National Cancer Institute (NCI), respectively. Most MDRs are implemented with indiscriminate extending for satisfying organization-specific needs and solving semantic and structural limitation of ISO/IEC 11179. As a result it is difficult to address interoperability among multiple MDRs. In this paper, we propose an integrated metadata object model for achieving interoperability among multiple MDRs. To evaluate this model, we developed an XML Schema Definition (XSD)-based metadata exchange format. We created an XSD-based metadata exporter, supporting both the integrated metadata object model and organization-specific MDR formats.

  4. Maternal inflammation during late pregnancy is lower in physically active compared with inactive obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinius, Rachel A; Cahill, Alison G; Strand, Eric A; Cade, W Todd

    2016-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare maternal plasma inflammation between physically active and inactive obese women during late pregnancy. The secondary purpose was to examine the relationships between maternal plasma inflammation and lipid metabolism and maternal and neonatal metabolic health in these women. A cross-sectional, observational study design was performed in 16 obese-inactive (OBI; means ± SD; age, 25.0 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), 36.3 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); body fat percentage in late gestation, 37.7% ± 3.5%) and 16 obese-active (OBA; age, 28.9 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy BMI, 34.0 ± 3.7 kg/m(2); body fat in late gestation, 36.6% ± 3.8%) women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal plasma inflammation (C -reactive protein (CRP)) and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance) were measured at rest. Plasma lipid concentration and metabolism (lipid oxidation and lipolysis) were measured at rest, during a 30-min bout of low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) exercise, and during a resting recovery period using indirect calorimetry. Umbilical cord blood was collected for measurement of neonatal plasma insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid concentration. Neonatal body composition was measured via air displacement plethysmography. Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly higher in OBI compared with OBA women (9.1 ± 4.0 mg/L vs. 6.3 ± 2.5 mg/L, p = 0.02). Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly associated with maternal lipolysis (r = 0.43, p = 0.02), baseline lipid oxidation rate (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), and baseline plasma free fatty acid concentration (r = 0.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, maternal physical activity may reduce inflammation during pregnancy in obese women. Maternal lipid metabolism is related to systemic inflammation.

  5. How Do Sociodemographics and Activity Participations Affect Activity-Travel? Comparative Study between Women and Men

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Min; Wang, Wei; Yu, Feifei; Ding, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Activity-travel behaviors of women and men are different because they have different social and household responsibilities. However, studies concerning gender differences are mainly limited in developed countries. This paper concentrates on gender role-based differences in activity-travel behavior in a typical developing country, namely, China. Using data from 3656 cases collected through surveys conducted in Shangyu, data processing, method choice, and descriptive analysis were conducted. Bi...

  6. A Multi-model Study on Warm Precipitation Biases in Global Models Compared to Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, X.; Suzuki, K.; Guo, H.; Goto, D.; Ogura, T.; Koshiro, T.; Mulmenstadt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The cloud-to-precipitation transition process in warm clouds simulated by state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs), including both traditional climate models and a global cloud-resolving model, is evaluated against A-Train satellites observations. The models and satellite observations are compared in the form of the statistics obtained from combined analysis of multiple satellite observables that probe signatures of the cloud-to-precipitation transition process. One common problem identified among these models is the too frequent occurrence of warm precipitation. The precipitation is found to form when the cloud particle size and the liquid water path (LWP) are both much smaller than those in observations. The too efficient formation of precipitation is found to be compensated for by errors of cloud microphysical properties, such as underestimated cloud particle size and LWP, to an extent that varies among the models. However, this does not completely cancel the precipitation formation bias. Robust errors are also found in the evolution of cloud microphysical properties in precipitation process in some GCMs, implying unrealistic interaction between precipitation and cloud water. Nevertheless, auspicious information is found for future improvement of warm precipitation representations: the adoption of more realistic autoconversion scheme or subgrid variability scheme is shown to improve the triggering of precipitation and evolution of cloud microphysical properties.

  7. Clinical Prediction Models for Cardiovascular Disease: Tufts Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Prediction Model Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Lai Yh, Lana; Kramer, Whitney; Cangelosi, Michael; Raman, Gowri; Lutz, Jennifer S; Kent, David M

    2015-07-01

    Clinical prediction models (CPMs) estimate the probability of clinical outcomes and hold the potential to improve decision making and individualize care. For patients with cardiovascular disease, there are numerous CPMs available although the extent of this literature is not well described. We conducted a systematic review for articles containing CPMs for cardiovascular disease published between January 1990 and May 2012. Cardiovascular disease includes coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and peripheral vascular disease. We created a novel database and characterized CPMs based on the stage of development, population under study, performance, covariates, and predicted outcomes. There are 796 models included in this database. The number of CPMs published each year is increasing steadily over time. Seven hundred seventeen (90%) are de novo CPMs, 21 (3%) are CPM recalibrations, and 58 (7%) are CPM adaptations. This database contains CPMs for 31 index conditions, including 215 CPMs for patients with coronary artery disease, 168 CPMs for population samples, and 79 models for patients with heart failure. There are 77 distinct index/outcome pairings. Of the de novo models in this database, 450 (63%) report a c-statistic and 259 (36%) report some information on calibration. There is an abundance of CPMs available for a wide assortment of cardiovascular disease conditions, with substantial redundancy in the literature. The comparative performance of these models, the consistency of effects and risk estimates across models and the actual and potential clinical impact of this body of literature is poorly understood. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  9. Alfven waves in the auroral ionosphere: A numerical model compared with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors solve a linear numerical model of Alfven waves reflecting from the high-latitude ionosphere, both to better understanding the role of the ionosphere in the magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling process and to compare model results with in situ measurements. They use the model to compute the frequency-dependent amplitude and phase relations between the meridional electric and the zonal magnetic fields due to Alfven waves. These relations are compared with measurements taken by an auroral sounding rocket flow in the morningside oval and by the HILAT satellite traversing the oval at local noon. The sounding rocket's trajectory was mostly parallel to the auroral oval, and is measured enhanced fluctuating field energy in regions of electron precipitation. The rocket-measured phase data are in excellent agreement with the Alfven wave model, and the relation between the modeled and the measured by HILAT are related by the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity Σ p , indicating that the measured field fluctuations were due mainly to structured field-aligned current systems. A reason for the relative lack of Alfven wave energy in the HILAT measurements could be the fact that the satellite traveled mostly perpendicular to the oval and therefore quickly traversed narrow regions of electron precipitation and associated wave activity

  10. Comparing the MOLAP the ROLAP storage models Marysol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Tamayo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Data Warehouses (DWs, supported by OLAP, have played a key role in helping company decision-making du- ring the last few years. DWs can be stored in ROLAP and/or MOLAP data storage systems. Data is stored in a relational database in ROLAP and in multidimensional matrices in MOLAP. This paper presents a comparative example, analysing the performance and advantages and disadvantages of ROLAP and MOLAP in a specific database management system (DBMS. An overview of DBMS is also given to see how these technologies are being incorporated.

  11. Microbial comparative pan-genomics using binomial mixture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussery David W

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size of the core- and pan-genome of bacterial species is a topic of increasing interest due to the growing number of sequenced prokaryote genomes, many from the same species. Attempts to estimate these quantities have been made, using regression methods or mixture models. We extend the latter approach by using statistical ideas developed for capture-recapture problems in ecology and epidemiology. Results We estimate core- and pan-genome sizes for 16 different bacterial species. The results reveal a complex dependency structure for most species, manifested as heterogeneous detection probabilities. Estimated pan-genome sizes range from small (around 2600 gene families in Buchnera aphidicola to large (around 43000 gene families in Escherichia coli. Results for Echerichia coli show that as more data become available, a larger diversity is estimated, indicating an extensive pool of rarely occurring genes in the population. Conclusion Analyzing pan-genomics data with binomial mixture models is a way to handle dependencies between genomes, which we find is always present. A bottleneck in the estimation procedure is the annotation of rarely occurring genes.

  12. Comparative analysis of calculation models of railway subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Sviatko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In transport engineering structures design, the primary task is to determine the parameters of foundation soil and nuances of its work under loads. It is very important to determine the parameters of shear resistance and the parameters, determining the development of deep deformations in foundation soils, while calculating the soil subgrade - upper track structure interaction. Search for generalized numerical modeling methods of embankment foundation soil work that include not only the analysis of the foundation stress state but also of its deformed one. Methodology. The analysis of existing modern and classical methods of numerical simulation of soil samples under static load was made. Findings. According to traditional methods of analysis of ground masses work, limitation and the qualitative estimation of subgrade deformations is possible only indirectly, through the estimation of stress and comparison of received values with the boundary ones. Originality. A new computational model was proposed in which it will be applied not only classical approach analysis of the soil subgrade stress state, but deformed state will be also taken into account. Practical value. The analysis showed that for accurate analysis of ground masses work it is necessary to develop a generalized methodology for analyzing of the rolling stock - railway subgrade interaction, which will use not only the classical approach of analyzing the soil subgrade stress state, but also take into account its deformed one.

  13. Modelling of Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtanjeka, Ž.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge wastewater treatment is a highly complex physical, chemical and biological process, and variations in wastewater flow rate and its composition, combined with time-varying reactions in a mixed culture of microorganisms, make this process non-linear and unsteady. The efficiency of the process is established by measuring the quantities that indicate quality of the treated wastewater, but they can only be determined at the end of the process, which is when the water has already been processed and is at the outlet of the plant and released into the environment.If the water quality is not acceptable, it is already too late for its improvement, which indicates the need for a feed forward process control based on a mathematical model. Since there is no possibility of retracing the process steps back, all the mistakes in the control of the process could induce an ecological disaster of a smaller or bigger extent. Therefore, models that describe this process well may be used as a basis for monitoring and optimal control of the process development. This work analyzes the process of biological treatment of wastewater in the Velika Gorica plant. Two empirical models for the description of the process were established, multiple linear regression model (MLR with 16 predictor variables and piecewise linear regression model (PLR with 17 predictor variables. These models were developed with the aim to predict COD value of the effluent wastewater at the outlet, after treatment. The development of the models is based on the statistical analysis of experimental data, which are used to determine the relations among individual variables. In this work are applied linear models based on multiple linear regression (MLR and partial least squares (PLR methods. The used data were obtained by everyday measurements of the quantities that indicate the quality of the input and output water, working conditions of the plant and the quality of the activated sludge

  14. Modeling Mitigation Activities in North Carolina Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Nutrient enrichment and excessive sediment loadings have contributed to the degradation of rivers, lakes and estuaries in North Carolina. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) has implemented several basin-wide nutrient and sediment management strategies, yet gaps remain in understanding the impact of these strategies given the complexities in quantifying the processes that govern the transport of nutrient and sediment. In particular, improved assessment of the status of nutrient and sediment loadings to lakes and estuaries throughout the state is needed, including characterizing their sources and describing the relative contributions of different areas. The NCDEQ Division of Mitigation Services (DMS) uses watershed planning to identify and prioritize the best locations to implement stream, wetland, and riparian-buffer restoration to improve water quality. To support better decision-making for watershed restoration activities we are developing a SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model framework specifically for North Carolina. The SPARROW analysis (developed by the U.S. Geological Survey) relates water-quality monitoring data to better understand the effects of human activities and natural processes on surface-water quality. The core of the model consists of using a nonlinear-regression equation to describe the non-conservative transport of contaminants from point and nonpoint sources on land to rivers, lakes and estuaries through the stream and river network. In this presentation, preliminary total Nitrogen, total Phosphorus, and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) NC-SPARROW models are described that illustrate the SPARROW modeling framework incorporating specific restoration datasets and activity metrics, such as extent of riparian buffer and easements.

  15. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  16. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  17. Body shape model, physical activity and eating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui Lobera, I; Tomillo Cid, S; Santiago Fernández, M J; Bolaños Ríos, P

    2011-01-01

    Research on the influence of body shape model on adolescent males is scarce. The current study aimed to assess this influence among adult males involved in intense physical activity and to determine its relationship to eating behaviour. Possible variations between 1998 and 2008 were also analysed. A total of 950 males (672 in 1998 and 278 in 2008), all aspiring professional soldiers, were studied using the Questionnaire of Influences on Body Shape Model (CIMEC-V) and the Eating Attitudes Test-40 (EAT-40), as well as by assessing their physical/sporting activity and body mass index (BMI). Scores on the CIMEC-V were significantly correlated with the EAT-40 and BMI. As regards physical activity the only positive correlation referred to gym-based exercise. A cluster analysis revealed two subgroups with respect to physical activity, BMI, and scores on the CIMEC-V and EAT-40. One of them scored higher on these three variables and they also had a BMI > 25. The comparative study of data from 1998 and 2008 showed significant changes in some variables. Generally, the results differ considerably from those reported for younger samples (which would suggest a lower risk of disordered eating behaviour). However, there is a higher risk group in which the influence of body shape models, physical activity and eating behaviour are related to greater body volume. The influence of the body shape model on males has increased, especially as regards the influence of friends and in terms of behaviours aimed at weight loss.

  18. Delta Learning Rule for the Active Sites Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lingashetty, Krishna Chaithanya

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results on methods of comparing the memory retrieval capacity of the Hebbian neural network which implements the B-Matrix approach, by using the Widrow-Hoff rule of learning. We then, extend the recently proposed Active Sites model by developing a delta rule to increase memory capacity. Also, this paper extends the binary neural network to a multi-level (non-binary) neural network.

  19. Task decomposition: a framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. J. Coffey

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Training studies, in which the structural or functional neurophysiology is compared before and after expertise is acquired, are increasingly being used as models for understanding the human brain’s potential for reorganization. It is proving difficult to use these results to answer basic and important questions like how task training leads to both specific and general changes in behaviour and how these changes correspond with modifications in the brain. The main culprit is the diversity of paradigms used as complex task models. An assortment of activities ranging from juggling to deciphering Morse code has been reported. Even when working in the same general domain, few researchers use similar training models. New ways to meaningfully compare complex tasks are needed. We propose a method for characterizing and deconstructing the task requirements of complex training paradigms, which is suitable for application to both structural and functional neuroimaging studies. We believe this approach will aid brain plasticity research by making it easier to compare training paradigms, identify ‘missing puzzle pieces’, and encourage researchers to design training protocols to bridge these gaps.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power DevelopmentModels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter

    2005-05-20

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned windpower development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for windpower. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus cooperative ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

  1. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers.

  2. Comparative study of active plasma lenses in high-quality electron accelerator transport lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, J.; Barber, S. K.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Isono, F.; Tsai, H.-E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2018-05-01

    Electrically discharged active plasma lenses (APLs) are actively pursued in compact high-brightness plasma-based accelerators due to their high-gradient, tunable, and radially symmetric focusing properties. In this manuscript, the APL is experimentally compared with a conventional quadrupole triplet, highlighting the favorable reduction in the energy dependence (chromaticity) in the transport line. Through transport simulations, it is explored how the non-uniform radial discharge current distribution leads to beam-integrated emittance degradation and a charge density reduction at focus. However, positioning an aperture at the APL entrance will significantly reduce emittance degradation without additional loss of charge in the high-quality core of the beam. An analytical model is presented that estimates the emittance degradation from a short beam driving a longitudinally varying wakefield in the APL. Optimizing laser plasma accelerator operation is discussed where emittance degradation from the non-uniform discharge current (favoring small beams inside the APL) and wakefield effects (favoring larger beam sizes) is minimized.

  3. Characterizing cavities in model inclusion molecules: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, F; Sánchez-Marín, J; Nebot-Gil, I

    1998-04-01

    We have selected fullerene-60 and -70 cavities as model systems in order to test several methods for characterizing inclusion molecules. The methods are based on different technical foundations such as a square and triangular tessellation of the molecule taken as a unitary sphere, spherical tessellation of the molecular surface, numerical integration of the atomic volumes and surfaces, triangular tessellation of the molecular surface, and a cubic lattice approach to a molecular space. Accurate measures of the molecular volume and surface area have been performed with the pseudo-random Monte Carlo (MCVS) and uniform Monte Carlo (UMCVS) methods. These calculations serve as a reference for the rest of the methods. The SURMO2 and MS methods have not recognized the cavities and may not be convenient for intercalation compounds. The programs that have detected the cavities never exceed 5% deviation relative to the reference values for molecular volume and surface area. The GEPOL algorithm, alone or combined with TOPO, shows results in good agreement with those of the UMCVS reference. The uniform random number generator provides the fastest convergence for UMCVS and a correct estimate of the standard deviations. The effect of the internal cavity on the accessible surfaces has been calculated.

  4. Modeling Aspects Of Activated Sludge Processes Part I: Process Modeling Of Activated Sludge Facilitation And Sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, H. I.; EI-Ahwany, A.H.; Ibrahim, G.

    2004-01-01

    Process modeling of activated sludge flocculation and sedimentation reviews consider the activated sludge floc characteristics such as: morphology viable and non-viable cell ratio density and water content, bio flocculation and its kinetics were studied considering the characteristics of bio flocculation and explaining theory of Divalent Cation Bridging which describes the major role of cations in bio flocculation. Activated sludge flocculation process modeling was studied considering mass transfer limitations from Clifft and Andrew, 1981, Benefild and Molz 1983 passing Henze 1987, until Tyagi 1996 and G. Ibrahim et aI. 2002. Models of aggregation and breakage of flocs were studied by Spicer and Pratsinis 1996,and Biggs 2002 Size distribution of floes influences mass transfer and biomass separation in the activated sludge process. Therefore, it is of primary importance to establish the role of specific process operation factors, such as sludge loading dynamic sludge age and dissolved oxygen, on this distribution with special emphasis on the formation of primary particles

  5. Active earth pressure model tests versus finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to compare failure mechanisms observed in small scale model tests on granular sample in active state, and simulated by finite element method (FEM using Plaxis 2D software. Small scale model tests were performed on rectangular granular sample retained by a rigid wall. Deformation of the sample resulted from simple wall translation in the direction ‘from the soil” (active earth pressure state. Simple Coulomb-Mohr model for soil can be helpful in interpreting experimental findings in case of granular materials. It was found that the general alignment of strain localization pattern (failure mechanism may belong to macro scale features and be dominated by a test boundary conditions rather than the nature of the granular sample.

  6. Active earth pressure model tests versus finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is to compare failure mechanisms observed in small scale model tests on granular sample in active state, and simulated by finite element method (FEM) using Plaxis 2D software. Small scale model tests were performed on rectangular granular sample retained by a rigid wall. Deformation of the sample resulted from simple wall translation in the direction `from the soil" (active earth pressure state. Simple Coulomb-Mohr model for soil can be helpful in interpreting experimental findings in case of granular materials. It was found that the general alignment of strain localization pattern (failure mechanism) may belong to macro scale features and be dominated by a test boundary conditions rather than the nature of the granular sample.

  7. Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontier, Mikael; Moertberg, Ulla; Balfors, Berit

    2010-01-01

    Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

  8. A comparative QSAR study on the estrogenic activities of persistent organic pollutants by PLS and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs were determined using partial least square (PLS and support vector machine (SVM. The predicted values by the final QSAR models were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values. Chemical estrogenic activities are related to atomic properties (atomic Sanderson electronegativities, van der Waals volumes and polarizabilities. Comparison of the results obtained from two models, the SVM method exhibited better overall performances. Besides, three PLS models were constructed for some specific families based on their chemical structures. These predictive models should be useful to rapidly identify potential estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  9. Activity based costing model for inventory valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Chouhan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Activity-Based-Model (ABC is used for the purpose of significant improvement for overhead accounting systems by providing the best information required for managerial decision. This pa-per discusses implacability of ABC technique on inventory valuation as a management account-ing innovation. In order to prove the applicability of ABC for inventory control a material driven medium-sized and privately owned company from engineering (iron and steel industry is select-ed and by analysis of its production process and its material dependency and use of indirect in-ventory, an ABC model is explored for better inventory control. The case revealed that the ne-cessity of ABC in the area of inventory control is significant. The company is not only able to increase its quality of decision but also it can significantly analyze its cost of direct material cost, valuation of direct material and use its implications for better decision making.

  10. On avoidance activities in fishery enforcement models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Abildtrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Compliance and enforcement in fisheries are important issues from an economic point of view since management measures are useless without a certain level of enforcement. These conclusions come from the well-established theoretical literature on compliance and enforcement problems within fisheries...... the likelihood of being detected when noncomplying. The paper presents a model of fisheries that allows the fishermen to engage in avoidance activities. The conclusions from the model are that, under certain circumstances, fines are costly transfers to society since they not only have a direct positive effect...... offenders. For an externality, that has an exogenous effect on other actors, Malik shows that fines are only costly transfers for conditional deterrence (when one actor is deterred while another actor is not). For fisheries, we show that fines are also costly transfers under no deterrence (when no agents...

  11. ACTIVE AND PARTICIPATORY METHODS IN BIOLOGY: MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brînduşa-Antonela SBÎRCEA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By using active and participatory methods it is hoped that pupils will not only come to a deeper understanding of the issues involved, but also that their motivation will be heightened. Pupil involvement in their learning is essential. Moreover, by using a variety of teaching techniques, we can help students make sense of the world in different ways, increasing the likelihood that they will develop a conceptual understanding. The teacher must be a good facilitator, monitoring and supporting group dynamics. Modeling is an instructional strategy in which the teacher demonstrates a new concept or approach to learning and pupils learn by observing. In the teaching of biology the didactic materials are fundamental tools in the teaching-learning process. Reading about scientific concepts or having a teacher explain them is not enough. Research has shown that modeling can be used across disciplines and in all grade and ability level classrooms. Using this type of instruction, teachers encourage learning.

  12. Comparative Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Collectors Solar Power Plant with MARS Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ramón Rogada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Power plants producing energy through solar fields use a heat transfer fluid that lends itself to be influenced and changed by different variables. In solar power plants, a heat transfer fluid (HTF is used to transfer the thermal energy of solar radiation through parabolic collectors to a water vapor Rankine cycle. In this way, a turbine is driven that produces electricity when coupled to an electric generator. These plants have a heat transfer system that converts the solar radiation into heat through a HTF, and transfers that thermal energy to the water vapor heat exchangers. The best possible performance in the Rankine cycle, and therefore in the thermal plant, is obtained when the HTF reaches its maximum temperature when leaving the solar field (SF. In addition, it is necessary that the HTF does not exceed its own maximum operating temperature, above which it degrades. The optimum temperature of the HTF is difficult to obtain, since the working conditions of the plant can change abruptly from moment to moment. Guaranteeing that this HTF operates at its optimal temperature to produce electricity through a Rankine cycle is a priority. The oil flowing through the solar field has the disadvantage of having a thermal limit. Therefore, this research focuses on trying to make sure that this fluid comes out of the solar field with the highest possible temperature. Modeling using data mining is revealed as an important tool for forecasting the performance of this kind of power plant. The purpose of this document is to provide a model that can be used to optimize the temperature control of the fluid without interfering with the normal operation of the plant. The results obtained with this model should be necessarily contrasted with those obtained in a real plant. Initially, we compare the PID (proportional–integral–derivative models used in previous studies for the optimization of this type of plant with modeling using the multivariate adaptive

  13. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  14. Charcoal and activated carbon as adsorbate of phytotoxic compounds - a comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, M.G.; Ouden, den J.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares the potential of natural charcoal from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and activated carbon to improve germination under the hypothesis that natural charcoal adsorbs phytotoxins produced by dwarf-shrubs, but due to it's chemical properties to a lesser extent than activated

  15. Favoured Free-Time: Comparing Children's Activity Preferences in the UK and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Merris

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a comparative study of the free-time activity preferences of 9- to 11-year-old children in the UK and USA, as drawn by them in art workshops. Six themes emerged relating to sport, outdoor play, family/peers, media, special occasions and other (indefinable) activities. The children's talk about their drawings revealed additional…

  16. Comparing Activity Patterns, Biological, and Family Factors in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutum, Monique Natalie; Cordier, Reinie; Bundy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The association between motor proficiency and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) suggests children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) may be susceptible to inactivity-related conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to compare children with and without DCD on physical activity patterns, activity…

  17. Representing and estimating interactions between activities in a need-based model of activity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, L.; Arentze, T.; Timmermans, H.

    2013-01-01

    Although several activity-based models made the transition to practice in recent years, modeling dynamic activity generation and especially, the mechanisms underlying activity generation are not well incorporated in the current activity-based models. For instance, current models assume that

  18. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  19. Alkali activated fly ash binders. A comparative study between sodium and potassium activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criado, M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the effect of the nature of some alkaline activators in the microstructural development of thermal-alkali activated f/y ash systems. The alkaline compounds employed in this investigation were: NaOH, KOH, Na2C03, K2C03, sodium silicate and potassium silicate. Results confirm that the main reaction product of the activation process (throughout the studied systems is the amorphous alkaline aluminosilicate gel with a three-dimensional structure already observed in earlier research. It has been proved that the type of anion and cation involved in the activation reaction of the ashes not only affects the microstructural development of the systems but the Si/Al ratio of that prezeolitic gel too. For example, in the presence of soluble silicate ions the content of Si in the final structure is notably increased (Si/Al =2.7-3.0, however carbonate ions play a different role since the formation of Sodium or Potassium carbonate/bicarbonate acidifies the system and consequently the reaction rate is considerably slowed. Finally it is evident that; when all experimental conditions are equal, sodium has a greater capacity than potassium to accelerate the setting and hardening reactions of fly ash and also to stimulate the growth of certain zeolitic crystals (reaction by-products. In general it can be affirmed that OH- ion acts as a reaction catalyst; and the alkaline metal (M+ acts as a structure-forming element.Este trabajo muestra el efecto de la naturaleza del activador alcalino en el desarrollo microestructural de sistemas de ceniza volante, activados térmica y alcalinamente. Los componentes alcalinos empleados en esta investigación fueron: NaOH, KOH, Na2C03, K2C03, silicato sódico y silicato potásico. Los resultados obtenidos confirman que el principal producto de reacción del proceso de activación (a través de los sistemas estudiados es un gel de aluminosilicato alcalino amorfo con estructura tridimensional ya observada en trabajos

  20. Models of the stochastic activity of neurones

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Arun Vivian

    1976-01-01

    These notes have grown from a series of seminars given at Leeds between 1972 and 1975. They represent an attempt to gather together the different kinds of model which have been proposed to account for the stochastic activity of neurones, and to provide an introduction to this area of mathematical biology. A striking feature of the electrical activity of the nervous system is that it appears stochastic: this is apparent at all levels of recording, ranging from intracellular recordings to the electroencephalogram. The chapters start with fluctuations in membrane potential, proceed through single unit and synaptic activity and end with the behaviour of large aggregates of neurones: L have chgaen this seque~~e\\/~~';uggest that the interesting behaviourr~f :the nervous system - its individuality, variability and dynamic forms - may in part result from the stochastic behaviour of its components. I would like to thank Dr. Julio Rubio for reading and commenting on the drafts, Mrs. Doris Beighton for producing the fin...

  1. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  2. Antimicrobial activity and chemometric modelling of South African propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, T; van Vuuren, S; Sandasi, M; Viljoen, A M

    2015-10-01

    This study reports on the inhibitory and bactericidal properties of 39 South African (SA) propolis samples and three propolis samples from Brazil. Ethanolic extracts of propolis (EEP) were prepared and their antimicrobial activities tested using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assays. Some samples displayed substantial antimicrobial activity with MIC and MBC values as low as 6 μg ml(-1) against Staphylococcus aureus. The correlation between liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) chemical data and the antimicrobial activity of propolis extracts was investigated using multivariate data analysis tools. Orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) models were created for the two Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis and S. aureus) and Candida albicans. Using the S-plot function, it was possible to identify the bioactive constituents in propolis as chrysin, pinocembrin, galangin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate. The SA propolis samples tested displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity, favourably comparable to that of the Brazilian comparator and 'gold standard'. The observed antimicrobial activity of SA propolis can possibly be attributed to its flavonoid content. Based on the good antimicrobial activity observed for SA propolis, this natural resource shows promise and should be considered for development which may contribute to growing the bio-economy in the region. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. ECONOMIC COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF COMBINATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON GENERATION AND SPENT ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATION PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TINNABHOP SANTADKHA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the maximum annual profit of proposed three project plants as follows: (i a generation process of activated carbon (AC prepared from coconut shells; (ii a regeneration process of spent AC obtained from petrochemical industries; and (iii a project combined the AC generation process with the regeneration process. The maximum annual profit obtained from the sole regeneration plant was about 1.2- and 15.4- fold higher than that obtained from the integrated and the generation plants, respectively. The sensitivity of selected variables to net present value (NPV, AC sales price was the most sensitive to NPV while fixed costs of generation and regeneration, and variable cost of regeneration were the least sensitive to NPV. Based on the optimal results of each project plant, the economic indicators namely NPV, return on investment (ROI, internal rate of return (IRR, and simple payback period (SPP were determined. Applying a rule of thumb of 12% IRR and 7-year SPP, the AC sales prices for the generation, regeneration, and integrated plants were 674.31, 514.66 and 536.66 USD/ton of product, respectively. The economic analysis suggested that the sole regeneration project yields more profitable.

  4. Comparing the Quality of Life Between Active and Non-Active Elderly Women With an Emphasis on Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion The findings of this study suggested engaging in regular physical activity as it could work as a significant strategy to improve the quality of life among the elderly. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that the officials dealing with public health create appropriate facilities for  the physical activity and sports of the elderly women.

  5. Comparative in vitro and in vivo models of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, A.L.; Mitchell, C.E.; Seiler, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    To understand the development of disease from inhalation of complex chemical mixtures, it is necessary to use both in vitro and whole animal systems. This project is designed to provide links between these two types of research. The project has three major goals. The first goal is to evaluate the mutagenic activity of complex mixtures and the interactions between different fractions in these mixtures. The second is to develop model cellular systems that help define the mechanisms of genotoxic damage and repair in the lung. The third goal is to understand the mechanisms involved in the induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells. Research on the measurement and interactions of mutagens in complex mixtures is illustrated by reporting a study using diesel exhaust particle extracts. The extracts were fractionated into ten different chemical classes. Each of the fractions was tested for mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella mutation assay. Individual fractions were combined using different permutations. The total mixture was reconstituted and the mutagenic activity compared to the predicted level of activity. Mutagenic activity was additive indicating that the chemical fractionation did not alter the extracts and that there was little evidence of synergistic or antagonistic interaction. To help define the mechanisms involved in the induction of mutations, they have exposed CHO cells to radiation and mutagenic chemicals alone and in combination. In these studies, they have demonstrated that when cells were exposed to 500 rad of x-rays followed by either direct or indirect acting mutagens frequency was less than would be predicted by an additive model

  6. A Comparative Study on the Antioxidant Activity of Commonly Used South Asian Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viduranga Waisundara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activities of curry leaves, fenugreek seeds, Indian malabar leaves, red silk cotton tree leaves, cowitch leaves, holyfruit tree leaves, and black mustard seeds were compared. Their effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity were investigated. The Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC assay determined the antioxidant potential of the extracts, while the ROS scavenging ability was explored in hyperglycemia-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The SOD assay determined if the extracts stimulated the enzyme activity in the HUVECs. Curry leaf and fenugreek extracts had high ORAC values and superior free radical scavenging abilities compared with the rest of the extracts. The curry leaf extract had also increased the SOD activity. Fenugreek extract had not increased the SOD activity of the HUVECs. Thus, the two herbs displayed two distinct pathways of action for scavenging of ROS.

  7. Comparative potential of black tea leaves waste to granular activated carbon in adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ifelebuegu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption properties and mechanics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds; 17 β-estradiol, 17 α – ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A on locally available black tea leaves waste and granular activated carbon were investigated. The results obtained indicated that the kinetics of adsorption were pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature dependent with equilibrium being reached at 20 to 40 minutes for tea leaves waste and 40 to 60 minutes for granular activated compound. Maximum adsorption capacities of 3.46, 2.44 and 18.35 mg/g were achieved for tea leaves waste compared to granular activated compound capacities of 4.01, 2.97 and 16.26 mg/g for 17 β- estradiol, 17 α-ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A respectively. Tea leaves waste adsorption followed pseudo-first order kinetics while granular activated compound fitted better to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The experimental isotherm data for both tea leaves waste and granular activated compound showed a good fit to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models with the Langmuir model showing the best fit. The thermodynamic and kinetic data for the adsorption indicated that the adsorption process for tea leaves waste was predominantly by physical adsorption while the granular activated compound adsorption was more chemical in nature. The results have demonstrated the potential of waste tea leaves for the adsorptive removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from water.

  8. Detailed numerical modeling of a linear parallel-plate Active Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model simulating Active Magnetic Regeneration (AMR) is presented and compared to a selection of experiments. The model is an extension and re-implementation of a previous two-dimensional model. The new model is extended to 2.5D, meaning that parasitic thermal losses are included in th...

  9. Modeling Criminal Activity in Urban Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantingham, Patricia; Glässer, Uwe; Jackson, Piper; Vajihollahi, Mona

    Computational and mathematical methods arguably have an enormous potential for serving practical needs in crime analysis and prevention by offering novel tools for crime investigations and experimental platforms for evidence-based policy making. We present a comprehensive formal framework and tool support for mathematical and computational modeling of criminal behavior to facilitate systematic experimental studies of a wide range of criminal activities in urban environments. The focus is on spatial and temporal aspects of different forms of crime, including opportunistic and serial violent crimes. However, the proposed framework provides a basis to push beyond conventional empirical research and engage the use of computational thinking and social simulations in the analysis of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

  10. Match and mismatch - comparing plant phenological metrics from ground-observations and from a prognostic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, This; Stöckli, Reto; Jeanneret, François; Peñuelas, Josep

    2010-05-01

    Changes in the seasonality of life cycles of plants as recorded in phenological observations have been widely analysed at the species level with data available for many decades back in time. At the same time, seasonality changes in satellite-based observations and prognostic phenology models comprise information at the pixel-size or landscape scale. Change analysis of satellite-based records is restricted due to relatively short satellite records that further include gaps while model-based analyses are biased due to current model deficiencies., At 30 selected sites across Europe, we analysed three different sources of plant seasonality during the 1971-2000 period. Data consisted of (1) species-specific development stages of flowering and leave-out with different species observed at each site. (2) We used a synthetic phenological metric that integrates the common interannual phenological signal across all species at one site. (3) We estimated daily Leaf Area Index with a prognostic phenology model. The prior uncertainties of the model's empirical parameter space are constrained by assimilating the Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We extracted the day of year when the 25%, 50% and 75% thresholds were passed each spring. The question arises how the three phenological signals compare and correlate across climate zones in Europe. Is there a match between single species observations, species-based ground-observed metrics and the landscape-scale prognostic model? Are there single key-species across Europe that best represent a landscape scale measure from the prognostic model? Can one source substitute another and serve as proxy-data? What can we learn from potential mismatches? Focusing on changes in spring this contribution presents first results of an ongoing comparison study from a number of European test sites that will be extended to

  11. Business model in research-development activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszałka Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The partners and allies of business practice in the processes of modernization of the economy are scientific-research institutions, such as scientific institutes, research-development units and universities. A market on which companies can look for the solutions they need and scientific-research institutions can look for inspiration, partners and capital is being formed. The market provides conditions for operation, development and implementation of developed solutions. Taking into consideration the complexity of market, technical, legal, financial, or intellectual property protection issues, research-development units are more and more frequently unable to function efficiently without a clear and unequivocal definition of goals, methods and conditions of activity. Their market offer has to take into consideration not just scientific-research, or methodological aspects. Taking into consideration continuously growing demands of the clients and pressure of the competition, scientific-research institutions have to pay attention also to market, information, personnel, or financial aspects typical of strictly commercial ventures. What may support a comprehensive preparation and implementation of scientific-research activities under market conditions are tools successfully used in trade and economy, such as business models. These issues are the basis of deliberations contained in this work.

  12. Modeling Nonlinear Power Amplifiers in OFDM Systems from Subsampled Data: A Comparative Study Using Real Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaría Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study among several nonlinear high-power amplifier (HPA models using real measurements is carried out. The analysis is focused on specific models for wideband OFDM signals, which are known to be very sensitive to nonlinear distortion. Moreover, unlike conventional techniques, which typically use a single-tone test signal and power measurements, in this study the models are fitted using subsampled time-domain data. The in-band and out-of-band (spectral regrowth performances of the following models are evaluated and compared: Saleh's model, envelope polynomial model (EPM, Volterra model, the multilayer perceptron (MLP model, and the smoothed piecewise-linear (SPWL model. The study shows that the SPWL model provides the best in-band characterization of the HPA. On the other hand, the Volterra model provides a good trade-off between model complexity (number of parameters and performance.

  13. Comparative active-site mutation study of human and Caenorhabditis elegans thymidine kinase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Tine; Uhlin, Ulla; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    ligands. To improve our understanding of TK1 substrate specificity, we performed a detailed, mutation-based comparative structure-function study of the active sites of two thymidine kinases: HuTK1 and Caenorhabditis elegans TK1 (CeTK1). Specifically, mutations were introduced into the hydrophobic pocket......'-deoxythymidine (AZT) compared with the natural substrate thymidine. The crystal structure of the T163S-mutated HuTK1 reveals a less ordered conformation of the ligand thymidine triphosphate compared with the wild-type structure but the cause of the changed specificity towards AZT is not obvious. Based on its...... highly increased AZT activity relative to thymidine activity this TK1 mutant could be suitable for suicide gene therapy....

  14. COMPARISON BETWEEN DIFFERENT MODELS FOR RHEOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Khalili Garakani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge flow rheology is a very complicated phenomenon. Studies related to activated sludge tend to classify sludge as non-Newtonian fluid. Until now, several theories have been built to describe the complex behavior of activated sludge with varying degrees of success. In this article, seven different models for viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids (i.e., Power law, Bingham plastic, Herschel-Bulkley, Casson, Sisko, Carreau and Cross were considered to evaluate their predictive capability of apparent viscosity of activated sludge. Results showed that although evaluating the constants in the four-parameter models is difficult, they provide the best prediction of viscosity in the whole range of shear rates for activated sludge. For easier prediction of viscosity at different mixed liquor suspended solids (2.74-31g/L, temperature (15-25°C and shear rate (1-1000/s, simple correlations were proposed. Comparing the results with the experimental data revealed that the proposed correlations are in good agreement with real apparent viscosities.

  15. On a Mathematical Model of Brain Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2007-01-01

    The procedure of recognition can be described as follows: There is a set of complex signals stored in the memory. Choosing one of these signals may be interpreted as generating a hypothesis concerning an 'expexted view of the world'. Then the brain compares a signal arising from our senses with the signal chosen from the memory leading to a change of the state of both signals. Furthermore, measurements of that procedure like EEG or MEG are based on the fact that recognition of signals causes a certain loss of excited neurons, i.e. the neurons change their state from 'excited' to 'nonexcited'. For that reason a statistical model of the recognition process should reflect both--the change of the signals and the loss of excited neurons. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given. In the present note it is not possible to present this approach in detail. In lieu we will sketch roughly a few of the basic ideas and structures of the proposed model of the recognition process (Section). Further, we introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces used in this approach. A more elaborate presentation including all proofs will be given in a series of some forthcoming papers. In this series also the procedures of creation of signals from the memory, amplification, accumulation and transformation of input signals, and measurements like EEG and MEG will be treated in detail

  16. A Comparative Structural Equation Modeling Investigation of the Relationships among Teaching, Cognitive and Social Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Kadir

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships among teaching, cognitive, and social presence through several structural equation models to see which model would better fit the data. To this end, the present study employed and compared several different structural equation models because different models could fit the data equally well. Among…

  17. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrino; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the EEG, solving the so called EEG forward problem, and reconstructing the brain electrical activity from recorded EEG data, solving the EEG inverse problem. Many factors affect the accuracy of the forward and hence of the inverse problem solution, one of them is the shape of the head model. Realistic head models can lead to more accurate forward problem solutions, but imply heavier computational burdens in comparison to spherical models. Conversely, inverse solutions require the forward model to be computationally efficient. The aim of this study is to investigate the different general potentialities, in terms of EEG source reconstruction, which can be achieved adopting realistic or spherical geometries in head modeling. Previous studies in the literature analyzed the effect of head model geometry presenting results for particular cases of head models. In this paper, we re-address the effect of realistic geometry in head modeling, seeking for more general results by adopting the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) phantom model to represent a whole family of realistic head models. This paper presents results of a computer simulation study in which the potentialities of two different four-shell head models are compared, the realistic MNI-based FDM and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model, by means of the Point Spread Function (PSF) correlation maps, with a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in EEG source reconstruction given by head modeling refinement from the spherical to the more complex realistic FDM head modeling.

  18. Comparing Domain-Specific Physical Activity Efficacy Level between Turkish Adolescent Girls and Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çatikkas, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The adolescence period is a very critical developmental period for personality, socializing and promotion of physical activity. In this regard, the aim of this study was to compare domain-specific physical activity efficacy level between adolescent boys and girls. A total of 219 girls (body weight: 57.50 ± 10.44 kg, height: 160.30 ± 7.40 cm, age…

  19. Comparative analysis of competitive activities of skilled players of different functions in women's and men's football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhurid S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis of results of the pedagogical looking is conducted after individual and command competition activity of footballers of professional clubs. The most characteristic are exposed technical tactical receptions. Quantitative and high-quality competition performance of sportsmen indicators are certain. In descriptions of competition activity it is necessary to take into account quantitative and high-quality indexes. Also are terms: speed, limitations, is in time and space, presence of hammerings together factors and competitor.

  20. Comparative study on economic security of enterprises depending on implemented business activities quantity

    OpenAIRE

    Shkarina Tatyana; Chudnova Olga; Mokhova Olga

    2017-01-01

    The results of a comparative study on economic security of enterprises depending on the quantity of business activities are published in the article. The sampling for analysis was conducted based on statistic data of Primorsky Region of the Russian Federation. The control points are the years of the most thorough data collection on the business activities of one-field and diversified enterprises: 2005, 2009, 2013, 2015.

  1. Comparing Apples to Apples: Paleoclimate Model-Data comparison via Proxy System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Sylvia; Emile-Geay, Julien; Evans, Michael; Noone, David

    2014-05-01

    The wealth of paleodata spanning the last millennium (hereinafter LM) provides an invaluable testbed for CMIP5-class GCMs. However, comparing GCM output to paleodata is non-trivial. High-resolution paleoclimate proxies generally contain a multivariate and non-linear response to regional climate forcing. Disentangling the multivariate environmental influences on proxies like corals, speleothems, and trees can be complex due to spatiotemporal climate variability, non-stationarity, and threshold dependence. Given these and other complications, many paleodata-GCM comparisons take a leap of faith, relating climate fields (e.g. precipitation, temperature) to geochemical signals in proxy data (e.g. δ18O in coral aragonite or ice cores) (e.g. Braconnot et al., 2012). Isotope-enabled GCMs are a step in the right direction, with water isotopes providing a connector point between GCMs and paleodata. However, such studies are still rare, and isotope fields are not archived as part of LM PMIP3 simulations. More importantly, much of the complexity in how proxy systems record and transduce environmental signals remains unaccounted for. In this study we use proxy system models (PSMs, Evans et al., 2013) to bridge this conceptual gap. A PSM mathematically encodes the mechanistic understanding of the physical, geochemical and, sometimes biological influences on each proxy. To translate GCM output to proxy space, we have synthesized a comprehensive, consistently formatted package of published PSMs, including δ18O in corals, tree ring cellulose, speleothems, and ice cores. Each PSM is comprised of three sub-models: sensor, archive, and observation. For the first time, these different components are coupled together for four major proxy types, allowing uncertainties due to both dating and signal interpretation to be treated within a self-consistent framework. The output of this process is an ensemble of many (say N = 1,000) realizations of the proxy network, all equally plausible

  2. A Comparative Study of Neural Networks and Fuzzy Systems in Modeling of a Nonlinear Dynamic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Demirtas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the neural networks and fuzzy modeling approaches on a nonlinear system. We have taken Permanent Magnet Brushless Direct Current (PMBDC motor data and have generated models using both approaches. The predictive performance of both methods was compared on the data set for model configurations. The paper describes the results of these tests and discusses the effects of changing model parameters on predictive and practical performance. Modeling sensitivity was used to compare for two methods.

  3. How can schools help youth increase physical activity? An economic analysis comparing school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Susan H; Wu, Shinyi; Cohen, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    For optimal health, physical activity should be an integral and routine part of daily life. Youth spend a significant amount of time at school yet rarely achieve the recommended 60 min of moderate and vigorous physical activity in physical education (PE) classes or recess. This study assessed the following types of school-based opportunities to improve physical activity for youth: after-school programs, before-school programs, PE classes, extended-day PE, and short physical activity breaks during the school day. An economic analysis conducted in 2013 compared school-based approaches to increasing physical activity. Analysis factors included costs, reach, effects on physical activity gains, cost-effectiveness, and other potentially augmenting benefits. Two programs were significantly superior in terms of reach and cost per student: (1) extending the school day with mandatory PE participation and (2) offering short (10-minute) physical activity breaks during regular classroom hours. After-school program costs per student are high and the programs have a smaller reach, but they offer benefits (such as childcare) that may justify their higher costs. Before-school programs did not appear feasible. Incorporating short physical activity breaks into the existing school day would be a cost-effective way to increase school-based activity. This type of program is inexpensive and has broad reach. Inserting activity breaks throughout the day is appropriate, especially when youth are otherwise largely sedentary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduced activity of AMP-activated protein kinase protects against genetic models of motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, M A; Selak, M A; Xiang, Z; Krainc, D; Neve, R L; Kraemer, B C; Watts, J L; Kalb, R G

    2012-01-18

    A growing body of research indicates that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models of ALS exhibit metabolic dysfunction. A subpopulation of ALS patients possesses higher levels of resting energy expenditure and lower fat-free mass compared to healthy controls. Similarly, two mutant copper zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1) mouse models of familial ALS possess a hypermetabolic phenotype. The pathophysiological relevance of the bioenergetic defects observed in ALS remains largely elusive. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of cellular energy status and thus might be activated in various models of ALS. Here, we report that AMPK activity is increased in spinal cord cultures expressing mSOD1, as well as in spinal cord lysates from mSOD1 mice. Reducing AMPK activity either pharmacologically or genetically prevents mSOD1-induced motor neuron death in vitro. To investigate the role of AMPK in vivo, we used Caenorhabditis elegans models of motor neuron disease. C. elegans engineered to express human mSOD1 (G85R) in neurons develops locomotor dysfunction and severe fecundity defects when compared to transgenic worms expressing human wild-type SOD1. Genetic reduction of aak-2, the ortholog of the AMPK α2 catalytic subunit in nematodes, improved locomotor behavior and fecundity in G85R animals. Similar observations were made with nematodes engineered to express mutant tat-activating regulatory (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa molecular weight. Altogether, these data suggest that bioenergetic abnormalities are likely to be pathophysiologically relevant to motor neuron disease.

  5. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  6. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of an Active Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luís Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation methodology of the dynamic behavior of an active viscous damper. The damper has two flexible metallic bellows connected to a rigid reservoir filled with fluid. When one of the bellows is connected to a vibrating structure a periodic flow passes through a variable internal orifice and the damping effect is produced. The size of the orifice is adjusted by a controlled linear piezoelectric actuator that positions the conical core into a conical cavity. The device finite element structural model consists of the valve body and its conical core that are assumed rigid and the flexible bellows are represented by two pistons with elastic suspensions. The flow developed inside the damper is modeled considering the fluid-structure interation, using the Lagrangean-Eulerian formulation. To validate the proposed model a prototype was constructed and experimental tests and numerical simulations are accomplished in the time domain, applying harmonic excitations. The results are compared using curves that relate the damping coefficient with the orifice size and with the input velocity applied at the bellows face. However, for the proper control design and system operation, the direct use of the finite element model becomes unviable due to its high computational time. Then, a reduced second order discrete dynamic model for the damper was developed. The model parameters are identified by analysis in the frequency domain, using impulsive excitation force, for constant and variable orifice sizes. At low excitation frequencies, the damper prototype behaves like a single degree of freedom system which damping factor changes with the orifice size A fuzzy controller was designed and it generates the orifice reference size associated to the desired damping factor. The active system presented better performance when compared to the passive one.

  7. Snakes on a plane: modeling flexible active nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Robin

    Active soft matter systems of self-propelled rod-shaped particles exhibit ordered phases and collective behavior that are remarkably different from their passive analogs. In nature, many self-propelled rod-shaped particles, such as gliding bacteria and kinesin-driven microtubules, are flexible and can bend. We model these ``living liquid crystals'' to explore their phase behavior, dynamics, and pattern formation. We model particles as short polymers via molecular dynamics with a Langevin thermostat and various types of activity, substrate, and environments. For self-propelled polar particles gliding on a solid substrate, we map out the phase diagram as a function of particle density and flexibility. We compare simulated defect structures to those observed in colonies of gliding myxobacteria; compare spooling behavior to that observed in microtubule gliding assays; and analyze emergence of nematic and polar order. Next we explore pattern formation of self-propelled polar particles under flexible encapsulation, and on substrates with non-uniform Gaussian curvature. Lastly, we impose an activity mechanism that mimics extensile shear, study flexible particles both on solid substrates and coupled to a lipid membrane, and discuss comparisons to relevant experiments. Work performed in collaboration with Michael Varga (Kent State) and Luca Giomi (Universiteit Leiden.) Work supported by NSF DMR-1409658.

  8. Models Constraints from Observations of Active Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, R.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Dametto, N. Z.; Ruschel-Dutra, D.; Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Martins, L. P.; Mason, R.; Ho, L. C.; Palomar XD Team

    2015-08-01

    Studying the unresolved stellar content of galaxies generally involves disentangling the various components contributing to the spectral energy distribution (SED), and fitting a combination of simple stellar populations (SSPs) to derive information about age, metallicity, and star formation history. In the near-infrared (NIR, 0.85-2.5 μm), the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase - the last stage of the evolution of intermediate-mass (M ≲ 6 M⊙) stars - is a particularly important component of the SSP models. These stars can dominate the emission of stellar populations with ages ˜ 0.2-2 Gyr, being responsible for roughly half of the luminosity in the K band. In addition, when trying to describe the continuum observed in active galactic nuclei, the signatures of the central engine and from the dusty torus cannot be ignored. Over the past several years we have developed a method to disentangle these three components. Our synthesis shows significant differences between Seyfert 1 (Sy 1) and Seyfert 2 (Sy 2) galaxies. The central few hundred parsecs of our galaxy sample contain a substantial fraction of intermediate-age populations with a mean metallicity near solar. Two-dimensional mapping of the near-infrared stellar population of the nuclear region of active galaxies suggests that there is a spatial correlation between the intermediate-age stellar population and a partial ring of low stellar velocity dispersion (σ*). Such an age is consistent with a scenario in which the origin of the low-σ* rings is a past event which triggered an inflow of gas and formed stars which still keep the colder kinematics of the gas from which they have formed. We also discuss the fingerprints of features attributed to TP-AGB stars in the spectra of the nuclear regions of nearby galaxies.

  9. Comparing Book- and Tablet-Based Picture Activity Schedules: Acquisition and Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Aimee; Markham, Victoria

    2017-09-01

    Picture activity schedules consist of a sequence of images representing the order of tasks for a person to complete. Although, picture activity schedules have traditionally been presented in a book format, recently picture activity schedules have been evaluated on technological devices such as an iPod™ touch. The present study compared the efficiency of picture activity schedule acquisition on book- and tablet-based modalities. In addition, participant preference for each modality was assessed. Three boys aged below 5 years with a diagnosis of autism participated. Participants were taught to follow the schedules using both modalities. Following mastery of each modality of picture activity schedule, a concurrent-chains preference assessment was conducted to evaluate participant preference for each modality. Differences in acquisition rates across the two modalities were marginal. Preference for book- or tablet-based schedules was idiosyncratic across participants.

  10. Comparative analysis of national and regional models of the silver economy in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Klimczuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The approach to analysing population ageing and its impacts on the economy has evolved in recent years. There is increasing interest in the development and use of products and services related to gerontechnology as well as other social innovations that may be considered as central parts of the "silver economy." However, the concept of silver economy is still being formed and requires detailed research. This article proposes a typology of models of the silver economy in the European Union (EU at the national and regional levels. This typology was created by comparing the Active Ageing Index to the typology of varieties and cultures of capitalism and typology of the welfare states. Practical recommendations for institutions of the EU and directions for further research are discussed.

  11. Anti-granuloma activity of Coriandrum sativum in experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vinod; Singh, Surender; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coriandrum sativum has been used in the traditional systems of medicine for management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. Objectives: In this study, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract (CSHE) in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of CSHE was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model and the anti-granuloma activity of CSHE was evaluated using the subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation-induced granuloma formation and stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with complete Freund's adjuvant. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-1 β levels, and peritoneal macrophage expression of TNF-R1 were evaluated as markers of global inflammation. Results: CSHE at the highest dose tested (32 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in paw edema after carrageenan administration. CSHE treatment also reduced dry granuloma weight in all treated animals. Serum IL-6 and IL-1 β levels were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the CSHE (32 mg/kg)-treated group as compared to control. Although there was an increase in serum TNF-α level in the CSHE-treated group as compared to control, TNF-R1 expression on peritoneal macrophages was found to be reduced. Conclusion: Thus, the result of this study demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of CSHE in experimental models, and validates its traditional use for the management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:23741156

  12. Modelling of phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, J.-C.; Gavard, L.; Boussidan, C.; Lepoittevin, C.; Servant, C.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to summarize modelling of on-heating and on-cooling phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic (LAM) steels. Calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium phase fractions and kinetic aspects of phase transformations have been performed by using different approaches from experimental data (CCT and TTT diagrams obtained by dilatometry). All the calculated data have been compared to an important and systematic set of experimental data obtained on different LAM steels of the 7.5-11% CrWVT a type. (orig.)

  13. Modelling of phase transformations occurring in low activation martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, J.-C.; Gavard, L.; Boussidan, C.; Lepoittevin, C.; Denis, S.; Servant, C.

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this paper is to summarize modelling of on-heating and on-cooling phase transformations occurring in Low Activation Martensitic (LAM) steels. Calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium phase fractions and kinetic aspects of phase transformations have been performed by using different approaches from experimental data (CCT and TTT diagrams obtained by dilatometry). All the calculated data have been compared to an important and systematic set of experimental data obtained on different LAM steels of the 7.5-11% CrWVT a type.

  14. Active hip and spine ROM differs when comparing unconstrained motion with voluntary segmental constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreside, Janice M; Barbado, David; Juan-Recio, Casto; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2013-12-01

    Active range of motion trials are frequently used as a baseline for normalizing other data. However, previous research has not focused on methods utilized to achieve maximum active range of motion. Twenty-seven males (age 20-38 years) participated in this study. Active hip extension in upright standing was compared to active lumbar extension with regards to degrees of total hip and spine extension obtained. Similarly, active spine rotation whereby participants attempted to constrain associated pelvis and hip rotation was compared to rotation trials in which the pelvis and hips were free to rotate concurrently. An infra-red motion capture system and associated software were used to capture movement and determine joint angles. Results indicate that average degrees of hip extension did not differ between the two methods (p = 0.138), nor did either method result more frequently in the highest measurement. Spine extension values were significantly greater in the active spine extension manoeuvre compared to the associated back extension that occurred when participants were asked to actively extend their hip (p < 0.001). Average degrees of spine rotation were greater in the unconstrained trials: when concurrent hip and pelvis rotation were allowed to take place (p < 0.001). Of the 27 participants, 23 obtained maximum rotation during the unconstrained trials. To obtain maximum active hip joint extension, both hip and back extension trials should be collected. Maximum spine rotation is more likely to occur when the pelvis and hips are unconstrained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARATIVE MODELLING AND LIGAND BINDING SITE PREDICTION OF A FAMILY 43 GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE FROM Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 showed close evolutionary relation with carbohydrate binding family 6 proteins from C. cellulolyticum, C. papyrosolvens, C. cellulyticum, and A. cellulyticum. Comparative modeling of CtGH43 was performed based on crystal structures with PDB IDs 3C7F, 1YIF, 1YRZ, 2EXH and 1WL7. The structure having lowest MODELLER objective function was selected. The three-dimensional structure revealed typical 5-fold beta–propeller architecture. Energy minimization and validation of predicted model with VERIFY 3D indicated acceptability of the proposed atomic structure. The Ramachandran plot analysis by RAMPAGE confirmed that family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 contains little or negligible segments of helices. It also showed that out of 301 residues, 267 (89.3% were in most favoured region, 23 (7.7% were in allowed region and 9 (3.0% were in outlier region. IUPred analysis of CtGH43 showed no disordered region. Active site analysis showed presence of two Asp and one Glu, assumed to form a catalytic triad. This study gives us information about three-dimensional structure and reaffirms the fact that it has the similar core 5-fold beta–propeller architecture and so probably has the same inverting mechanism of action with the formation of above mentioned catalytic triad for catalysis of polysaccharides.

  16. A comparative behavioural study of mechanical hypersensitivity in 2 pain models in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Marie-Céline; Hrncic, Dragan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Caspani, Ombretta

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of pain sensitivity in humans has been standardized using quantitative sensory testing, whereas in animals mostly paw withdrawal thresholds to diverse stimuli are measured. This study directly compares tests used in quantitative sensory testing (pinpricks, pressure algometer) with tests used in animal studies (electronic von Frey test: evF), which we applied to the dorsal hind limbs of humans after high frequency stimulation and rats after tibial nerve transection. Both experimental models induce profound mechanical hypersensitivity. At baseline, humans and rats showed a similar sensitivity to evF with 0.2 mm diameter tips, but significant differences for other test stimuli (all P pain models (P pain sensitivity, but probe size and shape should be standardized. Hypersensitivity to blunt pressure-the leading positive sensory sign after peripheral nerve injury in humans-is a novel finding in the tibial nerve transection model. By testing outside the primary zone of nerve damage (rat) or activation (humans), our methods likely involve effects of central sensitization in both species.

  17. Screening of Plant Extracts for Antioxidant Activity: a Comparative Study on Three Testing Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, I.; Beek, van T.A.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Groot, de Æ.; Evstatieva, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    Three methods widely employed in the evaluation of antioxidant activity, namely 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, static headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) and -carotene bleaching test (BCBT), have been compared with regard to their application in the screening of

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of ceftobiprole against staphylococci displaying normal and small-colony variant phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eiff, Christof; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Becker, Karsten; Peters, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The antistaphylococcal activity of ceftobiprole was compared with those of cefuroxime, linezolid, and moxifloxacin by using the agar dilution method. Apart from three strains with small-colony variant phenotypes, all Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested were inhibited by < or =2 microg/ml of

  19. Non-occupational physical activity levels of shift workers compared with non-shift workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loef, Bette; Hulsegge, Gerben; Wendel-Vos, G C Wanda; Verschuren, W M Monique; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Bakker, Marije F.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Proper, Karin I

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lack of physical activity (PA) has been hypothesised as an underlying mechanism in the adverse health effects of shift work. Therefore, our aim was to compare non-occupational PA levels between shift workers and non-shift workers. Furthermore, exposure-response relationships for

  20. Non-occupational physical activity levels of shift workers compared with non-shift workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loef, Bette; Hulsegge, Gerben; Wendel-Vos, G. C Wanda; Verschuren, W. M Monique; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Bakker, Marije F.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Proper, Karin I.

    Objectives Lack of physical activity (PA) has been hypothesised as an underlying mechanism in the adverse health effects of shift work. Therefore, our aim was to compare non-occupational PA levels between shift workers and non-shift workers. Furthermore, exposure- response relationships for

  1. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S.; Graedel, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1 degree x 1 degree grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings

  2. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Graedel, T.E. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1993-05-20

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1{degree} {times} 1{degree} grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings.

  3. Protocol: Entrepreneurship in the area of Marketing. Comparing PBL vs active lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Rincón Diez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This protocol presents a research process which aims to analyze the impact of an active learning model on entrepreneurship of university students of Marketing. First, a learning model is proposed which allows to jointly conducting the content of different subjects and which provides an integrated vision of Marketing. Subsequently, the concept of entrepreneurship is defined and a measuring instrument is mentioned. Through this instrument the information needed to analyze to what extent the new learning model promotes students’ entrepreneurship is gathered. Finally, several possibilities to perform the data analysis are presented.

  4. How Accurate Is Your Activity Tracker? A Comparative Study of Step Counts in Low-Intensity Physical Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinia, Parastoo; Cain, Chris; Fallahzadeh, Ramin; Shahrokni, Armin; Cook, Diane; Ghasemzadeh, Hassan

    2017-08-11

    As commercially available activity trackers are being utilized in clinical trials, the research community remains uncertain about reliability of the trackers, particularly in studies that involve walking aids and low-intensity activities. While these trackers have been tested for reliability during walking and running activities, there has been limited research on validating them during low-intensity activities and walking with assistive tools. The aim of this study was to (1) determine the accuracy of 3 Fitbit devices (ie, Zip, One, and Flex) at different wearing positions (ie, pants pocket, chest, and wrist) during walking at 3 different speeds, 2.5, 5, and 8 km/h, performed by healthy adults on a treadmill; (2) determine the accuracy of the mentioned trackers worn at different sites during activities of daily living; and (3) examine whether intensity of physical activity (PA) impacts the choice of optimal wearing site of the tracker. We recruited 15 healthy young adults to perform 6 PAs while wearing 3 Fitbit devices (ie, Zip, One, and Flex) on their chest, pants pocket, and wrist. The activities include walking at 2.5, 5, and 8 km/h, pushing a shopping cart, walking with aid of a walker, and eating while sitting. We compared the number of steps counted by each tracker with gold standard numbers. We performed multiple statistical analyses to compute descriptive statistics (ie, ANOVA test), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), mean absolute error rate, and correlation by comparing the tracker-recorded data with that of the gold standard. All the 3 trackers demonstrated good-to-excellent (ICC>0.75) correlation with the gold standard step counts during treadmill experiments. The correlation was poor (ICCactivities. There was no significant difference between the trackers and the gold standard in the shopping cart experiment. The wrist worn tracker, Flex, counted several steps when eating (Pactivities, while the wrist was the optimal wearing site in less

  5. Applying fuzzy logic to comparative distribution modelling: a case study with two sympatric amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A Márcia; Real, Raimundo

    2012-01-01

    We modelled the distributions of two toads (Bufo bufo and Epidalea calamita) in the Iberian Peninsula using the favourability function, which makes predictions directly comparable for different species and allows fuzzy logic operations to relate different models. The fuzzy intersection between individual models, representing favourability for the presence of both species simultaneously, was compared with another favourability model built on the presences shared by both species. The fuzzy union between individual models, representing favourability for the presence of any of the two species, was compared with another favourability model based on the presences of either or both of them. The fuzzy intersections between favourability for each species and the complementary of favourability for the other (corresponding to the logical operation "A and not B") were compared with models of exclusive presence of one species versus the exclusive presence of the other. The results of modelling combined species data were highly similar to those of fuzzy logic operations between individual models, proving fuzzy logic and the favourability function valuable for comparative distribution modelling. We highlight several advantages of fuzzy logic over other forms of combining distribution models, including the possibility to combine multiple species models for management and conservation planning.

  6. Comparing i-Tree modeled ozone deposition with field measurements in a periurban Mediterranean forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Morani; D. Nowak; S. Hirabayashi; G. Guidolotti; M. Medori; V. Muzzini; S. Fares; G. Scarascia Mugnozza; C. Calfapietra

    2014-01-01

    Ozone flux estimates from the i-Tree model were compared with ozone flux measurements using the Eddy Covariance technique in a periurban Mediterranean forest near Rome (Castelporziano). For the first time i-Tree model outputs were compared with field measurements in relation to dry deposition estimates. Results showed generally a...

  7. A comparative study of two communication models in HIV/AIDS coverage in selected Nigerian newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Okidu, Onjefu

    2013-01-01

    The current overriding thought in HIV/AIDS communication in developing countries is the need for a shift from the cognitive model, which emphasises the decision-making of the individual, to the activity model, which emphasises the context of the individual. In spite of the acknowledged media shift from the cognitive to the activity model in some developing countries, some HIV/AIDS communication scholars have felt otherwise. It was against this background that this study examined the content o...

  8. Comparative modeling analyses of Cs-137 fate in the rivers impacted by Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Kivva, S. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The consequences of two largest nuclear accidents of the last decades - at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) (1986) and at Fukushima Daiichi NPP (FDNPP) (2011) clearly demonstrated that radioactive contamination of water bodies in vicinity of NPP and on the waterways from it, e.g., river- reservoir water after Chernobyl accident and rivers and coastal marine waters after Fukushima accident, in the both cases have been one of the main sources of the public concerns on the accident consequences. The higher weight of water contamination in public perception of the accidents consequences in comparison with the real fraction of doses via aquatic pathways in comparison with other dose components is a specificity of public perception of environmental contamination. This psychological phenomenon that was confirmed after these accidents provides supplementary arguments that the reliable simulation and prediction of the radionuclide dynamics in water and sediments is important part of the post-accidental radioecological research. The purpose of the research is to use the experience of the modeling activities f conducted for the past more than 25 years within the Chernobyl affected Pripyat River and Dnieper River watershed as also data of the new monitoring studies in Japan of Abukuma River (largest in the region - the watershed area is 5400 km{sup 2}), Kuchibuto River, Uta River, Niita River, Natsui River, Same River, as also of the studies on the specific of the 'water-sediment' {sup 137}Cs exchanges in this area to refine the 1-D model RIVTOX and 2-D model COASTOX for the increasing of the predictive power of the modeling technologies. The results of the modeling studies are applied for more accurate prediction of water/sediment radionuclide contamination of rivers and reservoirs in the Fukushima Prefecture and for the comparative analyses of the efficiency of the of the post -accidental measures to diminish the contamination of the water bodies. Document

  9. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 μCi of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor

  10. Partially hydrogenated soybean oil reduces postprandial t-PA activity compared with palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H; Seljeflot, I; Solvoll, K; Pedersen, J I

    2001-04-01

    The effects of dietary trans fatty acids on fasting and diurnal variation in hemostatic variables are not known. This study compares the effects of three diets with three different margarines, one based on palm oil (PALM-diet), one based on partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO, TRANS-diet) and one with a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA-diet) on diurnal postprandial hemostatic variables. A strictly controlled dietary Latin square study was performed and nine young female participants consumed each of the diets for 17 days in a random order. The sum of the cholesterol-increasing fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0, C16:0) was 36.3% of total fatty acids in the PALM-diet, the same as the sum of saturated-(C12:0, C14:0, C16:0) (12.5%) and trans fatty acids (23.1%) in the TRANS-diet. The sum of C12:0, C14:0 and C16:0 was 20.7% in the PUFA-diet. The amount of fat made up 30-31% of energy in all diets. Nine participants completed the study. The diurnal postprandial state level of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity was significantly decreased on the TRANS-diet compared with the PALM-diet. t-PA activity was also decreased on the PUFA-diet compared with PALM-diet but the difference was below statistical significance (P=0.07, Bonferonni adjusted). There were no significant differences in either fasting levels or in circadian variation of t-PA antigen, PAI-1 activity, PAI-antigen, factor VII coagulant activity or fibrinogen between the three diets. Our results indicate that dietary trans fatty acids from PHSO has an unfavourable effect on postprandial t-PA activity and thus possibly on the fibrinolytic system compared with palm oil.

  11. Comparative study of the in vitro activity of a new fluoroquinolone, ABT-492.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, S J; Fraise, A P; Andrews, J M; Jevons, G; Brenwald, N P; Wise, R

    2004-05-01

    The in vitro activity of a new fluoroquinolone, ABT-492, was determined. MICs were compared with those of two beta-lactams, telithromycin, ciprofloxacin and four later generation fluoroquinolones. The effects of human serum and of inoculum concentration were also investigated. MIC data indicate that ABT-492 has potent activity against Gram-positive organisms with enhanced anti-staphylococcal activity compared with earlier fluoroquinolones, in addition to activity against beta-haemolytic streptococci, pneumococci including penicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and vancomycin-susceptible and -resistant Enterococcus faecalis but not Enterococcus faecium. ABT-492 was the most active agent tested against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Neisseria meningitidis, fluoroquinolone-susceptible Neisseria gonorrhoeae and anaerobes. Good activity was observed for ABT-492 amongst the Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes tested, but ciprofloxacin showed superior activity for species of Proteus, Morganella and Providencia, as well as for Pseudomonas spp. In common with the other fluoroquinolones tested, organisms with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin had raised MIC(90)s to ABT-492. The one isolate of H. influenzae tested with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility had an ABT-492 MIC close to that of the population lacking a mechanism of quinolone resistance. ABT-492 was more active than ciprofloxacin against Chlamydia spp. An inoculum effect was observed with a number of isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, E. faecium, Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli, in addition to moderately raised MICs in the presence of 70% serum protein. The clinical significance of these findings is yet to be determined. ABT-492 is a new fluoroquinolone with excellent activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, with many potential clinical uses.

  12. Comparative evaluation of life cycle assessment models for solid waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Joerg; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    This publication compares a selection of six different models developed in Europe and America by research organisations, industry associations and governmental institutions. The comparison of the models reveals the variations in the results and the differences in the conclusions of an LCA study done with these models. The models are compared by modelling a specific case - the waste management system of Dresden, Germany - with each model and an in-detail comparison of the life cycle inventory results. Moreover, a life cycle impact assessment shows if the LCA results of each model allows for comparable and consecutive conclusions, which do not contradict the conclusions derived from the other models' results. Furthermore, the influence of different level of detail in the life cycle inventory of the life cycle assessment is demonstrated. The model comparison revealed that the variations in the LCA results calculated by the models for the case show high variations and are not negligible. In some cases the high variations in results lead to contradictory conclusions concerning the environmental performance of the waste management processes. The static, linear modelling approach chosen by all models analysed is inappropriate for reflecting actual conditions. Moreover, it was found that although the models' approach to LCA is comparable on a general level, the level of detail implemented in the software tools is very different

  13. A model of the statistical power of comparative genome sequence analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sean R Eddy

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genome sequence analysis is powerful, but sequencing genomes is expensive. It is desirable to be able to predict how many genomes are needed for comparative genomics, and at what evolutionary distances. Here I describe a simple mathematical model for the common problem of identifying conserved sequences. The model leads to some useful rules of thumb. For a given evolutionary distance, the number of comparative genomes needed for a constant level of statistical stringency in identi...

  14. 3D active workspace of human hand anatomical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungureanu Loredana

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the model of the human hand is created with accuracy by respecting the type of motion provided by each articulation and the dimensions of articulated bones, it can function as the real organ providing the same motions. Unfortunately, the human hand is hard to model due to its kinematical chains submitted to motion constraints. On the other hand, if an application does not impose a fine manipulation it is not necessary to create a model as complex as the human hand is. But always the hand model has to perform a certain space of motions in imposed workspace architecture no matter what the practical application does. Methods Based on Denavit-Hartenberg convention, we conceived the kinematical model of the human hand, having in mind the structure and the behavior of the natural model. We obtained the kinematical equations describing the motion of every fingertip with respect to the general coordinate system, placed on the wrist. For every joint variable, a range of motion was established. Dividing these joint variables to an appropriate number of intervals and connecting them, the complex surface bordering the active hand model workspace was obtained. Results Using MATLAB 7.0, the complex surface described by fingertips, when hand articulations are all simultaneously moving, was obtained. It can be seen that any point on surface has its own coordinates smaller than the maximum length of the middle finger in static position. Therefore, a sphere having the centre in the origin of the general coordinate system and the radius which equals this length covers the represented complex surface. Conclusion We propose a human hand model that represents a new solution compared to the existing ones. This model is capable to make special movements like power grip and dexterous manipulations. During them, the fingertips do not exceed the active workspace encapsulated by determined surfaces. The proposed kinematical model can help to choose

  15. Comparative study of the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in different forms of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Quesada, Jorge; Jorquera Cortez, Rodrigo; Rivera Alvarez, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    The activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was determined in the fluid gingival crevicular (FGC) from different sites of the anterior sector of the oral cavity in a clinically healthy subjects, and other with moderate gingivitis and with chronic severe generalized periodontists. Patients were treated and followed for three months, after the which has proceeded to make measurements of activity in the same sites discussed above. The results have showed statistically significant differences when comparing the activity of LDH in healthy individuals, and in other patients, treated by the pathology that presenting. On the other hand, were found without statistically significant differences between patients treated with clinically healthy subjects. The conclusion has been that the activity of LDH could be a quantitative marker for assessing cellular damage and evolution of treatment. (author) [es

  16. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Diane E. [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Program of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hoover, Benjamin [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cloud, Loretta Grey [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Shihui [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molinolo, Alfredo A. [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Leppla, Stephen H. [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bugge, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.bugge@nih.go [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti

  17. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  18. A computational approach to compare regression modelling strategies in prediction research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajouheshnia, R.; Pestman, W.R.; Teerenstra, S.; Groenwold, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is often unclear which approach to fit, assess and adjust a model will yield the most accurate prediction model. We present an extension of an approach for comparing modelling strategies in linear regression to the setting of logistic regression and demonstrate its application in

  19. Comparing Campers' Physical Activity Levels Between Sport Education And Traditional Instruction in a Residential Summer Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary; Morehead, Craig A

    2017-09-01

    To date, studies examining physical activity (PA) levels have largely been dedicated to the school setting, while there is little known about the activity levels of children who participate in traditional or summer day camps. Participants were 83 11- to 12-year-old campers who partook in either Sport Education or traditional instruction at a large residential summer camp. All lessons were video recorded and coded using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT), which categorizes PA levels as well as contextual characteristics. Results indicated that campers who participated in Sport Education spent a higher percentage of time (61.6%) engaged in moderate to vigorous activity than campers in the traditional activity unit (42.2%). In addition, campers spent less time idly within Sport Education (27.9%), than its counterpart (39.5%). These findings indicate that utilizing the Sport Education model may provide campers with higher levels of PA within this context.

  20. Quantitative modeling of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Fuller-Rowell

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A physical model of the coupled thermosphere and ionosphere has been used to determine the accuracy of model predictions of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity, and assess our understanding of the physical processes. The physical model is driven by empirical descriptions of the high-latitude electric field and auroral precipitation, as measures of the strength of the magnetospheric sources of energy and momentum to the upper atmosphere. Both sources are keyed to the time-dependent TIROS/NOAA auroral power index. The output of the model is the departure of the ionospheric F region from the normal climatological mean. A 50-day interval towards the end of 1997 has been simulated with the model for two cases. The first simulation uses only the electric fields and auroral forcing from the empirical models, and the second has an additional source of random electric field variability. In both cases, output from the physical model is compared with F-region data from ionosonde stations. Quantitative model/data comparisons have been performed to move beyond the conventional "visual" scientific assessment, in order to determine the value of the predictions for operational use. For this study, the ionosphere at two ionosonde stations has been studied in depth, one each from the northern and southern mid-latitudes. The model clearly captures the seasonal dependence in the ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity at mid-latitude, reproducing the tendency for decreased ion density in the summer hemisphere and increased densities in winter. In contrast to the "visual" success of the model, the detailed quantitative comparisons, which are necessary for space weather applications, are less impressive. The accuracy, or value, of the model has been quantified by evaluating the daily standard deviation, the root-mean-square error, and the correlation coefficient between the data and model predictions. The modeled quiet-time variability, or standard

  1. Antibacterial activity of statins: a comparative study of atorvastatin, simvastatin, and rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Majed; Mhaidat, Nizar; Alzoubi, Karem; Al-Azzam, Sayer; Alnasser, Ziad

    2012-05-07

    Statins have several effects beyond their well-known antihyperlipidemic activity, which include immunomodulatory, antioxidative and anticoagulant effects. In this study, we have tested the possible antimicrobial activity of statins against a range of standard bacterial strains and bacterial clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) values were evaluated and compared among three members of the statins drug (atorvastatin, simvastatin, and rosuvastatin). It was revealed that statins are able to induce variable degrees of antibacterial activity with atorvastatin, and simvastatin being the more potent than rosuvastatin. Methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), acinetobacter baumannii, staphylococcus epidermidis, and enterobacter aerogenes, were more sensitive to both atorvastatin, and simvastatin compared to rosuvastatin. On the other hand, escherichia coli, proteus mirabilis, and enterobacter cloacae were more sensitive to atorvastatin compared to both simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Furthermore, most clinical isolates were less sensitive to statins compared to their corresponding standard strains. Our findings might raise the possibility of a potentially important antibacterial class effect for statins especially, atorvastatin and simvastatin.

  2. Antibacterial activity of statins: a comparative study of Atorvastatin, Simvastatin, and Rosuvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masadeh Majed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins have several effects beyond their well-known antihyperlipidemic activity, which include immunomodulatory, antioxidative and anticoagulant effects. In this study, we have tested the possible antimicrobial activity of statins against a range of standard bacterial strains and bacterial clinical isolates. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC values were evaluated and compared among three members of the statins drug (atorvastatin, simvastatin, and rosuvastatin. Results It was revealed that statins are able to induce variable degrees of antibacterial activity with atorvastatin, and simvastatin being the more potent than rosuvastatin. Methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus (MSSA, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE, vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE, acinetobacter baumannii, staphylococcus epidermidis, and enterobacter aerogenes, were more sensitive to both atorvastatin, and simvastatin compared to rosuvastatin. On the other hand, escherichia coli, proteus mirabilis, and enterobacter cloacae were more sensitive to atorvastatin compared to both simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Furthermore, most clinical isolates were less sensitive to statins compared to their corresponding standard strains. Conclusion Our findings might raise the possibility of a potentially important antibacterial class effect for statins especially, atorvastatin and simvastatin.

  3. Leisure activities are linked to mental health benefits by providing time structure: comparing employed, unemployed and homemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, William K; Geiger, Ashley M; Wolf, Jutta M

    2017-01-01

    Unemployment has consistently been linked to negative mental health outcomes, emphasising the need to characterise the underlying mechanisms. The current study aimed at testing whether compared with other employment groups, fewer leisure activities observed in unemployment may contribute to elevated risk for negative mental health via loss of time structure. Depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression), leisure activities (exercise, self-focused, social), and time structure (Time Structure Questionnaire (TSQ)) were assessed cross-sectionally in 406 participants (unemployed=155, employed=140, homemakers=111) recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Controlling for gender and age, structural equation modelling revealed time structure partially (employed, homemakers) and fully (unemployed) mediated the relationship between leisure activities and depressive symptoms. With the exception of differential effects for structured routines, all other TSQ factors (sense of purpose, present orientation, effective organisation and persistence) contributed significantly to all models. These findings support the idea that especially for the unemployed, leisure activities impose their mental health benefits through increasing individuals' perception of spending their time effectively. Social leisure activities that provide a sense of daily structure may thereby be a particularly promising low-cost intervention to improve mental health in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Rivaroxaban limits complement activation compared with warfarin in antiphospholipid syndrome patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchillage, D R J; Mackie, I J; Efthymiou, M; Chitolie, A; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D A; Khamashta, M; Machin, S J; Cohen, H

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Complement activation has a pathogenic role in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Coagulation proteases such as factor Xa can activate complement proteins. Complement activation markers were elevated in anticoagulated thrombotic APS patients. Complement activation decreased in APS patients switching from warfarin to rivaroxaban. Background Complement activation may play a major role in the pathogenesis of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Coagulation proteases such as factor Xa can activate complement proteins. Aims To establish whether rivaroxaban, a direct factor Xa inhibitor, limits complement activation compared with warfarin in APS patients with previous venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods A total of 111 APS patients with previous VTE, on warfarin target INR 2.5, had blood samples taken at baseline and at day 42 after randomization in the RAPS (Rivaroxaban in Antiphospholipid Syndrome) trial. Fifty-six patients remained on warfarin and 55 switched to rivaroxaban. Fifty-five normal controls (NC) were also studied. Markers of complement activation (C3a, C5a, terminal complement complex [SC5b-9] and Bb fragment) were assessed. Results APS patients had significantly higher complement activation markers compared with NC at both time-points irrespective of the anticoagulant. There were no differences between the two patient groups at baseline, or patients remaining on warfarin at day 42. In 55 patients randomized to rivaroxaban, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 were lower at day 42 (median (ng mL -1 ) [confidence interval] 64 [29-125] vs. 83 [35-147], 9 [2-15] vs. 12 [4-18] and 171 [56-245] vs. 201 [66-350], respectively) but levels of Bb fragment were unchanged. There were no correlations between rivaroxaban levels and complement activation markers. Conclusions APS patients with previous VTE on warfarin exhibit increased complement activation, which is likely to occur via the classical pathway and is decreased by rivaroxaban administration

  5. Comparative Studies on Polyphenolic Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Schisandra chinensis Leaves and Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Mocan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and the polyphenolic content of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz. Baill. leaves and fruits. The leaves are an important source of flavonoids (35.10 ± 1.23 mg RE/g plant material. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the polyphenolic compounds were achieved using a HPLC-UV-MS method. The main flavonoid from the leaves was isoquercitrin (2486.18 ± 5.72 μg/g plant material, followed by quercitrin (1645.14 ± 2.12 μg/g plant material. Regarding the fruit composition, the dominant compound there was rutin (13.02 ± 0.21 μg/g plant material, but comparing with the leaves, fruits can be considered a poor source of phenolic compounds. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH, TEAC, hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX, inhibition of lipid peroxidation catalyzed by cytochrome c and EPR spectroscopic assays, revealing a better antioxidant activity for the S. chinensis leaves extract. In the antimicrobial assay, S. chinensis leaves extract showed efficient activities against the targeted bacteria, being more active than the fruits extract. The results suggest the leaves of S. chinensis as a valuable source of antioxidant compounds with significant antioxidant activity.

  6. Comparing present (DNA) and active (RNA) marine ciliate communities across depth gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, S. J.; Katz, L. A.; McManus, G. B.; Grattepanche, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Despite their important role in the marine food web, marine ciliate biogeography and ecology remains underexplored. Traditionally, marine ciliate diversity and abundance was believed to be greatest at the chlorophyll maximum, where there is an abundance of autotrophic prey, and then declines dramatically with depth. However, recent studies using high-throughput sequencing of ciliate communities showed that the diversity did not decline with depth (Grattepanche et al submitted). Instead Grattepanche et al (submitted) suggests there is a highly diverse ciliate community present in deep waters. In this study we compared the abundant (DNA) and the active (RNA) marine ciliate communities of the New England coast (Northwest Atlantic) across depth gradients in a transect crossing the continental shelf. We compared estimates of ciliate communities from SSU-rDNA (abundant) and SSU-rRNA (active) on a Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), which reveals abundant community members based on band brightness. Our findings 1) confirm that ciliate communities are diverse far below the chlorophyll maximum, 2) show that at all depths some ciliate members are abundant but not active (perhaps encysted) and 3) suggests that rare members of the ciliate community are sometimes extremely active. Our study provides a novel approach to understanding marine ciliate ecology and characterizes rare and active ciliates throughout the water column, with a focus on communities below the photic zone.

  7. Modeling and preparation of activated carbon for methane storage II. Neural network modeling and experimental studies of the activated carbon preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namvar-Asl, Mahnaz; Soltanieh, Mohammad; Rashidi, Alimorad

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the activated carbon (AC) preparation for methane storage. Due to the need for the introduction of a model, correlating the effective preparation parameters with the characteristic parameters of the activated carbon, a model was developed by neural networks. In a previous study [Namvar-Asl M, Soltanieh M, Rashidi A, Irandoukht A. Modeling and preparation of activated carbon for methane storage: (I) modeling of activated carbon characteristics with neural networks and response surface method. Proceedings of CESEP07, Krakow, Poland; 2007.], the model was designed with the MATLAB toolboxes providing the best response for the correlation of the characteristics parameters and the methane uptake of the activated carbon. Regarding this model, the characteristics of the activated carbon were determined for a target methane uptake. After the determination of the characteristics, the demonstrated model of this work guided us to the selection of the effective AC preparation parameters. According to the modeling results, some samples were prepared and their methane storage capacity was measured. The results were compared with those of a target methane uptake (special amount of methane storage). Among the designed models, one of them illustrated the methane storage capacity of 180 v/v. It was finally found that the neural network modeling for the assay of the efficient AC preparation parameters was financially feasible, with respect to the determined methane storage capacity. This study could be useful for the development of the Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG) technology

  8. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  9. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial activities of valinomycin and cereulide, the Bacillus cereus emetic toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Tempelaars, M.H.; Rodrigues, S.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Cereulide and valinomycin are highly similar cyclic dodecadepsipeptides with potassium ionophoric properties. Cereulide, produced by members of the Bacillus cereus group, is known mostly as emetic toxin, and no ecological function has been assigned. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial activity of valinomycin produced by Streptomyces spp. and cereulide was performed at a pH range of pH 5.5 to pH 9.5, under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Both compounds display pH-dependent activity a...

  10. COMPARATIVE LEGISLATIVE ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE BRIBERY IN THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijo Galiot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Confronting socially unacceptable activities, especially corruptive criminal acts, including bribing, makes an important issue of every regulated legal system. The crucial part of such policies are the criminal polices. In this paper, the author deals with the criminal legislation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, related to the matters of active bribing as one of the basic forms of corruptive behaviour. While comparing the way the penal system is regulated in the said country, the author comments basic similarities and differences of the passive bribing legal regulation in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Croatia.

  11. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freun...

  12. Comparative analysis of procoagulant and fibrinogenolytic activity of crude protease fractions of turmeric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Nafeesa, Zohara; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-08-22

    Turmeric rhizome is a traditional herbal medicine, which has been widely used as a remedy to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and for wound healing by the rural and tribal population of India. To validate scientific and therapeutic application of turmeric rhizomes to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and its role in wound healing process. The water extracts of thoroughly scrubbed and washed turmeric rhizomes viz., Curcuma aromatica Salisb., Curcuma longa L., Curcuma caesia Roxb., Curcuma amada Roxb. and Curcuma zedoria (Christm.) Roscoe. were subjected to salting out and dialysis. The dialyzed crude enzyme fractions (CEFs) were assessed for proteolytic activity using casein as substrate and were also confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. Its coagulant activity and fibrinogenolytic activity were assessed using human citrated plasma and fibrinogen, respectively. The type of protease(s) in CEFs was confirmed by inhibition studies using specific protease inhibitors. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed 1.89, 1.21 and 1.07 folds higher proteolytic activity, respectively, compared to papain. In contrast to these, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited moderate proteolytic activity. CEFs showed low proteolytic activities compared to trypsin. The proteolytic activities of CEFs were confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed complete hydrolysis of Aα, Bβ and γ subunits of human fibrinogen, while C. amada and C. zedoria showed partial hydrolysis. The CEFs viz., C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited strong procoagulant activity by reducing the human plasma clotting time from 172s (Control) to 66s, 84s 88s, 78s and 90s, respectively. The proteolytic activity of C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia and C. amada was inhibited (>82%) by PMSF, suggesting the possible presence of a serine protease(s). However, C. zedoria showed significant inhibition (60%) against IAA and moderate inhibition (30

  13. Active Orientation Models for Face Alignment In-the-Wild

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Alabort-i-Medina, Joan; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    We present Active Orientation Models (AOMs), generative models of facial shape and appearance, which extend the well-known paradigm of Active Appearance Models (AAMs) for the case of generic face alignment under unconstrained conditions. Robustness stems from the fact that the proposed AOMs employ a

  14. The influence comparing of activated biochar and conventional biochar on the soil biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáčková, Helena; Mykajlo, Irina; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment we have used biochar. This material is the product of the pyrolysis that has shown a positive effect on numerous physical and chemical soil properties. However, its influence on the biological component of the soil is very variable. A number of toxic substances that inhibit the soil productivity may be produced during pyrolysis process. The experiment dealt with the hypothesis concerning biochar toxicity reduction by simulating natural processes in the soil. Biochar has been exposed to aeration in the aquatic environment, enriched with nutrients and a source of native soil microflora. It has been created 6 variants in total, each with four replications. The soils samples have been placed in a phytotron for 90 days. Variants consisted of the soil with fertilizers adding (compost, biochar, activated biochar) and have been prepared as well as variants containing compost and biochar and activated biochar optionally. The highest aboveground biomass production has been estimated in variants containing compost, while the lowest production - in the variants containing conventional biochar. During production comparing of the variants with the conventional biochar, activated biochar and control samples it has been evident that activated biochar promotes plant growth, and in contradiction conventional biochar inhibits it. We will approach to the same conclusions when comparing variants with a combination of conventional biochar + compost and activated biochar + compost. Mineral nitrogen leaching has been another investigated parameter. The highest leaching has occurred in the control variant, while the lowest - in the variant with activated biochar (the leaching of nitrate nitrogen has been negligeable). Our results suggest that activated biochar has the potential; however, it is necessary to carry out similar experiments in the field conditions.

  15. Comparative Study of Biological Activities of Venom from Colubrid Snakes Rhabdophis tigrinus (Yamakagashi and Rhabdophis lateralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Komori

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdophis lateralis, a colubrid snake distributed throughout the continent of Asia, has recently undergone taxonomic revisions. Previously, Rhabdophis lateralis was classified as a subspecies of R. tigrinus (Yamakagashi until 2012, when several genetic differences were discovered which classified this snake as its own species. To elucidate the toxicity of venom from this poorly studied colubrid, various biological activities were compared between the venom from the two snake species. The components of their venom were compared by the elution profiles of reversed-phase HPLC and SDS-PAGE, and gel filtrated fractions were tested for effects on blood coagulation. Proteolytic activities of these fractions were also assayed by using synthetic substrates, fibrinogen, and matrix proteins. Similar to the R. tigrinus venom, the higher molecular weight fraction of R. lateralis venom contained a prothrombin activator. Both prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT of human plasma were shortened by the addition of R. lateralis and R. tigrinus venom. The thrombin formation was estimated by the uses of SDS-PAGE and chromogenic substrates. These venom fractions also possessed very specific proteinase activity on human fibrinogen, but the substrates for matrix metalloproteinase, such as collagen and laminin, were not hydrolyzed. However, there were some notable differences in reactivity to synthetic substrates for matrix metalloproteinase, and R. tigrinus venom possessed relatively higher activity. Our chemical investigation indicates that the components included in both venoms resemble each other closely. However, the ratio of components and proteolytic activity of some ingredients are slightly different, indicating differences between two closely-related snakes.

  16. Comparative Research on RC Equivalent Circuit Models for Lithium-Ion Batteries of Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent circuit models are a hot research topic in the field of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles, and scholars have proposed a variety of equivalent circuit models, from simple to complex. On one hand, a simple model cannot simulate the dynamic characteristics of batteries; on the other hand, it is difficult to apply a complex model to a real-time system. At present, there are few systematic comparative studies on equivalent circuit models of lithium-ion batteries. The representative first-order resistor-capacitor (RC model and second-order RC model commonly used in the literature are studied comparatively in this paper. Firstly, the parameters of the two models are identified experimentally; secondly, the simulation model is built in Matlab/Simulink environment, and finally the output precision of these two models is verified by the actual data. The results show that in the constant current condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.65% and the maximum error for the second-order RC model is 1.22%. In urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.88%, and for the second-order RC model the maximum error is 1.69%. This is of great instructional significance to the application in practical battery management systems for the equivalent circuit model of lithium-ion batteries of electric vehicles.

  17. Prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning provision for Australian community aged care clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen Margaret; Carter, Rachel Zoe; Sellars, Marcus William; Lewis, Virginia; Sutton, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-12-01

    Conduct a prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning (ACP) provision in community aged care: ACP conducted by the client's case manager (CM) ('Facilitator') and ACP conducted by an external ACP service ('Referral') over a 6-month period. This Australian study involved CMs and their clients. Eligible CM were English speaking, ≥18 years, had expected availability for the trial and worked ≥3 days per week. CMs were recruited via their organisations, sequentially allocated to a group and received education based on the group allocation. They were expected to initiate ACP with all clients and to facilitate ACP or refer for ACP. Outcomes were quantity of new ACP conversations and quantity and quality of new advance care directives (ACDs). 30 CMs (16 Facilitator, 14 Referral) completed the study; all 784 client's files (427 Facilitator, 357 Referral) were audited. ACP was initiated with 508 (65%) clients (293 Facilitator, 215 Referral; p<0.05); 89 (18%) of these (53 Facilitator, 36 Referral) and 41 (46%) (13 Facilitator, 28 Referral; p<0.005) completed ACDs. Most ACDs (71%) were of poor quality/not valid. A further 167 clients (facilitator 124; referral 43; p<0.005) reported ACP was in progress at study completion. While there were some differences, overall, models achieved similar outcomes. ACP was initiated with 65% of clients. However, fewer clients completed ACP, there was low numbers of ACDs and document quality was generally poor. The findings raise questions for future implementation and research into community ACP provision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Epidemiological models to support animal disease surveillance activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeberg, Preben; Paisley, Larry; Lind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological models have been used extensively as a tool in improving animal disease surveillance activities. A review of published papers identified three main groups of model applications: models for planning surveillance, models for evaluating the performance of surveillance systems...... and models for interpreting surveillance data as part of ongoing control or eradication programmes. Two Danish examples are outlined. The first illustrates how models were used in documenting country freedom from disease (trichinellosis) and the second demonstrates how models were of assistance in predicting...

  19. Editorial: Comparing Educational Modelling Languages on the "Planet Game" Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vignollet, Laurence; Martel, Christian; Burgos, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A few eLearning research teams promoting a scenario-based approach have adopted the IMS-LD specification, At the same time, other teams have developed other notations, languages and meta-models related to IMS-LD, along with tools and methodologies for modelling and implementing learning activities on eLearning platforms.The aim of this special issue is to share and confront approaches (i.e., models, tools and methodologies) through modelling experiences of collaborative learning activities. T...

  20. Comparative evaluation of two models of UPQC for suitable interface to enhance power quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Malabika [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Das, Shyama P.; Dubey, Gopal K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India)

    2007-05-15

    Majority of the dispersed generations from renewable energy sources are connected to the grid through power electronic interface, which introduce additional harmonics in the distribution systems. Research is being carried out to integrate active filtering with specific interface such that a common power quality (PQ) platform could be achieved. For generalized solution, a unified power quality conditioner (UPQC) could be the most comprehensive PQ protecting device for sensitive non-linear loads, which require quality input supply. Also, load current harmonic isolation needs to be ensured for maintaining the quality of the supply current. The present paper describes two control scheme models for UPQC, for enhancing PQ of sensitive non-linear loads. Based on two different kinds of voltage compensation strategy, two control schemes have been designed, which are termed as UPQC-Q and UPQC-P. A comparative loading analysis has developed useful insight in finding the typical application of the two different control schemes. The effectiveness of the two control schemes is verified through extensive simulation using the software SABER. As the power circuit configuration of UPQC remains same for both the model, with modification of control scheme only, the utility of UPQC can be optimized depending upon the application requirement. (author)

  1. A comparative study of antithrombotic and antiplatelet activities of different fucoidans from Laminaria japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Dong, Shizhu; Wang, Jingfeng; Li, Fang; Chen, Anjin; Li, Bafang

    2012-06-01

    Fucoidans extracted from brown algae represent an intriguing group of natural fucose-enriched sulfated polysaccharide, with excellent anticoagulant, antimetastatic, antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we compared antithrombotic activities of four fucoidan fractions with different molecular weight and sulfated ester content from Laminaria japonica in an electrical induced arterial thrombosis and their potential mechanism underlying such activity. In vivo middle molecular weight (MMW) fucoidan fractions with molecular weight about 28000 and 35000 exhibited better antithrombotic activity in electrical induced arterial thrombosis than low molecular weight (LMW) fucoidan LF1 and LF2 (Mw 7600 and 3900). Inhibition of arterial thrombosis occurred at dose of 0.1-0.25mg/kg for MMW fucoidans, accompanied with moderate anticoagulant activity and significant decrease of whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The antithrombotic effects of MMW Fucoidans might be related with promotion of TFPI content and decrease of TXB2 content, without affecting platelet aggregation and 6-keto-PGF1α content in vivo. In contrast, LMW fucoidans showed a correlation among anticoagulant, antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects in vivo. Antithrombotic action of LF1 and LF2 required high dose of 2.5-10mg/kg, concomitantly with anticoagulant activity and specific inhibition of platelet aggregation in vivo. Their antithrombotic effect might be related to their promotion of TFPI and 6-keto-PGF1α, down regulation of TXB2, without affecting hemorheology. These findings suggested that fucoidan fractions with different molecular weight acted on the antithrombotic action by different mechanism. By comparison, highly sulfated fucoidan LF2 with molecular weight of 3900 seemed to be a more suitable choice of antithrombotic drug for its antithrombotic activity accompanied with specific inhibitory activity on platelet aggregation, low anticoagulant activity and low hemorrhagic

  2. Exploration of freely available web-interfaces for comparative homology modelling of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Vijay; Pal, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to find the best suited freely available software for modelling of proteins by taking a few sample proteins. The proteins used were small to big in size with available crystal structures for the purpose of benchmarking. Key players like Phyre2, Swiss-Model, CPHmodels-3.0, Homer, (PS)2, (PS)(2)-V(2), Modweb were used for the comparison and model generation. Benchmarking process was done for four proteins, Icl, InhA, and KatG of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and RpoB of Thermus Thermophilus to get the most suited software. Parameters compared during analysis gave relatively better values for Phyre2 and Swiss-Model. This comparative study gave the information that Phyre2 and Swiss-Model make good models of small and large proteins as compared to other screened software. Other software was also good but is often not very efficient in providing full-length and properly folded structure.

  3. Comparative study on the electrocatalytic activities of ordered mesoporous carbons and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huan; Qi Bin; Lu Baoping; Bo Xiangjie; Guo Liping

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a comparative study on the electrocatalytic activities of ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) and graphene (GR) is presented. Using voltammetry and amperometry as detection methods, four DNA bases, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), six important electroactive compounds and various biomolecules were employed to investigate their electrochemical responses on OMC and GR modified glassy carbon electrodes (OMC/GCE and GR/GCE). The results show that OMC/GCE enhances the electron transfer kinetics of these compounds compared to GR/GCE. The discrepancy in electrochemical activities can be attributed to the different microstructures of OMC and GR, which were examined by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and nitrogen adsorption-desorption.

  4. Comparative Antianaerobic Activities of Doripenem Determined by MIC and Time-Kill Analysis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim L.; Ednie, Lois M.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Against 447 anaerobe strains, the investigational carbapenem doripenem had an MIC50 of 0.125 μg/ml and an MIC90 of 1 μg/ml. Results were similar to those for imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem. Time-kill studies showed that doripenem had very good bactericidal activity compared to other carbapenems, with 99.9% killing of 11 strains at 2× MIC after 48 h. PMID:17938185

  5. Comparative antianaerobic activities of doripenem determined by MIC and time-kill analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim L; Ednie, Lois M; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Against 447 anaerobe strains, the investigational carbapenem doripenem had an MIC 50 of 0.125 microg/ml and an MIC 90 of 1 microg/ml. Results were similar to those for imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem. Time-kill studies showed that doripenem had very good bactericidal activity compared to other carbapenems, with 99.9% killing of 11 strains at 2x MIC after 48 h.

  6. Comparative analysis of the activity of two promoters in insect cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are currently two major commercial vector providers. The pIB/V5-His vector from invitrogen uses the OpIE2 promoter and the pIEX-4 vector from novagen uses the IE1 promoter and hr5 enhancer. To compare the activity of these two promoters, we replaced the OpIE2 promoter in the pIB/V5-His vector with the hr5- IE1 ...

  7. Reductive activity of free and immobilized cells of cyanobacteria toward oxophosphonates-comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górak, Monika; Żymańczyk-Duda, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    This report, based on the previous studies, compares the reductive activity of different modes of following photobiocatalysts (on laboratory and preparative scale): Arthrospira maxima , Nostoc cf. muscorum and Nodularia sphaerocarpa , toward diethyl esters of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (1), 2-oxo-2-phenylethylphosphonate (2), and 2-oxobutylphosphonate (3). It was confirmed that immobilization in alginate matrix do not affect the activity and viability of the biocatalysts. Corresponding ( S )-hydroxyphosphonates (1a-3a) were obtained with similar efficiency compared to the free-cell mode with the yield and of the optical purity e.e respectively (e.g., N. sphaerocarpa experiments): (1) yield: 21 %, e.e . 84 %; (2) yield 97 %, e.e . 97; (3) yield 21 %, e.e. 89 %. Scaling up the processes for the best biocatalyst, N. sphaerocarpa , indicated that the use of free-living cells of cyanobacteria is more effective (640 mg of substrate 2, 44 % of yield, 91 % of e . e .), compared to the column bioreactor packed with immobilized cells of this photobiocatalyst (384 mg of substrate 2, 38 % of yield, 86 % of e.e ). In the case of free and immobilized cells of N. cf. muscorum , agitation of the medium was the crucial activity mediator. Shaking culture of free cells of N. cf. muscorum converted the diethyl 2-oxo-2-phenylethylphosphonate (2) with the yield of 43 % (99 % of e.e. ) compared to 18 % (99 % of e.e. , stationary culture). Immobilized cells of this cyanobacterium were also more active toward (2) under shaking conditions (28 % of yield, 99 % of e.e. ) than free ones without agitation.

  8. Neural activation in cognitive motor processes: comparing motor imagery and observation of gymnastic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzert, Jörn; Zentgraf, Karen; Stark, Rudolf; Vaitl, Dieter

    2008-07-01

    The simulation concept suggested by Jeannerod (Neuroimage 14:S103-S109, 2001) defines the S-states of action observation and mental simulation of action as action-related mental states lacking overt execution. Within this framework, similarities and neural overlap between S-states and overt execution are interpreted as providing the common basis for the motor representations implemented within the motor system. The present brain imaging study compared activation overlap and differential activation during mental simulation (motor imagery) with that while observing gymnastic movements. The fMRI conjunction analysis revealed overlapping activation for both S-states in primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area as well as in the intraparietal sulcus, cerebellar hemispheres, and parts of the basal ganglia. A direct contrast between the motor imagery and observation conditions revealed stronger activation for imagery in the posterior insula and the anterior cingulate gyrus. The hippocampus, the superior parietal lobe, and the cerebellar areas were differentially activated in the observation condition. In general, these data corroborate the concept of action-related S-states because of the high overlap in core motor as well as in motor-related areas. We argue that differential activity between S-states relates to task-specific and modal information processing.

  9. Antimicrobial and general toxicity activities of Gymnosperma glutinosum: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, M; Hernández, T; Serrano, R; Hernández, L B; Duran, A; Ríos, V; Sigrist, S; Hernández, H L H; Garcia, A M; Angeles-López, O; Fernández-Araiza, M A; Avila, G

    2007-03-21

    Gymnosperma glutinosum (Spreng.) Less (Asteraceae) is an important, and an effective herbal medicine which is wide used for the treatment of diarrhoea in Mexico. We examined and compared the antibacterial and antifungal activities through the dilution method and for general toxicity activity by the brine shrimp lethality assay of two samples of Gymnosperma glutinosum from two localities of Mexico: San Rafael-Coxcatlan (Puebla State) and Tepeji del Rio (Hidalgo State). In addition, two bioactive compounds (-)-17-hydroxy-neo-clerod-3-en-15-oic acid (1) and 5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8,2',4',5'-hexamethoxyflavone (2) were isolated. From the hexane extract from both places was obtained a MeOH partition M(2). M(2) of Tepeji del Rio showed the least MICs (<125 microg/ml) in the majority of the bacterial strains. Sarcina lutea was the most sensitive bacteria (MIC< 125 microg/ml). The hexane extract of both localities showed antifungal activity against all tested fungi. San Rafael's hexane extract was significant more activity than Tepeji del Rio. Aspergillus niger (IC(50)=23.79 microg/ml) and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (IC(50)=90.25 microg/ml) were the more sensitive fungus strains. The strongest general toxicity activity was observed with the M(2) partition from Tepeji del Rio (LC(50)=503.7 microg/ml). The results obtained in this investigation, showed differences between the antimicrobial activities of the samples of plants collected in San Rafael (Puebla) and Tepeji del Rio (Hidalgo).

  10. Water vapor measurements at ALOMAR over a solar cycle compared with model calculations by LIMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartogh, P.; Sonnemann, G. R.; Grygalashvyly, M.; Song, Li; Berger, U.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave water vapor measurements between 40 and 80 km altitude over a solar cycle (1996-2006) were carried out in high latitudes at Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) (69.29°N, 16.03°E), Norway. Some smaller gaps and three interruptions of monitoring in the winters 1996/1997 and 2005/2006 and from spring 2001 to spring 2002 occurred during this period. The observations show a distinct year-to-year variability not directly related to solar Lyman-α radiation. In winter the water vapor mixing ratios in the upper domain were anticorrelated to the solar activity, whereas in summer, minima occurred in the years after the solar maximum in 2000/2001. In winter, sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) modulated the water vapor mixing ratios. Within the stratopause region a middle atmospheric water vapor maximum was observed, which results from the methane oxidation and is a regular feature there. The altitude of the maximum increased by approximately 5 km as summer approached. The largest mixing ratios were monitored in autumn. During the summer season a secondary water vapor maximum also occurred above 65 km most pronounced in late summer. The solar Lyman-α radiation impacts the water vapor mixing ratio particularly in winter above 65 km. In summer the correlation is positive below 70 km. The correlation is also positive in the lower mesosphere/stratopause region in winter due to the action of sudden stratospheric warmings, which occur more frequently under the condition of high solar activity and the enhancing the humidity. A strong day-to-day variability connected with planetary wave activity was found throughout the entire year. Model calculations by means of Leibniz-Institute Middle Atmosphere model (LIMA) reflect the essential patterns of the water vapor variation, but the results also show differences from the observations, indicating that exchange processes between the troposphere and stratosphere not modeled by LIMA could have

  11. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: Agent-based versus structured metapopulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merler Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years large-scale computational models for the realistic simulation of epidemic outbreaks have been used with increased frequency. Methodologies adapt to the scale of interest and range from very detailed agent-based models to spatially-structured metapopulation models. One major issue thus concerns to what extent the geotemporal spreading pattern found by different modeling approaches may differ and depend on the different approximations and assumptions used. Methods We provide for the first time a side-by-side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent-based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the progression of a baseline pandemic event in Italy, a large and geographically heterogeneous European country. The agent-based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM model, based on high-resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short-range human mobility patterns at the global scale. The model also considers age structure data for Italy. GLEaM and the agent-based models are synchronized in their initial conditions by using the same disease parameterization, and by defining the same importation of infected cases from international travels. Results The results obtained show that both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing on the order of a few days. The relative difference of the epidemic size depends on the basic reproductive ratio, R0, and on the fact that the metapopulation model consistently yields a larger incidence than the agent-based model, as expected due to the differences in the structure in the intra-population contact pattern of the approaches. The age

  12. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: agent-based versus structured metapopulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajelli, Marco; Gonçalves, Bruno; Balcan, Duygu; Colizza, Vittoria; Hu, Hao; Ramasco, José J; Merler, Stefano; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-06-29

    In recent years large-scale computational models for the realistic simulation of epidemic outbreaks have been used with increased frequency. Methodologies adapt to the scale of interest and range from very detailed agent-based models to spatially-structured metapopulation models. One major issue thus concerns to what extent the geotemporal spreading pattern found by different modeling approaches may differ and depend on the different approximations and assumptions used. We provide for the first time a side-by-side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent-based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the progression of a baseline pandemic event in Italy, a large and geographically heterogeneous European country. The agent-based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) model, based on high-resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short-range human mobility patterns at the global scale. The model also considers age structure data for Italy. GLEaM and the agent-based models are synchronized in their initial conditions by using the same disease parameterization, and by defining the same importation of infected cases from international travels. The results obtained show that both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing on the order of a few days. The relative difference of the epidemic size depends on the basic reproductive ratio, R0, and on the fact that the metapopulation model consistently yields a larger incidence than the agent-based model, as expected due to the differences in the structure in the intra-population contact pattern of the approaches. The age breakdown analysis shows that similar attack rates are

  13. Comparative analysis of competitive activity parameters of amateur boxers high qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Martsiv

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : analyze competitive activity of boxers of high qualifications in different time periods in the development of boxing. Material : 142 analyzed boxing matches at the Olympic Games 2012. Results : present indicators of competitive activity of boxers. Shows the comparative characteristics of the battles that took place under different formulas of competitive activity in different periods of the development of amateur boxing. It is shown that increasing the skills of athletes appear to increase the density of hits in combat. As a result of innovations in the rules of the competition, boxing match was different higher intensity combat, attacking actions began to perform at a higher speed mode. Conclusions : As a result of the transition to the new formula of fighting to increase the density of the match. Also a 3-fold increase in the number of strikes indicator, surviving on target. Increased efficiency factor strikes, which leads to the expansion of effective technical and tactical actions.

  14. Speech recognition in noise with active and passive hearing protectors: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstael, Annelies; De Coensel, Bert; Botteldooren, Dick; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Maes, Leen; Philips, Birgit; Swinnen, Freya; Bart, Vinck

    2011-06-01

    The perceived negative influence of standard hearing protectors on communication is a common argument for not wearing them. Thus, "augmented" protectors have been developed to improve speech intelligibility. Nevertheless, their actual benefit remains a point of concern. In this paper, speech perception with active earplugs is compared to standard passive custom-made earplugs. The two types of active protectors included amplify the incoming sound with a fixed level or to a user selected fraction of the maximum safe level. For the latter type, minimal and maximal amplification are selected. To compare speech intelligibility, 20 different speech-in-noise fragments are presented to 60 normal-hearing subjects and speech recognition is scored. The background noise is selected from realistic industrial noise samples with different intensity, frequency, and temporal characteristics. Statistical analyses suggest that the protectors' performance strongly depends on the noise condition. The active protectors with minimal amplification outclass the others for the most difficult and the easiest situations, but they also limit binaural listening. In other conditions, the passive protectors clearly surpass their active counterparts. Subsequently, test fragments are analyzed acoustically to clarify the results. This provides useful information for developing prototypes, but also indicates that tests with human subjects remain essential. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. Comparative Study of Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Yellow, Green, Brown, and Red Brazilian Propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Christiane Schineider; Mokochinski, João Benhur; de Lira, Tatiana Onofre; de Oliveira, Fátima de Cassia Evangelista; Cardoso, Magda Vieira; Ferreira, Roseane Guimarães; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Pessoa, Cláudia; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; de Campos, Mônica Soares; Torres, Yohandra Reyes

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of a sample of yellow propolis from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (EEP-Y MS), were investigated for the first time and compared with green, brown, and red types of Brazilian propolis and with a sample of yellow propolis from Cuba. Overall, EEP-Y MS had different qualitative chemical profiles, as well as different cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities when compared to the other types of propolis assessed in this study and it is a different chemotype of Brazilian propolis. Absence of phenolic compounds and the presence of mixtures of aliphatic compounds in yellow propolis were determined by analysing (1)H-NMR spectra and fifteen terpenes were identified by GC-MS. EEP-Y MS showed cytotoxic activity against human tumour strain OVCAR-8 but was not active against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. Our results confirm the difficulty of establishing a uniform quality standard for propolis from diverse geographical origins. The most appropriate pharmacological applications of yellow types of propolis must be further investigated.

  16. Comparative Study of Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Yellow, Green, Brown, and Red Brazilian Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schineider Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and biological activity of a sample of yellow propolis from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (EEP-Y MS, were investigated for the first time and compared with green, brown, and red types of Brazilian propolis and with a sample of yellow propolis from Cuba. Overall, EEP-Y MS had different qualitative chemical profiles, as well as different cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities when compared to the other types of propolis assessed in this study and it is a different chemotype of Brazilian propolis. Absence of phenolic compounds and the presence of mixtures of aliphatic compounds in yellow propolis were determined by analysing 1H-NMR spectra and fifteen terpenes were identified by GC-MS. EEP-Y MS showed cytotoxic activity against human tumour strain OVCAR-8 but was not active against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. Our results confirm the difficulty of establishing a uniform quality standard for propolis from diverse geographical origins. The most appropriate pharmacological applications of yellow types of propolis must be further investigated.

  17. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    -scale sequencing began with simple organisms, viruses and bacteria, progressed to eukaryotes such as yeast, and more recently (1998) progressed to a multi-cellular animal, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Sequencers have now moved on to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose sequence is slated for completion by the end of 1999. The human genome project is expected to determine the complete sequence of all 3 billion bases of human DNA within the next five years. In the wake of genome-scale sequencing, further instrumentation is being developed to assay gene expression and function on a comparably large scale. Much of the work in computational biology focuses on computational tools used in sequencing, finding genes that are related to a particular gene, finding which parts of the DNA code for proteins and which do not, understanding what proteins will be formed from a given length of DNA, predicting how the proteins will fold from a one-dimensional structure into a three dimensional structure, and so on. Much less computational work has been done regarding the function of proteins. One reason for this is that different proteins function very differently, and so work on protein function is very specific to certain classes of proteins. There are, for example, proteins such enzymes that catalyze various intracellular reactions, receptors that respond to extracellular signals and ion channels that regulate the flow of charged particles into and out of the cell. In this chapter, we will consider a particular class of proteins called transcription factors(TFs), which are responsible for regulating when a certain gene is expressed in a certain cell, which cells it is express in, and how much is expressed. Understanding these processes will involve developing a deeper understanding of transcription, translation, and the cellular processes that control those processes. All of these elements fall under the aegis of gene regulation or more narrowly transcriptional regulation. Some of

  18. Comparative removal of emerging contaminants from aqueous solution by adsorption on an activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A; Taoufik, N; García, A M; Korili, S A

    2018-04-19

    Batch sorption experiments were performed to study the adsorption of six emerging pollutants from aqueous solutions using a commercial granular activated carbon as adsorbent. Caffeine, clofibric acid, diclofenac, gallic acid, ibuprofen and salicylic acid were selected as representative contaminants. The activated carbon was characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, and through the determination of point of zero charge. The effects of several operational parameters, such as pH, initial concentration of organic molecules, mass of adsorbent and contact time, on the sorption behaviour were evaluated. The contact time to attain equilibrium for maximum adsorption was found to be 40 min. The kinetic data were correlated to several adsorption models, and the adsorption mechanism found to follow pseudo-second-order and intraparticle-diffusion models with external mass transfer predominating in the first 15 min of the experiment. The equilibrium adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir and Toth isotherm equation models. The similar chemical structure and molecular weight of the organic pollutants studied to make the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon used very similar for all the molecules.

  19. AIRLINE ACTIVITY FORECASTING BY REGRESSION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. Білак

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Proposed linear and nonlinear regression models, which take into account the equation of trend and seasonality indices for the analysis and restore the volume of passenger traffic over the past period of time and its prediction for future years, as well as the algorithm of formation of these models based on statistical analysis over the years. The desired model is the first step for the synthesis of more complex models, which will enable forecasting of passenger (income level airline with the highest accuracy and time urgency.

  20. A comparative study of carbon dioxide adsorption on multi-walled carbon nanotubes versus activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, S.; Ghoreyshi, A. A.; Jahanshahi, M.; Davoodi, M.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the quilibrium adsorption of CO2 on activated charcoal and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were experimentally investigated at temperature range of 298-318 K and pressures up to 40 bars. The maximum storage capacity for both materials was obtained at lowest temperature and highest pressure under study. The amount of CO2 adsorbed on MWCNT is 2 times higher than that of activated Charcoal whereas the specific surface area of activated carbon is aboute 2 times higher than MWNT. The experimental data of CO2 adsorption have been analyzed using different model isotherms such as the Freundlich and Langmuir. Heat of adsorption evaluated from a set of isotherms based on the Clausius-Clapeyron equation indicated physical nature of adsorption mechanism.

  1. Activated sludge model No. 2d, ASM2d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) presents a model for biological phosphorus removal with simultaneous nitrification-denitrification in activated sludge systems. ASM2d is based on ASM2 and is expanded to include the denitrifying activity of the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs......). This extension of ASM2 allows for improved modeling of the processes, especially with respect to the dynamics of nitrate and phosphate. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. The canine 'groove' model, compared with the ACLT model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, A.C.A.; Roermund, P.M. van; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The frequently used anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis (OA) in the dog, makes use of a permanent trigger (joint instability) for inducing degenerative changes. The present study evaluates a canine model of degenerative cartilage damage, mimicking OA,

  3. The utility of comparative models and the local model quality for protein crystal structure determination by Molecular Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski Marcin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational models of protein structures were proved to be useful as search models in Molecular Replacement (MR, a common method to solve the phase problem faced by macromolecular crystallography. The success of MR depends on the accuracy of a search model. Unfortunately, this parameter remains unknown until the final structure of the target protein is determined. During the last few years, several Model Quality Assessment Programs (MQAPs that predict the local accuracy of theoretical models have been developed. In this article, we analyze whether the application of MQAPs improves the utility of theoretical models in MR. Results For our dataset of 615 search models, the real local accuracy of a model increases the MR success ratio by 101% compared to corresponding polyalanine templates. On the contrary, when local model quality is not utilized in MR, the computational models solved only 4.5% more MR searches than polyalanine templates. For the same dataset of the 615 models, a workflow combining MR with predicted local accuracy of a model found 45% more correct solution than polyalanine templates. To predict such accuracy MetaMQAPclust, a “clustering MQAP” was used. Conclusions Using comparative models only marginally increases the MR success ratio in comparison to polyalanine structures of templates. However, the situation changes dramatically once comparative models are used together with their predicted local accuracy. A new functionality was added to the GeneSilico Fold Prediction Metaserver in order to build models that are more useful for MR searches. Additionally, we have developed a simple method, AmIgoMR (Am I good for MR?, to predict if an MR search with a template-based model for a given template is likely to find the correct solution.

  4. Exploratory Topology Modelling of Form-Active Hybrid Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden Deleuran, Anders; Pauly, Mark; Tamke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel form-active hybrid structures (FAHS) is impeded by a lack of modelling tools that allow for exploratory topology modelling of shaped assemblies. We present a flexible and real-time computational design modelling pipeline developed for the exploratory modelling of FAHS...... that enables designers and engineers to iteratively construct and manipulate form-active hybrid assembly topology on the fly. The pipeline implements Kangaroo2's projection-based methods for modelling hybrid structures consisting of slender beams and cable networks. A selection of design modelling sketches...... is presented in which the developed modelling pipeline has been integrated to explore the design space delineated by FAHS....

  5. Detecting exoplanets: jointly modeling radial velocity and stellar activity time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Edward; Stenning, David; Ford, Eric B.; Wolpert, Robert L.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2017-06-01

    The radial velocity method is one of the most successful techniques for detecting exoplanets, but stellar activity often corrupts the radial velocity signal. This corruption can make it difficult to detect low mass planets and planets orbiting more active stars. A principled approach to recovering planet radial velocity signals in the presence of stellar activity was proposed by Rajpaul et al. (2015) and involves the use of dependent Gaussian processes to jointly model the corrupted radial velocity signal and multiple proxies for stellar activity. We build on this work in two ways: (i) we propose using dimension reduction techniques to construct more informative stellar activity proxies; (ii) we extend the Rajpaul et al. (2015) model to a larger class of models and use a model comparison procedure to select the best model for the particular stellar activity proxies at hand. Our framework enables us to compare the performance of various proxies in terms of the resulting statistical power for planet detection.

  6. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  7. Comparative study of boron transport models in NRC Thermal-Hydraulic Code Trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo-Juan, Nicolás; Barrachina, Teresa; Miró, Rafael; Verdú, Gumersindo; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: nioljua@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRYM). Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the interest in the study of various types of transients involving changes in the boron concentration inside the reactor, has led to an increase in the interest of developing and studying new models and tools that allow a correct study of boron transport. Therefore, a significant variety of different boron transport models and spatial difference schemes are available in the thermal-hydraulic codes, as TRACE. According to this interest, in this work it will be compared the results obtained using the different boron transport models implemented in the NRC thermal-hydraulic code TRACE. To do this, a set of models have been created using the different options and configurations that could have influence in boron transport. These models allow to reproduce a simple event of filling or emptying the boron concentration in a long pipe. Moreover, with the aim to compare the differences obtained when one-dimensional or three-dimensional components are chosen, it has modeled many different cases using only pipe components or a mix of pipe and vessel components. In addition, the influence of the void fraction in the boron transport has been studied and compared under close conditions to BWR commercial model. A final collection of the different cases and boron transport models are compared between them and those corresponding to the analytical solution provided by the Burgers equation. From this comparison, important conclusions are drawn that will be the basis of modeling the boron transport in TRACE adequately. (author)

  8. Neurophysiological modeling of bladder afferent activity in the rat overactive bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mahipal; van Asselt, Els; van Mastrigt, Ron; Clavica, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome-based urinary dysfunction characterized by "urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia". Earlier we developed a mathematical model of bladder nerve activity during voiding in anesthetized rats and found that the nerve activity in the relaxation phase of voiding contractions was all afferent. In the present study, we applied this mathematical model to an acetic acid (AA) rat model of bladder overactivity to study the sensitivity of afferent fibers in intact nerves to bladder pressure and volume changes. The afferent activity in the filling phase and the slope, i.e., the sensitivity of the afferent fibers to pressure changes in the post-void relaxation phase, were found to be significantly higher in AA than in saline measurements, while the offset (nerve activity at pressure ~0) and maximum pressure were comparable. We have thus shown, for the first time, that the sensitivity of afferent fibers in the OAB can be studied without cutting nerves or preparation of single fibers. We conclude that bladder overactivity induced by AA in rats is neurogenic in origin and is caused by increased sensitivity of afferent sensors in the bladder wall.

  9. Development of independent generalized probabilistic models for regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashev, M.Kh.; Zinchenko, Yu.A.; Stefanishin, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of probabilistic models to be used in regulatory activities. Results from the development of independent generalized PSA-1 models for purposes of SNRIU risk-informed regulation are presented

  10. Rodent model of activity-based anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Olaia; Fraga, Ángela; Pellón, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2014-04-10

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) consists of a procedure that involves the simultaneous exposure of animals to a restricted feeding schedule, while free access is allowed to an activity wheel. Under these conditions, animals show a progressive increase in wheel running, a reduced efficiency in food intake to compensate for their increased activity, and a severe progression of weight loss. Due to the parallelism with the clinical manifestations of anorexia nervosa including increased activity, reduced food intake and severe weight loss, the ABA procedure has been proposed as the best analog of human anorexia nervosa (AN). Thus, ABA research could both allow a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying AN and generate useful leads for treatment development in AN. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  12. Physical activity and gender: comparative study between adolescents from Monterrey, Mexico and Zaragoza, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Ceballos Gurrola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare medium energy expenditure and levels of physical activity between adolescents from Monterrey, Mexico and Zaragoza, Spain taking into consideration variables such as gender, type of school, and time of the week.  Methods: adolescent students of 12 to 17 years of age from public and private schools in Monterrey (N= 396 and Zaragoza (N= 394.  The Four-by-One-Day Physical Activity Questionnaire was used and a .89 reliability with a test-retest because the test was adapted to this study.  Results: In Zaragoza as well as in Monterrey there is a significant number of students with low levels of physical activity.  Almost half of the students have been classified as inactive and very inactive.  The energy expenditure was very similar for both cities: Monterrey 37.52 ± 2.12 kcal/kg/day and Zaragoza 37.66 ± 2.95 kcal/kg/day.  Conclusions: Regarding gender, men show greater levels of physical activity than women.  This data coincides with the majority of the studies.  Students perform a higher level of physical activity during school days than during weekends.

  13. Comparing glow discharge plasma and ultrasound treatment for improving aerobic respiration of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortel, Nina; Van den Broeck, Rob; Degrève, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a new and innovative technique, glow discharge plasma, is introduced for the treatment of activated sludge, whereby its effect on sludge solubilization, settleability, floc structure and biomass activity for carbon removal and nitrification is investigated. The obtained results are compared to the use of ultrasound for activated sludge treatment, a technique known for its potential to enhancing biomass activity. Results indicate that ultrasound is up to 9 times more efficient in solubilizing activated sludge and disrupting the sludge floc. However, ultrasound has a detrimental effect on sludge settling, even the lowest treatment intensity of 180 kJ/kgMLSS induced a 12% increase in sludge volume index (SVI). Glow discharge plasma on the other hand, improved settleability up to 51%. Glow discharge plasma and ultrasound both positively affect the carbon removal rate. On the long term, extreme conditions even gave rise to a maximum improvement in respiration by 58.6% and 176.5% for a glow discharge plasma and ultrasound treatment. Nitrification, however, was never positively influenced by either of the treatments. Starting from 8297 kJ/kgMLSS for glow discharge plasma and 9000 kJ/kgMLSS for ultrasound, a negative effect on the nitrification rate was found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing summer and winter indoor radon and radon daughters activity in Campinas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, O.S.; Hadler, N.J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Neman, R.S.; Souza, W.F.; Tello, S.C.A.; Paulo, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a technique - based on alpha particle track detection using CR-39 - where the activity originated from indoor radon can be potentially separated into three fraction: (i) radon in the air, (ii) radon daughters (RD), 218 Po and 214 Po, in the air and (iii) RD plated-out on the detector surface during exposure. In this work only a partial separation was carried out, then our results are limited to radon plus RD in the air and RD attached to detector surface. These activities can be separated if size and gray level of the round tracks are measured using an automatic optical microscopy system.Our group carried out an indoor radon and radon daughters (RD) survey in Campinas made up by a summer (November, 96 to May, 97) and a winter (May, 97 to November, 97) exposure, where the detectors were placed in the same rooms of the same dwellings (approximately 100) in both cases. Comparing winter and summer alpha activity for the detectors analyzed up to now, approximately 45 dwellings, we observed that: i) it seems that the source of radon is the material (brick and concrete mainly) making up walls, floor and ceiling of the dwellings, ii) there is no clear relationship between intensity of aeration and the activities measured in this work, and iii) the average ratio between winter and summer activity in the air (radon plus RD) is approximately equal to similar ratios observed in other countries, but for radon only. (author)

  15. Comparative experimental evaluation of the efficacy of Prostamol Uno and Samprost on rat model of chronic aseptic prostate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahomova, A V; Borovskaja, T G; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vychuzhanina, A V; Rumpel, O A; Granstrem, O K; Baranova, O V

    2011-11-01

    Comparative experimental evaluation of the efficiency of prostatotropic drugs Prostamol Uno and Samprost on the model of the chronic aseptic prostate inflammation in rats was performed. It was established that peptide drug Samprost decelerates sclerotic processes in the prostate gland to a greater extent than herbal preparation Prostamol Uno. Both products equally stimulate secretory activity of the gland. Prostamol Uno, unlike Samprost, prevents the development of reduced sexual motivation, one of the complications of chronic prostatitis.

  16. Identification of contrastive and comparable school neighborhoods for childhood obesity and physical activity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyou; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer; Mason, Maryann; Liu, Lin

    2006-03-30

    The neighborhood social and physical environments are considered significant factors contributing to children's inactive lifestyles, poor eating habits, and high levels of childhood obesity. Understanding of neighborhood environmental profiles is needed to facilitate community-based research and the development and implementation of community prevention and intervention programs. We sought to identify contrastive and comparable districts for childhood obesity and physical activity research studies. We have applied GIS technology to manipulate multiple data sources to generate objective and quantitative measures of school neighborhood-level characteristics for school-based studies. GIS technology integrated data from multiple sources (land use, traffic, crime, and census tract) and available social and built environment indicators theorized to be associated with childhood obesity and physical activity. We used network analysis and geoprocessing tools within a GIS environment to integrate these data and to generate objective social and physical environment measures for school districts. We applied hierarchical cluster analysis to categorize school district groups according to their neighborhood characteristics. We tested the utility of the area characterizations by using them to select comparable and contrastive schools for two specific studies. We generated school neighborhood-level social and built environment indicators for all 412 Chicago public elementary school districts. The combination of GIS and cluster analysis allowed us to identify eight school neighborhoods that were contrastive and comparable on parameters of interest (land use and safety) for a childhood obesity and physical activity study. The combination of GIS and cluster analysis makes it possible to objectively characterize urban neighborhoods and to select comparable and/or contrasting neighborhoods for community-based health studies.

  17. Identification of contrastive and comparable school neighborhoods for childhood obesity and physical activity research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffel Katherine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The neighborhood social and physical environments are considered significant factors contributing to children's inactive lifestyles, poor eating habits, and high levels of childhood obesity. Understanding of neighborhood environmental profiles is needed to facilitate community-based research and the development and implementation of community prevention and intervention programs. We sought to identify contrastive and comparable districts for childhood obesity and physical activity research studies. We have applied GIS technology to manipulate multiple data sources to generate objective and quantitative measures of school neighborhood-level characteristics for school-based studies. GIS technology integrated data from multiple sources (land use, traffic, crime, and census tract and available social and built environment indicators theorized to be associated with childhood obesity and physical activity. We used network analysis and geoprocessing tools within a GIS environment to integrate these data and to generate objective social and physical environment measures for school districts. We applied hierarchical cluster analysis to categorize school district groups according to their neighborhood characteristics. We tested the utility of the area characterizations by using them to select comparable and contrastive schools for two specific studies. Results We generated school neighborhood-level social and built environment indicators for all 412 Chicago public elementary school districts. The combination of GIS and cluster analysis allowed us to identify eight school neighborhoods that were contrastive and comparable on parameters of interest (land use and safety for a childhood obesity and physical activity study. Conclusion The combination of GIS and cluster analysis makes it possible to objectively characterize urban neighborhoods and to select comparable and/or contrasting neighborhoods for community-based health studies.

  18. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    OpenAIRE

    О. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namel...

  19. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Experience gained with the application of the MODIS diffusion model compared with the ATMOS Gauss-function-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of the Gauss-function-based models doubtlessly consists in their proven propagation parameter sets and empirical stack plume rise formulas and in their easy matchability and handability. However, grid models based on trace matter transport equation are more convincing concerning their fundamental principle. Grid models of the MODIS type are to acquire a practical applicability comparable to Gauss models by developing techniques allowing to consider the vertical self-movement of the plumes in grid models and to secure improved diffusion co-efficient determination. (orig./PW) [de

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF LIPID PROFILE IN SEDENTARY AND ACTIVE ADULT FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhasini Sanda

    2018-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lipids and lipoproteins are essential constituents of the body and their activities assist in maintenance of body homeostasis. Sedentary lifestyle has been shown to lead to inactivity, which could lead to lipid disorders. Hyperlipidaemias is one of the major independent risk factor, which affects the cardiovascular system adversely resulting eventually damage to various organs most notably heart, kidneys and brain. The present study is therefore designed to ascertain the effect of sedentary lifestyle on lipid status of sedentary adult females when compared to that of the lipid status of active adult females. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprised of Group I - 50 sedentary adult females and Group II - 50 active adult females aged between 30 to 60 years. The subjects selected in both groups were matched for age and dietary habits. The subjects with hypertension, diabetes, smokers, pregnancy and subjects with Body Mass Index (BMI greater than 30 are excluded. After overnight fasting of 12 to 14 hours, 5 mL of blood is collected from the subjects and fasting Total Serum Cholesterol (TC, Total Serum Triglycerides (TG, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL cholesterol (LDL-C and total serum cholesterol/HDL-C ratio are measured and data is statistically analysed. RESULTS The evaluation of lipid profile patterns in above subjects showed hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, increased LDLC and total serum cholesterol/HDL-C ratio in sedentary adult females and also decreased HDL-C levels in them when compared to the normal healthy lipid profile patterns in active adult females. A statistically significant increased lipid profiles (P-value <0.001 was observed in the sedentary adult females than in active adult females. CONCLUSION This study shows that sedentary lifestyle predisposes to hyperlipidaemias, one of the major risk factor of cardiovascular disease and lack of exercise worsens the situation.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty.

  3. Comparing habitat suitability and connectivity modeling methods for conserving pronghorn migrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Poor

    Full Text Available Terrestrial long-distance migrations are declining globally: in North America, nearly 75% have been lost. Yet there has been limited research comparing habitat suitability and connectivity models to identify migration corridors across increasingly fragmented landscapes. Here we use pronghorn (Antilocapra americana migrations in prairie habitat to compare two types of models that identify habitat suitability: maximum entropy (Maxent and expert-based (Analytic Hierarchy Process. We used distance to wells, distance to water, NDVI, land cover, distance to roads, terrain shape and fence presence to parameterize the models. We then used the output of these models as cost surfaces to compare two common connectivity models, least-cost modeling (LCM and circuit theory. Using pronghorn movement data from spring and fall migrations, we identified potential migration corridors by combining each habitat suitability model with each connectivity model. The best performing model combination was Maxent with LCM corridors across both seasons. Maxent out-performed expert-based habitat suitability models for both spring and fall migrations. However, expert-based corridors can perform relatively well and are a cost-effective alternative if species location data are unavailable. Corridors created using LCM out-performed circuit theory, as measured by the number of pronghorn GPS locations present within the corridors. We suggest the use of a tiered approach using different corridor widths for prioritizing conservation and mitigation actions, such as fence removal or conservation easements.

  4. Comparing habitat suitability and connectivity modeling methods for conserving pronghorn migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Erin E; Loucks, Colby; Jakes, Andrew; Urban, Dean L

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial long-distance migrations are declining globally: in North America, nearly 75% have been lost. Yet there has been limited research comparing habitat suitability and connectivity models to identify migration corridors across increasingly fragmented landscapes. Here we use pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) migrations in prairie habitat to compare two types of models that identify habitat suitability: maximum entropy (Maxent) and expert-based (Analytic Hierarchy Process). We used distance to wells, distance to water, NDVI, land cover, distance to roads, terrain shape and fence presence to parameterize the models. We then used the output of these models as cost surfaces to compare two common connectivity models, least-cost modeling (LCM) and circuit theory. Using pronghorn movement data from spring and fall migrations, we identified potential migration corridors by combining each habitat suitability model with each connectivity model. The best performing model combination was Maxent with LCM corridors across both seasons. Maxent out-performed expert-based habitat suitability models for both spring and fall migrations. However, expert-based corridors can perform relatively well and are a cost-effective alternative if species location data are unavailable. Corridors created using LCM out-performed circuit theory, as measured by the number of pronghorn GPS locations present within the corridors. We suggest the use of a tiered approach using different corridor widths for prioritizing conservation and mitigation actions, such as fence removal or conservation easements.

  5. Effects of stimulus order on discrimination processes in comparative and equality judgements: data and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjas, Oliver; Ulrich, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In typical discrimination experiments, participants are presented with a constant standard and a variable comparison stimulus and their task is to judge which of these two stimuli is larger (comparative judgement). In these experiments, discrimination sensitivity depends on the temporal order of these stimuli (Type B effect) and is usually higher when the standard precedes rather than follows the comparison. Here, we outline how two models of stimulus discrimination can account for the Type B effect, namely the weighted difference model (or basic Sensation Weighting model) and the Internal Reference Model. For both models, the predicted psychometric functions for comparative judgements as well as for equality judgements, in which participants indicate whether they perceived the two stimuli to be equal or not equal, are derived and it is shown that the models also predict a Type B effect for equality judgements. In the empirical part, the models' predictions are evaluated. To this end, participants performed a duration discrimination task with comparative judgements and with equality judgements. In line with the models' predictions, a Type B effect was observed for both judgement types. In addition, a time-order error, as indicated by shifts of the psychometric functions, and differences in response times were observed only for the equality judgement. Since both models entail distinct additional predictions, it seems worthwhile for future research to unite the two models into one conceptual framework.

  6. What can be learned from computer modeling? Comparing expository and modeling approaches to teaching dynamic systems behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Borkulo, S.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297554727; van Joolingen, W.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073458872; Savelsbergh, E.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17345853X; de Jong, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer modeling has been widely promoted as a means to attain higher order learning outcomes. Substantiating these benefits, however, has been problematic due to a lack of proper assessment tools. In this study, we compared computer modeling with expository instruction, using a tailored assessment

  7. Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

    2014-01-01

    Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

  8. A Comparative Study of Spectral Auroral Intensity Predictions From Multiple Electron Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Donald; Hecht, James; Solomon, Stanley; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2018-01-01

    It is important to routinely examine and update models used to predict auroral emissions resulting from precipitating electrons in Earth's magnetotail. These models are commonly used to invert spectral auroral ground-based images to infer characteristics about incident electron populations when in situ measurements are unavailable. In this work, we examine and compare auroral emission intensities predicted by three commonly used electron transport models using varying electron population characteristics. We then compare model predictions to same-volume in situ electron measurements and ground-based imaging to qualitatively examine modeling prediction error. Initial comparisons showed differences in predictions by the GLobal airglOW (GLOW) model and the other transport models examined. Chemical reaction rates and radiative rates in GLOW were updated using recent publications, and predictions showed better agreement with the other models and the same-volume data, stressing that these rates are important to consider when modeling auroral processes. Predictions by each model exhibit similar behavior for varying atmospheric constants, energies, and energy fluxes. Same-volume electron data and images are highly correlated with predictions by each model, showing that these models can be used to accurately derive electron characteristics and ionospheric parameters based solely on multispectral optical imaging data.

  9. Comparative study of surrogate models for groundwater contamination source identification at DNAPL-contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zeyu; Lu, Wenxi

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of groundwater contamination sources is critical for effectively protecting groundwater resources, estimating risks, mitigating disaster, and designing remediation strategies. Many methods for groundwater contamination source identification (GCSI) have been developed in recent years, including the simulation-optimization technique. This study proposes utilizing a support vector regression (SVR) model and a kernel extreme learning machine (KELM) model to enrich the content of the surrogate model. The surrogate model was itself key in replacing the simulation model, reducing the huge computational burden of iterations in the simulation-optimization technique to solve GCSI problems, especially in GCSI problems of aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). A comparative study between the Kriging, SVR, and KELM models is reported. Additionally, there is analysis of the influence of parameter optimization and the structure of the training sample dataset on the approximation accuracy of the surrogate model. It was found that the KELM model was the most accurate surrogate model, and its performance was significantly improved after parameter optimization. The approximation accuracy of the surrogate model to the simulation model did not always improve with increasing numbers of training samples. Using the appropriate number of training samples was critical for improving the performance of the surrogate model and avoiding unnecessary computational workload. It was concluded that the KELM model developed in this work could reasonably predict system responses in given operation conditions. Replacing the simulation model with a KELM model considerably reduced the computational burden of the simulation-optimization process and also maintained high computation accuracy.

  10. A comparative study between EGB gravity and GTR by modeling compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhar, Piyali [Government General Degree College, Department of Mathematics, Hooghly, West Bengal (India); Govender, Megan [Durban University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban (South Africa); Sharma, Ranjan [P. D. Women' s College, Department of Physics, Jalpaiguri (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we utilise the Krori-Barua ansatz to model compact stars within the framework of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) gravity. The thrust of our investigation is to carry out a comparative analysis of the physical properties of our models in EGB and classical general relativity theory with the help of graphical representation. From our analysis we have shown that the central density and central pressure of EGB star model is higher than the GTR star model. The most notable feature is that for both GTR and the EGB star model the compactness factor crosses the Buchdahl (Phys Rev 116:1027, 1959) limit. (orig.)

  11. [Living environment and activation of early maladaptive schemas specific to the elderly: Comparative study among 80 individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, S; Kazour, F; Kazour, G

    2015-06-01

    Early maladaptive schemas described by Young may be identified in the elderly. They represent models and themes of emotions, memories, thoughts and bodily sensations experienced by the individual. This study aims to evaluate the activation of early maladaptive thoughts in the elderly depending on their living environment. The Young Schema Questionnaire--short form--was administered to 80 elderly individuals (40 living in a nursing home, and 40 in their own home with at least one person). The studied schemas that were most relevant to the elderly were the maladaptive schemas of abandonment, emotional deprivation, mistrust, exclusion, dependency, vulnerability and emotional overcontrol. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale were administered to eliminate dementia or depression among individuals. Individuals living in a nursing home, compared to their controls had increased activation of schemas of emotional deprivation (22.5% vs. 7.5%), abandonment (15% vs. 0%), mistrust (32.5% vs. 2.5%), exclusion (7.5% vs. 0%), and emotional overcontrol (25% vs. 2.5%). The activation of maladaptive schemas was significantly elevated in nursing homes for those 5 schemas, while there was no difference in activation between the 2 groups concerning the schemas of dependency and vulnerability. The activation of early maladaptive schemas of emotional deprivation, abandonment, mistrust, exclusion, and emotional overcontrol is higher in individuals living in nursing homes compared to a control group of individuals living in their homes with at least one companion. This schema activation may be related to a lack of emotional and family support in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing Multidimensional and Continuum Models of Vocabulary Acquisition: An Empirical Examination of the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey; Batty, Aaron Olaf; Bovee, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Second language vocabulary acquisition has been modeled both as multidimensional in nature and as a continuum wherein the learner's knowledge of a word develops along a cline from recognition through production. In order to empirically examine and compare these models, the authors assess the degree to which the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (VKS;…

  13. A comparative study of two fast nonlinear free-surface water wave models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    simply directly solves the three-dimensional problem. Both models have been well validated on standard test cases and shown to exhibit attractive convergence properties and an optimal scaling of the computational effort with increasing problem size. These two models are compared for solution of a typical...

  14. On Applications of Rasch Models in International Comparative Large-Scale Assessments: A Historical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Heike; Bos, Wilfried; Goy, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several current international comparative large-scale assessments of educational achievement (ICLSA) make use of "Rasch models", to address functions essential for valid cross-cultural comparisons. From a historical perspective, ICLSA and Georg Rasch's "models for measurement" emerged at about the same time, half a century ago. However, the…

  15. Comparing fire spread algorithms using equivalence testing and neutral landscape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Miranda; Brian R. Sturtevant; Jian Yang; Eric J. Gustafson

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to evaluate the degree to which a meta-model approximates spatial disturbance processes represented by a more detailed model across a range of landscape conditions, using neutral landscapes and equivalence testing. We illustrate this approach by comparing burn patterns produced by a relatively simple fire spread algorithm with those generated by...

  16. How do farm models compare when estimating greenhouse gas emissions from dairy cattle production?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Nicholas John; Özkan, Şeyda; de Haan, M

    2018-01-01

    feed imported. This was because the models differed in their description of biophysical responses and feedback mechanisms, and in the extent to which management functions were internalised. We conclude that comparing the results of different farm-scale models when applied to a range of scenarios would...

  17. Comparative study of antioxidant, metal chelating and antiglycation activities of Momordica charantia flesh and pulp fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghous, Tahseen; Aziz, Nouman; Mehmood, Zahid; Andleeb, Saiqa

    2015-07-01

    Momordica charantia is commonly used as a vegetable and folk medicine in most parts of South Asia. This study aims to determine and compare the antioxidant, metal chelating and antiglycation activities of aqueous extracts of M. charantia fruit flesh (MCF) and fruit pulp (MCP) fractions. Our results show that MCP has pronounced DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging potential compared to MCF. In the antiglycation assay both fractions illustrated considerable inhibitory activities against the formation of AGEs induced by glucose with an efficacy of 75 and 67% with 150 μl of MCP and MCF extracts respectively, almost equal to 0.3mM amino guanidine. Results for metal catalysed protein fragmentation and autoxidative and glycoxidation assays demonstrate that MCF and MCP inhibited metal catalysed protein fragmentation. The percentage of relative standard deviation for three replicate measurements of 150 μl of MCF and MCP was < 3.0% for antiglycation. The antioxidant assays with regression values of MCP (0.981 and 0.991) and MCF (0.967 and 0.999) were also recorded. We conclude that both extracts possess high antioxidant and antiglycation activities and are equally good sources of antioxidant and antiglycating agents.

  18. Comparative study of erythromycin, amoxicillin and ampicillin antimicrobial activity against human respiratory tract pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, R H; Norman, J C; Goldmann, D A

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro test system was used to compare the antimicrobial activity of erythromycin, amoxicillin and ampicillin against respiratory tract pathogens isolated from man. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fresh clinical isolates of Streptoccus pyogenes, Streptocuccus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae to the macrolide and penicillins ranged between 0.01 and 0.9 microgram/ml. The microbes were exposed to each antibiotic for approximately 3 h at 1x,2x and 5x the relevant MIC. Irreversible surface defects and intracellular lesions were resolved by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in all antibiotic-treated bacterial species, irrespective of the antimicrobial used. In each case, inhibition of growth was recorded by turbometric assay; no significant difference was observed among the declining slopes of post-dosing growth curves for either erythromycin-, amoxicillin- or ampicillin-treated pathogens. The experimental observations show that the onset of antimicrobial activity and the bactericidal effectiveness of equipotent concentrations of erythromycin, amoxicillin and ampicillin were comparable in this study. The results complement previous clinical, bacteriologic and ultrastructure studies in vivo and demonstrate the contribution of the combined in vivo/in vitro study design for better understanding of antimicrobial activity in human respiratory tract infections.

  19. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1994-01-01

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques

  20. Investigation of phytochemical constituents, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities of ricegrass juice compared to wheatgrass juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanamanee Chomchan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cereal grass has been brought attention as a new functional food. Wheatgrass juice was known as a super food which provides lots of advantages for human health. However, the young stage of rice sprout has not been made widely known for consumption, though it is in the similar family to wheat (Poaeceae. Accordingly, ricegrass juice can and should be introduced, especially in Asian countries, as an economical functional drink. Nevertheless, currently there is none of the apparent evidences which confirm the nutritive values of ricegrass juice compared to wheatgrass juice. Objective: To investigate the chemical compositions, major phytochemical constituents, bioactive compounds content, specific phenolic profiles, and in vitro antioxidant activities of ricegrass juice compared to wheatgrass juice. Methods: Rice and wheat seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for 8 days. Both fresh plants were determined for chemical compositions. Next, the grasses were extracted with water, centrifuged, and the supernatants were tested for chlorophyll, carotenoid, and ascorbic acid contents. The left-over supernatant were freeze-dried. The extracts were then screened for the main group of phytochemicals, total extractable phenolic and specific phenolic compounds. Lastly, the extracts were tested for the antioxidant activities using DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, FCA and HRSA. Results: Data revealed that wheatgrass contained higher levels of protein and fat. Both ricegrass and wheatgrass juice extract exhibited the group of phenol, tannin and saponin but not alkaloid, flavonoid, sterol, terpenoid, courmarin, and cardiac glycoside. Wheatgrass juice can be detected for higher level of ascorbic acid and chlorophyll. Both grass juices were found the similar phenolic acids analyzed by HPLC included pyrogallol, vanilic acid, syringic acid and ferulic acid, however, ricegrass juice contained larger amounts of all phenolic acids excluding syringic acid. Conversely

  1. The Consensus String Problem and the Complexity of Comparing Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Rune Bang; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2002-01-01

    The basic theory of hidden Markov models was developed and applied to problems in speech recognition in the late 1960s, and has since then been applied to numerous problems, e.g. biological sequence analysis. Most applications of hidden Markov models are based on efficient algorithms for computing...... the probability of generating a given string, or computing the most likely path generating a given string. In this paper we consider the problem of computing the most likely string, or consensus string, generated by a given model, and its implications on the complexity of comparing hidden Markov models. We show...... that computing the consensus string, and approximating its probability within any constant factor, is NP-hard, and that the same holds for the closely related labeling problem for class hidden Markov models. Furthermore, we establish the NP-hardness of comparing two hidden Markov models under the L∞- and L1...

  2. Comparative study of active and inactive elderly persons through the assessment of activities of daily living and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Caporicci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the activities of daily living and quality of active and inactive seniors’ life. This is a descriptive research of a quantitative nature. Participants were 24 seniors, 12 physical activity practitioners (PPA and 12 non-practitioners (NPPA. The instrument was a demographic questionnaire and SF-36 for measuring the quality of life and tests proposed by GDLAM. SPSS 15.0 was used for data analysis. The results obtained by the sociodemographic questionnaire for PPA and NPPA groups were, respectively: age − 69.5 and 70.0 years, marital status − 50.0% widower and 41.7% were married; education − 50.0% with complete elementary school and 58.3% with incomplete elementary school; health problems − 25.0% and 58.33% hypertension. In functional autonomy tests, the PPA group had shorter execution time when compared with the NPPA group; however, both groups found themselves in the rating of "weak" according to the protocol GDLAM. We concluded that there was no statistical difference between groups.

  3. Comparative study of active and inactive elderly persons through the assessment of activities of daily living and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caporicci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the activities of daily living and quality of active and inactive seniors’ life. This is a descriptive research of a quantitative nature. Participants were 24 seniors, 12 physical activity practitioners (PPA and 12 non-practitioners (NPPA. The instrument was a demographic questionnaire and SF-36 for measuring the quality of life and tests proposed by GDLAM. SPSS 15.0 was used for data analysis. The results obtained by the sociodemographic questionnaire for PPA and NPPA groups were, respectively: age − 69.5 and 70.0 years, marital status − 50.0% widower and 41.7% were married; education − 50.0% with complete elementary school and 58.3% with incomplete elementary school; health problems − 25.0% and 58.33% hypertension. In functional autonomy tests, the PPA group had shorter execution time when compared with the NPPA group; however, both groups found themselves in the rating of "weak" according to the protocol GDLAM. We concluded that there was no statistical difference between groups.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daminov Ildar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  5. Modelling carbon stocks and fluxes in the wood product sector: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet-Navarro, Pau; Jochheim, Hubert; Muys, Bart

    2016-07-01

    In addition to forest ecosystems, wood products are carbon pools that can be strategically managed to mitigate climate change. Wood product models (WPMs) simulating the carbon balance of wood production, use and end of life can complement forest growth models to evaluate the mitigation potential of the forest sector as a whole. WPMs can be used to compare scenarios of product use and explore mitigation strategies. A considerable number of WPMs have been developed in the last three decades, but there is no review available analysing their functionality and performance. This study analyses and compares 41 WPMs. One surprising initial result was that we discovered the erroneous implementation of a few concepts and assumptions in some of the models. We further described and compared the models using six model characteristics (bucking allocation, industrial processes, carbon pools, product removal, recycling and substitution effects) and three model-use characteristics (system boundaries, model initialization and evaluation of results). Using a set of indicators based on the model characteristics, we classified models using a hierarchical clustering technique and differentiated them according to their increasing degrees of complexity and varying levels of user support. For purposes of simulating carbon stock in wood products, models with a simple structure may be sufficient, but to compare climate change mitigation options, complex models are needed. The number of models has increased substantially over the last ten years, introducing more diversity and accuracy. Calculation of substitution effects and recycling has also become more prominent. However, the lack of data is still an important constraint for a more realistic estimation of carbon stocks and fluxes. Therefore, if the sector wants to demonstrate the environmental quality of its products, it should make it a priority to provide reliable life cycle inventory data, particularly regarding aspects of time and

  6. Cognitive models of choice: comparing decision field theory to the proportional difference model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg; González-Vallejo, Claudia

    2009-07-01

    People often face preferential decisions under risk. To further our understanding of the cognitive processes underlying these preferential choices, two prominent cognitive models, decision field theory (DFT; Busemeyer & Townsend, 1993) and the proportional difference model (PD; González-Vallejo, 2002), were rigorously tested against each other. In two consecutive experiments, the participants repeatedly had to choose between monetary gambles. The first experiment provided the reference to estimate the models' free parameters. From these estimations, new gamble pairs were generated for the second experiment such that the two models made maximally divergent predictions. In the first experiment, both models explained the data equally well. However, in the second generalization experiment, the participants' choices were much closer to the predictions of DFT. The results indicate that the stochastic process assumed by DFT, in which evidence in favor of or against each option accumulates over time, described people's choice behavior better than the trade-offs between proportional differences assumed by PD. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Comparing predictive models of glioblastoma multiforme built using multi-institutional and local data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kyle W; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-01-01

    The growing amount of electronic data collected from patient care and clinical trials is motivating the creation of national repositories where multiple institutions share data about their patient cohorts. Such efforts aim to provide sufficient sample sizes for data mining and predictive modeling, ultimately improving treatment recommendations and patient outcome prediction. While these repositories offer the potential to improve our understanding of a disease, potential issues need to be addressed to ensure that multi-site data and resultant predictive models are useful to non-contributing institutions. In this paper we examine the challenges of utilizing National Cancer Institute datasets for modeling glioblastoma multiforme. We created several types of prognostic models and compared their results against models generated using data solely from our institution. While overall model performance between the data sources was similar, different variables were selected during model generation, suggesting that mapping data resources between models is not a straightforward issue.

  8. Comparative analysis of diffused solar radiation models for optimum tilt angle determination for Indian locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, P.; Chandel, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Tilt angle and orientation greatly are influenced on the performance of the solar photo voltaic panels. The tilt angle of solar photovoltaic panels is one of the important parameters for the optimum sizing of solar photovoltaic systems. This paper analyses six different isotropic and anisotropic diffused solar radiation models for optimum tilt angle determination. The predicted optimum tilt angles are compared with the experimentally measured values for summer season under outdoor conditions. The Liu and Jordan model is found to exhibit t lowest error as compared to other models for the location. (author)

  9. Modelling of the Human Knee Joint Supported by Active Orthosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalimov, V.; Monahov, Y.; Tamre, M.; Rõbak, D.; Sivitski, A.; Aryassov, G.; Penkov, I.

    2018-02-01

    The article discusses motion of a healthy knee joint in the sagittal plane and motion of an injured knee joint supported by an active orthosis. A kinematic scheme of a mechanism for the simulation of a knee joint motion is developed and motion of healthy and injured knee joints are modelled in Matlab. Angles between links, which simulate the femur and tibia are controlled by Simulink block of Model predictive control (MPC). The results of simulation have been compared with several samples of real motion of the human knee joint obtained from motion capture systems. On the basis of these analyses and also of the analysis of the forces in human lower limbs created at motion, an active smart orthosis is developed. The orthosis design was optimized to achieve an energy saving system with sufficient anatomy, necessary reliability, easy exploitation and low cost. With the orthosis it is possible to unload the knee joint, and also partially or fully compensate muscle forces required for the bending of the lower limb.

  10. Modelling of the Human Knee Joint Supported by Active Orthosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musalimov V.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses motion of a healthy knee joint in the sagittal plane and motion of an injured knee joint supported by an active orthosis. A kinematic scheme of a mechanism for the simulation of a knee joint motion is developed and motion of healthy and injured knee joints are modelled in Matlab. Angles between links, which simulate the femur and tibia are controlled by Simulink block of Model predictive control (MPC. The results of simulation have been compared with several samples of real motion of the human knee joint obtained from motion capture systems. On the basis of these analyses and also of the analysis of the forces in human lower limbs created at motion, an active smart orthosis is developed. The orthosis design was optimized to achieve an energy saving system with sufficient anatomy, necessary reliability, easy exploitation and low cost. With the orthosis it is possible to unload the knee joint, and also partially or fully compensate muscle forces required for the bending of the lower limb.

  11. Antibiotic Resistances in Livestock: A Comparative Approach to Identify an Appropriate Regression Model for Count Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Hüls

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in livestock is a matter of general concern. To develop hygiene measures and methods for resistance prevention and control, epidemiological studies on a population level are needed to detect factors associated with antimicrobial resistance in livestock holdings. In general, regression models are used to describe these relationships between environmental factors and resistance outcome. Besides the study design, the correlation structures of the different outcomes of antibiotic resistance and structural zero measurements on the resistance outcome as well as on the exposure side are challenges for the epidemiological model building process. The use of appropriate regression models that acknowledge these complexities is essential to assure valid epidemiological interpretations. The aims of this paper are (i to explain the model building process comparing several competing models for count data (negative binomial model, quasi-Poisson model, zero-inflated model, and hurdle model and (ii to compare these models using data from a cross-sectional study on antibiotic resistance in animal husbandry. These goals are essential to evaluate which model is most suitable to identify potential prevention measures. The dataset used as an example in our analyses was generated initially to study the prevalence and associated factors for the appearance of cefotaxime-resistant Escherichia coli in 48 German fattening pig farms. For each farm, the outcome was the count of samples with resistant bacteria. There was almost no overdispersion and only moderate evidence of excess zeros in the data. Our analyses show that it is essential to evaluate regression models in studies analyzing the relationship between environmental factors and antibiotic resistances in livestock. After model comparison based on evaluation of model predictions, Akaike information criterion, and Pearson residuals, here the hurdle model was judged to be the most appropriate

  12. A comparative study on immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides from two official species of Ganoderma (Lingzhi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lan-Zhen; Xie, Jing; Lv, Guang-Ping; Hu, De-Jun; Zhao, Jing; Duan, Jin-Ao; Li, Shao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Two Ganoderma species, G. lucidum and G. sinense, are listed as Lingzhi in Chinese Pharmacopoeia and they are considered to have the same therapeutic effects. Polysaccharides were the main immunomodulatory and anticancer components in Ganoderma. In this study, the chemical characters and the effects of polysaccharides from G. lucidum (GLPS) and G. sinense (GSPS) on macrophage functions were investigated and compared. Chemical studies showed that GLPS and GSPS were different, displaying various molecular weight distribution and ratio of monosaccharide components. In vitro pharmacological studies showed that both GLPS and GSPS had potent effects on macrophage functions, such as promoting macrophage phagocytosis, increasing their release of nitric oxide and cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Generally, GLPS was more powerful than GSPS. This study is helpful to elucidate the active components and pharmacological variation between the 2 Ganoderma species. The structure-activity relationship of polysaccharides from Ganoderma needs further study.

  13. Comparative activity of benzoyl peroxide and hexachlorophene. In vivo studies against propionibacterium acnes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacht, S; Gans, E H; McGinley, K J; Kligman, A M

    1983-07-01

    The bactericidal effects of benzoyl peroxide (5% lotion) and hexachlorophene (3% colloidal suspension) against Propionibacterium acnes were compared in nine healthy college students who had the microbiological and skin lipid characteristics typical of acne vulgaris, but no active lesions. Each of the two medications was applied twice daily, to opposite sides of the face, for four consecutive weeks. Hexachlorophene was effective against surface aerobes but only slightly active against P acnes. It marginally reduced free fatty acid concentrations in surface lipids and in follicular porphyrin fluorescence. Conversely, benzoyl peroxide virtually eliminated P acnes and aerobes and induced substantially decreased free fatty acid concentrations and follicular fluorescence. We conclude that benzoyl peroxide exerts its antimicrobial action in the follicles and inhibits P acnes, while the antimicrobial effectiveness of hexachlorophene is limited to the skin surface.

  14. Comparative SPR study on the effect of nanomaterials on the biological activity of adsorbed proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Q.; Chen, Y.; Hong, J.; Chen, H.; Ding, X.; Yin, Y.; Koh, K.; Lee, J.

    2012-01-01

    Bioactivity of proteins is evaluated to test the adverse effects of nanoparticles interjected into biological systems. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy detects binding affinity that is normally related to biological activity. Utilizing SPR spectroscopy, a concise testing matrix is established by investigating the adsorption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA on the surface covered with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA); magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), respectively. The immunoactivity of BSA on MNPs and SWCNT decreased by 18 % and 5 %, respectively, compared to that on the gold film modified with MUA. This indicates that MNPs cause a considerable loss of biological activity of adsorbed protein. This effect can be utilized for practical applications on detailed biophysical research and nanotoxicity studies. (author)

  15. Comparative inhibition of tetrameric carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol by alkyl 4-pyridyl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Tanigawa, Takahiro; Matayoshi, Kazunori; Katakura, Kazufumi; Babazono, Ken; Takayama, Hiroyuki; Murahashi, Tsuyoshi; Akita, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Toshiyuki; Eto, Masashi; Imamura, Yorishige

    2014-06-01

    The present study is to elucidate the comparative inhibition of tetrameric carbonyl reductase (TCBR) activity by alkyl 4-pyridyl ketones, and to characterize its substrate-binding domain. The inhibitory effects of alkyl 4-pyridyl ketones on the stereoselective reduction of 4-benzoylpyridine (4-BP) catalyzed by TCBR were examined in the cytosolic fraction of pig heart. Of alkyl 4-pyridyl ketones, 4-hexanoylpyridine, which has a straight-chain alkyl group of five carbon atoms, inhibited most potently TCBR activity and was a competitive inhibitor. Furthermore, cyclohexyl pentyl ketone, which is substituted by cyclohexyl group instead of phenyl group of hexanophenone, had much lower ability to be reduced than hexanophenone. These results suggest that in addition to a hydrophobic cleft corresponding to a straight-chain alkyl group of five carbon atoms, a hydrophobic pocket with affinity for an aromatic group is located in the substrate-binding domain of TCBR.

  16. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Las Casas, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    Several methods are used In the pollutant removal from Industrial and domestic wastewater. However when the degradation of toxic organic pollutants, mainly the recalcitrant is objectified, the conventional treatments usually do not meet the desirable performance in the elimination or decrease the impact when the effluent are released to the environment what takes to the research of alternative methods that seek the improvement of the efficiency of the wastewater treatment systems jointly employees or separately. This work presents a study of degradation/removal of pollutants organic compounds comparing two methods using radiation from industrial electron beam and granular activated carbon (GAC). The removal efficiency of the pollutants was evaluated and it was verified that the efficiency of adsorption with activated carbon is similar to the radiation method. The obtained results allowed to evaluated the relative costs of these methods. (author)

  17. Comparative study on the antioxidant and anti-Toxoplasma activities of vanillin and its resorcinarene derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudio B S; Meurer, Ywlliane S R; Oliveira, Marianne G; Medeiros, Wendy M T Q; Silva, Francisco O N; Brito, Ana C F; Pontes, Daniel de L; Andrade-Neto, Valter F

    2014-05-07

    A resorcinarene derivative of vanillin, resvan, was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. We measured the cytotoxicity (in vivo and in vitro), antioxidant and anti-Toxoplasma activities of vanillin and the resorcinarene compound. Here we show that vanillin has a dose-dependent behavior with IC50 of 645 µg/mL through an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. However, we could not observe any cytotoxic response at higher concentrations of resvan (IC50 > 2,000 µg/mL). The in vivo acute toxicity assays of vanillin and resvan exhibited a significant safety margin indicated by a lack of systemic and behavioral toxicity up to 300 mg/kg during the first 30 min, 24 h or 14 days after administration. The obtained derivative showed greater antioxidative activity (84.9%) when comparing to vanillin (19.4%) at 1,000 μg/mL. In addition, vanillin presents anti-Toxoplasma activity, while resvan does not show that feature. Our findings suggest that this particular derivative has an efficient antioxidant activity and a negligible cytotoxic effect, making it a potential target for further biological investigations.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Phenolic Content and Anti oxidative Activities of Eight Malaysian Traditional Vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Huda-Faujan; Zulaikha Abdul Rahim; Maryam Mohamed Rehan; Faujan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables have been believed to exhibit antioxidant activities due to its phenolic content. Thus, this study was carried out to determine the total phenolic content of water and ethanolic extracts of Malaysian traditional vegetables and assess their antioxidant activities. Eight samples of Malaysian traditional vegetables were dried and extracted its phenolic compounds using water and ethanolic solvent. Total phenolic content of the extracts were compared and evaluated using Folin-Ciocalteu and Prussian Blue reagent. The antioxidant activity were assessed using ferric thiocyanate assay and DPPH free radical scavenging assays. Results found that total phenolic content of water extracts ranged from 7.08 to 14.76 mg GAE (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) and 3.50 to 7.82 mg GAE (Prussian Blue assay). However, the content of phenolic of ethanolic extracts ranged from 5.21 to 15.86 mg GAE (Folin-Ciocalteu assay), and 1.84 to 11.54 mg GAE (Prussian Blue assay). The highest antioxidant activity was observed in water extracts of Etlingera elatior (75.6 %) and ethanolic extracts of Sauropus androgynus (78.1 %). Results also found that the best half maximal inhibitory concentration or IC 50 were demonstrated by water and ethanolic extracts of Sauropus androgynus which demonstrated 0.077 mg/mL and 0.078 mg/ mL, respectively. Hence, this study obtained that most of the Malaysian traditional vegetables have a potential source of natural antioxidant. (author)

  19. COMPARATIVE SUDY OF THE ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY AT PROFESSIONAL HANDBALL AND FENCERS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENISA ENESCU BIERU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our purpose was to study the electroencephalographic activity of professional handball and fencers players, to compare the obtained data and to identify a possible neurophysiologic pattern associate to practiced sportive activity. Material and method. The study was performed on a group of 22 male athletes, 11 handball players and 11 fencers (different stress degrees of the upper members, active for between 5 and 12 years exclusively in eitherhandball or fencing. Using Nihon-Kohden EEG-9200 device, was recorded EEG line during some activities (relaxation-contraction,which can emphasize possible characteristic cerebral patterns, EEG analyze was made by assessing the classic rhythms and synthetic indexes as edge frequency. To perform spectral analyze was used fast Fourier transformation and for wave values comparison was used Pearson correlation coefficient. Results. For both groups was remarked a slight increase of the theta wave values and for handball players a high degree of correlation for theta and beta indexes and also a correlation in the dominant hemisphere for alpha1 and 2.Conclusions. EEG complex testing of professional sportsmen, as well as the outlining of an EEG pattern specific to studied sportive discipline, represent an original aspect of this study

  20. Novel Control Strategy for VSI and CSI Active Filters and Comparing These Two Types of Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Arab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently to eliminate the harmonics and improve the power factor of the power networks, much attention has been attracted to active filters. The advantages of these filters are lower volume and their better compensating characteristics than the passive filters. In conventional sliding mode controllers, the source current waveform is fluctuated in near to zero values. In this paper, using a new sliding technique, lower Total Harmonic Distortion (THD in source current is obtained and the current waveform is improved. As well as, two novel control strategies for two types of active filters, VSI and CSI is proposed and then these two types of filters are compared to reduce THD value of source current.The proposed controlled strategies are simulated by MATLAB/Simulink. The Simulation results confirm that the proposed strategies reduce the THD of source current more than other strategies, and active filter based on CSI has a better performance than active filter based on VSI with a dead time area (for avoiding short circuit of the source in high powers.

  1. Effect of bypass on the motor activation SPECT compared to the acetazolamide SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Iwahashi, Hideaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The authors evaluated and analyzed motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) in ischemic cerebrovascular disease compared to resting and acetazolamide (ACZ) activated SPECT studies. Seventeen cases with STA-MCA bypass performed for ischemic cerebrovascular disease were examined. The SPECT studies consisting of resting, ACZ activation, and motor activation stages were performed before bypass, at 1 month, and 3 months after bypass. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as negative or positive. Before bypass: In all 17 cases, SPECT studies of the affected side showed reduction of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduction of cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). Eight cases were positive in the M-SPECT study. One week after bypass: The resting CBF increased in seven cases. Four showed preoperative positive M-SPECT. Eight cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Twelve cases were positive in M-SPECT, and two were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. Three months after bypass: Thirteen cases showed improvement in the resting CBF, and fourteen cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Fourteen cases were positive in the M-SPECT, and among these, 6 were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. There was a discrepancy between the improvement in CVRC and M-SPECT. M-SPECT study can provide information about the degree of hemodynamic compromise and effect of bypass surgery. (author)

  2. Canis familiaris As a Model for Non-Invasive Comparative Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunford, Nóra; Andics, Attila; Kis, Anna; Miklósi, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta

    2017-07-01

    There is an ongoing need to improve animal models for investigating human behavior and its biological underpinnings. The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) is a promising model in cognitive neuroscience. However, before it can contribute to advances in this field in a comparative, reliable, and valid manner, several methodological issues warrant attention. We review recent non-invasive canine neuroscience studies, primarily focusing on (i) variability among dogs and between dogs and humans in cranial characteristics, and (ii) generalizability across dog and dog-human studies. We argue not for methodological uniformity but for functional comparability between methods, experimental designs, and neural responses. We conclude that the dog may become an innovative and unique model in comparative neuroscience, complementing more traditional models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of Germanium as comparator and integral monitor of neutron flux in activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnari, Juan C.; Cohen, Isaac M.; Arribere, Maria A.; Kestelman, Abraham J.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of using germanium as monitor of the thermal and epithermal components of the neutron flux, and comparator in parametric activation analysis, is discussed. The advantages and drawbacks associated to the use of this element are commented on, and the comparison with zirconium, in terms of the determination relative error, is performed. The utilisation of germanium as integral flux monitor, including the fast component of the neutron spectrum, is also discussed. Data corresponding to measurements of k 0 factor for the most relevant gamma transitions from Ge-75 and Be-77 are presented, as well as the results of the reference material analysis, employing germanium as flux monitor and comparator in a simultaneous way. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Comparative analysis of methods and sources of financing of the transport organizations activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Roman

    2017-10-01

    The article considers the analysis of methods of financing of transport organizations in conditions of limited investment resources. A comparative analysis of these methods is carried out, the classification of investment, methods and sources of financial support for projects being implemented to date are presented. In order to select the optimal sources of financing for the projects, various methods of financial management and financial support for the activities of the transport organization were analyzed, which were considered from the perspective of analysis of advantages and limitations. The result of the study is recommendations on the selection of optimal sources and methods of financing of transport organizations.

  5. Comparative study between the PIXE technique and neutron activation analysis for Zinc determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruvinel, Paulo Estevao; Crestana, Silvio; Artaxo Netto, Paulo Eduardo

    1997-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study between the PIXE, proton beams and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques, for determination of total zinc concentration. Particularly, soil samples from the Pindorama, Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, experimental station have been analysed and measuring the zinc contents in μg/g. The results presented good correlation between the mentioned techniques. The PIXE and NAA analyses have been carried out by using the series S, 2.4 MeV proton beams Pelletron accelerator and the IPEN/CNEN-IEA-R1 reactor, both installed at the Sao Paulo - Brazil university

  6. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  7. Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmandrier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Descombes, Patrice; Sandel, Brody; Faurby, Soren; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Pellissier, Loïc

    2018-03-01

    Reconstructing the processes that have shaped the emergence of biodiversity gradients is critical to understand the dynamics of diversification of life on Earth. Islands have traditionally been used as model systems to unravel the processes shaping biological diversity. MacArthur and Wilson's island biogeographic model predicts diversity to be based on dynamic interactions between colonization and extinction rates, while treating islands themselves as geologically static entities. The current spatial configuration of islands should influence meta-population dynamics, but long-term geological changes within archipelagos are also expected to have shaped island biodiversity, in part by driving diversification. Here, we compare two mechanistic models providing inferences on species richness at a biogeographic scale: a mechanistic spatial-temporal model of species diversification and a spatial meta-population model. While the meta-population model operates over a static landscape, the diversification model is driven by changes in the size and spatial configuration of islands through time. We compare the inferences of both models to floristic diversity patterns among land patches of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Simulation results from the diversification model better matched observed diversity than a meta-population model constrained only by the contemporary landscape. The diversification model suggests that the dynamic re-positioning of islands promoting land disconnection and reconnection induced an accumulation of particularly high species diversity on Borneo, which is central within the island network. By contrast, the meta-population model predicts a higher diversity on the mainlands, which is less compatible with empirical data. Our analyses highlight that, by comparing models with contrasting assumptions, we can pinpoint the processes that are most compatible with extant biodiversity patterns.

  8. A computational approach to compare regression modelling strategies in prediction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouheshnia, Romin; Pestman, Wiebe R; Teerenstra, Steven; Groenwold, Rolf H H

    2016-08-25

    It is often unclear which approach to fit, assess and adjust a model will yield the most accurate prediction model. We present an extension of an approach for comparing modelling strategies in linear regression to the setting of logistic regression and demonstrate its application in clinical prediction research. A framework for comparing logistic regression modelling strategies by their likelihoods was formulated using a wrapper approach. Five different strategies for modelling, including simple shrinkage methods, were compared in four empirical data sets to illustrate the concept of a priori strategy comparison. Simulations were performed in both randomly generated data and empirical data to investigate the influence of data characteristics on strategy performance. We applied the comparison framework in a case study setting. Optimal strategies were selected based on the results of a priori comparisons in a clinical data set and the performance of models built according to each strategy was assessed using the Brier score and calibration plots. The performance of modelling strategies was highly dependent on the characteristics of the development data in both linear and logistic regression settings. A priori comparisons in four empirical data sets found that no strategy consistently outperformed the others. The percentage of times that a model adjustment strategy outperformed a logistic model ranged from 3.9 to 94.9 %, depending on the strategy and data set. However, in our case study setting the a priori selection of optimal methods did not result in detectable improvement in model performance when assessed in an external data set. The performance of prediction modelling strategies is a data-dependent process and can be highly variable between data sets within the same clinical domain. A priori strategy comparison can be used to determine an optimal logistic regression modelling strategy for a given data set before selecting a final modelling approach.

  9. Adaptation to Climate Change: A Comparative Analysis of Modeling Methods for Heat-Related Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Simon N; Hondula, David M; Bunker, Aditi; Ibarreta, Dolores; Liu, Junguo; Zhang, Xinxin; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2017-08-16

    Multiple methods are employed for modeling adaptation when projecting the impact of climate change on heat-related mortality. The sensitivity of impacts to each is unknown because they have never been systematically compared. In addition, little is known about the relative sensitivity of impacts to "adaptation uncertainty" (i.e., the inclusion/exclusion of adaptation modeling) relative to using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios. This study had three aims: a ) Compare the range in projected impacts that arises from using different adaptation modeling methods; b ) compare the range in impacts that arises from adaptation uncertainty with ranges from using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios; c ) recommend modeling method(s) to use in future impact assessments. We estimated impacts for 2070-2099 for 14 European cities, applying six different methods for modeling adaptation; we also estimated impacts with five climate models run under two emissions scenarios to explore the relative effects of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. The range of the difference (percent) in impacts between including and excluding adaptation, irrespective of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty, can be as low as 28% with one method and up to 103% with another (mean across 14 cities). In 13 of 14 cities, the ranges in projected impacts due to adaptation uncertainty are larger than those associated with climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. Researchers should carefully consider how to model adaptation because it is a source of uncertainty that can be greater than the uncertainty in emissions and climate modeling. We recommend absolute threshold shifts and reductions in slope. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP634.

  10. Software Cost Estimating Models: A Comparative Study of What the Models Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    generate good cost estimates. One model developer best summed up this sentiment by stating: Estimation is not a mechanical process. Art, skill, and...Allocation Perc.uinta~es for SASEY Development Phases Sysieni Conce~pt 7.5% yseS/W Requ~irements Anlysis _________%__ S/W Raq;iirements Analysis 9.0

  11. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  12. Comparative Analysis of River Flow Modelling by Using Supervised Learning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shuhaida; Mohamad Pandiahi, Siraj; Shabri, Ani; Mustapha, Aida

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the efficiency of three supervised learning algorithms for forecasting monthly river flow of the Indus River in Pakistan, spread over 550 square miles or 1800 square kilometres. The algorithms include the Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Wavelet Regression (WR). The forecasting models predict the monthly river flow obtained from the three models individually for river flow data and the accuracy of the all models were then compared against each other. The monthly river flow of the said river has been forecasted using these three models. The obtained results were compared and statistically analysed. Then, the results of this analytical comparison showed that LSSVM model is more precise in the monthly river flow forecasting. It was found that LSSVM has he higher r with the value of 0.934 compared to other models. This indicate that LSSVM is more accurate and efficient as compared to the ANN and WR model.

  13. A Comparative Study of Theoretical Graph Models for Characterizing Structural Networks of Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated both structural and functional brain networks via graph-theoretical methods. However, there is an important issue that has not been adequately discussed before: what is the optimal theoretical graph model for describing the structural networks of human brain? In this paper, we perform a comparative study to address this problem. Firstly, large-scale cortical regions of interest (ROIs are localized by recently developed and validated brain reference system named Dense Individualized Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL to address the limitations in the identification of the brain network ROIs in previous studies. Then, we construct structural brain networks based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data. Afterwards, the global and local graph properties of the constructed structural brain networks are measured using the state-of-the-art graph analysis algorithms and tools and are further compared with seven popular theoretical graph models. In addition, we compare the topological properties between two graph models, namely, stickiness-index-based model (STICKY and scale-free gene duplication model (SF-GD, that have higher similarity with the real structural brain networks in terms of global and local graph properties. Our experimental results suggest that among the seven theoretical graph models compared in this study, STICKY and SF-GD models have better performances in characterizing the structural human brain network.

  14. Internal friction in an intrinsically disordered protein—Comparing Rouse-like models with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranno, Andrea; Zosel, Franziska; Hofmann, Hagen

    2018-03-01

    Internal friction is frequently found in protein dynamics. Its molecular origin however is difficult to conceptualize. Even unfolded and intrinsically disordered polypeptide chains exhibit signs of internal friction despite their enormous solvent accessibility. Here, we compare four polymer theories of internal friction with experimental results on the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR (activator of thyroid hormone receptor). Using nanosecond fluorescence correlation spectroscopy combined with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we determine the time scales of the diffusive chain dynamics of ACTR at different solvent viscosities and varying degrees of compaction. Despite pronounced differences between the theories, we find that all models can capture the experimental viscosity-dependence of the chain relaxation time. In contrast, the observed slowdown upon chain collapse of ACTR is not captured by any of the theories and a mechanistic link between chain dimension and internal friction is still missing, implying that the current theories are incomplete. In addition, a discrepancy between early results on homopolymer solutions and recent single-molecule experiments on unfolded and disordered proteins suggests that internal friction is likely to be a composite phenomenon caused by a variety of processes.

  15. Comparative efficacies of candidate antibiotics against Yersinia pestis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Arnold; Vanscoy, Brian; Liu, Weiguo; Kulawy, Robert; Brown, David; Heine, Henry S; Drusano, George L

    2011-06-01

    Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, is a potential agent of bioterrorism. Streptomycin is the "gold standard" for the treatment of plague infections in humans, but the drug is not available in many countries, and resistance to this antibiotic occurs naturally and has been generated in the laboratory. Other antibiotics have been shown to be active against Y. pestis in vitro and in vivo. However, the relative efficacies of clinically prescribed regimens of these antibiotics with streptomycin and with each other for the killing of Yersinia pestis are unknown. The efficacies of simulated pharmacokinetic profiles for human 10-day clinical regimens of ampicillin, meropenem, moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin were compared with the gold standard, streptomycin, for killing of Yersinia pestis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model. Resistance amplification with therapy was also assessed. Streptomycin killed the microbe in one trial but failed due to resistance amplification in the second trial. In two trials, the other antibiotics consistently reduced the bacterial densities within the pharmacodynamic systems from 10⁸ CFU/ml to undetectable levels (pestis and deserve further evaluation.

  16. A comparative study of two communication models in HIV/AIDS coverage in selected Nigerian newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okidu, Onjefu

    2013-01-30

    The current overriding thought in HIV/AIDS communication in developing countries is the need for a shift from the cognitive model, which emphasises the decision-making of the individual, to the activity model, which emphasises the context of the individual. In spite of the acknowledged media shift from the cognitive to the activity model in some developing countries, some HIV/AIDS communication scholars have felt otherwise. It was against this background that this study examined the content of some selected Nigerian newspapers to ascertain the attention paid to HIV/AIDS cognitive and activity information. Generally, the study found that Nigerian newspapers had shifted from the cognitive to the activity model of communication in their coverage of HIV/AIDS issues. The findings of the study seem inconsistent with the theoretical argument of some scholars that insufficient attention has been paid by mass media in developing countries to the activity model of HIV/AIDS communication. It is suggested that future research replicate the study for Nigerian and other developing countries' mass media.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of the New Five-Pole and Three-Pole Active Magnet Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Vakili

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more attention has been given to the active AMBs thanks to their low maintenance cost, suitability for clean environments, and high speed. One of the popular types of AMBs is the three-pole type with integrated and separate cores. Some deficiencies of this type of bearing are its high oscillation, low stability and low efficiency. This paper seeks to analyse the three-pole AMBs and describe their deficiencies and introduce and analyse a new five-pole AMB. The model thus proposed has lower oscillation as well as more stability and efficiency. The five-pole AMB has been simulated by a controller in the presence of disturbance. The results of simulation demonstrate lower vibration and oscillation in the five-pole AMB in comparison with the three-pole model.

  18. Comparative Analysis of ANN and SVM Models Combined with Wavelet Preprocess for Groundwater Depth Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prediction of groundwater depth fluctuations has been an important component in sustainable water resources management. In this study, a data-driven prediction model combining discrete wavelet transform (DWT preprocess and support vector machine (SVM was proposed for groundwater depth forecasting. Regular artificial neural networks (ANN, regular SVM, and wavelet preprocessed artificial neural networks (WANN models were also developed for comparison. These methods were applied to the monthly groundwater depth records over a period of 37 years from ten wells in the Mengcheng County, China. Relative absolute error (RAE, Pearson correlation coefficient (r, root mean square error (RMSE, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE were adopted for model evaluation. The results indicate that wavelet preprocess extremely improved the training and test performance of ANN and SVM models. The WSVM model provided the most precise and reliable groundwater depth prediction compared with ANN, SVM, and WSVM models. The criterion of RAE, r, RMSE, and NSE values for proposed WSVM model are 0.20, 0.97, 0.18 and 0.94, respectively. Comprehensive comparisons and discussion revealed that wavelet preprocess extremely improves the prediction precision and reliability for both SVM and ANN models. The prediction result of SVM model is superior to ANN model in generalization ability and precision. Nevertheless, the performance of WANN is superior to SVM model, which further validates the power of data preprocess in data-driven prediction models. Finally, the optimal model, WSVM, is discussed by comparing its subseries performances as well as model performance stability, revealing the efficiency and universality of WSVM model in data driven prediction field.

  19. Comparing the photothermal effects of gold nanorods and single-walled carbon nanotubes in cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Connor L.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Young, Blake; Wolf, Roman; Silk, Kegan; Ingalls, Rianna; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer treatment modality that is specifically targeted towards treating late-stage, metastatic cancer. This treatment modality utilizes laser irradiation in combination with active immune system stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immune response against metastatic cancer. Nanoparticles have recently been utilized to support and increase the photothermal effect of the laser irradiation by absorbing the light energy produced from the laser and converting that energy into thermal energy. In the past, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been the main choice in nanotechnology, however, recent studies have shown that gold nanorods (AuNRs) are a prospective alternative that may produce photothermal effects similar to SWNTs. Due to the precedence of gold biomaterials currently having approval for use in various treatments for humans, AuNRs are regarded to be a safer option than SWNTs. The goal of this study is to precisely compare any differences in photothermal effects between AuNRs and SWNTs. Both types of nanoparticles were irradiated with the same wavelength of near-infrared light to ascertain the photothermal effects in gel phantom tumor models, aqueous solutions, and metastatic cancer cell cultures. We discerned from the results that the AuNRs could be equally or more effective than SWNTs in absorbing the light energy from the laser and converting it into thermal energy. In both solution and gel studies, AuNRs were shown to be more efficient than SWNTs in creating thermal energy, while in cell studies, no definitive differences between AuNRs and SWNTs were observed. The cytotoxicity of both nanoparticles needs further assessment in future studies. Given these results, AuNRs are comparable to SWNTs, even superior in certain aspects. This advances the opportunity to use AuNRs as replacements for SWNTs in LIT treatments. The results from this study will contribute to any subsequent studies in the development

  20. Comparative MD Simulations Indicate a Dual Role for Arg1323.50 in Dopamine-Dependent D2R Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf C Kling

    Full Text Available Residue Arg3.50 belongs to the highly conserved DRY-motif of class A GPCRs, which is located at the bottom of TM3. On the one hand, Arg3.50 has been reported to help stabilize the inactive state of GPCRs, but on the other hand has also been shown to be crucial for stabilizing active receptor conformations and mediating receptor-G protein coupling. The combined results of these studies suggest that the exact function of Arg3.50 is likely to be receptor-dependent and must be characterized independently for every GPCR. Consequently, we now present comparative molecular-dynamics simulations that use our recently described inactive-state and Gα-bound active-state homology models of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R, which are either bound to dopamine or ligand-free, performed to identify the function of Arg1323.50 in D2R. Our results are consistent with a dynamic model of D2R activation in which Arg1323.50 adopts a dual role, both by stabilizing the inactive-state receptor conformation and enhancing dopamine-dependent D2R-G protein coupling.