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Sample records for models boys identify

  1. Teacher-identified oral language difficulties among boys with attention problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T; Koltun, H; Malone, M; Roberts, W

    1994-04-01

    Teachers evaluated the language functioning of 95 boys, aged 6.5 to 13.8 years, identified as having attention problems (AP, n = 30), learning disability (LD, n = 33), or average achievement (AA, n = 32). The three groups did not differ significantly (p > .05) in their frequency of articulation problems. Significantly (p pragmatics problems than both of the other groups. AP boys were also viewed as having a higher frequency of receptive/expressive language problems than were AA boys, but not compared with LD boys. LD and AA boys did not differ in their ratings for pragmatics problems, but more LD than AA boys were perceived as having receptive/expressive problems. The average incidence of all types of language problems was highest for the AP boys at 42% with poor pragmatics representing their most frequently rated language difficulty. AP boys' pragmatics difficulties seemed to be characterized by greater difficulty in maintaining than initiating a conversation compared with the other two groups. This difficulty was positively associated with the teachers' ratings of the AP boys' impulsivity.

  2. Identifiability in stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The problem of identifiability is basic to all statistical methods and data analysis, occurring in such diverse areas as Reliability Theory, Survival Analysis, and Econometrics, where stochastic modeling is widely used. Mathematics dealing with identifiability per se is closely related to the so-called branch of ""characterization problems"" in Probability Theory. This book brings together relevant material on identifiability as it occurs in these diverse fields.

  3. Brothers in Excellence: An Empowerment Model for the Career Development of African American Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    The author describes Brothers in Excellence (BE), a conceptual model for understanding African American boys and helping them to be successful. BE addresses 3 domains of development proposed to be essential to the success of all African American boys: identity development, social development, and career development. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. Sparse Linear Identifiable Multivariate Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider sparse and identifiable linear latent variable (factor) and linear Bayesian network models for parsimonious analysis of multivariate data. We propose a computationally efficient method for joint parameter and model inference, and model comparison. It consists of a fully...... Bayesian hierarchy for sparse models using slab and spike priors (two-component δ-function and continuous mixtures), non-Gaussian latent factors and a stochastic search over the ordering of the variables. The framework, which we call SLIM (Sparse Linear Identifiable Multivariate modeling), is validated...... and bench-marked on artificial and real biological data sets. SLIM is closest in spirit to LiNGAM (Shimizu et al., 2006), but differs substantially in inference, Bayesian network structure learning and model comparison. Experimentally, SLIM performs equally well or better than LiNGAM with comparable...

  5. Identifying and modeling safety hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

    2000-03-29

    The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

  6. Sparse Linear Identifiable Multivariate Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    and bench-marked on artificial and real biological data sets. SLIM is closest in spirit to LiNGAM (Shimizu et al., 2006), but differs substantially in inference, Bayesian network structure learning and model comparison. Experimentally, SLIM performs equally well or better than LiNGAM with comparable...

  7. Enhancing the conversation skills of a boy with Asperger's Disorder through Social Stories and video modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattone, Dorothy

    2008-02-01

    This study combined Social Stories with video modeling in an effort to enhance the conversation skills of a boy with Asperger's Disorder. Treatment consisted of two components: (a) observation of video taped Social Stories that included two adults modeling targeted conversational skills and (b) 5-min social interactions. A multiple baseline design across behaviors was used to evaluate the intervention and an increase in 2 out of 3 targeted conversation skills occurred. In addition, generalized behavior changes were observed. These findings provide support for including Social Stories as part of a video treatment package in teaching complex social interaction behaviors to young children with Asperger's Disorder.

  8. Effects of poverty on academic failure and delinquency in boys: a change and process model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, L; Boulerice, B; Vitaro, F; Tremblay, R E

    1999-11-01

    Using data from the Montreal Longitudinal-Experimental Study, we examined the impact of poverty (and its correlate, family configuration status) on academic placement and self-reported delinquency in boys at age 16. We then investigated whether the relation between family economic hardship and antisocial behaviour is direct or indirect by considering the value of parenting practices and academic failure as process variables in the model. Data included official records, and parent, teacher, and self-reports. The temporal intensity of poverty was classified into five categories: never-poor; always-poor; poor-earlier; poor-later; and transitory-poverty. Family configuration status was classified by both temporal characteristics and number of marital transitions: intact-family; short-term-single; long-term-single; short-term-remarried; long-term-remarried; and multiple-marital-transitions. Results revealed that when maternal education and early childhood behaviour were controlled, poverty had an effect on both academic failure and extreme delinquency. This effect was independent of family configuration status. Although they both significantly predicted extreme delinquency on their own, academic failure and parental supervision did not mediate the relationship between poverty and delinquency. Divorce increased the risk of theft and fighting at age 16, regardless of financial hardship. Parental supervision only helped explain the effects of divorce on boys' fighting.

  9. Enhancing the Conversation Skills of a Boy with Asperger's Disorder through Social Stories[TM] and Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattone, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    This study combined Social Stories with video modeling in an effort to enhance the conversation skills of a boy with Asperger's Disorder. Treatment consisted of two components: (a) observation of video taped Social Stories that included two adults modeling targeted conversational skills and (b) 5-min social interactions. A multiple baseline design…

  10. Barrio Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Ernesto

    An autobiography, "Barrio Boy" is the story of Little Ernie, a boy born in the tiny mountain village of Jalcocotan in the State of Nayarit, Mexico. Divided into 5 parts, the book offers vivid descriptions of the author's early life--his family, his friends, his surroundings, as well as events in the journey from Jalcocotan that eventually ended in…

  11. Barrio Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Ernesto

    An autobiography, "Barrio Boy" is the story of Little Ernie, a boy born in the tiny mountain village of Jalcocotan in the State of Nayarit, Mexico. Divided into 5 parts, the book offers vivid descriptions of the author's early life--his family, his friends, his surroundings, as well as events in the journey from Jalcocotan that eventually ended in…

  12. Evaluating Expectations about Negative Emotional States of Aggressive Boys Using Bayesian Model Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, Rens; Hoijtink, Herbert; Mulder, Joris; Van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Meeus, Wim; Romeijn, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Researchers often have expectations about the research outcomes in regard to inequality constraints between, e.g., group means. Consider the example of researchers who investigated the effects of inducing a negative emotional state in aggressive boys. It was expected that highly aggressive boys would, on average, score higher on aggressive…

  13. Global identifiability of linear structural equation models

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation models are multivariate statistical models that are defined by specifying noisy functional relationships among random variables. We consider the classical case of linear relationships and additive Gaussian noise terms. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for global identifiability of the model in terms of a mixed graph encoding the linear structural equations and the correlation structure of the error terms. Global identifiability is understood to mean injectivity of the parametrization of the model and is fundamental in particular for applicability of standard statistical methodology.

  14. Identifying nonlinear biomechanical models by multicriteria analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srdjevic, Zorica; Cveticanin, Livija

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the methodology developed by Srdjevic and Cveticanin (International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 34 (2004) 307-318) for the nonbiased (objective) parameter identification of the linear biomechanical model exposed to vertical vibrations is extended to the identification of n-degree of freedom (DOF) nonlinear biomechanical models. The dynamic performance of the n-DOF nonlinear model is described in terms of response functions in the frequency domain, such as the driving-point mechanical impedance and seat-to-head transmissibility function. For randomly generated parameters of the model, nonlinear equations of motion are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The appropriate data transformation from the time-to-frequency domain is performed by a discrete Fourier transformation. Squared deviations of the response functions from the target values are used as the model performance evaluation criteria, thus shifting the problem into the multicriteria framework. The objective weights of criteria are obtained by applying the Shannon entropy concept. The suggested methodology is programmed in Pascal and tested on a 4-DOF nonlinear lumped parameter biomechanical model. The identification process over the 2000 generated sets of parameters lasts less than 20 s. The model response obtained with the imbedded identified parameters correlates well with the target values, therefore, justifying the use of the underlying concept and the mathematical instruments and numerical tools applied. It should be noted that the identified nonlinear model has an improved accuracy of the biomechanical response compared to the accuracy of a linear model.

  15. Identifiability of large phylogenetic mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, John A; Sullivant, Seth

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic mixture models are statistical models of character evolution allowing for heterogeneity. Each of the classes in some unknown partition of the characters may evolve by different processes, or even along different trees. Such models are of increasing interest for data analysis, as they can capture the variety of evolutionary processes that may be occurring across long sequences of DNA or proteins. The fundamental question of whether parameters of such a model are identifiable is difficult to address, due to the complexity of the parameterization. Identifiability is, however, essential to their use for statistical inference.We analyze mixture models on large trees, with many mixture components, showing that both numerical and tree parameters are indeed identifiable in these models when all trees are the same. This provides a theoretical justification for some current empirical studies, and indicates that extensions to even more mixture components should be theoretically well behaved. We also extend our results to certain mixtures on different trees, using the same algebraic techniques.

  16. Identifying motifs in folktales using topic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2013-01-01

    With the undertake of various folktale digitalization initiatives, the need for computational aids to explore these collections is increasing. In this paper we compare Labeled LDA (L-LDA) to a simple retrieval model on the task of identifying motifs in folktales. We show that both methods are well a

  17. Identifiability of Causal Graphs using Functional Models

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Jonas; Janzing, Dominik; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    This work addresses the following question: Under what assumptions on the data generating process can one infer the causal graph from the joint distribution? The approach taken by conditional independence-based causal discovery methods is based on two assumptions: the Markov condition and faithfulness. It has been shown that under these assumptions the causal graph can be identified up to Markov equivalence (some arrows remain undirected) using methods like the PC algorithm. In this work we propose an alternative by defining Identifiable Functional Model Classes (IFMOCs). As our main theorem we prove that if the data generating process belongs to an IFMOC, one can identify the complete causal graph. To the best of our knowledge this is the first identifiability result of this kind that is not limited to linear functional relationships. We discuss how the IFMOC assumption and the Markov and faithfulness assumptions relate to each other and explain why we believe that the IFMOC assumption can be tested more eas...

  18. Identifying confounders using additive noise models

    CERN Document Server

    Janzing, Dominik; Mooij, Joris; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for inferring the existence of a latent common cause ('confounder') of two observed random variables. The method assumes that the two effects of the confounder are (possibly nonlinear) functions of the confounder plus independent, additive noise. We discuss under which conditions the model is identifiable (up to an arbitrary reparameterization of the confounder) from the joint distribution of the effects. We state and prove a theoretical result that provides evidence for the conjecture that the model is generically identifiable under suitable technical conditions. In addition, we propose a practical method to estimate the confounder from a finite i.i.d. sample of the effects and illustrate that the method works well on both simulated and real-world data.

  19. Ebola Virus Infection Modelling and Identifiability Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van-Kinh eNguyen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV infections have underlined the impact of the virus as a major threat for human health. Due to the high biosafety classification of EBOV (level 4, basic research is very limited. Therefore, the development of new avenues of thinking to advance quantitative comprehension of the virus and its interaction with the host cells is urgently neededto tackle this lethal disease. Mathematical modelling of the EBOV dynamics can be instrumental to interpret Ebola infection kinetics on quantitative grounds. To the best of our knowledge, a mathematical modelling approach to unravel the interaction between EBOV and the host cells isstill missing. In this paper, a mathematical model based on differential equations is used to represent the basic interactions between EBOV and wild-type Vero cells in vitro. Parameter sets that represent infectivity of pathogens are estimated for EBOV infection and compared with influenza virus infection kinetics. The average infecting time of wild-type Vero cells in EBOV is slower than in influenza infection. Simulation results suggest that the slow infecting time of EBOV could be compensated by its efficient replication. This study reveals several identifiability problems and what kind of experiments are necessary to advance the quantification of EBOV infection. A first mathematical approach of EBOV dynamics and the estimation of standard parametersin viral infections kinetics is the key contribution of this work, paving the way for future modelling work on EBOV infection.

  20. Optimal Model for Velocity Strength Training Methods for Boy Sprinters Base on Fuzzy Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With literature consultation, Delphi method, fuzzy mathematics, experimental method and mathematical statistics method, from multi viewpoints, this study analyzes the velocity strength quality of boy two-level sprinters in quality and quantity. The result shows, with fuzzy mathematics, we can judge the relative degree between velocity strength and various methods, with quantitative disposal to analyze quantitatively, which has certain theoretic significance; according to analysis of fuzzy relation and corresponding relation, build the classification figure for velocity strength training method for boy sprinters; relative data proof, the optimal organization of different training methods can outstand the training specialization and save time and energy, so as to supplement the special training theories, to provide theoretic references and practical instructions for most coaches’ training processes, to improve the efficiency.

  1. Exploring a model linking social physique anxiety, drive for muscularity, drive for thinness and self-esteem among adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Dorsch, Kim D; McCreary, Donald R

    2010-03-01

    This study examined gender differences on body image measures, and tested a model where self-esteem influences social physique anxiety (SPA), which in turn influences drive for muscularity and drive for thinness in a sample of adolescents (N=329; 58% boys). Multi-group invariance analyses indicated that the measurement and structural models were partially invariant for boys and girls, allowing for gender comparisons. Results indicated that boys reported significantly lower drive for thinness and SPA, and higher drive for muscularity and self-esteem compared to girls. The measurement and structural models were an adequate fit for the total sample. Findings supported the proposed sequence in which self-esteem significantly influenced SPA, and SPA significantly influenced the drives for muscularity and thinness. Interventions aimed at decreasing SPA, by promoting self-esteem, may be helpful in decreasing adolescent boys' and girls' drive for muscularity and thinness.

  2. Modeling of Teaching 5th-7th-Grade Boys Physical Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Г. Абдулхалікова

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to determine the effectiveness of orthogonal variants of teaching 5th-7th graders physical exercises. Materials and methods. The participants in the research were boys of the 5th grade (n = 32, 6th grade (n = 40, 7th grade (n = 52. To achieve the tasks set, the research used the following methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical testing, pedagogical observation, timing of educational tasks; pedagogical experiment, medical and biological research methods; methods of mathematical statistics, methods of mathematical experiment planning. In order to achieve the objective set, the research has studied the effect of different variants of the educational process structure, namely: the number of repetitions (х1 and rest intervals (х2 when learning the technique of performing physical exercises. The research has conducted a complete factor experiment of type 22. According to the experiment plan, the 5th-7th graders were divided into training groups. In total, there were 12 experimental groups organized. Research results. The analysis of the regression equations shows that the teaching of physical exercises to the 5th-7th-grade boys is mostly influenced by rest intervals between repetitions (х2. The number of repetitions (х1 has somewhat less influence. The interaction of these factors is insignificant when teaching physical exercises and becomes much more influential only when teaching a switch leg pull-over exercise (х1х2. Conclusions. To increase the effectiveness of teaching 5th-7th graders physical exercises, it is necessary to shorten rest intervals between repetition to 60 s and to reduce the number of repetitions to six. When teaching boys the switch leg pull-over exercise, rest intervals should be increased to 120 s and the number of repetitions — to twelve.

  3. Engaging men and boys in preventing violence against women: applying a cognitive-behavioral model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V; Goodall, George R; Hughes, Ray; Jaffe, Peter G; Baker, Linda L

    2007-03-01

    Although historically the prevention of relationship violence has been seen as a women's issue, more recently recognition has emerged regarding the need to engage men as partners in these initiatives. Early attempts have been mainly driven by grassroots efforts and have not been consistent with a particular theory of behavior and attitude change. This article investigates the application of cognitive-behavioral strategies to engaging men and boys in violence prevention, within a profeminist framework. Three fundamental components of a cognitive-behavioral therapy approach--goal setting, core beliefs, and strategies for change--are discussed and examples of promising initiatives are used to highlight these ideas.

  4. Parental involvement, child effort, and the development of immigrant boys' and girls' reading and mathematics skills: A latent difference score growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ui Jeong; Hofferth, Sandra L

    2016-04-01

    Gender differences in elementary school performance among immigrant children have not yet been well documented. This study examined how differences in parental involvement, child effort, and family characteristics and resources contribute to immigrant boys'-and girls' academic achievement from kindergarten through 5(th)-grade. The sample was drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten cohort. Using a latent score growth model, this study found that parents' involvement at home benefited boys' reading and mathematics skills throughout all early elementary school years, but did not have the same benefit for girls. For both boys and girls, child effort in reading appears to be strongly linked to better reading and mathematics skills at kindergarten and to subsequent improvement between grades. The positive associations of parental involvement and child's effort with test scores were greater during earlier years than during later years for boys, whereas there was no difference in the association over time for girls.

  5. On identifiability of certain latent class models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, W.N.

    2005-01-01

    Blischke [1962. Moment estimators for the parameters of a mixture of two binomial distributions. Ann. Math. Statist. 33, 444-454] studies a mixture of two binomials, a latent class model. In this article we generalize this model to a mixture of two products of binomials. We show when this generalize

  6. Model atmospheres - Tool for identifying interstellar features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.; Slojkowski, S. E.; Rodriguez-Bell, T.; York, D.

    1993-01-01

    Model atmosphere parameters are derived for 14 early A stars with rotation velocities, from optical spectra, in excess of 80 km/s. The models are compared with IUE observations of the stars in regions where interstellar lines are expected. In general, with the assumption of solar abundances, excellent fits are obtained in regions longward of 2580 A, and accurate interstellar equivalent widths can be derived using models to establish the continuum. The fits are poorer at shorter wavelengths, particularly at 2026-2062 A, where the stellar model parameters seem inadequate. Features indicating mass flows are evident in stars with known infrared excesses. In gamma TrA, variability in the Mg II lines is seen over the 5-year interval of these data, and also over timescales as short as 26 days. The present technique should be useful in systematic studies of episodic mass flows in A stars and for stellar abundance studies, as well as interstellar features.

  7. Understanding boys': thinking through boys, masculinity and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac An Ghaill, Mairtin; Haywood, Chris

    2012-02-01

    In the UK, the media are reporting increasing rates of childhood suicide, while highlighting that increasing numbers of pre-adolescent boys (in relation to girls) are diagnosed as mentally ill. In response, academic, professional and political commentators are explaining this as a consequence of gender. One way of doing this has been to apply adult defined understandings of men and masculinities to the attitudes and behaviours of pre-adolescent boys. As a consequence, explanations of these trends point to either 'too much' masculinity, such as an inability to express feelings and seek help, or 'not enough' masculinity that results in isolation and rejection from significant others, such as peer groups. Using a discourse analysis of semi-structured interviews with 28 children aged 9-13 (12 male, 16 females) and 12 school staff at a school in North East England, this article questions the viability of using normative models of masculinity as an explanatory tool for explaining boys' behaviours and suggests that researchers in the field of gender and suicide consider how boys' genders may be constituted differently. We develop this argument in three ways. First, it is argued that studies that use masculinity tend to reduce the formation of gender to the articulation of power across and between men and other men and women. Second, we argue that approaches to understanding boys' behaviours are simplistically grafting masculinity as a conceptual frame onto boy's attitudes and behaviours. In response, we suggest that it is important to re-think how we gender younger boys. The final section focuses specifically on the ways that boys engage in friendships. The significance of this section is that we need to question how notions of communication, integration and isolation, key features of suicide behaviours, are framed through the local production of friendships.

  8. On linear models and parameter identifiability in experimental biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Timothy O; Condon, Nicholas D; Stow, Jennifer L; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2014-10-07

    A key problem in the biological sciences is to be able to reliably estimate model parameters from experimental data. This is the well-known problem of parameter identifiability. Here, methods are developed for biologists and other modelers to design optimal experiments to ensure parameter identifiability at a structural level. The main results of the paper are to provide a general methodology for extracting parameters of linear models from an experimentally measured scalar function - the transfer function - and a framework for the identifiability analysis of complex model structures using linked models. Linked models are composed by letting the output of one model become the input to another model which is then experimentally measured. The linked model framework is shown to be applicable to designing experiments to identify the measured sub-model and recover the input from the unmeasured sub-model, even in cases that the unmeasured sub-model is not identifiable. Applications for a set of common model features are demonstrated, and the results combined in an example application to a real-world experimental system. These applications emphasize the insight into answering "where to measure" and "which experimental scheme" questions provided by both the parameter extraction methodology and the linked model framework. The aim is to demonstrate the tools' usefulness in guiding experimental design to maximize parameter information obtained, based on the model structure.

  9. Supporting Boys as Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The challenges associated with boys and reading are focused on such factors as society's lack of focus on literacy skills, parents failings to inspire reading in boys, and internal motivational factors rather than looking at the environments created for reading in and out of school. In this column, several ideas for helping boys develop a…

  10. Narrative Development in Aggressive Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Doris

    2001-01-01

    A study analyzed the oral narrative abilities in Caucasian males (ages 8-13) identified as aggressive. The boys were asked to construct an oral narrative based on a wordless picture book. Subjects provided fewer pieces of information to create the setting of the story for listeners than did controls. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  11. Challenges of Identifying Communities with Shared Semantics in Enterprise Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Stijn; Linden, D. van der

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use and challenges of identifying communities with shared semantics in Enterprise Modeling. People tend to understand modeling meta-concepts (i.e., a modeling language’s constructs or types) in a certain way and can be grouped by this understanding. Having an insight int

  12. A Note on the Identifiability of Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    I present here a simple proof that, under general regularity conditions, the standard parametrization of generalized linear mixed model is identifiable. The proof is based on the assumptions of generalized linear mixed models on the first and second order moments and some general mild regularity ...... conditions, and, therefore, is extensible to quasi-likelihood based generalized linear models. In particular, binomial and Poisson mixed models with dispersion parameter are identifiable when equipped with the standard parametrization......I present here a simple proof that, under general regularity conditions, the standard parametrization of generalized linear mixed model is identifiable. The proof is based on the assumptions of generalized linear mixed models on the first and second order moments and some general mild regularity...

  13. Identifiability of Model Properties in Over-Parameterized Model Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    in the data. In this paper we make some initial steps to extend and adapt basic concepts of computational learnability and statistical identifiability to provide a foundation for investigating learnability in such broader contexts. We exemplify the use of the framework in three different applications...

  14. Identifiability of causal effect for a simple causal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑忠国; 张艳艳; 童行伟

    2002-01-01

    Counterfactual model is put forward to discuss the causal inference in the directed acyclic graph and its corresponding identifiability is thus studied with the ancillary information based on conditional independence. It is shown that the assumption of ignorability can be expanded to the assumption of replaceability,under which the causal efiects are identifiable.

  15. Identifying interacting pairs of sites in infinite range Ising models

    CERN Document Server

    Galves, Antonio; Takahashi, Daniel Yasumasa

    2010-01-01

    We consider Ising models (pairwise interaction Gibbs probability measures) in $\\Z^d$ with an infinite range potential. We address the problem of identifying pairs of interacting sites from a finite sample of independent realisations of the Ising model. The sample contains only the values assigned by the Ising model to a finite set of sites in $\\Z^d$. Our main result is an upperbound for the probability with our estimator to misidentify the pairs of interacting sites in this finite set.

  16. On the Identifiability of Transmission Dynamic Models for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintusaari, Jarno; Gutmann, Michael U; Kaski, Samuel; Corander, Jukka

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases is important for both biological research and public health applications. It has been widely demonstrated that statistical modeling provides a firm basis for inferring relevant epidemiological quantities from incidence and molecular data. However, the complexity of transmission dynamic models presents two challenges: (1) the likelihood function of the models is generally not computable, and computationally intensive simulation-based inference methods need to be employed, and (2) the model may not be fully identifiable from the available data. While the first difficulty can be tackled by computational and algorithmic advances, the second obstacle is more fundamental. Identifiability issues may lead to inferences that are driven more by prior assumptions than by the data themselves. We consider a popular and relatively simple yet analytically intractable model for the spread of tuberculosis based on classical IS6110 fingerprinting data. We report on the identifiability of the model, also presenting some methodological advances regarding the inference. Using likelihood approximations, we show that the reproductive value cannot be identified from the data available and that the posterior distributions obtained in previous work have likely been substantially dominated by the assumed prior distribution. Further, we show that the inferences are influenced by the assumed infectious population size, which generally has been kept fixed in previous work. We demonstrate that the infectious population size can be inferred if the remaining epidemiological parameters are already known with sufficient precision.

  17. Similarity transformation approach to identifiability analysis of nonlinear compartmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, S; Godfrey, K R; Rabitz, H

    1989-04-01

    Through use of the local state isomorphism theorem instead of the algebraic equivalence theorem of linear systems theory, the similarity transformation approach is extended to nonlinear models, resulting in finitely verifiable sufficient and necessary conditions for global and local identifiability. The approach requires testing of certain controllability and observability conditions, but in many practical examples these conditions prove very easy to verify. In principle the method also involves nonlinear state variable transformations, but in all of the examples presented in the paper the transformations turn out to be linear. The method is applied to an unidentifiable nonlinear model and a locally identifiable nonlinear model, and these are the first nonlinear models other than bilinear models where the reason for lack of global identifiability is nontrivial. The method is also applied to two models with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics, both of considerable importance in pharmacokinetics, and for both of which the complicated nature of the algebraic equations arising from the Taylor series approach has hitherto defeated attempts to establish identifiability results for specific input functions.

  18. On the Identifiability of the Post-Nonlinear Causal Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Kun

    2012-01-01

    By taking into account the nonlinear effect of the cause, the inner noise effect, and the measurement distortion effect in the observed variables, the post-nonlinear (PNL) causal model has demonstrated its excellent performance in distinguishing the cause from effect. However, its identifiability has not been properly addressed, and how to apply it in the case of more than two variables is also a problem. In this paper, we conduct a systematic investigation on its identifiability in the two-variable case. We show that this model is identifiable in most cases; by enumerating all possible situations in which the model is not identifiable, we provide sufficient conditions for its identifiability. Simulations are given to support the theoretical results. Moreover, in the case of more than two variables, we show that the whole causal structure can be found by applying the PNL causal model to each structure in the Markov equivalent class and testing if the disturbance is independent of the direct causes for each va...

  19. Identifiability analysis of the CSTR river water quality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Deng, Y

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual river water quality models are widely known to lack identifiability. The causes for that can be due to model structure errors, observational errors and less frequent samplings. Although significant efforts have been directed towards better identification of river water quality models, it is not clear whether a given model is structurally identifiable. Information is also limited regarding the contribution of different unidentifiability sources. Taking the widely applied CSTR river water quality model as an example, this paper presents a theoretical proof that the CSTR model is indeed structurally identifiable. Its uncertainty is thus dominantly from observational errors and less frequent samplings. Given the current monitoring accuracy and sampling frequency, the unidentifiability from sampling frequency is found to be more significant than that from observational errors. It is also noted that there is a crucial sampling frequency between 0.1 and 1 day, over which the simulated river system could be represented by different illusions and the model application could be far less reliable.

  20. Boys With Long Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙利英

    2005-01-01

    Long hair is popular among the young people.Even the boy students in high school join in this group.Some boy students would rather wear long hair,some even change their hair's color into golden,red,brown and pink.Why?

  1. Data Mining and Pattern Recognition Models for Identifying Inherited Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iddamalgoda, Lahiru; Das, Partha S; Aponso, Achala;

    2016-01-01

    Data mining and pattern recognition methods reveal interesting findings in genetic studies, especially on how the genetic makeup is associated with inherited diseases. Although researchers have proposed various data mining models for biomedical approaches, there remains a challenge in accurately...... prioritizing the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with the disease. In this commentary, we review the state-of-art data mining and pattern recognition models for identifying inherited diseases and deliberate the need of binary classification- and scoring-based prioritization methods...

  2. Parameter Identifiability of Ship Manoeuvring Modeling Using System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilin Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the feasibility of system identification in the prediction of ship manoeuvrability, several measures are presented to deal with the parameter identifiability in the parametric modeling of ship manoeuvring motion based on system identification. Drift of nonlinear hydrodynamic coefficients is explained from the point of view of regression analysis. To diminish the multicollinearity in a complicated manoeuvring model, difference method and additional signal method are employed to reconstruct the samples. Moreover, the structure of manoeuvring model is simplified based on correlation analysis. Manoeuvring simulation is performed to demonstrate the validity of the measures proposed.

  3. 'Bad boys'' Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skårderud, Finn; Nygren, Pär; Edlund, Birgitta

    2005-01-01

    (n= 196) completed the Eating Disorders Inventory ? Child version (EDI-C). The childcare residents also completed an extended questionnaire, including questions regarding the use of anabolic?andro-genic steroids. Our main ?ndings were high scores on EDI-C symptom scales for boys in the childcare...... resident group; few differences between girls in the two samples; and a high frequency of having used anabolic?androgenic steroids among boys in care. Body-image problems among boys have hitherto been given little attention. The results call for increased efforts in describing and detecting patho...

  4. Identifiability and identification of a Synthesis Load Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A Synthesis Load Model (SLM) including both the power load and the distribution network has been proposed in the references. The identifiability of SLM is analyzed at first, it is concluded that the model parameters are identifiable if one of the resistance, reactance and the ratio of them is known. The conclusion is validated through a simulation example. A strategy for parameter identification of SLM is proposed with the combination of the component based approach and the measurement based approach. During parameter identification, only the key parameters playing very important roles in the dynamics of the load and the system are estimated, while the other parameters playing limited role are set as the default values. The proposed strategy is verified by the field measurements.

  5. IDENTIFYING THE PARAMETERS OF THE MATHEMATICAL EXPENDITURE SYSTEM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA-PETRINA PĂUN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes an optimum regulation model for the public expenditures system in Romania. The aim of this work is to design an optimal control system of public expenditures in Romania. It contains an offline identification of the total public expenditures system in Romania for a timespan of 15 years. The total public expenditures system is a MISO type one (Multiple Input – Single Output and is identified by the use of the lowest foursquare applied on an OE (Output Error type model.

  6. Identifying gene regulatory network rewiring using latent differential graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dechao; Gu, Quanquan; Ma, Jian

    2016-09-30

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are highly dynamic among different tissue types. Identifying tissue-specific gene regulation is critically important to understand gene function in a particular cellular context. Graphical models have been used to estimate GRN from gene expression data to distinguish direct interactions from indirect associations. However, most existing methods estimate GRN for a specific cell/tissue type or in a tissue-naive way, or do not specifically focus on network rewiring between different tissues. Here, we describe a new method called Latent Differential Graphical Model (LDGM). The motivation of our method is to estimate the differential network between two tissue types directly without inferring the network for individual tissues, which has the advantage of utilizing much smaller sample size to achieve reliable differential network estimation. Our simulation results demonstrated that LDGM consistently outperforms other Gaussian graphical model based methods. We further evaluated LDGM by applying to the brain and blood gene expression data from the GTEx consortium. We also applied LDGM to identify network rewiring between cancer subtypes using the TCGA breast cancer samples. Our results suggest that LDGM is an effective method to infer differential network using high-throughput gene expression data to identify GRN dynamics among different cellular conditions.

  7. How I Teach Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sue; Albano, Judith Baron

    1975-01-01

    The first article in a continuing series, which will be devoted to successful teaching techniques for teaching home economics to boys, offers two techniques used to teach sewing by making dashiki shirts. (EA)

  8. Working with Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reay, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Describes a project involving weekly group guidance sessions with the third and fourth grade boys in a North London (England) elementary school. Evaluates the program's effectiveness in relation to racism, sexism, bullying, collaborative group process, and other matters. (DM)

  9. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  10. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  11. Identifying and modeling the structural discontinuities of human interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Szell, Michael; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Hövel, Philipp; Simini, Filippo; Vanhoof, Maarten; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Barabási, Albert-László; Ratti, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    The idea of a hierarchical spatial organization of society lies at the core of seminal theories in human geography that have strongly influenced our understanding of social organization. Along the same line, the recent availability of large-scale human mobility and communication data has offered novel quantitative insights hinting at a strong geographical confinement of human interactions within neighboring regions, extending to local levels within countries. However, models of human interaction largely ignore this effect. Here, we analyze several country-wide networks of telephone calls - both, mobile and landline - and in either case uncover a systematic decrease of communication induced by borders which we identify as the missing variable in state-of-the-art models. Using this empirical evidence, we propose an alternative modeling framework that naturally stylizes the damping effect of borders. We show that this new notion substantially improves the predictive power of widely used interaction models. This increases our ability to understand, model and predict social activities and to plan the development of infrastructures across multiple scales.

  12. A Simple Model for Identifying Critical Structures in Atrial Fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Kim; Peters, Nicholas S

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wavefront propagation on a structure mimicking the branching network architecture of heart muscle and show how AF emerges spontaneously as age-related parameters change. We identify regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia. This analytical result allows us to locate the transition in parameter space and highlights that the transition from regular to fibrillatory behaviour is a finite-size effect present in systems of any size. These clinically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  13. Identifiability of Gaussian Structural Equation Models with Same Error Variances

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    We consider structural equation models (SEMs) in which variables can be written as a function of their parents and noise terms (the latter are assumed to be jointly independent). Corresponding to each SEM, there is a directed acyclic graph (DAG) G_0 describing the relationships between the variables. In Gaussian SEMs with linear functions, the graph can be identified from the joint distribution only up to Markov equivalence classes (assuming faithfulness). It has been shown, however, that this constitutes an exceptional case. In the case of linear functions and non-Gaussian noise, the DAG becomes identifiable. Apart from few exceptions the same is true for non-linear functions and arbitrarily distributed additive noise. In this work, we prove identifiability for a third modification: if we require all noise variables to have the same variances, again, the DAG can be recovered from the joint Gaussian distribution. Our result can be applied to the problem of causal inference. If the data follow a Gaussian SEM w...

  14. Sexual abuse of boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sharon M

    2005-01-01

    Sexual abuse in childhood can disable self-esteem, self-concept, relationships, and ability to trust. It can also leave psychological trauma that compromises a boy's confidence in adults. While some boys who willingly participate may adjust to sexual abuse, many others face complications, such as reduced quality of life, impaired social relationships, less than optimal daily functioning, and self-destructive behavior. These problems can respond to treatment if detected. In this paper, we examine the prevalence, characteristics, psychological consequences, treatment, and coping patterns of boys who have been sexually abused and their failure to disclose abuse unless asked during a therapeutic encounter. Nurses have a responsibility to detect the clues to sexual abuse, diagnose the psychological consequences, and advocate for protection and treatment. Computerized literature search of the Medline and PsychInfo literature and books on sexual abuse of boys. Psychological responses to abuse such as anxiety, denial, self-hypnosis, dissociation, and self-mutilation are common. Coping strategies may include being the angry avenger, the passive victim, rescuer, daredevil, or conformist. Sexual abuse may precipitate runaway behavior, chronic use of sick days, poor school or job performance, costly medical, emergency and or mental health visits. In worst cases, the boy may decide that life is not worth living and plan suicide. The nurse has a key role to play in screening, assessing, and treating sexual abuse children.

  15. Identifying Spatially Variable Sensitivity of Model Predictions and Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, S. A.; Hart, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    Stochastic inverse modeling provides an ensemble of stochastic property fields, each calibrated to measured steady-state and transient head data. These calibrated fields are used as input for predictions of other processes (e.g., contaminant transport, advective travel time). Use of the entire ensemble of fields transfers spatial uncertainty in hydraulic properties to uncertainty in the predicted performance measures. A sampling-based sensitivity coefficient is proposed to determine the sensitivity of the performance measures to the uncertain values of hydraulic properties at every cell in the model domain. The basis of this sensitivity coefficient is the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Sampling-based sensitivity coefficients are demonstrated using a recent set of transmissivity (T) fields created through a stochastic inverse calibration process for the Culebra dolomite in the vicinity of the WIPP site in southeastern New Mexico. The stochastic inverse models were created using a unique approach to condition a geologically-based conceptual model of T to measured T values via a multiGaussian residual field. This field is calibrated to both steady-state and transient head data collected over an 11 year period. Maps of these sensitivity coefficients provide a means of identifying the locations in the study area to which both the value of the model calibration objective function and the predicted travel times to a regulatory boundary are most sensitive to the T and head values. These locations can be targeted for deployment of additional long-term monitoring resources. Comparison of areas where the calibration objective function and the travel time have high sensitivity shows that these are not necessarily coincident with regions of high uncertainty. The sampling-based sensitivity coefficients are compared to analytically derived sensitivity coefficients at the 99 pilot point locations. Results of the sensitivity mapping exercise are being used in combination

  16. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment. PMID:25635565

  17. The Problem With Boys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pony,a 10-month-old boy,lost his first confrontation in life to a girl of the same age.The two babies'mothers met in a shopping mall recently and decided to let the two children play with each other.They put the babies down together on the floor.As soon as her feet were on the floor,the baby girl waddled toward Pony,stretching out her little hands to grab him.The boy,not yet strong enough to walk,cried at the aggressive girl.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  19. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vyazunova

    Full Text Available Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  20. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  1. New Toys for Boys

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 'Out of Time: Reflections on the Programming Life', Ellen Ullman writes that a senior (male) engineer once asked her why she left full-time engineering for consulting. She replied that she found the engineering culture very 'teenage-boy puerile'. The engineer replied to the effect that such loss of talent was too bad.

  2. Unlocking Boys' Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Long stereotyped as not being interested in building relationships with teachers, boys actually search for--and are in need of--teachers who make meaningful connections with them, writes Reichert in this article. The author examines how school practices of the past and present have contributed to the so-called gender achievement gap and stresses…

  3. Predicting the onset of smoking in boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, A; Blair, V

    1989-01-01

    The problem of the high prevalence of smoking among girls and young women is of great concern. In an attempt to identify the factors which influence girls and boys respectively to attempt smoking, the study examines social background, advertising and brand awareness, knowledge, teaching and personal beliefs in conjunction as predictors of smoking. In this study which involved the administration of identical pre- and post-test questionnaires to a sample of boys and girls aged 12 and 13 years, nine variables expressed by never-smokers at pre-test stage were assessed as predictors of immediate future smoking. The two tests were administered 4 months apart to 1125 boys and 1213 girls in northern England. The nine variables included were parental smoking, best friends' smoking, perceived positive values of smoking, perceived negative values of smoking, correct health knowledge, cigarette-brand awareness, having a favourite cigarette advertisement, having a cigarette-brand sponsored sport in four top favourites on television. One group received teaching about smoking between the pre- and post-tests and this was also included as a variable. For boys, no variable investigated had any consistently statistically significant correlation with the uptake of smoking. The most important predictor of smoking for boys, having a best friend who smoked, was significant on application of the chi 2 test (P 0.037), although it was non-significant when included singly in a logistic regression model (0.094); the discrepancy was probably due to the small number of best friends known to smoke. For girls, four variables were found to be significant predictors of smoking when included singly in a logistic regression.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Friendship in school-age boys with autism spectrum disorders: A meta-analytic summary and developmental, process-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Jenna L; Gates, Jacquelyn A; Lerner, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Friendship-making is considered a well-established domain of deficit for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; American Psychiatric Association, 2013), with this population sometimes described as incapable of making friends. However, the majority of children with ASD indicate a desire for friends, and many report having friends. To what degree, then, do youth with ASD succeed in achieving friendships with peers? If and when they do succeed, by what means do these friendships emerge relative to models of typically developing (TD) youths' friendships? To address these questions, we first meta-analyzed the descriptive friendship literature (peer-reported sociometrics, self-report, parent-report) among school-age boys with ASD. Using random effects models, we found that youth with ASD do make friends according to peers and parents (Hedges's g > 2.84). However, self-reported friendship quality (Hedges's g = -1.09) and parent- and peer-reported quantity (Hedges's g < -0.63) were poorer than TD peers. We consider these findings in light of 2 conceptual frameworks for understanding social deficits in ASD (social cognition and social motivation theory) and in view of a leading model of friendship in TD youth (Hartup & Stevens, 1997). We then present a model that synthesizes these domains through the construct of social information processing speed, and thereby present the first developmental, process-based model of friendship development among youth with ASD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Modeling secondary accidents identified by traffic shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junhua, Wang; Boya, Liu; Lanfang, Zhang; Ragland, David R

    2016-02-01

    The high potential for occurrence and the negative consequences of secondary accidents make them an issue of great concern affecting freeway safety. Using accident records from a three-year period together with California interstate freeway loop data, a dynamic method for more accurate classification based on the traffic shock wave detecting method was used to identify secondary accidents. Spatio-temporal gaps between the primary and secondary accident were proven be fit via a mixture of Weibull and normal distribution. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate major factors contributing to secondary accident occurrence. Traffic shock wave speed and volume at the occurrence of a primary accident were explicitly considered in the model, as a secondary accident is defined as an accident that occurs within the spatio-temporal impact scope of the primary accident. Results show that the shock waves originating in the wake of a primary accident have a more significant impact on the likelihood of a secondary accident occurrence than the effects of traffic volume. Primary accidents with long durations can significantly increase the possibility of secondary accidents. Unsafe speed and weather are other factors contributing to secondary crash occurrence. It is strongly suggested that when police or rescue personnel arrive at the scene of an accident, they should not suddenly block, decrease, or unblock the traffic flow, but instead endeavor to control traffic in a smooth and controlled manner. Also it is important to reduce accident processing time to reduce the risk of secondary accident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Boys' Bodies in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Murray

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on qualitative research data from a project investigating early childhood boys' constructions of masculinities in relation to sport, health and the body. The focus group data, with 33 boys, has been collected in each of the boys' first three years at school. It is part of the data that will be collected over eight years with…

  7. [Girls are more successful than boys at the university. Gender group differences in models integrating motivational and aggressive components correlated with Test-Anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, A-M; Hoyois, Ph; Cadot, M; Nahama, V; Petit, F; Ansseau, M

    2004-01-01

    performance value were scored higher in women, self-confidence and procrastination higher in men. Because TASTE didn't discriminate the different components of motivation (performance value referred to intrinsic and extrinsic motivations without precise distinction) we decided to use the MPS (Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) which gave the opportunity to distinguish SOP (Self Oriented Perfectionism) ie, the self-imposed unrealistic standards with inability to accept faults in order to know and master a subject, that corresponded to intrinsic motivation; SPP (Socially Prescribed Perfectionism) ie, the exaggerated expectancies of others which are subjectively believed as imposed and uncontrollable leading to anxiety, feelings of failure or helplessness, that corresponded to extrinsic motivation; POO (Perfectionism Oriented to Others) ie, the unrealistic demands expected from significant others, which especially characterized males. We assumed that women attached more importance to succeed and submitted more to society exigencies. That way extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were probably more combined unlike men who, dreading a loss of self esteem, tried to avoid failure responsibility in using self handicapping or aggressive behaviours, so separating motivation in an extrinsic part turned to performance value and an intrinsic one more concerned by self confidence and sense of competence with the result that the motivational balance was surely disrupted in case of high competition leading to failure or avoidance. In another previous study we established a structural model illustrating, according to gender, correlations between anxiety, sense of incompetence, self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism. Self-oriented perfectionism was less correlated to socially prescribed perfectionism in boys than in girls; furthermore especially by those who had never failed, it was negatively correlated to sense of incompetence, thus leading to lower scores of

  8. Identifying errors in dust models from data assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, R J; Marsham, J H; Knippertz, P; Brooks, M E; Roberts, A J

    2016-09-16

    Airborne mineral dust is an important component of the Earth system and is increasingly predicted prognostically in weather and climate models. The recent development of data assimilation for remotely sensed aerosol optical depths (AODs) into models offers a new opportunity to better understand the characteristics and sources of model error. Here we examine assimilation increments from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer AODs over northern Africa in the Met Office global forecast model. The model underpredicts (overpredicts) dust in light (strong) winds, consistent with (submesoscale) mesoscale processes lifting dust in reality but being missed by the model. Dust is overpredicted in the Sahara and underpredicted in the Sahel. Using observations of lighting and rain, we show that haboobs (cold pool outflows from moist convection) are an important dust source in reality but are badly handled by the model's convection scheme. The approach shows promise to serve as a useful framework for future model development.

  9. The Problem of Boys' Literacy Underachievement: Raising Some Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne; Kehler, Michael; Martino, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Boys' literacy underachievement continues to garner significant attention and has been identified by journalists, educational policymakers, and scholars in the field as the cause for much concern. It has been established that boys perform less well than girls on literacy benchmark or standardized tests. According to the National Assessment of…

  10. What is the best model for girls and boys faced with a standardized mathematics evaluation situation: a hardworking role model or a gifted role model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagès, Céline; Martinot, Delphine

    2011-09-01

    Same-gender role models are likely to improve girls' math performance. This field experiment examined whether the explanation given for a role model's success also influence children's math performance. Fifth graders were presented with a female or a male role model before a difficult math test and were informed about the cause of his/her math success (effort vs. ability vs. no explanation). The results showed that the gender of a hardworking role model did not influence math performance. In contrast, when the role model's success was not explained or explained by abilities, children performed better with the female role model than with the male role model. The hardworking role model and the female role model allowed reducing stereotype threat among girls.

  11. A Test of the Tripartite Model of Anxiety and Depression in Elementary and High School Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Heather A. K.; Mash, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    The applicability of the tripartite model of emotion, which distinguishes the shared aspect of depression and anxiety, negative affect (NA), from their respective specific components of low positive affect (PA) and physiological hyperarousal (PH), was examined in 472 elementary and high school students. The relations among depression, anxiety, and…

  12. Identifying anaerobic digestion models using simultaneous batch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotats, X.; Palatsi, J.; Fernandez, B.; Colomer, M. A.; Illa, J.

    2009-07-01

    As in other wastewater treatment processes, anaerobic digestion models have become a valuable tool to increase the understanding of complex biodegradation processes, to teach and to communicate using a common language, to optimize design plants and operating strategies and for trying operators and process engineers. Models require accurate and significant parameter values for being useful. (Author) 2 refs.

  13. Modelling intelligence-led policing to identify its potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengst-Bruggeling, M. den; Graaf, H.A.L.M. de; Scheepstal, P.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    lntelligence-led policing is a concept of policing that has been applied throughout the world. Despite some encouraging reports, the effect of intelligence-led policing is largely unknown. This paper presents a method with which it is possible to identify intelligence-led policing's potential to

  14. Modelling intelligence-led policing to identify its potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengst-Bruggeling, M. den; Graaf, H.A.L.M. de; Scheepstal, P.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    lntelligence-led policing is a concept of policing that has been applied throughout the world. Despite some encouraging reports, the effect of intelligence-led policing is largely unknown. This paper presents a method with which it is possible to identify intelligence-led policing's potential to inc

  15. An Unfinished Agenda: Why is the Boy Child Endangered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Koskey Chang’ach

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent campaign for awareness of girl’s retention in school has started bearing fruits, but in retrospect the society has ignored the plight of boy-child. The issue of the Boy-Child has not been adequately addressed (World Bank, 2005. Extensive analysis of data indicates that boy-child is at a higher risk of dropping out of school than girls. The trend of more boys dropping out of school started in a cohort comprising of 620,000 boys and 586,000 girls that joined standard one in 2005. By 2010, survival rate in the group had dropped to 558,000 boys and 562,000 girls. Never before had enrolment of girls in any primary school grade nationally had exceeded that of boys (UNESCO, 2003.This impedes the achievement of Universal Primary Education which is Millennium Development Goal, number two that by 2015 ensure that all boys and girls alike complete primary schooling. This paper seeks to examine the problems that hinder the boy child from achieving their dream as revealed in the transition rates from primary to secondary schools in Keiyo South district, Elgeyo-Marakwet County. It identifies the challenges to the achievement of education for all and proposes positive actions for the mitigation of the situation.

  16. 'Bad boys'' Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skårderud, Finn; Nygren, Pär; Edlund, Birgitta

    2005-01-01

    Children residing in care (hereafter referred to as childcare residents) are a risk¬group for emotional disturbances and behaviour problems. Based on existing knowledge of risk factors one would also expect this population to be a high-risk group for eating disorders and related body-image disord......Children residing in care (hereafter referred to as childcare residents) are a risk¬group for emotional disturbances and behaviour problems. Based on existing knowledge of risk factors one would also expect this population to be a high-risk group for eating disorders and related body...... resident group; few differences between girls in the two samples; and a high frequency of having used anabolic?androgenic steroids among boys in care. Body-image problems among boys have hitherto been given little attention. The results call for increased efforts in describing and detecting patho......¬logical cognitions, emotions and behaviour concerning the body in males in general and, more speci?cally, in high-risk male groups, such as childcare residents....

  17. A Method to Identify Flight Obstacles on Digital Surface Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; LIN Xinggang; SUN Shouyu; WANG Youzhi

    2005-01-01

    In modern low-altitude terrain-following guidance, a constructing method of the digital surface model (DSM) is presented in the paper to reduce the threat to flying vehicles of tall surface features for safe flight. The relationship between an isolated obstacle size and the intervals of vertical- and cross-section in the DSM model is established. The definition and classification of isolated obstacles are proposed, and a method for determining such isolated obstacles in the DSM model is given. The simulation of a typical urban district shows that when the vertical- and cross-section DSM intervals are between 3 m and 25 m, the threat to terrain-following flight at low-altitude is reduced greatly, and the amount of data required by the DSM model for monitoring in real time a flying vehicle is also smaller. Experiments show that the optimal results are for an interval of 12.5 m in the vertical- and cross-sections in the DSM model, with a 1:10 000 DSM scale grade.

  18. An ecohydraulic model to identify and monitor moapa dace habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, James R.; Batt, Thomas R.; Scoppettone, Gayton G.; Dixon, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Moapa dace (Moapa coriacea) is a critically endangered thermophilic minnow native to the Muddy River ecosystem in southeastern Nevada, USA. Restricted to temperatures between 26.0 and 32.0°C, these fish are constrained to the upper two km of the Muddy River and several small tributaries fed by warm springs. Habitat alterations, nonnative species invasion, and water withdrawals during the 20th century resulted in a drastic decline in the dace population and in 1979 the Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was created to protect them. The goal of our study was to determine the potential effects of reduced surface flows that might result from groundwater pumping or water diversions on Moapa dace habitat inside the Refuge. We accomplished our goal in several steps. First, we conducted snorkel surveys to determine the locations of Moapa dace on three warm-spring tributaries of the Muddy River. Second, we conducted hydraulic simulations over a range of flows with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Third, we developed a set of Moapa dace habitat models with logistic regression and a geographic information system. Fourth, we estimated Moapa dace habitat over a range of flows (plus or minus 30% of base flow). Our spatially explicit habitat models achieved classification accuracies between 85% and 91%, depending on the snorkel survey and creek. Water depth was the most significant covariate in our models, followed by substrate, Froude number, velocity, and water temperature. Hydraulic simulations showed 2-11% gains in dace habitat when flows were increased by 30%, and 8-32% losses when flows were reduced by 30%. To ensure the health and survival of Moapa dace and the Muddy River ecosystem, groundwater and surface-water withdrawals and diversions need to be carefully monitored, while fully implementing a proactive conservation strategy.

  19. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington's disease transgenic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Renee R; Reid, Suzanne J; Patassini, Stefano; Rudiger, Skye R; Obolonkin, Vladimir; McLaughlan, Clive J; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Waldvogel, Henry J; Bawden, C Simon; Faull, Richard L M; Snell, Russell G

    2016-02-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of HD but has circadian rhythm alterations and molecular changes characteristic of the early phase disease. Quantitative metabolite profiles were generated from the motor cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and liver tissue of 5 year old transgenic sheep and matched controls by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differentially abundant metabolites were evident in the cerebellum and liver. There was striking tissue-specificity, with predominantly amino acids affected in the transgenic cerebellum and fatty acids in the transgenic liver, which together may indicate a hyper-metabolic state. Furthermore, there were more strong pair-wise correlations of metabolite abundance in transgenic than in wild-type cerebellum and liver, suggesting altered metabolic constraints. Together these differences indicate a metabolic disruption in the sheep model of HD and could provide insight into the presymptomatic human disease.

  20. Identifying missing dictionary entries with frequency-conserving context models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jake Ryland; Clark, Eric M.; Bagrow, James P.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2015-10-01

    In an effort to better understand meaning from natural language texts, we explore methods aimed at organizing lexical objects into contexts. A number of these methods for organization fall into a family defined by word ordering. Unlike demographic or spatial partitions of data, these collocation models are of special importance for their universal applicability. While we are interested here in text and have framed our treatment appropriately, our work is potentially applicable to other areas of research (e.g., speech, genomics, and mobility patterns) where one has ordered categorical data (e.g., sounds, genes, and locations). Our approach focuses on the phrase (whether word or larger) as the primary meaning-bearing lexical unit and object of study. To do so, we employ our previously developed framework for generating word-conserving phrase-frequency data. Upon training our model with the Wiktionary, an extensive, online, collaborative, and open-source dictionary that contains over 100 000 phrasal definitions, we develop highly effective filters for the identification of meaningful, missing phrase entries. With our predictions we then engage the editorial community of the Wiktionary and propose short lists of potential missing entries for definition, developing a breakthrough, lexical extraction technique and expanding our knowledge of the defined English lexicon of phrases.

  1. The Politics of Policy in Boys' Education: Getting Boys "Right"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B.

    2008-01-01

    This book explores boy-focused education policy and how different educators struggle to implement or resist it in their schools. Weaver-Hightower examines masculinity politics in Australia and the United States, mapping how these politics create panic over raising and educating boys the "Right" way. Contextualizing this policy with…

  2. Car Hits Boy on Bicycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present the fascinating reconstruction of an accident where a car hit a boy riding his bicycle. The boy dramatically flew several metres through the air after the collision and was injured, but made a swift and complete recovery from the accident with no long-term after-effects. Students are challenged to determine the speed of…

  3. Are Girls Behaving like Boys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Rosie

    2008-01-01

    This article explores some of the issues that have given rise to the perception of an increase in aggressive behaviour by females. It asserts that merely comparing girls' behaviour with that of boys, especially the claim that "girls are behaving like boys", trivialises the very real issues associated with females and aggression. This paper will…

  4. Integrating fire with hydrological projections: model evaluation to identify uncertainties and tradeoffs in model complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M.; McKenzie, D.

    2013-12-01

    It is imperative for resource managers to understand how a changing climate might modify future watershed and hydrological processes, and such an understanding is incomplete if disturbances such as fire are not integrated with hydrological projections. Can a robust fire spread model be developed that approximates patterns of fire spread in response to varying topography wind patterns, and fuel loads and moistures, without requiring intensive calibration to each new study area or time frame? We assessed the performance of a stochastic model of fire spread (WMFire), integrated with the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), for projecting the effects of climatic change on mountain watersheds. We first use Monte Carlo inference to determine that the fire spread model is able to replicate the spatial pattern of fire spread for a contemporary wildfire in Washington State (the Tripod fire), measured by the lacunarity and fractal dimension of the fire. We then integrate a version of WMFire able to replicate the contemporary wildfire with RHESSys and simulate a New Mexico watershed over the calibration period of RHESSys (1941-1997). In comparing the fire spread model to a single contemporary wildfire we found issues in parameter identifiability for several of the nine parameters, due to model input uncertainty and insensitivity of the mathematical function to certain ranges of the parameter values. Model input uncertainty is caused by the inherent difficulty in reconstructing fuel loads and fuel moistures for a fire event after the fire has occurred, as well as by issues in translating variables relevant to hydrological processes produced by the hydrological model to those known to affect fire spread and fire severity. The first stage in the model evaluation aided the improvement of the model in both of these regards. In transporting the model to a new landscape in order to evaluate fire regimes in addition to patterns of fire spread, we find reasonable

  5. Young boys and street gangs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria; Pless, Mette

    of joining street gangs, this presentation demonstrates that, to the young boys, street gangs represent alternative societies that seems much more accessible than school and work communities. Street gangs seemingly gives access to social recognition and networks, economic opportunities and material status...... to the police sta- tion and a short police internship, show that the boys are very attracted to the police profession and find that it offers many of the same opportunities; network, recognition and thrills. Thus, indicating that, for the 40 boys, the line between civic and anti-civic participation can...

  6. The identifiability of parameters in a water quality model of the Biebrza River, Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perk, van der M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    1997-01-01

    The identifiability of model parameters of a steady state water quality model of the Biebrza River and the resulting variation in model results was examined by applying the Monte Carlo method which combines calibration, identifiability analysis, uncertainty analysis, and sensitivity analysis. The wa

  7. Global identifiability of linear compartmental models--a computer algebra algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoly, S; D'Angiò, L; Saccomani, M P; Cobelli, C

    1998-01-01

    A priori global identifiability deals with the uniqueness of the solution for the unknown parameters of a model and is, thus, a prerequisite for parameter estimation of biological dynamic models. Global identifiability is however difficult to test, since it requires solving a system of algebraic nonlinear equations which increases both in nonlinearity degree and number of terms and unknowns with increasing model order. In this paper, a computer algebra tool, GLOBI (GLOBal Identifiability) is presented, which combines the topological transfer function method with the Buchberger algorithm, to test global identifiability of linear compartmental models. GLOBI allows for the automatic testing of a priori global identifiability of general structure compartmental models from general multi input-multi output experiments. Examples of usage of GLOBI to analyze a priori global identifiability of some complex biological compartmental models are provided.

  8. Some boys' problems in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2015-01-01

    to general education, but social and institutional processes of differentiation in the vocational schools place a significant group of students in a position where they have little chance of completing the programme. In the conclusion, some reflections are made on the effect of a recent reform of VET......The last two decades have seen an increasing political concern in the high dropout rates and low performance in education of boys compared to girls – at times in the form of a ‘moral panic’. This has also been the case in Denmark where ‘the boy problem’ in education now is placed high on the agenda...... of education policy. The purpose of this article is to examine this ‘boy problem’ in relation to the dual system of vocational education and training (VET) in Denmark. By considering the gender divisions and the value of the VET programmes on the labour market, it explores what kind of problems boys have...

  9. "We don't need no education": Video game preferences, video game motivations, and aggressiveness among adolescent boys of different educational ability levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nije Bijvank, Marije; Konijn, Elly A; Bushman, Brad J

    2012-02-01

    This research focuses on low educational ability as a risk factor for aggression and violent game play. We propose that boys of lower educational ability are more attracted to violent video games than other boys are, and that they are also higher in trait aggressiveness and sensation seeking. Participants were Dutch boys in public schools (N = 830, age-range 11-17). In the Netherlands, standardized tests are used to place students into lower, medium, and higher educational ability groups. Results showed that boys in the lower educational ability group preferred to play violent, stand-alone games, identified more with video game characters, and perceived video games to be more realistic than other boys did. Lower levels of education were also related to higher levels of aggressiveness and sensation seeking. Higher educational ability boys preferred social, multiplayer games. Within a risk and resilience model, boys with lower educational ability are at greater risk for aggression. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. All rights reserved.

  10. Boys' and young men's perspectives on violence in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marni; Likindikoki, Samuel; Kaaya, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of violence for youth in low-income countries includes a range of experiences from witnessing, to experiencing, to participating in violence. Although boys and young men are often the perpetrators of such violence, they may also be its victims. Yet little evidence exists from the voiced experiences of boys themselves on perceptions and interpretations of the violence around them. Given the numerous negative health implications of violence for boys, for the girls and other boys with whom they interact, and for the health of their future partners and families, we conducted an in-depth study in rural and urban Tanzania with adolescent boys on the masculinity norms shaping their transitions through puberty that might be contributing to high-risk behaviours, including engagement in violence. The findings identified underlying societal gendered norms influencing the enactment of violence, and recommendations from the boys on how to diminish the violence around them. Additional research is needed with boys on the social norms and structural factors influencing their engagement in violence.

  11. Identifying Staff Development Needs of Cooperative Extension Faculty Using a Modified Borich Needs Assessment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Randol G.; Haskell, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    To identify staff development needs and test the Borich Needs Assessment Model, 68 faculty in Nevada were surveyed (90 percent response). Use of the model made rankings of individual topics substantively different from results obtained by traditional methods. (JOW)

  12. Local identifiability and sensitivity analysis of neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M M; Lemos, J M; Coito, A; Costa, B A; Wigren, T; Mendonça, T

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the local identifiability and sensitivity properties of two classes of Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis, when drug dose profiles like the ones commonly administered in the clinical practice are used as model inputs. The local parameter identifiability was assessed based on the singular value decomposition of the normalized sensitivity matrix. For the given input signal excitation, the results show an over-parameterization of the standard pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models. The same identifiability assessment was performed on recently proposed minimally parameterized parsimonious models for both the neuromuscular blockade and the depth of hypnosis. The results show that the majority of the model parameters are identifiable from the available input-output data. This indicates that any identification strategy based on the minimally parameterized parsimonious Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and for the depth of hypnosis is likely to be more successful than if standard models are used.

  13. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  14. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  15. Structural identifiability of a model for the acetic acid fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hornero, Jorge E; Santos-Dueñas, Inés M; Garci A-Garci A, Isidoro

    2008-12-01

    Modelling has proved an essential tool for addressing research into biotechnological processes, particularly with a view to their optimization and control. Parameter estimation via optimization approaches is among the major steps in the development of biotechnology models. In fact, one of the first tasks in the development process is to determine whether the parameters concerned can be unambiguously determined and provide meaningful physical conclusions as a result. The analysis process is known as 'identifiability' and presents two different aspects: structural or theoretical identifiability and practical identifiability. While structural identifiability is concerned with model structure alone, practical identifiability takes into account both the quantity and quality of experimental data. In this work, we discuss the theoretical identifiability of a new model for the acetic acid fermentation process and review existing methods for this purpose.

  16. Assessing Reliability of Cellulose Hydrolysis Models to Support Biofuel Process Design – Identifiability and Uncertainty Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Meyer, Anne S.; Gernaey, Krist

    2010-01-01

    The reliability of cellulose hydrolysis models is studied using the NREL model. An identifiability analysis revealed that only 6 out of 26 parameters are identifiable from the available data (typical hydrolysis experiments). Attempting to identify a higher number of parameters (as done...... are not informative enough (sensitivities of 16 parameters were insignificant). This indicates that the NREL model has severe parameter uncertainty, likely to be the case for other hydrolysis models as well since similar kinetic expressions are used. To overcome this impasse, we have used the Monte Carlo procedure...

  17. Identifiability of the Sign of Covariate Effects in the Competing Risks Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Simon M.S.; Wilke, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    We present a new framework for the identification of competing risks models, which also include Roy models. We show that by establishing a Hicksian-type decomposition, the direction of covariate effects on the marginal distributions of the competing risks model can be identified under weak...... of the range of durations for which the direction of the covariate effect is identified, particularly for long duration....

  18. Bayesian inference for partially identified models exploring the limits of limited data

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Identification What Is against Us? What Is for Us? Some Simple Examples of Partially Identified ModelsThe Road Ahead The Structure of Inference in Partially Identified Models Bayesian Inference The Structure of Posterior Distributions in PIMs Computational Strategies Strength of Bayesian Updating, Revisited Posterior MomentsCredible Intervals Evaluating the Worth of Inference Partial Identification versus Model Misspecification The Siren Call of Identification Comp

  19. Identifying Ghanaian Pre-Service Teachers' Readiness for Computer Use: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Stephen Adu

    2016-01-01

    This study extends the technology acceptance model to identify factors that influence technology acceptance among pre-service teachers in Ghana. Data from 380 usable questionnaires were tested against the research model. Utilising the extended technology acceptance model (TAM) as a research framework, the study found that: pre-service teachers'…

  20. Identifying E-Business Model:A Value Chain-Based Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qingfeng; HUANG Lihua

    2004-01-01

    E-business will change the ways that all companies do business, and most traditional businesses will evolve from their current business model to a combination of place and space via e-business model To choose the proper e-business model becomes the important strategic concern for company to succeed The main objective of this paper is to investigate the analysis framework for identifying e-business model Based on the e-business process, from the value chain to the value net perspective. This paper provides a theoretical framework for identifying e-business models, and results in 11 e-business models. The strategic intend of every e-business model is discussed in the end of this paper. An enterprise e-business model design and implementation can be specified by the combination of one or more among 11 e-business models.

  1. Local identifiability for two and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models with time-lags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J A; De Biasi, J; Plusquellec, Y; Houin, G

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we show that time-lags between compartments in a 2 and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic model may be taken into account but that separate identification for model parameters and for time-lags would not be suitable. Furthermore, it may happen that a time-lag model is locally identifiable while the corresponding model without delay is not. For two-compartment delayed models, with only one observation, it is not necessary to have two different inputs contrary to the case without time-lag. Both the Laplace transformation and a Jacobian matrix are used in an identifiability study. For all two-compartment models we have investigated which kind of parameters or lags are identifiable from amount (Q) or concentration (C) measures.

  2. Sufficient conditions for rate-independent hysteresis in autoregressive identified models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Samir Angelo Milani; Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    2016-06-01

    This paper shows how hysteresis can be described using polynomial models and what are the sufficient conditions to be met by the model in order to have hysteresis. Such conditions are related to the model equilibria, to the forcing function and to certain term clusters in the polynomial models. The main results of the paper are used in the identification and analysis of nonlinear models estimated from data produced by a magneto-rheological damper (MRD) model with Bouc-Wen rate-independent hysteresis. A striking feature of the identified model is its simplicity and this could turn out to be a key factor in controller design.

  3. THE BULLYING PHENOMENON: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BOYS AND GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bullying phenomenon is characterized by aggression always unequal power and involves violence. This study aimed to identify the types of bullying (physical, verbal, psychological, material, virtual or sexual more prevalent in this population and compare bullying among adolescent males and females. We used a questionnaire prepared by the researcher. Participants were 309 students, 142 males and 167 females, from 6th to 8th grade from two schools, one state and one municipal. These results show 27% of participants were involved in episodes of bullying and that the most prevalent type of bullying was verbal, being appointed for 92% of girls and 84% boys; followed by psychological, indicated by 70% of girls and 53% boys. Physical bullying, had 46% of female and 44% male reports, the material was mentioned by 27% of girls and 16% boys. On sexual bullying type was greatest difference between the sexes, suffered by 38% of girls and 16% boys. Only 13% of girls and 12% boys, mentioned suffer the virtual bullying. Corroborating research area, in this study the highest percentage of victims were female and different from the literature girls reported being verbally abused more for boys than for girls.

  4. PE is not for me: when boys' masculinities are threatened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Amy; McCaughtry, Nate

    2011-03-01

    This study used hegemonic masculinity theory to examine the intersection of masculinities and school physical education from the perspectives of boys who embodied masculinities that were marginalized. Over a 13-week period using present-focused, student-centered, qualitative methodological approaches, we observed, interviewed, and worked in small groups with 5 middle school boys from two schools. We identified three significant themes that merge the stories and experiences of masculinity hierarchies in sport-based physical education. First, we found that four social practices (content, pedagogies, teacher-student relationships, and peer cultures) in these physical education settings privileged some masculinities over others. Second, we examined the role that embodiment played, both in how the boys wore their oppression and in how their bodies resisted marginalizing situations. Third, we describe the contrasts these boys drew between physical activities experienced in sport-based physical education and physical activity experiences in other areas of their lives. We used Connell and Messerschmidt's (2005) reconceptualization of the theory of hegemonic masculinity for understanding how competitive sport-based physical education functioned to oppress boys with masculinities that were deemed abnormal. Additionally, we introduce feminist poststructuralism as a possible theoretical lens for interpreting boys' bodies as also being active agents in social practices rather than being only passive objects who are oppressed and dominated.

  5. A general model-based design of experiments approach to achieve practical identifiability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanin, Federico; Ballan, Carlo C; Barolo, Massimiliano; Bezzo, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    The use of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models is a common and widespread practice in the preliminary stages of drug development. However, PK-PD models may be affected by structural identifiability issues intrinsically related to their mathematical formulation. A preliminary structural identifiability analysis is usually carried out to check if the set of model parameters can be uniquely determined from experimental observations under the ideal assumptions of noise-free data and no model uncertainty. However, even for structurally identifiable models, real-life experimental conditions and model uncertainty may strongly affect the practical possibility to estimate the model parameters in a statistically sound way. A systematic procedure coupling the numerical assessment of structural identifiability with advanced model-based design of experiments formulations is presented in this paper. The objective is to propose a general approach to design experiments in an optimal way, detecting a proper set of experimental settings that ensure the practical identifiability of PK-PD models. Two simulated case studies based on in vitro bacterial growth and killing models are presented to demonstrate the applicability and generality of the methodology to tackle model identifiability issues effectively, through the design of feasible and highly informative experiments.

  6. Clinical prediction model to identify vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery: towards optimal medical decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Mijderwijk (Herjan); R.J. Stolker (Robert); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); M. Klimek (Markus); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Ambulatory surgery patients are at risk of adverse psychological outcomes such as anxiety, aggression, fatigue, and depression. We developed and validated a clinical prediction model to identify patients who were vulnerable to these psychological outcome parameters.

  7. abducted boys in northern Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that physical, behavioural, cognitive, and emotional sequelae such as .... body parts (n I 206), others saw fellow captives dying of hunger (n I 182; .... fear of retribution, shame or guilt, and the heinous activities ... abuse could have happened to other boys as well. ... the study could have been individual response styles that.

  8. Toys for Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Many people in our society distinguish between girls and boys toys. A physical science toy collector shares her experience at a fast food restaurant when she was asked "Do you want a girl toy?" Her response was, "What's the difference?" (ZWH)

  9. Good Boys Are Problems Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The "problem" of boys' achievement in the United Kingdom has emerged as part of a policy response to a crisis in the post-war social settlement. Post-Fordism has become the dominant meta-policy of education reform in the United Kingdom, constituting both policy problems and solutions as gender-neutral. However, the economic and political…

  10. A parameter estimation and identifiability analysis methodology applied to a street canyon air pollution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Thor Bjørn; Ketzel, Matthias; Skov, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Pollution Model (OSPM®). To assess the predictive validity of the model, the data is split into an estimation and a prediction data set using two data splitting approaches and data preparation techniques (clustering and outlier detection) are analysed. The sensitivity analysis, being part......Mathematical models are increasingly used in environmental science thus increasing the importance of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. In the present study, an iterative parameter estimation and identifiability analysis methodology is applied to an atmospheric model – the Operational Street...

  11. A New Method for Identifying the Model Error of Adjustment System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Benzao; ZHANG Chaoyu

    2005-01-01

    Some theory problems affecting parameter estimation are discussed in this paper. Influence and transformation between errors of stochastic and functional models is pointed out as well. For choosing the best adjustment model, a formula, which is different from the literatures existing methods, for estimating and identifying the model error, is proposed. On the basis of the proposed formula, an effective approach of selecting the best model of adjustment system is given.

  12. Identifiability of parameters and behaviour of MCMC chains: a case study using the reaction norm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, M M; Korsgaard, I R; Sorensen, D

    2009-04-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) enables fitting complex hierarchical models that may adequately reflect the process of data generation. Some of these models may contain more parameters than can be uniquely inferred from the distribution of the data, causing non-identifiability. The reaction norm model with unknown covariates (RNUC) is a model in which unknown environmental effects can be inferred jointly with the remaining parameters. The problem of identifiability of parameters at the level of the likelihood and the associated behaviour of MCMC chains were discussed using the RNUC as an example. It was shown theoretically that when environmental effects (covariates) are considered as random effects, estimable functions of the fixed effects, (co)variance components and genetic effects are identifiable as well as the environmental effects. When the environmental effects are treated as fixed and there are other fixed factors in the model, the contrasts involving environmental effects, the variance of environmental sensitivities (genetic slopes) and the residual variance are the only identifiable parameters. These different identifiability scenarios were generated by changing the formulation of the model and the structure of the data and the models were then implemented via MCMC. The output of MCMC sampling schemes was interpreted in the light of the theoretical findings. The erratic behaviour of the MCMC chains was shown to be associated with identifiability problems in the likelihood, despite propriety of posterior distributions, achieved by arbitrarily chosen uniform (bounded) priors. In some cases, very long chains were needed before the pattern of behaviour of the chain may signal the existence of problems. The paper serves as a warning concerning the implementation of complex models where identifiability problems can be difficult to detect a priori. We conclude that it would be good practice to experiment with a proposed model and to understand its features

  13. Discrete Methods Based on First Order Reversal Curves to Identify Preisach Model of Smart Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fan; ZHAO Jian-hui

    2007-01-01

    Preisach model is widely used in modeling of smart materials. Although first order reversal curves (FORCs) have often found applications in the fields of physics and geology, they are able to serve to identify Preisach model. In order to clarify the relationship between the Preisach model and the first order reversal curves, this paper is directed towards: (1) giving the reason a first order reversal curve is introduced; (2) presenting, for identifying Preisach model, two discrete methods, which are analytically based on first order reversal curves. Herein also is indicated the solution's uniqueness of these two identifying methods. At last, the validity of these two methods is verified by simulating a real smart actuator both methods have been applied to.

  14. Robust global identifiability theory using potentials--Application to compartmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongvanich, N; Hann, C E; Sirisena, H R

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a global practical identifiability theory for analyzing and identifying linear and nonlinear compartmental models. The compartmental system is prolonged onto the potential jet space to formulate a set of input-output equations that are integrals in terms of the measured data, which allows for robust identification of parameters without requiring any simulation of the model differential equations. Two classes of linear and non-linear compartmental models are considered. The theory is first applied to analyze the linear nitrous oxide (N2O) uptake model. The fitting accuracy of the identified models from differential jet space and potential jet space identifiability theories is compared with a realistic noise level of 3% which is derived from sensor noise data in the literature. The potential jet space approach gave a match that was well within the coefficient of variation. The differential jet space formulation was unstable and not suitable for parameter identification. The proposed theory is then applied to a nonlinear immunological model for mastitis in cows. In addition, the model formulation is extended to include an iterative method which allows initial conditions to be accurately identified. With up to 10% noise, the potential jet space theory predicts the normalized population concentration infected with pathogens, to within 9% of the true curve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Timing and force control in boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: subtype differences and the effect of comorbid developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Thelma M; Piek, Jan P; Barrett, Nicholas C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the motor and performance outcomes of boys with subtypes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (DSM-IV, [American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th ed., Washington, DC, 1994]). It also examined the differences between boys with a single diagnosis of ADHD versus those who have the dual categorisation of ADHD and developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The participants were 157 boys, aged 7.70-12.98 years recruited from a community sample. Parent report was used to classify 143 boys into either a comparison group or one of the three DSM-IV ADHD subtypes. Participants were given a battery of tests that included the Movement Assessment Battery for Children [Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Psychological Corporation/Harcourt Brace-Jovanovich, New York, 1992], the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children--Third Edition [Manual for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Psychological Corporation, New York, 1992] and a finger tapping task targeting motor processing, preparation, and execution. Boys with subtypes that included inattentive symptomatology had significant difficulties with timing, force output and showed greater variability in motor outcomes. Boys with the comorbid condition (i.e., ADHD and DCD) had particular difficulty with force control. These outcomes identify a need for increased recognition of the clinical and research implications of the relationship between ADHD and motor dysfunction. This potentially impacts on assessment, intervention, theoretical modelling and the general interpretation of cognitive abilities research with children with ADHD.

  16. Examples of testing global identifiability of biological and biomedical models with the DAISY software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2010-04-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/ approximately pia/.

  17. The Wolf Boy: Reactive Attachment Disorder in an Adolescent Boy

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, James E.; Leckman, James F.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2005-01-01

    An adolescent boy presented with episodic wolf-like aggressive behaviors, for which his rural community planned an exorcism. Admission to a tertiary care hospital revealed an adolescent suffering an array of severe psychiatric symptoms, which best fit the diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder (RAD). The differential diagnosis included delusional disorder, mood problems, anxiety, schizophrenia, and “feral child” syndrome. Nosology and pathophysiology as well as pharmacological and psychoso...

  18. Natural headland sand bypassing; towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Ab Razak, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural headland sand bypassing: Towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms and processes of sand bypassing in artificial and non-artificial coastal environments through a numerical modelling study. Sand bypassing processes in ge

  19. The Baby TALK Model: An Innovative Approach to Identifying High-Risk Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Aimee Hilado; Leow, Christine; Hornstein, John

    2012-01-01

    This research report examines the Baby TALK model, an innovative early childhood intervention approach used to identify, recruit, and serve young children who are at-risk for developmental delays, mental health needs, and/or school failure, and their families. The report begins with a description of the model. This description is followed by an…

  20. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  1. Half-trek criterion for generic identifiability of linear structural equation models

    CERN Document Server

    Foygel, Rina; Drton, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    A linear structural equation model relates random variables of interest and corresponding Gaussian noise terms via a linear equation system. Each such model can be represented by a mixed graph in which directed edges encode the linear equations, and bidirected edges indicate possible correlations among noise terms. We study parameter identifiability in these models, that is, we ask for conditions that ensure that the edge coefficients and correlations appearing in a linear structural equation model can be uniquely recovered from the covariance matrix of the associated normal distribution. We treat the case of generic identifiability, where unique recovery is possible for almost every choice of parameters. We give a new graphical criterion that is sufficient for generic identifiability. It improves criteria from prior work and does not require the directed part of the graph to be acyclic. We also develop a related necessary condition and examine the "gap" between sufficient and necessary conditions through sim...

  2. Model Order and Identifiability of Non-Linear Biological Systems in Stable Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigren, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical result that clarifies when it is at all possible to determine the nonlinear dynamic equations of a biological system in stable oscillation, from measured data. As it turns out the minimal order needed for this is dependent on the minimal dimension in which the stable orbit of the system does not intersect itself. This is illustrated with a simulated fourth order Hodgkin-Huxley spiking neuron model, which is identified using a non-linear second order differential equation model. The simulated result illustrates that the underlying higher order model of the spiking neuron cannot be uniquely determined given only the periodic measured data. The result of the paper is of general validity when the dynamics of biological systems in stable oscillation is identified, and illustrates the need to carefully address non-linear identifiability aspects when validating models based on periodic data.

  3. A new process sensitivity index to identify important system processes under process model and parametric uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Heng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ye, Ming [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee Florida USA; Walker, Anthony P. [Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA; Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models are always composed of multiple components that represent processes key to intended model applications. When a process can be simulated by multiple conceptual-mathematical models (process models), model uncertainty in representing the process arises. While global sensitivity analysis methods have been widely used for identifying important processes in hydrologic modeling, the existing methods consider only parametric uncertainty but ignore the model uncertainty for process representation. To address this problem, this study develops a new method to probe multimodel process sensitivity by integrating the model averaging methods into the framework of variance-based global sensitivity analysis, given that the model averaging methods quantify both parametric and model uncertainty. A new process sensitivity index is derived as a metric of relative process importance, and the index includes variance in model outputs caused by uncertainty in both process models and model parameters. For demonstration, the new index is used to evaluate the processes of recharge and geology in a synthetic study of groundwater reactive transport modeling. The recharge process is simulated by two models that converting precipitation to recharge, and the geology process is also simulated by two models of different parameterizations of hydraulic conductivity; each process model has its own random parameters. The new process sensitivity index is mathematically general, and can be applied to a wide range of problems in hydrology and beyond.

  4. A Numerical Procedure for Model Identifiability Analysis Applied to Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daele, Timothy, Van; Van Hoey, Stijn; Gernaey, Krist;

    2015-01-01

    exercise, thereby bypassing the challenging task of model structure determination and identification. Parameter identification problems can thus lead to ill-calibrated models with low predictive power and large model uncertainty. Every calibration exercise should therefore be precededby a proper model...... and Pronzato (1997) and which can be easily set up for any type of model. In this paper the proposed approach is applied to the forward reaction rate of the enzyme kinetics proposed by Shin and Kim(1998). Structural identifiability analysis showed that no local structural model problems were occurring......The proper calibration of models describing enzyme kinetics can be quite challenging. In the literature, different procedures are available to calibrate these enzymatic models in an efficient way. However, in most cases the model structure is already decided on prior to the actual calibration...

  5. Unscented Kalman filter with parameter identifiability analysis for the estimation of multiple parameters in kinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Baker Syed; Poskar C; Junker Björn

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In systems biology, experimentally measured parameters are not always available, necessitating the use of computationally based parameter estimation. In order to rely on estimated parameters, it is critical to first determine which parameters can be estimated for a given model and measurement set. This is done with parameter identifiability analysis. A kinetic model of the sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm tissue developed by Rohwer et al. was taken as a test case model. Wh...

  6. Identifiability of Normal and Normal Mixture Models With Nonignorable Missing Data

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Wang; Ding, Peng; Geng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Missing data problems arise in many applied research studies. They may jeopardize statistical inference of the model of interest, if the missing mechanism is nonignorable, that is, the missing mechanism depends on the missing values themselves even conditional on the observed data. With a nonignorable missing mechanism, the model of interest is often not identifiable without imposing further assumptions. We find that even if the missing mechanism has a known parametric form, the model is not ...

  7. Testicular biopsy in prepubertal boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faure, Alice; Bouty, Aurore; O'Brien, Mike

    2016-01-01

    in undervirilized patients with 46,XY disorders of sexual development. Testicular histology is also of considerable value in the prediction of both fertility potential and risk of cancer in individuals with undescended testes, particularly those with intraabdominal undescended testes. New possibilities......No consensus exists regarding the precise role of testicular biopsy in prepubertal boys, although it is considered useful for assessing the potential consequences of undescended testes on fertility. Current scientific knowledge indicates that surgeons should broaden indications for this procedure...... for the preservation of fertility after gonadotoxic chemotherapy - even for prepubertal boys - are emerging. Cryopreservation of testicular tissue samples for the preservation of fertility - although still an experimental method at present - is appealing in this context. In our opinion, testicular biopsy...

  8. Vertebrae classification models - Validating classification models that use morphometrics to identify ancient salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) vertebrae to species

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Using morphometric characteristics of modern salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) vertebrae, we have developed classification models to identify salmonid vertebrae to the...

  9. Structural identifiability of systems biology models: a critical comparison of methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Teodora Chis

    Full Text Available Analysing the properties of a biological system through in silico experimentation requires a satisfactory mathematical representation of the system including accurate values of the model parameters. Fortunately, modern experimental techniques allow obtaining time-series data of appropriate quality which may then be used to estimate unknown parameters. However, in many cases, a subset of those parameters may not be uniquely estimated, independently of the experimental data available or the numerical techniques used for estimation. This lack of identifiability is related to the structure of the model, i.e. the system dynamics plus the observation function. Despite the interest in knowing a priori whether there is any chance of uniquely estimating all model unknown parameters, the structural identifiability analysis for general non-linear dynamic models is still an open question. There is no method amenable to every model, thus at some point we have to face the selection of one of the possibilities. This work presents a critical comparison of the currently available techniques. To this end, we perform the structural identifiability analysis of a collection of biological models. The results reveal that the generating series approach, in combination with identifiability tableaus, offers the most advantageous compromise among range of applicability, computational complexity and information provided.

  10. Heterogeneity within the Gifted: Higher IQ Boys Exhibit Behaviors Resembling Boys with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; Holahan, John M.; Freudenheim, Daniele A.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Makuch, Robert W.; Shaywitz, Bennett A.

    2001-01-01

    A study involving boys (grades 4-7) who were highly gifted (n=18), low gifted (n=17), had learning disabilities (n=26), and were typical (n=26), found highly gifted boys exhibited levels of behavioral problems similar to those with learning disabilities, whereas low gifted boys had lower levels than boys with learning disabilities. (Contains…

  11. Urinary phthalate excretion in 555 healthy Danish boys with and without pubertal gynaecomastia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G; Frederiksen, Hanne; Sørensen, Kaspar;

    2012-01-01

    Pubertal gynaecomastia is a clinical sign of an oestrogen-androgen imbalance, which occurs in 40-60% of adolescent Caucasian boys. In most cases no underlying endocrinopathy can be identified. A recent study reports higher plasma phthalate levels in Turkish boys with pubertal gynaecomastia....... Therefore, we asked whether there was an association between concurrent measures of urinary phthalate metabolites and pubertal timing as well as the presence of gynaecomastia in otherwise healthy boys. We studied a total of 555 healthy boys (age 6.07-19.83 years) as part of the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study...

  12. Avoiding and identifying errors in health technology assessment models: qualitative study and methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, J; Tappenden, P; Rawdin, A; Johnson, M; Kaltenthaler, E; Paisley, S; Papaioannou, D; Shippam, A

    2010-05-01

    identifying errors; and barriers and facilitators. There was no common language in the discussion of modelling errors and there was inconsistency in the perceived boundaries of what constitutes an error. Asked about the definition of model error, there was a tendency for interviewees to exclude matters of judgement from being errors and focus on 'slips' and 'lapses', but discussion of slips and lapses comprised less than 20% of the discussion on types of errors. Interviewees devoted 70% of the discussion to softer elements of the process of defining the decision question and conceptual modelling, mostly the realms of judgement, skills, experience and training. The original focus concerned model errors, but it may be more useful to refer to modelling risks. Several interviewees discussed concepts of validation and verification, with notable consistency in interpretation: verification meaning the process of ensuring that the computer model correctly implemented the intended model, whereas validation means the process of ensuring that a model is fit for purpose. Methodological literature on verification and validation of models makes reference to the Hermeneutic philosophical position, highlighting that the concept of model validation should not be externalized from the decision-makers and the decision-making process. Interviewees demonstrated examples of all major error types identified in the literature: errors in the description of the decision problem, in model structure, in use of evidence, in implementation of the model, in operation of the model, and in presentation and understanding of results. The HTA error classifications were compared against existing classifications of model errors in the literature. A range of techniques and processes are currently used to avoid errors in HTA models: engaging with clinical experts, clients and decision-makers to ensure mutual understanding, producing written documentation of the proposed model, explicit conceptual modelling

  13. A biophysical model for identifying splicing regulatory elements and their interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wen

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA is a crucial step in the expression of most eukaryotic genes. Splicing factors (SFs play an important role in AS regulation by binding to the cis-regulatory elements on the pre-mRNA. Although many splicing factors (SFs and their binding sites have been identified, their combinatorial regulatory effects remain to be elucidated. In this paper, we derive a biophysical model for AS regulation that integrates combinatorial signals of cis-acting splicing regulatory elements (SREs and their interactions. We also develop a systematic framework for model inference. Applying the biophysical model to a human RNA-Seq data set, we demonstrate that our model can explain 49.1%-66.5% variance of the data, which is comparable to the best result achieved by biophysical models for transcription. In total, we identified 119 SRE pairs between different regions of cassette exons that may regulate exon or intron definition in splicing, and 77 SRE pairs from the same region that may arise from a long motif or two different SREs bound by different SFs. Particularly, putative binding sites of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F/H and E/K are identified as interacting SRE pairs, and have been shown to be consistent with the interaction models proposed in previous experimental results. These results show that our biophysical model and inference method provide a means of quantitative modeling of splicing regulation and is a useful tool for identifying SREs and their interactions. The software package for model inference is available under an open source license.

  14. Identifying best-fitting inputs in health-economic model calibration: a Pareto frontier approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Eva A; Cipriano, Lauren E; Simons, Cyrena T; Kong, Chung Yin

    2015-02-01

    To identify best-fitting input sets using model calibration, individual calibration target fits are often combined into a single goodness-of-fit (GOF) measure using a set of weights. Decisions in the calibration process, such as which weights to use, influence which sets of model inputs are identified as best-fitting, potentially leading to different health economic conclusions. We present an alternative approach to identifying best-fitting input sets based on the concept of Pareto-optimality. A set of model inputs is on the Pareto frontier if no other input set simultaneously fits all calibration targets as well or better. We demonstrate the Pareto frontier approach in the calibration of 2 models: a simple, illustrative Markov model and a previously published cost-effectiveness model of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). For each model, we compare the input sets on the Pareto frontier to an equal number of best-fitting input sets according to 2 possible weighted-sum GOF scoring systems, and we compare the health economic conclusions arising from these different definitions of best-fitting. For the simple model, outcomes evaluated over the best-fitting input sets according to the 2 weighted-sum GOF schemes were virtually nonoverlapping on the cost-effectiveness plane and resulted in very different incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ($79,300 [95% CI 72,500-87,600] v. $139,700 [95% CI 79,900-182,800] per quality-adjusted life-year [QALY] gained). Input sets on the Pareto frontier spanned both regions ($79,000 [95% CI 64,900-156,200] per QALY gained). The TAVR model yielded similar results. Choices in generating a summary GOF score may result in different health economic conclusions. The Pareto frontier approach eliminates the need to make these choices by using an intuitive and transparent notion of optimality as the basis for identifying best-fitting input sets. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Identifying the molecular basis of host-parasite coevolution: merging models and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybdahl, Mark F; Jenkins, Christina E; Nuismer, Scott L

    2014-07-01

    Mathematical models of the coevolutionary process have uncovered consequences of host-parasite interactions that go well beyond the traditional realm of the Red Queen, potentially explaining several important evolutionary transitions. However, these models also demonstrate that the specific consequences of coevolution are sensitive to the structure of the infection matrix, which is embedded in models to describe the likelihood of infection in encounters between specific host and parasite genotypes. Traditional cross-infection approaches to estimating infection matrices might be unreliable because evolutionary dynamics and experimental sampling lead to missing genotypes. Consequently, our goal is to identify the likely structure of infection matrices by synthesizing molecular mechanisms of host immune defense and parasite counterdefense with coevolutionary models. This synthesis reveals that the molecular mechanisms of immune reactions, although complex and diverse, conform to two basic models commonly used within coevolutionary theory: matching infection and targeted recognition. Our synthesis also overturns conventional wisdom, revealing that the general models are not taxonomically restricted but are applicable to plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Finally, our synthesis identifies several important areas for future research that should improve the explanatory power of coevolutionary models. The most important among these include empirical studies to identify the molecular hotspots of genotypic specificity and theoretical studies examining the consequences of matrices that more accurately represent multistep infection processes and quantitative defenses.

  16. Validation of a Predictive Model to Identify Patients at High Risk for Hospital Readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiva, LeeAnna; Hand, Marti; VanBrackle, Lewis; McVay, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Hospital readmission is an adverse patient outcome that is serious, common, and costly. For hospitals, identifying patients at risk for hospital readmission is a priority to reduce costs and improve care. The purposes were to validate a predictive algorithm to identify patients at a high risk for preventable hospital readmission within 30 days after discharge and determine if additional risk factors enhance readmission predictability. A retrospective study was conducted on a randomized sample of 598 patients discharged from a Southeast community hospital. Data were collected from the organization's database and manually abstracted from the electronic medical record using a structured tool. Two separate logistic regression models were fit for the probability of readmission within 30 days after discharge. The first model used the LACE index as the predictor variable, and the second model used the LACE index with additional risk factors. The two models were compared to determine if additional risk factors increased the model's predictive ability. The results indicate both models have reasonable prognostic capability. The LACE index with additional risk factors did little to improve prognostication, while adding to the model's complexity. Findings support the use of the LACE index as a practical tool to identify patients at risk for readmission.

  17. Improving the precision of lake ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying predictors of model uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Jordan S.; Read, Emily K.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Adrian, Rita; Hanson, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Diel changes in dissolved oxygen are often used to estimate gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) in aquatic ecosystems. Despite the widespread use of this approach to understand ecosystem metabolism, we are only beginning to understand the degree and underlying causes of uncertainty for metabolism model parameter estimates. Here, we present a novel approach to improve the precision and accuracy of ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying physical metrics that indicate when metabolism estimates are highly uncertain. Using datasets from seventeen instrumented GLEON (Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network) lakes, we discovered that many physical characteristics correlated with uncertainty, including PAR (photosynthetically active radiation, 400-700 nm), daily variance in Schmidt stability, and wind speed. Low PAR was a consistent predictor of high variance in GPP model parameters, but also corresponded with low ER model parameter variance. We identified a threshold (30% of clear sky PAR) below which GPP parameter variance increased rapidly and was significantly greater in nearly all lakes compared with variance on days with PAR levels above this threshold. The relationship between daily variance in Schmidt stability and GPP model parameter variance depended on trophic status, whereas daily variance in Schmidt stability was consistently positively related to ER model parameter variance. Wind speeds in the range of ~0.8-3 m s–1 were consistent predictors of high variance for both GPP and ER model parameters, with greater uncertainty in eutrophic lakes. Our findings can be used to reduce ecosystem metabolism model parameter uncertainty and identify potential sources of that uncertainty.

  18. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  19. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  20. EARLY CHILDHOOD PREDICTORS OF LOW-INCOME BOYS' PATHWAYS TO ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN CHILDHOOD, ADOLESCENCE, AND EARLY ADULTHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S; Gilliam, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Guided by a bridging model of pathways leading to low-income boys' early starting and persistent trajectories of antisocial behavior, the current article reviews evidence supporting the model from early childhood through early adulthood. Using primarily a cohort of 310 low-income boys of families recruited from Women, Infants, and Children Nutrition Supplement centers in a large metropolitan area followed from infancy to early adulthood and a smaller cohort of boys and girls followed through early childhood, we provide evidence supporting the critical role of parenting, maternal depression, and other proximal family risk factors in early childhood that are prospectively linked to trajectories of parent-reported conduct problems in early and middle childhood, youth-reported antisocial behavior during adolescence and early adulthood, and court-reported violent offending in adolescence. The findings are discussed in terms of the need to identify at-risk boys in early childhood and methods and platforms for engaging families in healthcare settings not previously used to implement preventive mental health services. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  1. A review on statistical models for identifying climate contributions to crop yields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wenjiao; TAO Fulu; ZHANG Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Statistical models using historical data on crop yields and weather to calibrate relatively simple regression equations have been widely and extensively applied in previous studies,and have provided a common alternative to process-based models,which require extensive input data on cultivar,management,and soil conditions.However,very few studies had been conducted to review systematically the previous statistical models for indentifying climate contributions to crop yields.This paper introduces three main statistical methods,i.e.,time-series model,cross-section model and panel model,which have been used to identify such issues in the field of agrometeorology.Generally,research spatial scale could be categorized into two types using statistical models,including site scale and regional scale (e.g.global scale,national scale,provincial scale and county scale).Four issues exist in identifying response sensitivity of crop yields to climate change by statistical models.The issues include the extent of spatial and temporal scale,non-climatic trend removal,colinearity existing in climate variables and non-consideration of adaptations.Respective resolutions for the above four issues have been put forward in the section of perspective on the future of statistical models finally.

  2. Identifying rock blocks based on hierarchical rock-mass structure model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Rock-masses are divided into many closed blocks by deterministic and stochastic discontinuities and engineering interfaces in complex rock-mass engineering. Determining the sizes, shapes, and adjacent relations of blocks is important for stability analysis of fractured rock masses. Here we propose an algorithm for identifying spatial blocks based on a hierarchical 3D Rock-mass Structure Model (RSM). First, a model is built composed of deterministic discontinuities, engineering interfaces, and the earth’s surface, and the deterministic blocks surrounded by these interfaces are traced. Then, in each deter-ministic block, a network model of stochastic discontinuities is built and the stochastic blocks are traced. Building a unitary wire frame that connects all interfaces seamlessly is the key for our algorithm to identify the above two kinds of blocks. Using this algorithm, geometric models can be built for block theory, discrete element method, and discontinuous deformation analysis.

  3. A model to identify high crash road segments with the dynamic segmentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdian, Amin Mirza; Saffarzadeh, Mahmoud; Yousefi, Hassan; Ghassemian, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Currently, high social and economic costs in addition to physical and mental consequences put road safety among most important issues. This paper aims at presenting a novel approach, capable of identifying the location as well as the length of high crash road segments. It focuses on the location of accidents occurred along the road and their effective regions. In other words, due to applicability and budget limitations in improving safety of road segments, it is not possible to recognize all high crash road segments. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to identify high crash road segments and their real length to be able to prioritize the safety improvement in roads. In this paper, after evaluating deficiencies of the current road segmentation models, different kinds of errors caused by these methods are addressed. One of the main deficiencies of these models is that they can not identify the length of high crash road segments. In this paper, identifying the length of high crash road segments (corresponding to the arrangement of accidents along the road) is achieved by converting accident data to the road response signal of through traffic with a dynamic model based on the wavelet theory. The significant advantage of the presented method is multi-scale segmentation. In other words, this model identifies high crash road segments with different lengths and also it can recognize small segments within long segments. Applying the presented model into a real case for identifying 10-20 percent of high crash road segment showed an improvement of 25-38 percent in relative to the existing methods.

  4. Identifying and Quantifying Emergent Behavior Through System of Systems Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    EMERGENT BEHAVIOR THROUGH SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS MODELING AND SIMULATION by Mary Ann Cummings September 2015 Dissertation Supervisor: Man-Tak Shing...COVERED Ph.D. Dissertation 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IDENTIFYING AND QUANTIFYING EMERGENT BEHAVIOR THROUGH SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS MODELING AND SIMULATION 5...functionality and interfaces in these SoSs. An inherent deficiency of existing M&S approaches, however, lies in the emergent behavior that occurs as a result of

  5. Body Dissatisfaction of Adolescent Girls and Boys: Risk and Resource Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Erin T.; Galambos, Nancy L.

    2003-01-01

    Examined factors predicting body dissatisfaction for seventh- and tenth-grade girls and boys in the second wave of a 3-year study of psychosocial maturity. Identified high body mass index, greater figure management, and being teased about appearance as risk factors for girls' body dissatisfaction. Being teased was boys' only significant risk…

  6. Streetsmart Schoolsmart: Urban Poverty and the Education of Adolescent Boys. Multicultural Education Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchas, Gilberto Q.; Vigil, James Diego

    2012-01-01

    In "Streetsmart Schoolsmart", two respected scholars present original research on youth gangs and school success to explain why some boys become disengaged and join gangs while others do not. Chapters vividly describe how urban boys from different ethnic backgrounds (Asian, African American, and Latino) approach schooling and identify the…

  7. Serum AMH levels are lower in healthy boys who develop pubertal gynaecomastia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Hagen, Casper P.; Almstrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pubertal gynaecomastia is thought to be a clinical sign of an oestrogen-androgen imbalance, affecting up to 60% of boys. In most cases no underlying endocrinopathy can be identified. In boys, Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is produced by immature Sertoli cells and circulating level decr...

  8. Identifying an appropriate measurement modeling approach for the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubright, Jonathan D; Nandakumar, Ratna; Karlawish, Jason

    2016-02-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is a 30-item, dichotomously scored test of general cognition. A number of benefits could be gained by modeling the MMSE in an item response theory (IRT) framework, as opposed to the currently used classical additive approach. However, the test, which is built from groups of items related to separate cognitive subdomains, may violate a key assumption of IRT: local item independence. This study aimed to identify the most appropriate measurement model for the MMSE: a unidimensional IRT model, a testlet response theory model, or a bifactor model. Local dependence analysis using nationally representative data showed a meaningful violation of the local item independence assumption, indicating multidimensionality. In addition, the testlet and bifactor models displayed superior fit indices over a unidimensional IRT model. Statistical comparisons showed that the bifactor model fit MMSE respondent data significantly better than the other models considered. These results suggest that application of a traditional unidimensional IRT model is inappropriate in this context. Instead, a bifactor model is suggested for future modeling of MMSE data as it more accurately represents the multidimensional nature of the scale. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  10. Comparison of two model approaches in the Zambezi river basin with regard to model reliability and identifiability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Winsemius

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of water stocks in the upper Zambezi river basin have been determined by 2 different hydrological modelling approaches. The purpose was to provide preliminary terrestrial storage estimates in the upper Zambezi, which will be compared with estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE in a future study. The first modelling approach is GIS-based, distributed and conceptual (STREAM. The second approach uses Lumped Elementary Watersheds identified and modelled conceptually (LEW. The STREAM model structure has been assessed using GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation a posteriori to determine parameter identifiability. The LEW approach could, in addition, be tested for model structure, because computational efforts of LEW are low. Both models are threshold models, where the non-linear behaviour of the Zambezi river basin is explained by a combination of thresholds and linear reservoirs. The models were forced by time series of gauged and interpolated rainfall. Where available, runoff station data was used to calibrate the models. Ungauged watersheds were generally given the same parameter sets as their neighbouring calibrated watersheds. It appeared that the LEW model structure could be improved by applying GLUE iteratively. Eventually, it led to better identifiability of parameters and consequently a better model structure than the STREAM model. Hence, the final model structure obtained better represents the true hydrology. After calibration, both models show a comparable efficiency in representing discharge. However the LEW model shows a far greater storage amplitude than the STREAM model. This emphasizes the storage uncertainty related to hydrological modelling in data-scarce environments such as the Zambezi river basin. It underlines the need and potential for independent observations of terrestrial storage to enhance our understanding and modelling capacity of the hydrological processes. GRACE

  11. An Identifiable State Model To Describe Light Intensity Influence on Microalgae Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, A; Perin, G; Sforza, E; Galvanin, F; Morosinotto, T; Bezzo, F

    2014-04-23

    Despite the high potential as feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals, the industrial cultivation of microalgae still exhibits many issues. Yield in microalgae cultivation systems is limited by the solar energy that can be harvested. The availability of reliable models representing key phenomena affecting algae growth may help designing and optimizing effective production systems at an industrial level. In this work the complex influence of different light regimes on seawater alga Nannochloropsis salina growth is represented by first principles models. Experimental data such as in vivo fluorescence measurements are employed to develop the model. The proposed model allows description of all growth curves and fluorescence data in a reliable way. The model structure is assessed and modified in order to guarantee the model identifiability and the estimation of its parametric set in a robust and reliable way.

  12. Using Predictive Modelling to Identify Students at Risk of Poor University Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pengfei; Maloney, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Predictive modelling is used to identify students at risk of failing their first-year courses and not returning to university in the second year. Our aim is twofold. Firstly, we want to understand the factors that lead to poor first-year experiences at university. Secondly, we want to develop simple, low-cost tools that would allow universities to…

  13. Inference in partially identified models with many moment inequalities using Lasso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugni, Federico A.; Caner, Mehmet; Kock, Anders Bredahl;

    This paper considers the problem of inference in a partially identified moment (in)equality model with possibly many moment inequalities. Our contribution is to propose a novel two-step new inference method based on the combination of two ideas. On the one hand, our test statistic and critical va...

  14. Animal model for identifying therapetucually useful compounds for the treatment of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Ayuso-Gontán, Carmen; Martínez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a method for identifying compounds that are potentially useful for the treatment of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), comprising the use of an animal model of rats, developed by means of the administration of β-Ν-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA)

  15. Animal model for identifying therapetucually useful compounds for the treatment of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a method for identifying compounds that are potentially useful for the treatment of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), comprising the use of an animal model of rats, developed by means of the administration of β-Ν-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA)

  16. Identifying differentially methylated genes using mixed effect and generalized least square models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Pearlly S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation plays an important role in the process of tumorigenesis. Identifying differentially methylated genes or CpG islands (CGIs associated with genes between two tumor subtypes is thus an important biological question. The methylation status of all CGIs in the whole genome can be assayed with differential methylation hybridization (DMH microarrays. However, patient samples or cell lines are heterogeneous, so their methylation pattern may be very different. In addition, neighboring probes at each CGI are correlated. How these factors affect the analysis of DMH data is unknown. Results We propose a new method for identifying differentially methylated (DM genes by identifying the associated DM CGI(s. At each CGI, we implement four different mixed effect and generalized least square models to identify DM genes between two groups. We compare four models with a simple least square regression model to study the impact of incorporating random effects and correlations. Conclusions We demonstrate that the inclusion (or exclusion of random effects and the choice of correlation structures can significantly affect the results of the data analysis. We also assess the false discovery rate of different models using CGIs associated with housekeeping genes.

  17. Use of the shared frailty model to identify the determinants of child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    improving child survival during 5 years preceding the 2005 RDHS, all the achievements ... identify and rank order the most important factors that contributed to child survival ... observed differential performance in child survival are still not well known .... tool is the hazard function such that the Cox PH model for the individual.

  18. Research on identifying the dynamic error model of strapdown gyro on 3-axis turntable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai; REN Shun-qing; WANG Chang-hong

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic errors of gyros are the important error sources of a strapdown inertial navigation system.In order to identify the dynamic error model coefficients accurately, the static erTor model coefficients which lay a foundation for compensating while identifying the dynamic error model are identified in the gravity acceleration fields by using angular position function of the three-axis turntable. The angular acceleration and angular velocity are excited on the input, output and spin axis of the gyros when the outer axis and the middle axis of a threeaxis turntable are in the uniform angular velocity state simultaneously, while the inner axis of the turntable is in different static angular positions. 8 groups of data are sampled when the inner axis is in 8 different angular positions. These data are the function of the middle axis positions and the inner axis positions. For these data, harmonic analysis method is applied two times versus the middle axis positions and inner axis positions respectively so that the dynamic error model coefficients are finally identified through the least square method. In the meantime the optimal angular velocity of the outer axis and the middle axis are selected by computing the determination value of the information matrix.

  19. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  20. Modelling evapotranspiration during precipitation deficits: identifying critical processes in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, Anna M.; Pitman, Andy J.; Decker, Mark; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Abramowitz, Gab; Kala, Jatin; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Surface fluxes from land surface models (LSMs) have traditionally been evaluated against monthly, seasonal or annual mean states. The limited ability of LSMs to reproduce observed evaporative fluxes under water-stressed conditions has been previously noted, but very few studies have systematically evaluated these models during rainfall deficits. We evaluated latent heat fluxes simulated by the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) LSM across 20 flux tower sites at sub-annual to inter-annual timescales, in particular focusing on model performance during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits. The importance of key model processes in capturing the latent heat flux was explored by employing alternative representations of hydrology, leaf area index, soil properties and stomatal conductance. We found that the representation of hydrological processes was critical for capturing observed declines in latent heat during rainfall deficits. By contrast, the effects of soil properties, LAI and stomatal conductance were highly site-specific. Whilst the standard model performs reasonably well at annual scales as measured by common metrics, it grossly underestimates latent heat during rainfall deficits. A new version of CABLE, with a more physically consistent representation of hydrology, captures the variation in the latent heat flux during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits better than earlier versions, but remaining biases point to future research needs. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating LSMs under water-stressed conditions and across multiple plant functional types and climate regimes.

  1. IDENTIFYING OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS TO SELECT SUITABLE DECISION MODELS FOR A PUBLIC SECTOR EPROCUREMENT DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Public sector procurement should be a transparent and fair process. Strict legal requirements are enforced on public sector procurement to make it a standardised process. To make fair decisions on selecting suppliers, a practical method which adheres to legal requirements is important. The research that is the base for this paper aimed at identifying a suitable Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA method for the specific legal and functional needs of the Maldivian Public Sector. To identify such operational requirements, a set of focus group interviews were conducted in the Maldives with public officials responsible for procurement decision making. Based on the operational requirements identified through focus groups, criteria-based evaluation is done on published MCDA methods to identify the suitable methods for e-procurement decision making. This paper describes the identification of the operational requirements and the results of the evaluation to select suitable decision models for the Maldivian context.

  2. Antibiotic Resistances in Livestock: A Comparative Approach to Identify an Appropriate Regression Model for Count Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Hüls

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in livestock is a matter of general concern. To develop hygiene measures and methods for resistance prevention and control, epidemiological studies on a population level are needed to detect factors associated with antimicrobial resistance in livestock holdings. In general, regression models are used to describe these relationships between environmental factors and resistance outcome. Besides the study design, the correlation structures of the different outcomes of antibiotic resistance and structural zero measurements on the resistance outcome as well as on the exposure side are challenges for the epidemiological model building process. The use of appropriate regression models that acknowledge these complexities is essential to assure valid epidemiological interpretations. The aims of this paper are (i to explain the model building process comparing several competing models for count data (negative binomial model, quasi-Poisson model, zero-inflated model, and hurdle model and (ii to compare these models using data from a cross-sectional study on antibiotic resistance in animal husbandry. These goals are essential to evaluate which model is most suitable to identify potential prevention measures. The dataset used as an example in our analyses was generated initially to study the prevalence and associated factors for the appearance of cefotaxime-resistant Escherichia coli in 48 German fattening pig farms. For each farm, the outcome was the count of samples with resistant bacteria. There was almost no overdispersion and only moderate evidence of excess zeros in the data. Our analyses show that it is essential to evaluate regression models in studies analyzing the relationship between environmental factors and antibiotic resistances in livestock. After model comparison based on evaluation of model predictions, Akaike information criterion, and Pearson residuals, here the hurdle model was judged to be the most appropriate

  3. Identifying 'unhealthy' food advertising on television: a case study applying the UK Nutrient Profile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkin, Gabrielle; Wilson, Nick; Hermanson, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of the UK Nutrient Profile (NP) model for identifying 'unhealthy' food advertisements using a case study of New Zealand television advertisements. Four weeks of weekday television from 15.30 hours to 18.30 hours was videotaped from a state-owned (free-to-air) television channel popular with children. Food advertisements were identified and their nutritional information collected in accordance with the requirements of the NP model. Nutrient information was obtained from a variety of sources including food labels, company websites and a national nutritional database. From the 60 h sample of weekday afternoon television, there were 1893 advertisements, of which 483 were for food products or retailers. After applying the NP model, 66 % of these were classified as advertising high-fat, high-salt and high-sugar (HFSS) foods; 28 % were classified as advertising non-HFSS foods; and the remaining 2 % were unclassifiable. More than half (53 %) of the HFSS food advertisements were for 'mixed meal' items promoted by major fast-food franchises. The advertising of non-HFSS food was sparse, covering a narrow range of food groups, with no advertisements for fresh fruit or vegetables. Despite the NP model having some design limitations in classifying real-world televised food advertisements, it was easily applied to this sample and could clearly identify HFSS products. Policy makers who do not wish to completely restrict food advertising to children outright should consider using this NP model for regulating food advertising.

  4. A Hidden Markov Movement Model for rapidly identifying behavioral states from animal tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whoriskey, Kim; Auger-Méthé, Marie; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard

    2017-01-01

    1. Electronic telemetry is frequently used to document animal movement through time. Methods that can identify underlying behaviors driving specific movement patterns can help us understand how and why animals use available space, thereby aiding conservation and management efforts. For aquatic....... 2. We developed a new Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for identifying behavioral states from animal tracks with negligible error, which we called the Hidden Markov Movement Model (HMMM). We implemented as the basis for the HMMM the process equation of the DCRWS, but we used the method of maximum...... animal tracking data with significant measurement error, a Bayesian state-space model called the first-Difference Correlated Random Walk with Switching (DCRWS) has often been used for this purpose. However, for aquatic animals, highly accurate tracking data of animal movement are now becoming more common...

  5. Using cloud models of heartbeats as the entity identifier to secure mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Donglai; Liu, Yanhua

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices are extensively used to store more private and often sensitive information. Therefore, it is important to protect them against unauthorised access. Authentication ensures that authorised users can use mobile devices. However, traditional authentication methods, such as numerical or graphic passwords, are vulnerable to passive attacks. For example, an adversary can steal the password by snooping from a shorter distance. To avoid these problems, this study presents a biometric approach that uses cloud models of heartbeats as the entity identifier to secure mobile devices. Here, it is identified that these concepts including cloud model or cloud have nothing to do with cloud computing. The cloud model appearing in the study is the cognitive model. In the proposed method, heartbeats are collected by two ECG electrodes that are connected to one mobile device. The backward normal cloud generator is used to generate ECG standard cloud models characterising the heartbeat template. When a user tries to have access to their mobile device, cloud models regenerated by fresh heartbeats will be compared with ECG standard cloud models to determine if the current user can use this mobile device. This authentication method was evaluated from three aspects including accuracy, authentication time and energy consumption. The proposed method gives 86.04% of true acceptance rate with 2.73% of false acceptance rate. One authentication can be done in 6s, and this processing consumes about 2000 mW of power.

  6. Identifying western yellow-billed cuckoo breeding habitat with a dual modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew J.; Hatten, James R.; Holmes, Jennifer A.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2017-01-01

    The western population of the yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) was recently listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. Yellow-billed cuckoo conservation efforts require the identification of features and area requirements associated with high quality, riparian forest habitat at spatial scales that range from nest microhabitat to landscape, as well as lower-suitability areas that can be enhanced or restored. Spatially explicit models inform conservation efforts by increasing ecological understanding of a target species, especially at landscape scales. Previous yellow-billed cuckoo modelling efforts derived plant-community maps from aerial photography, an expensive and oftentimes inconsistent approach. Satellite models can remotely map vegetation features (e.g., vegetation density, heterogeneity in vegetation density or structure) across large areas with near perfect repeatability, but they usually cannot identify plant communities. We used aerial photos and satellite imagery, and a hierarchical spatial scale approach, to identify yellow-billed cuckoo breeding habitat along the Lower Colorado River and its tributaries. Aerial-photo and satellite models identified several key features associated with yellow-billed cuckoo breeding locations: (1) a 4.5 ha core area of dense cottonwood-willow vegetation, (2) a large native, heterogeneously dense forest (72 ha) around the core area, and (3) moderately rough topography. The odds of yellow-billed cuckoo occurrence decreased rapidly as the amount of tamarisk cover increased or when cottonwood-willow vegetation was limited. We achieved model accuracies of 75–80% in the project area the following year after updating the imagery and location data. The two model types had very similar probability maps, largely predicting the same areas as high quality habitat. While each model provided unique information, a dual-modelling approach provided a more complete picture of yellow-billed cuckoo habitat

  7. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Swindell

    Full Text Available Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1. While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis.

  8. Unscented Kalman filter with parameter identifiability analysis for the estimation of multiple parameters in kinetic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Syed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In systems biology, experimentally measured parameters are not always available, necessitating the use of computationally based parameter estimation. In order to rely on estimated parameters, it is critical to first determine which parameters can be estimated for a given model and measurement set. This is done with parameter identifiability analysis. A kinetic model of the sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm tissue developed by Rohwer et al. was taken as a test case model. What differentiates this approach is the integration of an orthogonal-based local identifiability method into the unscented Kalman filter (UKF, rather than using the more common observability-based method which has inherent limitations. It also introduces a variable step size based on the system uncertainty of the UKF during the sensitivity calculation. This method identified 10 out of 12 parameters as identifiable. These ten parameters were estimated using the UKF, which was run 97 times. Throughout the repetitions the UKF proved to be more consistent than the estimation algorithms used for comparison.

  9. Unscented Kalman filter with parameter identifiability analysis for the estimation of multiple parameters in kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed Murtuza; Poskar, C Hart; Junker, Björn H

    2011-10-11

    In systems biology, experimentally measured parameters are not always available, necessitating the use of computationally based parameter estimation. In order to rely on estimated parameters, it is critical to first determine which parameters can be estimated for a given model and measurement set. This is done with parameter identifiability analysis. A kinetic model of the sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm tissue developed by Rohwer et al. was taken as a test case model. What differentiates this approach is the integration of an orthogonal-based local identifiability method into the unscented Kalman filter (UKF), rather than using the more common observability-based method which has inherent limitations. It also introduces a variable step size based on the system uncertainty of the UKF during the sensitivity calculation. This method identified 10 out of 12 parameters as identifiable. These ten parameters were estimated using the UKF, which was run 97 times. Throughout the repetitions the UKF proved to be more consistent than the estimation algorithms used for comparison.

  10. Helping boys at-risk of criminal activity: qualitative results of a multi-component intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Erin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This qualitative study examines parent and child experiences of participation in a multi-component community-based program aimed at reducing offending behaviour, and increasing social competence in boys 6 to 11 years old in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The program builds on the concept of crime prevention through social development, and includes structured groups for the identified boy, parents, and siblings. Methods A sample of 35 families participating in the multi-component program took part in the qualitative study. Individual interviews with the boys, parents and siblings asked about changes in themselves, relationships with family and peers, and school after the group. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Results Parents reported improvement in parenting skills and attainment of more effective communication skills, particularly with their children. Parents also found the relationships they formed with other parents in the program and the advice that they gained to be beneficial. Boys who participated in the program also benefited, with both parents and boys reporting improvements in boys' anger management skills, social skills, impulse control, and ability to recognize potentially volatile situations. Both parents and boys described overall improvement in family relationships and school-related success. Conclusions The qualitative data revealed that parents and boys participating in the multi-component program perceived improvements in a number of specific areas, including social competence of the boys. This has not been demonstrated as clearly in other evaluations of the program.

  11. Identifying strategy use in category learning tasks: a case for more diagnostic data and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkin, Chris; Newell, Ben R; Kalish, Mike; Dunn, John C; Nosofsky, Robert M

    2015-07-01

    The strength of conclusions about the adoption of different categorization strategies-and their implications for theories about the cognitive and neural bases of category learning-depend heavily on the techniques for identifying strategy use. We examine performance in an often-used "information-integration" category structure and demonstrate that strategy identification is affected markedly by the range of models under consideration, the type of data collected, and model-selection techniques. We use a set of 27 potential models that represent alternative rule-based and information-integration categorization strategies. Our experimental paradigm includes the presentation of nonreinforced transfer stimuli that improve one's ability to discriminate among the predictions of alternative models. Our model-selection techniques incorporate uncertainty in the identification of individuals as either rule-based or information-integration strategy users. Based on this analysis we identify 48% of participants as unequivocally using an information-integration strategy. However, adopting the standard practice of using a restricted set of models, restricted data, and ignoring the degree of support for a particular strategy, we would typically conclude that 89% of participants used an information-integration strategy. We discuss the implications of potentially erroneous strategy identification for the security of conclusions about the categorization capabilities of various participant and patient groups.

  12. Interpersonal influences on late adolescent girls' and boys' disordered eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Furman, Wyndol

    2009-04-01

    Perceived socio-cultural pressure to be thin has an important impact on disordered eating during early and middle adolescence, but less is known about late adolescence. Most prospective studies included only girls, and less is known about the influence on boys. This study investigated interpersonal influences on changes in late adolescent boys' and girls' symptoms of disordered eating over one year. Participants were a community sample of late adolescents 16-19 years of age (N=199; 49.75% girls), their mothers, and friends. Structural equation modeling revealed that interpersonal pressure to be thin and criticism about appearance predicted increases in disordered eating over time. Late adolescents', mothers' and friends' reports of pressure were associated with disordered eating at Time 1 and Time 2. Further, adolescents' perceptions and friends' reports of pressure to be thin predicted changes in disordered eating over time. Findings underscore the significance of interpersonal relationships for disordered eating during late adolescence in both girls and boys.

  13. A state space transformation can yield identifiable models for tracer kinetic studies with enrichment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishnan, Janak D

    2010-11-01

    Tracer studies are analyzed almost universally by multicompartmental models where the state variables are tracer amounts or activities in the different pools. The model parameters are rate constants, defined naturally by expressing fluxes as fractions of the source pools. We consider an alternative state space with tracer enrichments or specific activities as the state variables, with the rate constants redefined by expressing fluxes as fractions of the destination pools. Although the redefinition may seem unphysiological, the commonly computed fractional synthetic rate actually expresses synthetic flux as a fraction of the product mass (destination pool). We show that, for a variety of structures, provided the structure is linear and stationary, the model in the enrichment state space has fewer parameters than that in the activities state space, and is hence better both to study identifiability and to estimate parameters. The superiority of enrichment modeling is shown for structures where activity model unidentifiability is caused by multiple exit pathways; on the other hand, with a single exit pathway but with multiple untraced entry pathways, activity modeling is shown to be superior. With the present-day emphasis on mass isotopes, the tracer in human studies is often of a precursor, labeling most or all entry pathways. It is shown that for these tracer studies, models in the activities state space are always unidentifiable when there are multiple exit pathways, even if the enrichment in every pool is observed; on the other hand, the corresponding models in the enrichment state space have fewer parameters and are more often identifiable. Our results suggest that studies with labeled precursors are modeled best with enrichments.

  14. Predictive modeling using a nationally representative database to identify patients at risk of developing microalbuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Zapata, Lorenzo; Warholak, Terri; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel; Murcko, Anita; Runger, George; Levengood, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Predictive models allow clinicians to identify higher- and lower-risk patients and make targeted treatment decisions. Microalbuminuria (MA) is a condition whose presence is understood to be an early marker for cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study were to develop a patient data-driven predictive model and a risk-score assessment to improve the identification of MA. The 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was utilized to create a predictive model. The dataset was split into thirds; one-third was used to develop the model, while the other two-thirds were utilized for internal validation. The 2012-2013 NHANES was used as an external validation database. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to create the model. Performance was evaluated using three criteria: (1) receiver operating characteristic curves; (2) pseudo-R (2) values; and (3) goodness of fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow). The model was then used to develop a risk-score chart. A model was developed using variables for which there was a significant relationship. Variables included were systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, C-reactive protein, blood urea nitrogen, and alcohol consumption. The model performed well, and no significant differences were observed when utilized in the validation datasets. A risk score was developed, and the probability of developing MA for each score was calculated. The predictive model provides new evidence about variables related with MA and may be used by clinicians to identify at-risk patients and to tailor treatment. The risk score developed may allow clinicians to measure a patient's MA risk.

  15. A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies via Modeling of Milestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, patents, news archives, and online mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

  16. Identifying At-Risk Employees: Modeling Psychosocial Precursors of Potential Insider Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Kangas, Lars J.; Noonan, Christine F.; Dalton, Angela C.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-04

    In many insider crimes, managers and other coworkers observed that the offenders had exhibited signs of stress, disgruntlement, or other issues, but no alarms were raised. Barriers to using such psychosocial indicators include the inability to recognize the signs and the failure to record the behaviors so that they can be assessed. A psychosocial model was developed to assess an employee's behavior associated with an increased risk of insider abuse. The model is based on case studies and research literature on factors/correlates associated with precursor behavioral manifestations of individuals committing insider crimes. To test the model's agreement with human resources and management professionals, we conducted an experiment with positive results. If implemented in an operational setting, the model would be part of a set of management tools for employee assessment to identify employees who pose a greater insider threat.

  17. Expansion of the Kano model to identify relevant customer segments and functional requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Stefansson, Arnaldur Smari; Wietz, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    or a service. A current limitation of the Kano model is that it does not allow developers to visualise which combined sets of FRs would provide the highest satisfaction between different customer segments. In this paper, a stepwise method to address this particular shortcoming is presented. First......The Kano model of customer satisfaction has been widely used to analyse perceived needs of customers. The model provides product developers valuable information about if, and then how much a given functional requirement (FR) will impact customer satisfaction if implemented within a product, system...... are identified. At last, the functions of the chosen segments with the smallest interval, define the FRs appealing to the biggest target group. The proposed extension to the model should assist product developers within various fields to more effectively evaluate which FRs should be implemented when considering...

  18. Model of areas for identifying risks influencing the compliance of technological processes and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, A.; Belu, N.

    2016-08-01

    Operation of every company is associated with the risk of interfering with proper performance of its fundamental processes. This risk is associated with various internal areas of the company, as well as the environment in which it operates. From the point of view of ensuring compliance of the course of specific technological processes and, consequently, product conformity with requirements, it is important to identify these threats and eliminate or reduce the risk of their occurrence. The purpose of this article is to present a model of areas of identifying risk affecting the compliance of processes and products, which is based on multiregional targeted monitoring of typical places of interference and risk management methods. The model is based on the verification of risk analyses carried out in small and medium-sized manufacturing companies in various industries..

  19. Discussion of using artificial neural nets to identify the well-test interpretation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, K. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Chakrabarty, C. (Golder Associates, Nottingham (United Kingdom)); Wu, S. (Univ. of Melbourne (Australia))

    1994-09-01

    Use of artificial neural nets (ANN's) to identify noisy and apparently unrecognizable patterns is common for many real-world problems, ranging from applications such as speech recognition to stock market prediction. ANN approaches are often good candidates for recognizing patterns when rigid mathematical models do not exist or are insufficient to meet a full-scale identification requirement. Al-Kaabi and Lee's proposal of using ANN's to identify the well-test interpretation model is appropriate because well-test data is often highly nonlinear and noisy. The purpose of this discussion is to present some of the authors results in a similar study and to suggest a simple technique that would enhance the use of ANN's in Al-Kaabi and Lee's approach.

  20. Physical Activity Experiences of Boys with and without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, William J.; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.; Staples, Kerri; Grizenko, Natalie; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity experiences of 12 age-matched boys with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were explored by converging information from Test of Gross Motor Development-2 assessments and semistructured interviews. The knowledge-based approach and the inhibitory model of executive functions, a combined theoretical lens,…

  1. Video incident analysis of concussions in boys' high school lacrosse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Andrew E; Caswell, Shane V; Almquist, Jon L; Dunn, Reginald E; Hinton, Richard Y

    2013-04-01

    Boys' lacrosse has one of the highest rates of concussion among boys' high school sports. A thorough understanding of injury mechanisms and game situations associated with concussions in boys' high school lacrosse is necessary to target injury prevention efforts. To characterize common game-play scenarios and mechanisms of injury associated with concussions in boys' high school lacrosse using game video. Descriptive epidemiological study. In 25 public high schools of a single school system, 518 boys' lacrosse games were videotaped by trained videographers during the 2008 and 2009 seasons. Video of concussion incidents was examined to identify game characteristics and injury mechanisms using a lacrosse-specific coding instrument. A total of 34 concussions were captured on video. All concussions resulted from player-to-player bodily contact. Players were most often injured when contact was unanticipated or players were defenseless (n = 19; 56%), attempting to pick up a loose ball (n = 16; 47%), and/or ball handling (n = 14; 41%). Most frequently, the striking player's head (n = 27; 79%) was involved in the collision, and the struck player's head was the initial point of impact in 20 incidents (59%). In 68% (n = 23) of cases, a subsequent impact with the playing surface occurred immediately after the initial impact. A penalty was called in 26% (n = 9) of collisions. Player-to-player contact was the mechanism for all concussions. Most commonly, injured players were unaware of the pending contact, and the striking player used his head to initiate contact. Further investigation of preventive measures such as education of coaches and officials and enforcement of rules designed to prevent intentional head-to-head contact is warranted to reduce the incidence of concussions in boys' lacrosse.

  2. Using genetic algorithm to learn neural network identifier for modeling gyro startup drift rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Studies the modeling of gyro startup drift rate from acquired experimental gyro startup drift rate data and the nonlinear dynamic models of gyro startup drift rate related temperature established by time-delay neural network which enables the gyro temperature drift rate to be compensated in the process of startup and the gyro instant startup to be implemented. And introduces an improved genetic algorithm to learn the weights of neural network identifier to avoid stacking into the local minimal value and achieve rapid convergence.

  3. FRIGA, A New Approach To Identify Isotopes and Hypernuclei In N-Body Transport Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fèvre, A Le; Aichelin, J; Hartnack, Ch; Kireyev, V; Bratkovskaya, E

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm to identify fragments in computer simulations of relativistic heavy ion collisions. It is based on the simulated annealing technique and can be applied to n-body transport models like the Quantum Molecular Dynamics. This new approach is able to predict isotope yields as well as hyper-nucleus production. In order to illustrate its predicting power, we confront this new method to experimental data, and show the sensitivity on the parameters which govern the cluster formation.

  4. GIS model for identifying urban areas vulnerable to noise pollution: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilaşco, Ştefan; Govor, Corina; Roşca, Sanda; Vescan, Iuliu; Filip, Sorin; Fodorean, Ioan

    2017-04-01

    The unprecedented expansion of the national car ownership over the last few years has been determined by economic growth and the need for the population and economic agents to reduce travel time in progressively expanding large urban centres. This has led to an increase in the level of road noise and a stronger impact on the quality of the environment. Noise pollution generated by means of transport represents one of the most important types of pollution with negative effects on a population's health in large urban areas. As a consequence, tolerable limits of sound intensity for the comfort of inhabitants have been determined worldwide and the generation of sound maps has been made compulsory in order to identify the vulnerable zones and to make recommendations how to decrease the negative impact on humans. In this context, the present study aims at presenting a GIS spatial analysis model-based methodology for identifying and mapping zones vulnerable to noise pollution. The developed GIS model is based on the analysis of all the components influencing sound propagation, represented as vector databases (points of sound intensity measurements, buildings, lands use, transport infrastructure), raster databases (DEM), and numerical databases (wind direction and speed, sound intensity). Secondly, the hourly changes (for representative hours) were analysed to identify the hotspots characterised by major traffic flows specific to rush hours. The validated results of the model are represented by GIS databases and useful maps for the local public administration to use as a source of information and in the process of making decisions.

  5. A computational technique to identify the optimal stiffness matrix for a discrete nuclear fuel assembly model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Nam-Gyu, E-mail: nkpark@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Joo, E-mail: kyoungjoo@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Hong, E-mail: kyounghong@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung-Min, E-mail: jmsuh@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► An identification method of the optimal stiffness matrix for a fuel assembly structure is discussed. ► The least squares optimization method is introduced, and a closed form solution of the problem is derived. ► The method can be expanded to the system with the limited number of modes. ► Identification error due to the perturbed mode shape matrix is analyzed. ► Verification examples show that the proposed procedure leads to a reliable solution. -- Abstract: A reactor core structural model which is used to evaluate the structural integrity of the core contains nuclear fuel assembly models. Since the reactor core consists of many nuclear fuel assemblies, the use of a refined fuel assembly model leads to a considerable amount of computing time for performing nonlinear analyses such as the prediction of seismic induced vibration behaviors. The computational time could be reduced by replacing the detailed fuel assembly model with a simplified model that has fewer degrees of freedom, but the dynamic characteristics of the detailed model must be maintained in the simplified model. Such a model based on an optimal design method is proposed in this paper. That is, when a mass matrix and a mode shape matrix are given, the optimal stiffness matrix of a discrete fuel assembly model can be estimated by applying the least squares minimization method. The verification of the method is completed by comparing test results and simulation results. This paper shows that the simplified model's dynamic behaviors are quite similar to experimental results and that the suggested method is suitable for identifying reliable mathematical model for fuel assemblies.

  6. Adolescent Boys and Body Image: Weight and Muscularity Concerns as Dual Pathways to Body Dissatisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Diane Carlson; Crawford, Joy K.

    2005-01-01

    This research evaluated a dual pathway model for body dissatisfaction among adolescent boys. The study provides empirical support for the importance of distinguishing between weight and muscularity concerns in understanding male body image. A total of 128 boys from grades 8 and 11 completed a self-report questionnaire. Results indicated that…

  7. Parent-Child Relationships of Boys in Different Offending Trajectories: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Loes; Loeber, Rolf; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study tested the theoretical assumption that transformations of parent-child relationships in late childhood and adolescence would differ for boys following different offending trajectories. Methods: Using longitudinal multiinformant data of 503 boys (ages 7-19), we conducted Growth Mixture Modeling to extract offending…

  8. 'Boys don't dance, do they?'

    OpenAIRE

    Holdsworth, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the Warwick Arts Centre launched the ‘Boys Dancing’ project through the formation of the West Midlands Boys Dance Alliance. Aimed exclusively at boys and young men, the project has offered a range of performance-making opportunities with male professionals including Liam Steel (DV8, Stan Won't Dance) and David McKenna (Beingfrank Physical Theatre), with a view to challenge the perception that dance is primarily an activity pursued by girls and young women. The project involves boys o...

  9. An algorithmic calibration approach to identify globally optimal parameters for constraining the DayCent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Rashid; Kumar, Sandeep; Luo, Yiqi; Kiely, Gerard; Asrar, Ghassem R.

    2015-02-01

    he accurate calibration of complex biogeochemical models is essential for the robust estimation of soil greenhouse gases (GHG) as well as other environmental conditions and parameters that are used in research and policy decisions. DayCent is a popular biogeochemical model used both nationally and internationally for this purpose. Despite DayCent’s popularity, its complex parameter estimation is often based on experts’ knowledge which is somewhat subjective. In this study we used the inverse modelling parameter estimation software (PEST), to calibrate the DayCent model based on sensitivity and identifi- ability analysis. Using previously published N2 O and crop yield data as a basis of our calibration approach, we found that half of the 140 parameters used in this study were the primary drivers of calibration dif- ferences (i.e. the most sensitive) and the remaining parameters could not be identified given the data set and parameter ranges we used in this study. The post calibration results showed improvement over the pre-calibration parameter set based on, a decrease in residual differences 79% for N2O fluxes and 84% for crop yield, and an increase in coefficient of determination 63% for N2O fluxes and 72% for corn yield. The results of our study suggest that future studies need to better characterize germination tem- perature, number of degree-days and temperature dependency of plant growth; these processes were highly sensitive and could not be adequately constrained by the data used in our study. Furthermore, the sensitivity and identifiability analysis was helpful in providing deeper insight for important processes and associated parameters that can lead to further improvement in calibration of DayCent model.

  10. Markov Mixed Effects Modeling Using Electronic Adherence Monitoring Records Identifies Influential Covariates to HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrasi, Kumpal; Chaturvedula, Ayyappa; Haberer, Jessica E; Sale, Mark; Fossler, Michael J; Bangsberg, David; Baeten, Jared M; Celum, Connie; Hendrix, Craig W

    2016-12-06

    Adherence is a major factor in the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. Modeling patterns of adherence helps to identify influential covariates of different types of adherence as well as to enable clinical trial simulation so that appropriate interventions can be developed. We developed a Markov mixed-effects model to understand the covariates influencing adherence patterns to daily oral PrEP. Electronic adherence records (date and time of medication bottle cap opening) from the Partners PrEP ancillary adherence study with a total of 1147 subjects were used. This study included once-daily dosing regimens of placebo, oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), and TDF in combination with emtricitabine (FTC), administered to HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples. One-coin and first- to third-order Markov models were fit to the data using NONMEM(®) 7.2. Model selection criteria included objective function value (OFV), Akaike information criterion (AIC), visual predictive checks, and posterior predictive checks. Covariates were included based on forward addition (α = 0.05) and backward elimination (α = 0.001). Markov models better described the data than 1-coin models. A third-order Markov model gave the lowest OFV and AIC, but the simpler first-order model was used for covariate model building because no additional benefit on prediction of target measures was observed for higher-order models. Female sex and older age had a positive impact on adherence, whereas Sundays, sexual abstinence, and sex with a partner other than the study partner had a negative impact on adherence. Our findings suggest adherence interventions should consider the role of these factors.

  11. Framing black boys: parent, teacher, and student narratives of the academic lives of black boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Stephanie J; Ross, Latisha; Lozada, Fantasy T; Williams, Amber; Gale, Adrian; Kurtz-Costes, Beth

    2014-01-01

    The discourse on Black boys tends to suggest that Black boys are in complete peril. We begin with evidence that Black boys are excelling in certain contexts (i.e., in certain states, in certain schools, and in certain courses). We then discuss the ways in which the narratives used by parents, teachers, and Black boys themselves may serve to further reinforce views that Black boys are beyond hope. Research on Black parents suggests that they tend to view their sons as vulnerable and have lower expectations for sons than for daughters. Studies of teachers show that they tend to view Black boys as unteachable, as social problems, and as scary. Research on Black boys shows that they are sometimes complicit in supporting these narratives by engaging in negative or ste reotypical behavior. We also include recent research that includes counter-narratives of Black boys. We end with suggestions for future research.

  12. Computational modeling identifies key gene regulatory interactions underlying phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Unterberger, Elif B.; Goodman, Jay I.; Schwarz, Michael; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory interactions underlying the early stages of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we have identified key candidate regulators of phenobarbital (PB)-mediated mouse liver tumorigenesis, a well-characterized model of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis, by applying a new computational modeling approach to a comprehensive collection of in vivo gene expression studies. We have combined our previously developed motif activity response analysis (MARA), which models gene expression patterns in terms of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites with singular value decomposition (SVD) of the inferred motif activities, to disentangle the roles that different transcriptional regulators play in specific biological pathways of tumor promotion. Furthermore, transgenic mouse models enabled us to identify which of these regulatory activities was downstream of constitutive androstane receptor and β-catenin signaling, both crucial components of PB-mediated liver tumorigenesis. We propose novel roles for E2F and ZFP161 in PB-mediated hepatocyte proliferation and suggest that PB-mediated suppression of ESR1 activity contributes to the development of a tumor-prone environment. Our study shows that combining MARA with SVD allows for automated identification of independent transcription regulatory programs within a complex in vivo tissue environment and provides novel mechanistic insights into PB-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24464994

  13. Impact of Hybrid Intelligent Computing in Identifying Constructive Weather Parameters for Modeling Effective Rainfall Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sudha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncertain atmosphere is a prevalent factor affecting the existing prediction approaches. Rough set and fuzzy set theories as proposed by Pawlak and Zadeh have become an effective tool for handling vagueness and fuzziness in the real world scenarios. This research work describes the impact of Hybrid Intelligent System (HIS for strategic decision support in meteorology. In this research a novel exhaustive search based Rough set reduct Selection using Genetic Algorithm (RSGA is introduced to identify the significant input feature subset. The proposed model could identify the most effective weather parameters efficiently than other existing input techniques. In the model evaluation phase two adaptive techniques were constructed and investigated. The proposed Artificial Neural Network based on Back Propagation learning (ANN-BP and Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS was compared with existing Fuzzy Unordered Rule Induction Algorithm (FURIA, Structural Learning Algorithm on Vague Environment (SLAVE and Particle Swarm OPtimization (PSO. The proposed rainfall prediction models outperformed when trained with the input generated using RSGA. A meticulous comparison of the performance indicates ANN-BP model as a suitable HIS for effective rainfall prediction. The ANN-BP achieved 97.46% accuracy with a nominal misclassification rate of 0.0254 %.

  14. Identifying Multiple Levels of Discussion-Based Teaching Strategies for Constructing Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Grant; Clement, John

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to identify specific types of discussion-based strategies that two successful high school physics teachers using a model-based approach utilized in attempting to foster students' construction of explanatory models for scientific concepts. We found evidence that, in addition to previously documented dialogical strategies that teachers utilize to engage students in effectively communicating their scientific ideas in class, there is a second level of more cognitively focused model-construction-supporting strategies that these teachers utilized in attempting to foster students' learning. A further distinction between macro and micro strategy levels within the set of cognitive strategies is proposed. The relationships between the resulting three levels of strategies are portrayed in a diagramming system that tracks discussions over time. The study attempts to contribute to a clearer understanding of how discussion-leading strategies may be used to scaffold the development of conceptual understanding.

  15. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted...... antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors...

  16. Simple Empirical Model for Identifying Rheological Properties of Soft Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of soft biological tissue is a key issue for mechanical systems used in the healthcare field. We propose a simple empirical model using Fractional Dynamics and Exponential Nonlinearity (FDEN) to identify the rheological properties of soft biological tissue. The model is derived from detailed material measurements using samples isolated from porcine liver. We conducted dynamic viscoelastic and creep tests on liver samples using a rheometer. The experimental results indicated that biological tissue has specific properties: i) power law increases in storage elastic modulus and loss elastic modulus with the same slope; ii) power law gain decrease and constant phase delay in the frequency domain over two decades; iii) log-log scale linearity between time and strain relationships under constant force; and iv) linear and log scale linearity between strain and stress relationships. Our simple FDEN model uses only three dependent parameters and represents the specific propertie...

  17. Identifying best existing practice for characterization modeling in life cycle impact assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Goedkoop, Mark; Guinée, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is a field of active development. The last decade has seen prolific publication of new impact assessment methods covering many different impact categories and providing characterization factors that often deviate from each other for the same substance...... continents and still support aggregation of impact scores over the whole life cycle. For the impact categories human toxicity and ecotoxicity, we are now able to recommend a model, but the number of chemical substances in common use is so high that there is a need to address the substance data shortage...... was performed for the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC). Methods Existing LCIA methods were collected and their individual characterization models identified at both midpoint and endpoint levels and supplemented with other environmental models of potential use for LCIA. No new developments...

  18. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kammann, Ulrike [Thünen-Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Hudjetz, Sebastian [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Cofalla, Catrina [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Schüttrumpf, Holger [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Preuss, Thomas [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt- Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios.

  19. New drug candidates for liposomal delivery identified by computer modeling of liposomes' remote loading and leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cern, Ahuva; Marcus, David; Tropsha, Alexander; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Goldblum, Amiram

    2017-02-16

    Remote drug loading into nano-liposomes is in most cases the best method for achieving high concentrations of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) per nano-liposome that enable therapeutically viable API-loaded nano-liposomes, referred to as nano-drugs. This approach also enables controlled drug release. Recently, we constructed computational models to identify APIs that can achieve the desired high concentrations in nano-liposomes by remote loading. While those previous models included a broad spectrum of experimental conditions and dealt only with loading, here we reduced the scope to the molecular characteristics alone. We model and predict API suitability for nano-liposomal delivery by fixing the main experimental conditions: liposome lipid composition and size to be similar to those of Doxil® liposomes. On that basis, we add a prediction of drug leakage from the nano-liposomes during storage. The latter is critical for having pharmaceutically viable nano-drugs. The "load and leak" models were used to screen two large molecular databases in search of candidate APIs for delivery by nano-liposomes. The distribution of positive instances in both loading and leakage models was similar in the two databases screened. The screening process identified 667 molecules that were positives by both loading and leakage models (i.e., both high-loading and stable). Among them, 318 molecules received a high score in both properties and of these, 67 are FDA-approved drugs. This group of molecules, having diverse pharmacological activities, may be the basis for future liposomal drug development.

  20. Using growth mixture modeling to identify classes of sodium adherence in adults with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson Creber, Ruth; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Topaz, Maxim; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of fluid retention is important to reduce hospitalizations in patients with heart failure (HF). Following a low-sodium diet helps to reduce fluid retention. The primary objective of this study was to use growth mixture modeling to identify distinct classes of sodium adherence-characterized by shared growth trajectories of objectively measured dietary sodium. The secondary objective was to identify patient-level determinants of the nonadherent trajectory. This was a secondary analysis of data collected from a prospective longitudinal study of 279 community-dwelling adults with previously or currently symptomatic HF. Growth mixture modeling was used to identify distinct trajectories of change in 24-hour urinary sodium excretion measured at 3 time points over 6 months. Logistic modeling was used to predict membership in observed trajectories. The sample was predominantly male (64%), had a mean age of 62 years, was functionally compromised (59% New York Heart Association class III), and had nonischemic HF etiology. Two distinct trajectories of sodium intake were identified and labeled adherent (66%) and nonadherent (34%) to low-sodium diet recommendations. Three predictors of the nonadherent trajectory were identified, confirming our previous mixed-effect analysis. Compared with being normal weight (body mass index obese was associated with a 4-fold incremental increase in the likelihood of being in the nonadherent trajectory (odds ratio [OR], 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-12.91; P < .002). Being younger than 65 years (OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.04-20.81; P = .044) or having diabetes (OR, 4.15; 95% CI, 1.29-13.40; P = .016) were both associated with more than 4 times the odds of being in the nonadherent urine sodium trajectory compared with being older than 65 years or not having diabetes, respectively. Two distinct trajectories of sodium intake were identified in patients with HF. The nonadherent trajectory was characterized by an elevated pattern

  1. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Identifying the origin of waterbird carcasses in Lake Michigan using a neural network source tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Ge, Zhongfu; Fara, Luke J.; Houdek, Steven C.; Lubinski, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Avian botulism type E is responsible for extensive waterbird mortality on the Great Lakes, yet the actual site of toxin exposure remains unclear. Beached carcasses are often used to describe the spatial aspects of botulism mortality outbreaks, but lack specificity of offshore toxin source locations. We detail methodology for developing a neural network model used for predicting waterbird carcass motions in response to wind, wave, and current forcing, in lieu of a complex analytical relationship. This empirically trained model uses current velocity, wind velocity, significant wave height, and wave peak period in Lake Michigan simulated by the Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting System. A detailed procedure is further developed to use the model for back-tracing waterbird carcasses found on beaches in various parts of Lake Michigan, which was validated using drift data for radiomarked common loon (Gavia immer) carcasses deployed at a variety of locations in northern Lake Michigan during September and October of 2013. The back-tracing model was further used on 22 non-radiomarked common loon carcasses found along the shoreline of northern Lake Michigan in October and November of 2012. The model-estimated origins of those cases pointed to some common source locations offshore that coincide with concentrations of common loons observed during aerial surveys. The neural network source tracking model provides a promising approach for identifying locations of botulinum neurotoxin type E intoxication and, in turn, contributes to developing an understanding of the dynamics of toxin production and possible trophic transfer pathways.

  3. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  4. Modeling strategy to identify patients with primary immunodeficiency utilizing risk management and outcome measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Vicki; Quinn, Jessica; Ginsberg, Grant; Gladue, Ron; Orange, Jordan; Modell, Fred

    2017-06-01

    This study seeks to generate analytic insights into risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. The Jeffrey Modell Centers Network database, Jeffrey Modell Foundation's 10 Warning Signs, the 4 Stages of Testing Algorithm, physician-reported clinical outcomes, programs of physician education and public awareness, the SPIRIT® Analyzer, and newborn screening, taken together, generates P values of less than 0.05%. This indicates that the data results do not occur by chance, and that there is a better than 95% probability that the data are valid. The objectives are to improve patients' quality of life, while generating significant reduction of costs. The advances of the world's experts aligned with these JMF programs can generate analytic insights as to risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. This strategy reduces the uncertainties related to primary immunodeficiency risks, as we can screen, test, identify, and treat undiagnosed patients. We can also address regional differences and prevalence, age, gender, treatment modalities, and sites of care, as well as economic benefits. These tools support high net benefits, substantial financial savings, and significant reduction of costs. All stakeholders, including patients, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, third party payers, and government healthcare agencies, must address the earliest possible precise diagnosis, appropriate intervention and treatment, as well as stringent control of healthcare costs through risk assessment and outcome measurement. An affected patient is entitled to nothing less, and stakeholders are responsible to utilize tools currently available. Implementation offers a significant challenge to the entire primary immunodeficiency community.

  5. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, A. A.; Dickey, D.; Seracino, R.; Rizkalla, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study for identifying damage locations in an idealized steel bridge girder using the ambient vibration measurements. A sensitive damage feature is proposed in the context of statistical pattern recognition to address the damage detection problem. The study utilizes an experimental program that consists of a two-span continuous steel beam subjected to ambient vibrations. The vibration responses of the beam are measured along its length under simulated ambient vibrations and different healthy/damage conditions of the beam. The ambient vibration is simulated using a hydraulic actuator, and damages are induced by cutting portions of the flange at two locations. Multivariate vector autoregressive models were fitted to the vibration response time histories measured at the multiple sensor locations. A sensitive damage feature is proposed for identifying the damage location by applying Mahalanobis distances to the coefficients of the vector autoregressive models. A linear discriminant criterion was used to evaluate the amount of variations in the damage features obtained for different sensor locations with respect to the healthy condition of the beam. The analyses indicate that the highest variations in the damage features were coincident with the sensors closely located to the damages. The presented method showed a promising sensitivity to identify the damage location even when the induced damage was very small.

  6. Growing Boys: Implementing a Boys' Empowerment Group in an Afterschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Georgia; Charmaraman, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The process of establishing a healthy male identity can be difficult for many boys. The limited definitions of masculinity available to boys and men are generally characterized by competition, repression of fear and emotion, and physical and emotional strength. Boys of color and those of lower economic status tend to encounter even fewer healthy…

  7. To Be a Boy, To Be a Reader: Engaging Teen and Preteen Boys in Active Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozo, William G.

    When it comes to reading, teen and preteen boys are the most difficult students. This book addresses the growing concern among middle and high school teachers about boys' lack of literacy growth and independent reading. The book makes the case that boys are in the greatest need of help with literacy instruction and stresses the importance of…

  8. Using Stochastic modelling to identify unusual continuous glucose monitor measurements and behaviour, in newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signal Matthew

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal blood glucose (BG concentrations have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in both critically ill adults and infants. Furthermore, hypoglycaemia and glycaemic variability have both been independently linked to mortality in these patients. Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM devices have the potential to improve detection and diagnosis of these glycaemic abnormalities. However, sensor noise is a trade-off of the high measurement rate and must be managed effectively if CGMs are going to be used to monitor, diagnose and potentially help treat glycaemic abnormalities. Aim To develop a tool that will aid clinicians in identifying unusual CGM behaviour and highlight CGM data that potentially need to be interpreted with care. Methods CGM data and BG measurements from 50 infants at risk of hypoglycaemia were used. Unusual CGM measurements were classified using a stochastic model based on the kernel density method and historical CGM measurements from the cohort. CGM traces were colour coded with very unusual measurements coloured red, highlighting areas to be interpreted with care. A 5-fold validation of the model was Monte Carlo simulated 25 times to ensure an adequate model fit. Results The stochastic model was generated using ~67,000 CGM measurements, spread across the glycaemic range ~2-10 mmol/L. A 5-fold validation showed a good model fit: the model 80% confidence interval (CI captured 83% of clinical CGM data, the model 90% CI captured 91% of clinical CGM data, and the model 99% CI captured 99% of clinical CGM data. Three patient examples show the stochastic classification method in use with 1 A stable, low variability patient which shows no unusual CGM measurements, 2 A patient with a very sudden, short hypoglycaemic event (classified as unusual, and, 3 A patient with very high, potentially un-physiological, glycaemic variability after day 3 of monitoring (classified as very unusual. Conclusions

  9. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in quark combination model

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical fluctuation and correlation of multiplicity distributions of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of the bulk quark system are systematically studied in quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of quark combination which are necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distribution of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting findings, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coincide flavor dependent two-baryon correlation and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization to study their influence on multiple production of baryons and ant...

  10. Three-stage Method for Identifying the Dynamic Model Parameters of Stranded Wire Helical Springs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yu; WANG Shilong; ZHOU Jie; LI Chuan; SUN Shouli

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of the stranded wire helical spring is described by a modified Bouc-Wen model while the model parameters must be identified using an identification method and experimental data. Existing identification methods usually relies either solely nonlinear iterative algorithms or manually trial and error. Therefore, the identification process can be rather time consuming and effort taking. As a result, these methods are not ideal for engineering applications. To come up with a more practical method, a three-stage identification method is proposed. Periodic loading and identification simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Noises are added to the simulated data to test the performance of the proposed method when dealing with noise contaminated data. The simulation results indicate that the proposed method is able to give satisfying results when the noise levels are set to be 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07. In addition, the proposed method is also applied to experimental data and compared with an existing method. The experimental data is acquired through a periodic loading test. The experiment results suggest that the proposed method features better accuracy compared with the existing method. An effective approach is proposed for identifying the model parameters of the stranded wire helical spring.

  11. An Allometric Modelling Approach to Identify the Optimal Body Shape Associated with, and Differences between Brazilian and Peruvian Youth Motor Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonete Silva

    Full Text Available Children from developed and developing countries differ in their body size and shape due to marked differences across their life history caused by social, economic and cultural differences which are also linked to their motor performance (MP. We used allometric models to identify size/shape characteristics associated with MP tests between Brazilian and Peruvian schoolchildren. A total of 4,560 subjects, 2,385 girls and 2,175 boys aged 9-15 years were studied. Height and weight were measured; biological maturation was estimated with the maturity offset technique; MP measures included the 12 minute run (12MR, handgrip strength (HG, standing long jump (SLJ and the shuttle run speed (SR tests; physical activity (PA was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. A multiplicative allometric model was adopted to adjust for body size differences across countries. Reciprocal ponderal index (RPI was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with the 12MR, SLJ, HG and SR performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with a better performance in SLJ, HG and SR tests. Sex differences were found in all motor tests. Brazilian youth showed better scores in MP than their Peruvian peers, even when controlling for their body size differences The current study identified the key body size associated with four body mass-dependent MP tests. Biological maturation and PA were associated with strength and motor performance. Sex differences were found in all motor tests, as well as across countries favoring Brazilian children even when accounting for their body size/shape differences.

  12. Teaching to the Minds of Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kelley; Gurian, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Using brain-based research, Douglass Elementary School in Boulder, Colorado, looked at the natural assets that both girls and boys bring to school and realized that its classrooms were generally a better fit for the verbal-emotive, sit-still, take-notes, listen-carefully, multitasking girl. Teachers tended to see the natural assets that boys bring…

  13. Are boys discriminated in Swedish high schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnerich, Bjørn Tyrefors; Höglin, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Girls typically have higher grades than boys in school and recent research suggests that part of this gender difference may be due to discrimination of boys in grading.Werigorously test this in a field experiment where a random sample of the same tests in the Swedish language is subject to blind...

  14. A Critical Evaluation of "Raising Boys' Attainment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Girls are outperforming boys in public examinations. However, this does not apply to "all boys" and "all girls", nor is it true of every subject. This paper questions the claims made based upon the statistical evidence and goes on to look at social, individual and school factors that may contribute to observed gender differences in school…

  15. hy More Boys Than Girls in China?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGZHENZHEN

    2005-01-01

    China's current total fertility rate of 1.8 is not particularly high. What's more, there is an imbalance in its ratio of infant boys to girls. Under the Chinese birth control policy, each couple is allowed one child, and most traditionally minded couples prefer boys to girls.According to the Fifth National Census,

  16. A boy with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, A.; Vissers, M.N.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a 9-year-old Iranian boy with tuberous xanthomas, elevated LDL-cholesterol levels of 15.5 mmol/l, and vague complaints of chest pain while playing soccer. The consanguineous parents of the boy had normal cholesterol concentrations, which indicated an autosomal recessive disorder rather

  17. Role Calls for Boys & Girls Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Allesandro, Lou

    2013-01-01

    The New Hampshire Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs has come a long way since the inception of the state's first Club in Manchester more than 100 years ago. The goal of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America is to provide youth with programs and services that allow them to realize their full potential as productive members of society. State and…

  18. Identifying areas of deforestation risk for REDD+ using a species modeling tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Amuchastegui, Naikoa; Riveros, Juan Carlos; Forrest, Jessica L

    2014-01-01

    To implement the REDD+ mechanism (Reducing Emissions for Deforestation and Forest Degradation, countries need to prioritize areas to combat future deforestation CO2 emissions, identify the drivers of deforestation around which to develop mitigation actions, and quantify and value carbon for financial mechanisms. Each comes with its own methodological challenges, and existing approaches and tools to do so can be costly to implement or require considerable technical knowledge and skill. Here, we present an approach utilizing a machine learning technique known as Maximum Entropy Modeling (Maxent) to identify areas at high deforestation risk in the study area in Madre de Dios, Peru under a business-as-usual scenario in which historic deforestation rates continue. We link deforestation risk area to carbon density values to estimate future carbon emissions. We quantified area deforested and carbon emissions between 2000 and 2009 as the basis of the scenario. We observed over 80,000 ha of forest cover lost from 2000-2009 (0.21% annual loss), representing over 39 million Mg CO2. The rate increased rapidly following the enhancement of the Inter Oceanic Highway in 2005. Accessibility and distance to previous deforestation were strong predictors of deforestation risk, while land use designation was less important. The model performed consistently well (AUC > 0.9), significantly better than random when we compared predicted deforestation risk to observed. If past deforestation rates continue, we estimate that 132,865 ha of forest could be lost by the year 2020, representing over 55 million Mg CO2. Maxent provided a reliable method for identifying areas at high risk of deforestation and the major explanatory variables that could draw attention for mitigation action planning under REDD+. The tool is accessible, replicable and easy to use; all necessary for producing good risk estimates and adapt models after potential landscape change. We propose this approach for developing

  19. A stochastic model for identifying differential gene pair co-expression patterns in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Yu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of gene differential co-expression patterns between cancer stages is a newly developing method to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Most researches of this subject lack an algorithm useful for performing a statistical significance assessment involving cancer progression. Lacking this specific algorithm is apparently absent in identifying precise gene pairs correlating to cancer progression. Results In this investigation we studied gene pair co-expression change by using a stochastic process model for approximating the underlying dynamic procedure of the co-expression change during cancer progression. Also, we presented a novel analytical method named 'Stochastic process model for Identifying differentially co-expressed Gene pair' (SIG method. This method has been applied to two well known prostate cancer data sets: hormone sensitive versus hormone resistant, and healthy versus cancerous. From these data sets, 428,582 gene pairs and 303,992 gene pairs were identified respectively. Afterwards, we used two different current statistical methods to the same data sets, which were developed to identify gene pair differential co-expression and did not consider cancer progression in algorithm. We then compared these results from three different perspectives: progression analysis, gene pair identification effectiveness analysis, and pathway enrichment analysis. Statistical methods were used to quantify the quality and performance of these different perspectives. They included: Re-identification Scale (RS and Progression Score (PS in progression analysis, True Positive Rate (TPR in gene pair analysis, and Pathway Enrichment Score (PES in pathway analysis. Our results show small values of RS and large values of PS, TPR, and PES; thus, suggesting that gene pairs identified by the SIG method are highly correlated with cancer progression, and highly enriched in disease-specific pathways. From

  20. Identifiability and Problems of Model Selection for Time-Series Analysis in Econometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    feedback", in Proc. 1971 NRL-.IS Con- ference on Ordinary Differential Equations , edited by L. Weiss, Acalumic Press, pazes 459-471. REKA Dr Pai-,e...abstract sense. The difficulty is nonuniqueness , not identifiability. Third, there is the question of parametrization of models. In econo- metrics...with the equation (a) + -1, O, i, where u i t is a linear stochastic process whose values ( h ) " f K c t _ Tr=O ’t - are generated with the aid of

  1. Proteomic profiling identifies breast tumor metastasis-associated factors in an isogenic model

    OpenAIRE

    KREUNIN, PAWEENA; YOO, CHUL; Urquidi, Virginia; Lubman, David M.; Goodison, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A combination of LC and MS was applied to an isogenic breast tumor metastasis model to identify proteins associated with a cellular phenotype. Chromatofocusing followed by nonporous-RP-HPLC/ESI-TOF MS was applied to cell lysates of a pair of monoclonal cell lines from the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435 that have different metastatic phenotypes in immune-compromised mice. This method was developed to separate proteins based on pI and hydrophobicity. The high resolution and mass ac...

  2. Application of the transtheoretical model to identify aspects influencing condom use among Korean college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Mi; Yeun, Eun Ja; Kim, Hee Young; Youn, Mi Sun; Cho, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hee Joo

    2008-12-01

    Increasing condom use requires an understanding of the influencing factors. Previous research has used psychosocial theories such as the social cognitive theory and health belief to explain AIDS risk factors and condom use. However, it is still difficult to effectively predict the multidimensional factors associated with condom use. The present study utilizes the transtheoretical model to investigate condom use among college students by examining stages of change for condom use and measuring decisional balance and self-efficacy for each stage. The aim was to identify the variables affecting condom use so as to provide scientific data that would aid the development of effective strategies for increasing condom use.

  3. Prediction equation for lower limbs lean soft tissue in circumpubertal boys using anthropometry and biological maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Valente-dos-Santos

    Full Text Available Lean soft tissue (LST, a surrogate of skeletal muscle mass, is largely limited to appendicular body regions. Simple and accurate methods to estimate lower limbs LST are often used in attempts to partition out the influence of body size on performance outputs. The aim of the current study was to develop and cross-validate a new model to predict lower limbs LST in boys aged 10-13 years, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA as the reference method. Total body and segmental (lower limbs composition were assessed with a Hologic Explorer-W QDR DXA scanner in a cross-sectional sample of 75 Portuguese boys (144.8±6.4 cm; 40.2±9.0 kg. Skinfolds were measured at the anterior and posterior mid-thigh, and medial calf. Circumferences were measured at the proximal, mid and distal thigh. Leg length was estimated as stature minus sitting height. Current stature expressed as a percentage of attained predicted mature stature (PMS was used as an estimate of biological maturity status. Backward proportional allometric models were used to identify the model with the best statistical fit: ln (lower limbs LST  = 0.838× ln (body mass +0.476× ln (leg length - 0.135× ln (mid-thigh circumference - 0.053× ln (anterior mid-thigh skinfold - 0.098× ln (medial calf skinfold - 2.680+0.010× (percentage of attained PMS (R = 0.95. The obtained equation was cross-validated using the predicted residuals sum of squares statistics (PRESS method (R2PRESS = 0.90. Deming repression analysis between predicted and current lower limbs LST showed a standard error of estimation of 0.52 kg (95% limits of agreement: 0.77 to -1.27 kg. The new model accurately predicts lower limbs LST in circumpubertal boys.

  4. Revised North Star Ambulatory Assessment for Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Coratti, Giorgia; Messina, Sonia; Ricotti, Valeria; Baranello, Giovanni; D'Amico, Adele; Pera, Maria Carmela; Albamonte, Emilio; Sivo, Serena; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Fanelli, Lavinia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Romeo, Domenico M; Vita, Gian Luca; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Pane, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The advent of therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has highlighted the need to identify reliable outcome measures for young boys with DMD. The aim of this study was to develop a revised version of the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) suitable for boys between the age of 3 and 5 years by identifying age appropriate items and revising the scoring system accordingly. Using the scale in 171 controls between the age of 2.9 and 4.8 years, we identified items that were appropriate at different age points. An item was defined as age appropriate if it was completed, achieving a full score, by at least 85% of the typically developing boys at that age. At 3 years (±3months) there were only 8 items that were age appropriate, at 3 years and 6 months there were 13 items while by the age of 4 years all 17 items were appropriate. A revised version of the scale was developed with items ordered according to the age when they could be reliably performed. The application of the revised version of the scale to data collected in young DMD boys showed that very few of the DMD boys were able to complete with a full score all the age appropriate items. In conclusion, our study suggests that a revised version of the NSAA can be used in boys from the age of 3 years to obtain information on how young DMD boys acquire new abilities and how this correlates with their peers.

  5. Probing the dynamics of identified neurons with a data-driven modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nowotny

    Full Text Available In controlling animal behavior the nervous system has to perform within the operational limits set by the requirements of each specific behavior. The implications for the corresponding range of suitable network, single neuron, and ion channel properties have remained elusive. In this article we approach the question of how well-constrained properties of neuronal systems may be on the neuronal level. We used large data sets of the activity of isolated invertebrate identified cells and built an accurate conductance-based model for this cell type using customized automated parameter estimation techniques. By direct inspection of the data we found that the variability of the neurons is larger when they are isolated from the circuit than when in the intact system. Furthermore, the responses of the neurons to perturbations appear to be more consistent than their autonomous behavior under stationary conditions. In the developed model, the constraints on different parameters that enforce appropriate model dynamics vary widely from some very tightly controlled parameters to others that are almost arbitrary. The model also allows predictions for the effect of blocking selected ionic currents and to prove that the origin of irregular dynamics in the neuron model is proper chaoticity and that this chaoticity is typical in an appropriate sense. Our results indicate that data driven models are useful tools for the in-depth analysis of neuronal dynamics. The better consistency of responses to perturbations, in the real neurons as well as in the model, suggests a paradigm shift away from measuring autonomous dynamics alone towards protocols of controlled perturbations. Our predictions for the impact of channel blockers on the neuronal dynamics and the proof of chaoticity underscore the wide scope of our approach.

  6. Integrative strategies to identify candidate genes in rodent models of human alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    The search for genes underlying alcohol-related behaviours in rodent models of human alcoholism has been ongoing for many years with only limited success. Recently, new strategies that integrate several of the traditional approaches have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol's actions in the brain. We have used alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and alcohol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) genetic strains of mice in an integrative strategy combining high-throughput gene expression screening, genetic segregation analysis, and mapping to previously published quantitative trait loci to uncover candidate genes for the ethanol-preference phenotype. In our study, 2 genes, retinaldehyde binding protein 1 (Rlbp1) and syntaxin 12 (Stx12), were found to be strong candidates for ethanol preference. Such experimental approaches have the power and the potential to greatly speed up the laborious process of identifying candidate genes for the animal models of human alcoholism.

  7. Boolean modeling identifies Greatwall/MASTL as an important regulator in the AURKA network of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlhaus, Meike; Burkovski, Andre; Hertwig, Falk; Mussel, Christoph; Volland, Ruth; Fischer, Matthias; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kestler, Hans A; Beltinger, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) is often overexpressed in neuroblastoma (NB) with poor outcome. The causes of AURKA overexpression in NB are unknown. Here, we describe a gene regulatory network consisting of core regulators of AURKA protein expression and activation during mitosis to identify potential causes. This network was transformed to a dynamic Boolean model. Simulated activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Greatwall (GWL, encoded by MASTL) that attenuates the pivotal AURKA inhibitor PP2A, predicted stabilization of AURKA. Consistent with this notion, gene set enrichment analysis showed enrichment of mitotic spindle assembly genes and MYCN target genes in NB with high GWL/MASTL expression. In line with the prediction of GWL/MASTL enhancing AURKA, elevated expression of GWL/MASTL was associated with NB risk factors and poor survival of patients. These results establish Boolean network modeling of oncogenic pathways in NB as a useful means for guided discovery in this enigmatic cancer.

  8. A model to identify urban traffic congestion hotspots in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of population in urban areas is jeopardizing the mobility and air quality worldwide. One of the most notable problems arising is that of traffic congestion. With the advent of technologies able to sense real-time data about cities, and its public distribution for analysis, we are in place to forecast scenarios valuable for improvement and control. Here, we propose an idealized model, based on the critical phenomena arising in complex networks, that allows to analytically predict congestion hotspots in urban environments. Results on real cities' road networks, considering, in some experiments, real-traffic data, show that the proposed model is capable of identifying susceptible junctions that might becomes hotspots if mobility demand increases.

  9. Identifying common components across biological network graphs using a bipartite data model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ej; Culpepper, C; Philips, C; Bubier, J; Langston, M; Chesler, Ej

    2014-01-01

    The GeneWeaver bipartite data model provides an efficient means to evaluate shared molecular components from sets derived across diverse species, disease states and biological processes. In order to adapt this model for examining related molecular components and biological networks, such as pathway or gene network data, we have developed a means to leverage the bipartite data structure to extract and analyze shared edges. Using the Pathway Commons database we demonstrate the ability to rapidly identify shared connected components among a diverse set of pathways. In addition, we illustrate how results from maximal bipartite discovery can be decomposed into hierarchical relationships, allowing shared pathway components to be mapped through various parent-child relationships to help visualization and discovery of emergent kernel driven relationships. Interrogating common relationships among biological networks and conventional GeneWeaver gene lists will increase functional specificity and reliability of the shared biological components. This approach enables self-organization of biological processes through shared biological networks.

  10. A model to identify urban traffic congestion hotspots in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-10-01

    The rapid growth of population in urban areas is jeopardizing the mobility and air quality worldwide. One of the most notable problems arising is that of traffic congestion. With the advent of technologies able to sense real-time data about cities, and its public distribution for analysis, we are in place to forecast scenarios valuable for improvement and control. Here, we propose an idealized model, based on the critical phenomena arising in complex networks, that allows to analytically predict congestion hotspots in urban environments. Results on real cities' road networks, considering, in some experiments, real traffic data, show that the proposed model is capable of identifying susceptible junctions that might become hotspots if mobility demand increases.

  11. A Simple Model to Identify Risk of Sarcopenia and Physical Disability in HIV-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinatti, Paulo; Paes, Lorena; Harris, Elizabeth A; Lopes, Gabriella O; Borges, Juliana P

    2017-09-01

    Farinatti, P, Paes, L, Harris, EA, Lopes, GO, and Borges, JP. A simple model to identify risk of sarcopenia and physical disability in HIV-infected patients. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2542-2551, 2017-Early detection of sarcopenia might help preventing muscle loss and disability in HIV-infected patients. This study proposed a model for estimating appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) to calculate indices to identify "sarcopenia" (SA) and "risk for disability due to sarcopenia" (RSA) in patients with HIV. An equation to estimate ASM was developed in 56 patients (47.2 ± 6.9 years), with a cross-validation sample of 24 patients (48.1 ± 6.6 years). The model validity was determined by calculating, in both samples: (a) Concordance between actual vs. estimated ASM; (b) Correlations between actual/estimated ASM vs. peak torque (PT) and total work (TW) during isokinetic knee extension/flexion; (c) Agreement of patients classified with SA and RSA. The predictive equation was ASM (kg) = 7.77 (sex; F = 0/M = 1) + 0.26 (arm circumference; cm) + 0.38 (thigh circumference; cm) + 0.03 (Body Mass Index; kg·m) - 8.94 (R = 0.74; Radj = 0.72; SEE = 3.13 kg). Agreement between actual vs. estimated ASM was confirmed in validation (t = 0.081/p = 0.94; R = 0.86/p < 0.0001) and cross-validation (t = 0.12/p = 0.92; R = 0.87/p < 0.0001) samples. Regression characteristics in cross-validation sample (Radj = 0.80; SEE = 3.65) and PRESS (RPRESS = 0.69; SEEPRESS = 3.35) were compatible with the original model. Percent agreements for the classification of SA and RSA from indices calculated using actual and estimated ASM were of 87.5% and 77.2% (gamma correlations 0.72-1.0; p < 0.04) in validation, and 95.8% and 75.0% (gamma correlations 0.98-0.97; p < 0.001) in cross-validation sample, respectively. Correlations between actual/estimated ASM vs. PT (range 0.50-0.73, p ≤ 0.05) and TW (range 0.59-0.74, p ≤ 0.05) were similar in both samples. In conclusion, our model correctly estimated ASM

  12. DESCARTES' RULE OF SIGNS AND THE IDENTIFIABILITY OF POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC MODELS FROM GENOMIC VARIATION DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S

    2014-01-01

    The sample frequency spectrum (SFS) is a widely-used summary statistic of genomic variation in a sample of homologous DNA sequences. It provides a highly efficient dimensional reduction of large-scale population genomic data and its mathematical dependence on the underlying population demography is well understood, thus enabling the development of efficient inference algorithms. However, it has been recently shown that very different population demographies can actually generate the same SFS for arbitrarily large sample sizes. Although in principle this nonidentifiability issue poses a thorny challenge to statistical inference, the population size functions involved in the counterexamples are arguably not so biologically realistic. Here, we revisit this problem and examine the identifiability of demographic models under the restriction that the population sizes are piecewise-defined where each piece belongs to some family of biologically-motivated functions. Under this assumption, we prove that the expected SFS of a sample uniquely determines the underlying demographic model, provided that the sample is sufficiently large. We obtain a general bound on the sample size sufficient for identifiability; the bound depends on the number of pieces in the demographic model and also on the type of population size function in each piece. In the cases of piecewise-constant, piecewise-exponential and piecewise-generalized-exponential models, which are often assumed in population genomic inferences, we provide explicit formulas for the bounds as simple functions of the number of pieces. Lastly, we obtain analogous results for the "folded" SFS, which is often used when there is ambiguity as to which allelic type is ancestral. Our results are proved using a generalization of Descartes' rule of signs for polynomials to the Laplace transform of piecewise continuous functions.

  13. A model-based approach to identify binding sites in CLIP-Seq data.

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    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-Seq has made it possible to identify the targeting sites of RNA-binding proteins in various cell culture systems and tissue types on a genome-wide scale. Here we present a novel model-based approach (MiClip to identify high-confidence protein-RNA binding sites from CLIP-seq datasets. This approach assigns a probability score for each potential binding site to help prioritize subsequent validation experiments. The MiClip algorithm has been tested in both HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP datasets. In the HITS-CLIP dataset, the signal/noise ratios of miRNA seed motif enrichment produced by the MiClip approach are between 17% and 301% higher than those by the ad hoc method for the top 10 most enriched miRNAs. In the PAR-CLIP dataset, the MiClip approach can identify ∼50% more validated binding targets than the original ad hoc method and two recently published methods. To facilitate the application of the algorithm, we have released an R package, MiClip (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/MiClip/index.html, and a public web-based graphical user interface software (http://galaxy.qbrc.org/tool_runner?tool_id=mi_clip for customized analysis.

  14. Identifying hypoxia in a newborn piglet model using urinary NMR metabolomic profiling.

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    Christopher Skappak

    Full Text Available Establishing the severity of hypoxic insult during the delivery of a neonate is key step in the determining the type of therapy administered. While successful therapy is present, current methods for assessing hypoxic injuries in the neonate are limited. Urine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR metabolomics allows for the rapid non-invasive assessment of a multitude breakdown products of physiological processes. In a newborn piglet model of hypoxia, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the levels of metabolites in urine samples, which were correlated with physiological measurements. Using PLS-DA analysis, we identified 13 urinary metabolites that differentiated hypoxic versus nonhypoxic animals (1-methylnicotinamide, 2-oxoglutarate, alanine, asparagine, betaine, citrate, creatine, fumarate, hippurate, lactate, N-acetylglycine, N-carbamoyl-β-alanine, and valine. Using this metabolomic profile, we then were able to blindly identify hypoxic animals correctly 84% of the time compared to nonhypoxic controls. This was better than using physiologic measures alone. Metabolomic profiling of urine has potential for identifying neonates that have undergone episodes of hypoxia.

  15. Identifying influential nodes in dynamic social networks based on degree-corrected stochastic block model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun

    2016-05-01

    Many real-world data can be represented as dynamic networks which are the evolutionary networks with timestamps. Analyzing dynamic attributes is important to understanding the structures and functions of these complex networks. Especially, studying the influential nodes is significant to exploring and analyzing networks. In this paper, we propose a method to identify influential nodes in dynamic social networks based on identifying such nodes in the temporal communities which make up the dynamic networks. Firstly, we detect the community structures of all the snapshot networks based on the degree-corrected stochastic block model (DCBM). After getting the community structures, we capture the evolution of every community in the dynamic network by the extended Jaccard’s coefficient which is defined to map communities among all the snapshot networks. Then we obtain the initial influential nodes of the dynamic network and aggregate them based on three widely used centrality metrics. Experiments on real-world and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our method can identify influential nodes in dynamic networks accurately, at the same time, we also find some interesting phenomena and conclusions for those that have been validated in complex network or social science.

  16. C. elegans model identifies genetic modifiers of alpha-synuclein inclusion formation during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjakko J van Ham

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Inclusions in the brain containing alpha-synuclein are the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease, but how these inclusions are formed and how this links to disease is poorly understood. We have developed a C. elegans model that makes it possible to monitor, in living animals, the formation of alpha-synuclein inclusions. In worms of old age, inclusions contain aggregated alpha- synuclein, resembling a critical pathological feature. We used genome-wide RNA interference to identify processes involved in inclusion formation, and identified 80 genes that, when knocked down, resulted in a premature increase in the number of inclusions. Quality control and vesicle-trafficking genes expressed in the ER/Golgi complex and vesicular compartments were overrepresented, indicating a specific role for these processes in alpha-synuclein inclusion formation. Suppressors include aging-associated genes, such as sir-2.1/SIRT1 and lagr-1/LASS2. Altogether, our data suggest a link between alpha-synuclein inclusion formation and cellular aging, likely through an endomembrane-related mechanism. The processes and genes identified here present a framework for further study of the disease mechanism and provide candidate susceptibility genes and drug targets for Parkinson's disease and other alpha-synuclein related disorders.

  17. Identifying the decision to be supported: a review of papers from environmental modelling and software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojda, Richard S.; Chen, Serena H.; El Sawah, Sondoss; Guillaume, Joseph H.A.; Jakeman, A.J.; Lautenbach, Sven; McIntosh, Brian S.; Rizzoli, A.E.; Seppelt, Ralf; Struss, Peter; Voinov, Alexey; Volk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Two of the basic tenets of decision support system efforts are to help identify and structure the decisions to be supported, and to then provide analysis in how those decisions might be best made. One example from wetland management would be that wildlife biologists must decide when to draw down water levels to optimise aquatic invertebrates as food for breeding ducks. Once such a decision is identified, a system or tool to help them make that decision in the face of current and projected climate conditions could be developed. We examined a random sample of 100 papers published from 2001-2011 in Environmental Modelling and Software that used the phrase “decision support system” or “decision support tool”, and which are characteristic of different sectors. In our review, 41% of the systems and tools related to the water resources sector, 34% were related to agriculture, and 22% to the conservation of fish, wildlife, and protected area management. Only 60% of the papers were deemed to be reporting on DSS. This was based on the papers reviewed not having directly identified a specific decision to be supported. We also report on the techniques that were used to identify the decisions, such as formal survey, focus group, expert opinion, or sole judgment of the author(s). The primary underlying modelling system, e.g., expert system, agent based model, Bayesian belief network, geographical information system (GIS), and the like was categorised next. Finally, since decision support typically should target some aspect of unstructured decisions, we subjectively determined to what degree this was the case. In only 23% of the papers reviewed, did the system appear to tackle unstructured decisions. This knowledge should be useful in helping workers in the field develop more effective systems and tools, especially by being exposed to the approaches in different, but related, disciplines. We propose that a standard blueprint for reporting on DSS be developed for

  18. Reprint of: bullying victimisation, self harm and associated factors in Irish adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Elaine M; Reulbach, Udo; Keeley, Helen; Perry, Ivan J; Arensman, Ella

    2012-02-01

    School bullying victimisation is associated with poor mental health and self harm. However, little is known about the lifestyle factors and negative life events associated with victimisation, or the factors associated with self harm among boys who experience bullying. The objectives of the study were to examine the prevalence of bullying in Irish adolescent boys, the association between bullying and a broad range of risk factors among boys, and factors associated with self harm among bullied boys and their non-bullied peers. Analyses were based on the data of the Irish centre of the Child and Adolescent Self Harm in Europe (CASE) study (boys n = 1870). Information was obtained on demographic factors, school bullying, deliberate self harm and psychological and lifestyle factors including negative life events. In total 363 boys (19.4%) reported having been a victim of school bullying at some point in their lives. The odds ratio of lifetime self harm was four times higher for boys who had been bullied than those without this experience. The factors that remained in the multivariate logistic regression model for lifetime history of bullying victimisation among boys were serious physical abuse and self esteem. Factors associated with self harm among bullied boys included psychological factors, problems with schoolwork, worries about sexual orientation and physical abuse, while family support was protective against self harm. Our findings highlight the mental health problems associated with victimisation, underlining the importance of anti-bullying policies in schools. Factors associated with self harm among boys who have been bullied should be taken into account in the identification of boys at risk of self harm.

  19. Bullying victimisation, self harm and associated factors in Irish adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Elaine M; Reulbach, Udo; Keeley, Helen; Perry, Ivan J; Arensman, Ella

    2010-10-01

    School bullying victimisation is associated with poor mental health and self harm. However, little is known about the lifestyle factors and negative life events associated with victimisation, or the factors associated with self harm among boys who experience bullying. The objectives of the study were to examine the prevalence of bullying in Irish adolescent boys, the association between bullying and a broad range of risk factors among boys, and factors associated with self harm among bullied boys and their non-bullied peers. Analyses were based on the data of the Irish centre of the Child and Adolescent Self Harm in Europe (CASE) study (boys n = 1870). Information was obtained on demographic factors, school bullying, deliberate self harm and psychological and lifestyle factors including negative life events. In total 363 boys (19.4%) reported having been a victim of school bullying at some point in their lives. The odds ratio of lifetime self harm was four times higher for boys who had been bullied than those without this experience. The factors that remained in the multivariate logistic regression model for lifetime history of bullying victimisation among boys were serious physical abuse and self esteem. Factors associated with self harm among bullied boys included psychological factors, problems with schoolwork, worries about sexual orientation and physical abuse, while family support was protective against self harm. Our findings highlight the mental health problems associated with victimisation, underlining the importance of anti-bullying policies in schools. Factors associated with self harm among boys who have been bullied should be taken into account in the identification of boys at risk of self harm.

  20. A Fuzzy Computing Model for Identifying Polarity of Chinese Sentiment Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingkun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the spurt of online user-generated contents on web, sentiment analysis has become a very active research issue in data mining and natural language processing. As the most important indicator of sentiment, sentiment words which convey positive and negative polarity are quite instrumental for sentiment analysis. However, most of the existing methods for identifying polarity of sentiment words only consider the positive and negative polarity by the Cantor set, and no attention is paid to the fuzziness of the polarity intensity of sentiment words. In order to improve the performance, we propose a fuzzy computing model to identify the polarity of Chinese sentiment words in this paper. There are three major contributions in this paper. Firstly, we propose a method to compute polarity intensity of sentiment morphemes and sentiment words. Secondly, we construct a fuzzy sentiment classifier and propose two different methods to compute the parameter of the fuzzy classifier. Thirdly, we conduct extensive experiments on four sentiment words datasets and three review datasets, and the experimental results indicate that our model performs better than the state-of-the-art methods.

  1. A Fuzzy Computing Model for Identifying Polarity of Chinese Sentiment Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingkun; Huang, Yongfeng; Wu, Xian; Li, Xing

    2015-01-01

    With the spurt of online user-generated contents on web, sentiment analysis has become a very active research issue in data mining and natural language processing. As the most important indicator of sentiment, sentiment words which convey positive and negative polarity are quite instrumental for sentiment analysis. However, most of the existing methods for identifying polarity of sentiment words only consider the positive and negative polarity by the Cantor set, and no attention is paid to the fuzziness of the polarity intensity of sentiment words. In order to improve the performance, we propose a fuzzy computing model to identify the polarity of Chinese sentiment words in this paper. There are three major contributions in this paper. Firstly, we propose a method to compute polarity intensity of sentiment morphemes and sentiment words. Secondly, we construct a fuzzy sentiment classifier and propose two different methods to compute the parameter of the fuzzy classifier. Thirdly, we conduct extensive experiments on four sentiment words datasets and three review datasets, and the experimental results indicate that our model performs better than the state-of-the-art methods.

  2. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes.

  3. Identifying potential misfit items in cognitive process of learning engineering mathematics based on Rasch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataei, Sh; Mahmud, Z.; Khalid, M. N.

    2014-04-01

    The students learning outcomes clarify what students should know and be able to demonstrate after completing their course. So, one of the issues on the process of teaching and learning is how to assess students' learning. This paper describes an application of the dichotomous Rasch measurement model in measuring the cognitive process of engineering students' learning of mathematics. This study provides insights into the perspective of 54 engineering students' cognitive ability in learning Calculus III based on Bloom's Taxonomy on 31 items. The results denote that some of the examination questions are either too difficult or too easy for the majority of the students. This analysis yields FIT statistics which are able to identify if there is data departure from the Rasch theoretical model. The study has identified some potential misfit items based on the measurement of ZSTD where the removal misfit item was accomplished based on the MNSQ outfit of above 1.3 or less than 0.7 logit. Therefore, it is recommended that these items be reviewed or revised to better match the range of students' ability in the respective course.

  4. [Comparison and analysis of hyperspectral remote sensing identifiable models for different vegetation under waterlogging stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Bao; Steven, Michael D; He, Ru-Yan; Cai, Qing-Kong

    2013-11-01

    With the global climate warming, flooding disasters frequently occurred and its influence scope constantly increased in China. The objective of the present paper was to study the leaf spectral features of vegetation (maize and beetroot) under waterlogging stress and design a hyperspectral remote sensing model to monitor the flooding disasters through a field simulated experiment. The experiment was carried out in the Sutton Bonington Campus of University of Nottingham (52.8 degrees N, 1. 2 degrees W) from May to August in 2008, and samples were collected one time every week and spectra were measured in the laboratory. The result showed that the reflectance of the maize and beetroot decreased in the 550 and 800-1 300 nm region, and the reflectance slightly increased in the 680 nm region. This paper chose NDVI, SIPI, PRI, SRPI, GNDVI and R800 * R550/R680 to identify the vegetation under waterlogging stress, respectively. The result suggested that the SIPI and R800 * R550/R680 was sensitive for maize under waterlogging stress, and then SIPI and PRI and R800 * R550/R680 was sensitive for beetroot under waterlogging stress. In order to seek the best identifiable model, the normalized distances between means of control and stressed vegetation indices were calculated and analyzed, the result indicated that the distance of R800 * R550/R680 is more than that of indices' in the early stress stage, illustrated that the index identifiable ability for waterlogging stress is better than other indices, then the index has the strong sensitivity and stability. Therefore, the index R800 * R550/R680 could be used to quickly extract flooding disaster area by using hyperspectral remote sensing, and would provide information support for disaster relief decisions.

  5. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kenchington

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores, and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here

  6. A clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yelin; Chen, Li; Yam, Yeung; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S; Budoff, Matthew J; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Min, James K; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2015-04-01

    This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify those patients with and without high-risk coronary anatomy. Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected multinational coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) cohort was conducted. High-risk anatomy was defined as left main diameter stenosis ≥50%, 3-vessel disease with diameter stenosis ≥70%, or 2-vessel disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery. Using a cohort of 27,125, patients with a history of CAD, cardiac transplantation, and congenital heart disease were excluded. The model was derived from 24,251 consecutive patients in the derivation cohort and an additional 7,333 nonoverlapping patients in the validation cohort. The risk score consisted of 9 variables: age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, hyperlipidemia, family history of CAD, history of peripheral vascular disease, and chest pain symptoms. Patients were divided into 3 risk categories: low (≤7 points), intermediate (8 to 17 points) and high (≥18 points). The model was statistically robust with area under the curve of 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75 to 0.78) in the derivation cohort and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.74) in the validation cohort. Patients who scored ≤7 points had a low negative likelihood ratio (risk CAD was 1% in patients with ≤7 points and 16.7% in those with ≥18 points. We propose a scoring system, based on clinical variables, that can be used to identify patients at high and low pre-test probability of having high-risk CAD. Identification of these populations may detect those who may benefit from a trial of medical therapy and those who may benefit most from an invasive strategy. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  7. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, C.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.; Nussbaumer, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Conway, S.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hartley, J.; Benmergui, J.; Lin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate Arctic tropospheric composition using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra, recorded at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, 80°05' N, 86°42' W) and at Thule (Greenland, 76°53' N, -68°74' W) from 2008 to 2012. The target species, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), formic acid (HCOOH), and formaldehyde (H2CO) are emitted by biomass burning and can be transported from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. By detecting simultaneous enhancements of three biomass burning tracers (HCN, CO, and C2H6), ten and eight fire events are identified at Eureka and Thule, respectively, within the 5-year FTIR time series. Analyses of Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model back-trajectories coupled with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire hotspot data, Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model footprints, and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) UV aerosol index maps, are used to attribute burning source regions and travel time durations of the plumes. By taking into account the effect of aging of the smoke plumes, measured FTIR enhancement ratios were corrected to obtain emission ratios and equivalent emission factors. The means of emission factors for extratropical forest estimated with the two FTIR data sets are 0.40 ± 0.21 g kg-1 for HCN, 1.24 ± 0.71 g kg-1 for C2H6, 0.34 ± 0.21 g kg-1 for C2H2, and 2.92 ± 1.30 g kg-1 for HCOOH. The emission factor for CH3OH estimated at Eureka is 3.44 ± 1.68 g kg-1. To improve our knowledge concerning the dynamical and chemical processes associated with Arctic pollution from fires, the two sets of FTIR measurements were compared to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). Seasonal cycles and day-to-day variabilities were compared to assess the ability of the model to reproduce emissions from fires and

  8. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Viatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate Arctic tropospheric composition using ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR solar absorption spectra, recorded at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, 80°5' N, 86°42' W and at Thule (Greenland, 76°53' N, −68°74' W from 2008 to 2012. The target species: carbon monoxide (CO, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, ethane (C2H6, acetylene (C2H2, formic acid (HCOOH, and formaldehyde (H2CO are emitted by biomass burning and can be transported from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. By detecting simultaneous enhancements of three biomass burning tracers (HCN, CO, and C2H6, ten and eight fire events are identified at Eureka and Thule, respectively, within the five-year FTIR timeseries. Analyses of Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT back-trajectories coupled with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS fire hot spot data, Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model (STILT footprints, and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI UV aerosol index maps are used to attribute burning source regions and travel time durations of the plumes. By taking into account the effect of aging of the smoke plumes, measured FTIR enhancement ratios were corrected to obtain emission ratios and equivalent emission factors. The means of emission factors for extratropical forest estimated with the two FTIR datasets are 0.39 ± 0.15 g kg−1 for HCN, 1.23 ± 0.49 g kg−1 for C2H6, 0.34 ± 0.16 g kg−1 for C2H2, 2.13 ± 0.92 g kg−1 for HCOOH, and 3.14 ± 1.28 g kg−1 for CH3OH. To improve our knowledge concerning the dynamical and chemical processes associated with Arctic pollution from fires, the two sets of FTIR measurements were compared to the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4. Seasonal cycles and day-to-day variabilities were compared to assess the ability of the model to reproduce emissions from fires and their transport. Good

  9. Typical structural elements of seismicity and impact crater morphology identified in GIS ENDDB digital models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheeva, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The subject database of the ENDDB system (Earth's Natural Disasters Database) is a combination of the EISC catalog (Earth's impact structures Catalog [1]) and seismological data of more than 60 earthquake catalogs (EC). ENDDB geographic subsystem uses the NASA ASTER GDEM data arrays to obtain a high-resolution (1 arc-second) shaded relief model, as well as the digital mapping technology, which consists in shading surface points according to their brightness controlled by the illumination angle. For example, the identifying impact craters by means of ENDDB begins with selecting the optimum base colors of the image, the parameters of illumination and shadow depth for constructing a shaded model on a regular grid of values. This procedure allows obtaining precise 3D images of the terrain and gravity patterns, and, moreover, furnishes data for recognizing standard morphological elements according to which impact structures can be visually detected. For constructing a shaded gravity anomaly with the ENDDB tools, Global marine gravity data (of models V16.1 and V18.1 [2]) are embedded into the system. These models, which are arrays of gravity pixel values, are of the resolution increased from the equator to the poles, being 30 arc-seconds per point on average. This resolution is the same as in the more recent V21.1 model. Due to these data, new morphological elements typical of impact structures, which are expressed in the shaded elevation and gravity models (identified using the ENDDB visualization tools) was found and compared in hundreds of craters from the EISC-catalog: tail-shaped asymmetry of relief, heart-shaped geometry of craters, and tail-shaped gravity lows [3] and so on. New diagnostic criteria associated with typical morphological elements revealed with advanced image processing technologies are very important to confirm the impact origin for many potential craters. The basic hypothesis of the impact-explosive tectonics [4] is that meteorite craters on the

  10. Hybrid models identified a 12-gene signature for lung cancer prognosis and chemoresponse prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Wooi Wan

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The recurrence rate ranges from 35-50% among early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. To date, there is no fully-validated and clinically applied prognostic gene signature for personalized treatment.From genome-wide mRNA expression profiles generated on 256 lung adenocarcinoma patients, a 12-gene signature was identified using combinatorial gene selection methods, and a risk score algorithm was developed with Naïve Bayes. The 12-gene model generates significant patient stratification in the training cohort HLM & UM (n = 256; log-rank P = 6.96e-7 and two independent validation sets, MSK (n = 104; log-rank P = 9.88e-4 and DFCI (n = 82; log-rank P = 2.57e-4, using Kaplan-Meier analyses. This gene signature also stratifies stage I and IB lung adenocarcinoma patients into two distinct survival groups (log-rank P<0.04. The 12-gene risk score is more significant (hazard ratio = 4.19, 95% CI: [2.08, 8.46] than other commonly used clinical factors except tumor stage (III vs. I in multivariate Cox analyses. The 12-gene model is more accurate than previously published lung cancer gene signatures on the same datasets. Furthermore, this signature accurately predicts chemoresistance/chemosensitivity to Cisplatin, Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Etoposide, Erlotinib, and Gefitinib in NCI-60 cancer cell lines (P<0.017. The identified 12 genes exhibit curated interactions with major lung cancer signaling hallmarks in functional pathway analysis. The expression patterns of the signature genes have been confirmed in RT-PCR analyses of independent tumor samples.The results demonstrate the clinical utility of the identified gene signature in prognostic categorization. With this 12-gene risk score algorithm, early stage patients at high risk for tumor recurrence could be identified for adjuvant chemotherapy; whereas stage I and II patients at low risk could be spared the toxic side effects of

  11. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  12. A hidden Markov model-based algorithm for identifying tumour subtype using array CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent advancement in array CGH (aCGH research has significantly improved tumor identification using DNA copy number data. A number of unsupervised learning methods have been proposed for clustering aCGH samples. Two of the major challenges for developing aCGH sample clustering are the high spatial correlation between aCGH markers and the low computing efficiency. A mixture hidden Markov model based algorithm was developed to address these two challenges. Results The hidden Markov model (HMM was used to model the spatial correlation between aCGH markers. A fast clustering algorithm was implemented and real data analysis on glioma aCGH data has shown that it converges to the optimal cluster rapidly and the computation time is proportional to the sample size. Simulation results showed that this HMM based clustering (HMMC method has a substantially lower error rate than NMF clustering. The HMMC results for glioma data were significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Conclusions We have developed a fast clustering algorithm to identify tumor subtypes based on DNA copy number aberrations. The performance of the proposed HMMC method has been evaluated using both simulated and real aCGH data. The software for HMMC in both R and C++ is available in ND INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php.

  13. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  14. Empirical Evaluation of a Preliminary Model to Identify Low-Risk MBA Applicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo A. Bisschoff

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the second stage of the model, namely to empiricallyevaluate the model’s performance and validity across all threeof the identified categories. These categories are ‘Low-to-no risk’ applicantsfor the MBA; and those applicants who did not complete thedegree in 3 years, classified as ‘Medium-to-low risk’ applicants who areexpected to complete their degree in extended study year, and ‘High-risk’applicants who are not expected to complete their degrees and whodrop out of the programme. The final-year MBA students at the PBS in2004 and 2005 served as the research population. The results were verysatisfactory. Concerning the categories Low-to-no risk and Medium-to-lowrisk applicants, the model can be used as predictive tool, presentinga validity higher than 60% (p = 0.9 and 90% (p = 0.7 respectively.Caution, however, looms at the category of High-risk applicants wherethe model judges too harshly with an error of 13.7% (p = 0.7.

  15. A Modified Adaptive Lasso for Identifying Interactions in the Cox Model with the Heredity Constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Shen, Jincheng; Thall, Peter F

    2014-10-01

    In many biomedical studies, identifying effects of covariate interactions on survival is a major goal. Important examples are treatment-subgroup interactions in clinical trials, and gene-gene or gene-environment interactions in genomic studies. A common problem when implementing a variable selection algorithm in such settings is the requirement that the model must satisfy the strong heredity constraint, wherein an interaction may be included in the model only if the interaction's component variables are included as main effects. We propose a modified Lasso method for the Cox regression model that adaptively selects important single covariates and pairwise interactions while enforcing the strong heredity constraint. The proposed method is based on a modified log partial likelihood including two adaptively weighted penalties, one for main effects and one for interactions. A two-dimensional tuning parameter for the penalties is determined by generalized cross-validation. Asymptotic properties are established, including consistency and rate of convergence, and it is shown that the proposed selection procedure has oracle properties, given proper choice of regularization parameters. Simulations illustrate that the proposed method performs reliably across a range of different scenarios.

  16. School absenteeism among children and its correlates: a predictive model for identifying absentees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Preena; Paul, Premila; Sreenivas, V

    2010-11-01

    To determine the magnitude of absenteeism and its correlates and to develop a model to predict absenteeism in school children. A cross-sectional study. three government schools in Delhi. 704 students, aged 10 to15 years. students were registered and interviewed using a pre designed questionnaire. The frequency and causes of school absenteeism were ascertained by school records, leave applications and one months recall. The factors were subjected to univariate analysis and a stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis and a predictive model was developed. The average absenteeism of a student over 6 months was 14.3±10.2 days (95% CI 13.5 -15.0). 48% children absented themselves for more than two days per month on an average. The main factors associated with school absenteeism were younger age, male sex, increasing birth order, lower levels of parental education and income, school truancy, school phobia and family reasons. The discriminating ability of the predictive model developed was 92.4% it is possible to identify potential absentees in school children.

  17. It’s harder for boys?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeRoux-Rutledge, Emily; A. Guerlain, Madeleine; B Andersen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether children in rural Zimbabwe have differing representations of their HIV/AIDS-affected peers based on the gender of those peers. A group of 128 children (58 boys, 70 girls) aged 10–14 participated in a draw-and-write exercise, in which they were asked to tell the story...... of either an HIV/AIDS-affected girl child, or an HIV/AIDS-affected boy child. Stories were inductively thematically coded, and then a post hoc statistical analysis was conducted to see if there were differences in the themes that emerged in stories about girls versus stories about boys. The results showed...

  18. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  19. Identifying generalized Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation from a numerical solution of Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola V. Georgiev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytic time series in the form of numerical solution (in an appropriate finite time interval of the Hodgkin-Huxley current clamped (HHCC system of four differential equations, well known in the neurophysiology as an exact empirical model of excitation of a giant axon of Loligo, is presented. Then we search for a second-order differential equation of generalized Fitzhugh-Nagumo (GFN type, having as a solution the given single component (action potential of the numerical solution. The given time series is used as a basis for reconstructing orders, powers, and coefficients of the polynomial right-hand sides of GFN equation approximately governing the process of action potential. For this purpose, a new geometrical method for determining phase space dimension of the unknown dynamical system (GFN equation and a specific modification of least squares method for identifying unknown coefficients are developed and applied.

  20. Unitary input DEA model to identify beef cattle production systems typologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Gonçalves Gomes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cow-calf beef production sector in Brazil has a wide variety of operating systems. This suggests the identification and the characterization of homogeneous regions of production, with consequent implementation of actions to achieve its sustainability. In this paper we attempted to measure the performance of 21 livestock modal production systems, in their cow-calf phase. We measured the performance of these systems, considering husbandry and production variables. The proposed approach is based on data envelopment analysis (DEA. We used unitary input DEA model, with apparent input orientation, together with the efficiency measurements generated by the inverted DEA frontier. We identified five modal production systems typologies, using the isoefficiency layers approach. The results showed that the knowledge and the processes management are the most important factors for improving the efficiency of beef cattle production systems.

  1. Identifying bubble collapse in a hydrothermal system using hiddden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benitez, M.C.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Chouet, Bernard A.

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in July 2003 and lasting through September 2003, the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park exhibited an unusual increase in ground temperature and hydrothermal activity. Using hidden Markov model theory, we identify over five million high-frequency (>15 Hz) seismic events observed at a temporary seismic station deployed in the basin in response to the increase in hydrothermal activity. The source of these seismic events is constrained to within ~100 m of the station, and produced ~3500–5500 events per hour with mean durations of ~0.35–0.45 s. The seismic event rate, air temperature, hydrologic temperatures, and surficial water flow of the geyser basin exhibited a marked diurnal pattern that was closely associated with solar thermal radiance. We interpret the source of the seismicity to be due to the collapse of small steam bubbles in the hydrothermal system, with the rate of collapse being controlled by surficial temperatures and daytime evaporation rates.

  2. A new transport mechanism of biomass burning from Indochina as identified by modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning in the Indochina Peninsula (Indochina is one of the important ozone sources in the low troposphere over East Asia in springtime. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data show that 20 000 or more active fire detections occurred annually in spring only from 2000 to 2007. In our tracer modeling study, we identify a new mechanism transporting the tracer over Indochina that is significantly different from the vertical transport mechanism over the equatorial areas such as Indonesia and Malaysia. Simulation results demonstrate that the leeside troughs over Indochina play a dominant role in the uplift of the tracer below 3 km, and that the strong westerlies prevailing above 3 km transport the tracer. These fundamental mechanisms have a major impact on the air quality downwind from Indochina over East Asia. The climatological importance of such a leeside trough is also discussed.

  3. Posterior gut development in Drosophila:a model system for identifying genes controlling epithelial morphogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LENGYELJUEITHA; SUEJUNLIU

    1998-01-01

    The posterior gut of the Drosophila embryo,consisting of hindgut and Malpighian tubules,provides a simple,well-defined system where it is possible to use a genetic approach to define components essential for epithelial morphogenesis.We review here the advantages of Drosophila as a model genetic organism,the morphogenesis of the epithelial structures of the posterior gut,and what is known about the genetic requirements to form these structures.In overview,primordia are patterned by expression of hierarchies of transcription factors;this leads to localized expression of cell signaling molecules,and finally,to the least understood step:modulation of cell adhesion and cell shape.We describe approaches to identify additional genes that are required for morphogenesis of these simple epithelia,particularly those that might play a structural role by affecting cell adhesion and cell shape.

  4. First WNK4-hypokalemia animal model identified by genome-wide association in Burmese cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gandolfi

    Full Text Available Burmese is an old and popular cat breed, however, several health concerns, such as hypokalemia and a craniofacial defect, are prevalent, endangering the general health of the breed. Hypokalemia, a subnormal serum potassium ion concentration ([K(+], most often occurs as a secondary problem but can occur as a primary problem, such as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis in humans, and as feline hypokalaemic periodic polymyopathy primarily in Burmese. The most characteristic clinical sign of hypokalemia in Burmese is a skeletal muscle weakness that is frequently episodic in nature, either generalized, or sometimes localized to the cervical and thoracic limb girdle muscles. Burmese hypokalemia is suspected to be a single locus autosomal recessive trait. A genome wide case-control study using the illumina Infinium Feline 63K iSelect DNA array was performed using 35 cases and 25 controls from the Burmese breed that identified a locus on chromosome E1 associated with hypokalemia. Within approximately 1.2 Mb of the highest associated SNP, two candidate genes were identified, KCNH4 and WNK4. Direct sequencing of the genes revealed a nonsense mutation, producing a premature stop codon within WNK4 (c.2899C>T, leading to a truncated protein that lacks the C-terminal coiled-coil domain and the highly conserved Akt1/SGK phosphorylation site. All cases were homozygous for the mutation. Although the exact mechanism causing hypokalemia has not been determined, extrapolation from the homologous human and mouse genes suggests the mechanism may involve a potassium-losing nephropathy. A genetic test to screen for the genetic defect within the active breeding population has been developed, which should lead to eradication of the mutation and improved general health within the breed. Moreover, the identified mutation may help clarify the role of the protein in K⁺ regulation and the cat represents the first animal model for WNK4-associated hypokalemia.

  5. First WNK4-hypokalemia animal model identified by genome-wide association in Burmese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J; Malik, Richard; Cortes, Alejandro; Jones, Boyd R; Helps, Chris R; Prinzenberg, Eva M; Erhardt, George; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-01-01

    Burmese is an old and popular cat breed, however, several health concerns, such as hypokalemia and a craniofacial defect, are prevalent, endangering the general health of the breed. Hypokalemia, a subnormal serum potassium ion concentration ([K(+)]), most often occurs as a secondary problem but can occur as a primary problem, such as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis in humans, and as feline hypokalaemic periodic polymyopathy primarily in Burmese. The most characteristic clinical sign of hypokalemia in Burmese is a skeletal muscle weakness that is frequently episodic in nature, either generalized, or sometimes localized to the cervical and thoracic limb girdle muscles. Burmese hypokalemia is suspected to be a single locus autosomal recessive trait. A genome wide case-control study using the illumina Infinium Feline 63K iSelect DNA array was performed using 35 cases and 25 controls from the Burmese breed that identified a locus on chromosome E1 associated with hypokalemia. Within approximately 1.2 Mb of the highest associated SNP, two candidate genes were identified, KCNH4 and WNK4. Direct sequencing of the genes revealed a nonsense mutation, producing a premature stop codon within WNK4 (c.2899C>T), leading to a truncated protein that lacks the C-terminal coiled-coil domain and the highly conserved Akt1/SGK phosphorylation site. All cases were homozygous for the mutation. Although the exact mechanism causing hypokalemia has not been determined, extrapolation from the homologous human and mouse genes suggests the mechanism may involve a potassium-losing nephropathy. A genetic test to screen for the genetic defect within the active breeding population has been developed, which should lead to eradication of the mutation and improved general health within the breed. Moreover, the identified mutation may help clarify the role of the protein in K⁺ regulation and the cat represents the first animal model for WNK4-associated hypokalemia.

  6. Comprehensive antigen screening identifies Moraxella catarrhalis proteins that induce protection in a mouse pulmonary clearance model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Smidt

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is one of the three most common causative bacterial pathogens of otitis media, however no effective vaccine against M. catarrhalis has been developed so far. To identify M. catarrhalis vaccine candidate antigens, we used carefully selected sera from children with otitis media and healthy individuals to screen small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected peptides on a bacterial cell surface. This ANTIGENome technology led to the identification of 214 antigens, 23 of which were selected by in vitro or in vivo studies for additional characterization. Eight of the 23 candidates were tested in a Moraxella mouse pulmonary clearance model, and 3 of these antigens induced significantly faster bacterial clearance compared to adjuvant or to the previously characterized antigen OmpCD. The most significant protection data were obtained with the antigen MCR_1416 (Msp22, which was further investigated for its biological function by in vitro studies suggesting that Msp22 is a heme binding protein. This study comprises one of the most exhaustive studies to identify potential vaccine candidate antigens against the bacterial pathogen M. catarrhalis.

  7. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Li, Hai-hong; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical multiplicity fluctuations and correlations of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of a bulk quark system are systematically studied in a quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of the quark combination which is necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness, and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distributions of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of a quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting results, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coinciding flavor-dependent two-baryon correlation, and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of the quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization and study their influence on multiple production of baryons and antibaryons. We find that quark number fluctuations and flavor conservation lead to a series of important results such as the negative p Ω¯ + multiplicity correlation and universal two-baryon correlations. We also study the influence of resonance decays in order to compare our results with future experimental data in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Identifying environmental controls on vegetation greenness phenology through model-data integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Forkel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs have a~limited ability in reproducing phenology and decadal dynamics of vegetation greenness as observed by satellites. These limitations in reproducing observations reflect a poor understanding and description of the environmental controls on phenology, which strongly influence the ability to simulate longer term vegetation dynamics, e.g. carbon allocation. Combining DGVMs with observational data sets can potentially help to revise current modelling approaches and thus to enhance the understanding of processes that control seasonal to long-term vegetation greenness dynamics. Here we implemented a~new phenology model within the LPJmL (Lund Potsdam Jena managed lands DGVM and integrated several observational data sets to improve the ability of the model in reproducing satellite-derived time series of vegetation greenness. Specifically, we optimized LPJmL parameters against observational time series of the fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (FAPAR, albedo and gross primary production to identify the main environmental controls for seasonal vegetation greenness dynamics. We demonstrated that LPJmL with new phenology and optimized parameters better reproduces seasonality, inter-annual variability and trends of vegetation greenness. Our results indicate that soil water availability is an important control on vegetation phenology not only in water-limited biomes but also in boreal forests and the arctic tundra. Whereas water availability controls phenology in water-limited ecosystems during the entire growing season, water availability co-modulates jointly with temperature the beginning of the growing season in boreal and arctic regions. Additionally, water availability contributes to better explain decadal greening trends in the Sahel and browning trends in boreal forests. These results emphasize the importance of considering water availability in a new generation of phenology modules

  9. Ocean Heat and Carbon Uptake in Transient Climate Change: Identifying Model Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou, Anastasia; Marshall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming on decadal and centennial timescales is mediated and ameliorated by the oceansequestering heat and carbon into its interior. Transient climate change is a function of the efficiency by whichanthropogenic heat and carbon are transported away from the surface into the ocean interior (Hansen et al. 1985).Gregory and Mitchell (1997) and Raper et al. (2002) were the first to identify the importance of the ocean heat uptakeefficiency in transient climate change. Observational estimates (Schwartz 2012) and inferences from coupledatmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs; Gregory and Forster 2008; Marotzke et al. 2015), suggest thatocean heat uptake efficiency on decadal timescales lies in the range 0.5-1.5 W/sq m/K and is thus comparable to theclimate feedback parameter (Murphy et al. 2009). Moreover, the ocean not only plays a key role in setting the timing ofwarming but also its regional patterns (Marshall et al. 2014), which is crucial to our understanding of regional climate,carbon and heat uptake, and sea-level change. This short communication is based on a presentation given by A.Romanou at a recent workshop, Oceans Carbon and Heat Uptake: Uncertainties and Metrics, co-hosted by US CLIVARand OCB. As briefly reviewed below, we have incomplete but growing knowledge of how ocean models used in climatechange projections sequester heat and carbon into the interior. To understand and thence reduce errors and biases inthe ocean component of coupled models, as well as elucidate the key mechanisms at work, in the final section we outlinea proposed model intercomparison project named FAFMIP. In FAFMIP, coupled integrations would be carried out withprescribed overrides of wind stress and freshwater and heat fluxes acting at the sea surface.

  10. A meta-modelling strategy to identify the critical offshore conditions for coastal flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rohmer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High water level at the coast may be the result of different combinations of offshore hydrodynamic conditions (e.g. wave characteristics, offshore water level, etc.. Providing the contour of the "critical" set of offshore conditions leading to high water level is of primary importance either to constrain early warning networks based on hydro-meteorological forecast or observations, or for the assessment of the coastal flood hazard return period. The challenge arises from the use of computationally intensive simulators, which prevent the application of a grid approach consisting in extracting the contour through the systematic evaluation of the simulator on a fine design grid defined in the offshore conditions domain. To overcome such a computational difficulty, we propose a strategy based on the kriging meta-modelling technique combined with an adaptive sampling procedure aiming at improving the local accuracy in the regions of the offshore conditions that contribute the most to the estimate of the targeted contour. This methodology is applied to two cases using an idealized site on the Mediterranean coast (southern France: (1 a two-dimensional case to ease the visual analysis and aiming at identifying the combination of offshore water level and of significant wave height; (2 a more complex case aiming at identifying four offshore conditions (offshore water level and offshore wave characteristics: height, direction and period. By using a simulator of moderate computation time cost (a few tens of minutes, the targeted contour can be estimated using a cluster composed of a moderate number of computer units. This reference contour is then compared with the results of the meta-model-based strategy. In both cases, we show that the critical offshore conditions can be estimated with a good level of accuracy using a very limited number (of a few tens of computationally intensive hydrodynamic simulations.

  11. Dynamic ligand-based pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening to identify mycobacterial cyclopropane synthase inhibitors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHINMAYEE CHOUDHURY; U DEVA PRIYAKUMAR; G NARAHARI SASTRY

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. Tb) and its coexistence with HIV arethe biggest therapeutic challenges in anti-M. Tb drug discovery. The current study reports a Virtual Screening(VS) strategy to identify potential inhibitors of Mycobacterial cyclopropane synthase (CmaA1), an importantM. Tb target considering the above challenges. Five ligand-based pharmacophore models were generatedfrom 40 different conformations of the cofactors of CmaA1 taken from molecular dynamics (MD) simulationstrajectories of CmaA1. The screening abilities of these models were validated by screening 23 inhibitors and1398 non-inhibitors of CmaA1. A VS protocol was designed with four levels of screening i.e., ligand-basedpharmacophore screening, structure-based pharmacophore screening, docking and absorption, distribution,metabolism, excretion and the toxicity (ADMET) filters. In an attempt towards repurposing the existing drugsto inhibit CmaA1, 6,429 drugs reported in DrugBank were considered for screening. To find compounds thatinhibit multiple targets of M. Tb as well as HIV, we also chose 701 and 11,109 compounds showing activitybelow 1 μM range on M. Tb and HIV cell lines, respectively, collected from ChEMBL database. Thus, a totalof 18,239 compounds were screened against CmaA1, and 12 compounds were identified as potential hits forCmaA1 at the end of the fourth step. Detailed analysis of the structures revealed these compounds to interactwith key active site residues of CmaA1.

  12. How can the polar dome be identified in meteorological analysis model data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Daniel; Bozem, Heiko; Gutmann, Robert; Hoor, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The thermal stratification of the lower atmosphere at high latitudes causes an isolation of polar regions from lower latitudes. A transport barrier establishes in the region where isentropic surfaces slope upward from near surface to higher altitudes. This barrier is also known as the polar dome. For adiabatic flow the transport of air masses from midlatitudes into high latitudes occurs almost along the isentropic surfaces. Only diabatic processes related to clouds, radiation, or turbulence can foster a transport across the barrier. Such processes can be identified by the material rate of change of potential temperature which have to occur in the vicinity of the polar dome. Thus, to identify regions of exchange, it is first crucial to know where the transport barrier is located. The question arises then which meteorological variables may be suited to identify the location of this transport barrier. A second question is how the shape of the polar dome changes during different time periods of the year? For this we use gridded analysis model data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) with high spatial resolution for several time periods during 2014 and 2015. Especially, we focus on time periods during spring and summer when extensive in-situ measurement campaigns took place in the high Arctic. We define four metrics to identify the location, i.e., the latitude, of the transport barrier at various altitudes, e.g., the surface or a surface of constant pressure in the lower troposphere. These metrics are based on (1) a constant value of potential temperature that intersects a given altitude, (2) the strongest gradient of potential temperature on a given altitude level, and (3) the relative difference between equivalent potential temperature and potential temperature at the surface. The last metric is based on a Lagrangian analysis for which ten days forward and backward trajectories are calculated, starting at each grid point between 45

  13. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael N; Sen Gupta, Alex; England, Matthew H

    2005-08-23

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear.

  14. Shared mechanism of teratogenicity of anti-angiogenic drugs identified in the chicken embryo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedie, Shaunna L.; Mahony, Chris; Walker, Heather M.; Chau, Cindy H.; Figg, William D.; Vargesson, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is essential for tumor growth, stabilization and progression. Angiogenesis inhibitors are now widely used in the clinic; however, there are relatively few published studies on the mechanism of their presumed teratogenic effects. To address this issue, we screened a variety of angiogenesis inhibitors in developing zebrafish and chicken embryo models to assess for developmental defects and potential teratogenic effects. We confirmed previous reports that sunitinib, sorafenib and TNP-470 are teratogenic and demonstrate that axitinib, pazopanib, vandetanib, and everolimus are also teratogens in these models. A dose response study identified the drugs inhibit HUVEC cell proliferation in vitro, and also target the developing blood vessels of embryos in vivo. This provides further evidence for the potential risk of fetal toxicity when using these drugs in a clinical setting, and emphasizes the importance of the development and maintenance of the vasculature in the embryo. We conclude that angiogenesis inhibitors, regardless of the molecular target, are teratogenic when exposed to chicken embryos. PMID:27443489

  15. A preclinical model for identifying rats at risk of alcohol use disorder

    KAUST Repository

    Jadhav, Kshitij S.

    2017-08-21

    Alcohol use is one of the world\\'s leading causes of death and disease, although only a small proportion of individuals develop persistent alcohol use disorder (AUD). The identification of vulnerable individuals prior to their chronic intoxication remains of highest importance. We propose here to adapt current methodologies for identifying rats at risk of losing control over alcohol intake by modeling diagnostic criteria for AUD: Inability to abstain during a signaled period of reward unavailability, increased motivation assessed in a progressive effortful task and persistent alcohol intake despite aversive foot shocks. Factor analysis showed that these three addiction criteria loaded on one underlying construct indicating that they represent a latent construct of addiction trait. Further, not only vulnerable rats displayed higher ethanol consumption, and higher preference for ethanol over sweetened solutions, but they also exhibited pre-existing higher anxiety as compared to resilient rats. In conclusion, the present preclinical model confirms that development of an addiction trait not only requires prolonged exposure to alcohol, but also depends on endophenotype like anxiety that predispose a minority of individuals to lose control over alcohol consumption.

  16. Integrated network modelling for identifying microbial mechanisms of particulate organic carbon accumulation in coastal marine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karlie; Turk, Valentina; Mozetič, Patricija; Tinta, Tinkara; Malfatti, Francesca; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of particulate organic carbon (POC) has the potential to change the structure and function of marine ecosystems. High abidance of POC can develop into aggregates, known as marine snow or mucus aggregates that can impair essential marine ecosystem functioning and services. Currently marine POC formation, accumulation and sedimentation processes are being explored as potential pathways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere by CO2 sequestration via fixation into biomass by phytoplankton. However, the current ability of scientists, environmental managers and regulators to analyse and predict high POC concentrations is restricted by the limited understanding of the dynamic nature of the microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation events in marine environments. We present a proof of concept study that applies a novel Bayesian Networks (BN) approach to integrate relevant biological and physical-chemical variables across spatial and temporal scales in order to identify the interactions of the main contributing microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation in the northern Adriatic Sea. Where previous models have characterised only the POC formed, the BN approach provides a probabilistic framework for predicting the occurrence of POC accumulation by linking biotic factors with prevailing environmental conditions. In this paper the BN was used to test three scenarios (diatom, nanoflagellate, and dinoflagellate blooms). The scenarios predicted diatom blooms to produce high chlorophyll a at the water surface while nanoflagellate blooms were predicted to occur at lower depths (> 6m) in the water column and produce lower chlorophyll a concentrations. A sensitivity analysis identified the variables with the greatest influence on POC accumulation being the enzymes protease and alkaline phosphatase, which highlights the importance of microbial community interactions. The developed proof of concept BN model allows for the first time to quantify the impacts of

  17. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol.

  18. Novel modeling of combinatorial miRNA targeting identifies SNP with potential role in bone density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Coronnello

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to their target mRNAs through base complementarity. Predicting miRNA targets is a challenging task and various studies showed that existing algorithms suffer from high number of false predictions and low to moderate overlap in their predictions. Until recently, very few algorithms considered the dynamic nature of the interactions, including the effect of less specific interactions, the miRNA expression level, and the effect of combinatorial miRNA binding. Addressing these issues can result in a more accurate miRNA:mRNA modeling with many applications, including efficient miRNA-related SNP evaluation. We present a novel thermodynamic model based on the Fermi-Dirac equation that incorporates miRNA expression in the prediction of target occupancy and we show that it improves the performance of two popular single miRNA target finders. Modeling combinatorial miRNA targeting is a natural extension of this model. Two other algorithms show improved prediction efficiency when combinatorial binding models were considered. ComiR (Combinatorial miRNA targeting, a novel algorithm we developed, incorporates the improved predictions of the four target finders into a single probabilistic score using ensemble learning. Combining target scores of multiple miRNAs using ComiR improves predictions over the naïve method for target combination. ComiR scoring scheme can be used for identification of SNPs affecting miRNA binding. As proof of principle, ComiR identified rs17737058 as disruptive to the miR-488-5p:NCOA1 interaction, which we confirmed in vitro. We also found rs17737058 to be significantly associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD in two independent cohorts indicating that the miR-488-5p/NCOA1 regulatory axis is likely critical in maintaining BMD in women. With increasing availability of comprehensive high-throughput datasets from patients ComiR is expected to become an essential

  19. Serotonergic contribution to boys' behavioral regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Nantel-Vivier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Animal and human adult studies reveal a contribution of serotonin to behavior regulation. Whether these findings apply to children is unclear. The present study investigated serotonergic functioning in boys with a history of behavior regulation difficulties through a double-blind, acute tryptophan supplementation procedure. METHOD: Participants were 23 boys (age 10 years with a history of elevated physical aggression, recruited from a community sample. Eleven were given a chocolate milkshake supplemented with 500 mg tryptophan, and 12 received a chocolate milkshake without tryptophan. Boys engaged in a competitive reaction time game against a fictitious opponent, which assessed response to provocation, impulsivity, perspective taking, and sharing. Impulsivity was further assessed through a Go/No-Go paradigm. A computerized emotion recognition task and a staged instrumental help incident were also administered. RESULTS: Boys, regardless of group, responded similarly to high provocation by the fictitious opponent. However, boys in the tryptophan group adjusted their level of responding optimally as a function of the level of provocation, whereas boys in the control group significantly decreased their level of responding towards the end of the competition. Boys in the tryptophan group tended to show greater perspective taking, tended to better distinguish facial expressions of fear and happiness, and tended to provide greater instrumental help to the experimenter. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides initial evidence for the feasibility of acute tryptophan supplementation in children and some effect of tryptophan supplementation on children's behaviors. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential impact of increased serotonergic functioning on boys' dominant and affiliative behaviors.

  20. Moving across the Margins: A Review of "Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karl; Sanders, James H., III

    2012-01-01

    Examining the first phase of a three-year study of adolescent boys engaged in preprofessional dance training, Doug Risner's "Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance: An Empirical Study of Male Identities in Western Theatrical Dance Training" broadly identifies the challenges facing male students pursuing dance education. His book…

  1. Effect of Ball Mass on Dribble, Pass, and Pass Reception in 9-11-Year-Old Boys' Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Jose L.; Argudo, Francisco M.; Alonso, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of ball mass on dribble, pass, and pass reception in real game situations in 9-11-year-old boys' basketball. Participants were 54 boys identified from six federated teams. The independent variable was ball mass, and dependent variables were number of dribbles, passes, and pass receptions. Three…

  2. Moving across the Margins: A Review of "Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karl; Sanders, James H., III

    2012-01-01

    Examining the first phase of a three-year study of adolescent boys engaged in preprofessional dance training, Doug Risner's "Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance: An Empirical Study of Male Identities in Western Theatrical Dance Training" broadly identifies the challenges facing male students pursuing dance education. His book…

  3. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  4. Implant supported prosthesis in an edentulous boy with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia - "A happy boy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Nyhuus, Lone; Buhl, Jytte

    2009-01-01

    Implant supported prosthesis in an edentulous boy with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia - "A happy boy". Authors; Gjoerup,H1; Nyhuus,L2; Buhl,J3. 1) Center for Oral Health in Rare Conditions, Aarhus University Hospital 2) Prosthodontic Department, the Dental School, Aarhus University 3) Department...... health has been registered. The boy and his family experience great improvement in the functioning as well as the comfort of his prosthesis after insertion of implants. Conclusion The prosthesis for edentulous boys with HED demand several adjustments and revisions, partly due to growth of the jaws...

  5. Content-Based Search on a Database of Geometric Models: Identifying Objects of Similar Shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XAVIER, PATRICK G.; HENRY, TYSON R.; LAFARGE, ROBERT A.; MEIRANS, LILITA; RAY, LAWRENCE P.

    2001-11-01

    The Geometric Search Engine is a software system for storing and searching a database of geometric models. The database maybe searched for modeled objects similar in shape to a target model supplied by the user. The database models are generally from CAD models while the target model may be either a CAD model or a model generated from range data collected from a physical object. This document describes key generation, database layout, and search of the database.

  6. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-07-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  7. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  8. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  9. Identifying overrepresented concepts in gene lists from literature: a statistical approach based on Poisson mixture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai Chengxiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale genomic studies often identify large gene lists, for example, the genes sharing the same expression patterns. The interpretation of these gene lists is generally achieved by extracting concepts overrepresented in the gene lists. This analysis often depends on manual annotation of genes based on controlled vocabularies, in particular, Gene Ontology (GO. However, the annotation of genes is a labor-intensive process; and the vocabularies are generally incomplete, leaving some important biological domains inadequately covered. Results We propose a statistical method that uses the primary literature, i.e. free-text, as the source to perform overrepresentation analysis. The method is based on a statistical framework of mixture model and addresses the methodological flaws in several existing programs. We implemented this method within a literature mining system, BeeSpace, taking advantage of its analysis environment and added features that facilitate the interactive analysis of gene sets. Through experimentation with several datasets, we showed that our program can effectively summarize the important conceptual themes of large gene sets, even when traditional GO-based analysis does not yield informative results. Conclusions We conclude that the current work will provide biologists with a tool that effectively complements the existing ones for overrepresentation analysis from genomic experiments. Our program, Genelist Analyzer, is freely available at: http://workerbee.igb.uiuc.edu:8080/BeeSpace/Search.jsp

  10. RCAUSE – A ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS MODEL TO IDENTIFY THE ROOT CAUSES OF SOFTWARE REENGINEERING PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Anand Rajavat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations that wish to modernize their legacy systems, must adopt a financial viable evolution strategy to gratify the needs of modern business environment. There are various options available to modernize legacy system in to more contemporary system. Over the last few years’ legacy system reengineering has emerged as a popular system modernization technique. The reengineering generally focuses on the increased productivity and quality of the system. However many of these efforts are often less than successful because they only concentrate on symptoms of software reengineering risk without targeting root causes of those risk. A subjective assessment (diagnosis of software reengineering risk from different domain of legacy system is required to identify the root causes of those risks. The goal of this paper is to highlight root causes of software reengineering risk. We proposed a root cause analysis model RCause that classify root causes of software reengineering risk in to three distinctive but connected areas of interest i.e. system domain, managerial domain and technical domain. .

  11. Identifying bubble collapse in a hydrothermal system using hidden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.B.; Benitez, M.C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Chouet, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in July 2003 and lasting through September 2003, the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park exhibited an unusual increase in ground temperature and hydrothermal activity. Using hidden Markov model theory, we identify over five million high-frequency (>15Hz) seismic events observed at a temporary seismic station deployed in the basin in response to the increase in hydrothermal activity. The source of these seismic events is constrained to within ???100 m of the station, and produced ???3500-5500 events per hour with mean durations of ???0.35-0.45s. The seismic event rate, air temperature, hydrologic temperatures, and surficial water flow of the geyser basin exhibited a marked diurnal pattern that was closely associated with solar thermal radiance. We interpret the source of the seismicity to be due to the collapse of small steam bubbles in the hydrothermal system, with the rate of collapse being controlled by surficial temperatures and daytime evaporation rates. copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Model for selecting quality standards for a salad bar through identifying elements of customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, D; Norback, J P

    1993-11-01

    Continuous quality improvement is the new requirement of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. This means that meeting quality standards will not be enough. Dietitians will need to improve those standards and the way they are selected. Because quality is defined in terms of the customers, all quality improvement projects must start by defining what customers want. Using a salad bar as an example, this article presents and illustrates a technique developed in Japan to identify which elements in a product or service will satisfy or dissatisfy consumers. Using a model and a questionnaire format developed by Kano and coworkers, 273 students were surveyed to classify six quality elements of a salad bar. Four elements showed a dominant "must-be" characteristic: food freshness, labeling of the dressings, no spills in the food, and no spills on the salad bar. The two other elements (food easy to reach and food variety) showed a dominant one-dimensional characteristic. By better understanding consumer perceptions of quality elements, foodservice managers can select quality standards that focus on what really matters to their consumers.

  13. Identifying Intracellular pDNA Losses From a Model of Nonviral Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Timothy Michael; Wysocki, Beata Joanna; Wysocki, Tadeusz Antoni; Pannier, Angela K

    2015-06-01

    Nonviral gene delivery systems are a type of nanocommunication system that transmit plasmid packets (i.e., pDNA packets) that are programmed at the nanoscale to biological systems at the microscopic cellular level. This engineered nanocommunication system suffers large pDNA losses during transmission of the genetically encoded information, preventing its use in biotechnological and medical applications. The pDNA losses largely remain uncharacterized, and the ramifications of reducing pDNA loss from newly designed gene delivery systems remain difficult to predict. Here, the pDNA losses during primary and secondary transmission chains were identified utilizing a MATLAB model employing queuing theory simulating delivery of pEGFPLuc transgene to HeLa cells carried by Lipofectamine 2000 nonviral DNA carrier. Minimizing pDNA loss during endosomal escape of the primary transmission process results in increased number of pDNA in the nucleus with increased transfection, but with increased probability of cell death. The number of pDNA copies in the nucleus and the amount of time the pDNAs are in the nucleus directly correlates to improved transfection efficiency. During secondary transmission, pDNAs are degraded during distribution to daughter cells. Reducing pDNA losses improves transfection, but a balance in quantity of nuclear pDNA, mitosis, and toxicity must be considered in order to achieve therapeutically relevant transfection levels.

  14. The speech and vocalization patterns of boys with ADHD compared with boys with dyslexia and boys without learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznitz, Zvia

    2003-12-01

    This research study dealt with an inquiry into the speech and vocalization patterns of boys with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) who were not under the influence of stimulating medication, compared with the speech and vocalization patterns of boys with reading disabilities and a control group of learners without learning disabilities. The voices of 105 participants were recorded during interviews and analyzed in the laboratory using equipment that examined the temporal speech patterns and physical features of vocalization. The speech patterns were examined with a frequency examination, speech unit length duration, and correlation between the vocalization and pauses in the speech unit. The physical features of vocalization were examined with volume and frequency scales. The research results indicated that the speech and vocalization patterns of boys with ADHD were significantly different from those of boys with reading disabilities and from the boys in the control group. The results support the assumption that speech and vocalization indicators can be used as objective indicators for the diagnosis of hyperactivity syndrome with attention and concentration difficulties.

  15. Using multi-state markov models to identify credit card risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Evangelista Régis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The main interest of this work is to analyze the application of multi-state Markov models to evaluate credit card risk by investigating the characteristics of different state transitions in client-institution relationships over time, thereby generating score models for various purposes. We also used logistic regression models to compare the results with those obtained using multi-state Markov models. The models were applied to an actual database of a Brazilian financial institution. In this application, multi-state Markov models performed better than logistic regression models in predicting default risk, and logistic regression models performed better in predicting cancellation risk.

  16. Overcoming the Obstacle Course: Teenage Boys and Reading; Boy Books, Girl Books: Should We Re-Organize Our School Library Collections?; Guys and Reading; Where the Boys Are...; From "Boys' Life" to "Thrasher": Boys and Magazines; Connecting with Boys at Lunch: A Success Story; Motivating Boys as Beginning Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick; Fiorelli, Dawn Cartwright; Doiron, Ray; Scieszka, Jon; Haupt, Allison; Cox, Ruth E.; Martin, Robie; Dahlhauser, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Includes seven articles that discuss overcoming obstacles to getting teenage boys to read. Highlights include what teacher-librarians can do; what boys see as obstacles; material selection; collection organization; gender issues; learning differences; magazines; lunchtime book discussion groups; motivating boys as beginning readers; and popular…

  17. An uncertainty inclusive un-mixing model to identify tracer non-conservativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Franks, Stewart; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2015-04-01

    uncertainty was only marginally impacted by the corrupted tracer. Improvement of uncertainty resulted from increasing the number of tracers in both the perfect and corrupted datasets. FR2000 was capable of detecting non-conservative tracer behaviour within the range of mean source values, therefore, it provided a more sensitive screening technique than assessing target values against source data. Non-conservative behaviour was identified in field data however only at a significant degree of corruption. Whilst further testing is required to determine the impact of individual and combined uncertainty components on synthetic, controlled experiments and field data, this study provides a framework for future assessment of uncertainty in un-mixing models.

  18. Identifying modeled ship noise hotspots for marine mammals of Canada's Pacific region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Erbe

    Full Text Available The inshore, continental shelf waters of British Columbia (BC, Canada are busy with ship traffic. South coast waters are heavily trafficked by ships using the ports of Vancouver and Seattle. North coast waters are less busy, but expected to get busier based on proposals for container port and liquefied natural gas development and expansion. Abundance estimates and density surface maps are available for 10 commonly seen marine mammals, including northern resident killer whales, fin whales, humpback whales, and other species with at-risk status under Canadian legislation. Ship noise is the dominant anthropogenic contributor to the marine soundscape of BC, and it is chronic. Underwater noise is now being considered in habitat quality assessments in some countries and in marine spatial planning. We modeled the propagation of underwater noise from ships and weighted the received levels by species-specific audiograms. We overlaid the audiogram-weighted maps of ship audibility with animal density maps. The result is a series of so-called "hotspot" maps of ship noise for all 10 marine mammal species, based on cumulative ship noise energy and average distribution in the boreal summer. South coast waters (Juan de Fuca and Haro Straits are hotspots for all species that use the area, irrespective of their hearing sensitivity, simply due to ubiquitous ship traffic. Secondary hotspots were found on the central and north coasts (Johnstone Strait and the region around Prince Rupert. These maps can identify where anthropogenic noise is predicted to have above-average impact on species-specific habitat, and where mitigation measures may be most effective. This approach can guide effective mitigation without requiring fleet-wide modification in sites where no animals are present or where the area is used by species that are relatively insensitive to ship noise.

  19. Successful Boys and Literacy: Are "Literate Boys" Challenging or Repackaging Hegemonic Masculinity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Christine; Francis, Becky

    2011-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress statistics show that boys are underachieving in literacy compared to girls. Attempts to redress the problem in various Global North countries and particularly Australia and the United Kingdom have failed to make any impact. However, there are boys who are doing well in literacy. The aim of this…

  20. Finding identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear ODE models and the rational reparameterization of their input-output equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; Distefano, Joseph J

    2011-09-01

    When examining the structural identifiability properties of dynamic system models, some parameters can take on an infinite number of values and yet yield identical input-output data. These parameters and the model are then said to be unidentifiable. Finding identifiable combinations of parameters with which to reparameterize the model provides a means for quantitatively analyzing the model and computing solutions in terms of the combinations. In this paper, we revisit and explore the properties of an algorithm for finding identifiable parameter combinations using Gröbner Bases and prove useful theoretical properties of these parameter combinations. We prove a set of M algebraically independent identifiable parameter combinations can be found using this algorithm and that there exists a unique rational reparameterization of the input-output equations over these parameter combinations. We also demonstrate application of the procedure to a nonlinear biomodel.

  1. Which prediction models best identify additional axillary disease after a positive sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, Tanya S; Lesperance, Mary; Truong, Pauline T; Walter, Caroline; Hayashi, Allen H; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2012-06-01

    To determine which web-based model best identifies women at low risk of further axillary disease after a positive sentinel lymph node (SLN+) biopsy. 673 women with T1-2cN0M0 SNB+ breast cancer who underwent completion axillary dissection (AxD) were identified. A subgroup not eligible to avoid AxD as part of the Z0011 study was defined (Z0011 exclusion group). Predicted risk of further axillary disease was generated using seven web-based models. "Low risk" was defined as a ≤10% risk of further axillary disease. False negative ("low risk" prediction but AxD+) rates (FNRs), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and Brier score were determined for each model. 6 of 7 models identified "low risk" patients but FNRs ranged from 14 to 30%. The Stanford and Memorial Sloan-Kettering (MSKCC) models had the best FNRs. FNRs were lower with SLN micrometastasis (7-15%) and higher in the Z0011 exclusion group (21-41%). All models under-predicted further nodal disease in low risk patients and over-predicted in higher-risk patients. The Stanford and MSKCC models were able to identify women with SLN micrometastasis with a ≤10% FNR. Models were not able to accurately identify low risk women from a cohort that would have been excluded from Z0011.

  2. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  3. Specification Search for Identifying the Correct Mean Trajectory in Polynomial Latent Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Yoon, Myeongsun; Willson, Victor; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the optimal strategy for model specification search under the latent growth modeling (LGM) framework, specifically on searching for the correct polynomial mean or average growth model when there is no a priori hypothesized model in the absence of theory. In this simulation study, the effectiveness of different starting…

  4. Identifying students’ mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeslav Hrepic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated introductory physics students’ mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the “Entity” model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the medium through which it propagates. All other observed alternative models contain elements of both Entity and Wave models, but at the same time are distinct from each of the constituent models. We called these models “hybrid” or “blend” models. We discuss how students use these models in various contexts before and after instruction and how our findings contribute to the understanding of conceptual change. Implications of our findings for teaching are summarized.

  5. Intervention effects from a social marketing campaign to promote HPV vaccination in preteen boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joan R; Diehl, Sandra J; Crandell, Jamie L; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera

    2014-07-16

    Adoption of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the US has been slow. In 2011, HPV vaccination of boys was recommended by CDC for routine use at ages 11-12. We conducted and evaluated a social marketing intervention with parents and providers to stimulate HPV vaccination among preteen boys. We targeted parents and providers of 9-13 year old boys in a 13 county NC region. The 3-month intervention included distribution of HPV vaccination posters and brochures to all county health departments plus 194 enrolled providers; two radio PSAs; and an online CME training. A Cox proportional hazards model was fit using NC immunization registry data to examine whether vaccination rates in 9-13 year old boys increased during the intervention period in targeted counties compared to control counties (n=15) with similar demographics. To compare with other adolescent vaccines, similar models were fit for HPV vaccination in girls and meningococcal and Tdap vaccination of boys in the same age range. Moderating effects of age, race, and Vaccines for Children (VFC) eligibility on the intervention were considered. The Cox model showed an intervention effect (β=0.29, HR=1.34, p=.0024), indicating that during the intervention the probability of vaccination increased by 34% in the intervention counties relative to the control counties. Comparisons with HPV vaccination in girls and Tdap and meningococcal vaccination in boys suggest a unique boost for HPV vaccination in boys during the intervention. Model covariates of age, race and VFC eligibility were all significantly associated with vaccination rates (pSocial marketing techniques can encourage parents and health care providers to vaccinate preteen boys against HPV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hard Bigotry, Low Expectations and Soft Support: Educating American African Boys in the United States with the Warrior Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbush, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Educating American Africans boys has been a mixture of political rhetoric, educational pedagogy, and historical neglect. Although American African educators have produced several models for effectively educating Black boys, most of them are dismissed as too "radical" by White researchers who have little understanding or experience in…

  7. Dioxin Exposure and Age of Pubertal Onset among Russian Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary M.; Williams, Paige L.; Sergeyev, Oleg; Burns, Jane S.; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Needham, Larry L.; Altshul, Larisa; Revich, Boris; Hauser, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Background: Animal data demonstrate associations of dioxin, furan, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures with altered male gonadal maturation. It is unclear whether these associations apply to human populations. Objectives: We investigated the association of dioxins, furans, PCBs, and corresponding toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations with pubertal onset among boys in a dioxin-contaminated region. Methods: Between 2003 and 2005, 499 boys 8–9 years of age were enrolled in a longitudinal study in Chapaevsk, Russia. Pubertal onset [stage 2 or higher for genitalia (G2+) or testicular volume (TV) > 3 mL] was assessed annually between ages 8 and 12 years. Serum levels at enrollment were analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess age at pubertal onset as a function of exposure adjusted for potential confounders. We conducted sensitivity analyses excluding boys with pubertal onset at enrollment. Results: The median (range) total serum TEQ concentration was 21 (4–175) pg/g lipid, approximately three times higher than values in European children. At enrollment, boys were generally healthy and normal weight (mean body mass index, 15.9 kg/m2), with 30% having entered puberty by G2+ and 14% by TV criteria. Higher dioxin TEQs were associated with later pubertal onset by TV (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49–0.95 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile). Similar associations were observed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and dioxin concentrations for TV but not G2+. Results were robust to sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: Findings support an association of higher peripubertal serum dioxin TEQs and concentrations with later male pubertal onset reflected in delayed testicular maturation. PMID:21527364

  8. A clinical decision model identifies patients at risk for delayed diagnosed injuries after high-energy trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Anniek; Dekker, Maaike; Lagrand, Tjerk; Epema, Anniek; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; van den Brand, J G H

    2013-06-01

    Tertiary trauma survey is widely implemented in trauma care to identify all injuries in trauma patients. However, various studies consistently show that some trauma patients have missed injuries. In this study, we developed a clinical decision model to identify patients who are at risk for delayed diagnosed injuries. During a period of 18 months, we collected the medical records of all the adult patients who presented after a high-energy trauma at the emergency department of a Dutch trauma centre. The type of trauma, patient characteristics, the radiology studies performed, Glasgow Coma Scale, Revised Trauma Score, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were registered. We thoroughly screened all medical records for delayed diagnosed injuries. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the variables associated with the outcome delayed diagnosed injuries and to develop a clinical prediction model. We included 475 patients. Thirteen (2.7%) patients with delayed diagnosed injuries were identified. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed several models with the ISS, ICU admittance, and CT-head as predictive variables. The model we proposed with the ISS could identify patients who are at a risk for delayed diagnosed injuries with a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 86.4%. Our newly developed clinical decision model can identify patients who are at a risk for delayed diagnosed injuries and who should undergo an intensified search for potential unidentified injuries.

  9. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the huma

  10. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Swindell (William R.); A. Johnston (Andrew); S. Carbajal (Steve); G. Han (Gangwen); C.T. Wohn (Christopher); J. Lu (Jun); X. Xing (Xianying); R.P. Nair (Rajan P.); J.J. Voorhees (John); J.T. Elder (James); X.J. Wang (Xian Jiang); S. Sano (Shigetoshi); E.P. Prens (Errol); J. DiGiovanni (John); M.R. Pittelkow (Mark R.); N.L. Ward (Nicole); J.E. Gudjonsson (Johann Eli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features

  11. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Swindell (William R.); A. Johnston (Andrew); S. Carbajal (Steve); G. Han (Gangwen); C.T. Wohn (Christopher); J. Lu (Jun); X. Xing (Xianying); R.P. Nair (Rajan P.); J.J. Voorhees (John); J.T. Elder (James); X.J. Wang (Xian Jiang); S. Sano (Shigetoshi); E.P. Prens (Errol); J. DiGiovanni (John); M.R. Pittelkow (Mark R.); N.L. Ward (Nicole); J.E. Gudjonsson (Johann Eli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features

  12. Identifiability of parameters and behaviour of the MCMC chains: a case study using the reaction norm model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shariati, M M; Korsgaard, I R; Sorensen, D

    2009-01-01

    the formulation of the model and the structure of the data and the models were then implemented via MCMC. The output of MCMC sampling schemes was interpreted in the light of the theoretical findings. The erratic behaviour of the MCMC chains was shown to be associated with identifiability problems...

  13. The Process of Identifying Children's Mental Model of Their Own Learning as Inferred from Learning a Song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Eva

    1998-01-01

    Identifies and describes children's in-action mental model of their own learning, which was inferred from the observation of children's behaviors when learning a song. Explains that the mental model is made up of musical organizations and learning strategies, each on two levels, large-scale and detailed. (CMK)

  14. The development and validation of two prediction models to identify employees at risk of high sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, Corne A.; van Rhenen, Willem; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J.; Bultmann, Ute; Heymans, Martijn W.

    Background: Sickness absence (SA) is a public health risk marker for morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate prediction models to identify employees at risk of high SA. Methods: Two prediction models were developed using self-rated health (SRH) and prior SA as

  15. Incremental impact of adding boys to current human papillomavirus vaccination programs: role of herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Marc; van de Velde, Nicolas; Franco, Eduardo L; Drolet, Mélanie; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to examine the potential incremental impact of vaccinating boys against human papillomavirus (HPV) on vaccine-type infection in females and males, using an individual-based HPV transmission-dynamic model. Under base assumptions (vaccine efficacy = 99%, duration of protection = 20 years, coverage = 70%), vaccinating 12-year-old boys, in addition to girls, resulted in an incremental reduction in HPV-16/18 (HPV-6/11) incidence over 70 years of 16% (3%) in females and 23% (4%) in males. The benefit of vaccinating boys decreased with improved vaccination coverage in girls. Given the important predicted herd immunity impact of vaccinating girls under moderate to high vaccine coverage, the potential incremental gains of vaccinating boys are limited.

  16. Identifying the optimal supply temperature in district heating networks - A modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Soma; Bojesen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    of this study is to develop a model for thermo-hydraulic calculation of low temperature DH system. The modelling is performed with emphasis on transient heat transfer in pipe networks. The pseudo-dynamic approach is adopted to model the District Heating Network [DHN] behaviour which estimates the temperature...... dynamically while the flow and pressure are calculated on the basis of steady state conditions. The implicit finite element method is applied to simulate the transient temperature behaviour in the network. Pipe network heat losses, pressure drop in the network and return temperature to the plant...... are calculated in the developed model. The model will serve eventually as a basis to find out the optimal supply temperature in an existing DHN in later work. The modelling results are used as decision support for existing DHN; proposing possible modifications to operate at optimal supply temperature....

  17. W_L W_L Scattering in Higgsless Models: Identifying Better Effective Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Alexander S; Christensen, Neil D; Simmons, Elizabeth H; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgsless models. In this paper we analyze how well the three-site model performs as a general exemplar of Higgsless models in describing W_L W_L scattering, and which modifications can make it more representative. We employ general sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgsless models as a way to compare the different theories. We show that the size of the four-point vertex for the (unphysical) Nambu-Goldstone modes and the degree to which the sum rules are saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying KK resonances both provide good measures of the extent to which a highly-deconstructed theory can accurately describe the low-energy physics of a continuum 5d Higgsless model. After comparing the three-site model to flat and warped continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear moose w...

  18. Rigorous selection of random forest models for identifying compounds that activate toxicity-related pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro eUesawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Random forest (RF is a machine-learning ensemble method with high predictive performance. Majority voting in RF uses the discrimination results in numerous decision trees produced from bootstrapping data. For the same dataset, the bootstrapping process yields different predictive capacities in each generation. As participants in the Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 DATA Challenge 2014, we produced numerous RF models for predicting the structures of compounds that can activate each toxicity-related pathway, and then selected the model with the highest predictive ability. Half of the compounds in the training dataset supplied by the competition organizer were allocated to the validation dataset. The remaining compounds were used in model construction. The charged and uncharged forms of each molecule were calculated using the molecular operating environment (MOE software. Subsequently, the descriptors were computed using MOE, MarvinView, and Dragon. These combined methods yielded over 4,071 descriptors for model construction. Using these descriptors, pattern recognition analyses were performed by RF implemented in JMP Pro (a statistical software package. A hundred to two hundred RF models were generated for each pathway. The predictive performance of each model was tested against the validation dataset, and the best-performing model was selected. In the competition, the latter model selected a best-performing model from the 50% test set that best predicted the structures of compounds that activate the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain (ER-LBD.

  19. Revised North Star Ambulatory Assessment for Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Coratti, Giorgia; Messina, Sonia; Ricotti, Valeria; Baranello, Giovanni; D’Amico, Adele; Pera, Maria Carmela; Albamonte, Emilio; Sivo, Serena; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Fanelli, Lavinia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Romeo, Domenico M; Vita, Gian Luca; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Pane, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The advent of therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has highlighted the need to identify reliable outcome measures for young boys with DMD. The aim of this study was to develop a revised version of the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) suitable for boys between the age of 3 and 5 years by identifying age appropriate items and revising the scoring system accordingly. Using the scale in 171 controls between the age of 2.9 and 4.8 years, we identified items that were appropriate at different age points. An item was defined as age appropriate if it was completed, achieving a full score, by at least 85% of the typically developing boys at that age. At 3 years (±3months) there were only 8 items that were age appropriate, at 3 years and 6 months there were 13 items while by the age of 4 years all 17 items were appropriate. A revised version of the scale was developed with items ordered according to the age when they could be reliably performed. The application of the revised version of the scale to data collected in young DMD boys showed that very few of the DMD boys were able to complete with a full score all the age appropriate items. In conclusion, our study suggests that a revised version of the NSAA can be used in boys from the age of 3 years to obtain information on how young DMD boys acquire new abilities and how this correlates with their peers. PMID:27494024

  20. Mosaic gene network modelling identified new regulatory mechanisms in HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Mishchenko, Elena L; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Modelling of gene networks is widely used in systems biology to study the functioning of complex biological systems. Most of the existing mathematical modelling techniques are useful for analysis of well-studied biological processes, for which information on rates of reactions is available. However, complex biological processes such as those determining the phenotypic traits of organisms or pathological disease processes, including pathogen-host interactions, involve complicated cross-talk between interacting networks. Furthermore, the intrinsic details of the interactions between these networks are often missing. In this study, we developed an approach, which we call mosaic network modelling, that allows the combination of independent mathematical models of gene regulatory networks and, thereby, description of complex biological systems. The advantage of this approach is that it allows us to generate the integrated model despite the fact that information on molecular interactions between parts of the model (so-called mosaic fragments) might be missing. To generate a mosaic mathematical model, we used control theory and mathematical models, written in the form of a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In the present study, we investigated the efficiency of this method in modelling the dynamics of more than 10,000 simulated mosaic regulatory networks consisting of two pieces. Analysis revealed that this approach was highly efficient, as the mean deviation of the dynamics of mosaic network elements from the behaviour of the initial parts of the model was less than 10%. It turned out that for construction of the control functional, data on perturbation of one or two vertices of the mosaic piece are sufficient. Further, we used the developed method to construct a mosaic gene regulatory network including hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the first piece and the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis and NF-κB induction pathways as the second piece. Thus

  1. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  2. Parents' choices in banking boys' testicular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2010-12-01

    Researchers are working to derive sperm from banked testicular tissue taken from pre-pubertal boys who face therapies or injuries that destroy sperm production. Success in deriving sperm from this tissue will help to preserve the option for these boys to have genetically related children later in life. For the twin moral reasons of preserving access and equity in regard to having such children, clinicians and researchers are justified in offering the option to the parents of all affected boys. However, some parents may wish to decline the option to bank tissue from their boys because the technique may seem too unfamiliar or unusual, but over time people may become more comfortable with the technique as they have done with other novel assisted reproductive treatments (ARTs). Other parents may wish to decline the option because of moral or religious reasons. A prominent natural law theory holds, for example, that the ARTs that would be involved in using sperm derived from banked tissue to produce a child are morally objectionable. Some parents might not want to bank tissue in order to shield their son from using ARTs they see as objectionable. Clinicians and researchers should respect parents who wish to decline banking tissue, but parents should ordinarily embrace choices that protect the possible interests their sons may have as adult men, including the wish to have genetically related children.

  3. Gemella bergeriae endocarditis in a boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Latania K; Zheng, Xiaotian; Shulman, Stanford T

    2008-02-01

    We describe the first pediatric case of Gemella bergeriae endocarditis in a 15-year-old boy with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia who presented with weight loss, chills, and cold intolerance. Blood cultures revealed Gram-positive cocci that failed to type with Lancefield group antiserum. The identification of the organism was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  4. It’s harder for boys?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeRoux-Rutledge, Emily; A. Guerlain, Madeleine; B Andersen, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether children in rural Zimbabwe have differing representations of their HIV/AIDS-affected peers based on the gender of those peers. A group of 128 children (58 boys, 70 girls) aged 10–14 participated in a draw-and-write exercise, in which they were asked to tell the story o...

  5. Anomalous Bimanual Coordination among Dyslexic Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Marshall; And Others

    1989-01-01

    To test for interhemispheric difficulties associated with dyslexia, this study assessed bimanual coordination in dyslexic and nondisabled boys using an Etch-a-Sketch-like task. Dyslexics showed significant impairments on mirror movements, and often unknowingly reverted to parallel movements when visual feedback was removed. (RH)

  6. Brucellosis: unusual presentations in two adolescent boys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piampiano, P.; McLeary, M.; Young, L.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Loma Linda University Children' s Hospital, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Janner, D. [Div. of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Loma Linda University Medical Center and Children' s Hospital, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Two boys presented with variable signs and symptoms of infectious disease that challenged diagnosis. One of the two patients had aortic valve vegetations and lower extremity aneurysms, and the other had calvarial osteomyelitis, epidural abscess, pleural effusions, and pulmonary nodules. Only after a battery of bacterial and fungal agglutination tests was the unsuspected diagnosis made in each of brucellosis from Brucella canis. (orig.)

  7. Increasing Reading Engagement in African American Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written concerning the challenges many teachers face in engaging African American males in reading practices. While much of this extant scholarship focuses on African American males at the pre-adolescent stage of development and beyond, little has been written regarding increasing reading engagement in African American boys in P-5…

  8. Boy George Helsingi-Tallinna geikruiisil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Angel Café & Gayclub ja firmade Tallink ja Madrenalin Ltd korraldatavast geikruiisist Lovebot 2006 (30. apr.-1. mai), kus show-programmi peaesinejateks briti laulja Boy Gerry ja ameerika laulja Sherry Vine (Sherry Vine kontsert ka 29. apr. Tallinnas Angeli klubis)

  9. Boy George Helsingi-Tallinna geikruiisil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Angel Café & Gayclub ja firmade Tallink ja Madrenalin Ltd korraldatavast geikruiisist Lovebot 2006 (30. apr.-1. mai), kus show-programmi peaesinejateks briti laulja Boy Gerry ja ameerika laulja Sherry Vine (Sherry Vine kontsert ka 29. apr. Tallinnas Angeli klubis)

  10. A Boy's Alternative to Bodice-Rippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Katherine T.; Manning, M. Lee

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the genre of fantasy novels, noting its popularity with adolescent readers (especially boys). Notes sources helpful to teachers and school librarians, and lists a few personal favorite fantasy novels. Offers a brief note on whether the Harry Potter books can be considered young adult literature. (SR)

  11. Heritage from the Wild Boy of Aveyron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ian M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recounts efforts made between 1801 and 1806 by French physician Itard to educate Victor, a boy found living in the wild in Aveyron. Explains how Itard's work with Victor, which met with limited success, led to the establishment of a school for educating clinical idiots. Describes procedures developed by Itard that are basic to the current…

  12. "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son": A Memoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Reta Ugena

    2010-01-01

    "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son" is Kevin Jennings's autobiographical account of growing up gay in the Southern United States. In his memoir, Jennings shares formative experiences relating to his impoverished childhood and his career as teacher and social activist. His rich description of the influence of family relationships on his personal and…

  13. Cryptorchidism in boys with imperforate anus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, D; Thorup, J M; Nielsen, O H

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the case reports of 136 boys who were operated on for an imperforate anus and who survived at least 18 months, cryptorchidism was the most common associated anomaly, involving 26 cases (19%). The higher the level of the anorectal malformations, the higher was the incid...

  14. Manifestations of Namibian Boy's Underachievement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimba, Roderick F.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the 2012 grade 10 and grade 12 Namibian examination data indicate that girls received higher grades than boys across the then 13 education regions (Educational Management Information System, EMIS, 2012). University of Namibia graduation statistics for the period of 2002 to 2012 revealed that the institution consistently produced…

  15. "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son": A Memoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Reta Ugena

    2010-01-01

    "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son" is Kevin Jennings's autobiographical account of growing up gay in the Southern United States. In his memoir, Jennings shares formative experiences relating to his impoverished childhood and his career as teacher and social activist. His rich description of the influence of family relationships on his personal…

  16. Identifying streamgage networks for maximizing the effectiveness of regional water balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, L. M.; Hunter, T. S.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Fortin, V.; Gronewold, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    One approach to regional water balance modeling is to constrain rainfall-runoff models with a synthetic regionalized hydrologic response. For example, the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM), a cornerstone of hydrologic forecasting in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, was calibrated to a synthetic discharge record resulting from a drainage area ratio method (ARM) for extrapolating beyond gaged areas. A challenge of such approaches is the declining availability of observations for development of synthetic records. To advance efficient use of the declining gage network in the context of regional water balance modeling, we present results from an assessment of ARM. All possible combinations of "most-downstream" gages were used to simulate runoff at the gaged outlet of Michigan's Clinton River watershed in order to determine the influence of gages' drainage area and other physical characteristics on model skill. For nearly all gage combinations, ARM simulations resulted in good model skill. However, the gages' catchment area relative to that of the outlet's catchment is not an unquestionable predictor of model performance. Results indicate that combinations representing less than 30% of the total catchment area (less than 10% in some cases) can provide very good discharge simulations, but that similarity of the gaged catchments' developed and cultivated area, stream density, and permeability relative to the outlet's catchment is also important for successful simulations. Recognition of thresholds on the relationship between the number of gages and their relative value in simulating flow over large area provides an opportunity for improving historical records for regional hydrologic modeling.

  17. Soft computing model for optimized siRNA design by identifying off target possibilities using artificial neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Reena; John, Philips George; Peter S, David

    2015-05-15

    The ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to do posttranscriptional gene regulation by knocking down targeted genes is an important research topic in functional genomics, biomedical research and in cancer therapeutics. Many tools had been developed to design exogenous siRNA with high experimental inhibition. Even though considerable amount of work has been done in designing exogenous siRNA, design of effective siRNA sequences is still a challenging work because the target mRNAs must be selected such that their corresponding siRNAs are likely to be efficient against that target and unlikely to accidentally silence other transcripts due to sequence similarity. In some cases, siRNAs may tolerate mismatches with the target mRNA, but knockdown of genes other than the intended target could make serious consequences. Hence to design siRNAs, two important concepts must be considered: the ability in knocking down target genes and the off target possibility on any nontarget genes. So before doing gene silencing by siRNAs, it is essential to analyze their off target effects in addition to their inhibition efficacy against a particular target. Only a few methods have been developed by considering both efficacy and off target possibility of siRNA against a gene. In this paper we present a new design of neural network model with whole stacking energy (ΔG) that enables to identify the efficacy and off target effect of siRNAs against target genes. The tool lists all siRNAs against a particular target with their inhibition efficacy and number of matches or sequence similarity with other genes in the database. We could achieve an excellent performance of Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R=0. 74) and Area Under Curve (AUC=0.906) when the threshold of whole stacking energy is ≥-34.6 kcal/mol. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is one of the best score while considering the "combined efficacy and off target possibility" of siRNA for silencing a gene. The proposed model

  18. Identifying Pedophiles "Eligible" for Community Notification under Megan's Law: A Multivariate Model for Actuarially Anchored Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, Nathaniel J.; Hennessy, James J.; Voelbel, Gerald T.

    1998-01-01

    A scientifically sound methodology for identifying offenders about whose presence the community should be notified is demonstrated. A stepwise multiple regression was calculated among incarcerated pedophiles (N=52) including both psychological and legal data; a precision-weighted equation produced 90.4% "true positives." This methodology can be…

  19. Identifying Professional Teaching Standards Using Rasch Model Analysis: The Case of Northern Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibaba Erden, Hale; Özer, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The Teacher's-Act defined for the state-school teachers of North Cyprus shows that teachers are not selected according to any specific standards. In North Cyprus, apart from the exam topics defined at the teacher's exam regulations, there is not any kind of identified standard for teachers. Training qualified teachers based upon…

  20. Comprehensive Antigen Screening Identifies Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins That Induce Protection in a Mouse Pulmonary Clearance Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Smidt (Margarita); P. Bättig (Patrick); S.J.C. Verhaegh (Suzanne); A. Niebisch (Axel); M. Hanner (Markus); S. Selak (Sanja); W. Schüler (Wolfgang); E. Morfeldt (Eva); C. Hellberg (Christel); E. Nagy (Eszter); U. Lundberg (Urban); J.P. Hays (John); A. Meinke (Andreas); B. Henriques-Normark (Birgitta)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMoraxella catarrhalis is one of the three most common causative bacterial pathogens of otitis media, however no effective vaccine against M. catarrhalis has been developed so far. To identify M. catarrhalis vaccine candidate antigens, we used carefully selected sera from children with ot

  1. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  2. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  3. Identifying student and teacher difficulties in interpreting atomic spectra using a quantum model of emission and absorption of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two questionnaires, one for teachers and the other for students. By analyzing the responses, we conclude that (i) teachers lack a quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation capable of explaining the spectra, (ii) teachers and students share the same difficulties, and (iii) these difficulties concern the model of the atom, the model of radiation, and the model of the interaction between them.

  4. Identifying abnormal connectivity in patients using Dynamic Causal Modelling of fMRI responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed L Seghier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging studies of brain damaged patients offer a unique opportunity to understand how sensori-motor and cognitive tasks can be carried out when parts of the neural system that support normal performance are no longer available. In addition to knowing which regions a patient activates, we also need to know how these regions interact with one another, and how these inter-regional interactions deviate from normal. Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM offers the opportunity to assess task-dependent interactions within a set of regions. Here we review its use in patients when the question of interest concerns the characterisation of abnormal connectivity for a given pathology. We describe the currently available implementations of DCM for fMRI responses, varying from the deterministic bilinear models with one-state equation to the stochastic nonlinear models with two-state equations. We also highlight the importance of the new Bayesian model selection and averaging tools that allow different plausible models to be compared at the single subject and group level. These procedures allow inferences to be made at different levels of model selection, from features (model families to connectivity parameters. Following a critical review of previous DCM studies that investigated abnormal connectivity we propose a systematic procedure that will ensure more flexibility and efficiency when using DCM in patients. Finally, some practical and methodological issues crucial for interpreting or generalising DCM findings in patients are discussed.

  5. Behavioral aggressiveness in boys with sexual precocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Kulshreshtha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some boys with sexual precocity are known to have behavioral problems like increased physical and verbal aggression and school and social maladjustments. It is believed to be due to premature androgen exposure. However, it is not clear why only some develop this problem, difference in etiology could be one explanation. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess behavioral aggression in boys with sexual precocity due to different disorders. Materials and Methods: Seven children, ages three to seven years, were enrolled for this study. Two were diagnosed to have congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, three had testotoxicosis, while two had central precocious puberty. Parents of children with precocious puberty underwent the (CASP questionnaire (children′s aggression scale-parent version. Results: Testosterone levels were high in all patients. Parents denied any history of physical or verbal aggression in the two boys with CAH. Their CASP rating was 0. In contrast, the CASP ratings in the two boys with testotoxicosis and the two with precocious puberty for five domains ranged from 3.1 - 24.2, 2.6 - 8.3,1-5.6,0 - 7.1, and 0 - 1, respectively. In the present study, increased aggression was seen among all the patients with testotoxicosis and both with precocious puberty. In contrast, there were no symptoms of either increased verbal or physical aggression in either of the two patients with CAH. Conclusions: The hormonal milieu in the boys with CAH versus those with sexual precocity due to other causes differed in terms of cortisol and androgen precursors. The androgen excess in CAH children was a consequence of cortisol deficiency. It is possible that cortisol sufficiency is required for androgen-mediated behavioral effects.

  6. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  7. Examining the Possibilities of Identifying and Modeling Correlations between Product Families and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Variant Master (PVM) modeling technique and Process Flow Charts in combination, to analyze the correlation between complexity in product families and business processes. The approach is based on a visual modeling of the product assortment and the business processes. It is hypothesized that the combined......In order for companies to make well founded decisions on the product family makeup, an understanding of the correlation between the complexity of the product family and business processes is required, though it is often not available. This paper investigates the potential of using the Product...... use of the modeling techniques can allow for analysis and communication of the product family and business processes; as well as the connections between the two, with the potential of creating a single combined model. A case from a Danish industrial company is used for the purpose of the investigation...

  8. Identifying Opportunities to Reduce Uncertainty in a National-Scale Forest Carbon Accounting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. H.; Metsaranta, J. M.; Kurz, W.; Hilger, A.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the quality of forest carbon budget models used for national and international reporting of greenhouse gas emissions is essential, but model evaluations are rarely conducted mainly because of lack of appropriate, independent ground plot data sets. Ecosystem carbon stocks for all major pools estimated from data collected for 696 ground plots from Canada's new National Forest Inventory (NFI) were used to assess plot-level carbon stocks predicted by the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector 3 (CBM-CFS3) -- a model compliant with the most complex (Tier-3) approach in the reporting guidelines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The model is the core of Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting, and Reporting System. At the landscape scale, a major portion of total uncertainty in both C stock and flux estimation is associated with biomass productivity, turnover, and soil and dead organic matter modelling parameters, which can best be further evaluated using plot-level data. Because the data collected for the ground plots were comprehensive we were able to compare carbon stock estimates for 13 pools also estimated by the CBM-CFS3 (all modelled pools excepting coarse and fine root biomass) using the classical comparison statistics of mean difference and correlation. Using a Monte Carlo approach we were able to determine the contribution of aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil pool error to modeled ecosystem total error, as well as the contribution of pools that are summed to estimate aboveground biomass, deadwood and soil, to the error of these three subtotal pools. We were also able to assess potential sources of error propagation in the computational sequence of the CBM-CFS3. Analysis of the data grouped by the 16 dominant tree species allowed us to isolate the leading species where further research would lead to the greatest reductions in uncertainty for modeling of carbon stocks using the CBM-CFS3. This analysis

  9. Fuzzy inferencing to identify degree of interaction in the development of fault prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkaj Goyal

    2017-01-01

    One related objective is the identification of influential metrics in the development of fault prediction models. A fuzzy rule intrinsically represents a form of interaction between fuzzified inputs. Analysis of these rules establishes that Low and NOT (High level of inheritance based metrics significantly contributes to the F-measure estimate of the model. Further, the Lack of Cohesion of Methods (LCOM metric was found insignificant in this empirical study.

  10. Evaluating environmental modeling and sampling data with biomarker data to identify sources and routes of exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals results from multiple sources, environmental media, and exposure routes. Ideally, modeled exposures should be compared to biomonitoring data. This study compares the magnitude and variation of modeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposures resulting from emissions to outdoor and indoor air and estimated exposure inferred from biomarker levels. Outdoor emissions result in both inhalation and food-based exposures. We modeled PAH intake doses using U.S. EPA's 2002 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) county-level emissions data for outdoor inhalation, the CalTOX model for food ingestion (based on NATA emissions), and indoor air concentrations from field studies for indoor inhalation. We then compared the modeled intake with the measured urine levels of hydroxy-PAH metabolites from the 2001-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) survey as quantifiable human intake of PAH parent-compounds. Lognormal probability plots of modeled intakes and estimated intakes inferred from biomarkers suggest that a primary route of exposure to naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene for the U.S. population is likely inhalation from indoor sources. For benzo(a)pyrene, the predominant exposure route is likely from food ingestion resulting from multi-pathway transport and bioaccumulation due to outdoor emissions. Multiple routes of exposure are important for pyrene. We also considered the sensitivity of the predicted exposure to the proportion of the total naphthalene production volume emitted to the indoor environment. The comparison of PAH biomarkers with exposure variability estimated from models and sample data for various exposure pathways supports that both indoor and outdoor models are needed to capture the sources and routes of exposure to environmental contaminants.

  11. Identifying Tipping Points in a Decision-Theoretic Model of Network Security

    OpenAIRE

    Heimann, C. F. Larry; Nochenson, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although system administrators are frequently urged to protect the machines in their network, the fact remains that the decision to protect is far from universal. To better understand this decision, we formulate a decision-theoretic model of a system administrator responsible for a network of size n against an attacker attempting to penetrate the network and infect the machines with a virus or similar exploit. By analyzing the model we are able to demonstrate the cost sensitivity of smaller n...

  12. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington’s disease transgenic sheep model

    OpenAIRE

    Handley, Renee. R.; Reid, Suzanne J; Stefano Patassini; Rudiger, Skye R.; Vladimir Obolonkin; McLaughlan, Clive J.; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; C Simon Bawden; Faull, Richard L. M.; Snell, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of ...

  13. Combat-Related Heterotopic Ossification: Development of Animal Models for Identifying Mechanisms and Testing Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    etiology, treatment, and prevention is the absence of a reliable and reproducible small animal model that can be used to characterize combat‐related HO...contamination and subsequent wound colonization may be a key risk factor. Using a small animal model of blast-related extremity injury involving a...to the systemic and perhaps local antimicrobial therapies geared towards decreasing bioburden in combat wounds. 6 Using our blast-related HO

  14. Damage detection of structures identified with deterministic-stochastic models using seismic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Chih; Wang, Yen-Po; Chang, Ming-Lian

    2014-01-01

    A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV) is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s) with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems.

  15. Spatial Durbin Model (SDM For Identified Influence Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Factors in Kabupaten Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Resti Ayuni Suri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever or usually populer call DBD (Demam Berdarah Degue is the cronic desease that caused by virus infection who carry by Aedes Aegypti mousquito. The observation act by DBD descriptioning and some factors territorial view that influence them, also DBD’s modeling use Spatial Durbin Model (SDM. SDM is the particullary case from Spatial Autoregresive Model (SAR, it means modeling with spatial lag at dependen variable and independen variable. This observation use ratio DBD invectors amount with population amount of citizenry at Kabupaten Malang in 2009. Some variable was used, those are the precentation of existention free number embrio, ratio of civil amount between family, procentation of healthy clinic between invectors and procentase of the invectors who taking care by medical help with amount of invectors. The fourth variables are independen variable to ratio of DBD invector amount with population of citizenry amount, as dependen variable trough spatial SDM modelling. The result of SDM parameter modelling, the significant influence variable in session % is the procentation of free amount embrio existention from their own district, the procentation of healthy clinic amount with the DBD invector amount from their own district, the ratio of the population of citizenry with the family from their neighborhood district, and the procentation of healthy clinic amount with the DBD invector amount from their neighborhood district.

  16. An Integrated Model for Identifying Linkages Between the Management of Fuel Treatments, Fire and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, R. R.; Anderson, S.; Moritz, M.; Plantinga, A.; Tague, C.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fuel treatments (e.g. thinning, prescribed burning) are a frequent tool for managing fire-prone landscapes. However, predicting how fuel treatments may affect future wildfire risk and associated ecosystem services, such as forest water availability and streamflow, remains a challenge. This challenge is in part due to the large range of conditions under which fuel treatments may be implemented, as response is likely to vary with species type, rates of vegetation regrowth, meteorological conditions and physiographic properties of the treated site. It is also due to insufficient understanding of how social factors such as political pressure, public demands and economic constraints affect fuel management decisions. To examine the feedbacks between ecological and social dimensions of fuel treatments, we present an integrated model that links a biophysical model that simulates vegetation and hydrology (RHESSys), a fire spread model (WMFire) and an empirical fuel treatment model that accounts for agency decision-making. We use this model to investigate how management decisions affect landscape fuel loads, which in turn affect fire severity and ecosystem services, which feedback to management decisions on fuel treatments. We hypothesize that this latter effect will be driven by salience theory, which predicts that fuel treatments are more likely to occur following major wildfire events. The integrated model provides a flexible framework for answering novel questions about fuel treatments that span social and ecological domains, areas that have previously been treated separately.

  17. A model for identifying owner's needs in the building life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    ALSHUBBAK, ALI; Pellicer, Eugenio; Catalá Alís, Joaquín; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Building life cycle is a process which covers not only the construction phase but also the feasibility, the design and the operation phases. Identifying the owner s needs in all phases of this process is of paramount importance for achieving satisfactory results for the building project. Additionally, the owner s needs should be fulfilled by the work scope of every stakeholder involved in the project. Nevertheless, these needs are not always adequately considered in building projects. Thus, t...

  18. Identifying differentially methylated genes using mixed effect and generalized least square models

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background DNA methylation plays an important role in the process of tumorigenesis. Identifying differentially methylated genes or CpG islands (CGIs) associated with genes between two tumor subtypes is thus an important biological question. The methylation status of all CGIs in the whole genome can be assayed with differential methylation hybridization (DMH) microarrays. However, patient samples or cell lines are heterogeneous, so their methylation pattern may be very different. In a...

  19. Multivariate Modeling Identifies Neutrophil- and Th17-Related Factors as Differential Serum Biomarkers of Chronic Murine Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Megan E.; Zeng, Yu; Parry, Nicola; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of chronic intestinal inflammation, which characterizes inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), along with prediction of disease state is hindered by the availability of predictive serum biomarker. Serum biomarkers predictive of disease state will improve trials for therapeutic intervention, and disease monitoring, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. Chronic inflammation during IBD is considered distinct from infectious intestinal inflammation thereby requiring biomarkers to provide differential diagnosis. To address whether differential serum biomarkers could be identified in murine models of colitis, immunological profiles from both chronic spontaneous and acute infectious colitis were compared and predictive serum biomarkers identified via multivariate modeling. Methodology/Principal Findings Discriminatory multivariate modeling of 23 cytokines plus chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine (protein adducts from reactive nitrogen species and hypochlorite) in serum and tissue from two murine models of colitis was performed to identify disease-associated biomarkers. Acute C. rodentium-induced colitis in C57BL/6J mice and chronic spontaneous Helicobacter-dependent colitis in TLR4−/− x IL-10−/− mice were utilized for evaluation. Colon profiles of both colitis models were nearly identical with chemokines, neutrophil- and Th17-related factors highly associated with intestinal disease. In acute colitis, discriminatory disease-associated serum factors were not those identified in the colon. In contrast, the discriminatory predictive serum factors for chronic colitis were neutrophil- and Th17-related factors (KC, IL-12/23p40, IL-17, G-CSF, and chlorotyrosine) that were also elevated in colon tissue. Chronic colitis serum biomarkers were specific to chronic colitis as they were not discriminatory for acute colitis. Conclusions/Significance Immunological profiling revealed strikingly similar colon profiles, yet distinctly different serum

  20. Using an isolated rat kidney model to identify kidney origin proteins in urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jia

    Full Text Available The use of targeted proteomics to identify urinary biomarkers of kidney disease in urine can avoid the interference of serum proteins. It may provide better sample throughput, higher sensitivity, and specificity. Knowing which urinary proteins to target is essential. By analyzing the urine from perfused isolated rat kidneys, 990 kidney origin proteins with human analogs were identified in urine. Of these proteins, 128 were not found in normal human urine and may become biomarkers with zero background. A total of 297 proteins were not found in normal human plasma. These proteins will not be influenced by other normal organs and will be kidney specific. The levels of 33 proteins increased during perfusion with an oxygen-deficient solution compared to those perfused with oxygen. The 75 proteins in the perfusion-driven urine have a significantly increased abundance ranking compared to their ranking in normal human urine. When compared with existing candidate biomarkers, over ninety percent of the kidney origin proteins in urine identified in this study have not been examined as candidate biomarkers of kidney diseases.

  1. Study of techniques of identifying the earthquake precursory anomalies in terms of mathematical modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zun-guo; QIAN Jia-dong; CHEN Jun-hua; LI Sheng-le

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals mainly with the key technique of identifying the anomalous signals without distortion, which might be the precursors associated with earthquakes, from the real time series of observations that would be usually the mixture of the anomalous signals, the normal background variations, some interference and noises. The key technique of 2 un-biased estimation2 is to construct an empirical time series and set up the criterion for identifying the anomalous variation on the bases of time series analysis. To the end of testing the method, a man-made time series including the normal variations and random interference as well as specific anomaly, has been constructed. And the test of picking up the anomaly has been conducted with the intuitive and effective way of identifying the anomalous signal from a complicated time series. Test results confirms that the techniques under discussion are effective and applicable, and the signals extracted from the analysis, could be clear and precise, and is almost similar to the known simulated anomalous signals in the experiments.

  2. Boy-lovers and their influence on boys: distorted research and anecdotal observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brongersma, E

    1990-01-01

    A wide experience with boy-lovers has convinced the author that one can often learn more about them from reading some excellent novels than from so-called scientific studies. All too often research is unreliable because (1) it assumes pedosexual activity is a positive indicator of pedophilia; (2) no distinction is drawn between pseudo-pedophiles and real pedophiles; (3) no difference is recognized between boys and girls as partners; and (4) it is highly distorted by bias. Representative samples for research cannot be drawn from members of boy-love organizations. The incidence of violence is very low in pedophile contacts with boys. The influence can be strong in lasting relationships; it can be either wholesome or unwholesome. Within a relationship, sex is usually only a secondary element, although it can be important in sexual instruction and education. The impact of the law, the hostility of parents and the problem of the partners' inequality are discussed.

  3. Integrated modeling methodology for microtubule dynamics and Taxol kinetics with experimentally identifiable parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A

    2007-10-01

    Microtubule dynamics play a critical role in cell function and stress response, modulating mitosis, morphology, signaling, and transport. Drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol) can impact tubulin polymerization and affect microtubule dynamics. While theoretical methods have been previously proposed to simulate microtubule dynamics, we develop a methodology here that can be used to compare model predictions with experimental data. Our model is a hybrid of (1) a simple two-state stochastic formulation of tubulin polymerization kinetics and (2) an equilibrium approximation for the chemical kinetics of Taxol drug binding to microtubule ends. Model parameters are biologically realistic, with values taken directly from experimental measurements. Model validation is conducted against published experimental data comparing optical measurements of microtubule dynamics in cultured cells under normal and Taxol-treated conditions. To compare model predictions with experimental data requires applying a "windowing" strategy on the spatiotemporal resolution of the simulation. From a biological perspective, this is consistent with interpreting the microtubule "pause" phenomenon as at least partially an artifact of spatiotemporal resolution limits on experimental measurement.

  4. BCG-mediated bladder cancer immunotherapy: identifying determinants of treatment response using a calibrated mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentsch, Cyrill A; Biot, Claire; Gsponer, Joël R; Bachmann, Alexander; Albert, Matthew L; Breban, Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is considered the standard of care for treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however the treatment parameters were established empirically. In order to evaluate potential optimization of clinical parameters of BCG induction therapy, we constructed and queried a new mathematical model. Specifically, we assessed the impact of (1) duration between resection and the first instillation; (2) BCG dose; (3) indwelling time; and (4) treatment interval of induction therapy - using cure rate as the primary endpoint. Based on available clinical and in vitro experimental data, we constructed and parameterized a stochastic mathematical model describing the interactions between BCG, the immune system, the bladder mucosa and tumor cells. The primary endpoint of the model was the probability of tumor extinction following BCG induction therapy in patients with high risk for tumor recurrence. We theoretically demonstrate that extending the duration between the resection and the first BCG instillation negatively influences treatment outcome. Simulations of higher BCG doses and longer indwelling times both improved the probability of tumor extinction. A remarkable finding was that an inter-instillation interval two times longer than the seven-day interval used in the current standard of care would substantially improve treatment outcome. We provide insight into relevant clinical questions using a novel mathematical model of BCG immunotherapy. Our model predicts an altered regimen that may decrease side effects of treatment while improving response to therapy.

  5. Possibilities to identify engine combustion model parameters by analysis of the instantaneous crankshaft angular speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Slobodan J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, novel method for obtaining information about combustion process in individual cylinders of a multi-cylinder Spark Ignition Engine based on instantaneous crankshaft angular velocity is presented. The method is based on robust box constrained Levenberg-Marquardt minimization of nonlinear Least Squares given for measured and simulated instantaneous crankshaft angular speed which is determined from the solution of the engine dynamics torque balance equation. Combination of in-house developed comprehensive Zero-Dimensional Two-Zone SI engine combustion model and analytical friction loss model in angular domain have been applied to provide sensitivity and error analysis regarding Wiebe combustion model parameters, heat transfer coefficient and compression ratio. The analysis is employed to evaluate the basic starting assumption and possibility to provide reliable combustion analysis based on instantaneous engine crankshaft angular speed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. NPEE-290025 and TR-14074

  6. Utilizing Soize's Approach to Identify Parameter and Model Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonney, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Brake, Matthew Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in model parameters is a challenging task for analysts. Soize has derived a method that is able to characterize both model and parameter uncertainty independently. This method is explained with the assumption that some experimental data is available, and is divided into seven steps. Monte Carlo analyses are performed to select the optimal dispersion variable to match the experimental data. Along with the nominal approach, an alternative distribution can be used along with corrections that can be utilized to expand the scope of this method. This method is one of a very few methods that can quantify uncertainty in the model form independently of the input parameters. Two examples are provided to illustrate the methodology, and example code is provided in the Appendix.

  7. A short-term model of COPD identifies a role for mast cell tryptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Emma L.; Stevens, Richard L.; Jarnicki, Andrew G.; Kim, Richard Y.; Hanish, Irwan; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Deane, Andrew; Keely, Simon; Horvat, Jay C.; Yang, Ming; Oliver, Brian G.; van Rooijen, Nico; Inman, Mark D.; Adachi, Roberto; Soberman, Roy J.; Hamadi, Sahar; Wark, Peter A.; Foster, Paul S.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening inflammatory disorder of the lung. The development of effective therapies for COPD has been hampered by the lack of an animal model that mimics the human disease in a short time-frame. Objectives To create an early onset mouse model of cigarette smoke-induced COPD that develops the hallmark features of the human condition in a short time-frame. To use this model to better understand pathogenesis and the roles of macrophages and mast cells (MCs) in COPD. Methods Tightly controlled amounts of cigarette smoke were delivered to the airways of mice, and the development of the pathological features of COPD was assessed. The roles of macrophages and MC tryptase in pathogenesis were evaluated using depletion and in vitro studies and MC protease-6 deficient mice. Results After just 8 weeks of smoke exposure, wild-type mice developed chronic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, airway remodeling, emphysema, and reduced lung function. These characteristic features of COPD were glucocorticoid-resistant and did not spontaneously resolve. Systemic effects on skeletal muscle and the heart, and increased susceptibility to respiratory infections also were observed. Macrophages and tryptase-expressing MCs were required for the development of COPD. Recombinant MC tryptase induced pro-inflammatory responses from cultured macrophages. Conclusion A short-term mouse model of cigarette smoke-induced COPD was developed in which the characteristic features of the disease were induced more rapidly than existing models. The model can be used to better understand COPD pathogenesis, and we show a requirement for macrophages and tryptase-expressing MCs. PMID:23380220

  8. Estimation and identifiability of model parameters in human nociceptive processing using yes-no detection responses to electrocutaneous stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy or pathological states of nociceptive subsystems determine different stimulus-response relations measured from quantitative sensory testing. In turn, stimulus-responses measurements may be used to assess these states.In a recently developed computational model, six model parameters characterize activation of nerve endings and spinal neurons. However, both model nonlinearity and limited information in yes-no detection responses to electrocutaneous stimuli challenge to estimate model parameters. Here, we address the question whether and how one can overcome these difficulties for reliable parameter estimation. First, we fit the computational model to experimental stimulus-response pairs by maximizing the likelihood. To evaluate the balance between model fit and complexity, we evaluate the Bayesian Information Criterion. We find that the computational model is better than a conventional logistic model regarding the balance. Second, our theoretical analysis suggests to vary the pulse width among applied stimuli as a necessary condition to prevent structural non-identifiability. In addition, the numerically implemented profile likelihood approach reveals structural and practical non-identifiability. Our model-based approach with integration of psychophysical measurements can be useful for a reliable assessment of states of the nociceptive system.

  9. Testis Development and Fertility Potential in Boys with Klinefelter Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shanlee M; Rogol, Alan D; Ross, Judith L

    2015-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the leading genetic cause of primary hypogonadism and infertility in men. The clinical phenotype has expanded beyond the original description of infertility, small testes, and gynecomastia. Animal models, epidemiologic studies, and clinical research of male subjects with KS throughout the lifespan have allowed the better characterization of the variable phenotype of this condition. This review provides an overview on what is known of the epidemiology, clinical features, and pathophysiology of KS, followed by a more focused discussion of testicular development and the clinical management of hypogonadism and fertility in boys and men with KS.

  10. Boys in white: a classic of qualitative research turns 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte; de Barros, Nelson Filice

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes Boys in white: student culture in medical schoolby Howard S. Becker, Blanche Geer, Everett C. Hughes and Anselm Strauss, considered a model of qualitative research in sociology. The analysis investigates the trajectories of the authors, the book, qualitative analysis, and the medical students, emphasizing their importance in the origins of medical sociology and the sociology of medical education. In the trajectory of the authors, bibliographical information is given. The trajectory of qualitative research focuses on how this methodology influences the construction of the field. The investigation of the students' trajectory shows how they progress through their first years at medical school to build their own student culture.

  11. Combining multivariate analysis and monosaccharide composition modeling to identify plant cell wall variations by Fourier Transform Near Infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith-Moritz Andreia M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We outline a high throughput procedure that improves outlier detection in cell wall screens using FT-NIR spectroscopy of plant leaves. The improvement relies on generating a calibration set from a subset of a mutant population by taking advantage of the Mahalanobis distance outlier scheme to construct a monosaccharide range predictive model using PLS regression. This model was then used to identify specific monosaccharide outliers from the mutant population.

  12. Identifying genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, though differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor was examined using a two-choice feeding system and the Student’s t statistic. To eliminate the confounding effect of processin...

  13. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strock, T.W. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Gohara, W.F. [Babcock & Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  14. On the identifiability of the Hill-1948 model with one uniaxial tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Morgan; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    A uniaxial experiment is performed on an ultra-thin specimen made of 17-7 precipitation hardened stainless steel. An anti-wrinkling setup allows for the characterization of the mechanical behavior with Integrated Digital Image Correlation (IDIC). The result shows that a single uniaxial experiment investigated via IDIC possesses enough data (and even more) to characterize a complete anisotropic elastoplastic model.

  15. Identifying at-risk employees: A behavioral model for predicting potential insider threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Kangas, Lars J.; Noonan, Christine F.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2010-09-01

    A psychosocial model was developed to assess an employee’s behavior associated with an increased risk of insider abuse. The model is based on case studies and research literature on factors/correlates associated with precursor behavioral manifestations of individuals committing insider crimes. In many of these crimes, managers and other coworkers observed that the offenders had exhibited signs of stress, disgruntlement, or other issues, but no alarms were raised. Barriers to using such psychosocial indicators include the inability to recognize the signs and the failure to record the behaviors so that they could be assessed by a person experienced in psychosocial evaluations. We have developed a model using a Bayesian belief network with the help of human resources staff, experienced in evaluating behaviors in staff. We conducted an experiment to assess its agreement with human resources and management professionals, with positive results. If implemented in an operational setting, the model would be part of a set of management tools for employee assessment that can raise an alarm about employees who pose higher insider threat risks. In separate work, we combine this psychosocial model’s assessment with computer workstation behavior to raise the efficacy of recognizing an insider crime in the making.

  16. C-elegans model identifies genetic modifiers of alpha-synuclein inclusion formation during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Thijssen, Karen L.; Breitling, Rainer; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusions in the brain containing alpha-synuclein are the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease, but how these inclusions are formed and how this links to disease is poorly understood. We have developed a C. elegans model that makes it possible to monitor, in living animals, the formation of

  17. Very high resolution regional climate model simulations over Greenland: Identifying added value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas-Picher, P.; Wulff-Nielsen, M.; Christensen, J.H.;

    2012-01-01

    This study presents two simulations of the climate over Greenland with the regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM5 at 0.05° and 0.25° resolution driven at the lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis for the period 1989–2009. These simulations are validated against observations from meteorol...

  18. Method for identifying process reuse opportunities to enhance the operating model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Vries, M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available the volatility of strategy and suggests the use of an operating model (OM), which is a commitment to a way of doing business. The OM creates a company-wide vision for process standardization and data centralization and guides decisions about how a company...

  19. Identifying determinants of nations' wetland management programs using structural equation modeling: An exploratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, M.K.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; Reams, M.A.; Templet, P.H.; Grace, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Integrated management and policy models suggest that solutions to environmental issues may be linked to the socioeconomic and political Characteristics of a nation. In this study, we empirically explore these suggestions by applying them to the wetland management activities of nations. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate a model of national wetland management effort and one of national wetland protection. Using five predictor variables of social capital, economic capital, environmental and political characteristics, and land-use pressure, the multivariate models were able to explain 60% of the variation in nations' wetland protection efforts based on data from 90 nations, as defined by level of participation, in the international wetland convention. Social capital had the largest direct effect on wetland protection efforts, suggesting that increased social development may eventually lead to better wetland protection. In contrast, increasing economic development had a negative linear relationship with wetland protection efforts, suggesting the need for explicit wetland protection programs as nations continue to focus on economic development. Government, environmental characteristics, and land-use pressure also had a positive direct effect on wetland protection, and mediated the effect of social capital on wetland protection. Explicit wetland protection policies, combined with a focus on social development, would lead to better wetland protection at the national level.

  20. Fitting the Mixed Rasch Model to a Reading Comprehension Test: Identifying Reader Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Purya; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2013-01-01

    Standard unidimensional Rasch models assume that persons with the same ability parameters are comparable. That is, the same interpretation applies to persons with identical ability estimates as regards the underlying mental processes triggered by the test. However, research in cognitive psychology shows that persons at the same trait level may…

  1. Identifying Atomic Structure as a Threshold Concept: Student Mental Models and Troublesomeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung; Light, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Atomic theory or the nature of matter is a principal concept in science and science education. This has, however, been complicated by the difficulty students have in learning the concept and the subsequent construction of many alternative models. To understand better the conceptual barriers to learning atomic structure, this study explores the…

  2. A 3-D Mathematical Model to Identify Organ-Specific Risks in Rats During Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    model was im- ported into a FEM preprocessor and computer-aided design (CAD) software package, 3-matic (Materialise), and artifacts, such as inter ...Sports Exerc 37: 1338–1344, 2005. 11. Casa DJ, Armstrong LE, Ganio MS, Yeargin SW. Exertional heat stroke in competitive athletes. Curr Sports Med Rep 4

  3. Identifying Admired Models to Increase Emulation: Development of a Multidimensional Admiration Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapin, Susan H.; Christy, Katheryn; Lareau, Louise; Krakow, Melinda; Jensen, Jakob D.

    2015-01-01

    According to social cognitive theory, people are most likely to emulate the behaviors of admired models. Though potentially valuable to researchers and practitioners, this postulate remains untested, as there is no validated measure of admiration. To facilitate research on admiration, a 14-item measure was constructed and the resulting scores were…

  4. Identifying of risks in pricing using a regression model of demand on price dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Yashkina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The main purpose of the article is to describe scientific and methodological approaches of determining the price elasticity of demand as a regression model based on the price and risk assessment of price variations on the received model. The results of the analysis. The study is based on the assumption that the index of price elasticity of demand on high-tech innovation is not constant as it is commonly understood in the classical sense. On the stage of commodity market release and subsequent sales growth, the index of price elasticity of demand may vary within certain limits. Index value and thereafter market response are closely related to the current price. Achieving the stated purpose of the article is possible when having factual information about prices and corresponding volumes of sales of new high-tech products for a short period of time, on the basis of which types of demand and prices interrelation are modeled. Risk assessment of pricing and profit optimization by the regression of demand depending on price consists of three stages: a obtaining of a regression model of the demand on the price; b obtaining of function of demand price elasticity and risk assessment of pricing depending on behavior of the function; c determination of the price of company to receive a maximum operating profit based on the specific model of price to demand function. To receive the regression model of dependence of demand on price it is recommended to use specific reference models. The article includes linear, hyperbolic and parabolic models. The regression dependence of price elasticity of demand on price for each of the reference models of demand is obtained on the basis of the function elasticity concept in mathematical analysis. The concept of «function of price elasticity of demand» expresses this dependence. For the received functions of price elasticity of demand, the article provides intervals with the highest and lowest

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  6. High resolution modeling of agricultural nitrogen to identify private wells susceptible to nitrate contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Brendalynn; White, Denis; Harding, Anna; Mueller-Warrant, George; Hope, Bruce; Main, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Given the lack of data on private wells, public health and water quality specialists must explore alternative datasets for understanding associated exposures and health risks. Characterizing agricultural nitrogen inputs would be valuable for identifying areas where well water safety may be compromised. This study incorporated existing methods for estimating nutrient loading at the county level with datasets derived from a state permitting program for confined animal feeding operations and agricultural enterprise budget worksheets to produce a high resolution agricultural nitrogen raster map. This map was combined with data on soil leachability and new well locations. An algorithm was developed to calculate nitrogen loading and leachability within 1,000 meters of each well. Wells with a nonzero nitrogen total linked to soils with high leachability were categorized and displayed on maps communicating well susceptibility across the state of Oregon. Results suggest that 4% of recently drilled wells may be susceptible to nitrate contamination, while areas identified for mitigation are too restrictive to include all susceptible wells. Predicted increases in population density and the steady addition of approximately 3,800 new wells annually may lead to a large number of residents, especially those in rural areas, experiencing long-term exposures to nitrate in drinking water.

  7. Damage Detection of Structures Identified with Deterministic-Stochastic Models Using Seismic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems.

  8. Identifying Affinity Classes of Inorganic Materials Binding Sequences via a Graph-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Nan; Knecht, Marc R; Swihart, Mark T; Tang, Zhenghua; Walsh, Tiffany R; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in bionanotechnology have recently generated growing interest in identifying peptides that bind to inorganic materials and classifying them based on their inorganic material affinities. However, there are some distinct characteristics of inorganic materials binding sequence data that limit the performance of many widely-used classification methods when applied to this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to predict the affinity classes of peptide sequences with respect to an associated inorganic material. We first generate a large set of simulated peptide sequences based on an amino acid transition matrix tailored for the specific inorganic material. Then the probability of test sequences belonging to a specific affinity class is calculated by minimizing an objective function. In addition, the objective function is minimized through iterative propagation of probability estimates among sequences and sequence clusters. Results of computational experiments on two real inorganic material binding sequence data sets show that the proposed framework is highly effective for identifying the affinity classes of inorganic material binding sequences. Moreover, the experiments on the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) data set shows that the proposed framework is general and can be applied to traditional protein sequences.

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomics identifies filaggrin and other targets of ionizing radiation in a human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Sowa, Marianne B; von Neubeck, Claere; Aldrich, Josh T; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Stenoien, David L

    2012-05-01

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low- and high-dose ionizing radiation-dependent signalling in a complex three-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labelling strategy using sham and three radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1052 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 176 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1, 2 and 3) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. Altered phosphorylation of multiple sites in profilaggrin linker domains coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to both low and high doses of ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain tissue integrity and mitigate effects of radiation exposure.

  10. Proteomics-identified Bvg-activated autotransporters protect against bordetella pertussis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, Daan; Gouw, Daan de; de Jonge, Marien I; Jonge, Marien I de; Hermans, Peter W M; Wessels, Hans J C T; Zomer, Aldert; Berends, Alinda; Pratt, Catherine; Berbers, Guy A; Mooi, Frits R; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly infectious respiratory disease of humans caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis has re-emerged globally. Causes for the re-emergence of pertussis include limited duration of protection conferred by acellular pertussis vaccines (aP) and pathogen adaptation. Pathogen adaptations involve antigenic divergence with vaccine strains, the emergence of strains which show enhanced in vitro expression of a number of virulence-associated genes and of strains that do not express pertactin, an important aP component. Clearly, the identification of more effective B. pertussis vaccine antigens is of utmost importance. To identify novel antigens, we used proteomics to identify B. pertussis proteins regulated by the master virulence regulatory system BvgAS in vitro. Five candidates proteins were selected and it was confirmed that they were also expressed in the lungs of naïve mice seven days after infection. The five proteins were expressed in recombinant form, adjuvanted with alum and used to immunize mice as stand-alone antigens. Subsequent respiratory challenge showed that immunization with the autotransporters Vag8 and SphB1 significantly reduced bacterial load in the lungs. Whilst these antigens induced strong opsonizing antibody responses, we found that none of the tested alum-adjuvanted vaccines - including a three-component aP - reduced bacterial load in the nasopharynx, suggesting that alternative immunological responses may be required for efficient bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx.

  11. Birth on the Playground: Boys' Experiences Playing with Gender

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    Specifically, the study investigated the ways in which boys explore gender roles in relation to pregnancy and birthing. ... experience and helped to analyze our findings. The literature ..... although these teachers were not the boys' current or.

  12. Pregnancy Problems More Likely with Baby Boys, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160159.html Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests Gender-related differences seem to start ... are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half ...

  13. A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats during thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Helwig, Bryan G; Leon, Lisa R; Jackson, David A; Reifman, Jaques

    2013-12-01

    Early prediction of the adverse outcomes associated with heat stress is critical for effective management and mitigation of injury, which may sometimes lead to extreme undesirable clinical conditions, such as multiorgan dysfunction syndrome and death. Here, we developed a computational model to predict the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in a rat exposed to heat stress in an attempt to understand the correlation between heat load and differential organ dysfunction. The model includes a three-dimensional representation of the rat anatomy obtained from medical imaging and incorporates the key mechanisms of heat transfer during thermoregulation. We formulated a novel approach to estimate blood temperature by accounting for blood mixing from the different organs and to estimate the effects of the circadian rhythm in body temperature by considering day-night variations in metabolic heat generation and blood perfusion. We validated the model using in vivo core temperature measurements in control and heat-stressed rats and other published experimental data. The model predictions were within 1 SD of the measured data. The liver demonstrated the greatest susceptibility to heat stress, with the maximum temperature reaching 2°C higher than the measured core temperature and 95% of its volume exceeding the targeted experimental core temperature. Other organs also attained temperatures greater than the core temperature, illustrating the need to monitor multiple organs during heat stress. The model facilitates the identification of organ-specific risks during heat stress and has the potential to aid in the development of improved clinical strategies for thermal-injury prevention and management.

  14. Identifying victims of workplace bullying by integrating traditional estimation approaches into a latent class cluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Perez, Jose M; Notelaers, Guy; Arenas, Alicia; Munduate, Lourdes; Medina, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Research findings underline the negative effects of exposure to bullying behaviors and document the detrimental health effects of being a victim of workplace bullying. While no one disputes its negative consequences, debate continues about the magnitude of this phenomenon since very different prevalence rates of workplace bullying have been reported. Methodological aspects may explain these findings. Our contribution to this debate integrates behavioral and self-labeling estimation methods of workplace bullying into a measurement model that constitutes a bullying typology. Results in the present sample (n = 1,619) revealed that six different groups can be distinguished according to the nature and intensity of reported bullying behaviors. These clusters portray different paths for the workplace bullying process, where negative work-related and person-degrading behaviors are strongly intertwined. The analysis of the external validity showed that integrating previous estimation methods into a single measurement latent class model provides a reliable estimation method of workplace bullying, which may overcome previous flaws.

  15. Very high resolution regional climate model simulations over Greenland: Identifying added value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas-Picher, P.; Wulff-Nielsen, M.; Christensen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents two simulations of the climate over Greenland with the regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM5 at 0.05° and 0.25° resolution driven at the lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis for the period 1989–2009. These simulations are validated against observations from...... models. However, the bias between the simulations and the few available observations does not reduce with higher resolution. This is partly explained by the lack of observations in regions where the higher resolution is expected to improve the simulated climate. The RCM simulations show...... meteorological stations (Danish Meteorological Institute) at the coast and automatic weather stations on the ice sheet (Greenland Climate Network). Generally, the temperature and precipitation biases are small, indicating a realistic simulation of the climate over Greenland that is suitable to drive ice sheet...

  16. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them.

  17. Identifying plausible genetic models based on association and linkage results: application to type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Boehnke, Michael; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Cox, Nancy J; Scott, Laura J

    2012-12-01

    When planning resequencing studies for complex diseases, previous association and linkage studies can constrain the range of plausible genetic models for a given locus. Here, we explore the combinations of causal risk allele frequency (RAFC ) and genotype relative risk (GRRC ) consistent with no or limited evidence for affected sibling pair (ASP) linkage and strong evidence for case-control association. We find that significant evidence for case-control association combined with no or moderate evidence for ASP linkage can define a lower bound for the plausible RAFC . Using data from large type 2 diabetes (T2D) linkage and genome-wide association study meta-analyses, we find that under reasonable model assumptions, 23 of 36 autosomal T2D risk loci are unlikely to be due to causal variants with combined RAFC < 0.005, and four of the 23 are unlikely to be due to causal variants with combined RAFC < 0.05.

  18. Identifying the Reducing Resistance to Change Phase in an Organizational Change Model

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Bradutanu

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine where in an organizational change process it is better to place the reducing resistance to change phase, so that employees would accept the new changes easier and not manifest too much resistance. After analyzing twelve organizational change models we have concluded that the place of the reducing resistance to change phase in an organizational change process is not the same, it being modified according to the type of change. The results of this study are helpful for...

  19. Examining the Possibilities of Identifying and Modeling Correlations between Product Families and Business Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    2010-01-01

    In order for companies to make well founded decisions on the product family makeup, an understanding of the correlation between the complexity of the product family and business processes is required, though it is often not available. This paper investigates the potential of using the Product Variant Master (PVM) modeling technique and Process Flow Charts in combination, to analyze the correlation between complexity in product families and business processes. The approach is based on a visual...

  20. Model to identify mathematics topics in MXit lingo to provide tutors quick access to supporting documentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available of ?parabola? could be a subtopic in the major topic of ?algebra?. Subtopics could belong to more than one major topic; for example, the subtopic ?parabola? could also belong to the major topic ?graphs?. As with the compilation of the Create... instantiation of the ? model for integration into the Dr Math tutoring platform, mathematics topics were subdivided into topics and subtopics. The topics were algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, statistics, financial mathematics, number theory...

  1. Models of self-peptide sampling by developing T cells identify candidate mechanisms of thymic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Bains

    Full Text Available Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T(conv and T(reg are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T(conv and T(reg development.

  2. A Program Evaluation Model: Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Identify Outcome Indicators in Outcomes-Based Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Rita C.

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes-based program evaluation is a systematic approach to identifying outcome indicators and measuring results against those indicators. One dimension of program evaluation is assessing the level of learner acquisition to determine if learning objectives were achieved as intended. The purpose of the proposed model is to use Bloom's Taxonomy to…

  3. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M; Bruinsma, Caroline F; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-05-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design.

  4. Identifying future models for delivering genetic services: a nominal group study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Peter

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background To enable primary care medical practitioners to generate a range of possible service delivery models for genetic counselling services and critically assess their suitability. Methods Modified nominal group technique using in primary care professional development workshops. Results 37 general practitioners in Wales, United Kingdom too part in the nominal group process. The practitioners who attended did not believe current systems were sufficient to meet anticipated demand for genetic services. A wide range of different service models was proposed, although no single option emerged as a clear preference. No argument was put forward for genetic assessment and counselling being central to family practice, neither was there a voice for the view that the family doctor should become skilled at advising patients about predictive genetic testing and be able to counsel patients about the wider implications of genetic testing for patients and their family members, even for areas such as common cancers. Nevertheless, all the preferred models put a high priority on providing the service in the community, and often co-located in primary care, by clinicians who had developed expertise. Conclusion There is a need for a wider debate about how healthcare systems address individual concerns about genetic concerns and risk, especially given the increasing commercial marketing of genetic tests.

  5. Stochastic modeling to identify requirements for centralized monitoring of distributed wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, T; Maurer, M

    2012-01-01

    Distributed (decentralized) wastewater treatment can, in many situations, be a valuable alternative to a centralized sewer network and wastewater treatment plant. However, it is critical for its acceptance whether the same overall treatment performance can be achieved without on-site staff, and whether its performance can be measured. In this paper we argue and illustrate that the system performance depends not only on the design performance and reliability of the individual treatment units, but also significantly on the monitoring scheme, i.e. on the reliability of the process information. For this purpose, we present a simple model of a fleet of identical treatment units. Thereby, their performance depends on four stochastic variables: the reliability of the treatment unit, the respond time for the repair of failed units, the reliability of on-line sensors, and the frequency of routine inspections. The simulated scenarios show a significant difference between the true performance and the observations by the sensors and inspections. The results also illustrate the trade-off between investing in reactor and sensor technology and in human interventions in order to achieve a certain target performance. Modeling can quantify such effects and thereby support the identification of requirements for the centralized monitoring of distributed treatment units. The model approach is generic and can be extended and applied to various distributed wastewater treatment technologies and contexts.

  6. Identifying the Mysterious EGRET Sources Signatures of Polar Cap Pulsar Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    2001-01-01

    The advent of the next generation of gamma-ray experiments, led by GLAST, AGILE, INTEGRAL and a host of atmospheric \\v{C}erenkov telescopes coming on line in the next few years, will enable ground-breaking discoveries relating to the presently enigmatic set of EGRET/CGRO UID galactic sources that have yet to find definitive identifications. Pulsars are principal candidates for such sources, and many are expected to be detected by GLAST, some that are radio-selected, like most of the present EGRET/Comptel pulsars, and perhaps even more that are detected via independent pulsation searches. At this juncture, it is salient to outline the principal predictions of pulsar models that might aid identification of gamma-ray sources, and moreover propel subsequent interpretation of their properties. This review summarizes relevant characteristics of the polar cap model, emphasizing where possible distinctions from the competing outer gap model. Foremost among these considerations are the hard X-ray to gamma-ray spectral...

  7. Brain slices as models for neurodegenerative disease and screening platforms to identify novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Bowlby, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    Recent improvements in brain slice technology have made this biological preparation increasingly useful for examining pathophysiology of brain diseases in a tissue context. Brain slices maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for dissection of molecular pathways underlying neuronal dysfunction. Importantly, these ex vivo systems permit direct treatment with pharmacological agents modulating these responses and thus provide surrogate therapeutic screening systems without recourse to whole animal studies. Virus or particle mediated transgenic expression can also be accomplished relatively easily to study the function of novel genes in a normal or injured brain tissue context.In this review we will discuss acute brain injury models in organotypic hippocampal and co-culture systems and the effects of pharmacological modulation on neurodegeneration. The review will also cover the evidence of developmental plasticity in these ex vivo models, demonstrating emergence of injury-stimulated neuronal progenitor cells, and neurite sprouting and axonal regeneration following pathway lesioning. Neuro-and axo-genesis are emerging as significant factors contributing to brain repair following many acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore brain slice models may provide a critical contextual experimental system to explore regenerative mechanisms in vitro.

  8. Spontaneously hypertensive rats: a potential model to identify drugs for treatment of learning disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1998-04-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of 3 to 12 months of age learned and retrieved less information than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), although no difference was found with animals from 18 and 24 months of age. The combined influence of hypertension and aging had an additive detrimental effect on cognitive functions. Notwithstanding these deficiencies in learning and memory, SHR have seldom been used as a model in the screening of drugs with therapeutic potential for treatment of disorders of cognitive processes. Moreover, the calcium channel blocker nimodipine has beneficial effects on learning in both aged and hypertensive animals and humans. However, no attempt has been made to investigate whether nimodipine can reverse the additive deleterious effects of aging and hypertension in the same subject. We recently reported that deteriorated animals (middle-aged and/or hypertensive) chronically treated with nimodipine (via osmotic minipumps) exhibit higher learning scores. This information indicates that nimodipine can reverse the impairing effects of either aging or hypertension on learning; the presence of the two conditions, however, produces a severe impairment that can be partially reversed by this drug. Therefore, we propose that mature and middle-aged SHR represent a model for the screening of potentially useful drugs in the treatment of learning disorders, probably associated with hypertension and/or aging. Nevertheless, it must be remembered that the SHR is a genetic model and the appearance of neural disturbances could be a parallel genetic phenomenon and not necessarily or exclusively related to hypertension per se.

  9. Structural equation modeling identifies markers of damage and function in the aging male Fischer 344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth A; Nichols, LaNita A; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Spagnoli, Sean; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Parrish, Alan R

    2016-06-01

    The male Fischer 344 rat is an established model to study progressive renal dysfunction that is similar, but not identical, to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans. These studies were designed to assess age-dependent alterations in renal structure and function at late-life timepoints, 16-24 months. Elevations in BUN and plasma creatinine were not significant until 24 months, however, elevations in the more sensitive markers of function, plasma cystatin C and proteinuria, were detectable at 16 and 18 months, respectively. Interestingly, cystatin C levels were not corrected by caloric restriction. Urinary Kim-1, a marker of CKD, was elevated as early as 16 months. Klotho gene expression was significantly decreased at 24 months, but not at earlier timepoints. Alterations in renal structure, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, were noted at 16 months, with little change from 18 to 24 months. Tubulointerstitial inflammation was increased at 16 months, and remained similar from 18 to 24 months. A SEM (structural equation modeling) model of age-related renal dysfunction suggests that proteinuria is a marker of renal damage, while urinary Kim-1 is a marker of both damage and function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that age-dependent nephropathy begins as early as 16 months and progresses rapidly over the next 8 months.

  10. A stochastic multicellular model identifies biological watermarks from disorders in self-organized patterns of phyllotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refahi, Yassin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Farcot, Etienne; Jean-Marie, Alain; Pulkkinen, Minna; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of developmental mechanisms classically relies on analysis of pattern regularities. Whether disorders induced by biological noise may carry information on building principles of developmental systems is an important debated question. Here, we addressed theoretically this question using phyllotaxis, the geometric arrangement of plant aerial organs, as a model system. Phyllotaxis arises from reiterative organogenesis driven by lateral inhibitions at the shoot apex. Motivated by recurrent observations of disorders in phyllotaxis patterns, we revisited in depth the classical deterministic view of phyllotaxis. We developed a stochastic model of primordia initiation at the shoot apex, integrating locality and stochasticity in the patterning system. This stochastic model recapitulates phyllotactic patterns, both regular and irregular, and makes quantitative predictions on the nature of disorders arising from noise. We further show that disorders in phyllotaxis instruct us on the parameters governing phyllotaxis dynamics, thus that disorders can reveal biological watermarks of developmental systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14093.001 PMID:27380805

  11. Achondroplasia and enchondromatosis: report of three boys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numakura, Chikahiko [Yamagata University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Yamagata (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children' s Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Hironori [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Shimane (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children' s Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, Masanori [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Clinical Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan); Kim, Ok Hwa [Ajou University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    We report on three boys suffering from achondroplasia concurrent with enchondromatosis-like metaphyseal changes. Two boys who were examined by molecular analysis harbored a mutation of FGFR3, which occurs in most achondroplastic individuals. Given the prevalence of achondroplasia and enchondromatosis, the metaphyseal changes in these patients are less likely to represent the coincidence of both disorders, but rather to result from a rare consequence of the FGFR3 mutation. Impaired FGFs/FGFR3 signaling pathway in achondroplasia inhibits chondrocytic proliferation, which accounts for most characteristics of achondroplasia. On the other hand, it causes conflicting biological consequences that can suppress or stimulate chondrocytic maturation. In a small subset of achondroplastic individuals, the suppression of chondrocytic maturation may outweigh the stimulation, which leads to cartilaginous overgrowth into the metaphysis, eventually causing the metaphyseal dysplasia found in the present patients. (orig.)

  12. The Psychoeducational Profile of Boys with Klinefelter Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovet, Joanne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article integrates the literature on intelligence and achievement outcomes in boys with Klinefelter syndrome (KS). It reports results of a study following 36 boys with KS and 33 sibling controls. Boys with KS demonstrated verbal cognitive deficits and significant underachievement in reading, spelling, and arithmetic, which increased with age.…

  13. Boys' Friendships during Adolescence: Intimacy, Desire, and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Niobe

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal, mixed method research on friendships, conducted over the past two decades with Black, Latino, Asian, and European American boys, reveals three themes: (1) the importance for boys of being able to share their secrets with their close friends; (2) the importance of close friendships for boys' mental health; and (3) the loss of but…

  14. Boys' Friendships during Adolescence: Intimacy, Desire, and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Niobe

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal, mixed method research on friendships, conducted over the past two decades with Black, Latino, Asian, and European American boys, reveals three themes: (1) the importance for boys of being able to share their secrets with their close friends; (2) the importance of close friendships for boys' mental health; and (3) the loss of but…

  15. A Stereotype Threat Account of Boys' Academic Underachievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Bonny L.; Sutton, Robbie M.

    2013-01-01

    Three studies examined the role of stereotype threat in boys' academic underachievement. Study 1 (children aged 4-10, n = 238) showed that girls from age 4 years and boys from age 7 years believed, and thought adults believed, that boys are academically inferior to girls. Study 2 manipulated stereotype threat, informing children aged…

  16. I Can Learn from You: Boys as Relational Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Michael; Hawley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In "I Can Learn from You," Michael Reichert and Richard Hawley--the authors of "Reaching Boys, Teaching Boys"--set out to probe deeply into the relational dynamics that help boys succeed as learners. Drawing on interviews with students and teachers in thirty-five schools across six countries, they examine the particular ways…

  17. "Boys Don't Do Dance, Do They?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the Warwick Arts Centre launched the "Boys Dancing" project through the formation of the West Midlands Boys Dance Alliance. Aimed exclusively at boys and young men, the project has offered a range of performance-making opportunities with male professionals including Liam Steel (DV8, Stan Won't Dance) and David McKenna…

  18. Identifying Training Images from Fracture Outcrops for MPS-based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Mukerji, T.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Various MPS (multi-point geostatistics) based techniques have been successfully employed for modeling heterogeneous geologic features such as channel bodies. However, few studies exist on modeling fracture networks implementing MPS. Selecting a TI (training image) that is representative of the target subsurface fracture pattern is key to an effective implementation of any MPS algorithm. While recent research has employed equivalent continuum models created from Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) to serve as TIs, the present research explores the direct usage of outcrop analogues of fracture networks for this purpose. A set of nested-fracture maps from the Devonian Sandstone of Hornelen basin created at multiple scales and resolutions is considered. These maps have been previously classified as belonging to a single fractal system characterized by a fractal dimension but having slightly different spatial organization at each scale. Our research implements unconditional image quilting in generating multiple realizations of fracture networks from these maps. This pattern-based algorithm requires a template-size to be chosen which is representative of the heterogeneity of the pattern of interest. Lacunarity is a technique that essentially quantifies the distribution of spaces or gaps in a pattern and can thus delineate scale-dependent heterogeneity. It is therefore investigated if this technique, in conjunction with Entropy (a measure for randomness), can be applied for choosing the template-size required for reproducing a desired pattern from a given TI. Finally, it will be tested if fracture networks generated from two or more TIs at different scales but belonging to the same fractal-fracture system, can capture similar ranges of uncertainty.

  19. Utilizing a logic model to identify clinical research problems: a lesson from philosophy of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins CR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia R Collins School of Nursing, College of Social Sciences, Loyola University, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Communication and decision making in the health care workplace often involve finding solutions to ill-structured problems in uncertain, dynamic environments influenced by the competing interests of multiple stakeholders. In this environment, doctoral-prepared nurses who practice as administrators, policy makers, or advanced practice practitioners are often compelled to make important decisions based upon evaluating the merit of colleagues’ proposals against some desired organizational or population outcome. Of equal importance is the nurse leader’s own capacity to construct a compelling argument or proposal that will drive the organization forward to meet the evolving needs for quality health care. Where do we learn the skills necessary to foster this kind of critical thinking in our professional communications? The author suggests that one teaching–learning approach can be found through the thoughtful application of the work of British philosopher Steven Toulmin. Toulmin defined a model for both the analysis and derivation of logical arguments or proposals that can be readily learned and applied for use in health care systems. This model posits that a substantive argument or claim can be evaluated based on the assumptions it presumes (warrants and the strength of the evidence base (backing. Several of the social science professions have adapted Toulmin’s model to generate analysis and creative solutions to complex or emergent problems. The author proposes that an application of this model be included in the pedagogy of doctoral level Philosophy of Science or Nursing Theory courses. The Toulmin process often provides the doctoral student or novice researcher with their first real learning experience in defining the scope and inherent challenges of framing a clinical issue to be the focus of their scholarly translational

  20. Extrapolation of model tests measurements of whipping to identify the dimensioning sea states for container ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storhaug, Gaute; Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Whipping can contribute to increased fatigue and extreme loading of container ships, and guidelines have been made available by the leading class societies. Reports concerning the hogging collapse of MSC Napoli and MOL Comfort suggest that whipping contributed. The accidents happened in moderate...... to small storms. Model tests of three container ships have been carried out in different sea states under realistic assumptions. Preliminary extrapolation of the measured data suggested that moderate storms are dimensioning when whipping is included due to higher maximum speed in moderate storms...

  1. Visceral Leishmaniasis In A Native Kashmiri Boy

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    Deepti Mahajan, M.L. Bhat

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, though widely prevalent in South Asia, is not seen in the Kashmir valley where the coldclimatic conditions create a hostile environment for the growth of the parasite or its vector, the sandfly.However, a few cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis have been documented from the hot and arid Uri belt ofKashmir. We present a case of visceral leishmaniasis in a boy hailing from Uri, a rarity in this region.

  2. Netduino home automation projects for lazy boys

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanagh, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Netduino Home Automation Projects for Lazy Boys is written in a practical and friendly style. Reading this book will be an experience full of fun and learning as well.This book is ideally suited for someone who is interested in home automation, has some experience in C#, and has used a Netduino before but wants to explore more advanced topics. However, the book starts from the very basics so it can be picked up even by novices.

  3. From Implement to Outcrop: a model for identifying implement source rock at outcrop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Davis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the sourcing of prehistoric stone tools in Britain has been done most successfully by comparing the petrological and geochemical characteristics of individual stone tools with rock and debitage from known prehistoric quarry sites and stone tool production sites. However, this is a very rare occurrence because only a very small proportion of stone tools in Britain have a secure archaeological provenance, including those from prehistoric quarries or production sites. Substantial numbers of stone tools in the British archaeological record are chance finds; they lack a secure archaeological context. Through a case study of Carrock Fell and the Implement Petrology Group XXXIV, this article presents a new methodological and statistical model for assembling, analysing and interpreting fieldwork evidence, which combines petrological, geochemical portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF data, and geochemical inductively coupled plasma-atomic spectroscopy (ICP data to establish a signature for 17 gabbroic prehistoric stone implements (Table 1. These results are then compared with similar data gathered from rocks at outcrop. Through qualitative and quantitative analysis, seven gabbroic implements could be securely provenanced to rock from particular outcrop locations. The model is transferable to other similar contexts where sources of implement rock are sought from apparently random distributions of stone tools.

  4. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Gleit Kielmanowicz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees. The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health.

  5. Modeling the City Distribution System Reliability with Bayesian Networks to Identify Influence Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the increasingly uncertain economic environment, the research on the reliability of urban distribution system has great practical significance for the integration of logistics and supply chain resources. This paper summarizes the factors that affect the city logistics distribution system. Starting from the research of factors that influence the reliability of city distribution system, further construction of city distribution system reliability influence model is built based on Bayesian networks. The complex problem is simplified by using the sub-Bayesian network, and an example is analyzed. In the calculation process, we combined the traditional Bayesian algorithm and the Expectation Maximization (EM algorithm, which made the Bayesian model able to lay a more accurate foundation. The results show that the Bayesian network can accurately reflect the dynamic relationship among the factors affecting the reliability of urban distribution system. Moreover, by changing the prior probability of the node of the cause, the correlation degree between the variables that affect the successful distribution can be calculated. The results have significant practical significance on improving the quality of distribution, the level of distribution, and the efficiency of enterprises.

  6. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J R; Ballam, Joan M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health.

  7. Boys Live Dangerously in the Womb

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIKSSON, JOHAN G.; KAJANTIE, EERO; OSMOND, CLIVE; THORNBURG, KENT; BARKER, DAVID J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of every human fetus is constrained by the limited capacity of the mother and placenta to deliver nutrients to it. At birth, boys tend to be longer than girls at any placental weight. Boy’s placentas may therefore be more efficient than girls, but may have less reserve capacity. In the womb boys grow faster than girls and are therefore at greater risk of becoming undernourished. Fetal undernutrition leads to small size at birth and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, in later life. We studied 2003 men and women aged around 62 years who were born in Helsinki, Finland, of whom 644 had hypertension: we examined their body and placental size at birth. In both sexes, hypertension was associated with low birth weight. In men, hypertension was also associated with a long minor diameter of the placental surface. The dangerous growth strategy of boys may be compounded by the costs of compensatory placental enlargement in late gestation. In women, hypertension was associated with a small placental area, which may reduce nutrient delivery to the fetus. In men, hypertension was linked to the mothers’ socioeconomic status, an indicator of their diets: in women it was linked to the mothers’ heights, an indicator of their protein metabolism. Boys’ greater dependence on their mothers’ diets may enable them to capitalize on an improving food supply, but it makes them vulnerable to food shortages. The ultimate manifestation of their dangerous strategies may be that men have higher blood pressures and shorter lives than women. PMID:19844898

  8. Milk consumption and acne in teenaged boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebamowo, Clement A; Spiegelman, Donna; Berkey, Catherine S; Danby, F William; Rockett, Helaine H; Colditz, Graham A; Willett, Walter C; Holmes, Michelle D

    2008-05-01

    We sought to examine the association between dietary dairy intake and teenaged acne among boys. This was a prospective cohort study. We studied 4273 boys, members of a prospective cohort study of youths and of lifestyle factors, who reported dietary intake on up to 3 food frequency questionnaires from 1996 to 1998 and teenaged acne in 1999. We computed multivariate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for acne. After adjusting for age at baseline, height, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval; P value for test of trend) for acne comparing highest (>2 servings/d) with lowest (Acne assessment was by self-report and boys whose symptoms might have been part of an underlying disorder were not excluded. We did not adjust for steroid use and other lifestyle factors that may affect occurrence of acne. We found a positive association between intake of skim milk and acne. This finding suggests that skim milk contains hormonal constituents, or factors that influence endogenous hormones, in sufficient quantities to have biological effects in consumers.

  9. Machine learning approach identifies new pathways associated with demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis is an experimentally virus-induced inflammatory demyelinating disease of the spinal cord, displaying clinical and pathological similarities to chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify pathways associated with chronic demyelination using an assumption-free combined microarray and immunohistology approach. Movement control as determined by rotarod assay significantly worsened in Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis -virus-infected SJL/J mice from 42 to 196 days after infection (dpi). In the spinal cords, inflammatory changes were detected 14 to 196 dpi, and demyelination progressively increased from 42 to 196 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed 1001 differentially expressed genes over the study period. The dominating changes as revealed by k-means and functional annotation clustering included up-regulations related to intrathecal antibody production and antigen processing and presentation via major histocompatibility class II molecules. A random forest machine learning algorithm revealed that down-regulated lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis, differentially expressed neurite morphogenesis and up-regulated toll-like receptor-4-induced pathways were intimately associated with demyelination as measured by immunohistology. Conclusively, although transcriptional changes were dominated by the adaptive immune response, the main pathways associated with demyelination included up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 and down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol biosynthesis is a rate limiting step of myelination and its down-regulation is suggested to be involved in chronic demyelination by an inhibition of remyelination. PMID:19183246

  10. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  11. A note on MAR, identifying restrictions, model comparison, and sensitivity analysis in pattern mixture models with and without covariates for incomplete data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenguang; Daniels, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    Pattern mixture modeling is a popular approach for handling incomplete longitudinal data. Such models are not identifiable by construction. Identifying restrictions is one approach to mixture model identification (Little, 1995, Journal of the American Statistical Association 90, 1112-1121; Little and Wang, 1996, Biometrics 52, 98-111; Thijs et al., 2002, Biostatistics 3, 245-265; Kenward, Molenberghs, and Thijs, 2003, Biometrika 90, 53-71; Daniels and Hogan, 2008, in Missing Data in Longitudinal Studies: Strategies for Bayesian Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis) and is a natural starting point for missing not at random sensitivity analysis (Thijs et al., 2002, Biostatistics 3, 245-265; Daniels and Hogan, 2008, in Missing Data in Longitudinal Studies: Strategies for Bayesian Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis). However, when the pattern specific models are multivariate normal, identifying restrictions corresponding to missing at random (MAR) may not exist. Furthermore, identification strategies can be problematic in models with covariates (e.g., baseline covariates with time-invariant coefficients). In this article, we explore conditions necessary for identifying restrictions that result in MAR to exist under a multivariate normality assumption and strategies for identifying sensitivity parameters for sensitivity analysis or for a fully Bayesian analysis with informative priors. In addition, we propose alternative modeling and sensitivity analysis strategies under a less restrictive assumption for the distribution of the observed response data. We adopt the deviance information criterion for model comparison and perform a simulation study to evaluate the performances of the different modeling approaches. We also apply the methods to a longitudinal clinical trial. Problems caused by baseline covariates with time-invariant coefficients are investigated and an alternative identifying restriction based on residuals is proposed as a solution.

  12. Childhood acne in a boy with XYY syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparis, Christos; Loffeld, Annette

    2014-01-06

    A 3-year-old boy was referred to the dermatology department with a 12-month history of facial erythema associated with a papular-pustular facial eruption consistent with childhood acne. He had been diagnosed with XYY syndrome identified during genetic analysis for cardiac anomalies at birth. XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy of the sex chromosomes which affects 1 in 1000 male births. It is often asymptomatic and identified incidentally following genetic analysis for other conditions. The syndrome can be associated with an increased risk of learning difficulties and delayed language skills. Early diagnosis could alert physicians to the possibility of subtle developmental and learning abnormalities and result in prompt management. Our case highlights the fact that the presence of childhood acne could aid in the early detection of XYY syndrome.

  13. Childhood acne in a boy with XYY syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparis, Christos; Loffeld, Annette

    2014-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy was referred to the dermatology department with a 12-month history of facial erythema associated with a papular-pustular facial eruption consistent with childhood acne. He had been diagnosed with XYY syndrome identified during genetic analysis for cardiac anomalies at birth. XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy of the sex chromosomes which affects 1 in 1000 male births. It is often asymptomatic and identified incidentally following genetic analysis for other conditions. The syndrome can be associated with an increased risk of learning difficulties and delayed language skills. Early diagnosis could alert physicians to the possibility of subtle developmental and learning abnormalities and result in prompt management. Our case highlights the fact that the presence of childhood acne could aid in the early detection of XYY syndrome. PMID:24395875

  14. A conceptual model for identifying, preventing, and managing secondary conditions in people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, James H; Chen, Ming-De; Hsieh, Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Secondary conditions are considered a direct consequence of having a disability, and many are presumed to be preventable. Although a few researchers have noted that people with disabilities are exposed to several secondary conditions, including pain, fatigue, depression, and obesity, what is lacking in the literature is a conceptual framework for understanding the antecedents, risk factors, and consequences of secondary conditions. To move the rehabilitation and public health professions toward a more unified approach to understanding and managing secondary conditions as well as distinguishing them from chronic and associated conditions, this article proposes a set of criteria for defining secondary conditions and a conceptual model that considers the potential factors associated with their onset, impact, severity, and management.

  15. A method to identify energy efficiency measures for factory systems based on qualitative modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Krones, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Manuela Krones develops a method that supports factory planners in generating energy-efficient planning solutions. The method provides qualitative description concepts for factory planning tasks and energy efficiency knowledge as well as an algorithm-based linkage between these measures and the respective planning tasks. Its application is guided by a procedure model which allows a general applicability in the manufacturing sector. The results contain energy efficiency measures that are suitable for a specific planning task and reveal the roles of various actors for the measures’ implementation. Contents Driving Concerns for and Barriers against Energy Efficiency Approaches to Increase Energy Efficiency in Factories Socio-Technical Description of Factory Planning Tasks Description of Energy Efficiency Measures Case Studies on Welding Processes and Logistics Systems Target Groups Lecturers and Students of Industrial Engineering, Production Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Practi...

  16. A Kriging surrogate model coupled in simulation-optimization approach for identifying release history of groundwater sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Lu, Wenxi; Xiao, Chuanning

    2016-02-01

    As the incidence frequency of groundwater pollution increases, many methods that identify source characteristics of pollutants are being developed. In this study, a simulation-optimization approach was applied to determine the duration and magnitude of pollutant sources. Such problems are time consuming because thousands of simulation models are required to run the optimization model. To address this challenge, the Kriging surrogate model was proposed to increase computational efficiency. Accuracy, time consumption, and the robustness of the Kriging model were tested on both homogenous and non-uniform media, as well as steady-state and transient flow and transport conditions. The results of three hypothetical cases demonstrate that the Kriging model has the ability to solve groundwater contaminant source problems that could occur during field site source identification problems with a high degree of accuracy and short computation times and is thus very robust.

  17. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Holme

    Full Text Available The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species. For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  18. Bayesian distributed lag interaction models to identify perinatal windows of vulnerability in children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ander; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien Leon; Wright, Robert O; Wright, Rosalind J; Coull, Brent A

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiological research supports an association between maternal exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and adverse children's health outcomes. Advances in exposure assessment and statistics allow for estimation of both critical windows of vulnerability and exposure effect heterogeneity. Simultaneous estimation of windows of vulnerability and effect heterogeneity can be accomplished by fitting a distributed lag model (DLM) stratified by subgroup. However, this can provide an incomplete picture of how effects vary across subgroups because it does not allow for subgroups to have the same window but different within-window effects or to have different windows but the same within-window effect. Because the timing of some developmental processes are common across subpopulations of infants while for others the timing differs across subgroups, both scenarios are important to consider when evaluating health risks of prenatal exposures. We propose a new approach that partitions the DLM into a constrained functional predictor that estimates windows of vulnerability and a scalar effect representing the within-window effect directly. The proposed method allows for heterogeneity in only the window, only the within-window effect, or both. In a simulation study we show that a model assuming a shared component across groups results in lower bias and mean squared error for the estimated windows and effects when that component is in fact constant across groups. We apply the proposed method to estimate windows of vulnerability in the association between prenatal exposures to fine particulate matter and each of birth weight and asthma incidence, and estimate how these associations vary by sex and maternal obesity status in a Boston-area prospective pre-birth cohort study. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. 3D geostatistical modelling for identifying sinkhole disaster potential zones around the Verkhnekamskoye potash deposit (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, J. J.; Litaudon, J.; Filippov, L. O.; Lyubimova, T.; Maximovich, N.

    2017-07-01

    This work results from a cooperative scientific program between the Perm State University (Russia) and the University of Lorraine (France). Its objectives are to integrate modern 3D geomodeling in order to improve sustainable mining extraction, especially for predicting and avoiding the formation of sinkholes disaster potential zones. Systematic exploration drill holes performed in the Verkhnekamskoye potash deposit (Perm region, Russia) have been used to build a comprehensive 3D model for better understanding the spatial repartition of the ore quality (geometallurgy). A precise modelling of the mineralized layers allows an estimation of the in-situ ore reserves after interpolating by kriging the potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) contents at the node of a regular centred grid (over a million cells). Total resources in potassium vary according to the cut-off between 4.7Gt @ 16.1 % K2O; 0.32 % MgCl2 for a cut-off grade at 13.1% K2O and 2.06 Gt @ 18.2 % K2O; 0.32 % MgCl2 at a cut-off of 16.5% K2O. Most of reserves are located in the KPI, KPII and KPIII layers, the KPI being the richest, and KPIII the largest in terms of tonnage. A systematic study of the curvature calculated along the roof of the mineralized layers points out the location of potential main faults which play a major role in the formation of sinkhole during exploitation. A risk map is then derived from this attribute.

  20. Testing models of a MIR-identified wind-blown bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christer

    2013-10-01

    1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, 4 Vesta, 10 Hygiea and 13 Egeria are among the largest bodies in the main asteroid belt representing about 40 percent of the belts total mass. While many of their physical properties such as size, mass, bulk density and albedo are quite well constrained, their surface composition remains elusive (apart for Vesta). Studies in the 0.4-4 micron range have not yet answered the question of their surface composition. We propose to carry out spectroscopic observations with high signal to noise ratio of these objects with FORCAST over the 5-40 micron range in order to bring new constraints on their surface composition. Such high SNR is required in order to resolve the weak emissivity features in the asteroid spectra, which in turn will allow us to properly identify the mineralogical and meteoritic analogs of those objects. In addition, the obtained data will allow us to refine the albedo, the thermal inertia and the surface roughness of these objects, which is particularly helpful when comparing asteroids and meteorites; also, SOFIA offers us a great opportunity for collecting the first complete mid-infrared spectra ever assembled for both Ceres and Vesta, which is of particular interest with respect to the Dawn mission. In order to avoid misinterpreting any spectral features due to the atmosphere, we need to properly estimate its contribution. To achieve this goal, the observations of both Hygiea and Vesta will be helpful since Hygiea has already been observed in this wavelength range by ISO and since Vestas surface composition is well known from the VNIR range as well as its meteoritic analogs (HED meteorites). This is a long-term project whose goal is to study the mid-infrared spectral properties of large main belt asteroids for which the 0.4-4 micron range has been unable to constrain their surface composition.

  1. Identifiability and inference of non-parametric rates-across-sites models on large-scale phylogenies

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2011-01-01

    Mutation rate variation across loci is well known to cause difficulties, notably identifiability issues, in the reconstruction of evolutionary trees from molecular sequences. Here we introduce a new approach for estimating general rates-across-sites models. Our results imply, in particular, that large phylogenies are typically identifiable under rate variation. We also derive sequence-length requirements for high-probability reconstruction. Our main contribution is a novel algorithm that clusters sites according to their mutation rate. Following this site clustering step, standard reconstruction techniques can be used to recover the phylogeny. Our results rely on a basic insight: that, for large trees, certain site statistics experience concentration-of-measure phenomena.

  2. A sperm-specific proteome-scale metabolic network model identifies non-glycolytic genes for energy deficiency in asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Arvand; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Ansari-Pour, Naser

    2017-04-01

    About 15% of couples experience difficulty in conceiving a child, of which half of the cases are thought to be male-related. Asthenozoospermia, or low sperm motility, is one of the frequent types of male infertility. Although energy metabolism is suggested to be central to the etiology of asthenozoospermia, very few attempts have been made to identify its underlying metabolic pathways. Here, we reconstructed SpermNet, the first proteome-scale model of the sperm cell by using whole-proteome data and the mCADRE algorithm. The reconstructed model was then analyzed using the COBRA toolbox. Genes were knocked-out in the model to investigate their effect on ATP production. A total of 78 genes elevated ATP production rate considerably of which most encode components of oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid oxidation, the Krebs cycle, and members of the solute carrier 25 family. Among them, we identified 11 novel genes which have previously not been associated with sperm cell energy metabolism and may thus be implicated in asthenozoospermia. We further examined the reconstructed model by in silico knock out of currently known asthenozoospermia implicated-genes that were not predicted by our model. The pathways affected by knocking out these genes were also related to energy metabolism, confirming previous findings. Therefore, our model not only predicts the known pathways, it also identifies several non-glycolytic genes for deficient energy metabolism in asthenozoospermia. Finally, this model supports the notion that metabolic pathways besides glycolysis such as oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation are essential for sperm energy metabolism and if validated, may form a basis for fertility recovery.

  3. Estimation of body size and growth patterns in Korean boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngsuk

    2015-04-24

    Anthropometric surveys devised by each country attempt to fulfill the requirements of the manufacturers, designers, and human welfare device production, providing them with data and tools and allowing them to face both the internal and export markets. To this end, national anthropometric data collections and comparisons including three-dimensional information, together with comparison of these data among countries, are conducted at both the domestic and global levels. The anthropometric data of the Korean population measured in 2013 (Korean Agency for Technology and Standard (KATS) 2013 data) and the data collected from 2010 (KATS 2010 data) that was conducted on 710 males between the ages of 13 and 18 years were analyzed in this section to obtain information on Korean boys' physical features and growth. The mean height increased about 5 cm from 13 to 14 years which shows the early fast maturing somatotype. Also, the mean height of boys aged from 15 to 16 increased about 1 to 2 cm. For the results of body proportion rate index against height, they show 0.93, 0.81, 0.38, 0.99, and 0.26 times the height in eye height, shoulder height, fingertip height, and span and maximum shoulder breadth, respectively, in 16-year-old boys. For the body mass index, the weight is increased from the age of 16 years. There are several studies that cover growth features of the entire range from birth to maturity, and they have reported the comparison of the growth patterns among Europeans. Even though such researches have been made, as for the industry, the human modeling tools based on the anthropometric data and morphological features that cover all the countries should be developed for well-fit garments and other human-oriented design process.

  4. A case study of regional catchment water quality modelling to identify pollution control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, B; Seward, A J; Thompson, L

    2006-01-01

    There are four ecologically important river catchments that contain candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSACs) under the Habitats Directive in the Lake District National Park located in the North of England. These are the rivers Ehen, Kent, Derwent and Eden. For each cSAC, there are defined ecological criteria that include water quality targets to protect the designated species. Stretches of the riverine cSACs in each catchment are failing to meet these and other water quality targets. The Environment Agency commissioned a study of each catchment to provide the underpinning scientific knowledge to allow it to deliver its statutory obligations under the Habitats Directive. SIMCAT river water quality models were produced and used to predict the water quality impacts resulting from a number of water quality planning scenarios aimed at achieving full compliance with the Habitats Directive and other national and EEC water quality targets. The results indicated that further controls on effluent discharges will allow the majority of targets to be met but other sources of pollution will also need to be controlled. The outcome of the study also recognised that water quality improvements alone will not necessarily produce the required improvement to the ecological interest features in each cSAC.

  5. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayavel Arumugam

    Full Text Available Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve. In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system.

  6. Dissecting systems-wide data using mixture models: application to identify affected cellular processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giphart-Gassler Micheline

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional analysis of data from genome-scale experiments, such as microarrays, requires an extensive selection of differentially expressed genes. Under many conditions, the proportion of differentially expressed genes is considerable, making the selection criteria a balance between the inclusion of false positives and the exclusion of false negatives. Results We developed an analytical method to determine a p-value threshold from a microarray experiment that is dependent on the quality and design of the data set. To this aim, populations of p-values are modeled as mathematical functions in which the parameters to describe these functions are estimated in an unsupervised manner. The strength of the method is exemplified by its application to a published gene expression data set of sporadic and familial breast tumors with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Conclusion We present an objective and unsupervised way to set thresholds adapted to the quality and design of the experiment. The resulting mathematical description of the data sets of genome-scale experiments enables a probabilistic approach in systems biology.

  7. Identifying the Reducing Resistance to Change Phase in an Organizational Change Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bradutanu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine where in an organizational change process it is better to placethe reducing resistance to change phase, so that employees would accept the new changes easier andnot manifest too much resistance. After analyzing twelve organizational change models we haveconcluded that the place of the reducing resistanceto change phase in an organizational changeprocess is not the same, it being modified according to the type of change. The results of this studyare helpful for researchers, but especially for organizational change leaders. As change leaders areusually the ones confronted with resistance from their subordinates, they must know exactly how todeal with it and when is the best moment to reduceit, depending on the type of change that is desiredto be implemented. The key contribution to this paper is that the best way to gain employee’s supportand change attachment is to try and reduce resistance to change before the actual implementation.Only when an immediate or imposed change is required to be implemented, the methods and ways forovercoming resistance should be applied during andafter the implementation stage, to ensure asuccessful implementation of the change.

  8. Mixed models identify physic nut genotypes adapted to environments with different phosphorus availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, P E; Laviola, B G; Martins, L D; Amaral, J F T; Rodrigues, W N

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this study was to screen physic nut (Jatropha curcas) genotypes that differ in their phosphorous (P) use, using mixed models. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse located in the experimental area of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias of the Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, in Alegre, ES, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design, using a 10 x 3-factorial scheme, including ten physic nut genotypes and two environments that differed in their levels of soil P availability (10 and 60 mg/dm(3)), each with four replications. After 100 days of cultivation, we evaluated the plant height, stem diameter, root volume, root dry matter, aerial part dry matter, total dry matter, as well as the efficiency of absorption, and use. The parameters were estimated for combined selection while considering the studied parameters: stability and adaptability for both environments were obtained using the harmonic mean of the relative performance of the predicted genotypic values. High genotype by environment interactions were observed for most physic nut traits, indicating considerable influences of P availability on the phenotypic value. The genotype Paraíso simultaneously presented high adaptability and stability for aerial part dry matter, total dry matter, and P translocation efficiency. The genotype CNPAE-C2 showed a positive response to P fertilization by increasing both the total and aerial part dry matter.

  9. Cataract surgery: ensuring equal access for boys and girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Shirima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In Tanzania, many children are not brought for surgery in a timely fashion and follow up is often poor. Research at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC has shown that girls are more likely than boys to be negatively affected: * Only half as many girls as boys received cataract surgery. * Girls tended to be brought for surgery later than boys. * Girls who did receive surgery were less likely than boys to be brought for the appropriate two-week follow-up visit (36 per cent of girls vs 64 per cent of boys.

  10. On the so-called Boy or Girl Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G

    2010-01-01

    A quite old problem has been recently revitalized by Leonard Mlodinow's book The Drunkard's Walk, where it is presented in a way that has definitely confused several people, that wonder why the prevalence of the name of one daughter among the population should change the probability that the other child is a girl too. I try here to discuss the problem from scratch, showing that the rarity of the name plays no role, unless the strange assumption of two identical names in the same family is taken into account. But also the name itself does not matter. What is really important is `identification', meant in an acceptation broader than usual, in the sense that a child is characterized by a set of attributes that make him/her uniquely identifiable (`that one') inside a family. The important point of how the information is acquired is also commented, suggesting an explanation of why several people tend to consider the informations "at least one boy" and "a well defined boy" (elder/youngest or of a given name) equiva...

  11. Functional analysis of insistence on sameness in an 11-year old boy with Asperger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollington, N.; Green, V.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the functional properties of insistence on sameness associated with autism spectrum disorders. Method: An 11-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome was observed during play where scenarios (mistakes, misplaced items, interrupted activity) were created to correspond with

  12. Functional analysis of insistence on sameness in an 11-year old boy with Asperger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollington, N.; Green, V.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the functional properties of insistence on sameness associated with autism spectrum disorders. Method: An 11-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome was observed during play where scenarios (mistakes, misplaced items, interrupted activity) were created to correspond with parent-re

  13. The Repudiation of Single-Sex Education: Boys' Schools in the Soviet Union, 1943-1954

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, E. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the 11-year Soviet experiment with boys' schools as a way to cast new light on scholarly research and public debates about single-sex education. Drawing on archival and published materials by educators who described school conditions, identified problems, suggested reforms, and evaluated remedies, the author argues that…

  14. Functional analysis of insistence on sameness in an 11-year old boy with Asperger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollington, N.; Green, V.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the functional properties of insistence on sameness associated with autism spectrum disorders. Method: An 11-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome was observed during play where scenarios (mistakes, misplaced items, interrupted activity) were created to correspond with parent-re

  15. Emo Gay Boys and Subculture: Postpunk Queer Youth and (Re)thinking Images of Masculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    This is an exploration of gay youth subculture and emo boys. The study is a mesh of findings and related theoretical understandings about gay emo subculture, masculinities, style, and alternative gay youth. This study looks at gay male teenagers who identify with emo, a movement that stems from music and aesthetics creating a particular visual for…

  16. Identifying a window of vulnerability during fetal development in a maternal iron restriction model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Mihaila

    Full Text Available It is well acknowledged from observations in humans that iron deficiency during pregnancy can be associated with a number of developmental problems in the newborn and developing child. Due to the obvious limitations of human studies, the stage during gestation at which maternal iron deficiency causes an apparent impairment in the offspring remains elusive. In order to begin to understand the time window(s during pregnancy that is/are especially susceptible to suboptimal iron levels, which may result in negative effects on the development of the fetus, we developed a rat model in which we were able to manipulate and monitor the dietary iron intake during specific stages of pregnancy and analyzed the developing fetuses. We established four different dietary-feeding protocols that were designed to render the fetuses iron deficient at different gestational stages. Based on a functional analysis that employed Auditory Brainstem Response measurements, we found that maternal iron restriction initiated prior to conception and during the first trimester were associated with profound changes in the developing fetus compared to iron restriction initiated later in pregnancy. We also showed that the presence of iron deficiency anemia, low body weight, and changes in core body temperature were not defining factors in the establishment of neural impairment in the rodent offspring.Our data may have significant relevance for understanding the impact of suboptimal iron levels during pregnancy not only on the mother but also on the developing fetus and hence might lead to a more informed timing of iron supplementation during pregnancy.

  17. DREAM4: Combining genetic and dynamic information to identify biological networks and dynamical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Greenfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current technologies have lead to the availability of multiple genomic data types in sufficient quantity and quality to serve as a basis for automatic global network inference. Accordingly, there are currently a large variety of network inference methods that learn regulatory networks to varying degrees of detail. These methods have different strengths and weaknesses and thus can be complementary. However, combining different methods in a mutually reinforcing manner remains a challenge. METHODOLOGY: We investigate how three scalable methods can be combined into a useful network inference pipeline. The first is a novel t-test-based method that relies on a comprehensive steady-state knock-out dataset to rank regulatory interactions. The remaining two are previously published mutual information and ordinary differential equation based methods (tlCLR and Inferelator 1.0, respectively that use both time-series and steady-state data to rank regulatory interactions; the latter has the added advantage of also inferring dynamic models of gene regulation which can be used to predict the system's response to new perturbations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our t-test based method proved powerful at ranking regulatory interactions, tying for first out of methods in the DREAM4 100-gene in-silico network inference challenge. We demonstrate complementarity between this method and the two methods that take advantage of time-series data by combining the three into a pipeline whose ability to rank regulatory interactions is markedly improved compared to either method alone. Moreover, the pipeline is able to accurately predict the response of the system to new conditions (in this case new double knock-out genetic perturbations. Our evaluation of the performance of multiple methods for network inference suggests avenues for future methods development and provides simple considerations for genomic experimental design. Our code is publicly available at http://err.bio.nyu.edu/inferelator/.

  18. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Meshkat

    Full Text Available Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate

  19. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Kuo, Christine Er-zhen; DiStefano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity, with

  20. The motor characteristics of boys 4-6 years old to determine the prospects for gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomazan Arkadij Anatol'evich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The questions of primary screening of preschool and primary school children to gymnastics. Analyzed materials of recent publications on this topic. The study group consisted of 56 boys. Proposed test exercises to test motor abilities of boys 4-6 years old. Set mapped by age groups of rules for each of the proposed exercises. Established process for determining the motor and anthropometric characteristics for the selection of children 4-6 years of prior training. Identified standards of physical fitness that can be used in the method of primary selection for gymnastics.

  1. Bayesian sample size for diagnostic test studies in the absence of a gold standard: Comparing identifiable with non-identifiable models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendukuri, Nandini; Bélisle, Patrick; Joseph, Lawrence

    2010-11-20

    Diagnostic tests rarely provide perfect results. The misclassification induced by imperfect sensitivities and specificities of diagnostic tests must be accounted for when planning prevalence studies or investigations into properties of new tests. The previous work has shown that applying a single imperfect test to estimate prevalence can often result in very large sample size requirements, and that sometimes even an infinite sample size is insufficient for precise estimation because the problem is non-identifiable. Adding a second test can sometimes reduce the sample size substantially, but infinite sample sizes can still occur as the problem remains non-identifiable. We investigate the further improvement possible when three diagnostic tests are to be applied. We first develop methods required for studies when three conditionally independent tests are available, using different Bayesian criteria. We then apply these criteria to prototypic scenarios, showing that large sample size reductions can occur compared to when only one or two tests are used. As the problem is now identifiable, infinite sample sizes cannot occur except in pathological situations. Finally, we relax the conditional independence assumption, demonstrating in this once again non-identifiable situation that sample sizes may substantially grow and possibly be infinite. We apply our methods to the planning of two infectious disease studies, the first designed to estimate the prevalence of Strongyloides infection, and the second relating to estimating the sensitivity of a new test for tuberculosis transmission. The much smaller sample sizes that are typically required when three as compared to one or two tests are used should encourage researchers to plan their studies using more than two diagnostic tests whenever possible. User-friendly software is available for both design and analysis stages greatly facilitating the use of these methods.

  2. Fiction and reality in the modelling world - Balance between simplicity and complexity, calibration and identifiability, verification and falsification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, P.; Madsen, H.

    1999-01-01

    Where is the balance between simplicity and complexity in model prediction of urban drainage structures? The calibration/verification approach to testing of model performance gives an exaggerated sense of certainty. Frequently, the model structure and the parameters are not identifiable...... by calibration/verification on the basis of the data series available, which generates elements of sheer guessing - unless the universality of the model is be based on induction, i.e. experience from the sum of all previous investigations. There is a need to deal more explicitly with uncertainty...... and to incorporate that in the design, operation and control of urban drainage structures. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Hodgkin-Huxley revisited: reparametrization and identifiability analysis of the classic action potential model with approximate Bayesian methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Aidan C; Gavaghan, David J; Holmes, Chris; Cooper, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    As cardiac cell models become increasingly complex, a correspondingly complex 'genealogy' of inherited parameter values has also emerged. The result has been the loss of a direct link between model parameters and experimental data, limiting both reproducibility and the ability to re-fit to new data. We examine the ability of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to infer parameter distributions in the seminal action potential model of Hodgkin and Huxley, for which an immediate and documented connection to experimental results exists. The ability of ABC to produce tight posteriors around the reported values for the gating rates of sodium and potassium ion channels validates the precision of this early work, while the highly variable posteriors around certain voltage dependency parameters suggests that voltage clamp experiments alone are insufficient to constrain the full model. Despite this, Hodgkin and Huxley's estimates are shown to be competitive with those produced by ABC, and the variable behaviour of posterior parametrized models under complex voltage protocols suggests that with additional data the model could be fully constrained. This work will provide the starting point for a full identifiability analysis of commonly used cardiac models, as well as a template for informative, data-driven parametrization of newly proposed models.

  4. Examination for intratubular germ cell neoplasia at operation for undescended testis in boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Frisch, M;

    1994-01-01

    A total of 843 consecutive boys (median age 12.7 years) who had undergone testicular biopsy at operation for undescended testis was followed into adulthood (median age 25.2 years) to examine for testicular germ cell neoplasia. Five cases of testicular germ cell neoplasia were identified, including...... testicular biopsy from the patient in whom nonseminoma was noted at followup showed Sertoli cells only. We recommend that testicular biopsy be performed at operation for undescended testis in boys with abnormal sex chromosomes, particularly 45,X/46,XY karyotype, and in those with abnormal external genitalia....... The pattern of Sertoli cells only in biopsies from boys does not preclude the occurrence of testicular cancer in adulthood....

  5. Development and aetiology of body dissatisfaction in adolescent boys and girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Jacinthe; Blackburn, Marie-Eve; Auclair, Julie; Laberge, Luc; Veillette, Suzanne; Gaudreault, Marco; Vachon, Patrick; Perron, Michel; Touchette, Évelyne

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aims to describe the development of body dissatisfaction (BD), measured with the Contour Drawing Rating Scale, between the ages of 14 and 18, and to identify factors associated with BD at age 18, among 413 adolescents. Between the ages of 14 and 18, the proportion of girls wanting to be thinner increased, although it remained unchanged among boys. A ratio of 1:2 girls and 1:5 boys reported having seriously tried to lose weight. Factors associated with BD in girls at age 18 were (1) wanting to be thinner, (2) body mass index (BMI), (3) weight control behaviours and (4) negative comments about weight. Factors associated with BD in boys at age 18 were (1) wanting to be thinner or bigger, (2) BMI, (3) having experienced sexual intercourse and (4) negative comments about weight. The high prevalence of BD and weight-related concerns suggest a need for early interventions. PMID:25931646

  6. Implant supported prosthesis in an edentulous boy with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia - "A happy boy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Nyhuus, Lone; Buhl, Jytte

    2009-01-01

    by the patient and his family. Case presentation The boy was untreated until the age of 5 years. His oral functions were compromised in relation to speech and psychosocial aspects. In the following 6 years, he underwent prosthodontic treatment in three phases. 1. At the age of 5 years a set of complete dentures...... were made to enhance speech and social well-being. The lower denture was retained by 2 ball attachments. 2. At the age of 8 years the dentures were remade because of need for augmentation of vertical dimensions, better fit, and better aesthetics for an 8 year old with mixed dentition in the anterior...... health has been registered. The boy and his family experience great improvement in the functioning as well as the comfort of his prosthesis after insertion of implants. Conclusion The prosthesis for edentulous boys with HED demand several adjustments and revisions, partly due to growth of the jaws...

  7. Ecological Niche Modeling Identifies Fine-Scale Areas at High Risk of Dengue Fever in the Pearl River Delta, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoxuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever (DF is one of the most common and rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. In recent years, this imported disease has posed a serious threat to public health in China, especially in the Pearl River Delta (PRD. Although the severity of DF outbreaks in the PRD is generally associated with known risk factors, fine scale assessments of areas at high risk for DF outbreaks are limited. We built five ecological niche models to identify such areas including a variety of climatic, environmental, and socioeconomic variables, as well as, in some models, extracted principal components. All the models we tested accurately identified the risk of DF, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC were greater than 0.8, but the model using all original variables was the most accurate (AUC = 0.906. Socioeconomic variables had a greater impact on this model (total contribution 55.27% than climatic and environmental variables (total contribution 44.93%. We found the highest risk of DF outbreaks on the border of Guangzhou and Foshan (in the central PRD, and in northern Zhongshan (in the southern PRD. Our fine-scale results may help health agencies to focus epidemic monitoring tightly on the areas at highest risk of DF outbreaks.

  8. Using analytic hierarchy process to identify the nurses with high stress-coping capability: model and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F C Pan, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Nurses have long been relied as the major labor force in hospitals. Featured with complicated and highly labor-intensive job requirement, multiple pressures from different sources was inevitable. Success in identifying stresses and accordingly coping with such stresses is important for job performance of nurses, and service quality of a hospital. Purpose of this research is to identify the determinants of nurses' capabilities. A modified Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was adopted. Overall, 105 nurses from several randomly selected hospitals in southern Taiwan were investigated to generate factors. Ten experienced practitioners were included as the expert in the AHP to produce weights of each criterion. Six nurses from two regional hospitals were then selected to test the model. Four factors are then identified as the second level of hierarchy. The study result shows that the family factor is the most important factor, and followed by the personal attributes. Top three sub-criteria that attribute to the nurse's stress-coping capability are children's education, good career plan, and healthy family. The practical simulation provided evidence for the usefulness of this model. The study suggested including these key determinants into the practice of human-resource management, and restructuring the hospital's organization, creating an employee-support system as well as a family-friendly working climate. The research provided evidence that supports the usefulness of AHP in identifying the key factors that help stabilizing a nursing team.

  9. Using analytic hierarchy process to identify the nurses with high stress-coping capability: model and application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank F C Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have long been relied as the major labor force in hospitals. Featured with complicated and highly labor-intensive job requirement, multiple pressures from different sources was inevitable. Success in identifying stresses and accordingly coping with such stresses is important for job performance of nurses, and service quality of a hospital. Purpose of this research is to identify the determinants of nurses' capabilities.A modified Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP was adopted. Overall, 105 nurses from several randomly selected hospitals in southern Taiwan were investigated to generate factors. Ten experienced practitioners were included as the expert in the AHP to produce weights of each criterion. Six nurses from two regional hospitals were then selected to test the model.Four factors are then identified as the second level of hierarchy. The study result shows that the family factor is the most important factor, and followed by the personal attributes. Top three sub-criteria that attribute to the nurse's stress-coping capability are children's education, good career plan, and healthy family. The practical simulation provided evidence for the usefulness of this model.The study suggested including these key determinants into the practice of human-resource management, and restructuring the hospital's organization, creating an employee-support system as well as a family-friendly working climate. The research provided evidence that supports the usefulness of AHP in identifying the key factors that help stabilizing a nursing team.

  10. COMPARATIVE INDICATORS OF THE PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF BOYS IN REPUBLIC OF DAGESTAN IN THE VARIOUS ECO-GEOGRAPHICAL ZONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Kamalov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Purpose. The examination of the comparative aspect of the physical parameters of the boys in the pre - and puberty in different ecological zones (EZ of the Republic of Dagestan (RD: mountain, foothills and plains of the taxiway.Materials and Methods. The study in 3 eco-geographic zones of the Republic of Dagestan in 2641 a boy aged 11 to 17 years. Inclusion criteria were: age of onset of puberty and the completion of 11-17 years, male gender and residence in the territory (extragenital diseases. We compared the following anthropometric indicators: height, weight, body mass index.Results and conclusions. The analysing of the physical parameters of development in different areas of extragenital diseases RD identifies the following pattern: the lowest height and weight were boys living in the foothills of the taxiway. Their peers living in highland and lowland extragenital diseases taxiway growth were similar and statistically significant differences were found statistically significant differences are particularly evident with 13-14 years in boys from foothills of RD, especially when compared with their peers plain COPIES. Thus, the overall physical development of boys RD closes to those boys Russia, although the tendency to reduce them was determined. Comparative physical development of boys in various extragenital diseases RD, the worst performance demonstrated teenagers from foothill extragenital diseases.

  11. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-04-11

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Berecki-Gisolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seven studies (the derivation sample reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States. From these, 10 criteria were identified as diagnostic predictors. The conditional probability of each predictor was calculated by summation of the reported frequencies. A model of conditional probabilities and a priori probabilities of cardiac syncope was constructed. The model was tested in four datasets of patients with syncope (the test sample from Calgary (n=670; 21% had cardiac syncope, Amsterdam (n=503; 9%, Milan (n=689; 5% and Rochester (3877; 11%. In the derivation sample ten variables were significantly associated with cardiac syncope: age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, brief or absent prodrome, supine syncope, effort syncope, and absence of nausea, diaphoresis and blurred vision. Fitting the test datasets to the full model gave C-statistics of 0.87 (Calgary, 0.84 (Amsterdam, 0.72 (Milan and 0.71 (Rochester. Model sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 68% for Calgary, 86% and 67% for Amsterdam, 76% and 59% for Milan, and 73% and 52% for Rochester. A model with 5 variables (age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, and lack of prodromal symptoms was as accurate as the total set. CONCLUSION: A simple literature-based Bayesian model of historical criteria can distinguish patients with cardiac syncope from other patients with syncope with moderate accuracy.

  13. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lessios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike’s information criterion (AICc was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in

  14. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  15. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  16. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  17. Generalized Models: An Application to Identify Environmental Variables That Significantly Affect the Abundance of Three Tree Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Antúnez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In defining the environmental preferences of plant species, statistical models are part of the essential tools in the field of modern ecology. However, conventional linear models require compliance with some parametric assumptions and if these requirements are not met, imply a serious limitation of the applied model. In this study, the effectiveness of linear and nonlinear generalized models was examined to identify the unitary effect of the principal environmental variables on the abundance of three tree species growing in the natural temperate forests of Oaxaca, Mexico. The covariates that showed a significant effect on the distribution of tree species were the maximum and minimum temperatures and the precipitation during specific periods. Results suggest that the generalized models, particularly smoothed models, were able to detect the increase or decrease of the abundance against changes in an environmental variable; they also revealed the inflection of the regression. In addition, these models allow partial characterization of the realized niche of a given species according to some specific variables, regardless of the type of relationship.

  18. Sensational inventions by girls and boys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeon Jung

    1999-05-15

    This book introduces the interesting and original inventions invented by girls and boys. These are the titles of the inventions : an antenna ruler, muscular strength machine with spring, items to remove sticky matter for advertisement, chair ladder for the disabled, useful control box for feeding bees, a portable carriage for dogs, a lid of ashtray, hot-air balloon using solar power, toy cannon for reports, hard badminton racket, tv cable and a distributor which are easy to install, device for car automatic parking, a cleanser for vegetables.

  19. Boys and girls who reason well mathematically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J C

    1993-01-01

    Since 1971 the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) at Johns Hopkins University has pioneered in discovery of and provision of educational help for 12-year-old boys and girls who reason better mathematically than 99% of other 12-year-olds. SMPY originated widespread searches for such youths and special academic classes for them outside the regular school system. A regional talent search, verbal as well as mathematical, now covers all 50 states of the USA, and many varied residential summer programmes are offered across the country. These have provided educational facilitation for many thousands, and have encouraged greater curricular flexibility in schools and better articulation of in-school with out-of-school learning experiences. From the first talent search conducted by SMPY in 1972, it became obvious that boys tend to score considerably higher than girls on the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test-Mathematical (SAT-M), a test intended mainly for college-bound 17- and 18-year-olds. This difference was reported in 1974 but attracted little attention until a controversial report in 1980 stimulated research on sex differences in various aspects of mathematics. Here I describe a study of sex differences over 10 years on 14 College Board high school achievement tests, which are taken (three usually) by bright 17- and 18-year-olds seeking admission to the USA's selective colleges and universities. Among the high scores on the European history test the ratio of males to females was greatest, 6:1. The next most sex-differentiating test was physics, 2.9:1, followed by elementary-level mathematics (mainly algebra and geometry), 2.5:1. Other ratios favouring males were, in 1991, chemistry (2.4:1), American history (2.1:1), biology (1.8:1), precalculus mathematics (1.6:1), Latin (1.6:1), French (1.4:1), modern Hebrew (1.1:1) and German (1.02:1). Tests in which more females were high scorers were literature (1.26:1), English composition (1.05:1) and Spanish (1

  20. Systemic Thinking and Requisite Holism in Mastering Logistics Risks: the Model for Identifying Risks in Organisations and Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Rosi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Risks in logistic processes represent one of the major issues in supply chain management nowadays. Every organization strives for success, and uninterrupted operations are the key factors in achieving this goal, which cannot be achieved without efficient risk management. In the scope of supply chain risk research, we identified some key issues in the field, the major issue being the lack of standardization and models, which can make risk management in an organization easier and more efficient. Consequently, we developed a model, which captures and identifies risks in an organization and its supply chain. It is in accordance with the general risk management standard – ISO 31000, and incorporates some relevant recent findings from general and supply chain risk management, especially from the viewpoint of public segmentation. This experimental catalogue (which is also published online can serve as a checklist and a starting point of supply chain risk management in organizations. Its main idea is cooperation between experts from the area in order to compile an ever-growing list of possible risks and to provide an insight in the model and its value in practice, for which reason input and opinions of anyone who uses our model are greatly appreciated and included in the catalogue.

  1. Identifying sources of methane sampled in the Arctic using δ13C in CH4 and Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Michelle; France, James; Pyle, John; Warwick, Nicola; Fisher, Rebecca; Lowry, Dave; Allen, Grant; O'Shea, Sebastian; Illingworth, Samuel; Jones, Ben; Gallagher, Martin; Welpott, Axel; Muller, Jennifer; Bauguitte, Stephane; George, Charles; Hayman, Garry; Manning, Alistair; Myhre, Catherine Lund; Lanoisellé, Mathias; Nisbet, Euan

    2016-04-01

    An airmass of enhanced methane was sampled during a research flight at ~600 m to ~2000 m altitude between the North coast of Norway and Svalbard on 21 July 2012. The largest source of methane in the summertime Arctic is wetland emissions. Did this enhancement in methane come from wetland emissions? The airmass was identified through continuous methane measurements using a Los Gatos fast greenhouse gas analyser on board the UK's BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) as part of the MAMM (Methane in the Arctic: Measurements and Modelling) campaign. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model (the UK Met Office's NAME model) was run backwards to identify potential methane source regions. This was combined with a methane emission inventory to create "pseudo observations" to compare with the aircraft observations. This modelling was used to constrain the δ13C CH4 wetland source signature (where δ13C CH4 is the ratio of 13C to 12C in methane), resulting in a most likely signature of -73‰ (±4‰7‰). The NAME back trajectories suggest a methane source region of north-western Russian wetlands, and -73‰ is consistent with in situ measurements of wetland methane at similar latitudes in Scandinavia. This analysis has allowed us to study emissions from remote regions for which we do not have in situ observations, giving us an extra tool in the determination of the isotopic source variation of global methane emissions.

  2. Realtime Prediction in Disturbed Landscapes: Identifying Highest Priority Disturbance Characteristics Impacting Streamflow Response in a CONUS-Scale Operational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, A. L.; Gochis, D. J.; Yu, W.; McCreight, J. L.; Barlage, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The "next generation" of hydrologic prediction systems - targeting unified, process-based, real-time prediction of the total water cycle - bring with them an increased need for real-time land surface characterization. Climatologically-derived estimates may perform well under stationary conditions, however disturbance can significantly alter hydrologic behavior and may be poorly represented by mean historical conditions. Fortunately, remote sensing and on-the-ground observation networks are collecting snapshots of these land characteristics over an increasing fraction of the globe. Given the computing constraints of operating a large-domain, real-time prediction system, to take advantage of these data streams we need a way to prioritize which landscape characteristics are most important to hydrologic prediction post-disturbance. To address this need, we setup a model experiment over the contiguous US using the community WRF-Hydro system with the NoahMP land surface model to assess the value of incorporating various aspects of disturbed landscapes into a real-time streamflow prediction model. WRF-Hydro will serve as the initial operational model for the US National Weather Service's new national water prediction effort, so use of WRF-Hydro allows us to leverage both an existing CONUS-scale model implementation and a short research-to-operations path. We first identify USGS GAGES-II basins that experienced more than 25% forest loss between 2000 and 2013. Based on basin disturbance type, geophysical setting, and climate regime, we formulate a conceptual model of which "disturbed" landscape characteristics we expect to dominate streamflow response. We test our conceptual model using WRF-Hydro by modeling a baseline (no disturbance) case, and then bringing in empirically-derived model state shifts representing key disturbance characteristics (e.g., leaf area index, rooting depth, overland roughness, surface detention). For each state update and each basin, we quantify

  3. Identifying eastern Baltic cod nursery grounds using hydrodynamic modelling: knowledge for the design of Marine Protected Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Kraus, Gerd; Böttcher, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of juvenile cod is essential to closing the life cycle in population dynamic models, and it is a prerequisite for the design of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) aiming at the protection of juveniles. In this study, we use a hydrodynamic model...... evidence that the final destinations of juvenile cod drift routes are affected by decadal climate variability. Application of the methodology to MPA design is discussed, e.g. identifying the overlap of areas with a high probability of successful juvenile cod settlement and regions of high fishing effort...... to examine the spatial distribution of eastern Baltic cod larvae and early juveniles. The transport patterns of the larvae spawned at the three major spawning grounds in the central Baltic Sea were investigated by drift model simulations for the period 1979–2004. We analysed potential habitats...

  4. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Structural and Practical Identifiability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Dochain, D.;

    2002-01-01

    The structural and practical identifiability of a model for description of respirometric-titrimetric data derived from aerobic batch substrate degradation experiments of a CxHyOz carbon source with activated sludge was evaluated. The model processes needed to describe titrimetric data included...... difference in timing between pH effect and oxygen consumption. Finally, the biomass yield YH and the nitrogen content of the biomass i(xB) could be estimated from combined respirometric-titrimetric data obtained with addition of a known amount of carbon source. YH can also be estimated from r(O) data when...... considerably more for dextrose than for acetate degradation models. Noteworthy is the finding that the half-saturation substrate concentrations can be different depending on whether they are estimated from respirometric or titrimetric data. Moreover, this difference appears to be dependent on the carbon source...

  5. Molecular dissection of colorectal cancer in pre-clinical models identifies biomarkers predicting sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Moritz; Risch, Thomas; Abdavi-Azar, Nilofar; Boehnke, Karsten; Schumacher, Dirk; Keil, Marlen; Yildiriman, Reha; Jandrasits, Christine; Borodina, Tatiana; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Worth, Catherine L.; Schweiger, Caroline; Liebs, Sandra; Lange, Martin; Warnatz, Hans- Jörg; Butcher, Lee M.; Barrett, James E.; Sultan, Marc; Wierling, Christoph; Golob-Schwarzl, Nicole; Lax, Sigurd; Uranitsch, Stefan; Becker, Michael; Welte, Yvonne; Regan, Joseph Lewis; Silvestrov, Maxine; Kehler, Inge; Fusi, Alberto; Kessler, Thomas; Herwig, Ralf; Landegren, Ulf; Wienke, Dirk; Nilsson, Mats; Velasco, Juan A.; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Reinhard, Christoph; Beck, Stephan; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R. A.; Henderson, David; Lange, Bodo; Haybaeck, Johannes; Keilholz, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Jens; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma represents a heterogeneous entity, with only a fraction of the tumours responding to available therapies, requiring a better molecular understanding of the disease in precision oncology. To address this challenge, the OncoTrack consortium recruited 106 CRC patients (stages I–IV) and developed a pre-clinical platform generating a compendium of drug sensitivity data totalling >4,000 assays testing 16 clinical drugs on patient-derived in vivo and in vitro models. This large biobank of 106 tumours, 35 organoids and 59 xenografts, with extensive omics data comparing donor tumours and derived models provides a resource for advancing our understanding of CRC. Models recapitulate many of the genetic and transcriptomic features of the donors, but defined less complex molecular sub-groups because of the loss of human stroma. Linking molecular profiles with drug sensitivity patterns identifies novel biomarkers, including a signature outperforming RAS/RAF mutations in predicting sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. PMID:28186126

  6. Written expression in boys with attention deficit disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta, S P; Eliot, J

    1994-12-01

    32 boys, between the ages of 8 and 13 years, were identified on four teachers' and parents' rating scales (including the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-III for ADD) as showing attention deficits and hyperactivity (ADD + H; n = 10), attention deficits without hyperactivity (ADD-H; n = 11), or without ADD (attention deficits controls; n = 11). All subjects were administered Bender's Visual-motor Gestalt test and the Written Language Assessment. The ADD + H children produced significantly more errors on the Bender-Gestalt test, and both groups with attention deficits had lower (poorer) scores on most of the written language subtests. Results were interpreted as providing evidence that these children possessed significant limitations in their writing, copying, and composition.

  7. Learning, body and territory among indigenous Xakriabá boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Correia da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis article draws on an ethnographical study of indigenous Xakriabá boys, focusing on fieldwork that explores everyday practices that characterise the passage from domestic space to manhood through territory circulation. The hunt assumes an emblematic position in the learning process configuration that constitutes the male ethos of the Xakriabá. We review the unique arrangement of key practices, exploring their articulations and revealing learning processes developed both through the use of the scythe in agricultural work, and through hunting in the woods that surround the villages. Learning is explored as an inherent dimension of social practices. We highlight the relationships among different learning configurations in order to identify recurrent themes, such as peer interaction and co-responsability, which characterise particular ways of learning among the Xakriabá.

  8. Cycling peak power in obese and lean 6- to 8-year-old girls and boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Julien; Lazaar, Nordine; Doré, Eric; Meyer, Martine; Ratel, Sebastien; Duché, Pascale

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible effect of the difference in percentage body fat (%BF) and fat-free mass (FFM) on cycling peak power (CPP) in 6- to 8-year-old obese and lean untrained girls and boys. Obese (35 girls, 35 boys) and lean (35 girls, 35 boys) children were measured for obesity, %BF, calculated from skinfold measurements. FFM was calculated as body mass (BM) minus body fat. A force-velocity test on a cycle ergometer was used to measure CPP. CPP was related to anthropometric variables using standard and allometric models. CPP in absolute terms was higher in obese children than in lean children irrespective of gender. BM-related CPP was significantly lower in obese children than in lean ones, whereas no effect of obesity appeared on FFM-related CPP. Velocity at CPP (Vopt) was significantly lower and force at CPP (Fopt) was significantly higher in girls than in boys. Muscle power production was unaffected by obesity in children. Low BM-related CPP could explain the difficulty of taking up physical activities that are body-mass related in obese children. Gender difference for Vopt and Fopt shows that girls and boys may have different maturation patterns affecting CPP.

  9. VBORNET gap analysis: Mosquito vector distribution models utilised to identify areas of potential species distribution in areas lacking records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Schaffner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the second of a number of planned data papers presenting modelled vector distributions produced originally during the ECDC funded VBORNET project. This work continues under the VectorNet project now jointly funded by ECDC and EFSA. Further data papers will be published after sampling seasons when more field data will become available allowing further species to be modelled or validation and updates to existing models.  The data package described here includes those mosquito species first modelled in 2013 & 2014 as part of the VBORNET gap analysis work which aimed to identify areas of potential species distribution in areas lacking records. It comprises three species models together with suitability masks based on land class and environmental limits. The species included as part of this phase are the mosquitoes 'Aedes vexans', 'Anopheles plumbeus' and 'Culex modestus'. The known distributions of these species within the area covered by the project (Europe, the ­Mediterranean Basin, North Africa, and Eurasia are currently incomplete to a greater or lesser degree. The models are designed to fill the gaps with predicted distributions, to provide a assistance in ­targeting surveys to collect distribution data for those areas with no field validated information, and b a first indication of the species distributions within the project areas.

  10. Calibrating and Validating a Simulation Model to Identify Drivers of Urban Land Cover Change in the Baltimore, MD Metropolitan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jantz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We build upon much of the accumulated knowledge of the widely used SLEUTH urban land change model and offer advances. First, we use SLEUTH’s exclusion/attraction layer to identify and test different urban land cover change drivers; second, we leverage SLEUTH’s self-modification capability to incorporate a demographic model; and third, we develop a validation procedure to quantify the influence of land cover change drivers and assess uncertainty. We found that, contrary to our a priori expectations, new development is not attracted to areas serviced by existing or planned water and sewer infrastructure. However, information about where population and employment growth is likely to occur did improve model performance. These findings point to the dominant role of centrifugal forces in post-industrial cities like Baltimore, MD. We successfully developed a demographic model that allowed us to constrain the SLEUTH model forecasts and address uncertainty related to the dynamic relationship between changes in population and employment and urban land use. Finally, we emphasize the importance of model validation. In this work the validation procedure played a key role in rigorously assessing the impacts of different exclusion/attraction layers and in assessing uncertainty related to population and employment forecasts.

  11. A model to identify mathematics topics in MXit lingo to provide tutors quick access to supporting documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Butgereit

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dr MathTM is a mobile, online tutoring system where learners can use MXitTM on their mobile phones to receive help with their mathematics homework from volunteer tutors. These conversations between learners and Dr Math are held in MXit lingo. MXit lingo is a heavily abbreviated, English-like language that is evolving between users of mobile phones that communicate using MXit. The Dr Math project has been running since January 2007 and uses volunteer tutors who are mostly university students who readily understand and use MXit lingo. However, due to the large number of simultaneous conversations that the tutors are often involved in and the diversity of topics discussed, it would often be beneficial to provide assistance regarding the mathematics topic to the tutors. This article explains how the μ model identifies the mathematics topic in the conversation. The model identifies appropriate mathematics topics in just over 75% of conversations in a corpus of conversations identified to be about mathematics topics in the school curriculum.

  12. A new model to identify the productivity of theses in terms of articles using co-word analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Piedad Zamudio Igami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A thesis defense should be considered as not the end but the starting point for scientific communication flow. How many articles truly extend doctoral research? This article proposes a new model to automatically identify the productivity of theses in terms of article publications. We evaluate the use of the co-word analysis technique to establish relationships among 401 doctoral theses and 2,211 articles journal articles published by students in a graduate program at a Brazilian National Nuclear Research Institution (IPEN-CNEN/SP.To identify the relationship between a thesis and an article published by the same author, we used co-descriptor pairs from a controlled vocabulary. To validate the proposed model, a survey was applied to a random sample of theses authors (n = 128, response rate of 79%, thus establishing a minimum threshold of three coincident co-descriptors to identify the relationship between theses and articles. The agreement level between an author′s opinion and the automatic method was 86.9%, with a sampling error of 7.36%, which indicates an acceptable level of accuracy. Differences between the related or nonrelated distributions of articles were also demonstrated, as was a reduction in the median lag time to publication and the supervisor′s influence on student productivity.

  13. Multispectral and Photoplethysmography Optical Imaging Techniques Identify Important Tissue Characteristics in an Animal Model of Tangential Burn Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E; Li, Weizhi; Rodriguez-Vaqueiro, Yolanda; Squiers, John J; Mo, Weirong; Lu, Yang; Plant, Kevin D; Sellke, Eric; King, Darlene R; Fan, Wensheng; Martinez-Lorenzo, Jose A; DiMaio, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Burn excision, a difficult technique owing to the training required to identify the extent and depth of injury, will benefit from a tool that can cue the surgeon as to where and how much to resect. We explored two rapid and noninvasive optical imaging techniques in their ability to identify burn tissue from the viable wound bed using an animal model of tangential burn excision. Photoplethysmography (PPG) imaging and multispectral imaging (MSI) were used to image the initial, intermediate, and final stages of burn excision of a deep partial-thickness burn. PPG imaging maps blood flow in the skin's microcirculation, and MSI collects the tissue reflectance spectrum in visible and infrared wavelengths of light to classify tissue based on a reference library. A porcine deep partial-thickness burn model was generated and serial tangential excision accomplished with an electric dermatome set to 1.0 mm depth. Excised eschar was stained with hematoxylin and eosin to determine the extent of burn remaining at each excision depth. We confirmed that the PPG imaging device showed significantly less blood flow where burn tissue was present, and the MSI method could delineate burn tissue in the wound bed from the viable wound bed. These results were confirmed independently by a histological analysis. We found these devices can identify the proper depth of excision, and their images could cue a surgeon as to the preparedness of the wound bed for grafting. These image outputs are expected to facilitate clinical judgment in the operating room.

  14. When Boys Won't Be Boys: Discussing Gender with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katch, Hannah; Katch, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In this Voices Inside Schools essay, Hannah Katch and Jane Katch reflect on gender roles and how they are enacted in the classroom. When Timothy, a student in Jane's kindergarten class, refuses to count himself as one of the boys during a math lesson, Jane begins a conversation about social constructions of gender with her daughter, Hannah.…

  15. Salivary testosterone concentrations in pubertal ICSI boys compared with spontaneously conceived boys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Belva; M. Bonduelle; J. Schiettecatte; H. Tournaye; R.C. Painter; P. Devroey; J. de Schepper

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, no data exist about Leydig cell function of pubertal boys born after ICSI. To evaluate a potential risk of gonadal dysfunction in children born from fathers with compromised fertility, testicular function was assessed by the measurement of salivary testosterone. METHODS: Morning

  16. Using Range-Wide Abundance Modeling to Identify Key Conservation Areas for the Micro-Endemic Bolson Tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthya A Ureña-Aranda

    Full Text Available A widespread biogeographic pattern in nature is that population abundance is not uniform across the geographic range of species: most occurrence sites have relatively low numbers, whereas a few places contain orders of magnitude more individuals. The Bolson tortoise Gopherus flavomarginatus is endemic to a small region of the Chihuahuan Desert in Mexico, where habitat deterioration threatens this species with extinction. In this study we combined field burrows counts and the approach for modeling species abundance based on calculating the distance to the niche centroid to obtain range-wide abundance estimates. For the Bolson tortoise, we found a robust, negative relationship between observed burrows abundance and distance to the niche centroid, with a predictive capacity of 71%. Based on these results we identified four priority areas for the conservation of this microendemic and threatened tortoise. We conclude that this approach may be a useful approximation for identifying key areas for sampling and conservation efforts in elusive and rare species.

  17. Integrative analysis of functional genomic annotations and sequencing data to identify rare causal variants via hierarchical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela eCapanu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the small number of rare causal variants contributing to disease has beena major focus of investigation in recent years, but represents a formidable statisticalchallenge due to the rare frequencies with which these variants are observed. In thiscommentary we draw attention to a formal statistical framework, namely hierarchicalmodeling, to combine functional genomic annotations with sequencing data with theobjective of enhancing our ability to identify rare causal variants. Using simulations weshow that in all configurations studied, the hierarchical modeling approach has superiordiscriminatory ability compared to a recently proposed aggregate measure of deleteriousness,the Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion (CADD score, supportingour premise that aggregate functional genomic measures can more accurately identifycausal variants when used in conjunction with sequencing data through a hierarchicalmodeling approach

  18. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  19. Derivation and Validation of a Novel Prediction Model to Identify Low-Risk Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Muthiah; Gopalan, Sowmya; Ramadurai, Srinivasan; Arthur, Preetam; Prabhu, Mukund A; Thachathodiyl, Rajesh; Natarajan, Kumaraswamy

    2017-08-15

    Accurate identification of low-risk patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) who may be eligible for outpatient treatment or early discharge can have substantial cost-saving benefit. The purpose of this study was to derive and validate a prediction model to effectively identify patients with PE at low risk of short-term mortality, right ventricular dysfunction, and other nonfatal outcomes. This study analyzed data from 400 consecutive patients with acute PE. We derived and internally validated our prediction rule based on clinically significant variables that are routinely available at initial examination and that were categorized and weighted using coefficients in the multivariate logistic regression. The model was externally validated in an independent cohort of 82 patients. The final model (HOPPE score) consisted of 5 categorized patient variables (1, 2, or 3 points, respectively): systolic blood pressure (>120, 100 to 119, 80, 65 to 79, 101 beats/min), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (>80, 60 to 79, 4). The 30-day mortality rates were 0% in low risk (0 to 6 points), 7.5% to 8.5% in intermediate risk (7 to 10), and 18.2% to 18.8% in high-risk patients (≥11) across the derivation and validation cohorts. In comparison with the previously validated PESI score, the HOPPE score had a higher discriminatory power (area under the curve 0.74 vs 0.85, p = 0.033) and significantly improved both the discrimination (integrated discrimination improvement, p = 0.002) and reclassification (net reclassification improvement, p = 0.003) of the model for short-term mortality. In conclusion, the HOPPE score accurately identifies acute patients with PE at low risk of short-term mortality, right ventricular dysfunction, and other nonfatal outcomes. Prospective validation of the prediction model is necessary before implementation in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Why Are Girls Less Physically Active than Boys? Findings from the LOOK Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan M Telford

    Full Text Available A gender-based disparity in physical activity (PA among youth, whereby girls are less active than boys is a persistent finding in the literature. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying this difference has potential to guide PA intervention strategies.Data were collected at age 8 and 12 years (276 boys, 279 girls from 29 schools as part of the LOOK study. Multilevel linear models were fitted separately for boys and girls to examine effects of individual, family and environmental level correlates on pedometer measured PA. Cardio-respiratory fitness (multi-stage run, percent fat (DEXA, eye-hand coordination (throw and catch test and perceived competence in physical education (questionnaire were used as individual level correlates. At the family level, parent's support and education (questionnaire were used. School attended and extracurricular sport participation were included as environmental level correlates.Girls were 19% less active than boys (9420 vs 11360 steps/day, p<0.001, 95%CI [1844, 2626]. Lower PA among girls was associated with weaker influences at the school and family levels and through lower participation in extracurricular sport. School attended explained some of the variation in boys PA (8.4% but not girls. Girls compared to boys had less favourable individual attributes associated with PA at age 8 years, including 18% lower cardio-respiratory fitness (3.5 vs 4.2, p<0.001, CI [0.5,0.9], 44% lower eye-hand coordination (11.0 vs 17.3, p<0.001, CI [5.1,9.0], higher percent body fat (28% vs 23%, p<0.001, CI [3.5,5.7] and 9% lower perceived competence in physical education (7.7 vs 8.4, p<0.001, CI [0.2,0.9]. Participation in extracurricular sport at either age 8 or 12 years was protective against declines in PA over time among boys but not girls.Girls PA was less favourably influenced by socio-ecological factors at the individual, family, school and environmental levels. These factors are potentially modifiable suggesting