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Sample records for models assuming constant

  1. A simple model for constant storage modulus of poly (lactic acid)/poly (ethylene oxide)/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites at low frequencies assuming the properties of interphase regions and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Yasser; Rhim, Sungsoo; Garmabi, Hamid; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2018-04-01

    The networks of nanoparticles in nanocomposites cause solid-like behavior demonstrating a constant storage modulus at low frequencies. This study examines the storage modulus of poly (lactic acid)/poly (ethylene oxide)/carbon nanotubes (CNT) nanocomposites. The experimental data of the storage modulus in the plateau regions are obtained by a frequency sweep test. In addition, a simple model is developed to predict the constant storage modulus assuming the properties of the interphase regions and the CNT networks. The model calculations are compared with the experimental results, and the parametric analyses are applied to validate the predictability of the developed model. The calculations properly agree with the experimental data at all polymer and CNT concentrations. Moreover, all parameters acceptably modulate the constant storage modulus. The percentage of the networked CNT, the modulus of networks, and the thickness and modulus of the interphase regions directly govern the storage modulus of nanocomposites. The outputs reveal the important roles of the interphase properties in the storage modulus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Some consequences of assuming simple patterns for the treatment effect over time in a linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamia, Christina; White, Ian R; Kenward, Michael G

    2013-07-10

    Linear mixed models are often used for the analysis of data from clinical trials with repeated quantitative outcomes. This paper considers linear mixed models where a particular form is assumed for the treatment effect, in particular constant over time or proportional to time. For simplicity, we assume no baseline covariates and complete post-baseline measures, and we model arbitrary mean responses for the control group at each time. For the variance-covariance matrix, we consider an unstructured model, a random intercepts model and a random intercepts and slopes model. We show that the treatment effect estimator can be expressed as a weighted average of the observed time-specific treatment effects, with weights depending on the covariance structure and the magnitude of the estimated variance components. For an assumed constant treatment effect, under the random intercepts model, all weights are equal, but in the random intercepts and slopes and the unstructured models, we show that some weights can be negative: thus, the estimated treatment effect can be negative, even if all time-specific treatment effects are positive. Our results suggest that particular models for the treatment effect combined with particular covariance structures may result in estimated treatment effects of unexpected magnitude and/or direction. Methods are illustrated using a Parkinson's disease trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Constant-parameter capture-recapture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Jolly (1982, Biometrics 38, 301-321) presented modifications of the Jolly-Seber model for capture-recapture data, which assume constant survival and/or capture rates. Where appropriate, because of the reduced number of parameters, these models lead to more efficient estimators than the Jolly-Seber model. The tests to compare models given by Jolly do not make complete use of the data, and we present here the appropriate modifications, and also indicate how to carry out goodness-of-fit tests which utilize individual capture history information. We also describe analogous models for the case where young and adult animals are tagged. The availability of computer programs to perform the analysis is noted, and examples are given using output from these programs.

  4. Neutronic modeling for a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor assuming coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Buiron, C.; Poinot, B.; Pothet, J. F.; Salavy, E.; Studer

    2004-01-01

    The modeling of gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) with the SAPHYR system and in particular APOLLO2 code assuming coated fuel particles, was investigated. It aims to estimate the APOLLO2 code accuracy, solving the neutron transport equation in range of fast neutron reactors. A two level PIJ/SN APOLLO2 scheme is proposed in which the first level is devoted to the self-shielding and the leakage calculation on a cell configuration. The efficiency of a new treatment of adsorption and scattering rates in the self-shielding module of the multigroup transport code APOLLO2 has been evaluated. The results show that two-level scheme provides promising results with 172-group cross section libraries, which confirm the APOLLO2 scheme as a tool for reactor designs. (authors)

  5. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The average of the moments for event shapes in e+e− → hadrons within the con- text of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are 〈1 − T〉, 〈ρ〉, 〈BT〉 and 〈BW〉. We extract αs, the coupling con- stant in perturbative theory and α0 in the ...

  6. Global stability of an SEIR epidemic model with constant immigration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guihua; Wang Wendi; Jin Zhen

    2006-01-01

    An SEIR epidemic model with the infectious force in the latent (exposed), infected and recovered period is studied. It is assumed that susceptible and exposed individuals have constant immigration rates. The model exhibits a unique endemic state if the fraction p of infectious immigrants is positive. If the basic reproduction number R is greater than 1, sufficient conditions for the global stability of the endemic equilibrium are obtained by the compound matrix theory

  7. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs

  8. Sensitivity of Attitude Determination on the Model Assumed for ISAR Radar Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, S.; Krag, H.

    2013-09-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radars (ISAR) are valuable instrumentations for assessing the state of a large object in low Earth orbit. The images generated by these radars can reach a sufficient quality to be used during launch support or contingency operations, e.g. for confirming the deployment of structures, determining the structural integrity, or analysing the dynamic behaviour of an object. However, the direct interpretation of ISAR images can be a demanding task due to the nature of the range-Doppler space in which these images are produced. Recently, a tool has been developed by the European Space Agency's Space Debris Office to generate radar mappings of a target in orbit. Such mappings are a 3D-model based simulation of how an ideal ISAR image would be generated by a ground based radar under given processing conditions. These radar mappings can be used to support a data interpretation process. E.g. by processing predefined attitude scenarios during an observation sequence and comparing them with actual observations, one can detect non-nominal behaviour. Vice versa, one can also estimate the attitude states of the target by fitting the radar mappings to the observations. It has been demonstrated for the latter use case that a coarse approximation of the target through an 3D-model is already sufficient to derive the attitude information from the generated mappings. The level of detail required for the 3D-model is determined by the process of generating ISAR images, which is based on the theory of scattering bodies. Therefore, a complex surface can return an intrinsically noisy ISAR image. E.g. when many instruments on a satellite are visible to the observer, the ISAR image can suffer from multipath reflections. In this paper, we will further analyse the sensitivity of the attitude fitting algorithms to variations in the dimensions and the level of detail of the underlying 3D model. Moreover, we investigate the ability to estimate the orientations of different

  9. ANALYTICAL MODEL OF DAMAGED AIRCRAFT SKIN BONDED REPAIRS ASSUMING THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES DEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of optimal variants for composite repair patches allows to increase the service life of a damaged air- plane structure. To sensibly choose the way of repair, it is necessary to have a computational complex to predict the stress- strain condition of "structure-adhesive-patch" system and to take into account the damage growth considering the material properties change. The variant of the computational complex based on inclusion method is proposed.For calculation purposes the repair bonded joint is divided into two areas: a metal plate with patch-shaped hole and a "patch-adhesive layer-skin" composite plate (inclusion.Calculation stages:Evaluation of the patch influence to the skin stress-strain condition, stress distribution between skin and patch in the case of no damage. Calculation of the stress-strain condition is performed separately for the skin with hole and for the inclusion; solutions are coupled based on strain compatibility.Definition of the damage growth parameters at new stress-strain condition due to bonded patch existence. Skincrack stress intensity factors are found to identify the crack growth velocity. Patch is modelled as a set of "springs" bridging the crack.Degradation analysis of elasticity properties for the patch material.Repair effectiveness is evaluated with respect to crack growth velocity reduction in the initial material in compari- son with the case of the patch absence.Calculation example for the crack repair effectiveness depending on number of loading cycles for the 7075-T6 aluminum skin is given. Repair patches are carbon-epoxy, glass-epoxy and boron-epoxy material systems with quasi- isotropic layup and GLARE hybrid metal-polymeric material.The analysis shows the high effectiveness of the carbon-epoxy patch. Due to low stiffness, the glass-epoxy patchdemonstrates the least effectiveness. GLARE patch containing the fiberglass plies oriented across the crack has the same effectiveness as the carbon and

  10. Statistical Modelling of the Soil Dielectric Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Marczewski, Wojciech; Bogdan Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2010-05-01

    The dielectric constant of soil is the physical property being very sensitive on water content. It funds several electrical measurement techniques for determining the water content by means of direct (TDR, FDR, and others related to effects of electrical conductance and/or capacitance) and indirect RS (Remote Sensing) methods. The work is devoted to a particular statistical manner of modelling the dielectric constant as the property accounting a wide range of specific soil composition, porosity, and mass density, within the unsaturated water content. Usually, similar models are determined for few particular soil types, and changing the soil type one needs switching the model on another type or to adjust it by parametrization of soil compounds. Therefore, it is difficult comparing and referring results between models. The presented model was developed for a generic representation of soil being a hypothetical mixture of spheres, each representing a soil fraction, in its proper phase state. The model generates a serial-parallel mesh of conductive and capacitive paths, which is analysed for a total conductive or capacitive property. The model was firstly developed to determine the thermal conductivity property, and now it is extended on the dielectric constant by analysing the capacitive mesh. The analysis is provided by statistical means obeying physical laws related to the serial-parallel branching of the representative electrical mesh. Physical relevance of the analysis is established electrically, but the definition of the electrical mesh is controlled statistically by parametrization of compound fractions, by determining the number of representative spheres per unitary volume per fraction, and by determining the number of fractions. That way the model is capable covering properties of nearly all possible soil types, all phase states within recognition of the Lorenz and Knudsen conditions. In effect the model allows on generating a hypothetical representative of

  11. Mathematical Model of Seasonal Influenza with Treatment in Constant Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharis, M.; Arifudin, R.

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal Influenza is one of disease that outbreaks periodically at least once every year. This disease caused many people hospitalized. Many hospitalized people as employers would infect production quantities, distribution time, and some economic aspects. It will infect economic growth. Infected people need treatments to reduce infection period and cure the infection. In this paper, we discussed about a mathematical model of seasonal influenza with treatment. Factually, the disease was held in short period, less than one year. Hence, we can assume that the population is constant at the disease outbreak time. In this paper, we analyzed the existence of the equilibrium points of the model and their stability. We also give some simulation to give a geometric image about the results of the analysis process.

  12. The null distribution of the heterogeneity lod score does depend on the assumed genetic model for the trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Vieland, V J

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that the asymptotic null distribution of the homogeneity lod score (LOD) does not depend on the genetic model specified in the analysis. When appropriately rescaled, the LOD is asymptotically distributed as 0.5 chi(2)(0) + 0.5 chi(2)(1), regardless of the assumed trait model. However, because locus heterogeneity is a common phenomenon, the heterogeneity lod score (HLOD), rather than the LOD itself, is often used in gene mapping studies. We show here that, in contrast with the LOD, the asymptotic null distribution of the HLOD does depend upon the genetic model assumed in the analysis. In affected sib pair (ASP) data, this distribution can be worked out explicitly as (0.5 - c)chi(2)(0) + 0.5chi(2)(1) + cchi(2)(2), where c depends on the assumed trait model. E.g., for a simple dominant model (HLOD/D), c is a function of the disease allele frequency p: for p = 0.01, c = 0.0006; while for p = 0.1, c = 0.059. For a simple recessive model (HLOD/R), c = 0.098 independently of p. This latter (recessive) distribution turns out to be the same as the asymptotic distribution of the MLS statistic under the possible triangle constraint, which is asymptotically equivalent to the HLOD/R. The null distribution of the HLOD/D is close to that of the LOD, because the weight c on the chi(2)(2) component is small. These results mean that the cutoff value for a test of size alpha will tend to be smaller for the HLOD/D than the HLOD/R. For example, the alpha = 0.0001 cutoff (on the lod scale) for the HLOD/D with p = 0.05 is 3.01, while for the LOD it is 3.00, and for the HLOD/R it is 3.27. For general pedigrees, explicit analytical expression of the null HLOD distribution does not appear possible, but it will still depend on the assumed genetic model. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Phase field modeling of brittle fracture for enhanced assumed strain shells at large deformations: formulation and finite element implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, J.; Paggi, M.; Linder, C.

    2017-06-01

    Fracture of technological thin-walled components can notably limit the performance of their corresponding engineering systems. With the aim of achieving reliable fracture predictions of thin structures, this work presents a new phase field model of brittle fracture for large deformation analysis of shells relying on a mixed enhanced assumed strain (EAS) formulation. The kinematic description of the shell body is constructed according to the solid shell concept. This enables the use of fully three-dimensional constitutive models for the material. The proposed phase field formulation integrates the use of the (EAS) method to alleviate locking pathologies, especially Poisson thickness and volumetric locking. This technique is further combined with the assumed natural strain method to efficiently derive a locking-free solid shell element. On the computational side, a fully coupled monolithic framework is consistently formulated. Specific details regarding the corresponding finite element formulation and the main aspects associated with its implementation in the general purpose packages FEAP and ABAQUS are addressed. Finally, the applicability of the current strategy is demonstrated through several numerical examples involving different loading conditions, and including linear and nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive models.

  14. Importance of the habitat choice behavior assumed when modeling the effects of food and temperature on fish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Lamberson, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Various mechanisms of habitat choice in fishes based on food and/or temperature have been proposed: optimal foraging for food alone; behavioral thermoregulation for temperature alone; and behavioral energetics and discounted matching for food and temperature combined. Along with development of habitat choice mechanisms, there has been a major push to develop and apply to fish populations individual-based models that incorporate various forms of these mechanisms. However, it is not known how the wide variation in observed and hypothesized mechanisms of fish habitat choice could alter fish population predictions (e.g. growth, size distributions, etc.). We used spatially explicit, individual-based modeling to compare predicted fish populations using different submodels of patch choice behavior under various food and temperature distributions. We compared predicted growth, temperature experience, food consumption, and final spatial distribution using the different models. Our results demonstrated that the habitat choice mechanism assumed in fish population modeling simulations was critical to predictions of fish distribution and growth rates. Hence, resource managers who use modeling results to predict fish population trends should be very aware of and understand the underlying patch choice mechanisms used in their models to assure that those mechanisms correctly represent the fish populations being modeled.

  15. Mathematical models assuming selective recruitment fitted to data for driver mortality and seat belt use in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Kawamura, Takashi; Ichikawa, Masao; Wakai, Susumu

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that unbelted drivers are at higher risk of involvement in fatal crashes than belted drivers, suggesting selective recruitment that high-risk drivers are unlikely to become belt users. However, how the risk of involvement in fatal crashes among unbelted drivers varies according to the level of seat belt use among general drivers has yet to be clearly quantified. We, therefore, developed mathematical models describing the risk of fatal crashes in relation to seat belt use among the general public, and explored how these models fitted to changes in driver mortality and changes in observed seat belt use using Japanese data. Mortality data between 1979 and 1994 were obtained from vital statistics, and mortality data in the daytime and nighttime between 1980 and 2001 and belt use data between 1979 and 2001 were obtained from the National Police Agency. Regardless of the data set analyzed, exponential models, assuming that high-risk drivers would gradually become belt users in order of increasing risk as seat belt use among general motorists reached high levels, showed the best fit. Our models provide an insight into behavioral changes among high-risk drivers and support the selective recruitment hypothesis.

  16. Towards Grothendieck constants and LHV models in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Bobo; Li, Ming; Zhang, Tinggui; Zhou, Chunqin; Li-Jost, Xianqing; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We adopt a continuous model to estimate the Grothendieck constants. An analytical formula to compute the lower bounds of Grothendieck constants has been explicitly derived for arbitrary orders, which improves previous bounds. Moreover, our lower bound of the Grothendieck constant of order three gives a refined bound of the threshold value for the nonlocality of the two-qubit Werner states. (paper)

  17. a Unified Dark Energy Model from a Vanishing Speed of Sound with Emergent Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Orlando; Quevedo, Hernando

    2014-11-01

    The problem of the cosmic acceleration is here revisited by using the fact that the adiabatic speed of sound can be assumed to be negligible small. Within the context of general relativity, the total energy budget is recovered under the hypothesis of a vanishing speed of sound by assuming the existence of one fluid only. We find a cosmological model which reproduces the main results of the ΛCDM paradigm at late-times, showing an emergent cosmological constant, which is not at all related with the vacuum energy term. As a consequence, the model presented here behaves as a unified dark energy (DE) model.

  18. Magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-03

    Nov 3, 2016 ... Bianchi type-III cosmological model in the presence of magnetic aeolotropic dark energy. The only gen- eralization of the EoS parameter of the perfect fluid could also be to work out the EoS parameter singly on ... EoS parameters for the fluid on x-,y- and z-axes respectively, ω is the deviation-free EoS ...

  19. Simulating Supercapacitors: Can We Model Electrodes As Constant Charge Surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Céline; Péan, Clarisse; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Madden, Paul A; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2013-01-17

    Supercapacitors based on an ionic liquid electrolyte and graphite or nanoporous carbon electrodes are simulated using molecular dynamics. We compare a simplified electrode model in which a constant, uniform charge is assigned to each carbon atom with a realistic model in which a constant potential is applied between the electrodes (the carbon charges are allowed to fluctuate). We show that the simulations performed with the simplified model do not provide a correct description of the properties of the system. First, the structure of the adsorbed electrolyte is partly modified. Second, dramatic differences are observed for the dynamics of the system during transient regimes. In particular, upon application of a constant applied potential difference, the increase in the temperature, due to the Joule effect, associated with the creation of an electric current across the cell follows Ohm's law, while unphysically high temperatures are rapidly observed when constant charges are assigned to each carbon atom.

  20. Identifiability of models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boens, Noël; Van der Auweraer, Mark

    2014-02-01

    The deterministic identifiability analysis of photophysical models for the kinetics of excited-state processes, assuming errorless time-resolved fluorescence data, can verify whether the model parameters can be determined unambiguously. In this work, we have investigated the identifiability of several uncommon models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants which lead to non-exponential decays. The mathematical functions used here for the description of non-exponential fluorescence decays are the stretched exponential or Kohlrausch function, the Becquerel function, the Förster type energy transfer function, decay functions associated with exponential, Gaussian and uniform distributions of rate constants, a decay function with extreme sub-exponential behavior, the Mittag-Leffler function and Heaviside's function. It is shown that all the models are uniquely identifiable, which means that for each specific model there exists a single parameter set that describes its associated fluorescence δ-response function.

  1. Asymptotics for Greeks under the constant elasticity of variance model

    OpenAIRE

    Kritski, Oleg L.; Zalmezh, Vladimir F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the asymptotics for Greeks of European-style options and the risk-neutral density function calculated under the constant elasticity of variance model. Formulae obtained help financial engineers to construct a perfect hedge with known behaviour and to price any options on financial assets.

  2. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 707–720. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration parameter in general relativity. C P SINGH* and S KUMAR. Department of Applied Mathematics, Delhi College of Engineering, Bawana Road,. Delhi 110 042, India. E-mail: cpsphd@rediffmail.com. MS received 24 January 2006; revised 19 January ...

  3. Exacerbating the Cosmological Constant Problem with Interacting Dark Energy Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M C David

    2017-01-06

    Future cosmological surveys will probe the expansion history of the Universe and constrain phenomenological models of dark energy. Such models do not address the fine-tuning problem of the vacuum energy, i.e., the cosmological constant problem (CCP), but can make it spectacularly worse. We show that this is the case for "interacting dark energy" models in which the masses of the dark matter states depend on the dark energy sector. If realized in nature, these models have far-reaching implications for proposed solutions to the CCP that require the number of vacua to exceed the fine-tuning of the vacuum energy density. We show that current estimates of the number of flux vacua in string theory, N_{vac}∼O(10^{272 000}), are far too small to realize certain simple models of interacting dark energy and solve the cosmological constant problem anthropically. These models admit distinctive observational signatures that can be targeted by future gamma-ray observatories, hence making it possible to observationally rule out the anthropic solution to the cosmological constant problem in theories with a finite number of vacua.

  4. Spectral model selection in the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J.; Qu, Jifeng

    2017-04-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor at the triple point of water, and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source is constant to within 1 part in a billion for frequencies up to 1 GHz. Given knowledge of this ratio, and the values of other parameters that are known or measured, one can determine the Boltzmann constant. Due, in part, to mismatch between transmission lines, the experimental ratio spectrum varies with frequency. We model this spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency where the constant term in the polynomial determines the Boltzmann constant. When determining this constant (offset) from experimental data, the assumed complexity of the ratio spectrum model and the maximum frequency analyzed (fitting bandwidth) dramatically affects results. Here, we select the complexity of the model by cross-validation—a data-driven statistical learning method. For each of many fitting bandwidths, we determine the component of uncertainty of the offset term that accounts for random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of model complexity. We select the fitting bandwidth that minimizes this uncertainty. In the most recent measurement of the Boltzmann constant, results were determined, in part, by application of an earlier version of the method described here. Here, we extend the earlier analysis by considering a broader range of fitting bandwidths and quantify an additional component of uncertainty that accounts for imperfect performance of our fitting bandwidth selection method. For idealized simulated data with additive noise similar to experimental data, our method correctly selects the true complexity of the ratio spectrum model for all cases considered. A new analysis of data from the recent experiment yields evidence for a temporal trend in the offset

  5. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge, with enough good precision. The results obtained can be used in model and engineering calculations to estimate gas and electronic temperatures in the channel of an arc plasma generator.

  6. Modified arctan-gravity model mimicking a cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2014-03-01

    A novel theory of F(R) gravity with the Lagrangian density L =[R-(b/β)arctan(βR)]/(2κ2) is analyzed. Constant curvature solutions of the model are found, and the potential of the scalar field and the mass of a scalar degree of freedom in Einstein's frame are derived. The cosmological parameters of the model are calculated, which are in agreement with the PLANCK data. Critical points for the de Sitter phase and the matter dominated epoch of autonomous equations are obtained and studied.

  7. Coupling constants and the nonrelativistic quark model with charmonium potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Koegerler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Hadronic coupling constants of the vertices including charm mesons are calculated in a nonrelativistic quark model. The wave functions of the mesons which enter the corresponding overlap integrals are obtained from the charmonium picture as quark-antiquark bound state solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The model for the vertices takes into account in a dynamical way the SU 4 breakings through different masses of quarks and different wave functions in the overlap integrals. All hadronic vertices involving scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, pseudovector and tensor mesons are calculated up to an overall normalization constant. Regularities among the couplings of mesons and their radial excitations are observed: i) Couplings decrease with increasing order of radial excitations; ii) In general they change sign if a particle is replaced by its next radial excitation. The k-dependence of the vertices is studied. This has potential importance in explaining the unorthodox ratios in different decay channels. Having got the hadronic couplings radiative transitions are obtained with the current coupled to mesons and their recurrences. The resulting width values are smaller than those conventionally obtained in the naive quark model. The whole picture is only adequate for nonrelativistic configurations, as for the members of the charmonium- or of the UPSILON-family and most calculations have been done for transitions among charmed states. To see how far nonrelativistic concepts can be applied, couplings of light mesons are also considered. (author)

  8. Design, modeling and fabrication of a constant flow pneumatic micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Walker; Domansky, Karel; Serdy, James; Owens, Bryan; Trumper, David; Griffith, Linda G.

    2007-05-01

    This paper characterizes a bi-directional pneumatic diaphragm micropump and presents a model for performance of an integrated fluidic capacitor. The fluidic capacitor is used to convert pulsatile flow into a nearly continuous flow stream. The pump was fabricated in acrylic using a CNC mill. The stroke volume of the pump is ~1 µL. The pump is self-priming, bubble tolerant and insensitive to changes in head pressure and pneumatic pressure within its operating range. The pump achieves a maximum flow rate of 5 mL min-1 against zero head pressure. With pneumatic pressure set to 40 kPa, the pump can provide flow at 2.6 mL min-1 against a head pressure of 25 kPa. A nonlinear model for the capacitor was developed and compared with experimental results. The ratio of the time constant of the capacitor to the cycle time of the pump is shown to be an accurate indicator of capacitor performance and a useful design tool.

  9. INFIL1D: a quasi-analytical model for simulating one-dimensional, constant flux infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.; McKeon, T.J.

    1984-04-01

    The program INFIL1D is designed to calculate approximate wetting-front advance into an unsaturated, uniformly moist, homogeneous soil profile, under constant surface-flux conditions. The code is based on a quasi-analytical method, which utilizes an assumed invariant functional relationship between reduced (normalized) flux and water content. The code uses general hydraulic property data in tabular form to simulate constant surface-flux infiltration. 10 references, 4 figures

  10. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  11. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  12. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Einstein's field equations are considered for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi Type-II space–time in the presence of a massless scalar field with a scalar potential. Exact solutions of scale factors and other physical parameters are obtained by using a special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields a constant ...

  13. Model-independent determination of the carrier multiplication time constant in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Marco

    2009-11-21

    The experimental determination of the carrier multiplication (CM) time constant is complicated by the fact that this process occurs within the initial few hundreds of femtoseconds after excitation and, in transient-absorption experiments, cannot be separated from the buildup time of the 1p-state population. This work provides an accurate theoretical determination of the electron relaxation lifetime during the last stage of the p-state buildup, in CdSe nanocrystals, in the presence of a single photogenerated hole (no CM) and of a hole plus an additional electron-hole pair (following CM). From the invariance of the 1p buildup time observed experimentally for excitations above and below the CM threshold producing hot carriers with the same average per-exciton excess energy, and the calculated corresponding variations in the electron decay time in the two cases, an estimate is obtained for the carrier multiplication time constant. Unlike previous estimates reported in the literature so far, this result is model-independent, i.e., is obtained without making any assumption on the nature of the mechanism governing carrier multiplication. It is then compared with the time constant calculated, as a function of the excitation energy, assuming an impact-ionization-like process for carrier multiplication (DCM). The two results are in good agreement and show that carrier multiplication can occur on timescales of the order of tens of femtoseconds at energies close to the observed onset. These findings, which are compatible with the fastest lifetime estimated experimentally, confirm the suitability of the impact-ionization model to explain carrier multiplication in CdSe nanocrystals.

  14. The Multisite Antiferromagnetic Ising Spin Model and Universality of Feigenbaum Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Ananikian, N. S.; Lusiniants, R. R.; Oganessyan, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Feigenbaum constants $\\alpha$ and $\\delta$ for the three-site antiferromagnetic Ising spin model on Husimi tree are calculated. It is shown that the numerical values of these constants for this real physical system coincide with the famous universal Feigenbaum constants with high accuracy. The quantitative description from ordering to chaos is also obtained.

  15. Higher-order superclustering in the Ostriker explosion scenario I. Three-point correlation functions of clusters in the constant and power-law models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Yipeng.

    1989-08-01

    We study the three-point correlation functions ρ(r, u, v) of clusters in the two types of explosion models by numerical simulations. The clusters are identified as the ''knots'' where three shells intersect. The shells are assumed to have the constant radii (the constant models) or have the power law radius distributions (the power law models). In both kinds of models, we find that ρ can be approximately expressed by the scaling form: ρ = Q(ξ 1 ξ 2 + ξ 2 ξ 3 + ξ 3 ξ 1 ), and Q is about 1, which are consistent with the observations. More detailed studies of r-, u- and v-dependences of Q show that Q remains constant in the constant models. In the power-law models, Q is independent of the shape parameters u and v, while it has some moderate r-dependences (variations with r about a factor of 1 or 2). (author). 27 refs, 9 figs

  16. Constant curvature surfaces of the supersymmetric ℂP{sup N−1} sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delisle, L., E-mail: delisle@dms.umontreal.ca [Département de Mathématiques et de Statistique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Hussin, V., E-mail: hussin@dms.umontreal.ca [Département de Mathématiques et de Statistique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Centre de Recherches Mathématiques, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Yurduşen, İ., E-mail: yurdusen@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Mathematics, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Zakrzewski, W. J., E-mail: w.j.zakrzewski@durham.ac.uk [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE,United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Constant curvature surfaces are constructed from the finite action solutions of the supersymmetric ℂP{sup N−1} sigma model. It is shown that there is a unique holomorphic solution which leads to constant curvature surfaces: the generalized Veronese curve. We give a general criterion to construct non-holomorphic solutions of the model. We extend our analysis to general supersymmetric Grassmannian models.

  17. Revisiting the constant growth angle: Estimation and verification via rigorous thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virozub, Alexander; Rasin, Igal G.; Brandon, Simon

    2008-12-01

    Methods for estimating growth angle ( θgr) values, based on the a posteriori analysis of directionally solidified material (e.g. drops) often involve assumptions of negligible gravitational effects as well as a planar solid/liquid interface during solidification. We relax both of these assumptions when using experimental drop shapes from the literature to estimate the relevant growth angles at the initial stages of solidification. Assumed to be constant, we use these values as input into a rigorous heat transfer and solidification model of the growth process. This model, which is shown to reproduce the experimental shape of a solidified sessile water drop using the literature value of θgr=0∘, yields excellent agreement with experimental profiles using our estimated values for silicon ( θgr=10∘) and germanium ( θgr=14.3∘) solidifying on an isotropic crystalline surface. The effect of gravity on the solidified drop shape is found to be significant in the case of germanium, suggesting that gravity should either be included in the analysis or that care should be taken that the relevant Bond number is truly small enough in each measurement. The planar solidification interface assumption is found to be unjustified. Although this issue is important when simulating the inflection point in the profile of the solidified water drop, there are indications that solidified drop shapes (at least in the case of silicon) may be fairly insensitive to the shape of this interface.

  18. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  19. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extension of the master sintering curve for constant heating rate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Tammy Michelle

    density of the pellets based on the green density and the theoretical density of each of the compositions. The Master Sintering Curve (MSC) model is then utilized to generate data that can be utilized to predict the final density of the respective powder over a range of heating rates. The Elton Master Sintering Curve Extension (EMSCE) is developed to extend the functionality of the MSC tool. The parameters generated from the original MSC are used in tandem with the solution to the closed integral, theta ≡ 1cTo T1Texp -QRT dT, over a set range of temperatures. The EMSCE is used to generate a set of sintering curves having both constant heating rate and isothermal hold portions. The EMSCE extends the usefulness of the MSC by allowing this generation of a complete sintering schedule rather than just being able to predict the final relative density of a given material. The EMSCE is verified by generating a set of curves having both constant heating rate and an isothermal hold for the heat-treatment. The modeled curves are verified experimentally and a comparison of the model and experimental results are given for a selected composition. Porosity within the final product can hinder the product from sintering to full density. It is shown that some of the compositions studied did not sinter to full density because of the presence of large porosity that could not be eliminated in a reasonable amount of time. A statistical analysis of the volume fraction of porosity is completed to show the significance of the presence in the final product. The reason this is relevant to the MSC is that the model does not take into account the presence of porosity and assumes that the samples sinter to full density. When this does not happen, the model actually under-predicts the final density of the material.

  1. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 1: Constant wave climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the non-linear development of alongshore undulations up to fully developed quasi-steady equilibrium. A numerical model which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines is applied, based on a spectral wave model, a depth...... integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model.First the length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a stability analysis. Next the further evolution from the linear to the fully non-linear regime is described....... In the fully non-linear regime down-drift spits and migrating shoreline undulations are described.Three different shoreline shapes are found depending on the wave conditions: undulations with no spits, undulations with shore parallel spit and undulations with reconnecting spits. © 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  2. Dynamics of 'abc' and 'qd' constant parameters induction generator model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajardo-R, L.A.; Medina, A.; Iov, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, parametric sensibility effects on dynamics of the induction generator in the presence of local perturbations are investigated. The study is conducted in a 3x2 MW wind park dealing with abc, qd0 and qd reduced order, induction generator model respectively, and with fluxes as state...

  3. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh and S Kumar mechanism at the early stages of evolution to explain the flat, homogeneous and isotropic nature of the present day Universe. In these models, the Universe un- dergoes a phase transition characterized by the evolution of a Higg's field φ. The inflation will take place if the potential V (φ) has a 'flat' ...

  4. A Novel Model of Dielectric Constant of Two-Phase Composites with Interfacial Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong

    Considering the interface effect between two phases in composite, we present a novel model of dielectric constant of two-phase composites with interfacial shells. Starting from Maxwell theory and average polarization theory, the formula of calculating the effective dielectric constant of two-phase random composites with interfacial shells is presented. The theoretical results on effective dielectric constant of alkyd resin paint/Barium titanate random composites with interfacial shells are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Tumour control probability derived from dose distribution in homogeneous and heterogeneous models: assuming similar pharmacokinetics, 125Sn–177Lu is superior to 90Y–177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Hanin, François-Xavier; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, François

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials on 177 Lu– 90 Y therapy used empirical activity ratios. Radionuclides (RN) with larger beta maximal range could favourably replace 90 Y. Our aim is to provide RN dose-deposition kernels and to compare the tumour control probability (TCP) of RN combinations. Dose kernels were derived by integration of the mono-energetic beta-ray dose distributions (computed using Monte Carlo) weighted by their respective beta spectrum. Nine homogeneous spherical tumours (1–25 mm in diameter) and four spherical tumours including a lattice of cold, but alive, spheres (1, 3, 5, 7 mm in diameter) were modelled. The TCP for 93 Y, 90 Y and 125 Sn in combination with 177 Lu in variable proportions (that kept constant the renal cortex biological effective dose) were derived by 3D dose kernel convolution. For a mean tumour-absorbed dose of 180 Gy, 2 mm homogeneous tumours and tumours including 3 mm diameter cold alive spheres were both well controlled (TCP > 0.9) using a 75–25% combination of 177 Lu and 90 Y activity. However, 125 Sn– 177 Lu achieved a significantly better result by controlling 1 mm-homogeneous tumour simultaneously with tumours including 5 mm diameter cold alive spheres. Clinical trials using RN combinations should use RN proportions tuned to the patient dosimetry. 125 Sn production and its coupling to somatostatin analogue appear feasible. Assuming similar pharmacokinetics 125 Sn is the best RN for combination with 177 Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy justifying pharmacokinetics studies in rodent of 125 Sn-labelled somatostatin analogues. (paper)

  6. Calculation Method of Kinetic Constants for the Mathematical Model Peat Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plakhova Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the work is related to necessity to simplify the calculation of kinetic constants for the mathematical model peat pyrolysis. Execute transformations of formula Arrhenius law. Degree of conversion is expressed in terms mass changes of sample. The obtained formulas help to calculate the kinetic constants for any type of solid organic fuels

  7. Recommended Henry’s Law Constants for Non-Groundwater Pathways Models in GoldSim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    This memorandum documents the source and numerical value of Henry’s law constants for volatile radionuclides of interest used in the non-groundwater (air and radon) pathways models for the 2018 E-Area Performance Assessment.

  8. Effects of composite casein and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes on renneting properties and composition of bovine milk by assuming an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. IKONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes on the renneting properties and composition of milk were estimated for 174 and 155 milk samples of 59 Finnish Ayrshire and 55 Finnish Friesian cows, respectively. As well as the random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects of a cow, the model included the fixed effects for parity, lactation stage, season, kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes. Favourable renneting properties were associated with kappa-beta-casein genotypes ABA 1 A 2 , ABA 1 A 1 and AAA 1 A 2 in the Finnish Ayrshire, and with ABA 2 B, AAA 1 A 3 , AAA 2 A 3 , ABA 1 A 2 and ABA 2 A 2 in the Finnish Friesian. The favourable effect of these genotypes on curd firming time and on firmness of the curd was partly due to their association with a high kappa-casein concentration in the milk. The effect of the kappa-casein E allele on renneting properties was unfavourable compared with that of the kappa-casein B allele, and possibly with that of the A allele. The beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had no effect on renneting properties but they had a clear effect on the protein composition of milk. The beta-lactoglobulin AA genotype was associated with a high whey protein % and beta-lactoglobulin concentration and the BB genotype with a high casein % and casein number.;

  9. Fractional derivatives of constant and variable orders applied to anomalous relaxation models in heat transfer problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address a class of the fractional derivatives of constant and variable orders for the first time. Fractional-order relaxation equations of constants and variable orders in the sense of Caputo type are modeled from mathematical view of point. The comparative results of the anomalous relaxation among the various fractional derivatives are also given. They are very efficient in description of the complex phenomenon arising in heat transfer.

  10. An Empirical Rate Constant Based Model to Study Capacity Fading in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivatsan Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model based on solvent diffusion and kinetics to study the formation of the SEI (solid electrolyte interphase layer and its impact on the capacity of a lithium ion battery is developed. The model uses the earlier work on silicon oxidation but studies the kinetic limitations of the SEI growth process. The rate constant of the SEI formation reaction at the anode is seen to play a major role in film formation. The kinetics of the reactions for capacity fading for various battery systems are studied and the rate constants are evaluated. The model is used to fit the capacity fade in different battery systems.

  11. The hillslope-storage Boussinesq model for non-constant bedrock slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilberts, A.G.J.; Loon, van E.E.; Troch, P.A.A.; Paniconi, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study the recently introduced hill slope-storage Boussinesq (hsB) model is cast in a generalized formulation enabling the model to handle non-constant bedrock slopes (i.e. bedrock profile curvature). This generalization extends the analysis of hydrological behavior to hillslopes of arbitrary

  12. Inference and testing on the boundary in extended constant conditional correlation GARCH models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard

    2017-01-01

    We consider inference and testing in extended constant conditional correlation GARCH models in the case where the true parameter vector is a boundary point of the parameter space. This is of particular importance when testing for volatility spillovers in the model. The large-sample properties of ...... for (no) volatility spillovers between foreign exchange rates....

  13. A Lagrange Multiplier Test for Testing the Adequacy of the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Paul; Teräsvirta, Timo; Yin, Meiqun

    A Lagrange multiplier test for testing the parametric structure of a constant conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (CCC-GARCH) model is proposed. The test is based on decomposing the CCC-GARCH model multiplicatively into two components, one of which...

  14. Finite size scaling study of a two parameter percolation model: Constant and correlated growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bappaditya; Santra, S. B.

    2018-02-01

    A new percolation model of enhanced parameter space with nucleation and growth is developed taking the initial seed concentration ρ and a growth parameter g as two tunable parameters. Percolation transition is determined by the final static configurations of spanning clusters once taking uniform growth probability for all the clusters and then taking a cluster size dependent dynamic growth probability. The uniform growth probability remains constant over time and leads to a constant growth model whereas the dynamically varying growth probability leads to a correlated growth model. In the first case, the growth of a cluster will encounter partial hindrance due to the presence of other clusters whereas in the second case the growth of a larger cluster will be further suppressed in comparison to the growth of smaller clusters. A finite size scaling theory for percolation transition is developed and numerically verified for both the models. The scaling functions are found to depend on both g and ρ. At the critical growth parameter gc, the values of the critical exponents are found to be same as that of the original percolation at all values of ρ for the constant growth model whereas in the case of correlated growth model the scaling behavior deviates from ordinary percolation in the dilute limit of ρ. The constant growth model then belongs to the same universality class of percolation for a wide range of ρ whereas the correlated growth model displays a continuously varying universality class as ρ decreases towards zero.

  15. Mathematical model for determining the binding constants between immunoglobulins, bivalent ligands, and monovalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Eric T; Cummings, Linda; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This paper analyzes the equilibria between immunoglobulins (R(2)), homo-bifunctional ligands (L(2)), monovalent ligands (I), and their complexes. We present a mathematical model that can be used to estimate the concentration of each species present in a mixture of R(2), L(2), and I, given the initial conditions defining the total concentration of R(2), L(2), I, and four dissociation constants (K(d)(inter), K(d)(intra), K(d)(mono), and α). This model is based on fewer assumptions than previous models and can be used to describe exactly a broad range of experimental conditions. A series of curves illustrates the dependence of the equilibria upon the total concentrations of receptors and ligands, and the dissociation constants. We provide a set of guidelines for the design and analysis of experiments with a focus on estimating the binding constants from experimental binding isotherms. Two analytical equations relate the conditions for maximum aggregation in this system to the binding constants. This model is a tool to quantify the binding of immunoglobulins to antigens and a guide to understanding and predicting the experimental data of assays and techniques that employ immunoglobulins.

  16. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Rodolfo H.; Gomez, Sergio S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown

  17. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Rodolfo H. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)]. E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar; Gomez, Sergio S. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)

    2006-04-24

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown.

  18. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  19. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  20. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  1. The thermal coupling constant and the gap equation in the λ φ 4D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananos, G.N.J.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1998-05-01

    By the concurrent use of two different resummation methods, the composite operator formalism and the Dyson-Schwinger equation, we re-examine the behaviour at finite temperature of the O(N)-symmetric λψ 4 model in a generic D-dimensional Euclidean space. In the cases D = 3 and D = 4, an analysis of the thermal behaviour of the renormalized squared mass and coupling constant are done for all temperatures. It results that the thermal renormalized squared mass is positive and increases monotonically with the temperature. The behavior of the thermal coupling constant is quite different in odd or even dimensional space. In D = 3, the thermal coupling constant decreases up to a minimum value different from zero and ten grows up monotonically as the temperature increases. In the case D = 4, it is found that the thermal renormalized coupling constant tends in the high temperature limit to a constant asymptotic value. Also for general D-dimensional Euclidean space, we are able to obtain a formula for the critical temperature of the second order phase transition. This formula agrees with previous known values at D = 3 and D 4. (author)

  2. Physical constants and invariant charges of the U(1) x SU(3) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, A.V.; Ivanov, S.V.; Nesterenko, V.A.

    1981-11-01

    We have investigated the form of the invariant charges in a unified model of the strong and electromagnetic interactions. We have considered the asymptotic properties of the interaction constants in the Higgs sector. We conclude that the dependence of the invariant charges on Vertical Barq/sup 2/Vertical Bar does not contradict the constraints which are imposed on the parameters of the model by experimental tests of QED.

  3. Determination of Chemical Kinetic Rate Constants of a Model for Carbothermal Processing of Lunar Regolith Simulant Using Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R; Gokoglu, S.; Hegde, U.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously developed a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal processing of lunar regolith using methane to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. In this carbothermal process, gaseous methane is pyrolyzed as it flows over the hot surface of a molten zone of lunar regolith and is converted to carbon and hydrogen. Hydrogen is carried away by the exiting stream of gases and carbon is deposited on the melt surface. The deposited carbon mixes with the melt and reacts with the metal oxides in it to produce carbon monoxide that bubbles out of the melt. In our model, we assume that the flux of carbon deposited is equal to the product of the surface reaction rate constant gamma and the concentration of methane adjacent to the melt surface. Similarly, the rate of consumption of carbon per unit volume in the melt is equal to the product of the melt reaction rate constant k and the concentrations of carbon and metal oxide in the melt. In this paper, we describe our effort to determine gamma and k by comparison of the predictions from our model with test data obtained by ORBITEC (Orbital Technologies Corporation). The concentration of methane adjacent to the melt surface is a necessary input to the model. It is inferred from the test data by a mass balance of methane, adopting the usual assumptions of the continuously-stirred-tank-reactor model, whereby the average concentration of a given gaseous species equals its exit concentration. The reaction rates gamma and k have been determined by a non-linear least-squares fit to the test data for the production of carbon monoxide and the fraction of the incoming methane that is converted. The comparison of test data with our model predictions using the determined chemical kinetic rate constants provides a consistent interpretation of the process over the full range of temperatures, pressures, and methane flow rates used in the tests, thereby increasing our confidence to use the model for scale-up purposes.

  4. The effects of rigid motions on elastic network model force constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezon, Timothy R

    2012-04-01

    Elastic network models provide an efficient way to quickly calculate protein global dynamics from experimentally determined structures. The model's single parameter, its force constant, determines the physical extent of equilibrium fluctuations. The values of force constants can be calculated by fitting to experimental data, but the results depend on the type of experimental data used. Here, we investigate the differences between calculated values of force constants and data from NMR and X-ray structures. We find that X-ray B factors carry the signature of rigid-body motions, to the extent that B factors can be almost entirely accounted for by rigid motions alone. When fitting to more refined anisotropic temperature factors, the contributions of rigid motions are significantly reduced, indicating that the large contribution of rigid motions to B factors is a result of over-fitting. No correlation is found between force constants fit to NMR data and those fit to X-ray data, possibly due to the inability of NMR data to accurately capture protein dynamics. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J.A.P. Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT, together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  6. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P., E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Vielzeuf, P.E., E-mail: pvielzeuf@ifae.es [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Martinelli, M., E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Calabrese, E., E-mail: erminia.calabrese@astro.ox.ac.uk [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pandolfi, S., E-mail: stefania@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-09

    We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  7. Determination of a dielectric waveguide propagation constant using a multifilament-current model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, H; Altman, Z; Leviatan, Y

    1989-09-15

    A moment method using a multifilament-current model is presented to analyze the modes propagating in a cylindrical dielectric waveguide. In this model, analytically derivable fields of filamentary electric and magnetic currents (of yet unknown propagation constant and amplitude) are used to simulate the field of each mode inside and outside the guiding core. A simple point-matching procedure is subsequently used to enforce the boundary conditions at the core periphery and results in a homogeneous matrix equation. The longitudinal propagation constant of each mode and the currents that yield the field distribution of this mode are then found by solving this equation. As an example, a circular dielectric waveguide is analyzed and the results are presented.

  8. Model test study of evaporation mechanism of sand under constant atmospheric condition

    OpenAIRE

    CUI, Yu Jun; DING, Wenqi; SONG, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation mechanism of Fontainebleau sand using a large-scale model chamber is studied. First, the evaporation test on a layer of water above sand surface is performed under various atmospheric conditions, validating the performance of the chamber and the calculation method of actual evaporation rate by comparing the calculated and measured cumulative evaporations. Second,the evaporation test on sand without water layer is conducted under constant atmospheric condition. Both the evoluti...

  9. Modelling volatility using a non-homogeneous martingale model for processes with constant mean on count data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article a non-homogeneous martingale model is proposed to model volatility in a stochastic time series of count data with constant mean. The approach is derived from a general non- homogeneous birth-and-death process, in which the mean and the variance of population size can vary as a

  10. Structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) WZNW model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikida, Y.; Schomerus, V.

    2007-11-15

    We propose exact formulas for the 2- and 3-point functions of the WZNW model on the non-compact supergroup OSP(1 vertical stroke 2). Using the path integral approach that was recently developed in arXiv:0706.1030 we show how local correlation functions in the OSP(p vertical stroke 2) WZNW models can be obtained from those of N=p supersymmetric Liouville field theory for p=1,2. We then employ known results on correlators in N=1 Liouville theory to determine the structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) theory. (orig.)

  11. The varying cosmological constant: a new approximation to the Friedmann equations and universe model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztaş, Ahmet M.; Dil, Emre; Smith, Michael L.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the time-dependent nature of the cosmological constant, Λ, of the Einstein Field Equation (EFE). Beginning with the Einstein-Hilbert action as our fundamental principle we develop a modified version of the EFE allowing the value of Λ to vary as a function of time, Λ(t), indirectly, for an expanding universe. We follow the evolving Λ presuming four-dimensional space-time and a flat universe geometry and present derivations of Λ(t) as functions of the Hubble constant, matter density, and volume changes which can be traced back to the radiation epoch. The models are more detailed descriptions of the Λ dependence on cosmological factors than previous, allowing calculations of the important parameters, Ωm and Ωr, to deep lookback times. Since we derive these without the need for extra dimensions or other special conditions our derivations are useful for model evaluation with astronomical data. This should aid resolution of several difficult problems of astronomy such as the best value for the Hubble constant at present and at recombination.

  12. A review of shear strength models for rock joints subjected to constant normal stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanathan Thirukumaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical shear behaviour of rough joints has been studied under constant normal load/stress (CNL boundary conditions, but recent studies have shown that this boundary condition may not replicate true practical situations. Constant normal stiffness (CNS is more appropriate to describe the stress–strain response of field joints since the CNS boundary condition is more realistic than CNL. The practical implications of CNS are movements of unstable blocks in the roof or walls of an underground excavation, reinforced rock wedges sliding in a rock slope or foundation, and the vertical movement of rock-socketed concrete piles. In this paper, the highlights and limitations of the existing models used to predict the shear strength/behaviour of joints under CNS conditions are discussed in depth.

  13. Modelling and simulation of multi-phase effects on X-ray elasticity constants

    CERN Document Server

    Freour, S; Guillen, R; François, M X

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of X-ray Elasticity Constants (XEC) of phases embedded in multi-phase polycrystals. A three scales (macroscopic, pseudo-macroscopic, mesoscopic) model based on the classical self-consistent formalism is developed in order to analyse multi-phase effects on XEC values. Simulations are performed for cubic or hexagonal crystallographic structure phases embedded in several two-phases materials. In fact, it is demonstrated that XEC vary with the macroscopic stiffness of the whole polycrystal. In consequence, the constants of one particular phase depend on the elastic behaviour and the volume fraction of all the phases constituting the material. Now, XEC play a leading role in pseudo-macroscopic stresses determination by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. In this work, a quantitative analysis of the multi-phase effects on stresses determination by XRD methods was performed. Numerical results will be compared and discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Thrust Force Analysis of Tripod Constant Velocity Joint Using Multibody Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hideki; Matsunaga, Tsugiharu; Mizutani, Yoshiteru; Ando, Yosei; Kashiwagi, Isashi

    A tripod constant velocity joint is used in the driveshaft of front wheel drive vehicles. Thrust force generated by this joint causes lateral vibration in these vehicles. To analyze the thrust force, a detailed model is constructed based on a multibody dynamics approach. This model includes all principal parts of the joint defined as rigid bodies and all force elements of contact and friction acting among these parts. This model utilizes a new contact modeling method of needle roller bearings for more precise and faster computation. By comparing computational and experimental results, the appropriateness of this model is verified and the principal factors inducing the second and third rotating order components of the thrust force are clarified. This paper also describes the influence of skewed needle rollers on the thrust force and evaluates the contribution of friction forces at each contact region to the thrust force.

  15. Estimation of parameters of constant elasticity of substitution production functional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaboob, B.; Venkateswarlu, B.; Sankar, J. Ravi

    2017-11-01

    Nonlinear model building has become an increasing important powerful tool in mathematical economics. In recent years the popularity of applications of nonlinear models has dramatically been rising up. Several researchers in econometrics are very often interested in the inferential aspects of nonlinear regression models [6]. The present research study gives a distinct method of estimation of more complicated and highly nonlinear model viz Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) production functional model. Henningen et.al [5] proposed three solutions to avoid serious problems when estimating CES functions in 2012 and they are i) removing discontinuities by using the limits of the CES function and its derivative. ii) Circumventing large rounding errors by local linear approximations iii) Handling ill-behaved objective functions by a multi-dimensional grid search. Joel Chongeh et.al [7] discussed the estimation of the impact of capital and labour inputs to the gris output agri-food products using constant elasticity of substitution production function in Tanzanian context. Pol Antras [8] presented new estimates of the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour using data from the private sector of the U.S. economy for the period 1948-1998.

  16. A simplified permeability model for coalbed methane reservoirs based on matchstick strain and constant volume theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiang [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); Harpalani, Satya; Liu, Shimin [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Significant changes occur in the absolute permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs during primary depletion or enhanced recovery/CO{sub 2} sequestration operations. In order to project gas production, several analytical models have been developed to predict changes in coal permeability as a function of stress/porosity and sorption. Although these models are more transparent and less complicated than the coupled numerical models, there are differences between the various analytical models and there are several uncertainties. These are discussed briefly in this paper. A new model is then proposed, which is based on the volumetric balance between the bulk coal, and solid grains and pores, using the constant volume theory. It incorporates primarily the changes in grain and cleat volumes and is, therefore, different from the other models that lay heavy emphasis on the pore volume/cleat compressibility values. Finally, in order to demonstrate the simplicity of the proposed model, a history matching exercise is carried out using field data in order to compare the different models. The modeling results suggest that the agreement between the predicted permeability using the existing models and the one proposed here is very good. The merit of the proposed model is its simplicity, and the fact that all input parameters are easily measurable for any coal type with no uncertainties. (author)

  17. Insensitivity of The Distance Ladder Hubble Constant Determination to Cepheid Calibration Modeling Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, B.; Knox, L.

    2018-03-01

    Recent determination of the Hubble constant via Cepheid-calibrated supernovae by Riess et al. (2016) (R16) find ˜3σ tension with inferences based on cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization measurements from Planck. This tension could be an indication of inadequacies in the concordance ΛCDM model. Here we investigate the possibility that the discrepancy could instead be due to systematic bias or uncertainty in the Cepheid calibration step of the distance ladder measurement by R16. We consider variations in total-to-selective extinction of Cepheid flux as a function of line-of-sight, hidden structure in the period-luminosity relationship, and potentially different intrinsic colour distributions of Cepheids as a function of host galaxy. Considering all potential sources of error, our final determination of H0 = 73.3 ± 1.7 km/s/Mpc (not including systematic errors from the treatment of geometric distances or Type Ia Supernovae) shows remarkable robustness and agreement with R16. We conclude systematics from the modelling of Cepheid photometry, including Cepheid selection criteria, cannot explain the observed tension between Cepheid-variable and CMB-based inferences of the Hubble constant. Considering a `model-independent' approach to relating Cepheids in galaxies with known distances to Cepheids in galaxies hosting a Type Ia supernova and finding agreement with the R16 result, we conclude no generalization of the model relating anchor and host Cepheid magnitude measurements can introduce significant bias in the H0 inference.

  18. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. I. CONSTANT DENSITY ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure, and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by simultaneously solving the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance, and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell processes of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Kα line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  19. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. I. Constant Density Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by solving simultaneously the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Ka line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  20. Impact of the latest measurement of Hubble constant on constraining inflation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin

    2017-06-01

    We investigate how the constraint results of inflation models are affected by considering the latest local measurement of $H_0$ in the global fit. We use the observational data, including the Planck CMB full data, the BICEP2 and Keck Array CMB B-mode data, the BAO data, and the latest measurement of Hubble constant, to constrain the $\\Lambda$CDM+$r$+$N_{\\rm eff}$ model, and the obtained 1$\\sigma$ and 2$\\sigma$ contours of $(n_s, r)$ are compared to the theoretical predictions of selected inflationary models. We find that, in this fit, the scale invariance is only excluded at the 3.3$\\sigma$ level, and $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff}>0$ is favored at the 1.6$\\sigma$ level. The natural inflation model is now excluded at more than 2$\\sigma$ level; the Starobinsky $R^2$ model becomes only favored at around 2$\\sigma$ level; the most favored model becomes the spontaneously broken SUSY inflation model; and, the brane inflation model is also well consistent with the current data, in this case.

  1. The modelling of carbon-based supercapacitors: Distributions of time constants and Pascal Equivalent Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Iain; Dring, Roderick; Puttock, Robert; Thring, Rob; Howroyd, Simon

    2017-03-01

    Supercapacitors are an emerging technology with applications in pulse power, motive power, and energy storage. However, their carbon electrodes show a variety of non-ideal behaviours that have so far eluded explanation. These include Voltage Decay after charging, Voltage Rebound after discharging, and Dispersed Kinetics at long times. In the present work, we establish that a vertical ladder network of RC components can reproduce all these puzzling phenomena. Both software and hardware realizations of the network are described. In general, porous carbon electrodes contain random distributions of resistance R and capacitance C, with a wider spread of log R values than log C values. To understand what this implies, a simplified model is developed in which log R is treated as a Gaussian random variable while log C is treated as a constant. From this model, a new family of equivalent circuits is developed in which the continuous distribution of log R values is replaced by a discrete set of log R values drawn from a geometric series. We call these Pascal Equivalent Circuits. Their behaviour is shown to resemble closely that of real supercapacitors. The results confirm that distributions of RC time constants dominate the behaviour of real supercapacitors.

  2. Adaptation of fugacity models to treat speciating chemicals with constant species concentration ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toose, Liisa K; Mackay, Donald

    2004-09-01

    A "multiplier" method is developed by which multimedia mass balance fugacity models designed to describe the fate of a single chemical species can be applied to chemicals that exist as several interconverting species. The method is applicable only when observed ratios of species concentrations in each phase are relatively constant and there is thus no need to define interspecies conversion rates. It involves the compilation of conventional transformation and intermedia transport rate expressions for a single, selected key species, and then a multiplier, Ri, is deduced for each of the other species. The total rate applicable to all species is calculated as the product of the rate for the single key species and a combined multiplier (1 + R2 + R3 + etc.). The theory is developed and illustrated by two examples. Limitations of the method are discussed, especially under conditions when conversion rates are uncertain. The advantage of this approach is that existing fugacity and concentration-based models that describe the fate of single-species chemicals can be readily adapted to estimate the fate of multispecies substances such as mercury which display relatively constant species proportions in each medium.

  3. Johnson-Cook Strength Model Constants for VascoMax 300 and 1080 Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinnamon, J. D.; Palazotto, A. N.; Kennan, Z.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.

    2006-01-01

    High strength steels, VascoMax 300 and 1080, are characterized under tension at strain rates of ∼1/s, ∼500/s, ∼1000/s, and ∼1500/s and at high temperatures using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques. The data on 1080 steel exhibited a typical strain hardening response, whereas Vasco-Max 300 steel showed diminishing flow stress beyond yielding because of localized necking in gauge section of the tested specimens. The tension data are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook (J-C) strength model constants for the two steels. The flow stress values for VascoMax are adjusted to account for necking, and the corrected J-C model is developed

  4. Model based multi-wavelength spectrophotometric method for calculation of formation constants of phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazone complexes with some metallic cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In traditional spectrophotometric determination of stability constants of complexation, it is necessary to find a wavelength at which only one of the components has absorbance without any spectroscopic interference of the other reaction components. In the present work, a simple multi-wavelength model-based method has been developed to determine stability constants for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components are extracted using multi-wavelength model based method. In the present work spectrophotometric titration of several cationic metal ions with new synthetic ligand were studied in order to calculate the formation constant(s. In order to estimate the formation constants a chemometrics method, model based analysis was applied.

  5. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  6. Dispersive versus constant-geometry models of the neutron-208Pb mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1990-01-01

    Phenomenological optical-model analyses of differential elastic scattering cross sections of neutrons by 208 Pb indicate that the radius of the real part of the potential decreases with increasing energy in the domain 4< E<40 MeV. On the other hand, the experimental total cross section is compatible with a real potential whose radial shape is energy independent. In order to clarify this situation, we compare a 'constant geometry' model whose real part has an energy-independent radial shape with a 'dispersive model' whose real part has an energy-dependent radial shape calculated from the dispersion relation which connects the real and imaginary parts of the field. The following three main features are considered. (i) The junction of the optical-model potential with the shell-model potential at negative energy. (ii) The agreement between the calculated total and differential cross sections and their experimental values. (iii) The extent to which the real part of the optical-model potential can be accurately determined by analyzing the total cross section only. It is concluded that the presently available experimental data support the existence of an energy dependence of the radial shape of the real potential, in keeping with the dispersion relation. A new parametrization of a 'dispersive' mean field is also presented. It does not involve more parameters than the previously published one but takes better account of the physical properties of the spectral functions; it is shown to improve the agreement between predicted and experimental scattering data. (orig.)

  7. Analytical Model of Waterflood Sweep Efficiency in Vertical Heterogeneous Reservoirs under Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model has been developed for quantitative evaluation of vertical sweep efficiency based on heterogeneous multilayer reservoirs. By applying the Buckley-Leverett displacement mechanism, a theoretical relationship is deduced to describe dynamic changes of the front of water injection, water saturation of producing well, and swept volume during waterflooding under the condition of constant pressure, which substitutes for the condition of constant rate in the traditional way. Then, this method of calculating sweep efficiency is applied from single layer to multilayers, which can be used to accurately calculate the sweep efficiency of heterogeneous reservoirs and evaluate the degree of waterflooding in multilayer reservoirs. In the case study, the water frontal position, water cut, volumetric sweep efficiency, and oil recovery are compared between commingled injection and zonal injection by applying the derived equations. The results are verified by numerical simulators, respectively. It is shown that zonal injection works better than commingled injection in respect of sweep efficiency and oil recovery and has a longer period of water free production.

  8. Finding exact constants in a Markov model of Zipfs law generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu.; Nikiforov, A. A.; Pismenskiy, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    According to the classical Zipfs law, the word frequency is a power function of the word rank with an exponent -1. The objective of this work is to find multiplicative constant in a Markov model of word generation. Previously, the case of independent letters was mathematically strictly investigated in [Bochkarev V V and Lerner E Yu 2017 International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences Article ID 914374]. Unfortunately, the methods used in this paper cannot be generalized in case of Markov chains. The search of the correct formulation of the Markov generalization of this results was performed using experiments with different ergodic matrices of transition probability P. Combinatory technique allowed taking into account all the words with probability of more than e -300 in case of 2 by 2 matrices. It was experimentally proved that the required constant in the limit is equal to the value reciprocal to conditional entropy of matrix row P with weights presenting the elements of the vector π of the stationary distribution of the Markov chain.

  9. EOS simulation and GRNN modeling of the constant volume depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, A.M.; Foda, S.G. [Kuwait University, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-03-01

    Currently, two approaches are being used to predict the changes in retrograde gas condensate composition and estimate the pressure depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs. The first approach uses the equation of states whereas the second uses empirical correlations. Equations of states (EOS) are poor predictive tools for complex hydrocarbon systems. The EOS needs adjustment against phase behavior data of reservoir fluid of known composition. The empirical correlation does not involve numerous numerical computations but their accuracy is limited. This study presents two general regression neural network (GRNN) models. The first model, GRNNM1, is developed to predict dew point pressure and gas compressibility at dew point using initial composition of numerous samples while the second model, GRNNM2, is developed to predict the changes in well stream effluent composition at any stages of pressure depletion. GRNNM2 can also be used to determine the initial reservoir fluid composition using dew point pressure, gas compressibility at dew point, and reservoir temperature. These models are based on analysis of 142 sample of laboratory studies of constant volume depletion (CVD) for gas condensate systems forming a total of 1082 depletion stages. The database represents a wide range of gas condensate systems obtained worldwide. The performance of the GRNN models has been compared to simulation results of the equation of state. The study shows that the proposed general regression neural network models are accurate, valid, and reliable. These models can be used to forecast CVD data needed for many reservoir engineering calculations in case laboratory data is unavailable. The GRNN models save computer time involved in EOS calculations. The study also show that once these models are properly trained they can be used to cut expenses of frequent sampling and laborious experimental CVD tests required for gas condensate reservoirs. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Visible and Mid-Infrared Gypsum Optical Constants for Modeling of Martian Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Esposito, Francesca; Rossmann, George R.; Colangeli, Luigi

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: Recent and on-going remote and in situ observations indicate that sulfates are present in significant abundances at various locations on Mars [1-7]. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) imaging spectrometer (CRISM) is returning hyperspectral data at higher spatial resolution [8] than the OMEGA instrument on the Mars Express Mission [3]. Data from both OMEGA and CRISM have provided spectral evidence for the presence of gypsum and various hydrated sulfates on the Martian surface [e.g. 3-7] Thus, the optical properties of sulfates, in general, are of interest to quantitative interpretation of this increasing volume of remotely sensed data. This is because optical constants describe how a material interacts with electromagnetic radiation and represent the fundamental values used in radiative transfer calculations describing a variety of physical environments. Such environments include atmospheres where aerosols are present, planetary and satellite regoliths, and circumstellar dust clouds. Here we focus upon gypsum because of its applicability due to its identification on Mars. Also, gypsum is a mineral that is readily available in samples sizes that are suitable for study using a variety of spectral measurements. In the infrared (>5 μm) several studies reporting the optical constants of gypsum can be used in evaluating the approach used here. Most importantly, there is a general lack of data regarding the optical constants for gypsum at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) that are being observed by OMEGA and CRISM. Background: In the infrared, there have been several studies focused at determining the optical constants of gypsum using classical dispersion models [9-11]. These have used a variety of samples including; crystals, compressed pellets of pure materials, and grains suspended in a KBr matrix. Spectral measurements of gypsum, and other sulfates, have existed for about 100 years at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) [e

  11. A mathematical model to determine molecular kinetic rate constants under non-steady state conditions using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Tanmay P; Ingber, Donald E

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analyses of binding and unbinding of molecules that interact with insoluble scaffolds, such as the cytoskeleton and nuclear matrix, in living cells commonly assume that this process is at equilibrium over the time scale of fluorescence recovery. This assumption breaks down for relatively fast intracellular processes like focal adhesion assembly at the leading edge of a migrating cell, or changes of transcriptional activation in the nucleus, that can occur in a matter of a few minutes. In this paper, we formulate a mathematical model that permits FRAP to be used to determine kinetic rate constants of molecules that interact with insoluble cellular structures under non-steady state conditions. We show that unlike steady state FRAP, fluorescence recovery time scales under these unsteady conditions are determined not only by unbinding rates, but also by the overall assembly and disassembly dynamics of the structural scaffold which supports these binding interactions. Experimental data from FRAP analysis and quantification of scaffold assembly dynamics may be combined and used with our mathematical model to estimate kinetic rate constants, as well as the apparent rate constant of scaffold assembly and disassembly.

  12. Use of SAMC for Bayesian analysis of statistical models with intractable normalizing constants

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Statistical inference for the models with intractable normalizing constants has attracted much attention. During the past two decades, various approximation- or simulation-based methods have been proposed for the problem, such as the Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method and the auxiliary variable Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm specifically addresses this problem: It works by sampling from a sequence of approximate distributions with their average converging to the target posterior distribution, where the approximate distributions can be achieved using the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm. A strong law of large numbers is established for the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo estimator under mild conditions. Compared to the Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method, the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm is more robust to the initial guess of model parameters. Compared to the auxiliary variable MCMC methods, the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm avoids the requirement for perfect samples, and thus can be applied to many models for which perfect sampling is not available or very expensive. The Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm also provides a general framework for approximate Bayesian analysis. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-target QSPR modeling for simultaneous prediction of multiple gas-phase kinetic rate constants of diverse chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha

    2018-03-01

    The reactions of molecular ozone (O3), hydroxyl (•OH) and nitrate (NO3) radicals are among the major pathways of removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmospheric environment. The gas-phase kinetic rate constants (kO3, kOH, kNO3) are thus, important in assessing the ultimate fate and exposure risk of atmospheric VOCs. Experimental data for rate constants are not available for many emerging VOCs and the computational methods reported so far address a single target modeling only. In this study, we have developed a multi-target (mt) QSPR model for simultaneous prediction of multiple kinetic rate constants (kO3, kOH, kNO3) of diverse organic chemicals considering an experimental data set of VOCs for which values of all the three rate constants are available. The mt-QSPR model identified and used five descriptors related to the molecular size, degree of saturation and electron density in a molecule, which were mechanistically interpretable. These descriptors successfully predicted three rate constants simultaneously. The model yielded high correlations (R2 = 0.874-0.924) between the experimental and simultaneously predicted endpoint rate constant (kO3, kOH, kNO3) values in test arrays for all the three systems. The model also passed all the stringent statistical validation tests for external predictivity. The proposed multi-target QSPR model can be successfully used for predicting reactivity of new VOCs simultaneously for their exposure risk assessment.

  14. Description of bipolar charge transport in polyethylene using a fluid model with a constant mobility: model prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, S; Segur, P; Teyssedre, G; Laurent, C

    2004-01-01

    We present a conduction model aimed at describing bipolar transport and space charge phenomena in low density polyethylene under dc stress. In the first part we recall the basic requirements for the description of charge transport and charge storage in disordered media with emphasis on the case of polyethylene. A quick review of available conduction models is presented and our approach is compared with these models. Then, the bases of the model are described and related assumptions are discussed. Finally, results on external current, trapped and free space charge distributions, field distribution and recombination rate are presented and discussed, considering a constant dc voltage, a step-increase of the voltage, and a polarization-depolarization protocol for the applied voltage. It is shown that the model is able to describe the general features reported for external current, electroluminescence and charge distribution in polyethylene

  15. Physics and evolution of constant opening angle jets using a quasi-one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupelis, Theodoros

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the significance of the assumptions of infinite conductivity and time independence in the context of an ideal MHD model for constant opening angle jets. The model is developed by projecting the MHD equations onto the jet axis. We find that for initially sub-Alfvenic flows (i.e., flows emanating from active galactic nuclei and neutron stars) wind-type solutions exist only when the field lines at the origin are wound up in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of the compact source. We discuss the possibility that the time evolution of these outflows may be a cycle between breeze- and wind-type solutions as a result of continuous changes in the boundary conditions at the origin due to accretion. We propose that such cycles may explain the apparent one-sideness of some jets, especially the ones for which we cannot use arguments of relativistic beaming. We examine the dependence of the wind-type solutions on the following parameters describing the outflow at the origin: the degree of winding of the field lines, the value of the gas pressure, the polytropic index, the strength of the magnetic field, the value of the rotational velocity, the gravitational potential of the compact object, and the injection velocity. We compare results with results obtained previously, and discuss briefly the qualitative features and physical interpretation of the solutions for outflows emanating from neutron stars and protostars.

  16. Non-constant link tension coefficient in the tumbling-snake model subjected to simple shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The authors of the present study have recently presented evidence that the tumbling-snake model for polymeric systems has the necessary capacity to predict the appearance of pronounced undershoots in the time-dependent shear viscosity as well as an absence of equally pronounced undershoots in the transient two normal stress coefficients. The undershoots were found to appear due to the tumbling behavior of the director u when a rotational Brownian diffusion term is considered within the equation of motion of polymer segments, and a theoretical basis concerning the use of a link tension coefficient given through the nematic order parameter had been provided. The current work elaborates on the quantitative predictions of the tumbling-snake model to demonstrate its capacity to predict undershoots in the time-dependent shear viscosity. These predictions are shown to compare favorably with experimental rheological data for both polymer melts and solutions, help us to clarify the microscopic origin of the observed phenomena, and demonstrate in detail why a constant link tension coefficient has to be abandoned.

  17. Modeling Approach for Determining Equivalent Optical Constants of Plastic Shading Nets under Solar Radiation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abdel-Ghany

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiative properties of several plastic shading nets were measured under natural solar radiation conditions. We found that the plastic nets behave as homogeneous translucent materials (e.g., plastic film, plastic sheets, and glass. Based on this behavior, we suggest that it is possible to treat plastic nets as translucent materials and to characterize them with equivalent optical constants (i.e., equivalent refractive indexes, neq, and equivalent extinction coefficients, σeq. Here a physical model to determine neq and σeq of plastic nets was described in analogy to homogeneous translucent materials. We examined three groups of nets based on their color (black, black-green, and beige. Each group consisted of nets with four or five different porosities. Nets of each group had almost the same texture structure. For each group, we derived an equation for neq as a function of the net porosity and determined an average value for σeq. Once values of neq and σeq were determined, the solar radiative properties of a net could then be calculated from neq and σeq for any incident angle of solar beam radiation without the need of measurements. The present model was validated by comparing the calculated with the measured radiative properties of three nets at different incident angle of solar beam radiation. The calculated radiative properties reasonably agreed with measured values.

  18. Modeling the downward transport of 210Pb in Peatlands: Initial Penetration‐Constant Rate of Supply (IP-CRS) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olid, Carolina; Diego, David; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Klaminder, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    The vertical distribution of 210 Pb is commonly used to date peat deposits accumulated over the last 100–150 years. However, several studies have questioned this method because of an apparent post-depositional mobility of 210 Pb within some peat profiles. In this study, we introduce the Initial Penetration–Constant Rate of Supply (IP-CRS) model for calculating ages derived from 210 Pb profiles that are altered by an initial migration of the radionuclide. This new, two-phased, model describes the distribution of atmospheric-derived 210 Pb ( 210 Pb xs ) in peat taking into account both incorporation of 210 Pb into the accumulating peat matrix as well as an initial flushing of 210 Pb through the uppermost peat layers. The validity of the IP-CRS model is tested in four anomalous 210 Pb peat records that showed some deviations from the typical exponential decay profile not explained by variations in peat accumulation rates. Unlike the most commonly used 210 Pb-dating model (Constant Rate of Supply (CRS)), the IP-CRS model estimates peat accumulation rates consistent with typical growth rates for peatlands from the same areas. Confidence in the IP-CRS chronology is also provided by the good agreement with independent chronological markers (i.e. 241 Am and 137 Cs). Our results showed that the IP-CRS can provide chronologies from peat records where 210 Pb mobility is evident, being a valuable tool for studies reconstructing past environmental changes using peat archives during the Anthropocene. - Highlights: • Accurate age dating of peat and sediment cores is critical for evaluating change. • A new 210 Pb dating model that includes vertical transport of 210 Pb was developed. • The IP-CRS model provided consistent peat accumulation rates. • The IP-CRS ages were consistent with independent chronological markers. • The IP-CRS model derives peat ages where downward 210 Pb transport is evidenced.

  19. Modeling molecular acidity with electronic properties and Hammett constants for substituted benzoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Lianghong; Liu, Wanhui; Liu, Shaogang; Liu, Shubin

    2011-12-29

    Molecular acidity is an important physiochemical property essential in many fields of molecular studies, but an efficient and reliable computational approach to make accurate predictions is still missing. In this work, based on our previous studies to use gas phase electronic properties such as molecular electrostatic potential and valence natural atomic orbitals of the acidic atom and leaving proton, we demonstrate here that different approaches can be employed to tackle this problem. To that end, we employ 196 singly, doubly, and triply substituted benzoic acids for the study. We show that two different approaches are possible, one focusing on the carboxyl group through its localized electronic properties and the other on the substituting groups via Hammett constants and their additivity rule. Our present results clearly exhibit that with the linear models built from the singly substituted species, one can accurately predict the pK(a) values for the doubly and triply substituted species with both of these two approaches. The predictions from these approaches are consistent with each other and agree well with the experimental data. These intrinsically different approaches are the two manifestations of the same molecular acidity property, both valid and complementary to each other. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Preliminary study of rabbit model with corneal neovascularization after thermal burn under the constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore the suitable conditions in rapid model of corneal neovascularization(CNVafter thermal burn under different constant temperature in rabbit. METHODS: Total 45 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly into five groups(A, B, C, D, E. A groups: 100℃(n=10, B groups: 200℃(n=10, C groups: 300℃(n=10, D groups: 400℃(n=10, and E groups: control group(n=5. All left eyes of rabbits in A,B,C,D groups were induced corneal neovascularization by constant temperature burning device. The growth of CNV was observed by slit lamp microscope and the area of CNV were recorded on 4 th, 7 th, 14th, 30th days postoperatively. SPSS 19.0 statistical package was used for data analysis, and the data was recorded by mean±standard deviation. Comparison by analysis of variance was made by repeated measures in the area of neovascularization at each time point in groups. Statistical tests were considered significantly when P values were less than 0.05. RESULTS: On postoperative 4th, 7th, 14th, 30th days: no neovascularization was found after corneal thermal burn in A group, but only a few nebula left(n=2; the area of CNV were(9.16±1.45mm2,(37.73±5.49mm2,(62.44±7.54mm2,(40.28±7.39mm2 in B group respectively; and(11.45±1.04mm2,(44.51±4.64mm2,(66.13±4.13mm2,(43.04±2.33mm2 in C group respectively; and(13.23±0.86mm2,(47.26±4.59mm2,(67.57±4.56mm2,(45.59±4.44mm2 in D group respectively, and part corneal carbide(n=4was observed as well as corneal perforation(n=6were found on 3d in D group. No neovascularization was found in normal control group. Comparison of the areas of CNV at each time point between groups was statistically different, PPCOCLUSION: In 4 to 7d, the higher the temperature is, the more the neovascularization area of CNV are. It has no significant difference in 14 to 30d. But corneal carbide and corneal perforation are often found in 400℃ group, so its modeling failure rate is high. It is between 200℃ and 300℃ that

  1. On the scaling equations of the coupling constants for the one-dimensional two-fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Barsan, V.; Mantea, C.

    1984-08-01

    Jordan's boson representation and cut-off regularization procedure for the one-dimensional two-fermion model is used to get the equivalence with the two-dimensional Coulomb gas and sine-Gordon model. The scaling equations of the coupling constants to third-order are obtained thereby, which slightly differ from those reported in the literature. The scaling of the model onto the exactly soluble models is discussed. (author)

  2. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  3. Modeling of Anaerobic Digestion with a Focus on Estimation of Hydrolysis Constants at 35, 55, and 60 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatafshar, Salar; Ossiansson, Elin; Koch, Konrad; Kjerstadius, Hamse; Jansen, Jes la Cour; Davidsson, Åsa

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis constants of mixed sludge at 35, 55, and 60 °C were found to be 0.32, 0.44, and 0.50 1/d, respectively, in pilot-scale, semicontinuously operated anaerobic digesters. The hydrolysis constants and estimated chemical oxygen demand fractions in the feed were introduced to a mathematical model for anaerobic digestion published by Siegrist et al. (2002), which is similar to Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1. First-order and Monod-type kinetics were tested for estimation of hydrolysis constants. The applied kinetics were found to affect the outcome of the regression study. Moreover, the free ammonia inhibition model was excluded for both propionate oxidation and acetate conversion, thanks to the apparent acclimatized biomass. No substantial accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed in the reactors at 35, 55, and 60 °C, corresponding to free ammonia nitrogen concentrations of about 20, 110, and 130 g N/m³, respectively.

  4. Modelling of Spring Constant and Pull-down Voltage of Non-uniform RF MEMS Cantilever Incorporating Stress Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimul Chandra SAHA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a model for spring constant and pull-down voltage of a non-uniform radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS cantilever that works on electrostatic actuation. The residual stress gradient in the beam material that may arise during the fabrication process is also considered in the model. Using basic force deflection calculation of the suspended beam, a stand-alone model for the spring constant and pull-down voltage of the non-uniform cantilever is developed. To compare the model, simulation is performed using standard Finite Element Method (FEM analysis tolls from CoventorWare. The model matches very well with the FEM simulation results. The model will offer an efficient means of design, analysis, and optimization of RF MEMS cantilever switches.

  5. Algebraic aspects of evolution partial differential equation arising in the study of constant elasticity of variance model from financial mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsepa, Tanki; Aziz, Taha; Fatima, Aeeman; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2018-03-01

    The optimal investment-consumption problem under the constant elasticity of variance (CEV) model is investigated from the perspective of Lie group analysis. The Lie symmetry group of the evolution partial differential equation describing the CEV model is derived. The Lie point symmetries are then used to obtain an exact solution of the governing model satisfying a standard terminal condition. Finally, we construct conservation laws of the underlying equation using the general theorem on conservation laws.

  6. Model for ultrasonic attenuation and elastic constant in chromium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, E.P.; Marques, G.E.; Camargo, P.C. de.

    1987-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamics of a magnetic system under applied acoustic field is proposed. The calculated attenuation and longitudinal elastic constant for pure chromium and its alloys with diluted vanadium, show a good agreement with the experimental values. (Author) [pt

  7. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equilibria of the axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloximes by imidazole, 1-methyl imidazole, histidine, histamine, glycine, ethyl glycine ester, thiourea and urea have been spectrophotometrically measured in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KCl) at 25°C as a function of H. The equilibrium constants are in the ...

  8. Coupling constant corrections in a holographic model of heavy ion collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Schee, Wilke van der|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330953974

    2017-01-01

    We initiate a holographic study of coupling-dependent heavy ion collisions by analysing for the first time the effects of leading-order, inverse coupling constant corrections. In the dual description, this amounts to colliding gravitational shock waves in a theory with curvature-squared terms. We

  9. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  13. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    A sparsity-exploiting algorithm intended for few-view Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is proposed and characterized. The algorithm models the object as piecewise constant subject to a blurring operation. To validate that the algorithm closely approximates the true...

  14. The constant failure rate model for fault tree evaluation as a tool for unit protection reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichev, S.; Bogdanov, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the fault tree analysis method as a tool for unit protection reliability estimation. The constant failure rate model applies for making reliability assessment, and especially availability assessment. For that purpose an example for unit primary equipment structure and fault tree example for simplified unit protection system is presented (author)

  15. On exponential cosmological type solutions in the model with Gauss-Bonnet term and variation of gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchuk, V.D.; Kobtsev, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    A D-dimensional gravitational model with Gauss.Bonnet term is considered. When an ansatz with diagonal cosmological type metrics is adopted, we find solutions with an exponential dependence of the scale factors (with respect to a @gsynchronous-like@h variable) which describe an exponential expansion of @gour@h 3-dimensional factor space and obey the observational constraints on the temporal variation of effective gravitational constant G. Among them there are two exact solutions in dimensions D = 22, 28 with constant G and also an infinite series of solutions in dimensions D ≥ 2690 with the variation of G obeying the observational data. (orig.)

  16. The renormalised π NN coupling constant and the P-wave phase shifts in the cloudy bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, B.C.; Afnan, I.R.

    1986-02-01

    Most applications of the cloudy bag model to π N scattering involve unitarising the bare diagrams arising from the Lagrangian by iterating in a Lippmann-Schwinger equation. However analyses of the renormalisation of the coupling constant proceed by iterating the Lagrangian to a given order in the bare coupling constant. These two different approaches means there is an inconsistency between the calculation of phase shifts and the calculation of renormalisation. A remedy to this problem is presented that has the added advantage of improving the fit to the phase shifts in the P 11 channel. This is achieved by using physical values of the coupling constant in the crossed diagram which reduces the repulsion rather than adds attraction. This approach can be justified by examining equations for the π π N system that incorporate three-body unitarity

  17. Comparison of the constant and linear boundary element method for EEG and MEG forward modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chang, C.H.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We present a comparison of boundary element methods for solving the forward problem in EEG and MEG. We use the method of weighted residuals and focus on the collocation and Galerkin forms for constant and linear basis functions. We also examine the effect of the isolated skull approach for reducing numerical errors due to the low conductivity of the skull. We demonstrate the improvement that a linear Galerkin approach may yield in solving the forward problem.

  18. Modeling Phase Change Material in Micro-Foam Under Constant Temperature Condition (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    is a body -centered-cubic (BCC) lattice embedded with spherical micro-pores. Two different simulation methodologies were applied. One is the high...numerically studied. A high constant temperature was specified at the top surface of the structure. Each unit of the micro-foam is a body -centered-cubic...Methods for predicting the thermal conductivity of composite sytems : a review, Polymer Engineering & Science 16 (9) (1976) 615–625. [16] X. Hu, S.S

  19. COMMIX analysis of four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in a thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1989-04-01

    The three-dimensional thermal hydraulics computer code COMMIX-1AR was used to analyze four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in the thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR. An objective of these analyses was the validation of COMMIX-1AR for buoyancy affected flows. The COMMIX calculated temperature histories of some thermocouples in the model were compared with the corresponding measured data. The conclusions of this work are presented. 3 refs., 5 figs

  20. Stability analysis of 4-species Aβaggregation model: A novel approach to obtaining physically meaningful rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghag, G; Ghosh, P; Mauro, A; Rangachari, V; Vaidya, A

    2013-11-01

    Protein misfolding and concomitant aggregation towards amyloid formation is the underlying biochemical commonality among a wide range of human pathologies. Amyloid formation involves the conversion of proteins from their native monomeric states (intrinsically disordered or globular) to well-organized, fibrillar aggregates in a nucleation-dependent manner. Understanding the mechanism of aggregation is important not only to gain better insight into amyloid pathology but also to simulate and predict molecular pathways. One of the main impediments in doing so is the stochastic nature of interactions that impedes thorough experimental characterization and the development of meaningful insights. In this study, we have utilized a well-known intermediate state along the amyloid- β peptide aggregation pathway called protofibrils as a model system to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which they form fibrils using stability and perturbation analysis. Investigation of protofibril aggregation mechanism limits both the number of species to be modeled (monomers, and protofibrils), as well as the reactions to two (elongation by monomer addition, and protofibril-protofibril lateral association). Our new model is a reduced order four species model grounded in mass action kinetics. Our prior study required 3200 reactions, which makes determining the reaction parameters prohibitively difficult. Using this model, along with a linear perturbation argument, we rigorously determine stable ranges of rate constants for the reactions and ensure they are physically meaningful. This was accomplished by finding the ranges in which the perturbations dieout in a five-parameter sweep, which includes the monomer and protofibril equilibrium concentrations and three of the rate constants. The results presented are a proof-of-concept method in determining meaningful rate constants that can be used as a bonafide way for determining accurate rate constants for other models involving complex

  1. Noise sensitivity of portfolio selection in constant conditional correlation GARCH models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga-Haszonits, I.; Kondor, I.

    2007-11-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of minimum variance portfolio optimization for stock price movements following the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH process proposed by Bollerslev. Simulations show that the quality of portfolio selection can be improved substantially by computing optimal portfolio weights from conditional covariances instead of unconditional ones. Measurement noise can be further reduced by applying some filtering method on the conditional correlation matrix (such as Random Matrix Theory based filtering). As an empirical support for the simulation results, the analysis is also carried out for a time series of S&P500 stock prices.

  2. Comparison of the effectiveness of analytical wake models for wind farm with constant and variable hub heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Longyan; Tan, Andy C.C.; Cholette, Michael; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effectiveness of three analytical wake models is studied. • The results of the analytical wake models are compared with the CFD simulations. • The results of CFD simulation are verified by comparison to the offshore wind farm observation data. • The onshore wind farm with both constant and different hub height turbines are analyzed. • PARK model is able to predict the total wind farm power production well with tuned surface roughness value. - Abstract: Extensive power losses of wind farm have been witnessed due to the wake interactions between wind turbines. By applying analytical wake models which describe the wind speed deficits in the wake quantitatively, the power losses can be regained to a large extent through wind farm layout optimization, and this has been extensively reported in literature. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of the analytical wake models in predicting the wind farm power production have rarely been studied and compared for wind farm with both constant and variable wind turbine hub heights. In this study, the effectiveness of three different analytical wake models (PARK model, Larsen model and B-P model) is thoroughly compared over a wide range of wake properties. After the validation with the observation data from offshore wind farm, CFD simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the analytical wake models for an onshore wind farm. The results show that when using the PARK model the surface roughness value (z 0 ) must be carefully tuned to achieve good performance in predicting the wind farm power production. For the other two analytical wake models, their effectiveness varies depending on the situation of wind farm (offshore or onshore) and the wind turbine hub heights (constant or variable). It was found that the results of B-P model agree well with the CFD simulations for offshore wind farm, but not for the onshore wind farm. The Larsen model is more accurate for the wind farm with variable wind turbine

  3. The cosmological constant problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs

  4. The influence of fragmentation models on the determination of the strong coupling constant in e+e- annihilation into hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrend, H.J.; Chen, C.; Fenner, H.; Schachter, M.J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.; D'Agostini, G.; Apel, W.D.; Banerjee, S.; Bodenkamp, J.; Chrobaczek, D.; Engler, J.; Fluegge, G.; Fries, D.C.; Fues, W.; Gamerdinger, K.; Hopp, G.; Kuester, H.; Mueller, H.; Randoll, H.; Schmidt, G.; Schneider, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kruse, U.; Lierl, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Colas, P.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Journe, V.; Klarsfeld, A.; Laplanche, F.; Le Diberder, F.; Mallik, U.; Veillet, J.J.; Field, J.H.; George, R.; Goldberg, M.; Grossetete, B.; Hamon, O.; Kapusta, F.; Kovacs, F.; London, G.; Poggioli, L.; Rivoal, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bouchez, J.; Carnesecchi, G.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Gaidot, A.; Jadach, S.; Lavagne, Y.; Pamela, J.; Pansart, J.P.; Pierre, F.

    1983-01-01

    Hadronic events obtained with the CELLO detector at PETRA were compared with first-order QCD predictions using two different models for the fragmentation of quarks and gluons, the Hoyer model and the Lund model. Both models are in reasonable agreement with the data, although they do not completely reproduce the details of many distributions. Several methods have been applied to determine the strong coupling constant αsub(s). Although within one model the value of αsub(s) varies by 20% among the different methods, the values determined using the Lund model are 30% or more larger (depending on the method used) than the values determined with the Hoyer model. Our results using the Hoyer model are in agreement with previous results based on this approach. (orig.)

  5. The hierarchy problem and the cosmological constant problem in the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred

    2015-03-01

    We argue that the SM in the Higgs phase does not suffer form a ''hierarchy problem'' and that similarly the ''cosmological constant problem'' resolves itself if we understand the SM as a low energy effective theory emerging from a cut-off medium at the Planck scale. We discuss these issues under the condition of a stable Higgs vacuum, which allows to extend the SM up to the Planck length. The bare Higgs boson mass then changes sign below the Planck scale, such the the SM in the early universe is in the symmetric phase. The cut-off enhanced Higgs mass term as well as the quartically enhanced cosmological constant term trigger the inflation of the early universe. The coefficients of the shift between bare and renormalized Higgs mass as well as of the shift between bare and renormalized vacuum energy density exhibit close-by zeros at some point below the Planck scale. The zeros are matching points between short distance and the renormalized low energy quantities. Since inflation tunes the total energy density to take the critical value of a flat universe Ω tot =ρ tot /ρ crit =Ω Λ +Ω matter +Ω radiation =1 it is obvious that Ω Λ today is of order Ω tot given that 1>Ω matter , Ω radiation >0, which saturate the total density to about 26 % only, the dominant part being dark matter(21%).

  6. Evaluation of the Diagnostic Accuracy of a Typhoid IgM Flow Assay for the Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever in Cambodian Children Using a Bayesian Latent Class Model Assuming an Imperfect Gold Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E.; Pan-Ngum, Wirichada; Wijedoru, Lalith P. M.; Sona, Soeng; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Duy, Pham Thanh; Vinh, Phat Voong; Chheng, Kheng; Kumar, Varun; Emary, Kate; Carter, Michael; White, Lisa; Baker, Stephen; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests are needed for typhoid fever (TF) diagnosis in febrile children in endemic areas. Five hundred children admitted to the hospital in Cambodia between 2009 and 2010 with documented fever (≥ 38°C) were investigated using blood cultures (BCs), Salmonella Typhi/Paratyphi A real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), and a Typhoid immunoglobulin M flow assay (IgMFA). Test performance was determined by conventional methods and Bayesian latent class modeling. There were 32 cases of TF (10 BC- and PCR-positive cases, 14 BC-positive and PCR-negative cases, and 8 BC-negative and PCR-positive cases). IgMFA sensitivity was 59.4% (95% confidence interval = 41–76), and specificity was 97.8% (95% confidence interval = 96–99). The model estimate sensitivity for BC was 81.0% (95% credible interval = 54–99). The model estimate sensitivity for PCR was 37.8% (95% credible interval = 26–55), with a specificity of 98.2% (95% credible interval = 97–99). The model estimate sensitivity for IgMFA (≥ 2+) was 77.9% (95% credible interval = 58–90), with a specificity of 97.5% (95% credible interval = 95–100). The model estimates of IgMFA sensitivity and specificity were comparable with BCs and better than estimates using conventional analysis. PMID:24218407

  7. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  8. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.

  9. Generalization of color-difference formulas for any illuminant and any observer by assuming perfect color constancy in a color-vision model based on the OSA-UCS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleari, Claudio; Melgosa, Manuel; Huertas, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The most widely used color-difference formulas are based on color-difference data obtained under D65 illumination or similar and for a 10° visual field; i.e., these formulas hold true for the CIE 1964 observer adapted to D65 illuminant. This work considers the psychometric color-vision model based on the Optical Society of America-Uniform Color Scales (OSA-UCS) system previously published by the first author [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21, 677 (2004); Color Res. Appl. 30, 31 (2005)] with the additional hypothesis that complete illuminant adaptation with perfect color constancy exists in the visual evaluation of color differences. In this way a computational procedure is defined for color conversion between different illuminant adaptations, which is an alternative to the current chromatic adaptation transforms. This color conversion allows the passage between different observers, e.g., CIE 1964 and CIE 1931. An application of this color conversion is here made in the color-difference evaluation for any observer and in any illuminant adaptation: these transformations convert tristimulus values related to any observer and illuminant adaptation to those related to the observer and illuminant adaptation of the definition of the color-difference formulas, i.e., to the CIE 1964 observer adapted to the D65 illuminant, and then the known color-difference formulas can be applied. The adaptations to the illuminants A, C, F11, D50, Planckian and daylight at any color temperature and for CIE 1931 and CIE 1964 observers are considered as examples, and all the corresponding transformations are given for practical use.

  10. Cosmological constant as integration constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, H.-J.

    1994-08-01

    Einstein's field theory of elementary particles (Einstein 1919) yields black holes with a mass M approximately G-1 Lambda-1/2 c2 and a charge Q approximately G-1/2 Lambda-1/2 c2, their curvature radius is Lambda-1/2. Here Lambda is an integration constant of Einstein's 'trace-less' gravitation equations. The choice Lambda = G-1 h-1 c3 for this constant defines Planck ions and implies 'strong-gravity'. The choice Lambda = lambda = 3Hinf exp 2 c-2 (where Hinf means the Hubble parameter of a final de Sitter cosmos) involves 'weak-gravity' and describes an electro-vac spherical universe.

  11. A Bayesian MCMC method for point process models with intractable normalising constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Kasper Klitgaard; Møller, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    to simulate from the "unknown distribution", perfect simulation algorithms become useful. We illustrate the method in cases whre the likelihood is given by a Markov point process model. Particularly, we consider semi-parametric Bayesian inference in connection to both inhomogeneous Markov point process models...... and pairwise interaction point processes....

  12. A new approach to model strain change of gelled waxy crude oil under constant stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Lei; Song, Changyu; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deformation of gelled waxy crude oil with loaded stress is worthy of research for the flow assurance of pipelining system. A dispersion parameter was introduced to characterize the disruption degree of wax crystal structure in crude oil with shear action. Based on fractional calculus theory......, a rheological model incorporating dispersion parameter was proposed to describe creep of gelled waxy crude. A discrete and numerical algorithm was proposed to solve the model. Combining with the experimental results of five kinds of waxy crude oil, the model parameters were regressed and found to change...... monotonously with test temperature. Multiple creep curves of gelled waxy crude oil at a certain temperature can be described with this model....

  13. Some remarks on the theory of the dielectric constant of non-polar dense gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, B.R.A.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that the usual simple theory of the dielectric constant in isotropic nonpolar media, based on a model with constant polarizability and with dipolar interaction between atoms, is consistent only if the atoms are assumed to have a hard core, so that they cannot approach each other

  14. O(n) relations for coupling constants and space-time dimensions in dual models

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    1972-01-01

    It is proposed that certain daughter trajectories arise as a consequence of a higher underlying O(n) symmetry, with n>3. This suggestion is motivated by the dual resonance model, where such a pattern arises naturally from the existence of a critical space-time dimension. This is easily confirmed in the model (and provides a simple test for what is the critical dimension) by considering the amplitudes for spinless particles. The results of pi N phase shift analysis are discussed to give a speculative phenomenological estimate of the appropriate higher symmetry. (16 refs).

  15. A model for time-dependent cosmological constant and its consistency with the present Friedmann universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novello, M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barcelos-Neto, J [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salim, J M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-06-07

    We use a model where the cosmological term can be related to the chiral gauge anomaly of a possible quantum scenario of the initial evolution of the universe. We show that this term is compatible with the Friedmann behaviour of the present universe.

  16. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    e-mail: SSNSIRASANI@yahoo.com. MS received 2 March 2001; revised 17 August 2001. Abstract. ... In ligand substitution reactions of vitamin B12, its derivatives 1–3 and B12 model compounds, cobaloximes4 are of interest from the point of view ... vitamin B12 coenzyme. Marques et al11 and Randaccio et al12 studied the ...

  17. Examining roles pharmacists assume in disasters: a content analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Heath; Dallas, Cham E; Harris, Curt

    2013-12-01

    Numerous practice reports recommend roles pharmacists may adopt during disasters. This study examines the peer-reviewed literature for factors that explain the roles pharmacists assume in disasters and the differences in roles and disasters when stratified by time. Quantitative content analysis was used to gather data consisting of words and phrases from peer-reviewed pharmacy literature regarding pharmacists' roles in disasters. Negative binomial regression and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric models were applied to the data. Pharmacists' roles in disasters have not changed significantly since the 1960s. Pharmaceutical supply remains their preferred role, while patient management and response integration roles decrease in context of common, geographically widespread disasters. Policy coordination roles, however, significantly increase in nuclear terrorism planning. Pharmacists' adoption of nonpharmaceutical supply roles may represent a problem of accepting a paradigm shift in nontraditional roles. Possible shortages of personnel in future disasters may change the pharmacists' approach to disaster management.

  18. Two-loop coupling constant renormalization in lattice SU(N)xSU(N) 2D chiral models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoli, N.; Ravanini, F.

    1986-08-01

    For the most general link action of lattice SU(N)xSU(N) two dimensional chiral models, the two loop coupling constant renormalization is discussed in the context of the background field method. A non-linear reparametrization of the fields, necessary to keep the invariance of the theory, introduces unpleasant extra-terms. However some of the non-universal contributions are unaffected by these extra-terms and can be easily calculated. This allows to compute the difference between the first non-universal coefficients of the Callan-Symanzik beta functions for two actions having the same scale ..lambda...

  19. Asymptotic stability of constant steady states for a 2×2 reaction–diffusion system arising in cancer modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The dependence of tumor on essential nutrients is known to be crucial for its evolution and has become one of the targets for medical therapies. Based on this fact a reaction-diffusion system with chemotaxis term and nutrient-based growth of tumors is presented. The formulation of the model considers also an influence of tumor and pharmacological factors on nutrient concentration. In the paper, convergence of solutions to constant, stationary states in the one-dimensional case for small perturbation of the equilibria is investigated. The nonlinear stability results are obtained by means of the classical symmetrization method and energy Sobolev estimates. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Links between the charge model and bonded parameter force constants in biomolecular force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, David S.; Debiec, Karl T.; Case, David A.; Chong, Lillian T.

    2017-10-01

    The ff15ipq protein force field is a fixed charge model built by automated tools based on the two charge sets of the implicitly polarized charge method: one set (appropriate for vacuum) for deriving bonded parameters and the other (appropriate for aqueous solution) for running simulations. The duality is intended to treat water-induced electronic polarization with an understanding that fitting data for bonded parameters will come from quantum mechanical calculations in the gas phase. In this study, we compare ff15ipq to two alternatives produced with the same fitting software and a further expanded data set but following more conventional methods for tailoring bonded parameters (harmonic angle terms and torsion potentials) to the charge model. First, ff15ipq-Qsolv derives bonded parameters in the context of the ff15ipq solution phase charge set. Second, ff15ipq-Vac takes ff15ipq's bonded parameters and runs simulations with the vacuum phase charge set used to derive those parameters. The IPolQ charge model and associated protocol for deriving bonded parameters are shown to be an incremental improvement over protocols that do not account for the material phases of each source of their fitting data. Both force fields incorporating the polarized charge set depict stable globular proteins and have varying degrees of success modeling the metastability of short (5-19 residues) peptides. In this particular case, ff15ipq-Qsolv increases stability in a number of α -helices, correctly obtaining 70% helical character in the K19 system at 275 K and showing appropriately diminishing content up to 325 K, but overestimating the helical fraction of AAQAA3 by 50% or more, forming long-lived α -helices in simulations of a β -hairpin, and increasing the likelihood that the disordered p53 N-terminal peptide will also form a helix. This may indicate a systematic bias imparted by the ff15ipq-Qsolv parameter development strategy, which has the hallmarks of strategies used to develop

  1. Limits on evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models from Sunyaev–Zeldovich observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F.L. Holanda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new bounds on possible variations of the fine structure constant, α, for a class of runaway dilaton models are performed. By considering a possible evolution with redshift, z, such as Δαα=−γln⁡(1+z, where in γ are the physical properties of the model, we constrain this parameter by using a deformed cosmic distance duality relation jointly with gas mass fraction (GMF measurements of galaxy clusters and luminosity distances of type Ia supernovae. The GMF's used in our analyses are from cluster mass data from 82 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.12models used to describe the galaxy clusters. As a result no evidence of variation was obtained.

  2. Model for analysis and definition of the governor constants in hydroelectric power; Modelo para analise e definicao das constantes do regulador em usinas hidreletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Jose Geraldo Pena de; Koelle, Edmundo; Luvizotto Junior, Edevar [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil. Dept. de Hidraulica e Saneamento

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents a complete mathematical and computer model which allows simulating a generic hydroelectric power plant under steady state and transitory regimes, in the extensive time, and also the analysis of the oscillating flows resulting from excitation sources present in the installation, such as vortices in the suction pipe during partial load operation.

  3. Modeling of Solar Radiation Management: A Comparison of Simulations Using Reduced Solar Constant and Stratospheric Sulphate Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, G.; Kalidindi, S.; Modak, A.; Caldeira, K.

    2014-12-01

    Several climate modelling studies in the past have used reduction in solar constant to simulate the climatic effects of Solar Radiation Management (SRM) geoengineering. This is most likely valid only for space-based mirrors/reflectors but not for SRM methods that rely on stratospheric aerosols. In this study, we use a climate model to evaluate the differences in climate response to SRM by uniform solar constant reduction and stratospheric aerosols. The experiments are designed such that global mean warming from a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration (2xCO2) is nearly cancelled in each case. In such a scenario, the residual climate effects are similar when important surface and tropospheric climate variables such as temperature and precipitation are considered. However, there are significant differences in stratospheric temperature response and diffuse and direct radiation reaching the surface. A difference of 1K in the global mean stratospheric (61-9.8 hPa) temperature is simulated between the two SRM methods, with warming in the aerosol scheme and a slight cooling for sunshades. While the global mean surface diffuse radiation increases by ~23% and direct radiation decreases by about 9% in the case of aerosol SRM method, both direct and diffuse radiation decrease by similar fractional amounts (~1.0%) when solar constant is reduced. When CO2 fertilization effects from elevated CO2 concentration levels are removed, the contribution from shaded leaves to gross primary productivity (GPP) increases by 1.8 % in aerosol SRM because of increased diffuse light. However, this increase is almost offset by a 15.2% decline in sunlit contribution due to reduced direct light. Overall both the SRM simulations show similar decrease in GPP (~ 8%) and NPP (~3%) relative to 2xCO2, indicating the negligible effect of the fractional changes in direct/diffuse radiation on the overall plant productivity. Based on our modelling study, we conclude that the climate states produced by a

  4. Combination of poroelasticity theory and constant strain rate test in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tien Hung; Rühaak, Wolfram; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Extensive groundwater extraction leads to a drawdown of the ground water table. Consequently, soil effective stress increases and can cause land subsidence. Analysis of land subsidence generally requires a numerical model based on poroelasticity theory, which was first proposed by Biot (1941). In the review of regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction, Galloway and Burbey (2011) stated that more research and application is needed in coupling of stress-dependent land subsidence process. In geotechnical field, the constant rate of strain tests (CRS) was first introduced in 1969 (Smith and Wahls 1969) and was standardized in 1982 through the designation D4186-82 by American Society for Testing and Materials. From the reading values of CRS tests, the stress-dependent parameters of poroelasticity model can be calculated. So far, there is no research to link poroelasticity theory with CRS tests in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. One dimensional CRS tests using conventional compression cell and three dimension CRS tests using Rowe cell were performed. The tests were also modelled by using finite element method with mixed elements. Back analysis technique is used to find the suitable values of hydraulic conductivity and bulk modulus that depend on the stress or void ratio. Finally, the obtained results are used in land subsidence models. Biot, M. A. (1941). "General theory of three-dimensional consolidation." Journal of applied physics 12(2): 155-164. Galloway, D. L. and T. J. Burbey (2011). "Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction." Hydrogeology Journal 19(8): 1459-1486. Smith, R. E. and H. E. Wahls (1969). "Consolidation under constant rates of strain." Journal of Soil Mechanics & Foundations Div.

  5. A practical kinetic model that considers endproduct inhibition in anaerobic digestion processes by including the equilibrium constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, C Y; Cord-Ruwisch, R

    1996-09-05

    -Menten model, whereas, for reactions close to equilibrium, the reaction rate was mainly controlled by the quotient of mass action ratio (concentration of all products over concentration of all substrates) over the equilibrium constant K. This quotient is a measure of the displacement of the reaction from its equilibrium. As the new equation takes into account all of the substrates and products, it was able to predict the inhibitor effect of multiple endproducts. The model described is designed to be a useful basis for a number of different model applications where reaction conditions are close to equilibrium.

  6. Oregonator Model with a Flow Term for the Belousov-Zhabotinskii Reaction Having Constant Feed. I : Proposal of Model and Its Behavior : General and Mathematical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Chiaki, MURASE; Shinji, SAKANOUE; Mitsuo, ENDO; Physics, Faculty of General Education, The Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology; Chemistry,Faculty of General Education, The Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology; Physics, Faculty of General Education, The Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

    1987-01-01

    A modified version of the Oregonator with a flow term is proposed to study experimental results on the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction having constant feed. Our model can properly exhibit the following three characteristic behaviors in oscillations of the concentration of Br^-; i.e., the existence of two oscillations with a large and a small amplitude, multipeak oscillations and a mixing of two types of oscillations which we call mixing phenomena. We have examined our model by simulations and ...

  7. Modified magnetomechancial model in the constant and low intensity magnetic field based on J-A theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyou; Luo, Xu; Zhu, Haiyan; Liu, Jianxun; Han, Yiwei

    2017-06-01

    The existing magnetomechancial models cannot explain the different experimental phenomena when the ferromagnetic specimen is respectively subjected to tension and compression stress in the constant and low intensity magnetic field, especially in the compression case. To promote the development of magnetomechancial theory, the energy conservation equation, effective magnetic field equation, and anhysteretic magnetization equation of the original Jiles-Atherton (J-A) theory are elucidated and modified, an equation of the local equilibrium status is employed and the differential expression of the modified magnetomechancial model based on the modified J-A theory is established finally. The effect of stress and plastic deformation on the magnetic parameters is analyzed. An excellent agreement is achieved between the theoretic predictions by the present modified model and the previous experimental results. Comparing with the calculation results given by the existing models and experimental results, it is seen indeed that the modified magnetomechanical model can describe the different magnetization features during tension-release and compression-release processes much better, and is the only one which can accurately reflect the experimental observation that the magnetic induction intensity reverses to negative value with the increase of the compressive stress and applied field. Project supported by the Major Program of Sichuan Province Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant No. 2015SZ0010) and the Scientific Research Foundation of Sichuan Province, China (Grant No. 2014GZ0121).

  8. Use of weather research and forecasting model outputs to obtain near-surface refractive index structure constant over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xuebin; Zhu, Wenyue; Qiao, Chunhong; Rao, Ruizhong; Mei, Haipin

    2016-06-13

    The methods to obtain atmospheric refractive index structure constant (Cn2) by instrument measurement are limited spatially and temporally and they are more difficult and expensive over the ocean. It is useful to forecast Cn2 effectively from Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) outputs. This paper introduces a method that WRF Model is used to forecast the routine meteorological parameters firstly, and then Cn2 is calculated based on these parameters by the Bulk model from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) over the ocean near-surface. The corresponding Cn2 values measured by the micro-thermometer which is placed on the ship are compared with the ones forecasted by WRF model to determine how this method performs. The result shows that the forecasted Cn2 is consistent with the measured Cn2 in trend and the order of magnitude as a whole, as well as the correlation coefficient is up to 77.57%. This method can forecast some essential aspects of Cn2 and almost always captures the correct magnitude of Cn2, which experiences fluctuations of two orders of magnitude. Thus, it seems to be a feasible and meaningful method that using WRF model to forecast near-surface Cn2 value over the ocean.

  9. Modified magnetomechancial model in the constant and low intensity magnetic field based on J–A theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingyou; Luo Xu; Liu Jianxun; Han Yiwei; Zhu Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    The existing magnetomechancial models cannot explain the different experimental phenomena when the ferromagnetic specimen is respectively subjected to tension and compression stress in the constant and low intensity magnetic field, especially in the compression case. To promote the development of magnetomechancial theory, the energy conservation equation, effective magnetic field equation, and anhysteretic magnetization equation of the original Jiles–Atherton (J–A) theory are elucidated and modified, an equation of the local equilibrium status is employed and the differential expression of the modified magnetomechancial model based on the modified J–A theory is established finally. The effect of stress and plastic deformation on the magnetic parameters is analyzed. An excellent agreement is achieved between the theoretic predictions by the present modified model and the previous experimental results. Comparing with the calculation results given by the existing models and experimental results, it is seen indeed that the modified magnetomechanical model can describe the different magnetization features during tension-release and compression-release processes much better, and is the only one which can accurately reflect the experimental observation that the magnetic induction intensity reverses to negative value with the increase of the compressive stress and applied field. (paper)

  10. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  11. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  12. A Lagging Model for Describing Drawdown Induced by a Constant-Rate Pumping in a Leaky Confined Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2017-10-01

    This study proposes a generalized Darcy's law with considering phase lags in both the water flux and drawdown gradient to develop a lagging flow model for describing drawdown induced by constant-rate pumping (CRP) in a leaky confined aquifer. The present model has a mathematical formulation similar to the dual-porosity model. The Laplace-domain solution of the model with the effect of wellbore storage is derived by the Laplace transform method. The time-domain solution for the case of neglecting the wellbore storage and well radius is developed by the use of Laplace transform and Weber transform. The results of sensitivity analysis based on the solution indicate that the drawdown is very sensitive to the change in each of the transmissivity and storativity. Also, a study for the lagging effect on the drawdown indicates that its influence is significant associated with the lag times. The present solution is also employed to analyze a data set taken from a CRP test conducted in a fractured aquifer in South Dakota, USA. The results show the prediction of this new solution with considering the phase lags has very good fit to the field data, especially at early pumping time. In addition, the phase lags seem to have a scale effect as indicated in the results. In other words, the lagging behavior is positively correlated with the observed distance in the Madison aquifer.

  13. Universe of constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  14. How Afghanistan Can Assume Ownership for the Ongoing Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Sr, John M

    2008-01-01

    In view of United States global commitments and larger Global War on Terror (GWOT) strategy, the ultimate security goal in Afghanistan must be for the Afghans to assume ownership of the counterinsurgency struggle...

  15. Simulating the Refractive Index Structure Constant ({C}_{n}^{2}) in the Surface Layer at Antarctica with a Mesoscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xuebin; Tian, Qiguo; Liu, Dong; Rao, Ruizhong; Zhu, Wenyue

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an approach wherein the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is coupled with the bulk aerodynamic method to estimate the surface layer refractive index structure constant (C n 2) above Taishan Station in Antarctica. First, we use the measured meteorological parameters to estimate C n 2 using the bulk aerodynamic method, and second, we use the WRF model output parameters to estimate C n 2 using the bulk aerodynamic method. Finally, the corresponding C n 2 values from the micro-thermometer are compared with the C n 2 values estimated using the WRF model coupled with the bulk aerodynamic method. We analyzed the statistical operators—the bias, root mean square error (RMSE), bias-corrected RMSE (σ), and correlation coefficient (R xy )—in a 20 day data set to assess how this approach performs. In addition, we employ contingency tables to investigate the estimation quality of this approach, which provides complementary key information with respect to the bias, RMSE, σ, and R xy . The quantitative results are encouraging and permit us to confirm the fine performance of this approach. The main conclusions of this study tell us that this approach provides a positive impact on optimizing the observing time in astronomical applications and provides complementary key information for potential astronomical sites.

  16. Description of charge transport in polyethylene using a fluid model with a constant mobility: fitting model and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, S; Teyssedre, G; Laurent, C; Montanari, G C; Palmieri, F

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model for describing bipolar charge transport and storage in polyethylene has been developed recently. The present paper proposes a comparison of the model outputs with experimental data in three different direct current (DC) voltage application protocols (step field increase and polarization/depolarization schemes). Three kinds of measurement have been realized for the three different protocols: space charge distribution using the pulsed electro-acoustic method, external current and electroluminescence. Simulation under AC stress has also been attempted on the basis of the model parameters that were derived from the DC case. Model limitations and possible improvements are discussed

  17. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  18. Supersymmetric Dark Matter with a Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, J D

    1998-01-01

    Recent measurements of cosmological parameters from the microwave background radiation, type Ia supernovae, and the age of globular clusters help determine the relic matter density in the universe. It is first shown with mild cosmological assumptions that the relic matter density satisfies $\\Omega_M h^2 < 0.6$ independent of the cosmological constant and independent of the SNIa data. Including the SNIa data, the constraint becomes $\\Omega_M h^2 < 0.35$. This result is then applied to supersymmetric models motivated by generic features in supergravity mediated supersymmetry breaking. The result is an upper bound on gaugino masses within reach of the LHC and a 1.5 TeV lepton collider. Thus, cosmological considerations are beginning to limit the supersymmetric mass spectra in the experimentally verifiable range without recourse to finetuning arguments, and without assuming a zero cosmological constant.

  19. A model of mitochondrial creatine kinase binding to membranes: adsorption constants, essential amino acids and the effect of ionic strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey; Belousova, Lubov; Plesner, Igor

    1993-01-01

    of mitCK adsorption capacity by another method at pH 7.4, when the enzyme is almost protonated, gave View the MathML source. The effect of ionic strength on mitCK adsorption may be described in terms of Debye-Hückel's theory for activity coefficients assuming the charges of the interacting species......The quantitative aspects of mitochondrial creatinekinase (mitCK) binding to mitochondrial membranes were investigated. A simple adsorption and binding model was used for data fitting, taking into account the influence of protein concentration, pH, ionic strength and substrate concentration...... on the enzyme adsorption. An analysis of our own data as well as of the data from the literature is consistent with the adsorption site of the octameric mitCK being composed of 4 amino acid residues with pK = 8.8 in the free enzyme. The pK value changes to 9.8 upon binding of the protein to the membrane. Lysine...

  20. Th isotopes in the Santa Monica basin: temporal variation, long-term mass balance and model rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Chih-An

    1995-01-01

    Distribution and flux of 234 Th, 232 Th and 230 Th in the water column of central Santa Monica basin observed over a period of seven years show seasonal and interannual variabilities. A steady-state model is applied to the integrated data to calculate long term average flux and model rate constants of Th isotopes. Mass balance calculations show that the basin acts like a closed system for short-lived 234 Th, but not for the long-lived isotopes 230 Th and 232 Th. Most 230 Th in the basin is transported from elsewhere. Of the incoming Th, 40-55% of the 230 Th and 14-26% of the 232 Th enter the surface water in dissolved form. In the upper 100m, the residence time of dissolved Th with respect to adsorption onto suspended particulates, 70-80 days, is about one order of magnitude higher than the residence time of suspended particles with respect to aggregation into sinking particles, 7-10 days. (author)

  1. The maximum penalty criterion for ridge regression: application to the calibration of the force constant in elastic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouck, Yves; Bastolla, Ugo

    2017-07-17

    Tikhonov regularization, or ridge regression, is a popular technique to deal with collinearity in multivariate regression. We unveil a formal analogy between ridge regression and statistical mechanics, where the objective function is comparable to a free energy, and the ridge parameter plays the role of temperature. This analogy suggests two novel criteria for selecting a suitable ridge parameter: specific-heat (C v ) and maximum penalty (MP). We apply these fits to evaluate the relative contributions of rigid-body and internal fluctuations, which are typically highly collinear, to crystallographic B-factors. This issue is particularly important for computational models of protein dynamics, such as the elastic network model (ENM), since the amplitude of the predicted internal motion is commonly calibrated using B-factor data. After validation on simulated datasets, our results indicate that rigid-body motions account on average for more than 80% of the amplitude of B-factors. Furthermore, we evaluate the ability of different fits to reproduce the amplitudes of internal fluctuations in X-ray ensembles from the B-factors in the corresponding single X-ray structures. The new ridge criteria are shown to be markedly superior to the commonly used two-parameter fit that neglects rigid-body rotations and to the full fits regularized under generalized cross-validation. In conclusion, the proposed fits ensure a more robust calibration of the ENM force constant and should prove valuable in other applications.

  2. A Simple Model to Access Equilibrium Constants of Reactions Type A ⇋ B Using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Farias, L. A. M. Cardoso, N. M. Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model to describe equilibrium properties of homogeneous re-versible chemical reactions is proposed and applied to an A ⇋ B type reaction. Forthis purpose the equilibrium properties are analyzed by usual Monte Carlo simula-tion. It is shown that the equilibrium constant (Ke for this kind of reaction exhibitsdistinct characteristics for Eba 1, where Eba is the ratio be-tween the reverse and forward activation energies. For Eba 1 and increase(decrease the temperature our results recover the principle of Le Chˆtelier applied ato temperature effects. The special and interesting case is obtained for Eba = 1 sinceKe = 1 for all range of temperature. Another important parameter in our analysisis θA , defined as temperature measured with relation the activation energy of theforward reaction. For fixed values of Eba and for θA ≫ 1 the equilibrium constantapproaches 1, showing that all transitions are equally likely, no matter the differencein the energy barriers. The data obtained in our simulations show the well knownrelationship between Ke , Eb , Ea and kB T . Finally we argue that this theoreticalmodel can be applied to a family of homogeneous chemical reactions characterizedby the same Eba and θA showing the broad application of this stochastic model tostudy chemical reactions. Some of these results will be discussed in terms of collisiontheory.

  3. Oregonator Model with a Flow Term for the Belousov-Zhabotinskii Reaction Having Constant Feed. I ---Proposal of Model and Its Behavior---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, C.; Sakanoue, S.; Endo, M.

    1987-06-01

    A modified version of the Oregonator with a flow term is proposed to study experimental results on the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction having constant feed. Our model can properly exhibit the following three characteristic behaviors in oscillations of the concentration of Br(-) ; i.e., the existence of two oscillations with a large and a small amplitude, multipeak oscillations and a mixing of two types of oscillations which we call mixing phenomena. We have examined our model by simulations and shown how these characteristic behaviors occur. Especially a semi-global behavior around a stationary state is examined in connection with the mixing phenomena.

  4. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  5. Magnetic coupling constants of self-assembled Cu(II) [3×3] grids: alternative spin model from theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Carmen J; Ben Amor, Nadia; Maynau, Daniel

    2014-07-14

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic Cu(II) [3×3] grid. A two-step strategy, combining calculations on the whole grid and on binuclear fragments, has been employed to evaluate all the magnetic interactions in the grid. The calculations confirm an S = 7/2 ground state, which is in accordance with the magnetisation versus field curve and the thermal dependence of the magnetic moment data. Only the first-neighbour coupling terms present non-negligible amplitudes, all of them in agreement with the structure and arrangement of the Cu 3d magnetic orbitals. The results indicate that the dominant interaction in the system is the antiferromagnetic coupling between the ring and the central Cu sites (J3 = J4 ≈ -31 cm(-1)). In the ring two different interactions can be distinguished, J1 = 4.6 cm(-1) and J2 = -0.1 cm(-1), in contrast to the single J model employed in the magnetic data fit. The calculated J values have been used to determine the energy level distribution of the Heisenberg magnetic states. The effective magnetic moment versus temperature plot resulting from this ab initio energy profile is in good agreement with the experimental curve and the fitting obtained with the simplified spin model, despite the differences between these two spin models. This study underlines the role that the theoretical evaluations of the coupling constants can play on the rationalisation of the magnetic properties of these complex polynuclear systems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A quasi-QSPR modelling for the photocatalytic decolourization rate constants and cellular viability (CV%) of nanoparticles by CORAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-01-01

    Most quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) predict various endpoints related to organic compounds. Gradually, the variety of organic compounds has been extended to inorganic, organometallic compounds and polymers. However, the so-called molecular descriptors cannot be defined for super-complex substances such as different nanomaterials and peptides, since there is no simple and clear representation of their molecular structure. Some possible ways to define approaches for a predictive model in the case of super-complex substances are discussed. The basic idea of the approach is to change the traditionally used paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of the molecular structure' with another paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of available eclectic information'. The eclectic data can be (i) conditions of a synthesis, (ii) technological attributes, (iii) size of nanoparticles, (iv) concentration, (v) attributes related to cell membranes, and so on. Two examples of quasi-QSPR/QSAR analyses are presented and discussed. These are (i) photocatalytic decolourization rate constants (DRC) (10(-5)/s) of different nanopowders; and (ii) the cellular viability under the effect of nano-SiO(2).

  7. EVALUTION OF MONOLAYER MOISTURE CAPACITY AND THE ENERGY CONSTANT OF SOME POEDERED SPICES BY USING BET AND GAB MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Nurlela2

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available BET equation (IUPAC standard and GAB equation (European Project Group on physical properties of food recommendation standard for monolayer capacity value evaluations were used for testing the moisture adsorption experimental data of powdered white and black papper, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon. The BET equation fits only up to aw = 0.44, while the GAB isotherm fits and covers a much wider range (0.06model but the energy constant value of BET that were higher than the GAB vakue was observed only for black pepper sample.

  8. Bianchi type-I magnetized cosmological models for the Einstein-Boltzmann equation with the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayissi, Raoul Domingo, E-mail: raoulayissi@yahoo.fr; Noutchegueme, Norbert, E-mail: nnoutch@yahoo.fr [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2015-01-15

    Global solutions regular for the Einstein-Boltzmann equation on a magnetized Bianchi type-I cosmological model with the cosmological constant are investigated. We suppose that the metric is locally rotationally symmetric. The Einstein-Boltzmann equation has been already considered by some authors. But, in general Bancel and Choquet-Bruhat [Ann. Henri Poincaré XVIII(3), 263 (1973); Commun. Math. Phys. 33, 83 (1973)], they proved only the local existence, and in the case of the nonrelativistic Boltzmann equation. Mucha [Global existence of solutions of the Einstein-Boltzmann equation in the spatially homogeneous case. Evolution equation, existence, regularity and singularities (Banach Center Publications, Institute of Mathematics, Polish Academy of Science, 2000), Vol. 52] obtained a global existence result, for the relativistic Boltzmann equation coupled with the Einstein equations and using the Yosida operator, but confusing unfortunately with the nonrelativistic case. Noutchegueme and Dongho [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 2979 (2006)] and Noutchegueme, Dongho, and Takou [Gen. Relativ. Gravitation 37, 2047 (2005)], have obtained a global solution in time, but still using the Yosida operator and considering only the uncharged case. Noutchegueme and Ayissi [Adv. Stud. Theor. Phys. 4, 855 (2010)] also proved a global existence of solutions to the Maxwell-Boltzmann system using the characteristic method. In this paper, we obtain using a method totally different from those used in the works of Noutchegueme and Dongho [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 2979 (2006)], Noutchegueme, Dongho, and Takou [Gen. Relativ. Gravitation 37, 2047 (2005)], Noutchegueme and Ayissi [Adv. Stud. Theor. Phys. 4, 855 (2010)], and Mucha [Global existence of solutions of the Einstein-Boltzmann equation in the spatially homogeneous case. Evolution equation, existence, regularity and singularities (Banach Center Publications, Institute of Mathematics, Polish Academy of Science, 2000), Vol. 52] the

  9. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model for small and for large values of the Yukawa coupling constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    We consider a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model based on the Neuberger overlap operator D{sup (ov)}. As a first step towards the eventual determination of Higgs mass bounds we study the phase diagram of the model analytically in the large N{sub f}-limit. We present an expression for the effective potential at tree-level in the regime of small Yukawa and quartic coupling constants and determine the order of the phase transitions. In the case of strong Yukawa couplings the model effectively becomes an O(4)-symmetric non-linear {sigma}-model for all values of the quartic coupling constant. This leads to the existence of a symmetric phase also in the regime of large values of the Yukawa coupling constant. On finite and small lattices, however, strong finite volume effects prevent the expectation value of the Higgs field from vanishing thus obscuring the existence of the symmetric phase at strong Yukawa couplings. (orig.)

  10. Methods for determining the methane generation potential and methane generation rate constant for the FOD model: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Kyu; Chong, Yong-Gil; Tameda, Kazuo; Lee, Nam-Hoon

    2018-03-01

    In the first order decay (FOD) model of landfill methane generation, the methane generation potential ( L 0 ) and methane generation rate constant ( k) for both bulk municipal solid waste (MSW) and individual waste components have been determined by a variety of approaches throughout various literature. Differences in the determination methods for L 0 and k are related to differences in our understanding of the waste decomposition dynamics. A thorough understanding of the various available methods for determining L 0 and k values is critical for comparative study and the drawing of valid conclusions. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the available determining methods and the ranges for L 0 and k values of both bulk MSW and individual waste components, while focusing on understanding the decomposition of waste, including the role of lignin. L 0 estimates in the literature are highly variable and have been derived from theoretical stoichiometric calculations, laboratory experiments, or actual field measurements. The lignin concentration in waste is correlated with the fraction of total degradable organic carbon (DOC f ) that will actually anaerobically degrade in the landfill. The k value has been determined by precipitation rates, laboratory simulations, aged-defined waste sample, and model fitting or regression analysis using actual gas data. However, the lignin concentration does not correlate well with the k value, presumably due to the impact of lignin arrangement and structure on cellulose bioavailability and degradation rate. In sum, this review summarizes the literature on the measurement of L 0 and k values, including the dynamics and decomposition of bulk MSW and individual waste components within landfills.

  11. Modeling and monitoring cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes in a wastewater treatment plant using constant water level sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, De-Gao, E-mail: degaowang@dlmu.edu.cn; Du, Juan; Pei, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Guo, Mingxing

    2015-04-15

    The fate of cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) was evaluated in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using constant water level sequencing batch reactors from Dalian, China. Influent, effluent, and sewage sludge samples were collected for seven consecutive days. The mean concentrations of cyclic VMSs (cVMSs) in influent and effluent samples are 1.05 μg L{sup −1} and 0.343 μg L{sup −1}; the total removal efficiency of VMSs is > 60%. Linear VMS (lVMS) concentration is under the quantification limitation in aquatic samples but is found in sludge samples with a value of 90 μg kg{sup −1}. High solid-water partition coefficients result in high VMS concentrations in sludge with the mean value of 5030 μg kg{sup −1}. No significant differences of the daily mass flows are found when comparing the concentration during the weekend and during working days. The estimated mass load of total cVMSs is 194 mg d{sup −1} 1000 inhabitants{sup −1} derived for the population. A mass balance model of the WWTP was developed and derived to simulate the fate of cVMSs. The removal by sorption on sludge increases, and the volatilization decreases with increasing hydrophobicity and decreasing volatility for cVMSs. Sensitivity analysis shows that the total suspended solid concentration in the effluent, mixed liquor suspended solid concentration, the sewage sludge flow rate, and the influent flow rate are the most influential parameters on the mass distribution of cVMSs in this WWTP. - Highlights: • A mass balance model for siloxanes was developed in sequencing batch reactor. • Total suspended solid in effluent has the most influence on removal efficiency. • Enhancement of suspended solid removal reduces the release to aquatic environment.

  12. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  13. On the model dependence of the determination of the strong coupling constant in second order QCD from e+e--annihilation into hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achterberg, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Apel, W.D.; Engler, J.; Fluegge, G.; Forstbauer, B.; Fries, D.C.; Fues, W.; Gamerdinger, K.; Henkes, T.; Hopp, G.; Krueger, M.; Kuester, H.; Mueller, H.; Randoll, H.; Schmidt, G.; Schneider, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kruse, U.; Lierl, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Bonneaud, G.; Colas, P.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Journe, V.; Laplanche, F.; Le Diberder, F.; Mallik, U.; Ros, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Behrend, H.J.; Fenner, H.; Schachter, M.J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.

    1983-12-01

    Hadronic events obtained with the CELLO detector at PETRA are compared with second order QCD predictions using different models for the fragmentation of quarks and gluons into hadrons. We find that the model dependence in the determination of the strong coupling constant persists when going from first to second order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  14. Simulation of Metabolic Drug-Drug Interactions Perpetrated by Fluvoxamine Using Hybridized Two-Compartment Hepatic Drug-Pool-Based Tube Modeling and Estimation of In Vivo Inhibition Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    Co-administration of fluvoxamine (FLV) (perpetrator) and ramelteon (victim, high-clearance CYP1A2 substrate) reportedly showed a 130-fold increase in the area under blood-ramelteon-levels curve (AUCR), which is unpredictable by any method assuming the traditional well-stirred hepatic extraction (Eh ) model. Thus, in order to predict this drug interaction (DDI), a mathematical method that allows simulation of dynamic changes in blood victim levels in response to metabolic inhibition by a perpetrator, without the use of any specialized tools, was derived using hybridized two-compartment hepatic drug-pool-based tube modeling. Using this method, the ramelteon-victimized DDI could be simulated in comparison with other victim DDIs, assuming a consistent FLV dosing regimen. Despite large differences in AUCRs, CYP1A2 or CYP2C19 substrate-victimized DDIs resulted in equivalent inhibition constants (Ki , around 3 nM) and net enzymatic inhibitory activities calculated by eliminating hepatic availability increases for victims. Thus, the unusually large ramelteon DDI could be attributed to the Eh of ramelteon itself. This DDI risk could also be accurately predicted from Ki s estimated in the other CYP1A2 or CYP2C19-substrate interactions. Meanwhile, dynamic changes in blood perpetrator levels were demonstrated to have a small effect on DDI, thus suggesting the usefulness of a tube-based static method for DDI prediction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Experiments and mechanistic models for the chemical-mechanical polishing of low dielectric constant polymers and organosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Christopher Lyle

    LK polymer: (i) mass transport of reactant to polymer surface, (ii) adsorption of reactant, (iii) reaction at the polymer surface, (iv) shear-enhanced desorption, and (v) mass transport of abraded product away from polymer surface. We have compared model results to experimental data to discover which mechanistic steps determine the overall rate of SiLK removal. The experimental data indicate that SiLK CMP is reaction-rate limited for low slurry reactant concentrations and desorption-rate limited at high slurry reactant concentrations. Within the desorption-rate limited regime, the rate constant for removal has a power-law relation to the shear stress developed during CMP. The new mechanistic approach to CMP surface reaction kinetics shows promise as a robust model for CMP removal of other materials such as copper, tungsten, aluminum and SiO2, independent of the slurry chemistry and abrasive particle. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Determination of affinity constants and response factors of the noncovalent dimer of gramicidin by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, Raghu K; Rempel, Don L; Gross, Michael L

    2005-07-01

    The dimerization of gramicidin, a 15-residue membrane peptide, in solution can be viewed as a model for protein-protein interactions. We reported previously that the dimer can be observed when electrosprayed from organic solvents and that the abundances of the dimer depends on the dielectric constant of the solvent. Here, we report an effort to determine an affinity constant for the dimerization of gramicidin by using gas-phase abundance. Two issues affecting the determination are the electrospray-induced dissociation of the dimer and discrimination in the electrospray of the dimer compared with the monomer. Other methods developed for the purpose of determining affinity from mass spectral abundance do not address the dissociation of the complex in the gas phase or can not be applied for cases of low affinity constant, K(a). We present a mathematical model that uses the ratio of the signal intensities of the dimer and the monomer during a titration. The model also incorporates the dissociation and an electrospray ionization-response factor of the dimer for extracting the affinity constant for the dimerization of gramicidin. The dimerization constants from the new method agree within a factor of two with values reported in the literature.

  17. Modelo de simulação de secagem de produtos agrícolas usando entalpia do ar constante Drying simulation model of agricultural products with constant air enthalpy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir A. Dalpasquale

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A simulação matemática de secagem de produtos agrícolas teve seu auge nas décadas de 1960 e 1970, com destaque para os modelos de Thompson e de Michigan. Entretanto, nenhum deles abordou a condição de entalpia constante do ar de secagem durante o processo, limitando-se a conferir se a umidade relativa do ar não excedia 100%. Estudos conduzidos na Universidade Estadual de Maringá permitiram concluir que os balanços de energia e de massa de um processo de secagem estão incluídos no uso da mesma entalpia do ar durante a secagem, ajustando-se, com ela, a umidade absoluta do ar em função da umidade removida do produto. Com essa nova razão da mistura do ar e com a entalpia constante, avalia-se a nova temperatura do ar de secagem na saída da camada e, com essas duas propriedades psicrométricas, a umidade relativa do ar. Se ela atingir a condição saturada, encerra-se o processo de secagem naquele tempo, a partir daquela posição. Os resultados obtidos por simulação foram conferidos com resultados experimentais de secagem de milho em camadas fixas, com elevada concordância entre eles.Mathematical drying simulation of agricultural products reached its highest point in the decades of 1960 and 1970, with prominence for MSU and Thompson's models. However, none of them used the constant enthalpy condition of drying air during the process, being limited to checking if the relative humidity of the air did not exceed 100%. Studies conducted in the State University of Maringá allowed to conclude that energy and mass balances of a drying process are included when using the same air enthalpy in such process. The absolute humidity of the air is adjusted as a function of the removed humidity of the product. With that new absolute humidity of the air and with the constant enthalpy, the new temperature of the drying air is evaluated in the exit of the layer and, with those two psychrometric properties, the relative humidity of the air. If it

  18. Bench and mathematical modeling of the effects of breathing a helium/oxygen mixture on expiratory time constants in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expiratory time constants are used to quantify emptying of the lung as a whole, and emptying of individual lung compartments. Breathing low-density helium/oxygen mixtures may modify regional time constants so as to redistribute ventilation, potentially reducing gas trapping and hyperinflation for patients with obstructive lung disease. In the present work, bench and mathematical models of the lung were used to study the influence of heterogeneous patterns of obstruction on compartmental and whole-lung time constants. Methods A two-compartment mechanical test lung was used with the resistance in one compartment held constant, and a series of increasing resistances placed in the opposite compartment. Measurements were made over a range of lung compliances during ventilation with air or with a 78/22% mixture of helium/oxygen. The resistance imposed by the breathing circuit was assessed for both gases. Experimental results were compared with predictions of a mathematical model applied to the test lung and breathing circuit. In addition, compartmental and whole-lung time constants were compared with those reported by the ventilator. Results Time constants were greater for larger minute ventilation, and were reduced by substituting helium/oxygen in place of air. Notably, where time constants were long due to high lung compliance (i.e. low elasticity, helium/oxygen improved expiratory flow even for a low level of resistance representative of healthy, adult airways. In such circumstances, the resistance imposed by the external breathing circuit was significant. Mathematical predictions were in agreement with experimental results. Time constants reported by the ventilator were well-correlated with those determined for the whole-lung and for the low-resistance compartment, but poorly correlated with time constants determined for the high-resistance compartment. Conclusions It was concluded that breathing a low-density gas mixture, such

  19. Bench and mathematical modeling of the effects of breathing a helium/oxygen mixture on expiratory time constants in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew R; Katz, Ira M; Terzibachi, Karine; Gouinaud, Laure; Caillibotte, Georges; Texereau, Joëlle

    2012-05-30

    Expiratory time constants are used to quantify emptying of the lung as a whole, and emptying of individual lung compartments. Breathing low-density helium/oxygen mixtures may modify regional time constants so as to redistribute ventilation, potentially reducing gas trapping and hyperinflation for patients with obstructive lung disease. In the present work, bench and mathematical models of the lung were used to study the influence of heterogeneous patterns of obstruction on compartmental and whole-lung time constants. A two-compartment mechanical test lung was used with the resistance in one compartment held constant, and a series of increasing resistances placed in the opposite compartment. Measurements were made over a range of lung compliances during ventilation with air or with a 78/22% mixture of helium/oxygen. The resistance imposed by the breathing circuit was assessed for both gases. Experimental results were compared with predictions of a mathematical model applied to the test lung and breathing circuit. In addition, compartmental and whole-lung time constants were compared with those reported by the ventilator. Time constants were greater for larger minute ventilation, and were reduced by substituting helium/oxygen in place of air. Notably, where time constants were long due to high lung compliance (i.e. low elasticity), helium/oxygen improved expiratory flow even for a low level of resistance representative of healthy, adult airways. In such circumstances, the resistance imposed by the external breathing circuit was significant. Mathematical predictions were in agreement with experimental results. Time constants reported by the ventilator were well-correlated with those determined for the whole-lung and for the low-resistance compartment, but poorly correlated with time constants determined for the high-resistance compartment. It was concluded that breathing a low-density gas mixture, such as helium/oxygen, can improve expiratory flow from an obstructed

  20. Application of Constant Rate of Supply model (CRS) in dating of Guanabara Bay sediments using 210Pb measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braganca, Maura Julia Camara da Silva

    1992-09-01

    A geochronological study of the Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) based on 210P b dating technique to determine sedimentation rates and using the Constant Rate of Supply model (CRS) is presented in this work. Sediment samples were collected from river-head of Estrela, Sao Joao de Meriti, Guapimirim, Guaxindiba e Imbuacu. A low energy gamma spectrometry ( 210P b, samples taken from the Estrela and Sao Joao de Meriti rivers. Radiochemical method was applied to determine the amount of 210P b in samples collected near Guapimirim, Guaxindiba and Imbuacu Rivers. Atomic absorption spectrometry with air-acetylene flame technique was used to determine the amount of copper in all these samples. Experimental data shown the following variation in the concentration levels of copper and 210P b: (i) copper; from 2.5 μg/g to 37.1 μg/g (Imbuacu River); from 3.6 to 228.1 μg/g (Estrela River); from 11.6 to 73.4 μg/g (Guapimirim River); from 12.0 to 52.9 μg/g (Guaxindiba River) and from 90.8 to to 237.7 μg/g (Sao Joao de Meriti River), (ti) 210P b; from 2.0 Bq/kg to 27.0 Bq/kg (Imbuacu River); from 25.2 to 136.6 Bq/kg (Estrela River); from 40.0 to 90.0 Bq/kg (Sao Joao de Meriti River); from 7.0 to 70.0 Bq/kg (Guapimirim River); from 10.0 to 48.0 Bq/kg (Guaxindiba River). The sedimentation rates ranged from 0.30 cm/y in the Imbuacu River for a depth below of 35 cm to 1.3 cm/y for 0-30 cm depth in Guaxindiba River. It was concluded that the experimental data found in this work are consistent with those published in the scientific literature and that they can be predicted by the CRS model. (author)

  1. Assumed strain distributions for a finite strip plate bending element using Mindlin-Reissner plate theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Mullen, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation, new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-node linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking is observed with the newly developed element.

  2. Improved finite strip Mindlin plate bending element using assumed shear strain distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin/Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-code linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking phenomenon was observed with the newly developed element.

  3. Predicting the population dynamics of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in response to a constant hygrothermal environment using a model of the mite life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddulph, Phillip; Crowther, David; Leung, Brian; Wilkinson, Toby; Hart, Barbara; Oreszczyn, Tadj; Pretlove, Stephen; Ridley, Ian; Ucci, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    A generalised model of the life cycle of a house dust mite, which can be tailored to any particular species of domestic mite, is presented. The model takes into account the effects of hygrothermal conditions on each life cycle phase. It is used in a computer simulation program, called POPMITE, which, by incorporating a population age structure, is able to predict population dynamics. The POPMITE simulation is adapted to the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) (DP) mite using published data on the egg development period, total development period, adult longevity, mortality during egg development, mortality during juvenile development, and fecundity of individual DP mites held at a range of constant hygrothermal conditions. An example is given which illustrates how the model functions under constant hygrothermal conditions. A preliminary validation of POPMITE is made by a comparison of the POPMITE predictions with published measurements of population growth of DP mites held at a range constant hygrothermal conditions for 21 days. The POPMITE simulation is used to provide predictions of population growth or decline for a wide range of constant relative humidity and temperature combinations for 30 and 60 days. The adaptation of the model to correctly take account of fluctuating hygrothermal conditions is discussed.

  4. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  5. Characterization and modeling of 2D-glass micro-machining by spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) with constant velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Dolatabadi, Ali; Wüthrich, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) is an unconventional micro-machining technology based on electrochemical discharge used for micro-machining nonconductive materials. SACE 2D micro-machining with constant speed was used to machine micro-channels in glass. Parameters affecting the quality and geometry of the micro-channels machined by SACE technology with constant velocity were presented and the effect of each of the parameters was assessed. The effect of chemical etching on the geometry of micro-channels under different machining conditions has been studied, and a model is proposed for characterization of the micro-channels as a function of machining voltage and applied speed

  6. Beyond an assumed mother–child symbiosis in nutritional guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    of the child and the interest and focus of the mother. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore mothers’ concerns and feeding practices in the context of everyday life. A total of 45 mothers with children either seven months old or 13 months old participated. The results showed that the need to find......Researchers question the implications of the way in which “motherhood” is constructed in public health discourse. Current nutritional guidelines for Danish parents of young children are part of this discourse. They are shaped by an assumed symbiotic relationship between the nutritional needs...... practical solutions for the whole family in a busy everyday life, to socialise the child into the family and society at large, and to create personal relief from the strain small children put on time and energy all served as socially acceptable reasons for knowingly departing from nutritional...

  7. Modelling of the migration of lanthanoids and actinoids in ground water; the medium dependence of equilibrium constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, G.; Bruno, J.; Ferri, D.; Grenthe, I.; Salvatore, F.; Spahiu, K.

    1982-01-01

    The examples given in this communication indicate that it is possible to obtain a good estimate of the medium dependence of equilibrium constants by using the specific interaction theory. The theory is applicable both when extrapolating equilibrium constants to zero ionic strength and for the estimation of activity coefficients in mixtures of electrolytes. Many interaction coefficients are available in the literature, or can be calculated from published mean activity coefficient or isopiestic data. The magnitude of interaction coefficients can often be correlated with the charge and size of ions. This offers a possibility to estimate the coefficients for complexes, for which direct experimental information is difficult to get. The specific interaction theory is superior to the empirical equations of the Davies type. There is superior to the empirical equations of the Davies type. There is sufficient experimental information on interaction coefficients to warrant the implementation of the specific interaction approach in existing specifiation codes

  8. Calculation of the Dielectric Constant as a Function of Temperature Close to the Smectic A-Smectic B Transition in B5 Using the Mean Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Yurtseven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the static dielectric constant ( is calculated close to the smectic A-smectic B ( transition ( = 71.3°C for the liquid crystal compound B5. By expanding the free energy in terms of the order parameter in the mean field theory, the expression for the dielectric susceptibility (dielectric constant is derived and is fitted to the experimental data for which was obtained at the field strengths of 0 and 67 kV/cm from literature. Coefficients in the free energy expansion are determined from our fit for the transition of B5. Our results show that the observed behaviour of the dielectric constant close to the transition in B5 can be described satisfactorily by our mean field model.

  9. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-01-01

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a π√(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment

  10. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  11. Measurement and Modeling of Setschenow Constants for Selected Hydrophilic Compounds in NaCl and CaCl2Simulated Carbon Storage Brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2017-06-20

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), a climate change mitigation strategy, along with unconventional oil and gas extraction, generates enormous volumes of produced water containing high salt concentrations and a litany of organic compounds. Understanding the aqueous solubility of organic compounds related to these operations is important for water treatment and reuse alternatives, as well as risk assessment purposes. The well-established Setschenow equation can be used to determine the effect of salts on aqueous solubility. However, there is a lack of reported Setschenow constants, especially for polar organic compounds. In this study, the Setschenow constants for selected hydrophilic organic compounds were experimentally determined, and linear free energy models for predicting the Setschenow constant of organic chemicals in concentrated brines were developed. Solid phase microextraction was employed to measure the salting-out behavior of six selected hydrophilic compounds up to 5 M NaCl and 2 M CaCl 2 and in Na-Ca-Cl brines. All compounds, which include phenol, p-cresol, hydroquinone, pyrrole, hexanoic acid, and 9-hydroxyfluorene, exhibited log-linear behavior up to these concentrations, meaning Setschenow constants previously measured at low salt concentrations can be extrapolated up to high salt concentrations for hydrophilic compounds. Setschenow constants measured in NaCl and CaCl 2 brines are additive for the compounds measured here; meaning Setschenow constants measured in single salt solutions can be used in multiple salt solutions. The hydrophilic compounds in this study were selected to elucidate differences in salting-out behavior based on their chemical structure. Using data from this study, as well as literature data, linear free energy relationships (LFERs) for prediction of NaCl, CaCl 2 , LiCl, and NaBr Setschenow constants were developed and validated. Two LFERs were improved. One LFER uses the Abraham solvation parameters, which include

  12. Universal solvation model based on solute electron density and on a continuum model of the solvent defined by the bulk dielectric constant and atomic surface tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-07

    We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the "D" stands for "density" to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. "Continuum" denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute-solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where "universal" denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for electrostatics in terms of the integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). The cavities for the bulk electrostatic calculation are defined by superpositions of nuclear-centered spheres. The second component is called the cavity-dispersion-solvent-structure term and is the contribution arising from short-range interactions between the solute and solvent molecules in the first solvation shell. This contribution is a sum of terms that are proportional (with geometry-dependent proportionality constants called atomic surface tensions) to the solvent-accessible surface areas of the individual atoms of the solute. The SMD model has been parametrized with a training set of 2821 solvation data including 112 aqueous ionic solvation free energies, 220 solvation free energies for 166 ions in acetonitrile, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide, 2346 solvation free energies for 318 neutral solutes in 91 solvents (90 nonaqueous

  13. People favour imperfect catching by assuming a stable world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan López-Moliner

    Full Text Available The visual angle that is projected by an object (e.g. a ball on the retina depends on the object's size and distance. Without further information, however, the visual angle is ambiguous with respect to size and distance, because equal visual angles can be obtained from a big ball at a longer distance and a smaller one at a correspondingly shorter distance. Failure to recover the true 3D structure of the object (e.g. a ball's physical size causing the ambiguous retinal image can lead to a timing error when catching the ball. Two opposing views are currently prevailing on how people resolve this ambiguity when estimating time to contact. One explanation challenges any inference about what causes the retinal image (i.e. the necessity to recover this 3D structure, and instead favors a direct analysis of optic flow. In contrast, the second view suggests that action timing could be rather based on obtaining an estimate of the 3D structure of the scene. With the latter, systematic errors will be predicted if our inference of the 3D structure fails to reveal the underlying cause of the retinal image. Here we show that hand closure in catching virtual balls is triggered by visual angle, using an assumption of a constant ball size. As a consequence of this assumption, hand closure starts when the ball is at similar distance across trials. From that distance on, the remaining arrival time, therefore, depends on ball's speed. In order to time the catch successfully, closing time was coupled with ball's speed during the motor phase. This strategy led to an increased precision in catching but at the cost of committing systematic errors.

  14. The melatonin action on stromal stem cells within pericryptal area in colon cancer model under constant light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannen, Vinicius, E-mail: kannen71@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Marini, Tassiana [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Zanette, Dalila L. [National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Frajacomo, Fernando T.; Silva, Gyl E.B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Silva, Wilson A. [Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garcia, Sergio B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated melatonin against the malignant effects of constant light. {yields} Melatonin supplementation increased its serum levels and its receptor expression. {yields} Melatonin decreased cancer stem cells and dysplastic injuries in colon tissue. {yields} Melatonin controlled proliferative process and apoptosis induction. -- Abstract: Constant light (LL) is associated with high incidence of colon cancer. MLT supplementation was related to the significant control of preneoplastic patterns. We sought to analyze preneoplastic patterns in colon tissue from animals exposed to LL environment (14 days; 300 lx), MLT-supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) and DMH-treatment (1,2 dimethylhydrazine; 125 mg/kg). Rodents were sacrificed and MLT serum levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicated that LL induced ACF development (p < 0.001) with a great potential to increase the number of CD133(+) and CD68(+) cells (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). LL also increased the proliferative process (PCNA-Li; p < 0.001) as well as decreased caspase-3 protein (p < 0.001), related to higher COX-2 protein expression (p < 0.001) within pericryptal colonic stroma (PCCS). However, MLT-supplementation controlled the development of dysplastic ACF (p < 0.001) diminishing preneoplastic patterns into PCCS as CD133 and CD68 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). These events were relative to decreased PCNA-Li index and higher expression of caspase-3 protein. Thus, MLT showed a great potential to control the preneoplastic patterns induced by LL.

  15. The melatonin action on stromal stem cells within pericryptal area in colon cancer model under constant light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannen, Vinicius; Marini, Tassiana; Zanette, Dalila L.; Frajacomo, Fernando T.; Silva, Gyl E.B.; Silva, Wilson A.; Garcia, Sergio B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated melatonin against the malignant effects of constant light. → Melatonin supplementation increased its serum levels and its receptor expression. → Melatonin decreased cancer stem cells and dysplastic injuries in colon tissue. → Melatonin controlled proliferative process and apoptosis induction. -- Abstract: Constant light (LL) is associated with high incidence of colon cancer. MLT supplementation was related to the significant control of preneoplastic patterns. We sought to analyze preneoplastic patterns in colon tissue from animals exposed to LL environment (14 days; 300 lx), MLT-supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) and DMH-treatment (1,2 dimethylhydrazine; 125 mg/kg). Rodents were sacrificed and MLT serum levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicated that LL induced ACF development (p < 0.001) with a great potential to increase the number of CD133(+) and CD68(+) cells (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). LL also increased the proliferative process (PCNA-Li; p < 0.001) as well as decreased caspase-3 protein (p < 0.001), related to higher COX-2 protein expression (p < 0.001) within pericryptal colonic stroma (PCCS). However, MLT-supplementation controlled the development of dysplastic ACF (p < 0.001) diminishing preneoplastic patterns into PCCS as CD133 and CD68 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). These events were relative to decreased PCNA-Li index and higher expression of caspase-3 protein. Thus, MLT showed a great potential to control the preneoplastic patterns induced by LL.

  16. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification

    KAUST Repository

    Sudhakaran, Sairam

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (kOH and kO3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O3 and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, kOH and kO3, were predicted based on target compound properties. The kO3 and kOH values ranged from 5 * 10-4 to 105 M-1s-1 and 0.04 to 18 * (109) M-1 s-1, respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O3 and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r2 (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Trajectory Simulation of Meteors Assuming Mass Loss and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Saunders, David A

    2015-01-01

    Program used to simulate atmospheric flight trajectories of entry capsules [1] Includes models of atmospheres of different planetary destinations - Earth, Mars, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Titan, ... Solves 3-­-degrees of freedom (3DoF) equations for a single body treated as a point mass. Also supports 6-DoF trajectory simula4on and Monte Carlo analyses. Uses Fehlberg-­-Runge-­-Kuna (4th-5th order) time integraion with automaic step size control. Includes rotating spheroidal planet with gravitational field having a J2 harmonic. Includes a variety of engineering aerodynamic and heat flux models. Capable of specifying events - heatshield jettison, parachute deployment, etc. - at predefined altitudes or Mach number. Has material thermal response models of typical aerospace materials integrated.

  18. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  19. An initial abstraction and constant loss model, and methods for estimating unit hydrographs, peak streamflows, and flood volumes for urban basins in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow data, basin characteristics, and rainfall data from 39 streamflow-gaging stations for urban areas in and adjacent to Missouri were used by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Metropolitan Sewer District of St. Louis to develop an initial abstraction and constant loss model (a time-distributed basin-loss model) and a gamma unit hydrograph (GUH) for urban areas in Missouri. Study-specific methods to determine peak streamflow and flood volume for a given rainfall event also were developed.

  20. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Is Polar Amplification Deeper and Stronger than Dynamicists Assume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, J.; Maroon, E.

    2017-12-01

    In the CMIP multi-model mean under strong future warming, Arctic amplification is confined to the lower troposphere, so that the meridional gradient of warming reverses around 500 mb and the upper troposphere is characterized by strong "tropical amplification" in which warming weakens with increasing latitude. This model-derived pattern of warming maxima in the upper-level tropics and lower-level Arctic has become a canonical assumption driving theories of the large-scale circulation response to climate change. Yet, several lines of evidence and reasoning suggest that Arctic amplification may in fact extend through the entire depth of the troposphere, and/or may be stronger than commonly modeled. These include satellite Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) temperature trends as a function of latitude and vertical level, the recent discovery that the extratropical negative cloud phase feedback in models is largely spurious, and the very strong polar amplification observed in past warm and lukewarm climates. Such a warming pattern, with deep, dominant Arctic amplification, would have very different implications for the circulation than a canonical CMIP-like warming: instead of slightly shifting poleward and strengthening, eddies, jets and cells might shift equatorward and considerably weaken. Indeed, surface winds have been mysteriously weakening ("stilling") at almost all stations over the last half-century or so, there has been no poleward shift in northern hemisphere circulation metrics, and past warm climates' subtropics were apparently quite wet (and their global ocean circulations were weak.) To explore these possibilities more deeply, we examine the y-z structure of warming and circulation changes across a much broader range of models, scenarios and time periods than the CMIP future mean, and use an MSU simulator to compare them to the satellite warming record. Specifically, we examine whether the use of historical (rather than future) forcing, AMIP (rather than CMIP

  2. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed to be higher with the

  3. An efficient Mindlin finite strip plate element based on assumed strain distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A simple two node, linear, finite strip plate bending element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory for the analysis of very thin to thick bridges, plates, and axisymmetric shells is presented. The new transverse shear strains are assumed for constant distribution in the two node linear strip. The important aspect is the choice of the points that relate the nodal displacements and rotations through the locking transverse shear strains. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and ease in computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for analyzing plates with different supports, loading conditions, and a wide range of thicknesses are given. The results show no sign of the shear locking phenomenon.

  4. Cosmological constant and advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Turner, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors could measure the frequency sweep of a binary inspiral (characterized by its chirp mass) to high accuracy. The observed chirp mass is the intrinsic chirp mass of the binary source multiplied by (1+z), where z is the redshift of the source. Assuming a nonzero cosmological constant, we compute the expected redshift distribution of observed events for an advanced LIGO detector. We find that the redshift distribution has a robust and sizable dependence on the cosmological constant; the data from advanced LIGO detectors could provide an independent measurement of the cosmological constant. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar parameters and assumed wind parameters (Cazorla+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, C.; Morel, T.; Naze, Y.; Rauw, G.; Semaan, T.; Daflon, S.; Oey, S.

    2017-03-01

    Stellar parameters derived for the stars in our sample and assumed wind parameters for our hotter stars. Because macroturbulent velocities cannot be determined reliably for fast rotators (Sect. 4.2), all values in column 6 are upper limits. Column 7 provides the multiplicity status (see Sect. 4.1 for the classification criterion and Appendix C for the RV studies of each individual object). The runaway status is based on literature studies (references are given on a star-to-star basis in Appendix C). Columns 15, 16, and 17 of the table presenting the results for the hotter stars list the assumed wind parameters. For stars with the lowest temperatures (typically B0.5 stars), the carbon abundance cannot be firmly determined due to the weakness of the CIII lines at these temperatures. Besides, NII lines may also be very weak for the hottest stars studied with DETAIL/SURFACE. In these cases, we provide upper limits for both carbon and nitrogen abundances. They correspond to predicted lines becoming detectable, i.e., having a depth significantly exceeding the local noise. Similarly, CMFGEN fits may converge towards very high or very low CNO abundances. In both cases, the upper or lower limits were determined from the chi2 curves and correspond to the limit of their flat minimum. Since the CNO abundances are measured relative to the hydrogen content (assumed to be constant in our study), a correction should in principle be applied to the CNO abundances of stars that exhibit a very high helium abundance (and therefore have a reduced hydrogen abundance). However, we found this correction to be negligible (<~0.1dex) even for the most He-rich stars. The 1σ errors on the parameters are given in dedicated columns. (2 data files).

  6. Profiles of equilibrium constants for self-association of aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Davies, David B; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2009-04-28

    Analysis of the noncovalent, noncooperative self-association of identical aromatic molecules assumes that the equilibrium self-association constants are either independent of the number of molecules (the EK-model) or change progressively with increasing aggregation (the AK-model). The dependence of the self-association constant on the number of molecules in the aggregate (i.e., the profile of the equilibrium constant) was empirically derived in the AK-model but, in order to provide some physical understanding of the profile, it is proposed that the sources for attenuation of the equilibrium constant are the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom, the ordering of molecules in the aggregates and the electrostatic contribution (for charged units). Expressions are derived for the profiles of the equilibrium constants for both neutral and charged molecules. Although the EK-model has been widely used in the analysis of experimental data, it is shown in this work that the derived equilibrium constant, K(EK), depends on the concentration range used and hence, on the experimental method employed. The relationship has also been demonstrated between the equilibrium constant K(EK) and the real dimerization constant, K(D), which shows that the value of K(EK) is always lower than K(D).

  7. Assuming too much? Participatory water resource governance in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that participation in natural resource management, which is often coupled with moves for more local ownership of decision making, is based on three sets of assumptions: about the role of the state, the universality of application of such approaches and the transformatory potential of institutional reform. The validity of these assumptions requires investigation in view of the rapid institutionalisation and scaling-up of participatory approaches, particularly in developing country contexts. Post-apartheid South Africa is widely recognised as a pioneer of participatory and devolutionary approaches, particularly in the field of water resources. It is 12 years since the promulgation of the forward-thinking 1998 National Water Act, and thus an opportune moment to reflect on South Africa's experiences of participatory governance. Drawing on empirical research covering the establishment of the first Catchment Management Agency, and the transformation of existing Irrigation Boards into more inclusive Water User Associations in the Inkomati Water Management Area, it emerges that there may be fundamental weaknesses in the participatory model and underlying assumptions, and indeed such approaches may actually reinforce inequitable outcomes: the legacy of long-established institutional frameworks and powerful actors therein continues to exert influence in post-apartheid South Africa, and has the potential to subvert the democratic and redistributive potential of the water reforms. It is argued that a reassessment of the role of the state is necessary: where there is extreme heterogeneity in challenging catchments more, rather than less, state intervention may be required to uphold the interests of marginalised groups and effect redistribution.

  8. QED Based Calculation of the Fine Structure Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. Here, semi-classical approaches are used to obtain a more intuitive feel for what causes electrostatics, and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. These intuitive arguments lead to a possible answer to the question of the nature of charge. Virtual photons, with a reduced wavelength of λ, are assumed to interact with isolated electrons with a cross section of πλ2. This interaction is assumed to generate time-reversed virtual photons that are capable of seeking out and interacting with other electrons. This exchange of virtual photons between particles is assumed to generate and define the strength of electromagnetism. With the inclusion of near-field effects the model presented here gives a fine structure constant of ~1/137 and an anomalous magnetic moment of the electron of ~0.00116. These calculations support the possibility that near-field corrections are the key to understanding the numerical value of the dimensionless fine structure constant.

  9. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance Strategies in Contagious Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buccioli, Alice; Kokholm, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    charging and for risk management. The literature on CPPI modeling typically assumes diffusive or Lévy-driven dynamics for the risky asset underlying the strategy. In either case the self-contagious nature of asset prices is not taken into account. In order to account for contagion while preserving......Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance (CPPI) strategies are popular as they allow to gear up the upside potential of a stock index while limiting its downside risk. From the issuer's perspective it is important to adequately assess the risks associated with the CPPI, both for correct "gap'' fee...

  10. Simulation of deep coalbed methane permeability and production assuming variable pore volume compressibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonnsen, R.R.; Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presented an alternative view of deep coalbed methane (CBM) permeability, questioning the assumption of using constant pore volume compressibility for modelling permeability changes that would be part of deep CBM production. The sensitivity of coal permeability to changes in stress has led to the assumption that deep coals have limited permeability, but this belief takes for granted that a coal's porosity/cleat system maintains a constant pore volume compressibility during changing stress conditions. Exponentially declining (variable) pore volume compressibility was employed to model changes in permeability related to changing stress conditions within the coalbed. The assumption of constant or variable pore volume compressibility affects modelled permeability changes. Deep coals may maintain higher values during production than previously indicated. The modelled compressibility and permeability results were applied to the simulation of deep CBM reservoirs to determine the practical difference the compressibility assumption has on a coal's simulated production. With the assumption of variable pore volume compressibility, the modelled permeability decreases less than previously indicated, resulting in greater production. The simulation results may justify exploration for deeper CBM reservoirs, although economic production rates are shown to be possible only when the coal is modelled with zero water saturation in the cleat system. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  11. Systematics of constant roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2018-02-01

    We study constant roll inflation systematically. This is a regime, in which the slow roll approximation can be violated. It has long been thought that this approximation is necessary for agreement with observations. However, recently it was understood that there can be inflationary models with a constant, and not necessarily small, rate of roll that are both stable and compatible with the observational constraint ns ≈ 1. We investigate systematically the condition for such a constant-roll regime. In the process, we find a whole new class of inflationary models, in addition to the known solutions. We show that the new models are stable under scalar perturbations. Finally, we find a part of their parameter space, in which they produce a nearly scale-invariant scalar power spectrum, as needed for observational viability.

  12. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henry’s Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aq...

  13. Development of a kinetic model, including rate constant estimations, on iodine and caesium behaviour in the primary circuit of LWR's under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Buron, J.M.; Fernandez, S.

    1991-07-01

    In this report, a kinetic model has been developed with the aim to try to reproduce the chemical phenomena that take place in a flowing system containing steam, hydrogen and iodine and caesium vapours. The work is divided into two different parts. The first part consists in the estimation, through the Activited Complex Theory, of the reaction rate constants, for the chosen reactions, and the development of the kinetic model based on the concept of ideal tubular chemical reactor. The second part deals with the application of such model to several cases, which were taken from the Phase B 'Scoping Calculations' of the Phebus-FP Project (sequence AB) and the SFD-ST and SFD1.1 experiments. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that the assumption of instantaneous equilibrium could be inacurrate in order to estimate the iodine and caesium species distribution under severe accidents conditions

  14. The fine-structure constant before quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, H

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the early history of the fine-structure constant, largely the period until 1925. Contrary to what is generally assumed, speculations concerning the interdependence of the elementary electric charge and Planck's constant predated Arnold Sommerfeld's 1916 discussion of the dimensionless constant. This paper pays particular attention to a little known work from 1914 in which G N Lewis and E Q Adams derived what is effectively a numerical expression for the fine-structure constant.

  15. Decreased Expression of Arginine-Phenylalanine-Amide-Related Peptide-3 Gene in Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus of Constant Light Exposure Model of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shaaban

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background An abnormality in pulse amplitude and frequency of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH secretion is the most characteristics of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. On the other hand, arginine-phenylalanine-amide (RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3 inhibits the secretion of GnRH in mammalian hypothalamus. The current study performed in order to investigate the expression of RFRP3 mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH after the induction of PCOS in a rat model of constant light exposure, and the possible role of parity on occurrence of PCOS. Materials and Methods In the experimental study, female nulliparous (n=12 and primiparous (n=12 rats were randomly subdivided into control and PCOS subgroups (n=6. PCOS were induced by 90 days exposure to constant light. After 90 days, blood, brain, and ovaries were sampled. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone were evaluated. In addition, six adult female ovariectomized rats as a control of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR tests were prepared and in the DMH of all rats, the relative mRNA expression of RFRP3 was assessed. Results Histological evaluation of ovaries represented the polycystic features. In addition, serum concentrations of testosterone in the PCOS subgroups were more than the controls (P<0.05. Furthermore, the relative expression of RFRP3 mRNA in PCOS subgroups was lower than the controls (P<0.05. Conclusion Constant light model of the PCOS-induced rats decreased the gene expression of RFRP3 in the DMH that suggests the decrease of RFRP3 may reduce its inhibitory effect on GnRH during the PCOS pathogenesis. This effect was stronger in the nulliparous rats than the primiparous.

  16. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The article discusses the importance of the fine structure constant in quantum mechanics, along with the brief history of how it emerged. Al- though Sommerfelds idea of elliptical orbits has been replaced by wave mechanics, the fine struc- ture constant he introduced has remained as an important parameter in the field of ...

  17. The Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of the physics and cosmology of the cosmological constant. Focusing on recent developments, I present a pedagogical overview of cosmology in the presence of a cosmological constant, observational constraints on its magnitude, and the physics of a small (and potentially nonzero vacuum energy.

  18. On Aryabhata's Planetary Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of a Babylonian origin of Aryabhata's planetary constants. It shows that Aryabhata's basic constant is closer to the Indian counterpart than to the Babylonian one. Sketching connections between Aryabhata's framework and earlier Indic astronomical ideas on yugas and cyclic calendar systems, it is argued that Aryabhata's system is an outgrowth of an earlier Indic tradition.

  19. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ariel; Lemeshko, Mikhail; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a me...

  20. The cosmological constant. A small addition with a great effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessner, G.

    1999-01-01

    The consequences of a cosmological constant Λ to cosmological models on the one hand and to Newton's gravitational law in the weak field expansion on the other hand are discussed. In case of a negative Λ with Λ∼10 -56 cm -2 the universe is open but does not expand forever. Furthermore, its age is compatible with the age of the oldest globular clusters. On the other hand, Newton's gravitational law is modified by an additional attractive force term linearly increasing woth the distance. This term acts only over very large distances. If one assumes a value Λ∼=-10 -56 cm -2 the additional term acts for stars over a characteristic scale of about 120 pc and for galaxies over a characteristic scale of about 0.8 Mpc. A positive cosmological constant Λ∼=-10 -56 cm -2 leads to an additional repulsive force which would have prevented the existence of galaxy clusters

  1. Determination of thickness and optical constants of solgel derived polyvinylpyrrolidone/ZrO2 films from transmission spectra using different dispersion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongbao; Sun, Jinghua; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong

    2012-10-10

    Transmission measurements have been used to investigate the optical properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/ZrO(2) films synthesized by the solgel route. The optical constants of PVP/ZrO(2) films deposited on quartz substrates were determined by fitting transmission spectra in the wavelength range of 200-800 nm with the Tauc-Lorentz and Cody-Lorentz physical models. Combined with Urbach tail, both models give a good description of transmission data and reveal that refractive index of film slightly decreases with increasing PVP mass fraction. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements were also performed on PVP/ZrO(2) films to complement the thicknesses. The value of film thickness, including interface information from transmission spectra, is consistent with that result obtained from XRR, indicating that fitting transmission spectrum is a high reliable optical characterization.

  2. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...

  3. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Damos

    Full Text Available Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off, but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard

  4. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models using the constant and variable crust-mantle density contrast - a case study of Zealandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherbandi, Mohammad; Tenzer, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We compare three different numerical schemes of treating the Moho density contrast in gravimetric inverse problems for finding the Moho depths. The results are validated using the global crustal model CRUST2.0, which is determined based purely on seismic data. Firstly, the gravimetric recovery of the Moho depths is realized by solving Moritz's generalization of the Vening-Meinesz inverse problem of isostasy while the constant Moho density contrast is adopted. The Pratt-Hayford isostatic model is then facilitated to estimate the variable Moho density contrast. This variable Moho density contrast is subsequently used to determine the Moho depths. Finally, the combined least-squares approach is applied to estimate jointly the Moho depths and density contract based on a priori error model. The EGM2008 global gravity model and the DTM2006.0 global topographic/bathymetric model are used to generate the isostatic gravity anomalies. The comparison of numerical results reveals that the optimal isostatic inverse scheme should take into consideration both the variable depth and density of compensation. This is achieved by applying the combined least-squares approach for a simultaneous estimation of both Moho parameters. We demonstrate that the result obtained using this method has the best agreement with the CRUST2.0 Moho depths. The numerical experiments are conducted at the regional study area of New Zealand's continental shelf.

  5. New representation of water activity based on a single solute specific constant to parameterize the hygroscopic growth of aerosols in atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water activity is a key factor in aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth. We introduce a new representation of water activity (aw, which is empirically related to the solute molality (μs through a single solute specific constant, νi. Our approach is widely applicable, considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at high relative humidity (RH, including cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation. It also encompasses concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD. The constant νi can thus be used to parameterize the aerosol hygroscopic growth over a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. In contrast to other aw-representations, our νi factor corrects the solute molality both linearly and in exponent form x · ax. We present four representations of our basic aw-parameterization at different levels of complexity for different aw-ranges, e.g. up to 0.95, 0.98 or 1. νi is constant over the selected aw-range, and in its most comprehensive form, the parameterization describes the entire aw range (0–1. In this work we focus on single solute solutions. νi can be pre-determined with a root-finding method from our water activity representation using an aw−μs data pair, e.g. at solute saturation using RHD and solubility measurements. Our aw and supersaturation (Köhler-theory results compare well with the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH42SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. Envisaged applications include regional and global atmospheric chemistry and

  6. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-01

    The complex index of refraction, ñ = n + ik, has two components, n(ν) and k(ν), both a function of frequency, ν. The constant n is the real component, and k is the complex component, proportional to the absorption. In combination with other parameters, n and k can be used to model infrared spectra. However, obtaining reliable n/k values for solid materials is often difficult. In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, polished homogeneous materials free of defects; i.e. materials where the Fresnel equations are valid and there is no appreciable light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain such pure macroscopic samples, the alternative is to press the powder form of the material into a uniform disk. Recently, we have pressed such pellets from ammonium sulfate powder, and have measured the pellets' n and k values via two independent methods: 1) ellipsometry, which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) single-angle reflectance using a specular reflectance device within a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. This technique measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength over a wide spectral domain. The optical constants are determined from the single-angle measurements using the Kramers-Kronig relationship, whereas an oscillator model is used to analyze the ellipsometric measurements. The n(ν) and k(ν) values determined by the two methods were compared to previous values determined from single crystal samples from which transmittance and reflectance measurements were made and converted to n(ν) and k(ν) using a simple dispersion model. [Toon et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 81, 5733-5748, (1976)]. Comparison with the literature values shows good agreement, indicating that these are promising techniques to measure the optical constants

  7. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corresponds to an ideal collinear two-jet event and T = 0.5 corresponds to a perfectly spherical event. Usually one considers the variable t = 1 − T instead of the thrust T, such that the two jet regions correspond to t → 0. 2.2 Heavy jet mass MH. The plane orthogonal to the thrust axis divides the space into two hemispheres ...

  8. Deconstructing the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jejjala, V; Minic, D; Jejjala, Vishnu; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    Deconstruction provides a novel way of dealing with the notoriously difficult ultraviolet problems of four-dimensional gravity. This approach also naturally leads to a new perspective on the holographic principle, tying it to the fundamental requirements of unitarity and diffeomorphism invariance, as well as to a new viewpoint on the cosmological constant problem. The numerical smallness of the cosmological constant is implied by a unique combination of holography and supersymmetry, opening a new window into the fundamental physics of the vacuum.

  9. Dehydrogenation Kinetics and Modeling Studies of MgH2 Enhanced by Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts Using Constant Pressure Thermodynamic Driving Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Temitope Sabitu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transition metal oxide catalysts (ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and Nb2O5 on the hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2 was investigated using constant pressure thermodynamic driving forces in which the ratio of the equilibrium plateau pressure (pm to the opposing plateau (pop was the same in all the reactions studied. The results showed Nb2O5 to be vastly superior to other catalysts for improving the thermodynamics and kinetics of MgH2. The modeling studies showed reaction at the phase boundary to be likely process controlling the reaction rates of all the systems studied.

  10. Fixed-bed drying simulation with constant enthalpy, using the improved Michigan State University model - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i2.7812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir Antoninho Dalpasquale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Drying of agricultural products at high temperatures can be simulated by mathematical models, which intend to describe the drying process close to commercial patterns. They are based on simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the product that is losing moisture, and the air that is supplying energy to the process. All models use these balances, never allowing values of relative humidity of the air to be greater than 100%. However, it has not been common to evaluate air enthalpy, which should not have significant variation during the entire process, accepted as adiabatic. In this work, a mathematical model is proposed for fixed-bed corn (Zea mays L. drying simulation, according to the Michigan State University (MSU model. In the numerical solution, the enthalpy of the drying air was maintained constant as a quantitative physical indicator for correction of the heat and mass exchange in each step of the process, in order to obtain more real evaluations in all drying stages, and in the results for final moisture of the grain. As a result, greater space and time intervals for the simulation were possible. The simulation was validated by comparisons with literature results.  

  11. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henry's Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, S H; Saravanaraj, A N; Carreira, L A

    2014-02-01

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henry's Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aqueous pKa values, relative pKa values in the gas phase, and aqueous HLC for neutral compounds have been used to develop monopole interaction models that quantify the energy differences upon moving an ionic solute molecule from the gas phase to the liquid phase. Inter-molecular interaction energies were factored into mechanistic contributions of monopoles with polarizability, dipole, H-bonding, and resonance. The monopole ionic models were validated by a wide range of measured gas phase pKa data for 450 acidic compounds. The RMS deviation error and R(2) for the OH, SH, CO2 H, CH3 and NR2 acidic reaction centers (C) were 16.9 kcal/mol and 0.87, respectively. The calculated HLCs of ions were compared to the HLCs of 142 ions calculated by quantum mechanics. Effects of inter-molecular interaction of the monopoles with polarizability, dipole, H-bonding, and resonance on acidity of the solutes in the gas phase are discussed. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The rate constant of the reaction NCN + H2 and its role in NCN and NO modeling in low pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faßheber, Nancy; Lamoureux, Nathalie; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-06-28

    Bimolecular reactions of the NCN radical play a key role in modeling prompt-NO formation in hydrocarbon flames. The rate constant of the so-far neglected reaction NCN + H2 has been experimentally determined behind shock waves under pseudo-first order conditions with H2 as the excess component. NCN3 thermal decomposition has been used as a quantitative high temperature source of NCN radicals, which have been sensitively detected by difference UV laser absorption spectroscopy at [small nu, Greek, tilde] = 30383.11 cm(-1). The experiments were performed at two different total densities of ρ≈ 4.1 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) and ρ≈ 7.4 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) (corresponding to pressures between p = 324 mbar and p = 1665 mbar) and revealed a pressure independent reaction. In the temperature range 1057 K rate constant can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 4.1 × 10(13) exp(-101 kJ mol(-1)/RT) (Δlog k = ±0.11). The pressure independent reaction as well as the measured activation energy is consistent with a dominating H abstracting reaction channel yielding the products HNCN + H. The reaction NCN + H2 has been implemented together with a set of reactions for subsequent HNCN and HNC chemistry into the detailed GDFkin3.0_NCN mechanism for NOx flame modeling. Two fuel-rich low-pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames served as examples to quantify the impact of the additional chemical pathways. Although the overall NCN consumption by H2 remains small, significant differences have been observed for NO yields with the updated mechanism. A detailed flux analysis revealed that HNC, mainly arising from HCN/HNC isomerization, plays a decisive role and enhances NO formation through a new HNC → HNCO → NH2→ NH → NO pathway.

  13. Characterization for elastic constants of fused deposition modelling-fabricated materials based on the virtual fields method and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quankun; Xie, Huimin

    2017-12-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM), a widely used rapid prototyping process, is a promising technique in manufacturing engineering. In this work, a method for characterizing elastic constants of FDM-fabricated materials is proposed. First of all, according to the manufacturing process of FDM, orthotropic constitutive model is used to describe the mechanical behavior. Then the virtual fields method (VFM) is applied to characterize all the mechanical parameters (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) using the full-field strain, which is measured by digital image correlation (DIC). Since the principal axis of the FDM-fabricated structure is sometimes unknown due to the complexity of the manufacturing process, a disk in diametrical compression is used as the load configuration so that the loading angle can be changed conveniently. To verify the feasibility of the proposed method, finite element method (FEM) simulation is conducted to obtain the strain field of the disk. The simulation results show that higher accuracy can be achieved when the loading angle is close to 30°. Finally, a disk fabricated by FDM was used for the experiment. By rotating the disk, several tests with different loading angles were conducted. To determine the position of the principal axis in each test, two groups of parameters (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) are calculated by two different groups of virtual fields. Then the corresponding loading angle can be determined by minimizing the deviation between two groups of the parameters. After that, the four constants (Q_{11}, Q_{22}, Q_{12}, Q_{66}) were determined from the test with an angle of 27°.

  14. Modeling the pH and temperature dependence of aqueousphase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants of organic micropollutants using QSPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita

    2017-11-01

    Designing of advanced oxidation process (AOP) requires knowledge of the aqueous phase hydroxyl radical ( ● OH) reactions rate constants (k OH ), which are strictly dependent upon the pH and temperature of the medium. In this study, pH- and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models based on the decision tree boost (DTB) approach were developed for the prediction of k OH of diverse organic contaminants following the OECD guidelines. Experimental datasets (n = 958) pertaining to the k OH values of aqueous phase reactions at different pH (n = 470; 1.4 × 10 6 to 3.8 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) and temperature (n = 171; 1.0 × 10 7 to 2.6 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) were considered and molecular descriptors of the compounds were derived. The Sanderson scale electronegativity, topological polar surface area, number of double bonds, and halogen atoms in the molecule, in addition to the pH and temperature, were found to be the relevant predictors. The models were validated and their external predictivity was evaluated in terms of most stringent criteria parameters derived on the test data. High values of the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and small root mean squared error (RMSE) in respective training (> 0.972, ≤ 0.12) and test (≥ 0.936, ≤ 0.16) sets indicated high generalization and predictivity of the developed QSPR model. Other statistical parameters derived from the training and test data also supported the robustness of the models and their suitability for screening new chemicals within the defined chemical space. The developed QSPR models provide a valuable tool for predicting the ● OH reaction rate constants of emerging new water contaminants for their susceptibility to AOPs.

  15. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  16. Errors resulting from assuming opaque Lambertian clouds in TOMS ozone retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Newchurch, M.J.; Loughman, R.; Bhartia, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate remote sensing retrieval of atmospheric constituents over cloudy areas is very challenging because of insufficient knowledge of cloud parameters. Cloud treatments are highly idealized in most retrieval algorithms. Using a radiative transfer model treating clouds as scattering media, we investigate the effects of assuming opaque Lambertian clouds and employing a Partial Cloud Model (PCM) on Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) ozone retrievals, especially for tropical high-reflectivity clouds. Assuming angularly independent cloud reflection is good because the Ozone Retrieval Errors (OREs) are within 1.5% of the total ozone (i.e., within TOMS retrieval precision) when Cloud Optical Depth (COD)≥20. Because of Intra-Cloud Ozone Absorption ENhancement (ICOAEN), assuming opaque clouds can introduce large OREs even for optically thick clouds. For a water cloud of COD 40 spanning 2-12 km with 20.8 Dobson Unit (DU) ozone homogeneously distributed in the cloud, the ORE is 17.8 DU in the nadir view. The ICOAEN effect depends greatly on solar zenith angle, view zenith angle, and intra-cloud ozone amount and distribution. The TOMS PCM is good because negative errors from the cloud fraction being underestimated partly cancel other positive errors. At COD≤5, the TOMS algorithm retrieves approximately the correct total ozone because of compensating errors. With increasing COD up to 20-40, the overall positive ORE increases and is finally dominated by the ICOAEN effect. The ICOAEN effect is typically 5-13 DU on average over the Atlantic and Africa and 1-7 DU over the Pacific for tropical high-altitude (cloud top pressure ≤300 hPa) and high-reflectivity (reflectivity ≥ 80%) clouds. Knowledge of TOMS ozone retrieval errors has important implications for remote sensing of ozone/trace gases from other satellite instruments

  17. Non-constant retardation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Gu Zhijie; Yang Yue'e; Li Shushen

    2004-12-01

    Retardation coefficient is one of the important parameters used in transport models describing radionuclide migration in geological media and usually regarded as a constant in the models. The objectives of the work are to understand: (1) Whether the retardation coefficient, R d , is a constant? (2) How much effect is R d on calculated consequence if R d is not constant? (3) Is the retardation coefficient derived from distribution coefficient, k d , according to conventional equation suitable for safety assessment? The objectives are achieved through test and analysis of the test results on radionuclide migration in unsaturated loess. It can be seen from the results that retardation coefficient, R d , of 85 Sr is not constant and increases with water content, θ, under unsaturated condition. R d , of 85 Sr derived from k d according to conventional equation can not be used for safety assessment. R d , used for safety assessment should be directly measured, rather than derived from k d . It is shown from calculation that the effect of R d on calculated consequence is very considerable. (authors)

  18. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  19. Fundamental physics constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, E.R.; Taylor, B.N.

    1995-01-01

    Present technological applications require the values used for the fundamental physical and chemical constants to be more and more precise and at the same time coherent. Great importance is then attached to the task of coordinating and comparing the most recent experimental data, extracting from them as a whole, by means of a least square fit, a set of values for the fundamental constants as precise and coherent as possible. The set of values which is at present in usage, derives from a fit performed in 1986, but new experimental results already promise a large reduction in the uncertainties of various constants. A new global fit that will implement such reductions is scheduled for completion in 1995 or 1996

  20. Influence of fatigue–life data modelling on the estimated reliability of a structure subjected to a constant-amplitude loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes how a selected material’s fatigue–life-curve model influences the calculated reliability of a structure subjected to a dynamic loading. A uni-axially loaded structural beam with a fully-reversal constant loading amplitude was considered. The reliability for a certain number of cycles-to-failure was calculated as a cross-section of the probability distributions representing the load–amplitude scatter and the scatter of the material’s fatigue–life curve. The probability density function (PDF) of the loading amplitude was modelled by a uniform and a Gaussian PDF. The scattered fatigue–life curve was modelled by a conditional two-parametric Weibull’s PDF. Its parameters were estimated using two procedures: (i) a two-phase procedure and (ii) a direct procedure. Following the two-phase procedure a conditional PDF of the number of cycles-to-failure was estimated first and then converted into a corresponding conditional PDF of the stress amplitudes. In the direct procedure the conditional PDF of the stress amplitudes was modelled directly from the fatigue–life data. The two procedures were tested on 12 sets of simulated fatigue–life data and a set of experimental fatigue–life data. The two fatigue–life-curve models for the experimental data set were applied for calculating the reliability for the selected structural beam. - Highlights: • Fatigue–life curves and their scatter were estimated by two procedures. • Both procedures enable consideration of run-outs for estimating the fatigue–life curves. • Conditional PDF of stress amplitudes at particular number-of-cycles-to-failure was Weibull PDF. • Influence of the applied procedures to the reliability of the structural part was studied

  1. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: I. Constant Pressure Decline Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report, focuses on the isothermal gas phase growth from a supersaturated, slightly compressible, binary liquid in a porous medium. This is driven by mass transfer, the extent of which is controlled by the application of either a constant-rate decline of the system pressure or the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. This report deals with the first process. Pressure depletion due to constant-rate liquid withdrawal is analyzed in a companion report .

  2. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality was tes...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  3. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  4. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most pote...

  5. A semi-Markov model for stroke with piecewise-constant hazards in the presence of left, right and interval censoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Venediktos; Matthews, Fiona E; van den Hout, Ardo

    2013-02-20

    This paper presents a parametric method of fitting semi-Markov models with piecewise-constant hazards in the presence of left, right and interval censoring. We investigate transition intensities in a three-state illness-death model with no recovery. We relax the Markov assumption by adjusting the intensity for the transition from state 2 (illness) to state 3 (death) for the time spent in state 2 through a time-varying covariate. This involves the exact time of the transition from state 1 (healthy) to state 2. When the data are subject to left or interval censoring, this time is unknown. In the estimation of the likelihood, we take into account interval censoring by integrating out all possible times for the transition from state 1 to state 2. For left censoring, we use an Expectation-Maximisation inspired algorithm. A simulation study reflects the performance of the method. The proposed combination of statistical procedures provides great flexibility. We illustrate the method in an application by using data on stroke onset for the older population from the UK Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Yamabe constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O Murchadha, N.

    1991-01-01

    The set of riemannian three-metrics with positive Yamabe constant defines the space of independent data for the gravitational field. The boundary of this set is investigated, and it is shown that metrics close to the boundary satisfy the positive-energy theorem. (Author) 18 refs

  7. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions has been ... A good deal of work has been reported on the preparation and structural investigation of. Schiff base ... Formation constants and thermodynamic parameters of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn complexes. Bull. Chem.

  8. Estimating the surface layer refractive index structure constant over snow and sea ice using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory with a mesoscale atmospheric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Honghua; Tian, Qiguo; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong; Li, Xuebin

    2016-09-05

    Since systematic direct measurements of refractive index structure constant ( Cn2) for many climates and seasons are not available, an indirect approach is developed in which Cn2 is estimated from the mesoscale atmospheric model outputs. In previous work, we have presented an approach that a state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model called Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory which can be used to estimate surface layer Cn2 over the ocean. Here this paper is focused on surface layer Cn2 over snow and sea ice, which is the extending of estimating surface layer Cn2 utilizing WRF model for ground-based optical application requirements. This powerful approach is validated against the corresponding 9-day Cn2 data from a field campaign of the 30th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). We employ several statistical operators to assess how this approach performs. Besides, we present an independent analysis of this approach performance using the contingency tables. Such a method permits us to provide supplementary key information with respect to statistical operators. These methods make our analysis more robust and permit us to confirm the excellent performances of this approach. The reasonably good agreement in trend and magnitude is found between estimated values and measurements overall, and the estimated Cn2 values are even better than the ones obtained by this approach over the ocean surface layer. The encouraging performance of this approach has a concrete practical implementation of ground-based optical applications over snow and sea ice.

  9. Non-dimensional characterization of the friction stir/spot welding process using a simple Couette flow model part I: Constant property Bingham plastic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Langerman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simplified model for the material flow created during a friction stir/spot welding process has been developed using a boundary driven cylindrical Couette flow model with a specified heat flux at the inner cylinder for a Bingham plastic material. Non-dimensionalization of the constant property governing equations identified three parameters that influence the velocity and temperature fields. Analytic solutions to these equations are presented and some representative results from a parametric study (parameters chosen and varied over ranges expected for the welding of a wide variety of metals) are discussed. The results also provide an expression for the critical radius (location of vanishing material velocity) as functions of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. A final study was conducted in which values for the non-dimensional heat flux parameter were chosen to produce peak dimensional temperatures on the order of 80% of the melting temperature for a typical 2000 series aluminum. Under these conditions it was discovered that the ratio of the maximum rate of shear work within the material (viscous dissipation) to the rate of energy input at the boundary due to frictional heating, ranged from about 0.0005% for the lowest pin tool rotation rate, to about 1.3% for the highest tool rotation rate studied. Curve fits to previous Gleeble data taken for a number of aluminum alloys provide reasonable justification for the Bingham plastic constitutive model, and although these fits indicate a strong temperature dependence for critical flow stress and viscosity, this work provides a simple tool for more sophisticated model validation. Part II of this study will present numerical solutions for velocity and temperature fields resulting from the non-linear coupling of the momentum and energy equations created by temperature dependent transport properties

  10. Photodissociation constant of NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nootebos, M.A.; Bange, P.

    1992-01-01

    The velocity of the dissociation of NO 2 into ozone and NO mainly depends on the ultraviolet sunlight quantity, and with that the cloudiness. A correct value for this reaction constant is important for the accurate modelling of O 3 - and NO 2 -concentrations in plumes of electric power plants, in particular in the case of determination of the amount of photochemical summer smog. An advanced signal processing method (deconvolution, correlation) was applied on the measurements. The measurements were carried out from aeroplanes

  11. 49 CFR 568.7 - Requirements for manufacturers who assume legal responsibility for a vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR MORE STAGES § 568.7 Requirements for manufacturers who assume legal responsibility for a vehicle. (a) If an incomplete vehicle manufacturer assumes legal responsibility for all duties and... 49 CFR 567.5(f). (b) If an intermediate manufacturer of a vehicle assumes legal responsibility for...

  12. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  13. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Modeling of Filtration Processes—Microfiltration and Depth Filtration for Harvest of a Therapeutic Protein Expressed in Pichia pastoris at Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Sampath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration steps are ubiquitous in biotech processes due to the simplicity of operation, ease of scalability and the myriad of operations that they can be used for. Microfiltration, depth filtration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are some of the most commonly used biotech unit operations. For clean feed streams, when fouling is minimal, scaling of these unit operations is performed linearly based on the filter area per unit volume of feed stream. However, for cases when considerable fouling occurs, such as the case of harvesting a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris, linear scaling may not be possible and current industrial practices involve use of 20–30% excess filter area over and above the calculated filter area to account for the uncertainty in scaling. In view of the fact that filters used for harvest are likely to have a very limited lifetime, this oversizing of the filters can add considerable cost of goods for the manufacturer. Modeling offers a way out of this conundrum. In this paper, we examine feasibility of using the various proposed models for filtration of a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris at constant pressure. It is observed that none of the individual models yield a satisfactory fit of the data, thus indicating that more than one fouling mechanism is at work. Filters with smaller pores were found to undergo fouling via complete pore blocking followed by cake filtration. On the other hand, filters with larger pores were found to undergo fouling via intermediate pore blocking followed by cake filtration. The proposed approach can be used for more accurate sizing of microfilters and depth filters.

  15. Production in constant evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant now has 25 years of operation behind it: a quarter century adding value and demonstrating the reasons why it is one of the most important energy producing facilities in the Spanish power market. Particularly noteworthy is the enterprising spirit of the plant, which has strived to continuously improve with the large number of modernization projects that it has undertaken over the past 25 years. The plant has constantly evolved thanks to the amount of investments made to improve safety and reliability and the perseverance to stay technologically up to date. Efficiency, training and teamwork have been key to the success of the plant over these 25 years of constant change and progress. (Author)

  16. Constant elevation in renal pelvic pressure induces an increase in urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in a nonobstructive porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, L C; Atala, A

    1998-01-01

    To clarify the physiological significance of renal pelvic pressure elevations encountered in the evaluation of hydronephrotic kidney we examined the effects of different levels of renal pelvic pressure on the induction of renal injury. A nonobstructive porcine model was created in which the urine drained against a constant predetermined pressure gradient. Renal pelvic pressure of 10, 20 and 40 cm. was created in 2, 2 and 4 animals, respectively. During 18 to 23 hours serial urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels were determined as an indicator of renal tubular injury. Tissue specimens were examined histologically and renal arterial blood flow was monitored. Urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels in the kidneys subjected to 10 cm. water remained essentially unchanged. However, at 20 and 40 cm. water statistically significant increases were observed. Similarly, renal arterial blood flow was unchanged at 10 cm. water but it became significantly lower than in controls at 20 and 40 cm. water. Histological evaluation revealed mild to moderate tubular dilatation in the kidneys subjected to 20 and 40 cm. water. Excessively high collecting system pressure induced renal cellular injury, as reflected by an increase in urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels. While renal pelvic pressure up to 10 cm. water appeared to be innocuous, renal cellular injury was evident within as little as 1 hour at renal pelvic pressures 20 cm. water or greater. The degree of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in the urine also correlated with a decrease in renal arterial blood flow.

  17. Convergence of high order memory kernels in the Nakajima-Zwanzig generalized master equation and rate constants: Case study of the spin-boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yan, Yaming; Liu, Yanying; Shi, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    The Nakajima-Zwanzig generalized master equation provides a formally exact framework to simulate quantum dynamics in condensed phases. Yet, the exact memory kernel is hard to obtain and calculations based on perturbative expansions are often employed. By using the spin-boson model as an example, we assess the convergence of high order memory kernels in the Nakajima-Zwanzig generalized master equation. The exact memory kernels are calculated by combining the hierarchical equation of motion approach and the Dyson expansion of the exact memory kernel. High order expansions of the memory kernels are obtained by extending our previous work to calculate perturbative expansions of open system quantum dynamics [M. Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 064102 (2017)]. It is found that the high order expansions do not necessarily converge in certain parameter regimes where the exact kernel show a long memory time, especially in cases of slow bath, weak system-bath coupling, and low temperature. Effectiveness of the Padé and Landau-Zener resummation approaches is tested, and the convergence of higher order rate constants beyond Fermi's golden rule is investigated.

  18. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose K.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-05

    The optical constants n and k can be used to model infrared spectra, including refraction, absorption, reflectance, and emissivity, but obtaining reliable values for solid materials (pure or otherwise) presents a challenge: In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, homogeneous materials, free of defects. That is, materials where the Fresnel equations are operant since there is no light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain a pure macroscopic (crystalline) material, it may be possible to press the material into a (uniform, void-free) disk. We have recently been able to do this with ammonium sulfate powder and then measured the n & k values via two independent methods: 1) Ellipsometry - which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) Single angle specular reflectance with an FT spectrometer using a specular reflectance device within an FT instrument which measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence over a wide wavelength range. The quality of the derived n & k values was tested by generating the reflectance spectra of the pellet and comparing to the calculated to measured reflectance spectra of the pure material which has been previously published. The comparison to literature values showed good accuracy and good agreement, indicating promise to measure other materials by such methods.

  19. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    important parameter in the field of atomic struc- ture. The values of the constants of ... tions in their core that produce carbon. As a result, .... atom in 1913. In other words, the size of a hydrogen atom is a factor α−2 ≈ 20000 times the size of an elec- tron. Another way of looking at α is to consider the ratio of the orbital speed of ...

  20. The cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellor, F.

    1989-01-01

    Astronomical observations predict to an extremely accurate degree that the cosmological term in Einstein's equations should be zero. This conflicts with the predictions from particle theories of a non-zero cosmological term. Attempts to resolve this paradox range from arguments based on the anthropic principle to supersymmetric theories to quantum cosmological proposals. These approaches are discussed here and the history of the cosmological constant is reviewed. (author)

  1. The Hubble Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H 0 values of around 72-74 km s -1 Mpc -1 , with typical errors of 2-3 km s -1 Mpc -1 . This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s -1 Mpc -1 and typical errors of 1-2 km s -1 Mpc -1 . The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  2. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horatiu Nastase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now.

  3. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastase, Horatiu, E-mail: nastase@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Weltman, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.weltman@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology & Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2015-07-30

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  4. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastase, Horatiu; Weltman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  5. Model of the process with piecewise-constant extremals to minimize losses of vitamins during the melting of melons and gourds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Inochkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The extension of periods of storage of fruits of gourds is an urgent task processing industry. The most developed and available for injection is a method of dehydration of raw materials due to supply of heat transfer fluids. In addition to solid dry frame in raw materials is 80–90% water. In the period of moisture removal from raw material changes of thermal-physical and structural-mechanical and physicochemical characteristics. The ratio of water and dry matter in vegetative raw materials largely determines the modes of drying and storage conditions of the finished product. During drying, there are a number of limitations: the drying temperature should not exceed the degradation temperature of vitamins and proteins, and the magnitude of course, the moisture content of the product depends on the reaction prevention malonodinitrile sugars at the critical moisture content. An important problem of the drying of production is quality control stages of drying, the dynamics of which is quite difficult to describe using mathematical models. The main factors of optimization of industrial drying processes is preservation of valuable components of the feedstock, the drying time, energy and resource conservation. Development of effective control algorithm for the process of dehydration of raw materials described in the article on the example of drying of slices of melon. Experimental approach a two-stage process of drying of melon varieties Taman, the proposed regression model with the relaxation-based on humidity and content of vitamin C from the variable in time temperature and pressure, based on the available literature and own experimental data. According to the optimal control of the drying process to search for the thermobaric regime that maximizes the vitamin C content at the end of the drying, under specified conditions, the humidity. The main findings are the solution of the problem for the case of piecewise constant temperature and pressure in

  6. Elastic-plastic and creep analyses by assumed stress finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pian, T.H.H.; Spilker, R.L.; Lee, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    A formulation is presented of incremental finite element solutions for both initial stress and initial strain problems based on modified complementary energy principle with relaxed inter-element continuity requirement. The corresponding finite element model is the assumed stress hybrid model which has stress parameters in the interior of each element and displacements at the individual nodes as unknowns. The formulation includes an important consideration that the states of stress and strain and the beginning of each increment may not satisfy the equilibrium and compatibility equations. These imbalance and mismatch conditions all lead to correction terms for the equivalent nodal forces of the matrix equations. The initial stress method is applied to elastic-plastic analysis of structures. In this case the stress parameters for the individual elements can be eliminated resulting to a system of equations with only nodal displacements as unknowns. Two different complementary energy principles can be formulated, in one of which the equilibrium of the final state of stress is maintained while in the other the equilibrium of the stress increments is maintained. Each of these two different formulations can be combined with different iterative schemes to be used at each incremental steps of the elastic-plastic analysis. It is also indicated clearly that for the initial stress method the state of stress at the beginning of each increments is in general, not in equilibrium and an imbalance correction is needed. Results of a comprehensive evaluation of various solution procedures by the initial stress method using the assumed stress hybrid elements are presented. The example used is the static response of a thick wall cylinder of elastic-perfectly plastic material under internal pressure. Solid of revolution elements with rectangular cross sections are used

  7. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  8. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (orA-term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  9. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  10. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  11. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and kinetic modeling applied to near-infrared data from curing reactions of epoxy resins: mechanistic approach and estimation of kinetic rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2006-02-01

    This study describes the combination of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares with a kinetic modeling strategy for obtaining the kinetic rate constants of a curing reaction of epoxy resins. The reaction between phenyl glycidyl ether and aniline is monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy under isothermal conditions for several initial molar ratios of the reagents. The data for all experiments, arranged in a column-wise augmented data matrix, are analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. The concentration profiles recovered are fitted to a chemical model proposed for the reaction. The selection of the kinetic model is assisted by the information contained in the recovered concentration profiles. The nonlinear fitting provides the kinetic rate constants. The optimized rate constants are in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  12. Analytical estimation of the gravitational constant with atomic and nuclear physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshavatharam, U.V.S.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    2015-01-01

    If N A represents the Avogadro's number, gravitational constant associated with atomic electromagnetic interaction can be expressed as G E ≅ N 2 A G. With G E and with the assumed two new pseudo numbers x ≈ 38.725 and y ≈ 47.415, value of G can be fixed for 10 digits in a verifiable approach. (x, y) can be called as the back ground analytical numbers using by which micro-macro physical constants can be interlinked qualitatively and quantitatively

  13. Type Ia Supernovae Progenitor Problem and the Variation of Fundamental Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybicki M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological observations strongly suggest our universe is the interior of an expanding black hole. If the constant mass of the universe is assumed then from the equation for Schwarzschild radius: r S = 2 Gmc it follows that proportionality constant Gc depends linearly on the universe’s radius R u , identified with r S , i.e. Gc Because the Chandrasekhar limit M Ch relates to the speed of light and to the Newton’s constant as M Ch ( c = G 3 = 2 so expansion involves gradual decrease of M Ch . In result, a single white dwarf can alone become the Type Ia supernova progenitor, which provides a complementary solution to single-degenerate and double-degenerate models for SNe Ia. Both alternative scenarios: G R u and c R are analyzed in regard of their consistence with observations, and their consequences to cosmology.

  14. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2017-05-01

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Scalar-tensor cosmology with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslanka, K.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with cosmological constant in the case of homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model can be reduced to dynamical system of three differential equations with unknown functions H=R/R, THETA=phi/phi, S=e/phi. When new variables are introduced the system becomes more symmetrical and cosmological solutions R(t), phi(t), e(t) are found. It is shown that when cosmological constant is introduced large class of solutions which depend also on Dicke-Brans parameter can be obtained. Investigations of these solutions give general limits for cosmological constant and mean density of matter in plane model. (author)

  16. Un saludo constante

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo Ortega, Manuela; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Cali

    2013-01-01

    La presencia familiar estará siempre en mi vida: Creo que esa unión va más allá de los lazos que creamos en ese primer abrir de ojos del nacimiento pues los lazos se fortalecen con el tiempo. Es que esos lazos van de la genética al riñón y puede que suene muy raro, pero esta es mi enfermedad, la primera y la constante, la que desaparece y reaparece, la heredada y la que cada vez que me saluda, deja su huella. Comenzó hace 16 años. Mis infecciones urinarias fueron el comienzo de muchas maluque...

  17. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  18. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio insurance, as practiced in 1987, consisted of trading between an underlying stock portfolio and cash, using option theory to place a floor on the value of the position, as if it included a protective put. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance (CPPI) is an option-free variation...... on the theme, originally proposed by Fischer Black. In CPPI, a financial institution guarantees a floor value for the “insured” portfolio and adjusts the stock/bond mix to produce a leveraged exposure to the risky assets, which depends on how far the portfolio value is above the floor. Plain-vanilla portfolio...... insurance largely died with the crash of 1987, but CPPI is still going strong. In the frictionless markets of finance theory, the issuer’s strategy to hedge its liability under the contract is clear, but in the real world with transactions costs and stochastic jump risk, the optimal strategy is less obvious...

  19. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal income tax. (a) The assumed Federal income tax on competitive products income shall be based on the Postal Service theoretical competitive products enterprise income statement for the relevant year... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax...

  20. Wetware, Hardware, or Software Incapacitation: Observational Methods to Determine When Autonomy Should Assume Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2014-01-01

    Control-theoretic modeling of human operator's dynamic behavior in manual control tasks has a long, rich history. There has been significant work on techniques used to identify the pilot model of a given structure. This research attempts to go beyond pilot identification based on experimental data to develop a predictor of pilot behavior. Two methods for pre-dicting pilot stick input during changing aircraft dynamics and deducing changes in pilot behavior are presented This approach may also have the capability to detect a change in a subject due to workload, engagement, etc., or the effects of changes in vehicle dynamics on the pilot. With this ability to detect changes in piloting behavior, the possibility now exists to mediate human adverse behaviors, hardware failures, and software anomalies with autono-my that may ameliorate these undesirable effects. However, appropriate timing of when au-tonomy should assume control is dependent on criticality of actions to safety, sensitivity of methods to accurately detect these adverse changes, and effects of changes in levels of auto-mation of the system as a whole.

  1. Integrating a Smartphone and Molecular Modeling for Determining the Binding Constant and Stoichiometry Ratio of the Iron(II)-Phenanthroline Complex: An Activity for Analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; Silva, Se´rgio R. B.; Vieira, Davi S.; Lima, Ka´ssio M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The binding constant and stoichiometry ratio for the formation of iron(II)-(1,10-phenanthroline) or iron(II)-o-phenanthroline complexes has been determined by a combination of a low-cost analytical method using a smartphone and a molecular modeling method as a laboratory experiment designed for analytical and physical chemistry courses. Intensity…

  2. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    be made arbitrarily small—and thus the credit rating arbitrarily high—by increasing leverage, but the ratings obtained strongly depend on assumptions on the credit environment (high spread or low spread). More importantly, CPDO loss distributions are found to exhibit a wide range of tail risk measures......Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from...... the major rating agencies, based on complex models for the joint transition of ratings and spreads for all names in the underlying portfolio. We propose a parsimonious model for analysing the performance of CPDO strategies using a top-down approach that captures the essential risk factors of the CPDO. Our...

  3. Assuming it is all about conditions : Framing a simulation model for complex, adaptive urban space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamu, Claudia; de Roo, Gert; Frankhauser, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the route beyond the conventional, linear attitude within planning and its rationality debate. We combine our theoretical reasoning with a multiscale approach and with fractal-like argumentation which results in a frame of conditions which is supported by the outline of a

  4. Prediction of ion-exchange column breakthrough curves by constant-pattern wave approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Hsien; Kuan, Yu-Chung; Chern, Jia-Ming

    2008-03-21

    The release of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters represents one of major threats to environment. Compared with chemical precipitation method, fixed-bed ion-exchange process can effectively remove heavy metals from wastewaters and generate no hazardous sludge. In order to design and operate fixed-bed ion-exchange processes successfully, it is very important to understand the column dynamics. In this study, the column experiments for Cu2+/H+, Zn2+/H+, and Cd2+/H+ systems using Amberlite IR-120 were performed to measure the breakthrough curves under varying operating conditions. The experimental results showed that total cation concentration in the mobile-phase played a key role on the breakthrough curves; a higher feed concentration resulted in an earlier breakthrough. Furthermore, the column dynamics was also predicted by self-sharpening and constant-pattern wave models. The self-sharpening wave model assuming local ion-exchange equilibrium could provide a simple and quick estimation for the breakthrough volume, but the predicted breakthrough curves did not match the experimental data very well. On the contrary, the constant-pattern wave model using a constant driving force model for finite ion-exchange rate provided a better fit to the experimental data. The obtained liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient was correlated to the flow velocity and other operating parameters; the breakthrough curves under varying operating conditions could thus be predicted by the constant-pattern wave model using the correlation.

  5. The Nature of the Cosmological Constant Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, M. D.; Capistrano, A. J. S.; Monte, E. M.

    General relativity postulates the Minkowski space-time as the standard (flat) geometry against which we compare all curved space-times and also as the gravitational ground state where particles, quantum fields and their vacua are defined. On the other hand, experimental evidences tell that there exists a non-zero cosmological constant, which implies in a deSitter ground state, which not compatible with the assumed Minkowski structure. Such inconsistency is an evidence of the missing standard of curvature in Riemann's geometry, which in general relativity manifests itself in the form of the cosmological constant problem. We show how the lack of a curvature standard in Riemann's geometry can be fixed by Nash's theorem on metric perturbations. The resulting higher dimensional gravitational theory is more general than general relativity, similar to brane-world gravity, but where the propagation of the gravitational field along the extra dimensions is a mathematical necessity, rather than a postulate. After a brief introduction to Nash's theorem, we show that the vacuum energy density must remain confined to four-dimensional space-times, but the cosmological constant resulting from the contracted Bianchi identity represents a gravitational term which is not confined. In this case, the comparison between the vacuum energy and the cosmological constant in general relativity does not make sense. Instead, the geometrical fix provided by Nash's theorem suggests that the vacuum energy density contributes to the perturbations of the gravitational field.

  6. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  7. Prospects for carbon capture and sequestration technologies assuming their technological learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riahi, Keywan; Rubin, Edward S.; Schrattenholzer, Leo

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes potentials of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS) in a set of long-term energy-economic-environmental scenarios based on alternative assumptions for technological progress of CCS. In order to get a reasonable guide to future technological progress in managing CO 2 emissions, we review past experience in controlling sulfur dioxide emissions (SO 2 ) from power plants. By doing so, we quantify a 'learning curve' for CCS, which describes the relationship between the improvement of costs due to accumulation of experience in CCS construction. We incorporate the learning curve into the energy modeling framework MESSAGE-MACRO and develop greenhouse gas emissions scenarios of economic, demographic, and energy demand development, where alternative policy cases lead to the stabilization of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations at 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) by the end of the 21st century. Due to the assumed technological learning, costs of the emissions reduction for CCS drop rapidly and in parallel with the massive introduction of CCS on the global scale. Compared to scenarios based on static cost assumptions for CCS, the contribution of carbon sequestration is about 50 percent higher in the case of learning resulting in cumulative sequestration of CO 2 ranging from 150 to 250 billion (10 9 ) tons carbon during the 21st century. The results illustrate that carbon capture and sequestration is one of the obvious priority candidates for long-term technology policies and enhanced R and D efforts to hedge against the risk associated with high environmental impacts of climate change

  8. The fermion propagator in cosmological spaces with constant deceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koksma, J.F.; Prokopec, T.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the fermion propagator in Friedmann–Lemaˆıtre–Robertson– Walker (FLRW) spacetimeswith constant deceleration q = −1, = −H˙ /H2 for excited states. For fermions whose mass is generated by a scalar field through a Yukawa coupling m = gYφ, we assume φ ∝α H. We first solve the mode functions

  9. Assuming a Pharmacy Organization Leadership Position: A Guide for Pharmacy Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Blake; Weber, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Important and influential pharmacy organization leadership positions, such as president, board member, or committee chair, are volunteer positions and require a commitment of personal and professional time. These positions provide excellent opportunities for leadership development, personal promotion, and advancement of the profession. In deciding to assume a leadership position, interested individuals must consider the impact on their personal and professional commitments and relationships, career planning, employer support, current and future department projects, employee support, and personal readiness. This article reviews these factors and also provides an assessment tool that leaders can use to determine their readiness to assume leadership positions. By using an assessment tool, pharmacy leaders can better understand their ability to assume an important and influential leadership position while achieving job and personal goals.

  10. Bowing-reactivity trends in EBR-II assuming zero-swelling ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-01-01

    Predicted trends of duct-bowing reactivities for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are correlated with predicted row-wise duct deflections assuming use of idealized zero-void-swelling subassembly ducts. These assume no irradiation induced swellings of ducts but include estimates of the effects of irradiation-creep relaxation of thermally induced bowing stresses. The results illustrate the manners in which at-power creeps may affect subsequent duct deflections at zero power and thereby the trends of the bowing component of a subsequent power reactivity decrement

  11. Numerical analysis of dependence between adapted mesh and assumed error indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucwaj, Jan

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers the influence of the assumed error indicator on the final adapted mesh. Provided that threshold values of an error are increased by applying the adaptive procedure, it turns out that final mesh depends on the assumed error indicator. In the paper, there were used the standard error estimates and the error indicator proposed by the author. The proposed error indicator is based on applying hierarchically generalized finite difference method (FDM). In the case of the proposed error indicator, the final adapted mesh is the most optimal for the exact solution.

  12. The cosmological constant in theories with finite spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, Janis

    2014-08-01

    We study the role of the cosmological constant in different theories with finite spacetime. The cosmological constant appears both as an initial condition and as a constant of integration. In the context of the cosmological constant problem a new model will be presented. This modification of general relativity generates a small, non-vanishing cosmological constant, which is radiatively stable. The dynamics of the expansion of the universe in this model will be analyzed. Eventually, we try to solve the emergent problems concerning the generation of accelerated expansion using a quintessence model of dark energy.

  13. Investigation of Thermal Processes in Two-Layer Materials Exposed to High-Energy Heavy Ions in the Framework of a Thermal Peak Model with Constant Thermal Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirkhanov, I V; Muzafarov, D Z; Puzynin, I V; Puzynina, T P; Sarker, N R; Sarhadov, I; Sharipov, Z A

    2005-01-01

    A system of equations for temperatures of electronic gas and lattice around and along a trajectory of a 710-MeV heavy ion of bismuth $^{209}$Bi in a two-layer material Ni(2 $\\mu $m)/W at constant thermal parameters is solved numerically in an axial-symmetric cylindrical system of coordinates. On the basis of the obtained dependences of lattice temperature on radius around the ion trajectory and depth, one can make a conclusion that the ionization energy losses of bismuth ion in the target material are sufficient for melting. The sizes of regions with maximum radius and depth in the target material, where the phase transformations can take place, are estimated.

  14. Assuming measurement invariance of background indicators in international comparative educational achievement studies: a challenge for the interpretation of achievement differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Wendt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale cross-national studies designed to measure student achievement use different social, cultural, economic and other background variables to explain observed differences in that achievement. Prior to their inclusion into a prediction model, these variables are commonly scaled into latent background indices. To allow cross-national comparisons of the latent indices, measurement invariance is assumed. However, it is unclear whether the assumption of measurement invariance has some influence on the results of the prediction model, thus challenging the reliability and validity of cross-national comparisons of predicted results. Methods To establish the effect size attributed to different degrees of measurement invariance, we rescaled the ‘home resource for learning index’ (HRL for the 37 countries ( $$n=166,709$$ n = 166 , 709 students that participated in the IEA’s combined ‘Progress in International Reading Literacy Study’ (PIRLS and ‘Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study’ (TIMSS assessments of 2011. We used (a two different measurement models [one-parameter model (1PL and two-parameter model (2PL] with (b two different degrees of measurement invariance, resulting in four different models. We introduced the different HRL indices as predictors in a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM with mathematics achievement as the dependent variable. We then compared three outcomes across countries and by scaling model: (1 the differing fit-values of the measurement models, (2 the estimated discrimination parameters, and (3 the estimated regression coefficients. Results The least restrictive measurement model fitted the data best, and the degree of assumed measurement invariance of the HRL indices influenced the random effects of the GLMM in all but one country. For one-third of the countries, the fixed effects of the GLMM also related to the degree of assumed measurement invariance. Conclusion The

  15. The Ability to Assume the Upright Position in Blind and Sighted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipsman, Sandra Curtis

    To investigate the ability of 48 blind and partially sighted children (8 to 10 and 12 to 14 years old) to assume the upright position, Ss were given six trials in which they were requested to move themselves from a tilted starting position in a specially constructed chair to an upright position. No significant differences were found between three…

  16. Anti-periodic solutions for recurrent neural networks without assuming global Lipschitz conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays and continuously distributed delays. Without assuming global Lipschitz conditions on the activation functions, we establish the existence and local exponential stability of anti-periodic solutions.

  17. Does the Advice to Assume the Knee-Chest Position at the 36th to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the intervention group assumed the knee-chest position for 15 minutes three times a day for one week. The control group had 53 cases. The study and control groups were reviewed after a week to assess the fetal presentation. The version rate was 61% and 20% in intervention and in control groups, respectively (P value ...

  18. On the Estimation of Complex Speech DFT Coefficients Without Assuming Independent Real and Imaginary Parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, J.S.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.

    2008-01-01

    This letter considers the estimation of speech signals contaminated by additive noise in the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) domain. Existing complex-DFT estimators assume independency of the real and imaginary parts of the speech DFT coefficients, although this is not in line with measurements. In

  19. Some considerations on displacement assumed finite elements with the reduced numerical integration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.; Isha, H.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the displacement-assumed-finite elements by applying the reduced numerical integration technique in structural problems. The first part is a general consideration on the technique. Its purpose is to examine a variational interpretation of the finite element displacement formulation with the reduced integration technique in structural problems. The formulation is critically studied from a standpoint of the natural stiffness approach. It is shown that these types of elements are equivalent to a certain type of displacement and stress assumed mixed elements. The rank deficiency of the stiffness matrix of these elements is interpreted as a problem in the transformation from the natural system to a Cartesian system. It will be shown that a variational basis of the equivalent mixed formulation is closely related to the Hellinger-Reissner's functional. It is presented that for simple elements, e.g. bilinear quadrilateral plane stress and plate bending there are corresponding mixed elements from the functional. For relatively complex types of these elements, it is shown that they are equivalent to localized mixed elements from the Hellinger-Reissner's functional. In the second part, typical finite elements with the reduced integration technique are studied to demonstrate this equivalence. A bilinear displacement and rotation assumed shear beam element, a bilinear displacement assumed quadrilateral plane stress element and a bilinear deflection and rotation assumed quadrilateral plate bending element are examined to present equivalent mixed elements. Not only the theoretical consideration is presented but numerical studies are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of these elements in practical analysis. (orig.)

  20. Conformally invariant braneworld and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, E.I.

    2004-01-01

    A six-dimensional braneworld scenario based on a model describing the interaction of gravity, gauge fields and 3+1 branes in a conformally invariant way is described. The action of the model is defined using a measure of integration built of degrees of freedom independent of the metric. There is no need to fine tune any bulk cosmological constant or the tension of the two (in the scenario described here) parallel branes to obtain zero cosmological constant, the only solutions are those with zero 4D cosmological constant. The two extra dimensions are compactified in a 'football' fashion and the branes lie on the two opposite poles of the compact 'football-shaped' sphere

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charg...

  2. Implications of a decay law for the cosmological constant in higher dimensional cosmology and cosmological wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, El-Nabulsi Ahmad [Cheju National University (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engineering

    2009-09-15

    Higher dimensional cosmological implications of a decay law for the cosmological constant term are analyzed. Three independent cosmological models are explored mainly: 1) In the first model, the effective cosmological constant was chosen to decay with times like {delta}{sub effective} = Ca{sup -2} + D(b/a{sub I}){sup 2} where a{sub I} is an arbitrary scale factor characterizing the isotropic epoch which proceeds the graceful exit period. Further, the extra-dimensional scale factor decays classically like b(t) approx. a{sup x}(t), x is a real negative number. 2) In the second model, we adopt in addition to {delta}{sub effective} = Ca{sup -2} + D(b/a{sub I}){sup 2} the phenomenological law b(t) = a(t)exp( -Qt) as we expect that at the origin of time, there is no distinction between the visible and extra dimensions; Q is a real number. 3) In the third model, we study a {delta} - decaying extra-dimensional cosmology with a static traversable wormhole in which the four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime is subject to the conventional perfect fluid while the extra-dimensional part is endowed by an exotic fluid violating strong energy condition and where the cosmological constant in (3+n+1) is assumed to decays like {delta}(a) = 3Ca{sup -2}. The three models are discussed and explored in some details where many interesting points are revealed. (author)

  3. A determination of H-0 with the class gravitational lens B1608+656. II. Mass models and the Hubble constant from lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, LVE; Fassnacht, CD

    1999-01-01

    We present mass models of the four-image gravitational lens system B1608 + 656, based on information obtained through VLBA imaging, VLA monitoring, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS imaging. We have determined a mass model for the lens galaxies that reproduces (1) all image positions

  4. Project of computer program for designing the steel with the assumed CCT diagram

    OpenAIRE

    S. Malara; J. Trzaska; L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was developing a project of computer aided method for designing the chemicalcomposition of steel with the assumed CCT diagram.Design/methodology/approach: The purpose has been achieved in four stages. At the first stage characteristicpoints of CCT diagram have been determined. At the second stage neural networks have been developed, andnext CCT diagram terms of similarity have been worked out- at the third one. In the last one steel chemicalcomposition optimizat...

  5. DETERMINATION OF RATE CONSTANT AND STABILITY OF ADSORPTION IN COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION OF Cr(III AND Cd(II ON HUMIC ACID BY USING THE NEW MODEL OF KINETIC FORMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of rate and stability constants of adsorption in competitive adsorption of Cr(III and Cd(II on humic acid by using the new model of kinetic formulation has been done. The new model based on assumption that those adsorption was first order adsorption rearched equilibrium. Humic acid was isolated from Peat moss of Silaut- West Sumatra by modificated Schnitzer method. Humic acid characterization was conducted by using infrared spectrophotometer with KBR pellet method. The experiment of kinetic adsorption was conducted in batch system reactor using erlenmeyer at 25 ± 0.01 oC of water steam bath and in a series of sampling procedure. Initial concentration of both Cr(III and Cd(II was 4x10-4 M. Thirty milligrams of humic acid was added to 200 mL of metal solution, and then stirred continuously. At the fixed periode of time, 10 mL of sample was taken using a syringe, then filterd with 0.45 µm filter paper. Concentration of Cr(III and Cd(II in the filtrate was determinated by AAS, while that was adsorbed by humic acid was equal to difference between initial and equilibrium concentration. It was concluded that competitive adsorption of Cr(III and Cd(II on humic acid was first order adsorption rearched equilibrium as proposed in this research. Adsorption rate constant of Cr(III on humic acid  at competitive condition was greater than of Cd(II, but on the contrary for stability constant (K. Competition between Cr(III and Cd(II to interact with the active side of humic acid was dominated by Cr(III.   Keywords: rate constant, stability and competitive adsorption

  6. Accessibility versus accuracy in retrieving spatial memory: evidence for suboptimal assumed headings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramsetti, Ashok; Marchette, Steven A; Shelton, Amy L

    2013-07-01

    Orientation dependence in spatial memory has often been interpreted in terms of accessibility: Object locations are encoded relative to a reference orientation that affords the most accurate access to spatial memory. An open question, however, is whether people naturally use this "preferred" orientation whenever recalling the space. We tested this question by asking participants to locate buildings on a familiar campus from various imagined locations, without specifying the heading to be assumed. We then used these pointing judgments to infer the approximate heading participants assumed at each location. Surprisingly, each location showed a unique assumed heading that was consistent across participants and seemed to reflect episodic or visual properties of the space. This result suggests that although locations are encoded relative to a reference orientation, other factors may influence how people choose to access the stored information and whether they appeal to long-term spatial memory or other more sensory-based stores. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. The impact of assumed knowledge entry standards on undergraduate mathematics teaching in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deborah; Cattlin, Joann

    2015-10-01

    Over the last two decades, many Australian universities have relaxed their selection requirements for mathematics-dependent degrees, shifting from hard prerequisites to assumed knowledge standards which provide students with an indication of the prior learning that is expected. This has been regarded by some as a positive move, since students who may be returning to study, or who are changing career paths but do not have particular prerequisite study, now have more flexible pathways. However, there is mounting evidence to indicate that there are also significant negative impacts associated with assumed knowledge approaches, with large numbers of students enrolling in degrees without the stated assumed knowledge. For students, there are negative impacts on pass rates and retention rates and limitations to pathways within particular degrees. For institutions, the necessity to offer additional mathematics subjects at a lower level than normal and more support services for under-prepared students impacts on workloads and resources. In this paper, we discuss early research from the First Year in Maths project, which begins to shed light on the realities of a system that may in fact be too flexible.

  8. Determination of stability constants using genetic algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnett, Margaret K.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.; Diamond, Dermot

    1995-01-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA)-simplex hybrid approach has been developed for the determination of stability constants using calorimetric and polarographic data obtained from literature sources. The GA determined both the most suitable equilibrium model for the systems studied and the values of the

  9. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, James G; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry and drained constants, which are assumed known, and the saturated or undrained constants, which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the effects of the fluids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore fluid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  10. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: Drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.; Nakagawa, S.

    2009-11-20

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry or drained constants which are assumed known and the saturated or undrained constants which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the eects of the uids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore uid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  11. The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  12. The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  13. Assessing the environmental fate of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the region surrounding the Zhuoshui River of Taiwan based on an Equilibrium Constant fugacity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Kieran; Doherty, Rory; Robinson, Jill; Chiang, Wen-Son; Kao Kao, Ruey-Chy

    2015-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a group of flame retardants that have been in use since the 1970s. They are included in the list of hazardous substances known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) because they are extremely hazardous to the environment and human health. PBDEs have been extensively used in industry and manufacturing in Taiwan, thus its citizens are at high risk of exposure to these chemicals. An assessment of the environmental fate of these compounds in the Zhuoshui river and Changhua County regions of western Taiwan, and also including the adjacent area of the Taiwan Strait, was conducted for three high risk congeners, BDE-47, -99 and -209, to obtain information regarding the partitioning, advection, transfer and long range transport potential of the PBDEs in order to identify the level of risk posed by the pollutants in this region. The results indicate that large amounts of PBDEs presently reside in all model compartments - air, soil, water, and sediment - with particularly high levels found in air and especially in sediment. The high levels found in sediment, particularly for BDE-209, are significant, since there is the threat of these pollutants entering the food chain, either directly through benthic feeding, or through resuspension and subsequent feeding in the pelagic region of the water column which is a distinct possibility in the strong currents found within the Taiwan Strait. Another important result is that a substantial portion of emissions leave the model domain directly through advection, particularly for BDE-47 (58%) and BDE-209 (75%), thus posing a risk to adjacent communities. Model results were generally in reasonable agreement with available measured concentrations. In air, model concentrations are in reasonably good agreement with available measured values. For both BDE-47 and -99, model concentrations are a factor of 2-3 higher and BDE-209 within the range of measured values. In soil, model results are somewhat

  14. Understanding fine structure constants and three generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.L.; Nielsen, H.B.

    1988-02-01

    We put forward a model inspired by random dynamics that relates the smallness of the gauge coupling constants to the number of generations being 'large'. The new element in the present version of our model is the appearance of a free parameter χ that is a measure of the (presumably relatively minor) importance of a term in the plaquette action proportional to the trace in the (1/6, 2, 3) representation of the Standard Model. Calling N gen the number of generations, the sets of allowed (N gen , χN gen )-pairs obtained by imposing the three measured coupling constant values of the Standard Model form three lines. In addition to finding that these lines cross at a single point (as needed for a consistent fit), the intersection occurs with surprising accuracy at the integer N gen = 3 (thereby predicting exactly three generations). It is also encouraging that the parameter χ turns out to be small and positive as expected. (orig.)

  15. Derivation of the optical constants of anisotropic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.; Strong, P. F.

    1985-07-01

    This report concerns the development of methods for obtaining the optical constants of anisotropic crystals of the triclinic and monoclinic systems. The principal method used, classical dispersion theory, is adapted to these crystal systems by extending the Lorentz line parameters to include the angles characterizing the individual resonances, and by replacing the dielectric constant by a dielectric tensor. The sample crystals are gypsium, orthoclase and chalcanthite. The derived optical constants are shown to be suitable for modeling the optical properties of particulate media in the infrared spectral region. For those materials where suitable size single crystals are not available, an extension of a previously used method is applied to alabaster, a polycrystalline material of the monoclinic crystal system.

  16. Fast optimization algorithms and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ning; Bousso, Raphael; Jordan, Stephen; Lackey, Brad

    2017-11-01

    Denef and Douglas have observed that in certain landscape models the problem of finding small values of the cosmological constant is a large instance of a problem that is hard for the complexity class NP (Nondeterministic Polynomial-time). The number of elementary operations (quantum gates) needed to solve this problem by brute force search exceeds the estimated computational capacity of the observable Universe. Here we describe a way out of this puzzling circumstance: despite being NP-hard, the problem of finding a small cosmological constant can be attacked by more sophisticated algorithms whose performance vastly exceeds brute force search. In fact, in some parameter regimes the average-case complexity is polynomial. We demonstrate this by explicitly finding a cosmological constant of order 10-120 in a randomly generated 1 09-dimensional Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Kachru landscape.

  17. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  18. Effects of quantum entropy on bag constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.E.; Tawfik, A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of quantum entropy on the bag constant are studied at low temperatures and for small chemical potentials. The inclusion of the quantum entropy of the quarks in the equation of state provides the hadronic bag with an additional heat which causes a decrease in the effective latent heat inside the bag. We have considered two types of baryonic bags, Δ and Ω - . In both cases we have found that the bag constant without the quantum entropy almost does not change with temperature and quark chemical potential. The contribution from the quantum entropy to the equation of state clearly decreases the value of the bag constant. Furthermore, we construct states densities for quarks using the 'Thomas Fermi model' and take into consideration a thermal potential for the interaction. (author)

  19. Pure odd-order oscillators with constant excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the excited vibrations of a truly nonlinear oscillator are analyzed. The excitation is assumed to be constant and the nonlinearity is pure (without a linear term). The mathematical model is a second-order nonhomogeneous differential equation with strong nonlinear term. Using the first integral, the exact value of period of vibration i.e., angular frequency of oscillator described with a pure nonlinear differential equation with constant excitation is analytically obtained. The closed form solution has the form of gamma function. The period of vibration depends on the value of excitation and of the order and coefficient of the nonlinear term. For the case of pure odd-order-oscillators the approximate solution of differential equation is obtained in the form of trigonometric function. The solution is based on the exact value of period of vibration. For the case when additional small perturbation of the pure oscillator acts, the so called 'Cveticanin's averaging method' for a truly nonlinear oscillator is applied. Two special cases are considered: one, when the additional term is a function of distance, and the second, when damping acts. To prove the correctness of the method the obtained results are compared with those for the linear oscillator. Example of pure cubic oscillator with constant excitation and linear damping is widely discussed. Comparing the analytically obtained results with exact numerical ones it is concluded that they are in a good agreement. The investigations reported in the paper are of special interest for those who are dealing with the problem of vibration reduction in the oscillator with constant excitation and pure nonlinear restoring force the examples of which can be found in various scientific and engineering systems. For example, such mechanical systems are seats in vehicles, supports for machines, cutting machines with periodical motion of the cutting tools, presses, etc. The examples can be find in electronics

  20. The effects of reasoning, use of models, sex type, and their interactions on posttest achievement in chemical bonding after constant instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to determine the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Eighty-four high school students taking chemistry were randomly assigned within their classes to models and no models groups for the posttest. Reasoning capabilities were assessed by the Piagetian Logical Operations Test (PLOT) (Staver & Gabel, JRST, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1979), prior to instruction. All students then received the same instruction on chemical bonding which included teacher demonstrations of concepts with three-dimensional molecular models, interspersed teacher questions during the introduction and development of concepts, student manipulation of three-dimensional molecular models during laboratory experiments, and text reading assignments on concepts prior to their instruction in class. The posttest on molecular geometry and shape contained three sections requiring memory and application (Bloom, Taxonomy of educational objective, handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay, 1956). Data were analyzed by regression (Nie et al., Statistical package for the social sciences, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975). Results indicate that reasoning accounted for a significant portion (p sex type did not account for a significant (p > 0.05) portion of the variance on total scores or any section of posttest. The three-way interaction of reasoning, model usage, and sex type accounted for a significant portion (p < 0.05) of the variance in total scores, and in the memory and application sections of the posttest. Discussion focused on the results, conclusions, and implications for science teaching.

  1. On a delay differential equation arising from a car-following model: Wavefront solutions with constant-speed and their stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stumpf, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of a scalar delay differential equation \\begin{equation*} z^{\\prime\\prime}(t)=h^2\\,V(z(t-1)-z(t))+h\\,z^\\prime(t) \\end{equation*} motivated by a simple car-following model on an unbounded straight line. Here, the positive real $h$ denotes some parameter, and $V$ is a so-called \\textit{optimal velocity function} of the traffic model involved. We analyze the existence and local stability properties of solutions $z(t)=c\\,t+d$, $t\\in\\mathbb{R}$, with $c,d\\in\\m...

  2. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  3. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  4. Similarity, agreement, and assumed similarity in proxy end-of-life decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade-Montez, Elizabeth; Watson, David; Beer, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Medical decisions near the end of life are often made by proxies who can be inaccurate in their judgments of patient preferences. Given that accuracy in surrogate decision making is an important goal in end-of-life decision making, and in light of that previously seen levels of accuracy reflect substantial disagreement, error, or both, this study examined both relationship and individual factors that potentially affect surrogate accuracy. Specifically, this study examined similarity, agreement, and assumed similarity-a process whereby raters use their own traits and preferences to rate another person-in spousal ratings of end-of-life treatment. This study expands on previous research by examining the potential influence of relationship factors and assumed similarity on end-of-life decision making among a sample of newlyweds. Newly married couples (n = 197) completed self and spouse measures of hypothetical end-of-life preferences and scales assessing marital satisfaction, personality, and attitudes. Results indicate a moderate level of similarity on husband and wife self-rated end-of-life treatment preferences (rs = .18-.29) and a moderate level of agreement between self and proxy ratings (rs = .17-.41). The largest correlations were seen between self ratings and proxy ratings (e.g., husband self ratings and husband proxy ratings of wife preferences, rs = .46-.69), reflecting strong assumed similarity in proxy ratings. For wives, similarity with husbands on a few attitudinal variables (i.e., spirituality, moral strictness, and conservatism) influenced proxy accuracy. Recognizing the potential impact of personal preferences on proxy ratings, as well as the potential influence of relationship factors, may help improve proxy accuracy and end-of-life care for patients and families.

  5. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nez, F.

    2005-06-01

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  6. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-05-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant.

  7. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The background Friedmannian Hubble constant in relativistic inhomogeneous cosmology and the age of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F.; Mourier, Pierre; Buchert, Thomas; Ostrowski, Jan J.

    2017-02-01

    Context. In relativistic inhomogeneous cosmology, structure formation couples to average cosmological expansion. A conservative approach to modelling this assumes an Einstein-de Sitter model (EdS) at early times and extrapolates this forward in cosmological time as a "background model" against which average properties of today's Universe can be measured. Aims: This modelling requires adopting an early-epoch-normalised background Hubble constant . Methods: Here, we show that the ΛCDM model can be used as an observational proxy to estimate rather than choose it arbitrarily. We assume (I) an EdS model at early times; (II) a zero dark energy parameter; (III) bi-domain scalar averaging-division of the spatial sections into over- and underdense regions; and (iv) virialisation (stable clustering) of collapsed regions. Results: We find km s-1/ Mpc (random error only) based on a Planck ΛCDM observational proxy. Conclusions: Moreover, since the scalar-averaged expansion rate is expected to exceed the (extrapolated) background expansion rate, the expected age of the Universe should be much younger than Gyr. The maximum stellar age of Galactic bulge microlensed low-mass stars (most likely: 14.7 Gyr; 68% confidence: 14.0-15.0 Gyr) suggests an age of about a Gyr older than the (no-backreaction) ΛCDM estimate.

  9. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Li, Miao, E-mail: asiahu@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: linan@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangzhh@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω{sub hde} are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ{sup 2}{sub min}=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω{sub Λ0}<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω{sub hde0}<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  10. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω hde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ 2 min =426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω Λ0 <0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω hde0 <0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model

  11. Towards the geophysical regime in numerical dynamo models: studies of rapidly-rotating convection driven dynamos with low Pm and constant heat flux boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, A.A.; Finlay, Chris; Marti, P.

    We present a set of numerical dynamo models with the convection strength varied by a factor of 30 and the ratio of magnetic to viscous diffusivities by a factor of 20 at rapid rotation rates (E =nu/(2 Omega d^2 ) = 10-6 and 10-7 ) using a heat flux outer BC. This regime has been little explored...... on the structure of the dynamos and how this changes in relation to the selection of control parameters, a comparison with the proposed rotating convection and dynamo scaling laws, energy spectra of steady solutions and inner core rotation rates. Magnetic field on the CMB. E=2.959*10-7, Ra=6591.0, Pm=0.05, Pr=1....

  12. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  13. Bayesian Approach for Constant-Stress Accelerated Life Testing for Kumaraswamy Weibull Distribution with Censoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abd-Alla EL-Helbawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated life tests provide quick information on the life time distributions by testing materials or products at higher than basic conditional levels of stress such as pressure, high temperature, vibration, voltage or load to induce failures. In this paper, the acceleration model assumed is log linear model. Constant stress tests are discussed based on Type I and Type II censoring. The Kumaraswmay Weibull distribution is used. The estimators of the parameters, reliability, hazard rate functions and p-th percentile at normal condition, low stress, and high stress are obtained. In addition, credible intervals for parameters of the models are constructed. Optimum test plan are designed. Some numerical studies are used to solve the complicated integrals such as Laplace and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods.

  14. The Absolute Shielding Constants of Heavy Nuclei: Resolving the Enigma of the (119)Sn Absolute Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Elena; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-02-07

    We demonstrate that the apparent disagreement between experimental determinations and four-component relativistic calculations of the absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei is due to the breakdown of the commonly assumed relation between the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the NMR shielding constants. We demonstrate that this breakdown has significant consequences for the absolute shielding constant of (119)Sn, leading to errors of about 1000 ppm. As a consequence, we expect that many absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei will be in need of revision.

  15. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  16. Compositional Synthesis of Controllers from Scenario-Based Assume-Guarantee Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenyer, Joel; Kindler, Ekkart

    2013-01-01

    to avoid flaws in the product or costly iterations during its development. We propose to use Modal Sequence Diagrams (MSDs), a formal, yet intuitive formalism for specifying the interaction of a system with its environment, and developed a formal synthesis approach that allows us to detect inconsistencies...... and even to automatically synthesize controllers from MSD specifications. The technique is suited for specifications of technical systems with real-time constraints and environment assumptions. However, synthesis is computationally expensive. In order to employ synthesis also for larger specifications, we...... present, in this paper, a novel assume-guarantee-style compositional synthesis technique for MSD specifications. We provide evaluation results underlining the benefit of our approach and formally justify its correctness....

  17. Model for the techno-economic analysis of common work of wind power and CCGT power plant to offer constant level of power in the electricity market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Z.; Rajsl, I.; Filipovic, M.

    2017-11-01

    Wind power varies over time, mainly under the influence of meteorological fluctuations. The variations occur on all time scales. Understanding these variations and their predictability is of key importance for the integration and optimal utilization of wind in the power system. There are two major attributes of variable generation that notably impact the participation on power exchanges: Variability (the output of variable generation changes and resulting in fluctuations in the plant output on all time scales) and Uncertainty (the magnitude and timing of variable generation output is less predictable, wind power output has low levels of predictability). Because of these variability and uncertainty wind plants cannot participate to electricity market, especially to power exchanges. For this purpose, the paper presents techno-economic analysis of work of wind plants together with combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant as support for offering continues power to electricity market. A model of wind farms and CCGT plant was developed in program PLEXOS based on real hourly input data and all characteristics of CCGT with especial analysis of techno-economic characteristics of different types of starts and stops of the plant. The Model analyzes the followings: costs of different start-stop characteristics (hot, warm, cold start-ups and shutdowns) and part load performance of CCGT. Besides the costs, the technical restrictions were considered such as start-up time depending on outage duration, minimum operation time, and minimum load or peaking capability. For calculation purposes, the following parameters are necessary to know in order to be able to economically evaluate changes in the start-up process: ramp up and down rate, time of start time reduction, fuel mass flow during start, electricity production during start, variable cost of start-up process, cost and charges for life time consumption for each start and start type, remuneration during start up time regarding

  18. Exploring the assumed invariance of implied emission factors for forest biomass in greenhouse gas inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, James E.; Heath, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Reviews of each nation's annual greenhouse gas inventory submissions including forestland are part of the ongoing reporting process of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Goals of these reviews include improving quality and consistency within and among reports. One method of facilitating comparisons is the use of a standard index such as an implied emission factor (IEF), which for forest biomass indicates net rate of carbon emission or sequestration per area. Guidance on the use of IEFs in reviews is limited, but there is an expectation that values should be relatively constant both over time and across spatial scales. To address this hypothesis, we examine IEFs over time, derived from U.S. forests at plot-, state-, and national-levels. Results show that at increasingly aggregated levels, relative heterogeneity decreases but can still be substantial. A net increase in U.S. whole-forest IEFs over time is consistent with results from temperate forests of nations in the European Community. IEFs are better viewed as a distribution of values rather than one constant value principally because of sensitivities to productivity, disturbance, and land use change, which can all vary considerably across a nation's forest land.

  19. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC.

  20. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  1. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC, especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC.

  2. f(R) constant-roll inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hayato [Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Starobinsky, Alexei A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f(R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f(R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined. (orig.)

  3. Universal relation between spectroscopic constants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) The author has used eq. (6) of his paper to calculate De. This relation leads to a large deviation from the correct value depending upon the extent to which experimental values are known. Guided by this fact, in our work, we used experimentally observed De values to derive the relation between spectroscopic constants.

  4. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesseris, Savvas; Blake, Chris; Davis, Tamara; Parkinson, David

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of large-scale structure measured by the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey in the redshift range 0.1 m (assuming General Relativity), and use this to construct a diagnostic to detect the presence of an evolving Newton's constant. Secondly we directly measure the evolution of Newton's constant, G eff , that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these approaches are that, contrary to other methods, they do not require knowledge of the expansion history of the Universe, H(z), making them model independent tests. Our constraints for the second derivative of Newton's constant at the present day, assuming it is slowly evolving as suggested by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints, using the WiggleZ data is G double-dot eff (t 0 ) = −1.19 ± 0.95·10 −20 h 2 yr −2 , where h is defined via H 0 = 100 h km s −1 Mpc −1 , while using both the WiggleZ and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy (SDSS LRG) data is G double-dot eff (t 0 ) = −3.6 ± 6.8·10 −21 h 2 yr −2 , both being consistent with General Relativity. Finally, our constraint for the rms mass fluctuation σ 8 using the WiggleZ data is σ 8 = 0.75 ± 0.08, while using both the WiggleZ and the SDSS LRG data σ 8 = 0.77 ± 0.07, both in good agreement with the latest measurements from the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation

  5. Stabilized power constant alimentation; Alimentation regulee a puissance constante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The study and realization of a stabilized power alimentation variable from 5 to 100 watts are described. In order to realize a constant power drift of Lithium compensated diodes, we have searched a 1 per cent precision of regulation and a response time minus than 1 sec. Recent components like Hall multiplicator and integrated amplifiers give this possibility and it is easy to use permutable circuits. (author) [French] On decrit l'etude et la realisation d'une alimentation a puissance constante reglable dans une gamme de 5 a 100 watts. Prevue pour le drift a puissance constante des diodes compensees au lithium, l'etude a ete menee en vue d'obtenir une precision de regulation de 1 pour cent et un temps de reponse inferieur a la seconde. Des systemes recents tels que multiplicateurs a effet Hall et circuits integres ont permis d'atteindre ce but tout en facilitant l'emploi de modules interchangeables. (auteur)

  6. Kaon-nucleus scattering and kaon-nuclear coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.

    1979-01-01

    Possibilities are examined of obtaining information on kaon-nuclear coupling constants without referring to any specific models. The basis for such a type of analyses is the use of analytic properties of the scattering amplitudes. Particularly useful is the forward dispersion relation for the antisymmetric amplitude. The analysis of the K+- 12 C scattering leads to the conclusion that the corresponding effective coupling constant is significantly larger than the coherent sum of the elementary coupling constants

  7. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  8. Lower vehicular primary emissions of NO2 in Europe than assumed in policy projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Stuart K.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Moller, Sarah J.; Carslaw, David C.

    2017-12-01

    Many European countries do not meet legal air quality standards for ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) near roads; a problem that has been forecasted to persist to 2030. Although European air quality standards regulate NO2 concentrations, emissions standards for new vehicles instead set limits for NOx—the combination of nitric oxide (NO) and NO2. From around 1990 onwards, the total emissions of NOx declined significantly in Europe, but roadside concentrations of NO2—a regulated species—declined much less than expected. This discrepancy has been attributed largely to the increasing usage of diesel vehicles in Europe and more directly emitted tailpipe NO2. Here we apply a data-filtering technique to 130 million hourly measurements of NOx, NO2 and ozone (O3) from roadside monitoring stations across 61 urban areas in Europe over the period 1990-2015 to estimate the continent-wide trends of directly emitted NO2. We find that the ratio of NO2 to NOx emissions increased from 1995 to around 2010 but has since stabilized at a level that is substantially lower than is assumed in some key emissions inventories. The proportion of NOx now being emitted directly from road transport as NO2 is up to a factor of two smaller than the estimates used in policy projections. We therefore conclude that there may be a faster attainment of roadside NO2 air quality standards across Europe than is currently expected.

  9. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  10. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Jennifer D.; Hall, Edward K.; Lennon, Jay T.; Evans, Sarah E.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Cotner, James B.; Nemergut, Diana R.; Graham, Emily B.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes.

  11. Molecular relativistic corrections determined in the framework where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-10-03

    In this work, we describe how the energies obtained in molecular calculations performed without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation can be augmented with corrections accounting for the leading relativistic effects. Unlike the conventional BO approach, where these effects only concern the relativistic interactions between the electrons, the non-BO approach also accounts for the relativistic effects due to the nuclei and due to the coupling of the coupled electron-nucleus motion. In the numerical sections, the results obtained with the two approaches are compared. The first comparison concerns the dissociation energies of the two-electron isotopologues of the H2 molecule, H2, HD, D2, T2, and the HeH(+) ion. The comparison shows that, as expected, the differences in the relativistic contributions obtained with the two approaches increase as the nuclei become lighter. The second comparison concerns the relativistic corrections to all 23 pure vibrational states of the HD(+) ion. An interesting charge asymmetry caused by the nonadiabatic electron-nucleus interaction appears in this system, and this effect significantly increases with the vibration excitation. The comparison of the non-BO results with the results obtained with the conventional BO approach, which in the lowest order does not describe the charge-asymmetry effect, reveals how this effect affects the values of the relativistic corrections.

  12. Electron-muon puzzle and the electromagnetic coupling constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehle, H.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of a heuristic model we argued in an earlier paper (paper C of this series) electric field (and of course the magnetic field, too) of a lepton or of a quark may be formulated in terms of a closed loop of quantized magnetic flux whose alternative forms (''loopforms'') are superposed with probability amplitudes so as to represent the electromagnetic field of that lepton or quark. The Zitterbewegung of a single stationary (''elementary'') particle suggests a kind of quasiextension, which is assumed, in the present theory, to permit concepts of structuralization of the electromagnetic field even for leptons. Mesons and baryons may be represented by linked quantized flux loops, i.e., quark loops (as in paper B). The central problem now (in this paper D) is to formulate those probability-amplitude distributions in terms of wave functions to characterize the internal structure of the lepton or quark in question. As probability-amplitude functions one may choose bases of irreducible representations of the group with respect to which the model is to be invariant. It is seen that this implies the SO(4) group. As both the electron-muon mass ratio and the electromagnetic coupling constant depend, in this flux-quantization model, on the correct formulation of the structuralization of probability-amplitude distributions, we should expect to get an insight into both these puzzles from finding the right probability-amplitude wave functions. Furthermore, it is seen that this same structuralization of probability-amplitude distributions also permits one to estimate the rate of weak interactions, thus relating them to electromagnetic interactions

  13. Cosmological Constant and Local Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, Jose; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and $\\Lambda > 0$, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in whic...

  14. Evolution of the solar constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The ultimate source of the energy utilized by life on Earth is the Sun, and the behavior of the Sun determines to a large extent the conditions under which life originated and continues to thrive. What can be said about the history of the Sun. Has the solar constant, the rate at which energy is received by the Earth from the Sun per unit area per unit time, been constant at its present level since Archean times. Three mechanisms by which it has been suggested that the solar energy output can vary with time are discussed, characterized by long (approx. 10 9 years), intermediate (approx. 10 8 years), and short (approx. years to decades) time scales

  15. Potential constants of CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.H.; Kennedy, C.; Ekberg, S.

    1978-01-01

    The infrared spectra of the 12 C, 13 C, and 14 C isotopic species of CF 4 have been observed at a resolution of 0.06 cm -1 . In addition to the fundamentals ν 3 and ν 4 a number of combination bands have been observed. Using these results, combined with Raman data in the literature, we have calculated the quadratic valence force field, in terms of force constants as well as compliance constants, with considerably better precision than previously obtained. Interaction displacement coordinates have been calculated and show that stretching one CF bond leads, for minimum energy near equilibrium, to opening up of the angles between the other three bonds as well as to their contraction

  16. Magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we have studied the solutions of plane-symmetric Universe with variable ω in the presence and the absence of magnetic field of energy density ρ B . A special law of variation for Hubble's parameterproposed by Bermann in {\\it Nuovo Cimento} B 74, 182 (1983) has been utilized to solve the field equations.

  17. Magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-03

    Nov 3, 2016 ... Abstract. In this paper, we have studied the solutions of plane-symmetric Universe with variable ω in the presence and the absence of magnetic field of energy density ρB. A special law of variation for Hubble's parameter proposed by Bermann in Nuovo Cimento B 74, 182 (1983) has been utilized to solve ...

  18. One hundred years of the cosmological constant: from "superfluous stunt" to dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; O'Keeffe, Michael; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2018-03-01

    We present a centennial review of the history of the term known as the cosmological constant. First introduced to the general theory of relativity by Einstein in 1917 in order to describe a universe that was assumed to be static, the term fell from favour in the wake of the discovery of the expanding universe, only to make a dramatic return in recent times. We consider historical and philosophical aspects of the cosmological constant over four main epochs; (i) the use of the term in static cosmologies (both Newtonian and relativistic): (ii) the marginalization of the term following the discovery of cosmic expansion: (iii) the use of the term to address specific cosmic puzzles such as the timespan of expansion, the formation of galaxies and the redshifts of the quasars: (iv) the re-emergence of the term in today's Λ-CDM cosmology. We find that the cosmological constant was never truly banished from theoretical models of the universe, but was marginalized by astronomers for reasons of convenience. We also find that the return of the term to the forefront of modern cosmology did not occur as an abrupt paradigm shift due to one particular set of observations, but as the result of a number of empirical advances such as the measurement of present cosmic expansion using the Hubble Space Telescope, the measurement of past expansion using type SN Ia supernovae as standard candles, and the measurement of perturbations in the cosmic microwave background by balloon and satellite. We give a brief overview of contemporary interpretations of the physics underlying the cosmic constant and conclude with a synopsis of the famous cosmological constant problem.

  19. New constraints on time-dependent variations of fundamental constants using Planck data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Luke; Chluba, Jens

    2018-02-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) today allow us to answer detailed questions about the properties of our Universe, targeting both standard and non-standard physics. In this paper, we study the effects of varying fundamental constants (i.e. the fine-structure constant, αEM, and electron rest mass, me) around last scattering using the recombination codes COSMOREC and RECFAST++. We approach the problem in a pedagogical manner, illustrating the importance of various effects on the free electron fraction, Thomson visibility function and CMB power spectra, highlighting various degeneracies. We demonstrate that the simpler RECFAST++ treatment (based on a three-level atom approach) can be used to accurately represent the full computation of COSMOREC. We also include explicit time-dependent variations using a phenomenological power-law description. We reproduce previous Planck 2013 results in our analysis. Assuming constant variations relative to the standard values, we find the improved constraints αEM/αEM, 0 = 0.9993 ± 0.0025 (CMB only) and me/me, 0 = 1.0039 ± 0.0074 (including BAO) using Planck 2015 data. For a redshift-dependent variation, αEM(z) = αEM(z0) [(1 + z)/1100]p with αEM(z0) ≡ αEM, 0 at z0 = 1100, we obtain p = 0.0008 ± 0.0025. Allowing simultaneous variations of αEM(z0) and p yields αEM(z0)/αEM, 0 = 0.9998 ± 0.0036 and p = 0.0006 ± 0.0036. We also discuss combined limits on αEM and me. Our analysis shows that existing data are not only sensitive to the value of the fundamental constants around recombination but also its first time derivative. This suggests that a wider class of varying fundamental constant models can be probed using the CMB.

  20. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.

    1996-02-01

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study

  1. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    OpenAIRE

    Walden, Byron L.

    2005-01-01

    We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4) and 9-digit (in base 5) Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  2. Assuming Regge trajectories in holographic QCD: from OPE to Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappiello, Luigi; Greynat, David

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Wall model in holographic QCD has Regge trajectories but wrong operator product expansion (OPE) for the two-point vectorial QCD Green function. We correct analytically this problem and describe the axial sector and chiral symmetry breaking. The low energy chiral parameters, $F_{\\pi}$ and $L_{10}$ , are well described analytically by the model in terms of Regge spacing and QCD condensates. The model nicely supports and extends previous theoretical analyses advocating Digamma function to study QCD two-point functions in different momentum regions.

  3. Prediction of phase equilibrium for gas hydrate in the presence of organic inhibitors and electrolytes by using an explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant in the van der Waals–Platteeuw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Huai-Ying; Hsieh, Min-Kang; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Po-Chun; Lin, Shiang-Tai; Chen, Li-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrate phase is described by the van der Waals and Platteeuw model. • An explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant is used in our model. • Phase behavior of gas hydrates with organic inhibitors and electrolytes predicted. • Our model well predicts phase behavior of gas hydrates at high pressures. -- Abstract: A new approach is developed for the prediction of the melting curve of gas hydrate with single or multiple additives, including organic inhibitors and electrolytes. This is made possible by combining a predictive equation of state for the fluid phase, the Peng–Robinson–Stryjek–Vera equation of state (PRSV EoS) combined with the COSMO-SAC activity coefficient model through the first order modified Huron–Vidal (MHV1) mixing rule, and a modified van der Waals–Platteeuw model for the hydrate phase. We have examined this method for the change of the melting condition of gas hydrate upon addition of single organic inhibitor, single electrolyte, and a mixture of organic and electrolyte. The absolute average relative deviation in temperature (AARD-T) for these three types of systems are 0.79% (695 data points, T from 230.2 K to 294.0 K, P from 0.10 MPa to 33.9 MPa), 0.16% (810 data points, T from 259.5 K to 299.1 K, P from 0.13 MPa to 71.56 MPa), and 1.56% (316 data points, T from 248.2 K to 292.9 K, P from 0.90 MPa to 73.28 MPa), respectively. We believe that the proposed model is useful for the exploitation of natural or synthetic gas hydrates with multiple additives

  4. Rate Constant for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 Yields C2H6 at T = 155 K and Model Calculation of the CH3 Abundance in the Atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Regina J.; Romani, Paul N.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Iannone, Mark A.; Tardy, Dwight C.; Stief, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The column abundances of CH3 observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite on Saturn and Neptune were lower than predicted by atmospheric photochemical models, especially for Saturn. It has been suggested that the models underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate constant k of the CH3 + CH3 self-reaction at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheres. Motivated by this suggestion, we undertook a combined experimental and photochemical modeling study of the CH3 + CH3 reaction and its role in determining planetary CH3 abundances. In a discharge flow-mass spectrometer system, k was measured at T = 155 K and three pressures of He. The results in units of cu cm/molecule/s are k(0.6 Torr) = 6.82 x 10(exp -11), k(1.0 Torr) = 6.98 x 10(exp -11), and k(1.5 Torr) = 6.91 x 10(exp -11). Analytical expressions for k were derived that (1) are consistent with the present laboratory data at T = 155 K, our previous data at T = 202 K and 298 K, and those of other studies in He at T = 296-298 K and (2) have some theoretical basis to provide justification for extrapolation. The derived analytical expressions were then used in atmospheric photochemical models for both Saturn and Neptune. These model results reduced the disparity with observations of Saturn, but not with observations of Neptune. However, the disparity for Neptune is much smaller. The solution to the remaining excess CH3 prediction in the models relative to the ISO observations lies, to a large extent, elsewhere in the CH3 photochemistry or transport, not in the CH3 + CH3 rate.

  5. Estimating genetic covariance functions assuming a parametric correlation structure for environmental effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Karin

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A random regression model for the analysis of "repeated" records in animal breeding is described which combines a random regression approach for additive genetic and other random effects with the assumption of a parametric correlation structure for within animal covariances. Both stationary and non-stationary correlation models involving a small number of parameters are considered. Heterogeneity in within animal variances is modelled through polynomial variance functions. Estimation of parameters describing the dispersion structure of such model by restricted maximum likelihood via an "average information" algorithm is outlined. An application to mature weight records of beef cow is given, and results are contrasted to those from analyses fitting sets of random regression coefficients for permanent environmental effects.

  6. Low power constant fraction discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Shanti; Raut, S.M.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a low power ultrafast constant fraction discriminator, which significantly reduces the power consumption. A conventional fast discriminator consumes about 1250 MW of power whereas this low power version consumes about 440 MW. In a multi detector system, where the number of discriminators is very large, reduction of power is of utmost importance. This low power discriminator is being designed for GRACE (Gamma Ray Atmospheric Cerenkov Experiments) telescope where 1000 channels of discriminators are required. A novel method of decreasing power consumption has been described. (author)

  7. Can coupling constants be related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan; Ng, Wing-Chiu.

    1978-06-01

    We analyze the conditions under which several coupling constants in field theory can be related to each other. When the relation is independent of the renormalization point, the relation between any g and g' must satisfy a differential equation as follows from the renormalization group equations. Using this differential equation, we investigate the criteria for the feasibility of a power-series relation for various theories, especially the Weinberg-Salam type (including Higgs bosons) with an arbitrary number of quark and lepton flavors. (orig./WL) [de

  8. Measurement of Newton's gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlamminger, St.; Holzschuh, E.; Kuendig, W.; Nolting, F.; Pixley, R. E.; Schurr, J.; Straumann, U.

    2006-01-01

    A precision measurement of the gravitational constant G has been made using a beam balance. Special attention has been given to determining the calibration, the effect of a possible nonlinearity of the balance and the zero-point variation of the balance. The equipment, the measurements, and the analysis are described in detail. The value obtained for G is 6.674 252(109)(54)x10 -11 m 3 kg -1 s -2 . The relative statistical and systematic uncertainties of this result are 16.3x10 -6 and 8.1x10 -6 , respectively

  9. Exact constants in approximation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  10. Costs of Foraging Predispose Animals to Obesity-Related Mortality when Food Is Constantly Abundant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Higginson, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an important medical problem affecting humans and animals in the developed world, but the evolutionary origins of the behaviours that cause obesity are poorly understood. The potential role of occasional gluts of food in determining fat-storage strategies for avoiding mortality have been overlooked, even though animals experienced such conditions in the recent evolutionary past and may follow the same strategies in the modern environment. Humans, domestic, and captive animals in the developed world are exposed to a surplus of calorie-rich food, conditions characterised as 'constant-glut'. Here, we use a mathematical model to demonstrate that obesity-related mortality from poor health in a constant-glut environment should equal the average mortality rate in the 'pre-modern' environment when predation risk was more closely linked with foraging. It should therefore not be surprising that animals exposed to abundant food often over-eat to the point of ill-health. Our work suggests that individuals tend to defend a given excessive level of reserves because this level was adaptive when gluts were short-lived. The model predicts that mortality rate in constant-glut conditions can increase as the assumed health cost of being overweight decreases, meaning that any adaptation that reduced such health costs would have counter-intuitively led to an increase in mortality in the modern environment. Taken together, these results imply that efforts to reduce the incidence of obesity that are focussed on altering individual behaviour are likely to be ineffective because modern, constant-glut conditions trigger previously adaptive behavioural responses.

  11. Assuming Regge trajectories in holographic QCD: from OPE to chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappiello, Luigi; Greynat, David [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Naples (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Giancarlo [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); CERN Theory Division, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    The soft wall model in holographic QCD has Regge trajectories but wrong operator product expansion (OPE) for the two-point vectorial QCD Green function. We modify the dilaton potential to comply with the OPE. We study also the axial two-point function using the same modified dilaton field and an additional scalar field to address chiral symmetry breaking. OPE is recovered adding a boundary term and low energy chiral parameters, F{sub π} and L{sub 10}, are well described analytically by the model in terms of Regge spacing and QCD condensates. The model nicely supports and extends previous theoretical analyses advocating Digamma function to study QCD two-point functions in different momentum regions. (orig.)

  12. Assuming Regge trajectories in holographic QCD: from OPE to Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappiello, Luigi; Greynat, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft wall model in holographic QCD has Regge trajectories but wrong operator product expansion (OPE) for the two-point vectorial QCD Green function. We modify the dilaton potential to comply OPE. We study also the axial two-point function using the same modified dilaton field and an additional scalar field to address chiral symmetry breaking. OPE is recovered adding a boundary term and low energy chiral parameters, $F_\\pi$ and $L_{10}$, are well described analytically by the model in terms of Regge spacing and QCD condensates. The model nicely supports and extends previous theoretical analyses advocating Digamma function to study QCD two-point functions in different momentum regions.

  13. Design-based Sample and Probability Law-Assumed Sample: Their Role in Scientific Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Mario Miguel; Sahai, Hardeo

    2002-01-01

    Discusses some key statistical concepts in probabilistic and non-probabilistic sampling to provide an overview for understanding the inference process. Suggests a statistical model constituting the basis of statistical inference and provides a brief review of the finite population descriptive inference and a quota sampling inferential theory.…

  14. Is cosmological constant needed in Higgs inflation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jun Feng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of r, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts r≈0.2, ns≈0.96 with e-folds number N≈56, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly Λ∼(1014 GeV2, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  15. Simultaneous in vivo measurement of lumped constant and rate constants in experimental cerebral ischemia using F-18 FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, H; Matsuda, H; Takara, E; Diksic, M; Meyer, E; Yamamoto, Y L

    1987-01-01

    Lumped and transfer rate constants in ischemic brain tissue must be measured to estimate accurately cerebral glucose utilization by the deoxyglucose method. We studied the bilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion model in 17 cats, 5 with a 1-hour occlusion, 5 with a 4-hour occlusion, and 7 with a sham operation. The time course of cerebral tissue radioactivity (Ci*(t)) was monitored by external coincidence counting during a programmed infusion of [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-2-FDG). Arterial plasma concentration (Cp*(t)) of the tracer was kept constant during the first 45 minutes. Rate constants were estimated from Ci*(t) and Cp*(t) by a nonlinear least-squares fitting routine. The lumped constant was estimated from the fit of the ratio of extraction fractions of glucose and 18F-2-FDG by nonweighted, nonlinear least-squares fitting. In the 4-hour-occlusion model, the transfer constant k1* was 23% lower, k3* 39% lower, and the lumped constant 78% higher than in the sham-operated animals. In the 1-hour-occlusion model, k3* was 26% lower than in the sham-operated animals but the lumped constant was not significantly different. The rate of glucose utilization was significantly different in the 4-hour-occlusion model compared to the sham-operated animals (48% decrease, p less than 0.05) but was not significantly different in the 1-hour-occlusion model.

  16. Fluorodeoxyglucose rate constants, lumped constant, and glucose metabolic rate in rabbit heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivokapich, J.; Huang, S.C.; Selin, C.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The isolated arterial perfused rabbit interventricular septum was used to measure myocardial metabolic rate for glucose (MMRGlc) and rate constants and lumped constant (LC) for the glucose analogue [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) using a tracer kinetic model. FDG was delivered by constant infusion during coincidence counting of tissue 18 F radioactivity. The MMRGlc was measured by the Fick method. Control septa were paced at 72 beats/min and perfused at 1.5 ml/min with oxygenated perfusate containing 5.6 mM glucose and 5 mU/ml insulin. The following conditions were tested: 3.0 and 4.5 ml/min; insulin increased to 25 mU/ml; insulin omitted; 2.8 mM and 11.2 mM glucose; 144 beats/min and 96 paired stimuli/min; and anoxia. Under all conditions studied the phosphorylation (hexokinase) reaction was rate limiting relative to transport. Compared with control conditions, the phosphorylation rate constant was significantly increased with 2.8 mM glucose as well as in anoxia. With 4.5 ml/min and 11.2 mM glucose, conditions that should increase glucose flux into tissue without increasing demand, the phosphorylation rate constant decreased significantly. With 11.2 mM glucose, 96 paired stimuli/min, and anoxia without insulin, a significant increase in the hydrolysis rate of FDG 6-phosphate was observed and suggests that hydrolysis is also an important mechanism for regulating the MMRGlc. Increased transport rate constants were observed with increased flow rates, 96 paired stimuli/min, and anoxia at 96 beats/min. The LC was not significantly different from control in 11 of 14 conditions studied. Therefore, under most conditions in average LC can be used to calculate MMRGlc estimates

  17. Assume-Guarantee Verification of Software Components in SOFA 2 Framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parízek, P.; Plášil, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2010), s. 210-221 ISSN 1751-8806 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400300504 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : components * software verification * model checking Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 0.671, year: 2010

  18. Elastic constants of diamond from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guangtu; Van Workum, Kevin; Schall, J David; Harrison, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    The elastic constants of diamond between 100 and 1100 K have been calculated for the first time using molecular dynamics and the second-generation, reactive empirical bond-order potential (REBO). This version of the REBO potential was used because it was redesigned to be able to model the elastic properties of diamond and graphite at 0 K while maintaining its original capabilities. The independent elastic constants of diamond, C 11 , C 12 , and C 44 , and the bulk modulus were all calculated as a function of temperature, and the results from the three different methods are in excellent agreement. By extrapolating the elastic constant data to 0 K, it is clear that the values obtained here agree with the previously calculated 0 K elastic constants. Because the second-generation REBO potential was fit to obtain better solid-state force constants for diamond and graphite, the agreement with the 0 K elastic constants is not surprising. In addition, the functional form of the second-generation REBO potential is able to qualitatively model the functional dependence of the elastic constants and bulk modulus of diamond at non-zero temperatures. In contrast, reactive potentials based on other functional forms do not reproduce the correct temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The second-generation REBO potential also correctly predicts that diamond has a negative Cauchy pressure in the temperature range examined

  19. The relationship between elastic constants and structure of shock waves in a zinc single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosheina, M. N.; Kobenko, S. V.; Tuch, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides a 3D finite element simulation of shock-loaded anisotropic single crystals on the example of a Zn plate under impact using a mathematical model, which allows for anisotropy in hydrostatic stress and wave velocities in elastic and plastic ranges. The simulation results agree with experimental data, showing the absence of shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a plastic wave in Zn single crystals impacted in the [0001] direction. It is assumed that the absence of an elastic precursor under impact loading of a zinc single crystal along the [0001] direction is determined by the anomalously large ratio of the c/a-axes and close values of the propagation velocities of longitudinal and bulk elastic waves. It is shown that an increase in only one elastic constant along the [0001] direction results in shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a shock wave of "plastic" compression.

  20. Fisher matrix forecasts for astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Alves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We use Fisher Matrix analysis techniques to forecast the cosmological impact of astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant to be carried out by the forthcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at the VLT (due for commissioning in late 2017, as well by the planned high-resolution spectrograph (currently in Phase A for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Assuming a fiducial model without α variations, we show that ESPRESSO can improve current bounds on the Eötvös parameter—which quantifies Weak Equivalence Principle violations—by up to two orders of magnitude, leading to stronger bounds than those expected from the ongoing tests with the MICROSCOPE satellite, while constraints from the E-ELT should be competitive with those of the proposed STEP satellite. Should an α variation be detected, these measurements will further constrain cosmological parameters, being particularly sensitive to the dynamics of dark energy.

  1. The fundamental constants a mystery of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The speed of light, the fine structure constant, and Newton's constant of gravity — these are just three among the many physical constants that define our picture of the world. Where do they come from? Are they constant in time and across space? In this book, physicist and author Harald Fritzsch invites the reader to explore the mystery of the fundamental constants of physics in the company of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and a modern-day physicist

  2. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  3. Criticality safety assessment by assuming spent fuel burnup distribution. Examination of various methods for setting burnup (1) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2004-03-01

    Firstly, concerning the methods to set burnup for depletion calculation linked with criticality safety evaluation taking burnup credit into consideration, the upper 50 cm averaged burnups approved by regulations in European countries and USA are comparatively evaluated. Secondary, errors produced by different shapes of axial spent fuel burnup distribution assumed for criticality calculation, bias errors associated with depletion calculation compensated by correction factors applied to calculated nuclide isotopic composition, and statistic errors exerted by variation of irradiation history parameters used as input data for depletion calculation, are separately evaluated by performing criticality analyses with the spent fuel transport cask model of OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark. As a result, methods are proposed to set equivalent burnups reduced from a given burnup so as to compensate these errors to obtain criticality calculation results on the conservative side. Finally, 'Equivalent Uniform Burnup' and Equivalent Initial Enrichment' which are derived by incorporating these errors synthetically, are described to mention possibility of their common usage irrespective of difference in spent fuel transport cask specification. (author)

  4. Factor screening in a 12 Run Plackett-Burman design assuming four active factors

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we perform factor screening in a non-regular two-level design by reducing the number of possible sets of active factors to a certain number. The 12 Run Plackett-Burman(PB) design with four active factors is mainly concerned. Our proposed method works through picking up the 6 effects with the highest absolute value out of 10 in each projection model. To evaluate this method, we used the same example as was used in Tyssedal and Shahrukh\\cite{tyssedal2016factor} where variable sel...

  5. Stunt Barbie - A Laboratory Practicum Combining Constant Velocity and Constant Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Scott

    2011-04-01

    In preparing to teach the advanced physics course at my high school, I found it useful to work through the end-of-chapter problems in the book used by the advanced class. A problem on motion in one dimension involved a stunt woman in free fall from a tree limb onto a horse running beneath her.2 The problem presents a connected learning opportunity for students because it requires the use of the constant velocity model xf = v*t + xi and the constant acceleration model yf = ½* g* t2 + vyi* t + yi (where g = 9.8 m/s/s) to solve it. I named the stunt woman Barbie and created an activity titled "Stunt Barbie."

  6. The importance of variations in the deposition velocity assumed for the assessment of airborne radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Hoffman, F.O.; Shaeffer, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    In environmental radiological assessments, the depletion of airborne plumes by dry deposition processes and the subsequent contamination of ground and vegetation have been estimated through the use of a parameter termed the 'deposition velocity'. The sensitivity of environmental assessment models to changes in values of deposition velocity is here examined so that the effect of potential variations of deposition velocity on calculations of radiation dose can be determined. The results show that until more data are available great care must be exercised when applying theoretical ideas and scientific judgement in the selection of a value of the deposition velocity to be used in calculating the dose to man as a result of deposition. (U.K.)

  7. Fundamental Constants in Physics and their Time Dependence

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    In the Standard Model of Particle Physics we are dealing with 28 fundamental constants. In the experiments these constants can be measured, but theoretically they are not understood. I will discuss these constants, which are mostly mass parameters. Astrophysical measurements indicate that the finestructure constant is not a real constant, but depends on time. Grand unification then implies also a time variation of the QCD scale. Thus the masses of the atomic nuclei and the magnetic moments of the nuclei will depend on time. I proposed an experiment, which is currently done by Prof. Haensch in Munich and his group. The first results indicate a time dependence of the QCD scale. I will discuss the theoretical implications.

  8. Time variable cosmological constants from the age of universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lixin; Lu Jianbo; Li Wenbo

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, time variable cosmological constant, dubbed age cosmological constant, is investigated motivated by the fact: any cosmological length scale and time scale can introduce a cosmological constant or vacuum energy density into Einstein's theory. The age cosmological constant takes the form ρ Λ =3c 2 M P 2 /t Λ 2 , where t Λ is the age or conformal age of our universe. The effective equation of state (EoS) of age cosmological constant are w Λ eff =-1+2/3 (√(Ω Λ ))/c and w Λ eff =-1+2/3 (√(Ω Λ ))/c (1+z) when the age and conformal age of universe are taken as the role of cosmological time scales respectively. The EoS are the same as the so-called agegraphic dark energy models. However, the evolution histories are different from the agegraphic ones for their different evolution equations.

  9. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum Λ-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  10. Implications of a positive cosmological constant for general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2017-10-01

    Most of the literature on general relativity over the last century assumes that the cosmological constant Λ is zero. However, by now independent observations have led to a consensus that the dynamics of the universe is best described by Einstein’s equations with a small but positive Λ . Interestingly, this requires a drastic revision of conceptual frameworks commonly used in general relativity, no matter how small Λ is. We first explain why, and then summarize the current status of generalizations of these frameworks to include a positive Λ , focusing on gravitational waves.

  11. Implications of a positive cosmological constant for general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2017-10-01

    Most of the literature on general relativity over the last century assumes that the cosmological constant [Formula: see text] is zero. However, by now independent observations have led to a consensus that the dynamics of the universe is best described by Einstein's equations with a small but positive [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, this requires a drastic revision of conceptual frameworks commonly used in general relativity, no matter how small [Formula: see text] is. We first explain why, and then summarize the current status of generalizations of these frameworks to include a positive [Formula: see text], focusing on gravitational waves.

  12. Constant-Overhead Secure Computation of Boolean Circuits using Preprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Zakarias, Sarah Nouhad Haddad

    We present a protocol for securely computing a Boolean circuit $C$ in presence of a dishonest and malicious majority. The protocol is unconditionally secure, assuming access to a preprocessing functionality that is not given the inputs to compute on. For a large number of players the work done by...... with an additional multiplication property. We also show a new algorithm for verifying the product of Boolean matrices in quadratic time with exponentially small error probability, where previous methods would only give a constant error....

  13. Analysis of discrete and continuous distributions of ventilatory time constants from dynamic computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Marcus [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Markstaller, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Karmrodt, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Eberle, Balthasar [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Weiler, Norbert [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Thelen, Manfred [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, Wolfgang G [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2005-04-21

    In this study, an algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of pulmonary time constants (TCs) from dynamic computed tomography (CT) data sets during a sudden airway pressure step up. Simulations with synthetic data were performed to test the methodology as well as the influence of experimental noise. Furthermore the algorithm was applied to in vivo data. In five pigs sudden changes in airway pressure were imposed during dynamic CT acquisition in healthy lungs and in a saline lavage ARDS model. The fractional gas content in the imaged slice (FGC) was calculated by density measurements for each CT image. Temporal variations of the FGC were analysed assuming a model with a continuous distribution of exponentially decaying time constants. The simulations proved the feasibility of the method. The influence of experimental noise could be well evaluated. Analysis of the in vivo data showed that in healthy lungs ventilation processes can be more likely characterized by discrete TCs whereas in ARDS lungs continuous distributions of TCs are observed. The temporal behaviour of lung inflation and deflation can be characterized objectively using the described new methodology. This study indicates that continuous distributions of TCs reflect lung ventilation mechanics more accurately compared to discrete TCs.

  14. Analysis of discrete and continuous distributions of ventilatory time constants from dynamic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doebrich, Marcus; Markstaller, Klaus; Karmrodt, Jens; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Eberle, Balthasar; Weiler, Norbert; Thelen, Manfred; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2005-01-01

    In this study, an algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of pulmonary time constants (TCs) from dynamic computed tomography (CT) data sets during a sudden airway pressure step up. Simulations with synthetic data were performed to test the methodology as well as the influence of experimental noise. Furthermore the algorithm was applied to in vivo data. In five pigs sudden changes in airway pressure were imposed during dynamic CT acquisition in healthy lungs and in a saline lavage ARDS model. The fractional gas content in the imaged slice (FGC) was calculated by density measurements for each CT image. Temporal variations of the FGC were analysed assuming a model with a continuous distribution of exponentially decaying time constants. The simulations proved the feasibility of the method. The influence of experimental noise could be well evaluated. Analysis of the in vivo data showed that in healthy lungs ventilation processes can be more likely characterized by discrete TCs whereas in ARDS lungs continuous distributions of TCs are observed. The temporal behaviour of lung inflation and deflation can be characterized objectively using the described new methodology. This study indicates that continuous distributions of TCs reflect lung ventilation mechanics more accurately compared to discrete TCs

  15. LMFBR Emergency Deployment Assuming 45 year Time-Delay Excess CO{sub 2} Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest [5060 San Rafael Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90042-3239 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} is presently increasing 2.25% per year in proportion to 2.25% per year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. CO{sub 2} removal is modeled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO{sub 2} amount above 280 ppmV-C. This is: Exp (-0.0225/year * 45 years) = 0.36 fraction CO{sub 2} removed from anthropological emissions, apparently by seawater. LMFBRs use 15 year doubling time. Deploying 30000 GWe atomic power by year-2080 results in CO{sub 2} doubling year-2065 if World primary energy consumption continues increasing 2.25% per year. CO{sub 2} remains roughly twice pre-industrial until year-2100. Beginning year-2080, CO{sub 2} declines at 2.25% per year. CO{sub 2} will presumably decline back to roughly the year-2000 value by year-2200 if the 45-year-delay sink remains effective. LMFBR and GCFR fleet expands to 30000 GWe by 2080. 1000 GWe LWR fleet consumes 5 Mt HM (Heavy Metal). Breeder first cores require 1 Mt HM. (author)

  16. Historical Carbon Dioxide Emissions Caused by Land-Use Changes are Possibly Larger than Assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change andCO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  17. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  18. Uraemia progression in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5 is not constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Mortensen, Leif Spange

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive disease leading to loss of glomerular filtration rate (ΔGFR, measured in ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year). ΔGFR is usually assumed to be constant, but the hyperfiltration theory suggests that it accelerates in severe uraemia. A retrospective analysis of estimated...... GFR (eGFR) calculated from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation was performed to evaluate whether ΔGFR is constant or accelerating....

  19. Markov constant and quantum instabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelantová, E.; Starosta, Š.; Znojil, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 15 (2016), s. 155201 ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22945S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : renormalizable quantum theories with ghosts * Pais-Uhlenbeck model * singular spectra * square-well model * number theory analysis * physical applications Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  20. An adaptive-binning method for generating constant-uncertainty/constant-significance light curves with Fermi-LAT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, B.; Escande, L.; Larsson, S.; Ballet, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present a method enabling the creation of constant-uncertainty/constant-significance light curves with the data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT). The adaptive-binning method enables more information to be encapsulated within the light curve than with the fixed-binning method. Although primarily developed for blazar studies, it can be applied to any sources. Furthermore, this method allows the starting and ending times of each interval to be calculated in a simple and quick way during a first step. The reported mean flux and spectral index (assuming the spectrum is a power-law distribution) in the interval are calculated via the standard LAT analysis during a second step. In the absence of major caveats associated with this method Monte-Carlo simulations have been established. We present the performance of this method in determining duty cycles as well as power-density spectra relative to the traditional fixed-binning method.

  1. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  2. Lepton decay constants of light mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of lepton decay constants based on the path-integral formalism is given for chiral and vector mesons. Decay constants of the pseudoscalar and vector mesons are calculated and compared to other existing results.

  3. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  4. Critical survey of stability constants of EDTA complexes critical evaluation of equilibrium constants in solution stability constants of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Anderegg, G

    2013-01-01

    Critical Survey of Stability Constants of EDTA Complexes focuses on the computations, values, and characteristics of stability constants. The book emphasizes that for a critical discussion of experimentally determined stability constants, it is important to consider the precision of the values that manifests the self-consistency of the constant, taking into consideration the random errors. The publication reviews the stability constants of metal complexes. The numerical calculations affirm the reactions and transformations of metal ions when exposed to varying conditions. The text also present

  5. Bare coupling constants and asymptotic behaviour in reggeon field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M.

    1983-01-01

    A relation between the values of bare coupling constants and the asymptotic behaviour of the reggeon field theory (RFT) is discussed. It is shown how the numerical values of bare coupling constants fix the starting point of renormalization group trajectories which, in turn, determine the asymptotic behaviour of the RFT. Applications to a pure pomeron theory and a pomeron plus f-pole model are discussed. Some nontrivial phenomenological information concerning the values of bare triple-Regge pomeron-f-pole coupling constants is obtained

  6. High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale

    CERN Document Server

    Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Blumlein, J.; de la Cruz, L.; Dittmaier, S.; Dowling, M.; Erler, J.; Espinosa, J.R.; Fuster, J.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Hoang, A.H.; Huss, A.; Kluth, S.; Mulders, M.; Papanastasiou, A.S.; Piclum, J.; Rabbertz, K.; Schwinn, C.; Schulze, M.; Shintani, E.; Uwer, P.; Zerf, N.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 2014 Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics (MITP) scientific program on "High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale". The two outstanding parameters in the Standard Model dealt with during the MITP scientific program are the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ and the top-quark mass $m_t$. Lacking knowledge on the value of those fundamental constants is often the limiting factor in the accuracy of theoretical predictions. The current status on $\\alpha_s$ and $m_t$ has been reviewed and directions for future research have been identified.

  7. Procedures for determining MATMOD-4V material constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    The MATMOD-4V constitutive relations were developed from the original MATMOD model to extend the range of nonelastic deformation behaviors represented to include transient phenomena such as strain softening. Improvements in MATMOD-4V increased the number of independent material constants and the difficulty in determining their values. Though the constitutive relations are conceptually simple, their form and procedures for obtaining their constants can be complex. This paper reviews in detail the experiments, numerical procedures, and assumptions that have been used to determine a complete set of MATMOD-4V constants for high purity aluminum.

  8. High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.; Weinzierl, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 2014 Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics (MITP) scientific program on ''High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale''. The two outstanding parameters in the Standard Model dealt with during the MITP scientific program are the strong coupling constant α s and the top-quark mass m t . Lacking knowledge on the value of those fundamental constants is often the limiting factor in the accuracy of theoretical predictions. The current status on α s and m t has been reviewed and directions for future research have been identified.

  9. Ventricular fibrillation time constant for swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Sun, Hongyu; Nimunkar, Amit J; Webster, John G; O'Rourke, Ann; Huebner, Shane; Will, James A

    2008-01-01

    The strength–duration curve for cardiac excitation can be modeled by a parallel resistor–capacitor circuit that has a time constant. Experiments on six pigs were performed by delivering current from the X26 Taser dart at a distance from the heart to cause ventricular fibrillation (VF). The X26 Taser is an electromuscular incapacitation device (EMD), which generates about 50 kV and delivers a pulse train of about 15–19 pulses s −1 with a pulse duration of about 150 µs and peak current about 2 A. Similarly a continuous 60 Hz alternating current of the amplitude required to cause VF was delivered from the same distance. The average current and duration of the current pulse were estimated in both sets of experiments. The strength–duration equation was solved to yield an average time constant of 2.87 ms ± 1.90 (SD). Results obtained may help in the development of safety standards for future electromuscular incapacitation devices (EMDs) without requiring additional animal tests

  10. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron L. Walden

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4 and 9-digit (in base 5 Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  11. Generalized Euler constants for arithmetical progressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilcher, Karl

    1992-07-01

    The work of Lehmer and Briggs on Euler constants in arithmetical progressions is extended to the generalized Euler constants that arise in the Laurent expansion of ζ(s) about s = 1 . The results are applied to the summation of several classes of slowly converging series. A table of the constants is provided.

  12. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  13. Calculation of the hyperfine constants of Vk center in CaF2, SrF2 and BaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bufaical, R.F.

    1975-03-01

    The magnetic hyperfine constants of the V sub(K) center in CaF 2 , SrF 2 and BaF 2 have been calculated, assuming a phenomenological model, based on the F 2 central molecule, to describe the wave function of the defect. The introduction of covalence, with the ions neighboring the central molecule, have shown that this is a better description for the defect than a simple central molecule model. It was also shown that the results for the hyperfine constants are strongly dependent on the relaxations of these neighboring ions, which have been determined by fitting the experimental data. The present results are compared with other previous calculations where similar and different methods have been used. A better description for the wave function of the defect is suggested

  14. In-situ GPR test for three-dimensional mapping of the dielectric constant in a rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkarmoty, Mohamed; Colla, Camilla; Gabrielli, Elena; Papeschi, Paolo; Bonduà, Stefano; Bruno, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    The Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is used to detect subsurface anomalies in several applications. The more the velocity of propagation or the dielectric constant is estimated accurately, the more the detection of anomalies at true subsurface depth can be accurately obtained. Since many GPR applications are performed in rock mass with non-homogeneous discontinuous nature, errors in estimating a bulk velocity of propagation or dielectric constant are possible. This paper presents a new in-situ GPR test for mapping the dielectric constant variability in a rock mass. The main aim is to investigate to what extent the dielectric constant is variable in the micro and macro scale of a typical rock mass and to give attention to GPR users in rock mass mediums. The methodology of this research is based on the insertion of steel rods in a rock mass, thus acting as reflectors. The velocity of propagation can be then modeled, from hyperbolic reflections, in the form of velocity pathways from antenna positions to a buried rod. Each pathway is characterized by discrete points which are assumed in three dimensions as centers of micro cubic rock mass. This allows converting the velocity of propagation into a dielectric constant for mapping and modeling the dielectric constant in a volumetric rock mass using a volumetric data visualization software program (Voxler). In a case study, 6 steel drilling rods were diagonally inserted in a vertical face of a bench in a sandstone quarry. Five equally spaced parallel lines, almost perpendicular to the orientations of the rods, were surveyed by a dual frequency GPR antenna of 200 and 600 MHz. The results show that the dielectric constant is randomly varied within the micro and macro scale either in single radargrams or in the volumetric rock mass. The proposed method can be useful if considered in signal processing software programs, particularly in presence of subsurface utilities with known geometry and dimension, allowing converting

  15. On the substructure of the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvali, G.; Gomez, C.; Zell, S.

    We summarize the findings of our paper arXiv:1701.08776 [hep-th]. We start by defining the quantum break-time. Once one understands a classical solution as expectation value of an underlying quantum state, it emerges as time-scale after which the true quantum evolution departs from the classical mean field evolution. We apply this idea to de Sitter space. Following earlier work, we construct a simple model of a spin-2 field, which for some time reproduces the de Sitter metric and simultaneously allows for its well-defined representation as coherent quantum state of gravitons. The mean occupation number N of background gravitons turns out to be equal to the de Sitter horizon area in Planck units, while their frequency is given by the de Sitter Hubble parameter. In the semi-classical limit, we show that the model reproduces all semi-classical calculations in de Sitter, such as thermal Gibbons-Hawking radiation, all in the language of quantum S-matrix scatterings and decays of coherent state gravitons. Most importantly, this framework allows to capture the (1/N)-effects of back reaction to which the usual semi-classical treatment is blind. They violate the de Sitter symmetry and lead to a finite quantum break-time of the de Sitter state equal to the de Sitter radius times N. We also point out that the quantum-break time is inversely proportional to the number of particle species in the theory. Thus, the quantum break-time imposes the following consistency condition: Older and species-richer universes must have smaller cosmological constants. For the maximal, phenomenologically acceptable number of species, the observed cosmological constant would saturate this bound if our Universe were 10100 years old in its entire classical history.

  16. [Compared Markov with fractal models by using single-channel experimental and simulation data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tonghan; Wu, Hongxiu; Lin, Jiarui

    2006-10-01

    The gating mechanical kinetical of ion channels has been modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant, the transition rate constants among the states is independent both of time and of the previous channel activity. It is assumed in Liebovitch's fractal model that the channel exists in an infinite number of energy states, consequently, transitions from one conductance state to another would be governed by a continuum of rate constants. In this paper, a statistical comparison is presented of Markov and fractal models of ion channel gating, the analysis is based on single-channel data from ion channel voltage-dependence K+ single channel of neuron cell and simulation data from three-states Markov model.

  17. Modeling Soil Temperature Variations | Ogunlela | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on modeling soil temperature variations. Transient heat flow principles were used in the study, with the assumptions that the heat flow was one-dimensional, the soil was homogenous and that the thermal diffusivity was constant. Average conditions are also assumed. The annual and diurnal (daily) soil ...

  18. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  19. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the elastic constants in Nd3Se4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futterer, H.; Yohannes, T.; Bach, H.; Pelzl, J.; Nahm, K.; Kim, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    The elastic constants of Nd 3 Se 4 show an anomalous behaviour above and below T c =52 K. Band effects are assumed to be the origin of the softening of C' in the paramagnetic region. Below T c extra shifts arise from magneto-elastic coupling. An elastic hysteresis is observed which is directly related to the magnetic hysteresis loop

  20. 42 CFR 137.286 - Do Self-Governance Tribes become Federal agencies when they assume these Federal environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Do Self-Governance Tribes become Federal agencies... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.286 Do Self-Governance... Self-Governance Tribes are required to assume Federal environmental responsibilities for projects in...

  1. 42 CFR 137.291 - May Self-Governance Tribes carry out construction projects without assuming these Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes carry out construction... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.291 May Self-Governance Tribes carry out construction projects without assuming these Federal environmental...

  2. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for comment...

  3. Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model is investigated. To get a deterministic model, we have assumed the condition = ( is a constant) between metric potentials and where is the coefficient of shear viscosity and the scalar of expansion in the model. The coefficient of bulk viscosity () is taken as ...

  4. A comment on technical naturalness and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itzhaki, Nissan

    2006-01-01

    We propose a model of dynamical relaxation of the cosmological constant. Technical naturalness of the model and the present value of the vacuum energy density imply an upper bound on the supersymmetry breaking scale and the reheating temperature at the TeV scale

  5. Effects of an assumed cosmic ray-modulated low global cloud cover on the Earth's temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, J.; Mendoza, B. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza, V.; Adem, J. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: victor@atmosfera.unam.mx

    2006-07-15

    We have used the Thermodynamic Model of the Climate to estimate the effect of variations in the low cloud cover on the surface temperature of the Earth in the Northern Hemisphere during the period 1984-1994. We assume that the variations in the low cloud cover are proportional to the variation of the cosmic ray flux measured during the same period. The results indicate that the effect in the surface temperature is more significant in the continents, where for July of 1991, we have found anomalies of the order of 0.7 degrees Celsius for the southeastern of Asia and 0.5 degrees Celsius for the northeast of Mexico. For an increase of 0.75% in the low cloud cover, the surface temperature computed by the model in the North Hemisphere presents a decrease of {approx} 0.11 degrees Celsius; however, for a decrease of 0.90% in the low cloud cover, the model gives an increase in the surface temperature of {approx} 0.15 degrees Celsius, these two cases correspond to a climate sensitivity factor for the case of forcing by duplication of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. These decreases or increases in surface temperature by increases of decreases in low clouds cover are ten times greater than the overall variability of the non-forced model time series. [Spanish] Hemos usado el Modelo Termodinamico del Clima para estimar el efecto de variaciones en la cubierta de nubes bajas sobre la temperatura superficial de la Tierra en el Hemisferio Norte durante el periodo 1984 - 1994. Suponemos que las variaciones en la cubierta de nubes bajas son proporcionales a las variaciones del flujo de rayos cosmicos medido durante el mismo periodo. Los resultados indican que el efecto en la temperatura es mas significativo en los continentes, donde para julio de 1991, hemos encontrado anomalias del orden de 0.7 grados Celsius sobre el sureste de Asia y 0.5 grados Celsius al noreste de Mexico. Para un incremento de 0.75% en la cubierta de nubes bajas, la temperatura de la superficie calculada por el modelo en

  6. The importance of being (a) constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy-Leblond, J.-M.

    1979-01-01

    The author intends to show how the epistemological status of the physical constants bears witness to the development of physical science in general. He classifies the various physical constants into three types, properties of particular physical objects, characteristics of classes of physical phenomena and universal constants. He discusses the phenomena of fundamental constants experiencing a change in their type, at length on the example of two important constants, c and G. He considers Planck's constant and discusses the conceptual role of universal constants in general, as well as some aspects of quantum mechanics which appear in a new light from the proposed point of view. The existence is shown of hidden universal constants, forgotten ones in the realm of classical physics, as well as overlooked ones in modern physics. The velocity of light is studied as an example of general considerations on universal constants, and as a way to approach some epistemological problems of special relativity. Newton's gravitational constant is studied in connection with the interpretation of general relativity. (Auth./C.F.)

  7. Robust control for constant thrust rendezvous under thrust failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yongqiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A robust constant thrust rendezvous approach under thrust failure is proposed based on the relative motion dynamic model. Firstly, the design problem is cast into a convex optimization problem by introducing a Lyapunov function subject to linear matrix inequalities. Secondly, the robust controllers satisfying the requirements can be designed by solving this optimization problem. Then, a new algorithm of constant thrust fitting is proposed through the impulse compensation and the fuel consumption under the theoretical continuous thrust and the actual constant thrust is calculated and compared by using the method proposed in this paper. Finally, the proposed method having the advantage of saving fuel is proved and the actual constant thrust switch control laws are obtained through the isochronous interpolation method, meanwhile, an illustrative example is provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control design method.

  8. Sensitivity of molecular vibrational dynamics to energy exchange rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, G D; Coletti, C; Kurnosov, A K; Napartovich, A P

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular vibrational population dynamics, governing the CO laser operated in fundamental and overtone transitions, to vibration-to-vibration rate constants is investigated. With this aim, three rate constant sets have been used, differing in their completeness (i.e. accounting for single-quantum exchange only, or for multi-quantum exchange with a limited number of rate constants obtained by semiclassical calculations, and, finally, with an exhaustive set of rate constants including asymmetric exchange processes, as well) and in the employed interaction potential. The most complete set among these three is introduced in this paper. An existing earlier kinetic model was updated to include the latter new data. Comparison of data produced by kinetic modelling with the above mentioned sets of rate constants shows that the vibrational distribution function, and, in particular, the CO overtone laser characteristics, are very sensitive to the choice of the model. The most complete model predicts slower evolution of the vibrational distribution, in qualitative agreement with experiments

  9. A nonlocal approach to the cosmological constant problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Remmen, Grant N.

    2017-06-01

    We construct a model in which the cosmological constant is canceled from the gravitational equations of motion. Our model relies on two key ingredients: a nonlocal constraint on the action, which forces the spacetime average of the Lagrangian density to vanish, and a dynamical way for this condition to be satisfied classically with arbitrary matter content. We implement the former condition with a spatially constant Lagrange multiplier associated with the volume form and the latter by including a free four-form gauge field strength in the action. These two features are enough to remove the cosmological constant from the Einstein equation. The model is consistent with all cosmological and experimental bounds on modification of gravity and allows for both cosmic inflation and the present epoch of acceleration.

  10. Stability constants of scandium complexes, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisako; Itoh, Naomi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants of scandium complexes with some carboxylate ligands were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 and 40.0 0 C and at an ionic strength of 0.10 with potassium nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The constants of the scandium complexes were appreciably greater than those of the corresponding lanthanoid complexes, as expected. The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of the scandium complexes were calculated from the stability constants at two temperatures. (author)

  11. Effect of pH on stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)- humate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadfam, Mohammad; Jintoku, Takashi; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Hara, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yoshimitsu

    1999-01-01

    The apparent stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes were determined by dialysis method at ionic strength 0.1 in the pH range from 3.3 to 5.7 under N 2 bubbling. The Am(III) and Cm(III) loadings were about 10 -7 and 10 -10 mol/dm 3 . The concentrations of Am-241 and Cm-242 tracers were measured by α-spectrometry. It was found that the apparent stability constants were almost identical for both the Am(III)-humate and Cm(III)-humate complexes. The apparent stability constants showed a small pH-dependence, increasing from 10 4.6 at pH 3.3 to 10 5.1 at pH 5.7. The ionization of acidic functional groups of humic acid is possibly the primary factor. Above pH 6, the dialysis membrane was no langer permeable to Am(III) and Cm(III) ions and the apparent stability constant could not be experimentally obtained. The apparent stability constants between pH 6 and pH 8.5 were evaluated by considering that both binary metal-humate and ternary metal-hydroxo-humate complexes exist at pHs above 6. It was assumed that mono-hydroxo-humate complex Am(OH)HA and Cm(OH)HA are the major ternary complexes that exist below pH 9. The overall stability constants for Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes increased from 10 5.7 at pH 6 to 10 7.2 at pH 8. This implies that the formation of metal-hydroxo-humate species is preferred over the formation of hydroxide species. The apparent overall stability constants can be easily incorporated into geochemical modeling of trivalent actinide migration. The results of the present study show that the apparent stability constants determined experimentally at pH≤6 do not represent the complexation properties at higher pHs and the formation of ternary complexes should be considered in speciation calculations of radionuclides at terrestrial environment. (J.P.N.)

  12. Reply to the comment of S. Rayne on "QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: A case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Kovarich, Simona; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2013-07-30

    We appreciate the interest of Dr. Rayne on our article and we completely agree that the dataset of (benzo-)triazoles, which were screened by the hydroxyl radical reaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model, was not only composed of benzo-triazoles but also included some simpler triazoles (without the condensed benzene ring), such as the chemicals listed by Dr. Rayne, as well as some related heterocycles (also few not aromatic). We want to clarify that in this article (as well as in other articles in which the same dataset was screened), for conciseness, the abbreviations (B)TAZs and BTAZs were used as general (and certainly too simplified) notations meaning an extended dataset of benzo-triazoles, triazoles, and related compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reevaluation of Performance of Electric Double-layer Capacitors from Constant-current Charge/Discharge and Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allagui, Anis; Freeborn, Todd J; Elwakil, Ahmed S; Maundy, Brent J

    2016-12-09

    The electric characteristics of electric-double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are determined by their capacitance which is usually measured in the time domain from constant-current charging/discharging and cyclic voltammetry tests, and from the frequency domain using nonlinear least-squares fitting of spectral impedance. The time-voltage and current-voltage profiles from the first two techniques are commonly treated by assuming ideal R s C behavior in spite of the nonlinear response of the device, which in turn provides inaccurate values for its characteristic metrics [corrected]. In this paper we revisit the calculation of capacitance, power and energy of EDLCs from the time domain constant-current step response and linear voltage waveform, under the assumption that the device behaves as an equivalent fractional-order circuit consisting of a resistance R s in series with a constant phase element (CPE(Q, α), with Q being a pseudocapacitance and α a dispersion coefficient). In particular, we show with the derived (R s , Q, α)-based expressions, that the corresponding nonlinear effects in voltage-time and current-voltage can be encompassed through nonlinear terms function of the coefficient α, which is not possible with the classical R s C model. We validate our formulae with the experimental measurements of different EDLCs.

  14. Reevaluation of Performance of Electric Double-layer Capacitors from Constant-current Charge/Discharge and Cyclic Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allagui, Anis; Freeborn, Todd J.; Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Maundy, Brent J.

    2016-12-01

    The electric characteristics of electric-double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are determined by their capacitance which is usually measured in the time domain from constant-current charging/discharging and cyclic voltammetry tests, and from the frequency domain using nonlinear least-squares fitting of spectral impedance. The time-voltage and current-voltage profiles from the first two techniques are commonly treated by assuming ideal SsC behavior in spite of the nonlinear response of the device, which in turn provides inaccurate values for its characteristic metrics. In this paper we revisit the calculation of capacitance, power and energy of EDLCs from the time domain constant-current step response and linear voltage waveform, under the assumption that the device behaves as an equivalent fractional-order circuit consisting of a resistance Rs in series with a constant phase element (CPE(Q, α), with Q being a pseudocapacitance and α a dispersion coefficient). In particular, we show with the derived (Rs, Q, α)-based expressions, that the corresponding nonlinear effects in voltage-time and current-voltage can be encompassed through nonlinear terms function of the coefficient α, which is not possible with the classical RsC model. We validate our formulae with the experimental measurements of different EDLCs.

  15. Malaria Parasite Density Estimation using Actual and Assumed White Blood Cells Count in Children in Eastern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Jalal A; Gasim, Gasim I; Karsani, Amani H; Elbashir, Leana M; Adam, Ishag

    2016-04-01

    Estimating malaria parasite count is needed for estimating the severity of the disease and during the follow-up. This study was conducted to determine the malaria parasite density among children using actual white blood cell (WBC) and the assumed WBC counts (8.0 × 10(9)/l). A cross-sectional study was conducted at New Halfa Hospital, Sudan. WBC count and count of asexual malaria parasite were performed on blood films. One hundred and three children were enrolled. The mean (SD) WBCs was 6.2 (2.9) cells × 10(9)/l. The geometric mean (SD) of the parasite count using the assumed WBCs (8.0 × 10(9)/l cells/μl) was significantly higher than that estimated using the actual WBC count [7345.76 (31,038.56) vs. 5965 (28,061.57) rings/μl,p = 0.042]. Malaria parasitemia based on assumed (8.0 × 10(9)/) WBCs is higher than parasitemia based on actual WBCs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Modeling the Effects of Viscosity and Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Propagation in Rigid Tubes with Various Cross-Sectional Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, René

    2011-01-01

    When modeling acoustics with viscothermal effects included, typically of importance for narrow tubes and slits, one can often use the so-called low reduced frequency model. With this model a characteristic length is assumed for which the sound pressure is constant. For example for a circular cyli...

  17. Fundamental Physical Constants: Looking from Different Angles

    OpenAIRE

    Karshenboim, Savely G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider fundamental physical constants which are among a few of the most important pieces of information we have learned about Nature after its intensive centuries-long studies. We discuss their multifunctional role in modern physics including problems related to the art of measurement, natural and practical units, origin of the constants, their possible calculability and variability etc.

  18. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  19. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  20. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...

  1. On special relativity with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hanying; Huang Chaoguang; Xu Zhan; Zhou Bin

    2004-01-01

    Based on the principle of relativity and the postulate of invariant speed and length, we propose the theory of special relativity with cosmological constant SRc,R, in which the cosmological constant is linked with the invariant length. Its relation with the doubly special relativity is briefly mentioned

  2. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to zero-sum problems, Discrete Math. 306 (2006) 1–10. [2] Adhikari S D and Chen Y G, Davenport constant with weights and some related ques- tions – II, J. Combin. Theory A115 (2008) 178–184. [3] Adhikari Sukumar Das and Rath Purusottam, Davenport constant with weights and some related questions, Integers 6 ...

  3. Equilibrium-constant expressions for aqueous plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrium-constant expressions for Pu disproportionation reactions traditionally contain three or four terms representing the concentrations or fractions of the oxidation states. The expressions can be rewritten so that one of the oxidation states is replaced by a term containing the oxidation number of the plutonium. Experimental estimations of the numerical values of the constants can then be checked in several ways. (author)

  4. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION. Acids – base titration involves the gradual addition or removal of protons for example using the deprotic form of glycine. The plot has two distinct stages corresponding to the deprotonation of the two different groups on glycine.

  5. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  6. Tadpole diagrams in constant electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbstein, Felix

    2017-10-01

    We show how all possible one-particle reducible tadpole diagrams in constant electromagnetic fields can be constructed from one-particle irreducible constant-field diagrams. The construction procedure is essentially algebraic and involves differentiations of the latter class of diagrams with respect to the field strength tensor and contractions with derivatives of the one-particle irreducible part of the Heisenberg-Euler effective Lagrangian in constant fields. Specific examples include the two-loop addendum to the Heisenberg-Euler effective action as well as a novel one-loop correction to the charged particle propagator in constant electromagnetic fields discovered recently. As an additional example, the approach devised in the present article is adopted to derive the tadpole contribution to the two-loop photon polarization tensor in constant fields for the first time.

  7. Solar constant values for estimating solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huashan; Lian, Yongwang; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin; Zhao, Liang

    2011-01-01

    There are many solar constant values given and adopted by researchers, leading to confusion in estimating solar radiation. In this study, some solar constant values collected from literature for estimating solar radiation with the Angstroem-Prescott correlation are tested in China using the measured data between 1971 and 2000. According to the ranking method based on the t-statistic, a strategy to select the best solar constant value for estimating the monthly average daily global solar radiation with the Angstroem-Prescott correlation is proposed. -- Research highlights: → The effect of the solar constant on estimating solar radiation is investigated. → The investigation covers a diverse range of climate and geography in China. → A strategy to select the best solar constant for estimating radiation is proposed.

  8. An assumed mode method and finite element method investigation of the coupled vibration in a flexible-disk rotor system with lacing wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shui-Ting; Huang, Hong-Wu [Hunan University, Changsha (China); Chiu, Yi-Jui; Yu, Guo-Fei [Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen (China); Yang, Chia-Hao [Taipei Chengshih University of Science and Technology, Taipei (China); Jian, Sheng-Rui [I-Shou University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2017-02-15

    The Assumed mode method (AMM) and Finite element method (FEM) were used. Their results were compared to investigate the coupled shaft-torsion, disk-transverse, and blade-bending vibrations in a flexible-disk rotor system. The blades were grouped with a spring. The flexible-disk rotor system was divided into three modes of coupled vibrations: Shaft-disk-blade, disk-blade, and blade-blade. Two new modes of coupled vibrations were introduced, namely, lacing wires-blade and lacing wires-disk-blade. The patterns of change of the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system were discussed. The results showed the following: first, mode shapes and natural frequencies varied, and the results of the AMM and FEM differed; second, numerical calculation results showed three influencing factors on natural frequencies, namely, the lacing wire constant, the lacing wire location, and the flexible disk; lastly, the flexible disk could affect the stability of the system as reflected in the effect of the rotational speed.

  9. Unification of cosmology and the second law of thermodynamics. Proposal for solving the cosmological constant and inflation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Holger B.; Ninomiya, Masao

    2006-01-01

    We seek to unify the second law of thermodynamics with other physical laws, or, at least to find a law underlying the second law of thermodynamics. Assuming no fine tuning, using a random Hamiltonian, we argue just from the equations of motion - without the second law - that entropy cannot first increase and then decrease except with the rather strict restriction S large ≤ S small1 + S small2 . Here S large is the large' entropy in the intermediate era, while S small1 and S small2 are the entropies at certain times before and after the S large era. From this theorem asserting that there can exist no strong maximum for the entropy, we argue that an S 1 cyclic time model world could have entropy that varies by at most a factor of two and would not be phenomenologically realistic. With an open ended time axis (-∞, ∞)=R, some law underlying the second law of thermodynamics is needed if the entropy is not maximal (i.e. that heat death having y occurred at the start). We derive such a law behind the second law - or a unification of the second law with other laws - by assigning a probability weight P for finding the world/system in various places in phase space. In such a model, P is almost unified with the rest as P=exp(-2S Im ), with S Im being the imaginary part of the action. We quite naturally derive the second law for practical purposes, a Big Bang with two-sided time directions, and find that there is a need for a Hamiltonian density with a well-defined bottom. Assuming that the cosmological constant is a dynamical variable in the sense that it is counted as on 'initial condition', we even solve in our model the cosmological constant problem without using the anthropic principle. (author)

  10. Transient Accumulation of NO2- and N2O during Denitrification Explained by Assuming Cell Diversification by Stochastic Transcription of Denitrification Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Junaid; Qu, Zhi; Bergaust, Linda L; Bakken, Lars R

    2016-01-01

    Denitrifying bacteria accumulate [Formula: see text], NO, and N2O, the amounts depending on transcriptional regulation of core denitrification genes in response to O2-limiting conditions. The genes include nar, nir, nor and nosZ, encoding [Formula: see text]-, [Formula: see text]-, NO- and N2O reductase, respectively. We previously constructed a dynamic model to simulate growth and respiration in batch cultures of Paracoccus denitrificans. The observed denitrification kinetics were adequately simulated by assuming a stochastic initiation of nir-transcription in each cell with an extremely low probability (0.5% h-1), leading to product- and substrate-induced transcription of nir and nor, respectively, via NO. Thus, the model predicted cell diversification: after O2 depletion, only a small fraction was able to grow by reducing [Formula: see text]. Here we have extended the model to simulate batch cultivation with [Formula: see text], i.e., [Formula: see text], NO, N2O, and N2 kinetics, measured in a novel experiment including frequent measurements of [Formula: see text]. Pa. denitrificans reduced practically all [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] before initiating gas production. The [Formula: see text] production is adequately simulated by assuming stochastic nar-transcription, as that for nirS, but with a higher probability (0.035 h-1) and initiating at a higher O2 concentration. Our model assumes that all cells express nosZ, thus predicting that a majority of cells have only N2O-reductase (A), while a minority (B) has [Formula: see text]-, NO- and N2O-reductase. Population B has a higher cell-specific respiration rate than A because the latter can only use N2O produced by B. Thus, the ratio [Formula: see text] is low immediately after O2 depletion, but increases throughout the anoxic phase because B grows faster than A. As a result, the model predicts initially low but gradually increasing N2O concentration throughout the anoxic phase, as observed. The

  11. The fermion propagator in cosmological spaces with constant deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koksma, Jurjen F; Prokopec, Tomislav, E-mail: J.F.Koksma@uu.n, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.n [Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-06-21

    We calculate the fermion propagator in Friedmann-LemaItre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetimes with constant deceleration q=epsilon-1, epsilon=-H-dot/H{sup 2} for excited states. For fermions whose mass is generated by a scalar field through a Yukawa coupling m = g{sub Y}phi, we assume phi approx H. We first solve the mode functions by splitting the spinor into a direct product of helicity and chirality spinors. We also allow for non-vacuum states. We normalize the spinors using a consistent canonical quantization and by requiring orthogonality of particle and anti-particle spinors. We apply our propagator to calculate the one-loop effective action and renormalize using dimensional regularization. Since the Hubble parameter is now treated dynamically, this paves the way to study the dynamical backreaction of fermions on the background spacetime.

  12. Solvation free energies and solvent force constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, T.; Ladanyi, B.M.; Hynes, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical formulation for the solvent force constant k q , which gauges electrical potential fluctuations for an ion in solution and whose charge dependence is a measure of nonlinear aspects of solvation, is presented in terms of the solute charge (q) variation of the solvation free energy. This formulation allows the calculation of k q via integral equation theories. This is illustrated by a series of calculations for ionic solutes in model dipolar-quadrupolar solvents via the reference hypernetted chain (RHNC) integral equation approach. It is found that the q variation of k q can be comprehended in terms of the cooperative (or competing) contributions of the solvent dipole and quadrupole to the acceleration of the solvation free energy. By contrast, traditional notions of dielectric saturation prove to be of much less direct relevance, due in part to the importance of competing electrostriction effects. The formalism is also applied to available simulation and integral equation solvation free energy studies of aqueous ionic solvation to infer to behavior of k q . The extensions for the formalism to more complex solutes (e.g., ion pairs), to higher order fluctuations (e.g., electric field), and to the solvent frequency and effective mass are briefly indicated. 51 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. The properties of C-parameter and coupling constants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-03

    Dec 3, 2016 ... Abstract. We present the properties of the C-parameter as an event-shape variable. We calculate the coupling constants in the perturbative and also in the non-perturbative parts of the QCD theory, using the dispersive as well as the shape function models. By fitting the corresponding theoretical predictions ...

  14. Some Debye temperatures from single-crystal elastic constant data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.; Edwards, J.L.

    1966-01-01

    The mean velocity of sound has been calculated for 14 crystalline solids by using the best recent values of their single-crystal elastic stiffness constants. These mean sound velocities have been used to obtain the elastic Debye temperatures ??De for these materials. Models of the three wave velocity surfaces for calcite are illustrated. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Decay constants in soft wall AdS/QCD revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2016-12-01

    We show here that a modified framework of soft wall AdS/QCD involving an additional dimensionfull parameter, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, provides decay constants decreasing with radial excitation level. In this version of the soft wall model the two point function of gauge theory operators is calculated at a finite position of the anti-de Sitter space radial coordinate.

  16. Other Earths: Search for Life and the Constant Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshyaran M. M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a search methodology for finding other exactly similar earth like planets (or sister earths. The theory is based on space consisting of Riemann curves or highways. A mathematical model based on constant curvature, a moving frame bundle, and gravitational dynamics is introduced.

  17. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  18. On the constants for some Sobolev imbeddings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzocchero Livio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the imbedding inequality is the Sobolev space (or Bessel potential space of type and (integer or fractional order . We write down upper bounds for the constants , using an argument previously applied in the literature in particular cases. We prove that the upper bounds computed in this way are in fact the sharp constants if , , and exhibit the maximising functions. Furthermore, using convenient trial functions, we derive lower bounds on for in many cases these are close to the previous upper bounds, as illustrated by a number of examples, thus characterizing the sharp constants with little uncertainty.

  19. On the constant-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhu; Gong, Yungui

    2018-03-01

    The primordial power spectra of scalar and tensor perturbations during slow-roll inflation are usually calculated with the method of Bessel function approximation. For constant-roll or ultra slow-roll inflation, the method of Bessel function approximation may be invalid. We compare the numerical results with the analytical results derived from the Bessel function approximation, and we find that they differ significantly on super-horizon scales if the constant slow-roll parameter ηH is not small. More accurate method is needed for calculating the primordial power spectrum for constant-roll inflation.

  20. Gravitational Lorentz violations and adjustment of the cosmological constant in asymmetrically warped spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, C.; Erlich, J.; Grojean, C.

    2001-06-01

    We investigate spacetimes in which the speed of light along flat 4D sections varies over the extra dimensions due to different warp factors for the space and the time coordinates (``asymmetrically warped'' spacetimes). The main property of such spaces is that while the induced metric is flat, implying Lorentz invariant particle physics on a brane, bulk gravitational effects will cause apparent violations of Lorentz invariance and of causality from the brane observer's point of view. An important experimentally verifiable consequence of this is that gravitational waves may travel with a speed different from the speed of light on the brane, and possibly even faster. We find the most general spacetimes of this sort, which are given by AdS-Schwarzschild or AdS-Reissner-Nordström black holes, assuming the simplest possible sources in the bulk. Due to the gravitational Lorentz violations these models do not have an ordinary Lorentz invariant effective description, and thus provide a possible way around Weinberg's no-go theorem for the adjustment of the cosmological constant. Indeed we show that the cosmological constant may relax in such theories by the adjustment of the mass and the charge of the black hole. The black hole singularity in these solutions can be protected by a horizon, but the existence of a horizon requires some exotic energy densities on the brane. We investigate the cosmological expansion of these models and speculate that it may provide an explanation for the accelerating Universe, provided that the timescale for the adjustment is shorter than the Hubble time. In this case the accelerating Universe would be a manifestation of gravitational Lorentz violations in extra dimensions.

  1. A grid-based model of backwasting of supraglacial ice cliffs over debris-covered glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buri, Pascal; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Steiner, Jakob F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/119338653; Miles, Evan S.; Immerzeel, Wouter W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290472113

    2016-01-01

    Ice cliffs might be partly responsible for the high mass losses of debris-covered glaciers in the Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya region. The few existing models of cliff backwasting are point-scale models applied at few locations or assume cliffs to be planes with constant slope and aspect, a major

  2. Time-varying boundaries for diffusion models of decision making and response time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.; Lee, M.D.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Maris, G.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion models are widely-used and successful accounts of the time course of two-choice decision making. Most diffusion models assume constant boundaries, which are the threshold levels of evidence that must be sampled from a stimulus to reach a decision. We summarize theoretical results from

  3. Geometrical contributions to the exchange constants: Free electrons with spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2017-05-01

    Using thermal quantum field theory, we derive an expression for the exchange constant that resembles Fukuyama's formula for orbital magnetic susceptibility (OMS). Guided by this formal analogy between the exchange constant and OMS, we identify a contribution to the exchange constant that arises from the geometrical properties of the band structure in mixed phase space. We compute the exchange constants for free electrons and show that the geometrical contribution is generally important. Our formalism allows us to study the exchange constants in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. Thereby, we find sizable differences between the exchange constants of helical and cycloidal spin spirals. Furthermore, we discuss how to calculate the exchange constants based on a gauge-field approach in the case of the Rashba model with an additional exchange splitting, and we show that the exchange constants obtained from this gauge-field approach are in perfect agreement with those obtained from the quantum field theoretical method.

  4. Remote Sensing of Salinity: The Dielectric Constant of Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Global monitoring of sea surface salinity from space requires an accurate model for the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature to characterize the emissivity of the surface. Measurements are being made at 1.413 GHz, the center frequency of the Aquarius radiometers, using a resonant cavity and the perturbation method. The cavity is operated in a transmission mode and immersed in a liquid bath to control temperature. Multiple measurements are made at each temperature and salinity. Error budgets indicate a relative accuracy for both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of about 1%.

  5. Cardio-vascular reserve index (CVRI) during exercise complies with the pattern assumed by the cardiovascular reserve hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, Michael J; Bobrovsky, Ben-Zion; Gabbay, Itay E; Ben-Dov, Issahar; Reuveny, Ronen; Gabbay, Uri

    2017-05-01

    The Cardio-vascular reserve index (CVRI) had been empirically validated in diverse morbidities as a quantitative estimate of the reserve assumed by the cardiovascular reserve hypothesis. This work evaluates whether CVRI during exercise complies with the cardiovascular reserve hypothesis. Retrospective study based on a database of patients who underwent cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPX) for diverse indications. Patient's physiological measurements were retrieved at four predefined CPX stages (rest, anaerobic threshold, peak exercise and after 2min of recovery). CVRI was individually calculated retrospectively at each stage. Mean CVRI at rest was 0.81, significantly higher (p0.05). CVRI after 2min of recovery rose considerably, most in the group with the best exercise capacity and least in those with the lowest exercise capacity. CVRI during exercise fits the pattern predicted by the cardiovascular reserve hypothesis. CVRI decreased with exercise reaching a minimum at peak exercise and rising with recovery. The CVRI nadir at peak exercise, similar across groups classified by exercise capacity, complies with the assumed exhaustion threshold. The clinical utility of CVRI should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reasons People Surrender Unowned and Owned Cats to Australian Animal Shelters and Barriers to Assuming Ownership of Unowned Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Morton, John; Vankan, Dianne; Paterson, Mandy; Bennett, Pauleen C; Rand, Jacquie; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-01-01

    Most cats surrendered to nonhuman animal shelters are identified as unowned, and the surrender reason for these cats is usually simply recorded as "stray." A cross-sectional study was conducted with people surrendering cats to 4 Australian animal shelters. Surrenderers of unowned cats commonly gave surrender reasons relating to concern for the cat and his/her welfare. Seventeen percent of noncaregivers had considered adopting the cat. Barriers to assuming ownership most commonly related to responsible ownership concerns. Unwanted kittens commonly contributed to the decision to surrender for both caregivers and noncaregivers. Nonowners gave more surrender reasons than owners, although many owners also gave multiple surrender reasons. These findings highlight the multifactorial nature of the decision-making process leading to surrender and demonstrate that recording only one reason for surrender does not capture the complexity of the surrender decision. Collecting information about multiple reasons for surrender, particularly reasons for surrender of unowned cats and barriers to assuming ownership, could help to develop strategies to reduce the number of cats surrendered.

  7. Periods of constant and falling-rate for infrared drying of carrot slices Períodos de secagem constante e decrescente de fatias de cenoura por infravermelho

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando M. Botelho; Paulo C. Corrêa; André. L. D. Goneli; Márcio A. Martins; Felipe E. A. Magalhães; Sílvia C. Campos

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the infrared drying process of carrot slices and to determine coefficients related to the heat and mass transfer of the process. Fresh carrots were used, dried until constant weight in a dryer with infrared heating source. Different models were utilized to fit the experimental data of constant and falling drying rate periods. It was verified that the coefficients of heat and mass transfer, during the constant drying rate, significantly increased with temperat...

  8. Analysis of constant-head well tests in nonporous fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doe, T.; Remer, J.

    1981-01-01

    If one compares the results of steady analyses and transient flowrate analyses, the error in assuming steady flow is less than an order of magnitude for reasonable values of storativity, and this error can be minimized through proper choice of radius of influence. Although the steady flow assumptions do not result in large errors in the calculation of permeability, careful design of constant-head well tests can yield not only storativity, but also qualitative information on the areal extent of permeable zones or fractures tested. Constant-head well tests have several major advantages over other well test techniques in low permeability rock. Unlike pump tests, wellbore storage effects are virtually nonexistant. Provided low-flow measurement apparatus is available, constant-level tests are far more rapid than slug tests and, unlike pulse tests, compliance of equipment is not a factor, since the system is maintained at constant pressure throughout the test

  9. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Serrano, A. [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Bastos, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Robles-Pérez, S., E-mail: salvarp@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Física Teórica, Universidad del País Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-02-12

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts.

  10. An improved dosimeter having constant flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    A dosemeter designed for individual use which can be used to monitor toxic radon gas and toxic related products of radon gas in mines and which incorporates a constant air stream flowing through the dosimeter is described. (U.K.)

  11. Constant conditional entropy and related hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Dębowski, Łukasz; Moscoso del Prado Martín, Fermín

    2013-01-01

    Constant entropy rate (conditional entropies must remain constant as the sequence length increases) and uniform information density (conditional probabilities must remain constant as the sequence length increases) are two information theoretic principles that are argued to underlie a wide range of linguistic phenomena. Here we revise the predictions of these principles in the light of Hilberg’s law on the scaling of conditional entropy in language and related laws. We show that constant entropy rate (CER) and two interpretations for uniform information density (UID), full UID and strong UID, are inconsistent with these laws. Strong UID implies CER but the reverse is not true. Full UID, a particular case of UID, leads to costly uncorrelated sequences that are totally unrealistic. We conclude that CER and its particular cases are incomplete hypotheses about the scaling of conditional entropies. (letter)

  12. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Serrano, A.; Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Robles-Pérez, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts

  13. Hydrolysis and formation constants at 250C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.L.

    1982-05-01

    A database consisting of hydrolysis and formation constants for about 20 metals associated with the disposal of nuclear waste is given. Complexing ligands for the various ionic species of these metals include OH, F, Cl, SO 4 , PO 4 and CO 3 . Table 1 consists of tabulated calculated and experimental values of log K/sub xy/, mainly at 25 0 C and various ionic strengths together with references to the origin of the data. Table 2 consists of a column of recommended stability constants at 25 0 C and zero ionic strength tabulated in the column headed log K/sub xy/(0); other columns contain coefficients for an extended Debye-Huckel equation to permit calculations of stability constants up to 3 ionic strength, and up to 0.7 ionic strength using the Davies equation. Selected stability constants calculated with these coefficients for various ionic strengths agree to an average of +- 2% when compared with published experimental and calculated values

  14. A Markov decision model for optimising economic production lot size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Traditional approaches towards determining the economic production lot (EPL) size in man- ufacturing applications assume deterministic demand, often at a constant rate. In this paper, an optimisation model is developed for determining the EPL size that minimises production and inventory costs of a periodic ...

  15. Distribution of adhesion rate constant in the coal sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Brožek

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Flotation is the process of enrichment which consists in differentiating the useful component (volume property in the separation products. Flotation leads to the differentiation of the volume property by means of applying the differentiation of surface properties. Since there is a correlation between these properties, the authors determined the distribution of adhesion rate constant in relation with the content of the useful component and applying the dispersive model of a particle. The content of the useful component is directly connected with the volume physical property, represented by particle density. The paper present distribution functions of density and adhesion rate constant in the sample. Also the relation between adhesion rate constant and ash content for narrow density fractions has been revealed.

  16. Identification of force constants in β-brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norvell, J. C.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1969-01-01

    The phonon dispersion curves of β-brass have previously been measured by Gilat and Dolling and a fit was obtained to a Born-von Kármán model with forces extending to the fourth nearest neighbours. Although a factor of 10 was found between the second-nearest-neighbour Cu-Cu and Zn-Zn force constants......, the data did not allow an identification of these constants. By comparisons of neutron group intensities from two β-brass crystals, one with normal Cu and the other isotopically enriched with 65Cu, we are able to identify conclusively these force constants: αZn-Zn2nd similar, equals 10αCu-Cu2nd....

  17. NVU dynamics. III. Simulating molecules at constant potential energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final paper in a series that introduces geodesic molecular dynamics at constant potential energy. This dynamics is entitled NVU dynamics in analogy to standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics. In the first two papers [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B....... In this paper, the NVU algorithm for atomic systems is extended to be able to simulate the geodesic motion of molecules at constant potential energy. We derive an algorithm for simulating rigid bonds and test this algorithm on three different systems: an asymmetric dumbbell model, Lewis-Wahnström o......-terphenyl (OTP) and rigid SPC/E water. The rigid bonds introduce additional constraints beyond that of constant potential energy for atomic systems. The rigid-bond NVU algorithm conserves potential energy, bond lengths, and step length for indefinitely long runs. The quantities probed in simulations give results...

  18. A quadri-constant fraction discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Gu Zhongdao

    1992-01-01

    A quad Constant Fraction (Amplitude and Rise Time Compensation) Discriminator Circuit is described, which is based on the ECL high-speed dual comparator AD 9687. The CFD (ARCD) is of the constant fraction timing type (the amplitude and rise time compensation timing type) employing a leading edge discriminator to eliminate error triggers caused by noises. A timing walk measurement indicates a timing walk of less than +- 150 ps from -50 mV to -5 V

  19. Building evolutionary architectures support constant change

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Neal; Kua, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The software development ecosystem is constantly changing, providing a constant stream of new tools, frameworks, techniques, and paradigms. Over the past few years, incremental developments in core engineering practices for software development have created the foundations for rethinking how architecture changes over time, along with ways to protect important architectural characteristics as it evolves. This practical guide ties those parts together with a new way to think about architecture and time.

  20. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  1. Optical constants of concentrated aqueous ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Using experimental data obtained from applying spectroscopy to a 39-wt-% aqueous ammonium sulfate solution, it is shown that, even though specific aerosol optical constants appear quite accurate, spectral variations may exist as functions of material composition or concentration or both. Prudent users of optical constant data must then include liberal data error estimates when performing calculations or in interpreting spectroscopic surveys of collected aerosol material.

  2. Determination of the Equilibrium Constants of a Weak Acid: An Experiment for Analytical or Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Russell A.

    1998-05-01

    A simple experiment, utilizing readily available equipment and chemicals, is described. It allows students to explore the concepts of chemical equilibria, nonideal behavior of aqueous solutions, least squares with adjustment of nonlinear model parameters, and errors. The relationship between the pH of a solution of known initial concentration and volume of a weak acid as it is titrated by known volumes of a monohydroxy strong base is developed rigorously assuming ideal behavior. A distinctive feature of this work is a method that avoids dealing with the problems presented by equations with multiple roots. The volume of base added is calculated in terms of a known value of the pH and the equilibrium constants. The algebraic effort involved is nearly the same as the alternative of deriving a master equation for solving for the hydrogen ion concentration or activity and results in a more efficient computational algorithm. This approach offers two advantages over the use of computer software to solve directly for the hydrogen ion concentration. First, it avoids a potentially lengthy iterative procedure encountered when the polynomial exceeds third order in the hydrogen ion concentration; and second, it provides a means of obtaining results with a hand calculator that can prove useful in checking computer code. The approach is limited to weak solutions to avoid dealing with molalities and to insure that the Debye-Hückel limiting law is applicable. The nonlinear least squares algorithm Nonlinear Fit, found in the computational mathematics library Mathematica, is utilized to fit the measured volume of added base to the calculated value as a function of the measured pH subject to variation of all the equilibrium constants as parameters (including Kw). The experiment emphasizes both data collection and data analysis aspects of the problem. Data for the titration of phosphorous acid, H3PO3, by NaOH are used to illustrate the approach. Fits of the data without corrections

  3. Highly Reliable NPP Instrumentation Using Constant Voltage Feedback Circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung J.; Choi, Bo H.; Kim, Ji H.; Rim, Chun T. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    A highly reliable nuclear power plant (NPP) instrumentation using constant voltage feedback circuits is proposed. Contrary to conventional NPP instrumentation, two operational amplifiers are used at auxiliary building to supply constant DC voltage across the potentiometer or wheatstone bridge type sensors, such as resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and strain gauges. The proposed constant voltage feedback circuits maintain its output voltage as constant regardless of the length of lead wire from the auxiliary building to the sensors. A detail analysis of the proposed feedback circuits and design procedures including the internal resistance and parasitic LC components of lead wire are presented. A prototype with lumped RLC values for modeling lead wires is fabricated and experimentally verified to supply constant 10V up to 200m distance under 0.8% error. Due to its versatile characteristics with cost effective structure, the proposed scheme can be generally extended to pressure meters and water-level recorders to guarantee robust measurements without conventional current transducers under severe accidents.

  4. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  5. Topological structure of the vacuum, cosmological constant and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Das, A.; Das, C. R.; Laperashvili, L. V.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we present a theory of cosmological constant and dark energy (DE), based on the topological structure of the vacuum. The multiple point principle (MPP) is reviewed. It demonstrates the existence of the two vacua into the SM. The Froggatt-Nielsen’s prediction of the top-quark and Higgs masses is given in the assumption that there exist two degenerate vacua in the SM. This prediction was improved by the next-order calculations. We also considered Sidharth’s theory of cosmological constant based on the noncommutative geometry of the Planck scale space-time, what gives an extremely small DE density providing the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Theory of two degenerate vacua — the Planck scale phase and electroweak (EW) phase — is also reviewed, topological defects in these vacua are investigated, also the Compton wavelength phase suggested by Sidharth is discussed. A general theory of the phase transition and the problem of the vacuum stability in the SM is reviewed. Assuming the existence of a new scalar S bound state 6t + 6t¯, earlier predicted by Froggatt, Nielsen and Laperashvili, we try to provide the vacuum stability in the SM and exact accuracy of the MPP.

  6. Strong Nuclear Gravitational Constant and the Origin of Nuclear Planck Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshavatharam U. V. S.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether it may be real or an equivalent, existence of strong nuclear gravitational con- stant G S is assumed. Its value is obtained from Fermi’s weak coupling constant as G S = 6 : 9427284 10 31 m 3 / kg sec 2 and thus “nuclear planck scale” is defined. For strong interaction existence of a new integral charged “confined fermion” of mass 105.383 MeV is assumed. Strong coupling constant is the ratio of nuclear planck energy = 11.97 MeV and assumed 105.383 MeV. 1 s = X s is defined as the strong interaction mass gen- erator. With 105.383 MeV fermion various nuclear unit radii are fitted. Fermi’s weak coupling constant, strong interaction upper limit and Bohr radius are fitted at funda- mental level. Considering Fermi’s weak coupling constant and nuclear planck length a new number X e = 294.8183 is defined for fitting the electron, muon and tau rest masses. Using X s , X e and 105 : 32 = 0 : 769 MeV as the Coulombic energy constant = E c , en- ergy coe cients of the semi-empirical mass formula are estimated as E v = 16 : 32 MeV ; E s = 19 : 37 MeV ; E a = 23 : 86 MeV and E p = 11 : 97 MeV where Coulombic energy term contains [ Z ] 2 : Starting from Z = 2 nuclear binding energy is fitted with two terms along with only one energy constant = 0.769 MeV. Finally nucleon mass and its excited levels are fitted.

  7. A consistent set of thermodynamic constants for americium (III) species with hydroxyl and carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.; Silva, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent set of thermodynamic constants for aqueous species, and compounds of Am(III) with hydroxyl and carbonate ligands has been developed. The procedure used to develop these constants involved establishing a value for one formation constant at a time in a sequential order, starting with the hydrolysis products and hydroxide solids, and then proceeding to carbonate species. The EQ3NR chemical-equilibrium model was used to test the constants developed. These constants are consistent with most of the experimental data that form their basis; however, considerable uncertainty still exists in some aspects of the Am(III) data

  8. Solution of the punctual kinetic equation with constant reactivity by Laplace transformation with numeric inversion; Solucao da equacao de cinetica pontual com reatividade constante por transformada de Laplace com inversao numerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwanz, Daphne, E-mail: daphne_schwanz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual do Rio Grande do Sul, Novo Hamburgo, RS (Brazil); Petersen, Claudio Z., E-mail: claudiopetersen@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Leite, Sargio Q.B., E-mail: bogado@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e Ciclo do Combustivel

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the punctual kinetic equation, which consists of a Stiff type ordinary equation system, will be solved by the technique of Laplace Transformation with numerical inversion. The punctual kinetic equation will be written in a matrix form assuming constant reactivity. The inversion of the Laplace Transformation will be solved by the gaussian quadrature method. We will perform numerical simulation and will make comparisons with obtained results in the literature for constant reactivity

  9. Determination of Rate Constants and Equilibrium Constants for Solution-Phase Drug–Protein Interactions by Ultrafast Affinity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A method was created on the basis of ultrafast affinity extraction to determine both the dissociation rate constants and equilibrium constants for drug–protein interactions in solution. Human serum albumin (HSA), an important binding agent for many drugs in blood, was used as both a model soluble protein and as an immobilized binding agent in affinity microcolumns for the analysis of free drug fractions. Several drugs were examined that are known to bind to HSA. Various conditions to optimize in the use of ultrafast affinity extraction for equilibrium and kinetic studies were considered, and several approaches for these measurements were examined. The dissociation rate constants obtained for soluble HSA with each drug gave good agreement with previous rate constants reported for the same drugs or other solutes with comparable affinities for HSA. The equilibrium constants that were determined also showed good agreement with the literature. The results demonstrated that ultrafast affinity extraction could be used as a rapid approach to provide information on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of a drug–protein interaction in solution. This approach could be extended to other systems and should be valuable for high-throughput drug screening or biointeraction studies. PMID:24911267

  10. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  11. Hydrostatic pressure dependence of elastic constants for lead fluoride crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Rao, C.N.

    1988-10-01

    The variations of the second order elastic constants (SOEC) and longitudinal and shear moduli with hydrostatic pressure for the lead fluoride have been investigated theoretically, for the first time, by means of a three-body force potential (TBP) model. The significance of three-body interactions (TBI) has been clearly demonstrated in these investigations. The present TBP model has reproduced the pressure derivatives of the SOEC of PbF more satisfactorily than the shell model and other model calculations. (author). 24 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Modeling volatile organic compounds sorption on dry building materials using double-exponential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Baoqing; Ge, Di; Li, Jiajia; Guo, Yuan; Kim, Chang Nyung

    2013-01-01

    A double-exponential surface sink model for VOCs sorption on building materials is presented. Here, the diffusion of VOCs in the material is neglected and the material is viewed as a surface sink. The VOCs concentration in the air adjacent to the material surface is introduced and assumed to always maintain equilibrium with the material-phase concentration. It is assumed that the sorption can be described by mass transfer between the room air and the air adjacent to the material surface. The mass transfer coefficient is evaluated from the empirical correlation, and the equilibrium constant can be obtained by linear fitting to the experimental data. The present model is validated through experiments in small and large test chambers. The predicted results accord well with the experimental data in both the adsorption stage and desorption stage. The model avoids the ambiguity of model constants found in other surface sink models and is easy to scale up

  13. Analytical Determination of the Confinement Potential and Coupling Constant of Spin--Orbit Interactions of Electrons in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A; Al Farabi Kazakh State National University. Almaty

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer nanocrystalline structure is represented by the electrostatic field inducted by total image charge, and the confinement potential for electrons is determined. Assuming that at a given distance the confinement potential is equal to the Coulomb repulsion and an interaction between electrons becomes spin-orbit, the constant of the spin-orbit interaction of electrons in nanostructures is determined. The dependence of the constant of the spin-orbit interaction on environment parameters and the distance between electrons is studied.

  14. Prediction of acid dissociation constants of organic compounds using group contribution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Teng; Jhamb, Spardha; Liang, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, group contribution (GC) property models for the estimation of acid dissociation constants (Ka) of organic compounds are presented. Three GC models are developed to predict the negative logarithm of the acid dissociation constant pKa: (a) a linear GC model for amino acids using 180...... model, uncertainty estimates for the predicted pKa values are also provided. The model details, regressed parameters and application examples are highlighted....

  15. Potential role of strain hardening in the cessation of rifting at constant tectonic force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamasaki, T.; Stephenson, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study the cessation of rifting at constant tectonic force is discussed from the viewpoint of lithospheric rheology using a simple one-dimensional numerical model. The behaviour of the conventionally adopted constant force model re-examined in this study contradicts some general features in

  16. Construction and experimental testing of the constant-bandwidth constant-temperature anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, P

    2008-09-01

    A classical constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer enables the measurement of fast-changing flow velocity fluctuations, although its transmission bandwidth is a function of measured velocity. This may be a source of significant dynamic errors. Incorporation of an adaptive controller into the constant-temperature system results in hot-wire anemometer operating with a constant transmission bandwidth. The construction together with the results of experimental testing of a constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer prototype are presented in this article. During the testing, an approximately constant transmission bandwidth of the anemometer was achieved. The constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows characterized by a wide range of velocity changes.

  17. Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and big numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [KazNU, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); IETP, Al-Farabi KazNU, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2015-02-01

    The nonassociative generalization of supersymmetry is considered. It is shown that the associator of four supersymmetry generators has the coefficient ∝ ℎ/l{sub 0}{sup 2} where l0 is some characteristic length. Two cases are considered: (a) l{sub 0}{sup -2} coincides with the cosmological constant; (b) l{sub 0} is the classical radius of the electron. It is also shown that the scaled constant is of the order of 10{sup -120} for the first case and 10{sup -30} for the second case. The possible manifestation and smallness of nonassociativity is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  19. Decay constants of heavy-light mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allton, C.R.; Crisafulli, M.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Salina, G.; Bartoloni, A.; Battista, C.; Cabasino, S.; Cabibbo, N.; Marzano, F.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pech, J.; Rapuano, F.; Sarno, R.; Todesco, G.M.; Torelli, M.; Tross, W.; Vicini, P.

    1994-01-01

    The decay constants of the heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons are studied in a high statistics run using the Wilson action at β=6.0 and β=6.2, and the clover action at β=6.0. The systematics of O(a) discretisation errors are discussed. Our best estimates of the decay constants are: f D =218(9) MeV, f D /f D s =1.11(1) and we obtain preliminary values for f B . (orig.)

  20. Lattice theta constants vs Riemann theta constants and NSR superstring measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, P.; Morozov, A.; Sleptsov, A.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss relations between two different representations of hypothetical holomorphic NSR measures, based on two different ways of constructing the semi-modular forms of weight 8. One of these ways is to build forms from the ordinary Riemann theta constants and another - from the lattice theta constants. We discuss unexpectedly elegant relations between lattice theta constants, corresponding to 16-dimensional self-dual lattices, and Riemann theta constants and present explicit formulae expressing the former ones through the latter. Starting from genus 5 the modular-form approach to construction of NSR measures is clearly sick and it seems to fail completely already at genus 6.