WorldWideScience

Sample records for models assuming constant

  1. Assumed PDF modeling in rocket combustor simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempke, M.; Gerlinger, P.; Aigner, M.

    2013-03-01

    In order to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry, a multivariate assumed PDF (Probability Density Function) approach is used to simulate a model rocket combustor with finite-rate chemistry. The reported test case is the PennState preburner combustor with a single shear coaxial injector. Experimental data for the wall heat flux is available for this configuration. Unsteady RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) simulation results with and without the assumed PDF approach are analyzed and compared with the experimental data. Both calculations show a good agreement with the experimental wall heat flux data. Significant changes due to the utilization of the assumed PDF approach can be observed in the radicals, e. g., the OH mass fraction distribution, while the effect on the wall heat flux is insignificant.

  2. Bayesian modeling growth curves for quail assuming skewness in errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Marcelo Rossi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bayesian modeling growth curves for quail assuming skewness in errors - To assume normal distributions in the data analysis is common in different areas of the knowledge. However we can make use of the other distributions that are capable to model the skewness parameter in the situations that is needed to model data with tails heavier than the normal. This article intend to present alternatives to the assumption of the normality in the errors, adding asymmetric distributions. A Bayesian approach is proposed to fit nonlinear models when the errors are not normal, thus, the distributions t, skew-normal and skew-t are adopted. The methodology is intended to apply to different growth curves to the quail body weights. It was found that the Gompertz model assuming skew-normal errors and skew-t errors, respectively for male and female, were the best fitted to the data.

  3. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  4. Modeling turbulent/chemistry interactions using assumed pdf methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, R. L, Jr.; White, J. A.; Girimaji, S. S.; Drummond, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Two assumed probability density functions (pdfs) are employed for computing the effect of temperature fluctuations on chemical reaction. The pdfs assumed for this purpose are the Gaussian and the beta densities of the first kind. The pdfs are first used in a parametric study to determine the influence of temperature fluctuations on the mean reaction-rate coefficients. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations significantly affect the magnitude of the mean reaction-rate coefficients of some reactions depending on the mean temperature and the intensity of the fluctuations. The pdfs are then tested on a high-speed turbulent reacting mixing layer. Results clearly show a decrease in the ignition delay time due to increases in the magnitude of most of the mean reaction rate coefficients.

  5. A Model for Teacher Effects from Longitudinal Data without Assuming Vertical Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Louis T.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Lockwood, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using longitudinal measures of student achievement to estimate individual teacher effects. Current multivariate models assume each teacher has a single effect on student outcomes that persists undiminished to all future test administrations (complete persistence [CP]) or can diminish with time but remains…

  6. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Saleh-Moghaddam; M E Zomorrodian

    2013-11-01

    The average of the moments for event shapes in + - → hadrons within the context of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are $\\langle 1 - T \\rangle, \\langle ρ \\rangle, \\langle B_{T} \\rangle$ and $\\langle B_{W} \\rangle$. We extract , the coupling constant in perturbative theory and α0 in the non-perturbative theory using the dispersive model. By fitting the experimental data, the values of $(M_{Z^{°}})$ = 0.1171 ± 0.00229 and 0 ($_{I} = 2{\\text{GeV}}$) = 0.5068 ± 0.0440 are found. Our results are consistent with the above model. Our results are also consistent with those obtained from other experiments at different energies. All these features are explained in this paper.

  7. Radial diffusion in Saturn's radiation belts - A modeling analysis assuming satellite and ring E absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    A modeling analysis is carried out of six experimental phase space density profiles for nearly equatorially mirroring protons using methods based on the approach of Thomsen et al. (1977). The form of the time-averaged radial diffusion coefficient D(L) that gives an optimal fit to the experimental profiles is determined under the assumption that simple satellite plus Ring E absorption of inwardly diffusing particles and steady-state radial diffusion are the dominant physical processes affecting the proton data in the L range that is modeled. An extension of the single-satellite model employed by Thomsen et al. to a model that includes multisatellite and ring absorption is described, and the procedures adopted for estimating characteristic satellite and ring absorption times are defined. The results obtained in applying three representative solid-body absorption models to evaluate D(L) in the range where L is between 4 and 16 are reported, and a study is made of the sensitivity of the preferred amplitude and L dependence for D(L) to the assumed model parameters. The inferred form of D(L) is then compared with that which would be predicted if various proposed physical mechanisms for driving magnetospheric radial diffusion are operative at Saturn.

  8. Comparison of ELCAP data with lighting and equipment load levels and profiles assumed in regional models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The analysis in this report was driven by two primary objectives: to determine whether and to what extent the lighting and miscellaneous equipment electricity consumption measured by metering in real buildings differs from the levels assumed in the various prototypes used in power forecasting; and to determine the reasons for those differences if, in fact, differences were found. 13 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Tsunami Waveform Inversion without Assuming Fault Models- Application to Recent Three Earthquakes around Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namegaya, Y.; Ueno, T.; Satake, K.; Tanioka, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Tsunami waveform inversion is often used to study the source of tsunamigenic earthquakes. In this method, subsurface fault planes are divided into small subfaults, and the slip distribution, then seafloor deformation are estimated. However, it is sometimes difficult to judge the actual fault plane for offshore earthquake such as those along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. We developed an inversion method to estimate vertical seafloor deformation directly from observed tsunami waveforms. The tsunami source area is divided into many nodes, and the vertical seafloor deformation is calculated around each node by using the B-spline functions. The tsunami waveforms are calculated from each node, and used as the Green’s functions for inversion. To stabilize inversion or avoid overestimation of data errors, we introduce smoothing equations like Laplace’s equations. The optimum smoothing strength is estimated from the Akaike’s Bayesian information criterion (ABIC) Method. Advantage of this method is to estimate the vertical seafloor deformation can be estimated without assuming a fault plane. We applied the method to three recent earthquakes around Japan: the 2007 Chuetsu-oki, 2007 Noto Hanto, and 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquakes. The Chuetsu-oki earthquake (M6.8) occurred off the Japan Sea coast of central Japan on 16 July 2007. For this earthquake, complicated aftershock distribution makes it difficult to judge which of the southeast dipping fault or the northwest dipping fault was the actual fault plane. The tsunami inversion result indicates that the uplifted area extends about 10 km from the coastline, and there are two peaks of uplift: about 40 cm in the south and about 20 cm in the north. TheNoto Hanto earthquake (M6.9) occurred off Noto peninsula, also along the Japan Sea coast of central Japan, on 25 March 2007. The inversion result indicates that the uplifted area extends about 10 km off the coast, and the largest uplift amount is more than 40 cm. Location of

  10. THM Coupled Modeling in Near Field of an Assumed HLW Deep Geological Disposal Repository

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen

    2004-01-01

    One of the most suitable ways under study for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is isolation in deep geological repositories. It is very important to research the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes associated with an HLW disposal repository. Non-linear coupled equations, which are used to describe the THM coupled process and are suited to saturated-unsaturated porous media, are presented in this paper. A numerical method to solve these equations is put forward, and a finite element code is developed. This code is suited to the plane strain or axis-symmetry problem. Then this code is used to simulate the THM coupled process in the near field of an ideal disposal repository. The temperature vs. time, hydraulic head vs. time and stress vs. time results show that, in this assumed condition, the impact of temperature is very long (over 10 000 a) and the impact of the water head is short (about 90 d). Since the stress is induced by temperature and hydraulic head in this condition, the impact time of stress is the same as that of temperature. The results show that THM coupled processes are very important in the safety analysis of an HLW deep geological disposal repository.

  11. Perturbations of Kantowski-Sachs models with a cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Bradley, Michael; Dunsby, Peter K S; Gergely, László Á

    2013-01-01

    We investigate perturbations of Kantowski-Sachs models with a positive cosmological constant, using the gauge invariant 1+3 and 1+1+2 covariant splits of spacetime together with a harmonic decomposition. The perturbations are assumed to be vorticity-free and of perfect fluid type, but otherwise include general scalar, vector and tensor modes. In this case the set of equations can be reduced to six evolution equations for six harmonic coefficients.

  12. Cosmological models with constant deceleration parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, M.S.; de Mello Gomide, F.

    1988-02-01

    Berman presented elsewhere a law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields constant deceleration parameter models of the universe. By analyzing Einstein, Pryce-Hoyle and Brans-Dicke cosmologies, we derive here the necessary relations in each model, considering a perfect fluid.

  13. Fractional constant elasticity of variance model

    OpenAIRE

    Ngai Hang Chan; Chi Tim Ng

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a European option pricing formula for fractional market models. Although there exist option pricing results for a fractional Black-Scholes model, they are established without accounting for stochastic volatility. In this paper, a fractional version of the Constant Elasticity of Variance (CEV) model is developed. European option pricing formula similar to that of the classical CEV model is obtained and a volatility skew pattern is revealed.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model with nearly constant density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hai-ping; Wan, Rong-zheng; Lin, Zhi-fang

    2002-09-01

    An improved lattice Boltzmann model is developed to simulate fluid flow with nearly constant fluid density. The ingredient is to incorporate an extra relaxation for fluid density, which is realized by introducing a feedback equation in the equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure is dominated by the moving particles at a node, while the fluid density is kept nearly constant and explicit mass conservation is retained as well. Numerical simulation based on the present model for the (steady) plane Poiseuille flow and the (unsteady) two-dimensional Womersley flow shows a great improvement in simulation results over the previous models. In particular, the density fluctuation has been reduced effectively while achieving a relatively large pressure gradient.

  15. Standard-model coupling constants from compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Besprosvany, J

    2003-01-01

    A coupling-constant definition is given based on the compositeness property of some particle states with respect to the elementary states of other particles. It is applied in the context of the vector-spin-1/2-particle interaction vertices of a field theory, and the standard model. The definition reproduces Weinberg's angle in a grand-unified theory. One obtains coupling values close to the experimental ones for appropriate configurations of the standard-model vector particles, at the unification scale within grand-unified models, and at the electroweak breaking scale.

  16. Statistical Modelling of the Soil Dielectric Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Marczewski, Wojciech; Bogdan Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2010-05-01

    The dielectric constant of soil is the physical property being very sensitive on water content. It funds several electrical measurement techniques for determining the water content by means of direct (TDR, FDR, and others related to effects of electrical conductance and/or capacitance) and indirect RS (Remote Sensing) methods. The work is devoted to a particular statistical manner of modelling the dielectric constant as the property accounting a wide range of specific soil composition, porosity, and mass density, within the unsaturated water content. Usually, similar models are determined for few particular soil types, and changing the soil type one needs switching the model on another type or to adjust it by parametrization of soil compounds. Therefore, it is difficult comparing and referring results between models. The presented model was developed for a generic representation of soil being a hypothetical mixture of spheres, each representing a soil fraction, in its proper phase state. The model generates a serial-parallel mesh of conductive and capacitive paths, which is analysed for a total conductive or capacitive property. The model was firstly developed to determine the thermal conductivity property, and now it is extended on the dielectric constant by analysing the capacitive mesh. The analysis is provided by statistical means obeying physical laws related to the serial-parallel branching of the representative electrical mesh. Physical relevance of the analysis is established electrically, but the definition of the electrical mesh is controlled statistically by parametrization of compound fractions, by determining the number of representative spheres per unitary volume per fraction, and by determining the number of fractions. That way the model is capable covering properties of nearly all possible soil types, all phase states within recognition of the Lorenz and Knudsen conditions. In effect the model allows on generating a hypothetical representative of

  17. Phase field modeling of brittle fracture for enhanced assumed strain shells at large deformations: formulation and finite element implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, J.; Paggi, M.; Linder, C.

    2017-02-01

    Fracture of technological thin-walled components can notably limit the performance of their corresponding engineering systems. With the aim of achieving reliable fracture predictions of thin structures, this work presents a new phase field model of brittle fracture for large deformation analysis of shells relying on a mixed enhanced assumed strain (EAS) formulation. The kinematic description of the shell body is constructed according to the solid shell concept. This enables the use of fully three-dimensional constitutive models for the material. The proposed phase field formulation integrates the use of the (EAS) method to alleviate locking pathologies, especially Poisson thickness and volumetric locking. This technique is further combined with the assumed natural strain method to efficiently derive a locking-free solid shell element. On the computational side, a fully coupled monolithic framework is consistently formulated. Specific details regarding the corresponding finite element formulation and the main aspects associated with its implementation in the general purpose packages FEAP and ABAQUS are addressed. Finally, the applicability of the current strategy is demonstrated through several numerical examples involving different loading conditions, and including linear and nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive models.

  18. Phase field modeling of brittle fracture for enhanced assumed strain shells at large deformations: formulation and finite element implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, J.; Paggi, M.; Linder, C.

    2017-06-01

    Fracture of technological thin-walled components can notably limit the performance of their corresponding engineering systems. With the aim of achieving reliable fracture predictions of thin structures, this work presents a new phase field model of brittle fracture for large deformation analysis of shells relying on a mixed enhanced assumed strain (EAS) formulation. The kinematic description of the shell body is constructed according to the solid shell concept. This enables the use of fully three-dimensional constitutive models for the material. The proposed phase field formulation integrates the use of the (EAS) method to alleviate locking pathologies, especially Poisson thickness and volumetric locking. This technique is further combined with the assumed natural strain method to efficiently derive a locking-free solid shell element. On the computational side, a fully coupled monolithic framework is consistently formulated. Specific details regarding the corresponding finite element formulation and the main aspects associated with its implementation in the general purpose packages FEAP and ABAQUS are addressed. Finally, the applicability of the current strategy is demonstrated through several numerical examples involving different loading conditions, and including linear and nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive models.

  19. Importance of the habitat choice behavior assumed when modeling the effects of food and temperature on fish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Lamberson, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Various mechanisms of habitat choice in fishes based on food and/or temperature have been proposed: optimal foraging for food alone; behavioral thermoregulation for temperature alone; and behavioral energetics and discounted matching for food and temperature combined. Along with development of habitat choice mechanisms, there has been a major push to develop and apply to fish populations individual-based models that incorporate various forms of these mechanisms. However, it is not known how the wide variation in observed and hypothesized mechanisms of fish habitat choice could alter fish population predictions (e.g. growth, size distributions, etc.). We used spatially explicit, individual-based modeling to compare predicted fish populations using different submodels of patch choice behavior under various food and temperature distributions. We compared predicted growth, temperature experience, food consumption, and final spatial distribution using the different models. Our results demonstrated that the habitat choice mechanism assumed in fish population modeling simulations was critical to predictions of fish distribution and growth rates. Hence, resource managers who use modeling results to predict fish population trends should be very aware of and understand the underlying patch choice mechanisms used in their models to assure that those mechanisms correctly represent the fish populations being modeled.

  20. Mark-recapture models with parameters constant in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, G M

    1982-06-01

    The Jolly-Seber method, which allows for both death and immigration, is easy to apply but often requires a larger number of parameters to be estimated tha would otherwise be necessary. If (i) survival rate, phi, or (ii) probability of capture, p, or (iii) both phi and p can be assumed constant over the experimental period, models with a reduced number of parameters are desirable. In the present paper, maximum likelihood (ML) solutions for these three situations are derived from the general ML equations of Jolly [1979, in Sampling Biological Populations, R. M. Cormack, G. P. Patil and D. S. Robson (eds), 277-282]. A test is proposed for heterogeneity arising from a breakdown of assumptions in the general Jolly-Seber model. Tests for constancy of phi and p are provided. An example is given, in which these models are fitted to data from a local butterfly population.

  1. Mathematical Model of Seasonal Influenza with Treatment in Constant Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharis, M.; Arifudin, R.

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal Influenza is one of disease that outbreaks periodically at least once every year. This disease caused many people hospitalized. Many hospitalized people as employers would infect production quantities, distribution time, and some economic aspects. It will infect economic growth. Infected people need treatments to reduce infection period and cure the infection. In this paper, we discussed about a mathematical model of seasonal influenza with treatment. Factually, the disease was held in short period, less than one year. Hence, we can assume that the population is constant at the disease outbreak time. In this paper, we analyzed the existence of the equilibrium points of the model and their stability. We also give some simulation to give a geometric image about the results of the analysis process.

  2. Bianchi Type-Ⅲ Cosmological Models with Gravitational Constant G and the Cosmological Constant Λ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Singh; R.K.Tiwari; Pratibha Shukla

    2007-01-01

    Einstein field equations with variable gravitational and cosmological constants are considered in the presence of perfect fluid for the Bianchi type-Ⅲ universe by assuming conservation law for the energy-momentum tensor.Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by using the scalar of expansion proportional to the shear scalar θχσ,which leads to a relation between metric potential B=Cn,where n is a constant.The corresponding physical interpretation of the cosmological solutions are also discussed.

  3. Dependence of radiation belt simulations to assumed radial diffusion rates tested for two empirical models of radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Shprits, Yuri; Aseev, Nikita; Kellerman, Adam; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2017-04-01

    Radial diffusion is one of the dominant physical mechanisms that drives acceleration and loss of the radiation belt electrons, which makes it very important for nowcasting and forecasting space weather models. We investigate the sensitivity of the two parameterizations of the radial diffusion of Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] on long-term radiation belt modeling using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB). Following Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014], we first perform 1-D radial diffusion simulations. Comparison of the simulation results with observations shows that the difference between simulations with either radial diffusion parameterization is small. To take into account effects of local acceleration and loss, we perform 3-D simulations, including pitch-angle, energy and mixed diffusion. We found that the results of 3-D simulations are even less sensitive to the choice of parameterization of radial diffusion rates than the results of 1-D simulations at various energies (from 0.59 to 1.80 MeV). This result demonstrates that the inclusion of local acceleration and pitch-angle diffusion can provide a negative feedback effect, such that the result is largely indistinguishable simulations conducted with different radial diffusion parameterizations. We also perform a number of sensitivity tests by multiplying radial diffusion rates by constant factors and show that such an approach leads to unrealistic predictions of radiation belt dynamics. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999ja900344. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. Jonathan Rae, and D. K. Milling (2014), Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res. [Space Phys.], 119(3), 1587-1605, doi:10.1002/2013JA019204.

  4. Natural beauty of the standard model -A derivation of electro-weak unified and quantum-gravity theory without assuming a Higgs particle-

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, M

    2004-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of a singular potential that arises under several frequently occurring analytic behaviors of the eigenfunctions without introducing cut-offs. Instead, in our analyses we focus on power behaviors of eigenfunctions. Then, we discuss the self-consistency condition for the spherical symmetric Klein-Gordon equation, and discuss a natural possibility that gravity and weak coupling constants $g_G$ and $g_W$ may be defined after $g_{EM}$. In this point of view, gravity and the weak force are subsidiary derived from electricity. Particularly, $SU(2)_L\\times U(1)$ unification is derived without assuming a phase transition. A possible origin of the Higgs mechanism is proposed. Each particle pair of the standard model is associated with the corresponding asymptotic expansion of an eigenfunction. Next we consider the meaning of internal and external degreesof freedom for a two body problem, and find two degrees of freedom which can not reduce to the local motion of one frame. These two deg...

  5. a Unified Dark Energy Model from a Vanishing Speed of Sound with Emergent Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Orlando; Quevedo, Hernando

    2014-11-01

    The problem of the cosmic acceleration is here revisited by using the fact that the adiabatic speed of sound can be assumed to be negligible small. Within the context of general relativity, the total energy budget is recovered under the hypothesis of a vanishing speed of sound by assuming the existence of one fluid only. We find a cosmological model which reproduces the main results of the ΛCDM paradigm at late-times, showing an emergent cosmological constant, which is not at all related with the vacuum energy term. As a consequence, the model presented here behaves as a unified dark energy (DE) model.

  6. Role of the constant deceleration parameter in cosmological models with perfect fluid and dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Pawar, D D; Mapari, R V

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the present paper is to investigate LRS Bianchi type I metric in the presence of perfect fluid and dark energy. In order to obtain a deterministic solution of the field equations we have assumed that, the two sources of the perfect fluid and dark energy interact minimally with separate conservation of their energy momentum tensors. The EoS parameter of the perfect fluid is also assumed to be constant. In addition to these we have used a special law of variation of Hubble parameter proposed by Berman that yields constant deceleration parameter. For two different values of the constant deceleration parameters we have obtained two different cosmological models. The physical behaviors of both the models have been discussed by using some physical parameters.

  7. Distance determination for RAVE stars using stellar models II: Most likely values assuming a standard stellar evolution scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Zwitter, T; Breddels, M A; Smith, M C; Helmi, A; Munari, U; Bienaym\\'{e), O; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Boeche, C; Brown, A G A; Campbell, R; Freeman, K C; Fulbright, J; Gibson, B; Gilmore, G; Grebel, E K; Navarro, J F; Parker, Q A; Seabroke, G M; Siebert, A; Siviero, A; Steinmetz, M; Watson, F G; Williams, M; Wyse, R F G

    2010-01-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way. We use the subsample of spectra with spectroscopically determined values of stellar parameters to determine the distances to these stars. The list currently contains 235,064 high quality spectra which show no peculiarities and belong to 210,872 different stars. The numbers will grow as the RAVE survey progresses. The public version of the catalog will be made available through the CDS services along with the ongoing RAVE public data releases. The distances are determined with a method based on the work by Breddels et al.~(2010). Here we assume that the star undergoes a standard stellar evolution and that its spectrum shows no peculiarities. The refinements include: the use of either of the three isochrone sets, a better account of the stellar ages and masses, use of more realistic errors of stellar parameter values, and application to a larger dataset. The derived distances of both dwarfs and giants match within ~21% to the astr...

  8. Testing anthropic reasoning for the cosmological constant with a realistic galaxy formation model

    CERN Document Server

    Sudoh, Takahiro; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The anthropic principle is one of the possible explanations for the cosmological constant ($\\Lambda$) problem. In previous studies, a dark halo mass threshold comparable with our Galaxy must be assumed in galaxy formation to get a reasonably large probability of finding the observed small value, $P(<$$\\Lambda_{\\rm obs})$, though stars are found in much smaller galaxies as well. Here we examine the anthropic argument by using a semi-analytic model of cosmological galaxy formation, which can reproduce many observations such as galaxy luminosity functions. We calculate the probability distribution of $\\Lambda$ by running the model code for a wide range of $\\Lambda$, while other cosmological parameters and model parameters for baryonic processes of galaxy formation are kept constant. Assuming that the prior probability distribution is flat per unit $\\Lambda$, and that the number of observers is proportional to stellar mass, we find $P(<$$\\Lambda_{\\rm obs}) = 6.7 \\%$ without introducing any galaxy mass thres...

  9. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...... due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  10. Testing anthropic reasoning for the cosmological constant with a realistic galaxy formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoh, Takahiro; Totani, Tomonori; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The anthropic principle is one of the possible explanations for the cosmological constant (Λ) problem. In previous studies, a dark halo mass threshold comparable with our Galaxy must be assumed in galaxy formation to get a reasonably large probability of finding the observed small value, P(running the model code for a wide range of Λ, while other cosmological parameters and model parameters for baryonic processes of galaxy formation are kept constant. Assuming that the prior probability distribution is flat per unit Λ, and that the number of observers is proportional to stellar mass, we find P(extremely small, we conclude that the anthropic argument is a viable explanation, if the value of Λ observed in our Universe is determined by a probability distribution.

  11. A model for self-tuning the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J E; Lee, H M; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok; Lee, Hyun Min

    2001-01-01

    The vanishing cosmological constant in the four dimensional space-time is obtained in a 5D Randall-Sundrum model with a brane (B1) located at $y=0$. The matter fields can be located at the brane. For settling any vacuum energy generated at the brane to zero, we need a three index antisymmetric tensor field $A_{MNP}$ with a specific form for the Lagrangian. For the self-tuning mechanism, the bulk cosmological constant should be negative.

  12. Simple Model with Time-Varying Fine-Structure ``Constant''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    Extending the original version written in colaboration with L.A. Trevisan, we study the generalisation of Dirac's LNH, so that time-variation of the fine-structure constant, due to varying electrical and magnetic permittivities is included along with other variations (cosmological and gravitational ``constants''), etc. We consider the present Universe, and also an inflationary scenario. Rotation of the Universe is a given possibility in this model.

  13. Construction of constant-Q viscoelastic model with three parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng-yu; YIN Xing-yao

    2007-01-01

    The popularly used viscoelastic models have some shortcomings in describing relationship between quality factor (Q) and frequency, which is not consistent with the observation data. Based on the theory of viscoelasticity, a new approach to construct constant-Q viscoelastic model in given frequency band with three parameters is developed. The designed model describes the frequency-independence feature of quality factor very well, and the effect of viscoelasticity on seismic wave field can be studied relatively accurate in theory with this model. Furthermore, the number of required parameters in this model has been reduced fewer than that of other constant-Q models, this can simplify the solution of the viscoelastic problems to some extent. At last, the accuracy and application range have been analyzed through numerical tests. The effect of viscoelasticity on wave propagation has been briefly illustrated through the change of frequency spectra and waveform in several different viscoelastic models.

  14. Spectral model selection in the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J.; Qu, Jifeng

    2017-04-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor at the triple point of water, and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source is constant to within 1 part in a billion for frequencies up to 1 GHz. Given knowledge of this ratio, and the values of other parameters that are known or measured, one can determine the Boltzmann constant. Due, in part, to mismatch between transmission lines, the experimental ratio spectrum varies with frequency. We model this spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency where the constant term in the polynomial determines the Boltzmann constant. When determining this constant (offset) from experimental data, the assumed complexity of the ratio spectrum model and the maximum frequency analyzed (fitting bandwidth) dramatically affects results. Here, we select the complexity of the model by cross-validation—a data-driven statistical learning method. For each of many fitting bandwidths, we determine the component of uncertainty of the offset term that accounts for random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of model complexity. We select the fitting bandwidth that minimizes this uncertainty. In the most recent measurement of the Boltzmann constant, results were determined, in part, by application of an earlier version of the method described here. Here, we extend the earlier analysis by considering a broader range of fitting bandwidths and quantify an additional component of uncertainty that accounts for imperfect performance of our fitting bandwidth selection method. For idealized simulated data with additive noise similar to experimental data, our method correctly selects the true complexity of the ratio spectrum model for all cases considered. A new analysis of data from the recent experiment yields evidence for a temporal trend in the offset

  15. Exacerbating the Cosmological Constant Problem with Interacting Dark Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M. C. David

    2017-01-01

    Future cosmological surveys will probe the expansion history of the Universe and constrain phenomenological models of dark energy. Such models do not address the fine-tuning problem of the vacuum energy, i.e., the cosmological constant problem (CCP), but can make it spectacularly worse. We show that this is the case for "interacting dark energy" models in which the masses of the dark matter states depend on the dark energy sector. If realized in nature, these models have far-reaching implications for proposed solutions to the CCP that require the number of vacua to exceed the fine-tuning of the vacuum energy density. We show that current estimates of the number of flux vacua in string theory, Nvac˜O (1 0272 000) , are far too small to realize certain simple models of interacting dark energy and solve the cosmological constant problem anthropically. These models admit distinctive observational signatures that can be targeted by future gamma-ray observatories, hence making it possible to observationally rule out the anthropic solution to the cosmological constant problem in theories with a finite number of vacua.

  16. A streamwise constant model of turbulence in plane Couette flow

    OpenAIRE

    Gayme, D. F.; McKeon, B. J.; Papachristodoulou, A.; Bamieh, B; Doyle, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Streamwise and quasi-streamwise elongated structures have been shown to play a significant role in turbulent shear flows. We model the mean behaviour of fully turbulent plane Couette flow using a streamwise constant projection of the Navier–Stokes equations. This results in a two-dimensional three-velocity-component (2D/3C) model. We first use a steady-state version of the model to demonstrate that its nonlinear coupling provides the mathematical mechanism that shapes the turbulent velocity p...

  17. The Cosmological Constant for the Crystalline Vacuum Cosmic Space Model

    CERN Document Server

    Montemayor-Aldrete, J A; Morales-Mori, A; Mendoza-Allende, A; Montemayor-Varela, A; Castillo-Mussot, M; Vazquez, G J

    2005-01-01

    The value of the cosmological constant arising from a crystalline model for vacuum cosmic space with lattice parameter of the order of the neutron radius [1] has been calculated. The model allows to solve, in an easy way, the problem of the cosmological constant giving the right order of magnitude, which corresponds very well with the mean value of matter density in the universe. The obtained value is about 10-48 Km-2. Diffraction experiments with non-thermal neutron beam in cosmic space are proposed to search for the possibility of crystalline structure of vacuum space and to measure the lattice parameter. PACS numbers: 98.80.Es, 04.20.-q, 03.65.-w, 61.50.-f, 98.80.Ft

  18. A Streamwise Constant Model of Turbulence in Plane Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gayme, D F; Papachristodoulou, A; Bamieh, B; Doyle, J C

    2010-01-01

    There is a consensus that turbulent flow is characterized by coherent structures. In particular, streamwise and quasi-streamwise elongated structures have been observed in both numerical simulations and experiments. Using this idea the mean behavior of fully turbulent plane Couette flow is modeled using a streamwise constant projection of the Navier Stokes equations. This assumption results in a two dimensional, three velocity component (2D/3C) model. We first use a steady state version of this 2D/3C model to demonstrate that the nonlinear coupling in the equations provides the mathematical mechanisms associated with the shape of the turbulent velocity profile. In simulating the full model we borrow some ideas from robust control and represent uncertainty as well as modeling errors using small amplitude noise forcing. Simulations of the 2D/3C model under small amplitude Gaussian forcing of the cross stream components is compared to DNS data. The results indicate that a streamwise constant projection of the Na...

  19. Validation of models with constant bias: an applied approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Medina-Peralta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper presents extensions to the statistical validation method based on the procedure of Freese when a model shows constant bias (CB in its predictions and illustrate the method with data from a new mechanistic model that predict weight gain in cattle. Materials and methods. The extensions were the hypothesis tests and maximum anticipated error for the alternative approach, and the confidence interval for a quantile of the distribution of errors. Results. The model evaluated showed CB, once the CB is removed and with a confidence level of 95%, the magnitude of the error does not exceed 0.575 kg. Therefore, the validated model can be used to predict the daily weight gain of cattle, although it will require an adjustment in its structure based on the presence of CB to increase the accuracy of its forecasts. Conclusions. The confidence interval for the 1-α quantile of the distribution of errors after correcting the constant bias, allows determining the top limit for the magnitude of the error of prediction and use it to evaluate the evolution of the model in the forecasting of the system. The confidence interval approach to validate a model is more informative than the hypothesis tests for the same purpose.

  20. Fine-structure constant constraints on Bekenstein-type models

    CERN Document Server

    Leal, P M M; Ventura, L B

    2014-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of dimensionless fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant $\\alpha$, are an area of much increased recent activity, following some indications of possible spacetime variations at the few parts per million level. Here we obtain updated constraints on the Bekenstein-Sandvik-Barrow-Magueijo model, which is arguably the simplest model allowing for $\\alpha$ variations. Recent accurate spectroscopic measurements allow us to improve previous constraints by about an order of magnitude. We briefly comment on the dependence of the results on the data sample, as well as on the improvements expected from future facilities.

  1. BRS structure of simple model of cosmological constant and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taisaku; Nitta, Daisuke; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    2017-07-01

    In Mod. Phys. Lett. A 31, 1650213 (2016, 10.1142/S0217732316502138), Nojiri proposed a simple model in order to solve one of the problems related to the cosmological constant. The model is induced from a topological field theory, and the model has an infinite number of BRS symmetries. The BRS symmetries are, in general, spontaneously broken, however. We investigate the BRS symmetry in detail and show that there is one and only one BRS symmetry which is not broken, and the unitarity can be guaranteed. In the model, the quantum problem of the vacuum energy, which may be identified with the cosmological constant, reduces to the classical problem of the initial condition. We investigate the cosmology given by the model and specify the region of the initial conditions, which could be consistent with the evolution of the Universe. We also show that there is a stable solution describing the de Sitter space-time, which may explain the accelerating expansion in the current Universe.

  2. Spherically symmetric solutions of a (4 + n)-dimensional Einstein Yang Mills model with cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2005-01-01

    We construct solutions of an Einstein Yang Mills system including a cosmological constant in 4 + n spacetime dimensions, where the n-dimensional manifold associated with the extra dimensions is taken to be Ricci flat. Assuming the matter and metric fields to be independent of the n extra coordinates, a spherical symmetric ansatz for the fields leads to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations. We find that for n > 1 only solutions with either one non-zero Higgs field or with all Higgs fields constant and zero gauge field function (corresponding to a Wu Yang-type ansatz) exist. We give the analytic solutions available in this model. These are 'embedded' Abelian solutions with a diverging size of the manifold associated with the extra n dimensions. Depending on the choice of parameters, these latter solutions either represent naked singularities or they possess a single horizon. We also present solutions of the effective four-dimensional Einstein Yang Mills Higgs-dilaton model, where the higher-dimensional cosmological constant induces a Liouville-type potential. The solutions are non-Abelian solutions with diverging Higgs fields, which exist only up to a maximal value of the cosmological constant.

  3. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Paul A; Schmidt, Taly G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2012-01-01

    A sparsity-exploiting algorithm intended for few-view Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is proposed and characterized. The algorithm models the object as piecewise constant subject to a blurring operation. To validate that the algorithm closely approximates the true object in the noiseless case, projection data were generated from an object assuming this model and using the system matrix. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to provide more realistic data of a phantom with varying smoothness across the field of view. Reconstructions were performed across a sweep of two primary design parameters. The results demonstrate that the algorithm recovers the object in a noiseless simulation case. While the algorithm assumes a specific blurring model, the results suggest that the algorithm may provide high reconstruction accuracy even when the object does not match the assumed blurring model. Generally, increased values of the blurring parameter and TV weighting parameters reduced noi...

  4. Optimal Investment and Consumption Decisions under the Constant Elasticity of Variance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an investment and consumption problem under the constant elasticity of variance (CEV model, which is an extension of the original Merton’s problem. In the proposed model, stock price dynamics is assumed to follow a CEV model and our goal is to maximize the expected discounted utility of consumption and terminal wealth. Firstly, we apply dynamic programming principle to obtain the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equation for the value function. Secondly, we choose power utility and logarithm utility for our analysis and apply variable change technique to obtain the closed-form solutions to the optimal investment and consumption strategies. Finally, we provide a numerical example to illustrate the effect of market parameters on the optimal investment and consumption strategies.

  5. Web life: If We Assume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The title If We Assume refers to physicists' habit of making back-of-the-envelope calculations, but do not let the allusion to assumptions fool you: there are precious few spherical cows rolling around frictionless surfaces in this corner of the Internet.

  6. The Hubble constant from galaxy lenses: impacts of triaxiality and model degeneracies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The Hubble constant can be constrained using the time delays between multiple images of gravitationally lensed sources. In some notable cases, typical lensing analyses assuming isothermal galaxy density profiles produce low values for the Hubble constant, inconsistent with the result of the HST Key Project (72 +- 8 km/s/Mpc). Possible systematics in the values of the Hubble constant derived from galaxy lensing systems can result from a number of factors, e.g. neglect of environmental effects,...

  7. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores I: The constant-mass case

    CERN Document Server

    Pattle, Kate

    2016-01-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasistatic evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically-symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving toward virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion onto cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parameterising the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. (2015) in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the 'virial plane'. We find that not all virially-boun...

  8. Time variation of the fine structure constant α from realistic models of Oklo reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-11-01

    The topic of whether the fundamental constants of nature vary with time has been a subject of great interest since Dirac originally proposed the possibility that GN˜1/tuniverse. Recent observations of absorption spectra lines from distant quasars appeared to indicate a possible increase in the fine structure constant α over ten billion years. Contrarily, analyses of the time evolution of α from Oklo natural nuclear reactor data have yielded inconsistent results, some indicating a decrease over two billion years while others indicated no change. We have used known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Reactors RZ2 and RZ10 were modeled with MCNP and the resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the ^149Sm capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. Our study resolves the contradictory situation with previous Oklo α-results. Our suggested 2 σ bound on a possible time variation of α over two billion years is stringent: -0.11 <=δαα <=0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  9. Determination of Constitutive Model Constants from Cylinder Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    HONEYWELL, INC./ARMAMENT SYSTEMS DIVISION) FOR NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT DECEMBER 1988 Approved for public release...primary application is for higher strain rates, and the strain rate constant was therefore selected to give better correlation with the higher strain...to that of the test data. The new constants (C and C2) were obtained in conjunction with the previous values of C. and C4, as talen from Reference 2

  10. Evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. 3. Outburst properties of constant and uniform-. cap alpha. model discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.N.C.; Faulkner, J. (Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA (USA); California Univ., Santa Cruz (USA). Board of Studies in Astronomy and Astrophysics); Papaloizou, J. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Applied Mathematics)

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of accretion disc models relevant to cataclysmic-variable systems is continued. This paper examines the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disc models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc uniform-..cap alpha.. model. It is primarily concerned with systems in which the mass-input rate from the secondary to the disc around the primary is assumed to be constant. However, initial calculations with variable mass-input rates are also performed. The time-dependent visual magnitude light-curves are constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disc size, primary mass, mass-input rate, and magnitude of viscosity.

  11. The Constant-Sound-Speed parameterization for NJL models of quark matter in hybrid stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F; Orsaria, Milva G; Contrera, Gustavo A; Weber, Fridolin; Alford, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of pulsars as heavy as 2 solar masses has led astrophysicists to rethink the core compositions of neutron stars, ruling out many models for the nuclear equations of state (EoS). We explore the hybrid stars that occur when hadronic matter is treated in a relativistic mean-field approximation and quark matter is modeled by three-flavor local and non-local Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL) models with repulsive vector interactions. The NJL models typically yield equations of state that feature a first order transition to quark matter. Assuming that the quark-hadron surface tension is high enough to disfavour mixed phases, and restricting to EoSes that allow stars to reach 2 solar masses, we find that the appearance of the quark matter core either destabilizes the star immediately (this is typical for non-local NJL models) or leads to a very short hybrid star branch in the mass-radius relation (this is typical for local NJL models). Using the Constant-Sound-Speed parametrization we can see that the reason fo...

  12. Model-independent determination of the carrier multiplication time constant in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Marco

    2009-11-21

    The experimental determination of the carrier multiplication (CM) time constant is complicated by the fact that this process occurs within the initial few hundreds of femtoseconds after excitation and, in transient-absorption experiments, cannot be separated from the buildup time of the 1p-state population. This work provides an accurate theoretical determination of the electron relaxation lifetime during the last stage of the p-state buildup, in CdSe nanocrystals, in the presence of a single photogenerated hole (no CM) and of a hole plus an additional electron-hole pair (following CM). From the invariance of the 1p buildup time observed experimentally for excitations above and below the CM threshold producing hot carriers with the same average per-exciton excess energy, and the calculated corresponding variations in the electron decay time in the two cases, an estimate is obtained for the carrier multiplication time constant. Unlike previous estimates reported in the literature so far, this result is model-independent, i.e., is obtained without making any assumption on the nature of the mechanism governing carrier multiplication. It is then compared with the time constant calculated, as a function of the excitation energy, assuming an impact-ionization-like process for carrier multiplication (DCM). The two results are in good agreement and show that carrier multiplication can occur on timescales of the order of tens of femtoseconds at energies close to the observed onset. These findings, which are compatible with the fastest lifetime estimated experimentally, confirm the suitability of the impact-ionization model to explain carrier multiplication in CdSe nanocrystals.

  13. Modeling and Analysis of Transitional Tube with Constant Sectional Area along Derivative Central Route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-bao; TONG Bao-guo; PAN Zi-jian; LI Hai-xing

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, sample square-circular transition tube along straight central route was modeled on CATIA software. The parameters are as follows: let the tube length is L, and the constant cross section area is S, and S = πR^2 = a2, in which R stands for the circle radius on one end, and a the square side length on the other end; set up the coordinate system with OX axis on the central route in which the origin O is on centroid of the square end and assume the cross section size at x as the square shaped with all four comers filleted in radius r which is proportional to x, that is, the linear slope of r is R/L, thus, both values r and square side length ax can be attained on the constant cross section area assumption. Secondly, some sample polygonal-circular transition tubes along straight, circular and helical central route were implemented similarly. Thirdly, numerical analysis of stress and displacement of these tubes were carried out on MSC/PATRAN software which are important to the distribution of turbulent flow and the layout of these transitional tube structures.

  14. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores - I. The constant-mass case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasi-static evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving towards virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion on to cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parametrizing the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the `virial plane'. We find that not all virially bound and pressure-confined cores will evolve to become gravitationally bound, with many instead contracting to virial equilibrium with their surroundings, and find an absence of gravitationally dominated and virially unbound cores. We hypothesize a `starless core desert' in this quadrant of the virial plane, which may result from cores initially forming as pressure-confined objects. We conclude that a virially bound and pressure-confined core will not necessarily evolve to become gravitationally bound, and thus cannot be considered pre-stellar. A core can only be definitively considered pre-stellar (collapsing to form an individual stellar system) if it is gravitationally unstable.

  15. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  16. Modeling for Hydraulic Permeability and Kozeny-Carman Constant of Porous Nanofibers Using a Fractal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Boqi; Tu, Xing; Ren, Wen; Wang, Zongchi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the analytical expressions for the hydraulic permeability and Kozeny-Carman (KC) constant of porous nanofibers are derived based on fractal theory. In the present approach, the permeability is explicitly related to the porosity and the area fractal dimensions of porous nanofibers. The proposed fractal models for KC constant is also found to be a function of the microstructural parameters (porosity, area fractal dimensions). Besides, the present model clearly indicates that KC constant is not a constant and increases with porosity. However, KC constant is close to a constant value which is 18 for ϕ > 0.8. Every parameter of the proposed formulas of calculating permeability and KC constant has clear physical meaning. The model predictions are compared with the existing experimental data, and fair agreement between the model predictions and experimental data is found for different porosities.

  17. Cosmological constant problem in a scenario with compactifications (RS-I model)

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Robles, C

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we apply the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model, a scenario based on compactifications, to control the UV divergence of the zero-point energy density equation for the vacuum fluctuations, which has been unsuccessfully addressed to the cosmological constant (CC) due to a heavy discrepancy between theory and observation. Historically, the problem of CC has been shelved in the RS point of view, having few or non literature on the subject. In this sense and as done with the hierarchy problem, we apply the RS model to solve this difference via extra dimensions; we also describe how brane effects could be the solution to this substantial difference. It should be noticed that this problem is studied assuming first Minkoswki type branes, and then followed by cosmologically more realistic FLRW type branes. We finally find some remarkably interesting consequences in the RS scenario: The CC problem can be solved via compactification of the extra dimension and the compactification radius turns out to be approxima...

  18. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range.

  19. Dark energy models with time-dependent gravitational constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, S; Ray, Saibal; Mukhopadhyay, Utpal

    2005-01-01

    Two phenomenological models of $\\Lambda$, viz. $\\Lambda \\sim (\\dot a/a)^2$ and $\\Lambda \\sim \\ddot a/a$ are studied under the assumption that $G$ is a time-variable parameter. Both models show that $G$ is inversely proportional to time as suggested earlier by others including Dirac. The models considered here can be matched with observational results by properly tuning the parameters of the models. Our analysis shows that $\\Lambda \\sim \\ddot a/a$ model corresponds to a repulsive situation and hence correlates with the present status of the accelerating Universe. The other model $\\Lambda \\sim (\\dot a/a)^2$ is, in general, attractive in nature. Moreover, it is seen that due to the combined effect of time-variable $\\Lambda$ and $G$ the Universe evolved with acceleration as well as deceleration. This later one indicates a Big Crunch.

  20. Dark Energy Models with a Time-Dependent Gravitational Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Saibal; Mukhopadhyay, Utpal; Choudhury, S. B. Dutta

    Two phenomenological models of Λ, viz. Λ ˜ (˙ a/a)2 and Λ ˜ ḋ a/a, are studied under the assumption that G is a time-variable parameter. Both models show that G is inversely proportional to time, as suggested earlier by others, including Dirac. The models considered here can be matched with observational results by properly tuning the parameters of the models. Our analysis shows that the Λ ˜ ḋ a/a model corresponds to a repulsive situation and hence correlates with the present status of the accelerating Universe. The other model, Λ ˜ (˙ a/a)2, is in general attractive in nature. Moreover, it is seen that due to the combined effect of time-variable Λ and G the Universe evolved with acceleration as well as deceleration. Deceleration indicates a "big crunch".

  1. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  2. Using the pseudophase kinetic model to interpret chemical reactivity in ionic emulsions: determining antioxidant partition constants and interfacial rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2013-06-15

    Kinetic results obtained in cationic and anionic emulsions show for the first time that pseudophase kinetic models give reasonable estimates of the partition constants of reactants, here t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) between the oil and interfacial region, P(O)(I), and the water and interfacial region, P(W)(I), and of the interfacial rate constant, k(I), for the reaction with an arenediazonium ion in emulsions containing a 1:1 volume ratio of a medium chain length triglyceride, MCT, and aqueous acid or buffer. The results provide: (a) an explanation for the large difference in pH, >4 pH units, required to run the reaction in CTAB (pH 1.54, added HBr) and SDS (pH 5.71, acetate buffer) emulsions; (b) reasonable estimates of PO(I) and k(I) in the CTAB emulsions; (c) a sensible interpretation of added counterion effects based on ion exchange in SDS emulsions (Na(+)/H3O(+) ion exchange in the interfacial region) and Donnan equilibrium in CTAB emulsions (Br(-) increasing the interfacial H3O(+)); and (d) the significance of the effect of the much greater solubility of TBHQ in MCT versus octane, 1000/1, as the oil. These results should aid in interpreting the effects of ionic surfactants on chemical reactivity in emulsions in general and in selecting the most efficient antioxidant for particular food applications.

  3. Extension of the master sintering curve for constant heating rate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Tammy Michelle

    density of the pellets based on the green density and the theoretical density of each of the compositions. The Master Sintering Curve (MSC) model is then utilized to generate data that can be utilized to predict the final density of the respective powder over a range of heating rates. The Elton Master Sintering Curve Extension (EMSCE) is developed to extend the functionality of the MSC tool. The parameters generated from the original MSC are used in tandem with the solution to the closed integral, theta ≡ 1cTo T1Texp -QRT dT, over a set range of temperatures. The EMSCE is used to generate a set of sintering curves having both constant heating rate and isothermal hold portions. The EMSCE extends the usefulness of the MSC by allowing this generation of a complete sintering schedule rather than just being able to predict the final relative density of a given material. The EMSCE is verified by generating a set of curves having both constant heating rate and an isothermal hold for the heat-treatment. The modeled curves are verified experimentally and a comparison of the model and experimental results are given for a selected composition. Porosity within the final product can hinder the product from sintering to full density. It is shown that some of the compositions studied did not sinter to full density because of the presence of large porosity that could not be eliminated in a reasonable amount of time. A statistical analysis of the volume fraction of porosity is completed to show the significance of the presence in the final product. The reason this is relevant to the MSC is that the model does not take into account the presence of porosity and assumes that the samples sinter to full density. When this does not happen, the model actually under-predicts the final density of the material.

  4. Effects of composite casein and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes on renneting properties and composition of bovine milk by assuming an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. IKONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes on the renneting properties and composition of milk were estimated for 174 and 155 milk samples of 59 Finnish Ayrshire and 55 Finnish Friesian cows, respectively. As well as the random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects of a cow, the model included the fixed effects for parity, lactation stage, season, kappa-beta-casein genotypes and b-lactoglobulin genotypes. Favourable renneting properties were associated with kappa-beta-casein genotypes ABA 1 A 2 , ABA 1 A 1 and AAA 1 A 2 in the Finnish Ayrshire, and with ABA 2 B, AAA 1 A 3 , AAA 2 A 3 , ABA 1 A 2 and ABA 2 A 2 in the Finnish Friesian. The favourable effect of these genotypes on curd firming time and on firmness of the curd was partly due to their association with a high kappa-casein concentration in the milk. The effect of the kappa-casein E allele on renneting properties was unfavourable compared with that of the kappa-casein B allele, and possibly with that of the A allele. The beta-lactoglobulin genotypes had no effect on renneting properties but they had a clear effect on the protein composition of milk. The beta-lactoglobulin AA genotype was associated with a high whey protein % and beta-lactoglobulin concentration and the BB genotype with a high casein % and casein number.;

  5. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 1: Constant wave climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the non-linear development of alongshore undulations up to fully developed quasi-steady equilibrium. A numerical model which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines is applied, based on a spectral wave model, a depth...... integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model.First the length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a stability analysis. Next the further evolution from the linear to the fully non-linear regime is described....... In the fully non-linear regime down-drift spits and migrating shoreline undulations are described.Three different shoreline shapes are found depending on the wave conditions: undulations with no spits, undulations with shore parallel spit and undulations with reconnecting spits. © 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  6. Dynamics of 'abc' and 'qd' constant parameters induction generator model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajardo-R, L.A.; Medina, A.; Iov, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, parametric sensibility effects on dynamics of the induction generator in the presence of local perturbations are investigated. The study is conducted in a 3x2 MW wind park dealing with abc, qd0 and qd reduced order, induction generator model respectively, and with fluxes as state v...

  7. Quintessence a natural model to parametrize the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Macorra, A D L

    2003-01-01

    We show how a scalar field with gravitational interaction only, i e. quintessence, can account for present day acceleration of the universe and it gives the correct acoustic scale and peaks of the CMP,R anisotropy. We show that the quintessence field can be naturally be described by the fermion condensates of a non-abelian gauge group. This gauge group is unified with the standard model gauge groups. The model has no free parameters. Even the initial energy density at the unification scale and at the condensation scale are fixed by the number of degrees of freedom of the gauge group. We study the evolution of all fields from the unification scale and we calculate the relevant cosmological quantities. (Author)

  8. Magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Y SHAIKH; S D KATORE

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the solutions of plane-symmetric Universe with variable $\\omega$ in the presence and the absence of magnetic field of energy density $\\rho B$. A special law of variation for Hubble’s parameterproposed by Bermann in {\\it Nuovo Cimento} B 74, 182 (1983) has been utilized to solve the field equations. Some physical and kinematical properties of the models are also discussed.

  9. Weak decay constant of pseudscalar meson in a QCD-inspired model

    CERN Document Server

    Salcedo, L A M; Hadj-Michef, D; Frederico, T

    2003-01-01

    We show that a linear scaling between the weak decay constants of pseudoscalar and the vector mesons masses is supported by the available experimental data. The decay constant scale as $f_m/f_{pi}=M_V/M_{\\rho}$ (f_m is decay constant and M_V vector meson ground state mass). This simple form is justified within a renormalized light-front QCD-inpired model for quark-antiquark bound states.

  10. The effects of a non-zero cosmological constant on the Veltmann models

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, Manasvi

    2014-01-01

    The Veltmann models, which include the Plummer and Hernquist models as special cases, are studied in the presence of a cosmological constant. Physically relevant quantities such as the velocity dispersion profiles and the anisotropy parameter are computed through the use of the self-consistent approach. The cutoff radii for these models and the mass contained within this volume are also calculated. It is shown that the inclusion of a cosmological constant leads to many observable quantities such as the surface density, dispersion profiles and the anisotropy parameter becoming increasingly modified. In some scenarios, they are easily distinguished from the case where the cosmological constant is absent, as a result of their non-monotonic behaviour. The effects of neighbouring gravitational systems on the central system are also studied, and compared against the effects arising from the cosmological constant. Consequently, it is suggested that the effects of a cosmological constant can prove to be quite importa...

  11. Inflation and the cosmological constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Chaojun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available By assuming the cosmological “constant” is no longer a constant during the inflation epoch,it is found that the cosmological constant fine-tuning problem is solved.In the meanwhile,inflation models could predict a large tensor-to-scalar ratio,correct power spectral index and a larger running of it.Furthermore,the e-folding number is large enough to overcome the horizon,flatness problems in the Big Bang cosmology.

  12. Exponential Bounds for Ruin Probability in Two Moving Average Risk Models with Constant Interest Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Jun YAO; Rong Ming WANG

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider two discrete-time insurance risk models. Two moving average risk models are introduced to model the surplus process, and the probabilities of ruin are examined in models with a constant interest force. Exponential bounds for ruin probabilities of an infinite time horizon are derived by the martingale method.

  13. Recommended Henry’s Law Constants for Non-Groundwater Pathways Models in GoldSim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    This memorandum documents the source and numerical value of Henry’s law constants for volatile radionuclides of interest used in the non-groundwater (air and radon) pathways models for the 2018 E-Area Performance Assessment.

  14. Cosmological-constant cold dark matter models and the cobe two-year Sky maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, E F; Emory F Bunn; Naoshi Sugiyama

    1994-01-01

    Abstract. We compare the two-year COBE DMR sky maps with the predictions of cosmological-constant cold dark matter models. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find that the most likely value of the cosmological constant in such a model is Lambda = 0. The data set an upper limit on Lambda of 0.71 (0.78) at 90% confidence, and 0.78 (0.86) at 95% confidence with (without) the quadrupole anisotropy.

  15. Non-chiral fusion rules, structure constants of $D_{m}$ minimal models

    CERN Document Server

    Rida, A

    1999-01-01

    We present a technique to construct, for $D_{m}$ unitary minimal models, the non-chiral fusion rules which determines the operator content of the operator product algebra. Using these rules we solve the bootstrap equations and therefore determine the structure constants of these models. Through this approach we emphasize the role played by some discrete symmetries in the classification of minimal models.

  16. NON-CONSTANT POSITIVE STEADY-STATES OF A PREDATOR-PREY-MUTUALIST MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN WENYAN; WANG MINGXIN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the authors deal with the non-constant positive steady-states of a predator-prey-mutualist model with homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. They first give a priori estimates (positive upper and lower bounds) of positive steady-states,and then study the non-existence, the global existence and bifurcation of non-constant positive steady-states as some parameters are varied. Finally the asymptotic behavior of such solutions as d3 →∞ is discussed.

  17. Propagator with Positive Cosmological Constant in the 3D Euclidian Quantum Gravity Toy Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bunting, William

    2014-01-01

    We study the propagator on a single tetrahedron in a three dimensional toy model of quantum gravity with positive cosmological constant. The cosmological constant is included in the model via q-deformation of the spatial symmetry algebra, that is, we use the Tuarev-Viro amplitude. The expected repulsive effect of dark energy is recovered in numerical and analytic calculations of the propagator at large scales comparable to the infrared cutoff. However, due to the simplicity of the model we do not obtain the exact Newton limit of the propagator. This is a first step toward the similar calculation in the full 3+1 dimensional theory with larger numbers of simplicies.

  18. The hillslope-storage Boussinesq model for non-constant bedrock slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilberts, A.G.J.; Loon, van E.E.; Troch, P.A.A.; Paniconi, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study the recently introduced hill slope-storage Boussinesq (hsB) model is cast in a generalized formulation enabling the model to handle non-constant bedrock slopes (i.e. bedrock profile curvature). This generalization extends the analysis of hydrological behavior to hillslopes of arbitrary

  19. A Lagrange Multiplier Test for Testing the Adequacy of the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Paul; Teräsvirta, Timo; Yin, Meiqun

    A Lagrange multiplier test for testing the parametric structure of a constant conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (CCC-GARCH) model is proposed. The test is based on decomposing the CCC-GARCH model multiplicatively into two components, one of which...

  20. Dark Energy Model with Non-Minimal Coupling and Cosmological Constant Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓菲

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of dark energy models in the framework of the non-minimal coupling. With this kind of models, dark energy could cross the cosmological constant boundary, and at early time, dark energy could have "tracking" behavior.

  1. Dynamics of a stochastic tuberculosis model with constant recruitment and varying total population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a mathematical model for a tuberculosis model with constant recruitment and varying total population size by incorporating stochastic perturbations. By constructing suitable stochastic Lyapunov functions, we establish sufficient conditions for the existence of an ergodic stationary distribution as well as extinction of the disease to the stochastic system.

  2. Charge of the Electron, and the Constants of Radiation According to J. A. Wheeler's Geometrodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests a mechanical interpretation of Wheeler's model of the charge. According to the suggested interpretation, the oppositely charged particles are connected through the vortical lines of the current thus create a close contour "input-output" whose parameters determine the properties of the charge and spin. Depending on the energetic state of the system, the contour can be structurized into the units of the second and third order (photons. It is found that, in the framework of this interpretation, the charge is equivalent to the momentum. The numerical value of the unit charge has also been calculated proceeding from this basis. A system of the relations, connecting the charge to the constants of radiation (the Boltzmann, Wien, and Stefan-Boltzmann constants, and the fine structure constant has been obtained: this give a possibility for calculating all these constants through the unit charge.

  3. Charge of the Electron, and the Constants of Radiation According to J. A. Wheeler's Geometrodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests a mechanical interpretation of Wheller’s model of the charge. Ac- cording to the suggested interpretation, the oppositely charged particles are connected through the vortical lines of the current thus create a close contour “input-output” whose parameters determine the properties of the charge and spin. Depending on the energetic state of the system, the contour can be structurized into the units of the second and thirs order (photons. It is found that, in the framework of this interpretation, the charge is equivalent to the momentum. The numerical value of the unit charge has also been cal- culated proceeding from this basis. A system of the relations, connecting the charge to the constants of radiation (the Boltzmann, Wien, and Stefan-Boltzmann constants, and the fine structure constant has been obtained: this give a possibility for calculating all these constants through the unit charge.

  4. Estimating Energy Conversion Efficiency of Thermoelectric Materials: Constant Property Versus Average Property Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Hannah; Boese, Matthew; Carmichael, Cody; Dimich, Hannah; Seay, Dylan; Sheppard, Nathan; Beekman, Matt

    2017-01-01

    Maximum thermoelectric energy conversion efficiencies are calculated using the conventional "constant property" model and the recently proposed "cumulative/average property" model (Kim et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112:8205, 2015) for 18 high-performance thermoelectric materials. We find that the constant property model generally predicts higher energy conversion efficiency for nearly all materials and temperature differences studied. Although significant deviations are observed in some cases, on average the constant property model predicts an efficiency that is a factor of 1.16 larger than that predicted by the average property model, with even lower deviations for temperature differences typical of energy harvesting applications. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the conventional dimensionless figure of merit ZT obtained from the constant property model, while not applicable for some materials with strongly temperature-dependent thermoelectric properties, remains a simple yet useful metric for initial evaluation and/or comparison of thermoelectric materials, provided the ZT at the average temperature of projected operation, not the peak ZT, is used.

  5. Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate a correlated spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring unnatural fine-tunings of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently ``observed'' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP. Recent claims by Bekenstein that fine-structure-constant variability does not imply detectable violations of the equivalence principle are shown to be untenable.

  6. Modeling Nonlinear Adsorption with a Single Chemical Parameter: Predicting Chemical Median Langmuir Binding Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Craig Warren; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2015-07-07

    Procedures for accurately predicting linear partition coefficients onto various sorbents (e.g., organic carbon, soils, clay) are reliable and well established. However, similar procedures for the prediction of sorption parameters of nonlinear isotherm models are not. The purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for predicting nonlinear isotherm parameters, specifically the median Langmuir binding constants, K̃L, obtained utilizing the single-chemical parameter log-normal Langmuir isotherm developed in the accompanying work. A reduced poly parameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) is able to predict median Langmuir binding constants for graphite, charcoal, and Darco granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption data. For the larger F400 GAC data set, a single pp-LFER model was insufficient, as a plateau is observed for the median Langmuir binding constants of larger molecular volume sorbates. This volumetric cutoff occurs in proximity to the median pore diameter for F400 GAC. A log-linear relationship exists between the aqueous solubility of these large compounds and their median Langmuir binding constants. Using this relationship for the chemicals above the volumetric cutoff and the pp-LFER below the cutoff, the median Langmuir binding constants can be predicted with a root-mean square error for graphite (n = 13), charcoal (n = 11), Darco GAC (n = 14), and F400 GAC (n = 44) of 0.129, 0.307, 0.407, and 0.424, respectively.

  7. Random forest models of the retention constants in the thin layer chromatography

    CERN Document Server

    Kursa, Miron B; Rudnicki, Witold R

    2011-01-01

    In the current study we examine an application of the machine learning methods to model the retention constants in the thin layer chromatography (TLC). This problem can be described with hundreds or even thousands of descriptors relevant to various molecular properties, most of them redundant and not relevant for the retention constant prediction. Hence we employed feature selection to significantly reduce the number of attributes. Additionally we have tested application of the bagging procedure to the feature selection. The random forest regression models were built using selected variables. The resulting models have better correlation with the experimental data than the reference models obtained with linear regression. The cross-validation confirms robustness of the models.

  8. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Rodolfo H. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)]. E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar; Gomez, Sergio S. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)

    2006-04-24

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown.

  9. Decay constants in the heavy quark limit in models à la Bakamjian and Thomas

    CERN Document Server

    Morénas, V; Oliver, L; Pène, O; Raynal, J C

    1998-01-01

    In quark models à la Bakamjian and Thomas, that yield covariance and Isgur-Wise scaling of form factors in the heavy quark limit, we compute the decay constants $f^{(n)}$ and $f^{(n)}_{1/2}$ of S-wave and P-wave mesons composed of heavy and light quarks. Heavy quark limit scaling $\\sqrt{M} f = Cst$ is obtained, and it is shown that this class of models satisfies the sum rules involving decay constants and Isgur-Wise functions recently formulated by us in the heavy quark limit of QCD. Moreover, the model also satisfies the selection rules of the type $f^{(n)}_{3/2} = 0$ that must hold in this limit. We discuss different Ansätze for the dynamics of the mass operator at rest. For non-relativistic kinetic energies ${p^2 \\over 2m}$ the decay constants are finite even if the potential $V(r)$ has a Coulomb part. For the relativistic form $\\sqrt{p^2 + m^2}$, the S-wave decay constants diverge if there is a Coulomb singularity. Using phenomenological models of the spectrum with relativistic kinetic energy and regula...

  10. The Weierstrass Criterion and the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi Models with Cosmological Constant \\lambda

    CERN Document Server

    Bochicchio, Ivana; Laserra, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    We analyze Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi models in presence of the cosmological constant \\Lambda through the classical Weierstrass criterion. Precisely, we show that the Weierstrass approach allows us to classify the dynamics of these inhomogeneous spherically symmetric Universes taking into account their relationship with the sign of \\Lambda.

  11. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  12. The ruin probability of a discrete time risk model under constant interest rate with heavy tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Q.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the ultimate ruin probability of a discrete time risk model with a positive constant interest rate. Under the assumption that the gross loss of the company within one year is subexponentially distributed, a simple asymptotic relation for the ruin probability is derived and co

  13. A Note on "Stability of the Constant Cost Dynamic Lot Size Model" by K. Richter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Hoesel (Stan); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn a paper by K. Richter the stability regions of the dynamic lot size model with constant cost parameters are analyzed. In particular, an algorithm is suggested to compute the stability region of a so-called generalized solution. In general this region is only a subregion of the stabili

  14. Pricing Volatility Derivatives Under the Modified Constant Elasticity of Variance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Leunglung Chan; Eckhard Platen

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies volatility derivatives such as variance and volatility swaps, options on variance in the modified constant elasticity of variance model using the benchmark approach. The analytical expressions of pricing formulas for variance swaps are presented. In addition, the numerical solutions for variance swaps, volatility swaps and options on variance are demonstrated.

  15. Undamped critical speeds of rotor systems using assumed modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. D.; Chen, W. J.

    1993-07-01

    A procedure is presented to reduce the DOF of a discrete rotordynamics model by utilizing an assumed-modes Rayleigh-Ritz approximation. Many possibilities exist for the assumed modes and any reasonable choice will yield a reduced-order model with adequate accuracy for most applications. The procedure provides an option which can be implemented with relative ease and may prove beneficial for many applications where computational efficiency is particularly important.

  16. Model of constant probability event and its application in information fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓勇; 施文康

    2004-01-01

    A model of constant probability event is constructed rigorously in event space of PSCEA. It is showed that the numerical-based fusion and the algebraic-based fusion have a consistent result when the weight is regarded as a constant probability event. From the point of view of algebra, we present a novel similarity measure in product space. Based on the similarity degree, we use a similarity aggregation method to fusion experts' evaluation. We also give a numerical example to illustrate the method.

  17. Bekenstein model and the time variation of the strong coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Chamoun, N; Vucetich, H

    2001-01-01

    We propose to generalize Bekenstein model for the time variation of the fine structure "constant" $\\alpha_{em}$ to QCD strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$. We find that, except for a ``fine tuned'' choice of the free parameters, the extension can not be performed trivially without being in conflict with experimental constraints and this rules out $\\alpha_S$ variability. This is due largely to the huge numerical value of the QCD vacuum gluon condensate when compared to the mass density of the universe.

  18. Prediction of Henry's law constants of triazine derived herbicides from quantum chemical continuum solvation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eduardo J; Alderete, Joel B

    2003-01-01

    The Henry's law constants (H) for triazine derived herbicides are calculated using quantum chemical solvation models, SM2, SM3, PCM-DFT, and CPCM-DFT, and their performances are discussed. The results show considerable differences in performance among the different levels of theory. The values of H calculated by the semiempirical methods agree much better with the experimental values than those obtained at the DFT level. The differences are discussed in terms of the different contributions, electrostatic and no-electrostatic, to Gibbs free energy of solvation. In addition, the Henry's law constants of some triazine derived herbicides whose values have not been reported earlier are predicted as well.

  19. Exact diffusion constant for the one-dimensional partially asymmetric exclusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, B.; Mallick, K.

    1997-02-01

    We calculate exactly the diffusion constant associated with the fluctuations of the current for the partial asymmetric exclusion model on a ring with an arbitrary number of particles and holes. We also give the diffusion constant of a tagged particle on that ring. Our approach extends, using the deformed harmonic oscillator algebra, a result already known for the fully asymmetric case. In the limit of weak asymmetry, we extract from our exact expression the crossover between the Edwards - Wilkinson and the Kardar - Parisi - Zhang equations in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  20. Global behaviour of a predator-prey like model with piecewise constant arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Senol; Gurcan, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the analysis of a predator-prey like model consisting of system of differential equations with piecewise constant arguments. A solution of the system with piecewise constant arguments leads to a system of difference equations which is examined to study boundedness, local and global asymptotic behaviour of the positive solutions. Using Schur-Cohn criterion and a Lyapunov function, we derive sufficient conditions under which the positive equilibrium point is local and global asymptotically stable. Moreover, we show numerically that periodic solutions arise as a consequence of Neimark-Sacker bifurcation of a limit cycle.

  1. RESEARCH NOTE Static dielectric constant of the polarizable NCC water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Jean-Christophe Soetens Marilia T. C. Martins Costa Claude

    The static dielectric constant epsilon0 of the ab initio water model NCC including polarizability (Niesar, U., Corongiu, G., Clementi, E., Kneller, G. R., and Bhattacharya, D. K., 1990, J. phys. Chem., 94, 7949) has been computed by molecular dynamics simulation at 25oC and a density of 1gcm-3. The long range electrostatic interactions are taken into account by the reaction field method. Values of 100 8 and 8ps are found for the static dielectric constant and dielectric relaxation time, respectively.

  2. Elastic Constants of Superconducting MgB2 from Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Shell Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The elastic constants of superconducting MgB2 are calculated using a molecular dynamics method (MD)with shell model. The lattice parameters, five independent elastic constants, equations of state (EOS), Debye temperature, and bulk modulus of MgB2 are obtained. Meanwhile, the dependence of the bulk modulus B, the lattice parameters a and c, and the unit cell volume V on the applied pressure are presented. It is demonstrated that the method introduced here can well reproduce the experimental results with a reasonable accuracy.

  3. Constraints on field theoretical models for variation of the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant α may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which α is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating α, monotonic time variation of α, and time-independent α that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and “fifth force” experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo subnuclear reactor on models with monotonic timelike variation of α. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

  4. The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

    2014-01-01

    The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

  5. Time variation of the fine structure constant in the early universe and the Bekenstein model

    CERN Document Server

    Mosquera, Mercedes E; Landau, Susana J; Vucetich, Hector

    2007-01-01

    We use observational primordial abundances of $\\De$, $\\Het$, $\\He$ and $\\Li$, recent data from the Cosmic Microwave Background and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, to put limits on the variation of the fine structure constant in the early universe. Furthermore, we use these constraints together with other astronomical and geophysical bounds from the late universe to test Bekenstein's model for the variation of $\\alpha$. The model is not able to fit all observational and experimental data.

  6. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  7. Bianchi Type-II String Cosmological Models in Normal Gauge for Lyra's Manifold with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Pradhan, Anirudh

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi-II cosmological models representing massive strings in normal gauge for Lyra's manifold by applying the variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. The variation law for Hubble's parameter generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. Using these two forms, Einstein's modified field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The energy-momentum tensor for such string as formulated by Letelier (1983) is used to construct massive string cosmological models for which we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the component $\\sigma^{1}_{~1}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_{i}$. This condition leads to $A = (BC)^{m}$, where A, B and C are the metric coefficients and m is proportionality cons...

  8. Observational constraints on models of the Universe with time variable Gravitational and Cosmological constants along MOG

    CERN Document Server

    Khurshudyan, M; Momeni, D; Myrzakulov, R; Raza, M

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is to investigate the weak regime covariant scalar-tensor-vector gravity (STVG) theory, known as the MOdified gravity (MOG) theory of gravity. First, we show that the MOG in the absence of scalar fields is converted into $\\Lambda(t),G(t)$ models. Time evolution of the cosmological parameters for a family of viable models have been investigated. Numerical results with the cosmological data have been adjusted. We've introduced a model for dark energy (DE) density and cosmological constant which involves first order derivatives of Hubble parameter. To extend this model, correction terms including the gravitational constant are added. In our scenario, the cosmological constant is a function of time. To complete the model,interaction terms between dark energy and dark matter (DM) manually entered in phenomenological form. Instead of using the dust model for DM, we have proposed DM equivalent to a barotropic fluid. Time evolution of DM is a function of other cosmological parameters. Using ...

  9. Constraining spatial variations of the fine-structure constant in symmetron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, A. M. M.; Martinelli, M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a methodology to test models with spatial variations of the fine-structure constant α, based on the calculation of the angular power spectrum of these measurements. This methodology enables comparisons of observations and theoretical models through their predictions on the statistics of the α variation. Here we apply it to the case of symmetron models. We find no indications of deviations from the standard behavior, with current data providing an upper limit to the strength of the symmetron coupling to gravity (log ⁡β2 constrain the model when also the symmetry breaking scale factor aSSB is free to vary.

  10. Discrete fragment model for apparent formation constants of actinide ions with humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Yoshida, Hatsumi; Aoyama, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Taishi; Takagi, Ikuji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Moriyama, Hirotake [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2015-09-01

    A semi-empirical thermodynamic model was applied to estimate the apparent formation constants of actinide ions, i.e., Th(IV), Pu(IV) and Np(V), with humic substances (HSs), including humic and fulvic acids, over a wide range of solution conditions, i.e., pH, ionic strength, and HS and metal concentrations. The hypothetical HSs consist of humic and fulvic acids with nine types of simple organic ligands, which include aromatic and aliphatic carboxyl groups and phenol groups, as binding sites. The abundance of each binding site in the hypothetical HSs was determined via a fitting analysis using an acid-dissociation dataset for several HSs. To determine the apparent formation constant of a given metal ion with HSs, 54 specific binding sites were considered, including nine monodentate sites (1:1 metal/ligand complexes) and 45 bidentate sites (1:2 metal/ligand complexes). The formation constant of each monodentate binding was determined from the experimental data, while those of the bidentate bindings were determined by considering two monodentate bindings and the chelating effect, for which one of the adjustable parameters was introduced in the model. Introduction of the other parameter, which is related to the fraction of monodentate to bidentate sites (i.e., the heterogeneity), afforded the parameter values with good correlation with the apparent formation constant data. The present model with adjusted parameter values well reproduced the experimental apparent complex formation constants for actinide ion interaction with HSs in a wide range of solution conditions except for those obtained at trace concentrations.

  11. A generalized Forchheimer radial flow model for constant-rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Chen, Yi-Feng; Zhan, Hongbin; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2017-09-01

    Models used for data interpretation of constant-rate tests (CRTs) are commonly derived with the assumption of Darcian flow in an idealized integer flow dimension, where the non-Darcian nature of fluid flow and the complexity of flow geometry are disregarded. In this study, a Forchheimer's law-based analytical model is proposed with the assumption of buildup (or drawdown) decomposition for characterizing the non-Darcian flow in a generalized radial formation where the flow dimension n may become non-integer. The proposed model immediately reduces to Barker's (1988) model for Darcian flow in the generalized radial formation and to Mathias et al.'s (2008) model for non-Darcian flow in a two-dimensional confined aquifer. A comparison with numerical simulations shows that the proposed model behaves well at late times for flow dimension n > 1.5. The proposed model is finally applied for data interpretation of the constant-rate pumping tests performed at Ploemeur (Le Borgne et al., 2004), showing that the intrinsic hydraulic conductivity of formations will be underestimated and the specific storage will be overestimated if the non-Darcian effect is ignored. The proposed model is an extension of the generalized radial flow (GRF) model based on Forchheimer's law, which would be of significance for data interpretation of CRTs in aquifers of complex flow geometry in which non-Darcian flow occurs.

  12. Modeling drug release from hot-melt extruded mini-matrices with constant and non-constant diffusivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, E; Siepmann, F; De Beer, T R M; Van Loo, D; Van den Mooter, G; Remon, J P; Siepmann, J; Vervaet, C

    2009-10-01

    Different types of ethylcellulose-based mini-matrices were prepared by hot-melt extrusion and thoroughly characterized in vitro. Metoprolol tartrate was used as model drug, and various amounts and types of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/polyethylene oxide (PEO) were added as release rate modifiers. Based on the experimental results, appropriate mathematical theories were identified/developed, allowing for a better understanding of the underlying drug release mechanisms. For instance, it could be shown that at high initial PEG/PEO contents and/or intermediate initial PEG/PEO contents of low molecular weight, drug diffusion with time- and position-independent diffusivities is predominant. In contrast, at low initial PEG/PEO contents and intermediate initial PEG/PEO contents of high molecular weight, the time- and position-dependent dynamic changes in the matrix porosities significantly affect the conditions for drug and PEG/PEO diffusion. These dynamic changes must be taken into account in the mathematical model. Importantly, the proposed theories are mechanistic realistic and also allow for the quantitative prediction of the effects of the device design on the resulting drug release patterns. Interestingly, these quantitative predictions could be confirmed by independent experiments. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy allowed for the determination of the resulting drug concentration-position profiles within the mini-matrices as a function of time and confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  13. Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Solution for Exothermic Reactions Model with Constant Heat Source in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazle Mabood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat flow patterns profiles are required for heat transfer simulation in each type of the thermal insulation. The exothermic reaction models in porous medium can prescribe the problems in the form of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. In this research, the driving force model due to the temperature gradients is considered. A governing equation of the model is restricted into an energy balance equation that provides the temperature profile in conduction state with constant heat source on the steady state. The proposed optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM is used to compute the solutions of the exothermic reactions equation.

  14. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P., E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Vielzeuf, P.E., E-mail: pvielzeuf@ifae.es [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Martinelli, M., E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Calabrese, E., E-mail: erminia.calabrese@astro.ox.ac.uk [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pandolfi, S., E-mail: stefania@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-09

    We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  15. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, C J A P; Martinelli, M; Calabrese, E; Pandolfi, S

    2015-01-01

    We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent $\\alpha$ measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying $\\alpha$. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), together with more sensitive $\\alpha$ measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  16. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J.A.P. Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT, together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  17. Structural model for the dynamic buckling of a column under constant rate compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic buckling behavior of a column (rod, beam) under constant rate compression is considered. The buckling is caused by prescribed motion of column ends toward each other with constant velocity. Simple model with one degree of freedom simulating static and dynamic buckling of a column is derived. In the case of small initial disturbances the model yields simple analytical dependencies between the main parameters of the problem: critical force, compression rate, and initial disturbance. It is shown that the time required for buckling is inversely proportional to cubic root of compression velocity and logarithmically depends on the initial disturbance. Analytical expression for critical buckling force as a function of compression velocity is derived. It is shown that in a range of compression rates typical for laboratory experiments the dependence is accurately approximated by a power law with exponent equal to $2/3$. Theoretical findings are supported by available results of laboratory experiments. Keywords...

  18. Determination of a dielectric waveguide propagation constant using a multifilament-current model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, H; Altman, Z; Leviatan, Y

    1989-09-15

    A moment method using a multifilament-current model is presented to analyze the modes propagating in a cylindrical dielectric waveguide. In this model, analytically derivable fields of filamentary electric and magnetic currents (of yet unknown propagation constant and amplitude) are used to simulate the field of each mode inside and outside the guiding core. A simple point-matching procedure is subsequently used to enforce the boundary conditions at the core periphery and results in a homogeneous matrix equation. The longitudinal propagation constant of each mode and the currents that yield the field distribution of this mode are then found by solving this equation. As an example, a circular dielectric waveguide is analyzed and the results are presented.

  19. Analysis of a Periodic Single Species Population Model Involving Constant Impulsive Perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghua Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a continuation of the work of Tan et al. (2012. In this paper a periodic single species model controlled by constant impulsive perturbation is investigated. The constant impulse is realized at fixed moments of time. With the help of the comparison theorem of impulsive differential equations and Lyapunov functions, sufficient conditions for the permanence and global attractivity are established, respectively. Also, by comparing the above results with corresponding known results of Tan et al. (2012 (i.e., the above model with linear impulsive perturbations, we find that the two different types of impulsive perturbations have influence on the above dynamics. Numerical simulations are presented to substantiate our analytical results.

  20. A Time Varying Strong Coupling Constant as a Model of Inflationary Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Chamoun, N; Vucetich, H

    2000-01-01

    We consider a scenario where the strong coupling constant was changing in the early universe. We attribute this change to a variation in the colour charge within a Bekenstein-like model. Allowing for a large value for the vacuum gluon condensate $\\sim 10^{22}GeV^4$, we could generate inflation with the required properties to solve the fluctuation and other standard cosmology problems. A possible approach to end the inflation is suggested.

  1. Self-tuning Solution of Cosmological Constant in RS-II Model and Goldstone Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J E

    2001-01-01

    I give a review on the self-tuning solution of the cosmological constant in a 5D RS-II model using a three index antisymmetric tensor field $A_{MNP}$. The three index antisymmetric tensor field can be the fundamental one appearing in 11D supergravity. Also, the dual of its field strength $H_{MNPQ}$, being a massless scalar, may be interpreted as a Goldstone boson of some spontaneously broken global symmetry.

  2. CONSTANT ELASTICITY OF VARIANCE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL STRATEGIES FOR ANNUITY CONTRACTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian-wu; YIN Shao-hua; QIN Cheng-lin

    2006-01-01

    The constant elasticity of variance(CEV) model was constructed to study a defined contribution pension plan where benefits were paid by annuity. It also presents the process that the Legendre transform and dual theory can be applied to find an optimal investment policy during a participant's whole life in the pension plan. Finally, two explicit solutions to exponential utility function in the two different periods (before and after retirement) are revealed. Hence, the optimal investment strategies in the two periods are obtained.

  3. Model test study of evaporation mechanism of sand under constant atmospheric condition

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yu Jun; Ding, Wenqi; SONG, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation mechanism of Fontainebleau sand using a large-scale model chamber is studied. First, the evaporation test on a layer of water above sand surface is performed under various atmospheric conditions, validating the performance of the chamber and the calculation method of actual evaporation rate by comparing the calculated and measured cumulative evaporations. Second,the evaporation test on sand without water layer is conducted under constant atmospheric condition. Both the evoluti...

  4. Lemaître Class Dark Energy Model for Relaxing Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Dymnikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological constant corresponds to the maximally symmetric cosmological term with the equation of state p = − ρ . Introducing a cosmological term with the reduced symmetry, p r = − ρ in the spherically symmetric case, makes cosmological constant intrinsically variable component of a variable cosmological term which describes time-dependent and spatially inhomogeneous vacuum dark energy. Relaxation of the cosmological constant from the big initial value to the presently observed value can be then described in general setting by the spherically symmetric cosmology of the Lemaître class. We outline in detail the cosmological model with the global structure of the de Sitter spacetime distinguished by the holographic principle as the only stable product of quantum evaporation of the cosmological horizon entirely determined by its quantum dynamics. Density of the vacuum dark energy is presented by semiclassical description of vacuum polarization in the spherically symmetric gravitational field, and its initial value is chosen at the GUT scale. The final non-zero value of the cosmological constant is tightly fixed by the quantum dynamics of evaporation and appears in the reasonable agreement with its observational value.

  5. A simple biophysically plausible model for long time constants in single neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiganj, Zoran; Hasselmo, Michael E; Howard, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    Recent work in computational neuroscience and cognitive psychology suggests that a set of cells that decay exponentially could be used to support memory for the time at which events took place. Analytically and through simulations on a biophysical model of an individual neuron, we demonstrate that exponentially decaying firing with a range of time constants up to minutes could be implemented using a simple combination of well-known neural mechanisms. In particular, we consider firing supported by calcium-controlled cation current. When the amount of calcium leaving the cell during an interspike interval is larger than the calcium influx during a spike, the overall decay in calcium concentration can be exponential, resulting in exponential decay of the firing rate. The time constant of the decay can be several orders of magnitude larger than the time constant of calcium clearance, and it could be controlled externally via a variety of biologically plausible ways. The ability to flexibly and rapidly control time constants could enable working memory of temporal history to be generalized to other variables in computing spatial and ordinal representations.

  6. Challenges and implications of global modeling approaches that are alternatives to using constant plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years a number of approaches have been developed to provide alternatives to the use of plant functional types (PFTs) with constant vegetation characteristics for simulating vegetation responses to climate changes. In this presentation, an overview of those approaches and their challenges is given. Some new approaches aim at removing PFTs altogether by determining the combination of vegetation characteristics that would fit local conditions best. Others describe the variation in traits within PFTs as a function of environmental drivers, based on community assembly principles. In the first approach, after an equilibrium has been established, vegetation composition and its functional attributes can change by allowing the emergence of a new type that is more fit. In the latter case, changes in vegetation attributes in space and time as assumed to be the result intraspecific variation, genetic adaptation and species turnover, without quantifying their respective importance. Hence, it is assumed that -by whatever mechanism- the community as a whole responds without major time lags to changes in environmental drivers. Recently, we showed that intraspecific variation is highly species- and trait-specific and that none of the current hypotheses on drivers of this variation seems to hold. Also genetic adaptation varies considerably among species and it is uncertain whether it will be fast enough to cope with climate change. Species turnover within a community is especially fast in herbaceous communities, but much slower in forest communities. Hence, it seems that assumptions made may not hold for forested ecosystems, but solutions to deal with this do not yet exist. Even despite the fact that responsiveness of vegetation to environmental change may be overestimated, we showed that -upon implementation of trait-environment relationships- major changes in global vegetation distribution are projected, to similar extents as to those without such responsiveness.

  7. The Disquietude of Duty Assuming Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Maureira Pacheco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For Kant, the moral duty is determined universally, that is, on account of its form, in the moral norm. However the moral norm is opposed to particularity, determined by what is not the norm itself, hence being the origin of singularity. The singularized norm is opposed, from experience, by its negation in individual cases. To assume Kant demands the reconciliation of the singular, manifested incases, with the universal. This article deals with this question, demonstrating, above all, the practical difficulties linked to the moral experience in its totality.

  8. An initial-abstraction, constant-loss model for unit hydrograph modeling for applicable watersheds in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2007-01-01

    Estimation of representative hydrographs from design storms, which are known as design hydrographs, provides for cost-effective, riskmitigated design of drainage structures such as bridges, culverts, roadways, and other infrastructure. During 2001?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, investigated runoff hydrographs, design storms, unit hydrographs,and watershed-loss models to enhance design hydrograph estimation in Texas. Design hydrographs ideally should mimic the general volume, peak, and shape of observed runoff hydrographs. Design hydrographs commonly are estimated in part by unit hydrographs. A unit hydrograph is defined as the runoff hydrograph that results from a unit pulse of excess rainfall uniformly distributed over the watershed at a constant rate for a specific duration. A time-distributed, watershed-loss model is required for modeling by unit hydrographs. This report develops a specific time-distributed, watershed-loss model known as an initial-abstraction, constant-loss model. For this watershed-loss model, a watershed is conceptualized to have the capacity to store or abstract an absolute depth of rainfall at and near the beginning of a storm. Depths of total rainfall less than this initial abstraction do not produce runoff. The watershed also is conceptualized to have the capacity to remove rainfall at a constant rate (loss) after the initial abstraction is satisfied. Additional rainfall inputs after the initial abstraction is satisfied contribute to runoff if the rainfall rate (intensity) is larger than the constant loss. The initial abstraction, constant-loss model thus is a two-parameter model. The initial-abstraction, constant-loss model is investigated through detailed computational and statistical analysis of observed rainfall and runoff data for 92 USGS streamflow-gaging stations (watersheds) in Texas with contributing drainage areas from 0.26 to 166 square miles. The analysis is

  9. Review on optical constants of Titan aerosols: Experimental results and modeling/observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassé, Coralie; Muñoz, Olga; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François

    2014-05-01

    During the last years many studies have been performed to improve the experimental database of optical constants of Titan aerosols. Indeed, the determination of the optical constants of these particles is essential to quantify their capacity to absorb and to scatter solar radiation, and thus to evaluate their role on Titan's radiative balance and climate. The study of optical properties is also crucial to analyze and to better interpret many of Titan's observational data, in particular those acquired during the Cassini-Huygens mission. One way to determine Titan aerosols optical constant is to measure the optical constants of analogues of Titan complex organic material synthesized in the laboratory, usually named Titan's tholins (Sagan and Khare, 1979). But the optical constants depend on the chemical composition, the size and the shape of particles (Raulin et al., 2012). Those three parameters result from the experimental conditions such as energy source, gas mixing ratio, gas pressure, flow rate and irradiation time (Cable et al., 2012). Besides the determination of the refractive index in the laboratory, there are others methods using theoretical models or observational data. Nevertheless, theoretical models are based on laboratory data or/and observational data. The visible - near infrared spectral region of optical constants has been widely studied with laboratory analogues. Comparison of the obtained results suggest that tholins synthesized by Tran et al. (2003) and Majhoub et al. (2012) are the best representative of Titan aerosols with regards to their refractive indexes in this spectral region. The mid-infrared spectral range has been studied only by Imanaka et al. (2012) and slightly by Tran et al. (2003). In that spectral range, Titan tholins do not exhibit the features displayed by Kim and Courtin (2013) from Titan's observations. For spectral region of wavelengths smaller than 0.20µm or higher than 25µm, only the data from Khare et al. (1984) are

  10. Modeling selenium (IV and VI) adsorption envelopes in selected tropical soils using the constant capacitance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adsorption of selenium (Se) on soil is important due to the relevance of Se to environmental and health issues. The adsorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) was evaluated on soil samples from São Paulo state, Brazil, as a function of varying pH, and the experimental data were fitted to the constant capac...

  11. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  12. Structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) WZNW model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikida, Y.; Schomerus, V.

    2007-11-15

    We propose exact formulas for the 2- and 3-point functions of the WZNW model on the non-compact supergroup OSP(1 vertical stroke 2). Using the path integral approach that was recently developed in arXiv:0706.1030 we show how local correlation functions in the OSP(p vertical stroke 2) WZNW models can be obtained from those of N=p supersymmetric Liouville field theory for p=1,2. We then employ known results on correlators in N=1 Liouville theory to determine the structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) theory. (orig.)

  13. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  14. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: Insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the O17 and H1 isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4ppm for the O17 shielding and 1ppm for the H1 shielding.

  15. New contractivity condition in a population model with piecewise constant arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Yoshiaki

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we improve contractivity conditions of solutions for the positive equilibrium of the following differential equation with piecewise constant arguments: where r(t) is a nonnegative continuous function on [0,+[infinity]), r(t)[not identical with]0, , bi[greater-or-equal, slanted]0, i=0,1,2,...,m, and . In particular, for the case a=0 and m[greater-or-equal, slanted]1, we really improve the known three type conditions of the contractivity for solutions of this model (see for example, [Y. Muroya, A sufficient condition on global stability in a logistic equation with piecewise constant arguments, Hokkaido Math. J. 32 (2003) 75-83]). For the other case a[not equal to]0 and m[greater-or-equal, slanted]1, under the condition , the obtained result partially improves the known results on the contractivity of solutions for the positive equilibrium of this model given by the author [Y. Muroya, Persistence, contractivity and global stability in logistic equations with piecewise constant delays, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 270 (2002) 602-635] and others.

  16. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-21

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the (17)O and (1)H isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4 ppm for the (17)O shielding and 1 ppm for the (1)H shielding.

  17. Modelling and simulation of multi-phase effects on X-ray elasticity constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freour, S.; Gloaguen, D.; Guillen, R. [Laboratoire d' Applications des Materiaux a la Mecanique (L.A.M.M.), L.A.M.M.-C.R.T.T., Boulevard de L' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France); Francois, M. [Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' Ingenierie Simultanee (L.A.S.M.I.S.), Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2003-10-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of X-ray Elasticity Constants (XEC) of phases embedded in multi-phase polycrystals. A three scales (macroscopic, pseudo-macroscopic, mesoscopic) model based on the classical self-consistent formalism is developed in order to analyse multi-phase effects on XEC values. Simulations are performed for cubic or hexagonal crystallographic structure phases embedded in several two-phases materials. In fact, it is demonstrated that XEC vary with the macroscopic stiffness of the whole polycrystal. In consequence, the constants of one particular phase depend on the elastic behaviour and the volume fraction of all the phases constituting the material. Now, XEC play a leading role in pseudo-macroscopic stresses determination by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. In this work, a quantitative analysis of the multi-phase effects on stresses determination by XRD methods was performed. Numerical results will be compared and discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. A review of shear strength models for rock joints subjected to constant normal stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanathan Thirukumaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical shear behaviour of rough joints has been studied under constant normal load/stress (CNL boundary conditions, but recent studies have shown that this boundary condition may not replicate true practical situations. Constant normal stiffness (CNS is more appropriate to describe the stress–strain response of field joints since the CNS boundary condition is more realistic than CNL. The practical implications of CNS are movements of unstable blocks in the roof or walls of an underground excavation, reinforced rock wedges sliding in a rock slope or foundation, and the vertical movement of rock-socketed concrete piles. In this paper, the highlights and limitations of the existing models used to predict the shear strength/behaviour of joints under CNS conditions are discussed in depth.

  19. Absolute Determination of Optical Constants by a Direct Physical Modeling of Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, H; Toth, J; Tokesi, K; Ding, Z J

    2016-01-01

    We present an absolute extraction method of optical constants of metal from the measured reflection electron energy loss (REELS) spectra by using the recently developed reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) technique. The method is based on a direct physical modeling of electron elastic and electron inelastic scattering near the surface region where the surface excitation becomes important to fully describe the spectrum loss feature intensity in relative to the elastic peak intensity. An optimization procedure of oscillator parameters appeared in the energy loss function (ELF) for describing electron inelastic scattering due to the bulk- and surface-excitations was performed with the simulated annealing method by a successive comparison between the measured and Monte Carlo simulated REELS spectra. The ELF and corresponding optical constants of Fe were obtained from the REELS spectra measured at incident energies of 1000, 2000 and 3000 eV. The validity of the present optical data has been verified with the f- and ps-sum r...

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: effective optical constants for electric field modelling of nanostructured Ag films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, M. Nilusha M. N.; Schmidt, Daniel; Gibbs, W. E. Keith; Juodkazis, Saulius; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2016-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is drawing increasing interest in fields such as chemical and biomolecular sensing, nanoscale plasmonic engineering and surface science. In addition to the electromagnetic and chemical enhancements in SERS, several studies have reported a "back-side" enhancement when nanostructures are excited through a transparent base rather than directly through air. This additional enhancement has been attributed to a local increase in the electric field for propagation from high to low refractive index media. In this study, Mueller matrix ellipsometry was used to derive the effective optical constants of Ag nanostructures fabricated by thermal evaporation at oblique angles. The results confirm that the effective optical constants of the nanostructured Ag film depart substantially from the bulk properties. Detailed analysis suggests that the optical constants of the nano-island Ag structures exhibit uniaxial optical properties with the optical axis inclined from the substrate normal towards the deposition direction of the vapour flux. The substrates were functionalized with thiophenol and used to measure the wavelength dependence of the additional SERS signal. Further, a model based on the Fresnel equations was developed, using the Ag film optical constants and thickness as determined by ellipsometry. Both experimental data and the model show a significant additional enhancement in the back-side SERS, blue shifted from the plasmon resonance of the nanostructures. This information will be useful for a range of applications where it is necessary to understand the effective optical behaviour of thin films and in designing miniaturized optical fibre sensors for remote sensing applications.

  1. Selection of noise power ratio spectrum models for electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source varies with frequency due to mismatch between transmission lines. We model this ratio spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency. For any given frequency range, defined by the maximum frequency $f_{max}$, we select the optimal polynomial ratio spectrum model with a cross-validation method and estimate the conditional uncertainty of the constant term in the ratio spectrum model in a way that accounts for both random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of the model with a resampling method. We select $f_{max}$ by minimizing this conditional uncertainty. Since many values of $f_{max}$ yield conditional uncertainties close to the observed minimum value on a frequency grid, we quantify an additional component of uncertainty as...

  2. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm – Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable. PMID:27695626

  3. Kinematic equivalence between models driven by DBI field with constant $\\gamma$ and exotic holographic quintessence cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    We show the kinematic equivalence between cosmological models driven by Dirac-Born-Infeld fields $\\phi$ with constant proper velocity of the brane and exponential potential $V=V_0e^{-B\\phi}$ and interactive cosmological systems with Modified Holographic Ricci type fluids as dark energy in flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies.

  4. Static Potential in the SU(2)-Higgs Model and Coupling Constant Definitions in Lattice and Continuum Models

    CERN Document Server

    Csikor, Ferenc; Hegedüs, P; Piróth, A

    1999-01-01

    We present a one-loop calculation of the static potential in the SU(2)-Higgs model. The connection to the coupling constant definition used in lattice simulations is clarified. The consequences in comparing lattice simulations and perturbative results for finite temperature applications are explored.

  5. Decay Constants and Distribution Amplitudes of B Meson in the Relativistic Potential Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Hao-Kai

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the decay constants of $B$ and $B_s$ mesons based on the wave function obtained in the relativistic potential model. Our results are in good agreement with experiment data which enables us to apply this method to the investigation of $B$-meson distribution amplitudes. A very compact form of the distribution amplitudes is obtained. We also investigate the one-loop QCD corrections to the purely leptonic decays of $B$ mesons. We find that, after subtracting the infrared divergence in the one-loop corrections using the factorization method, the QCD one-loop corrections to the leptonic decay amplitude will be zero.

  6. Time Evolution of the Fine Structure Constant in a Two-Field Quintessence Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bento, M C; Santos, N M C

    2004-01-01

    We examine the variation of the fine structure constant in the context of a two-field quintessence model. We find that, for solutions that lead to a transient late period of accelerated expansion, it is possible to fit the data arising from quasar spectra and comply with the bounds on the variation of $\\alpha$ from the Oklo reactor, meteorite analysis, atomic clock measurements, Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. That is more difficult if we consider solutions corresponding to a late period of permanent accelerated expansion.

  7. Time evolution of the fine structure constant in a two-field quintessence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, M. C.; Bertolami, O.; Santos, N. M.

    2004-11-01

    We examine the variation of the fine structure constant in the context of a two-field quintessence model. We find that, for solutions that lead to a transient late period of accelerated expansion, it is possible to fit the data arising from quasar spectra and comply with the bounds on the variation of α from the Oklo reactor, meteorite analysis, atomic clock measurements, cosmic microwave background radiation, and big bang nucleosynthesis. That is more difficult if we consider solutions corresponding to a late period of permanent accelerated expansion.

  8. Non-Extensive Entropy Econometrics: New Statistical Features of Constant Elasticity of Substitution-Related Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Second Bwanakare

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Power-law (PL formalism is known to provide an appropriate framework for canonical modeling of nonlinear systems. We estimated three stochastically distinct models of constant elasticity of substitution (CES class functions as non-linear inverse problem and showed that these PL related functions should have a closed form. The first model is related to an aggregator production function, the second to an aggregator utility function (the Armington and the third to an aggregator technical transformation function. A q-generalization of K-L information divergence criterion function with a priori consistency constraints is proposed. Related inferential statistical indices are computed. The approach leads to robust estimation and to new findings about the true stochastic nature of this class of nonlinear—up until now—analytically intractable functions. Outputs from traditional econometric techniques (Shannon entropy, NLLS, GMM, ML are also presented.

  9. The saddle-node-transcritical bifurcation in a population model with constant rate harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Saputra, K V I; Quispel, G R W

    2010-01-01

    We study the interaction of saddle-node and transcritical bifurcations in a Lotka-Volterra model with a constant term representing harvesting or migration. Because some of the equilibria of the model lie on an invariant coordinate axis, both the saddle-node and the transcritical bifurcations are of codimension one. Their interaction can be associated with either a single or a double zero eigenvalue. We show that in the former case, the local bifurcation diagram is given by a nonversal unfolding of the cusp bifurcation whereas in the latter case it is a nonversal unfolding of a degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation. We present a simple model for each of the two cases to illustrate the possible unfoldings. We analyse the consequences of the generic phase portraits for the Lotka-Volterra system.

  10. Adaptation of fugacity models to treat speciating chemicals with constant species concentration ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toose, Liisa K; Mackay, Donald

    2004-09-01

    A "multiplier" method is developed by which multimedia mass balance fugacity models designed to describe the fate of a single chemical species can be applied to chemicals that exist as several interconverting species. The method is applicable only when observed ratios of species concentrations in each phase are relatively constant and there is thus no need to define interspecies conversion rates. It involves the compilation of conventional transformation and intermedia transport rate expressions for a single, selected key species, and then a multiplier, Ri, is deduced for each of the other species. The total rate applicable to all species is calculated as the product of the rate for the single key species and a combined multiplier (1 + R2 + R3 + etc.). The theory is developed and illustrated by two examples. Limitations of the method are discussed, especially under conditions when conversion rates are uncertain. The advantage of this approach is that existing fugacity and concentration-based models that describe the fate of single-species chemicals can be readily adapted to estimate the fate of multispecies substances such as mercury which display relatively constant species proportions in each medium.

  11. The modelling of carbon-based supercapacitors: Distributions of time constants and Pascal Equivalent Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Iain; Dring, Roderick; Puttock, Robert; Thring, Rob; Howroyd, Simon

    2017-03-01

    Supercapacitors are an emerging technology with applications in pulse power, motive power, and energy storage. However, their carbon electrodes show a variety of non-ideal behaviours that have so far eluded explanation. These include Voltage Decay after charging, Voltage Rebound after discharging, and Dispersed Kinetics at long times. In the present work, we establish that a vertical ladder network of RC components can reproduce all these puzzling phenomena. Both software and hardware realizations of the network are described. In general, porous carbon electrodes contain random distributions of resistance R and capacitance C, with a wider spread of log R values than log C values. To understand what this implies, a simplified model is developed in which log R is treated as a Gaussian random variable while log C is treated as a constant. From this model, a new family of equivalent circuits is developed in which the continuous distribution of log R values is replaced by a discrete set of log R values drawn from a geometric series. We call these Pascal Equivalent Circuits. Their behaviour is shown to resemble closely that of real supercapacitors. The results confirm that distributions of RC time constants dominate the behaviour of real supercapacitors.

  12. Compensation technique for Q-limit enforcements in a constant complex Jacobian power flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, V.B.; Bijwe, P.R.; Nanda, J. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Indian Inst. of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (IN))

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and efficient compensation technique to deal with but-type switchings associated with Q-limit enforcement at voltage controlled (PV) buses in a constant Jacobian power flow model. The Jacobian is expressed in the complex variable form resulting in reduced storage requirements as compared to real form of representation of the Jacobian. The structure of the Jacobian is preserved irrespective of bus-type switchings while Q-limit enforcements are performed at the PV buses. This feature permits implementation of optimal ordering of buses in an efficient way while factorizing the Jacobian matrix. The Jacobian is held constant throughout the load flow solution process. Incremental secondary injections (ISIs) are provided at the respective PV buses to maintain the specified voltages. The required injections are computed from the proposed compensation model. Results indicate that the proposed technique is quite efficient as the number of iterations for solution to converge, irrespective of bus-type switchings remains same as that in unadjusted solution case.

  13. Effective Henry's Law constant measurements for glyoxal in model aerosols containing sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, C.; Waxman, E.; Slowik, J.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Noziere, B.; Hoffmann, T.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional models represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation based on the gas-phase oxidation of a limited set of precursor molecules. However, these models tend to under-estimate the amounts and degree of oxygenation of actual SOA, indicating missing processes. One such source that has become increasingly important in recent years is glyoxal (CHOCHO, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl). Unlike traditional SOA precursors, glyoxal forms SOA by partitioning to the aqueous phase according to Henry's Law. This work presents an analysis of Henry's Law constants for glyoxal uptake to laboratory-generated aerosols in a dynamically coupled gas-aerosol system. We combine CU LED-CE-DOAS measurements of gas-phase glyoxal with online HR-Tof-AMS and time-resolved HPLC ESI MS/MS particle-phase measurements to characterize the time resolved evolution of glyoxal partitioning, and relate molecular-specific measurements to AMS mass spectra. The experiments were performed in the simulation chamber facility at PSI, Switzerland, and investigate ammonium sulfate (AS), and mixed AS / fulvic acid seed aerosols under relative humidity conditions ranging from 50 to 85% RH. The Henry's Law and effective Henry's Law constants are compared with other values reported in the literature.

  14. Cosmological constant in SUGRA models with Planck scale SUSY breaking and degenerate vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Froggatt, C D; Nielsen, H B; Thomas, A W

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the measured value of the cosmological constant, as well as the small values of quartic Higgs self--coupling and the corresponding beta function at the Planck scale, which can be obtained by extrapolating the Standard Model (SM) couplings to high energies, can originate from supergravity (SUGRA) models with degenerate vacua. This scenario is realised if there are at least three exactly degenerate vacua. In the first vacuum, associated with the physical one, local supersymmetry (SUSY) is broken near the Planck scale while the breakdown of the SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y symmetry takes place at the electroweak (EW) scale. In the second vacuum local SUSY breaking is induced by gaugino condensation at a scale which is just slightly lower than \\Lambda_{QCD} in the physical vacuum. Finally, in the third vacuum local SUSY and EW symmetry are broken near the Planck scale.

  15. CORAL: QSPR modeling of rate constants of reactions between organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, A A; Toropova, A P; Rasulev, B F; Benfenati, E; Gini, G; Leszczynska, D; Leszczynski, J

    2012-09-05

    The rate constants (K(OH)) of reactions between 78 organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical were examined. Simplified molecular input line entry system was used as representation of the molecular structure of the pollutants. Quantitative structure-property relationships was developed using CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/CORAL) for four random splits of the data into the subtraining, calibration, and test sets. The obtained results reveal good predictive potential of the applied approach: correlation coefficients (r(2)) for the test sets of the four random splits are 0.75, 0.91, 0.84, and 0.80. Using the Monte Carlo method CORAL software generated the optimal descriptors for one-variable models. The reproducibility of each model was tested performing three runs of the Monte Carlo optimization. The current data were compared to previous results and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  17. Testing for Constant Nonparametric Effects in General Semiparametric Regression Models with Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiawei; Carroll, Raymond J; Maity, Arnab

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  18. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  19. On the evolution of accretion disc flow in cataclysmic variables. III - Outburst properties of constant and uniform-alpha model discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Faulkner, J.; Papaloizou, J.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the stability and evolution of some simple accretion disk models in which the viscosity is prescribed by an ad hoc, uniform-alpha model. Emphasis is placed on systems in which the mass input rate from the secondary to the disk around the primary is assumed to be constant, although initial calculations with variable mass input rates are also performed. Time-dependent visual magnitude light curves constructed for cataclysmic binaries with a range of disk size, primary mass and mass input rate, and viscosity magnitude, are compared with the observed properties of various cataclysmic variable subclasses. The results obtained indicate that the observational differences between novae and dwarf novae may be due to mass input rate differences. The present models can reproduce the gross observational features of U-Gem-type dwarf nova outbursts.

  20. EOS simulation and GRNN modeling of the constant volume depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, A.M.; Foda, S.G. [Kuwait University, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-03-01

    Currently, two approaches are being used to predict the changes in retrograde gas condensate composition and estimate the pressure depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs. The first approach uses the equation of states whereas the second uses empirical correlations. Equations of states (EOS) are poor predictive tools for complex hydrocarbon systems. The EOS needs adjustment against phase behavior data of reservoir fluid of known composition. The empirical correlation does not involve numerous numerical computations but their accuracy is limited. This study presents two general regression neural network (GRNN) models. The first model, GRNNM1, is developed to predict dew point pressure and gas compressibility at dew point using initial composition of numerous samples while the second model, GRNNM2, is developed to predict the changes in well stream effluent composition at any stages of pressure depletion. GRNNM2 can also be used to determine the initial reservoir fluid composition using dew point pressure, gas compressibility at dew point, and reservoir temperature. These models are based on analysis of 142 sample of laboratory studies of constant volume depletion (CVD) for gas condensate systems forming a total of 1082 depletion stages. The database represents a wide range of gas condensate systems obtained worldwide. The performance of the GRNN models has been compared to simulation results of the equation of state. The study shows that the proposed general regression neural network models are accurate, valid, and reliable. These models can be used to forecast CVD data needed for many reservoir engineering calculations in case laboratory data is unavailable. The GRNN models save computer time involved in EOS calculations. The study also show that once these models are properly trained they can be used to cut expenses of frequent sampling and laborious experimental CVD tests required for gas condensate reservoirs. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Equilibrium Star Formation In A Constant Q Disk: Model Optimisation and Initial Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zheng; Heckman, Timothy; Thilker, David; Zwaan, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model for the distribution of the ISM and star formation in galaxies based on recent studies that indicate that galactic disks stabilise to a constant stability parameter, which we combine with prescriptions of how the phases of the ISM are determined and for the Star Formation Law (SFL). The model predicts the gas surface mass density and star formation intensity of a galaxy given its rotation curve, stellar surface mass density and the gas velocity dispersion. This model is tested on radial profiles of neutral and molecular ISM surface mass density and star formation intensity of 12 galaxies selected from the THINGS sample. Our tests focus on intermediate radii. Nevertheless, the model produces reasonable agreement with ISM mass and star formation rate integrated over the central region in all but one case. To optimise the model, we evaluate four recipes for the stability parameter, three recipes for apportioning the ISM into molecular and neutral components, and eight versions of the SFL. We f...

  2. The fine tuning of the cosmological constant in a conformal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pankaj; Kashyap, Gopal; Mitra, Subhadip

    2015-10-01

    We consider a conformal model involving two real scalar fields in which the conformal symmetry is broken by a soft mechanism and is not anomalous. One of these scalar fields is representative of the standard model Higgs. The model predicts exactly zero cosmological constant. In the simplest version of the model, some of the couplings need to be fine-tuned to very small values. We formulate the problem of fine tuning of these couplings. We argue that the problem arises since we require a soft mechanism to break conformal symmetry. The symmetry breaking is possible only if the scalar fields do not evolve significantly over the time scale of the Universe. Ignoring contributions due to quantum gravity, we present two solutions to this fine tuning problem. We argue that the problem is solved if the classical value of one of the scalar fields is super-Planckian, i.e. takes a value much larger than the Planck mass. The second solution involves introduction of a strongly coupled hidden sector that we call hypercolor. In this case, the conformal invariance is broken dynamically and triggers the breakdown of the electroweak symmetry. We argue that our analysis applies also to the case of the standard model Higgs multiplet.

  3. Physiological Flow of Jeffrey Six Constant Fluid Model due to Ciliary Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, A.; Hussain, S.; Nadeem, S.

    2016-12-01

    The main purpose of this article is to present a mathematical model of ciliary motion in an annulus. In this analysis, the peristaltic motion of non-Newtonian Jeffrey six constant fluid is observed in an annulus with ciliated tips in the presence of heat and mass transfer. The effects of viscous dissipation are also considered. The flow equations of non-Newtonian fluid for the two-dimensional tube in cylindrical coordinates are simplified using the low Reynolds number and long wave-length approximations. The main equations for Jeffrey six constant fluid are considered in cylindrical coordinates system. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved using the regular perturbation technique in terms of a variant of small dimensionless parameter α. The results of the solutions for velocity, temperature and concentration field are presented graphically. Bk is Brinkman number, ST is soret number, and SH is the Schmidth number. Outcome for the longitudinal velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and stream lines are represented through graphs. in the history, the viscous-dissipation effect is usually represented by the Brinkman number.

  4. Vector and tensor meson decay constants in light-front quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Xia, Chuanhui

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay constants ($f_M$) of the vector ($D^{*}$, $D^{*}_{s}$, $B^{*}$, $B^{*}_{s}$, $B^{*}_{c}$) and tensor ($D_{2}^{*}$, $D_{s2}^{*}$, $B^{*}_{2}$, $B^{*}_{s2}$) mesons in the light front quark model. With the known pseudoscalar meson decay constants of $f_D$, $f_{D_s}$, $f_B$, $f_{B_s}$, and $f_{B_c}$ as the input parameters to determine the light-front meson wave functions, we obtain that $f_{D^{*}, D^{*}_{s}, B^{*},B^{*}_s,B^{*}_c} = (252.0^{+13.8}_{-11.6}$, $318.3^{+15.3}_{-12.6}$ , $201.9^{+43.2}_{-41.4}$, $244.2\\pm7.0$, $473.4\\pm18.2$) and $(264.9^{+10.2}_{-9.5}$, $330.9^{+9.9}_{-9.0}$, $220.2^{+49.1}_{-46.2}$, $265.7\\pm8.0$, $487.6\\pm19.2$) MeV with Gaussian and power-law wave functions, respectively, while $f_{D_{2}^{*},D_{s2}^{*},B^{*}_{2},B^{*}_{s2}}$=($143.6^{+24.9}_{-21.8}$, $209.5^{+29.1}_{-24.2}$, $80.9^{+33.8}_{-27.7}$, $109.7^{+15.7}_{-15.0}$) MeV with only Gaussian wave functions.

  5. Properties of potential modelling three benchmarks: the cosmological constant, inflation and three generations

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, V V

    2010-01-01

    We argue for a model of low-energy correction to the inflationary potential as caused by the gauge-mediated breaking down the supersymmetry at the scale of $\\mu_\\textsc{x}\\sim 10^4$ GeV, that provides us with the seesaw mechanism of thin domain wall fluctuations in the flat vacuum. The fluctuations are responsible for the vacuum with the cosmological constant at the scale of $\\mu_\\Lambda\\sim 10^{-2}$ eV suppressed by the Planckian mass $m_\\mathtt{Pl}$ via $\\mu_\\Lambda\\sim\\mu_\\textsc{x}^2/m_\\mathtt{Pl}$. The appropriate vacuum state is occupied after the inflation with quartic coupling constant $\\lambda\\sim\\mu_\\textsc{x}/m_\\mathtt{Pl}\\sim 10^{-14}$ inherently related with the bare mass scale of $\\widetilde m\\sim\\sqrt{\\mu_\\textsc{x}m_\\mathtt{Pl}}\\sim 10^{12}$ GeV determining the thickness of domain walls $\\delta r\\sim1/\\widetilde m$. Such the parameters of potential are still marginally consistent with the observed inhomogeneity of matter density in the Universe. The inflationary evolution suggests the vacuum s...

  6. Modelling and operation of sub-miniature constant temperature hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, M.; Watmuff, J. H.; Van Buren, T.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Hultmark, M.; Smits, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-Reynolds number flows are very common in technological applications and in nature, and hot-wire anemometry is the preferred method for measuring the time-series of fluctuating velocity in such flows. However, measurement of very high-Reynolds number flows requires hot-wires with higher temporal and spatial resolution than is available with conventional probes. Much effort has therefore been devoted to decreasing the size of the hot-wire probes and this has led to associated challenges with operation. It is this latter operation problem which is the focus of this paper. To this end, an existing theoretical model of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometers (Perry 1982 Hot-Wire Anemometry (New York: Oxford University Press), Watmuff 1995 Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 11 117-34) is applied, and its accuracy is tested for the first time by comparison to measurements using an in-house constant temperature anemometer (CTA) for both conventional 5~μ m-diameter wires and sub-miniature hot-wires. With the aid of this model, we propose modifications to the CTA design and demonstrate successful operation of the CTA with the Princeton nano-scale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) (Bailey et al 2010 J. Fluid Mech. 663 160-79). It is also shown that the transfer function obtained from the model can be utilized to estimate the true frequency response and cut-off frequency of a hot-wire-CTA system to the velocity fluctuations, which is essential in accurate measurements of energy spectrum and higher order statistics of turbulent flows.

  7. Resolution of a Challenge for Solvation Modeling: Calculation of Dicarboxylic Acid Dissociation Constants Using Mixed Discrete-Continuum Solvation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marenich, Aleksandr; Ding, Wendu; Cramer, Christopher J.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-06-07

    First and second dissociation constants (pKa values) of oxalic acid, malonic acid, and adipic acid were computed by using a number of theoretical protocols based on density functional theory and using both continuum solvation models and mixed discrete-continuum solvation models. We show that fully implicit solvation models (in which the entire solvent is represented by a dielectric continuum) fail badly for dicarboxylic acids with mean unsigned errors averaged over six pKa values) of 2.4-9.0 log units, depending on the particular implicit model used. The use of water-solute clusters and accounting for multiple conformations in solution significantly improve the performance of both generalized Born solvation models and models that solve the nonhomogeneous dielectric Poisson equation for bulk electrostatics. The four most successful models have mean unsigned errors of only 0.6-0.8 log units.

  8. A simple model for hydromagnetic instabilities in the presence of a constant magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A; Arrieta, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study a simple model consisting of a dilute fully ionized plasma in the presence of the gravitational and a constant magnetic field to analyze the propagation of hydromagnetic instabilities. In particular we show that the so called Jeans instability is in principle affected by the presence of the magnetic field. A brief discussion is made attempting to assess this influence in the stage of the evolution of the Universe where structures were formed. The most logical conclusion is that if magnetic fields existed in those times their magnitudes were too small to modify Jeans' mass. Our results places limits of the possible values of seed magnetic fields consistent with the formation structures in the Universe. These values are within the range of the results obtained by other authors.

  9. Hyperon puzzle and the RMF model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Maslov, K. A.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of cold baryonic matter is studied within a relativistic mean-field model with hadron masses and coupling constants depending on a scalar field. We demonstrate that if the effective nucleon mass stops to decrease with a density increase at densities n > n*> n0, where n0 is the nuclear saturation density, the equation of state stiffens for these densities and the limiting neutron star mass increases. The stabilization of the nucleon mass can be realised if in the equation of motion for the scalar mean-field there appear a term sharply varying in a narrow vicinity of the field value corresponding to the density n*. We show several possible realizations of this mechanism getting sufficiently stiff equations of state. The appearance of hyperons in dense neutron star interiors is accounted for. The obtained equations of state remain sufficiently stiff if the reduction of the ϕ meson mass is incorporated. Thereby, the hyperon puzzle can be resolved.

  10. Thermal Modelling Analysis of Spiral Wound Supercapacitor under Constant-Current Cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional modelling approach is used to study the effects of operating and ambient conditions on the thermal behaviour of the spiral wound supercapacitor. The transient temperature distribution during cycling is obtained by using the finite element method with an implicit predictor-multicorrector algorithm. At the constant current of 2A, the results show that the maximum temperature appears in core area. After 5 cycles, the maximum temperature is 34.5°C, while in steady state, it's up to 42.5°C. This paper further studies the relationship between the maximum temperature and charge-discharge current. The maximum temperature will be more than 60°C after 5 cycles at the current of 4A, and cooling measurements should be taken at that time. It can provide thoughts on inner temperature field distribution and structure design of the spiral wound supercapacitor in working process.

  11. Exact diffusion constant of a one-dimensional asymmetric exclusion model with open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, B.; Evans, M. R.; Mallick, K.

    1995-06-01

    For the 1D fully asymmetric exclusion model with open boundary conditions, we calculate exactly the fluctuations of the current of particles. The method used is an extension of a matrix technique developed recently to describe the equatime steady-state properties for open boundary conditions and the diffusion constant for particles on a ring. We show how the fluctuations of the current are related to non-equal-time correlations. In the thermodynamic limit, our results agree with recent results of Ferrari and Fontes obtained by working directly in the infinite system. We also show that the fluctuations of the current become singular when the system undergoes a phase transition with discontinuities along the first-order transition line.

  12. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  13. Study of Antigravity in an F(R) Model and in Brans-Dicke Theory with Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We study antigravity, that is having an effective gravitational constant with a negative sign, in scalar-tensor theories originating from $F(R)$-theory and in a Brans-Dicke model with cosmological constant. For the $F(R)$ theory case, we obtain the antigravity scalar-tensor theory in the Jordan frame by using a variant of the Lagrange multipliers method and we numerically study the time dependent effective gravitational constant. As we shall demonstrate by using a specific $F(R)$ model, altho...

  14. Using a latent variable model with non-constant factor loadings to examine PM2.5 constituents related to secondary inorganic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; O'Neill, Marie S; Sánchez, Brisa N

    2016-04-01

    Factor analysis is a commonly used method of modelling correlated multivariate exposure data. Typically, the measurement model is assumed to have constant factor loadings. However, from our preliminary analyses of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) PM2.5 fine speciation data, we have observed that the factor loadings for four constituents change considerably in stratified analyses. Since invariance of factor loadings is a prerequisite for valid comparison of the underlying latent variables, we propose a factor model that includes non-constant factor loadings that change over time and space using P-spline penalized with the generalized cross-validation (GCV) criterion. The model is implemented using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and we select the multiple spline smoothing parameters by minimizing the GCV criterion with Newton's method during each iteration of the EM algorithm. The algorithm is applied to a one-factor model that includes four constituents. Through bootstrap confidence bands, we find that the factor loading for total nitrate changes across seasons and geographic regions.

  15. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning by Abstraction Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulous, Dimitra; Glannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    Current automated approaches for compositional model checking in the assume-guarantee style are based on learning of assumptions as deterministic automata. We propose an alternative approach based on abstraction refinement. Our new method computes the assumptions for the assume-guarantee rules as conservative and not necessarily deterministic abstractions of some of the components, and refines those abstractions using counter-examples obtained from model checking them together with the other components. Our approach also exploits the alphabets of the interfaces between components and performs iterative refinement of those alphabets as well as of the abstractions. We show experimentally that our preliminary implementation of the proposed alternative achieves similar or better performance than a previous learning-based implementation.

  16. Electrochemical modelling of Li-ion battery pack with constant voltage cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, T. R.; McGordon, A.; Jennings, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In a battery pack, cell-to-cell chemical variation, or the variation in operating conditions, can possibly lead to current imbalance which can accelerate pack ageing. In this paper, the Pseudo-Two-Dimensional(P2D) porous electrode model is extended to a battery pack layout, to predict the overall behaviour and the cell-to-cell variation under constant voltage charging and discharging. The algorithm used in this model offers the flexibility in extending the layout to any number of cells in a pack, which can be of different capacities, chemical characteristics and physical dimensions. The coupled electro-thermal effects such as differential cell ageing, temperature variation, porosity change and their effects on the performance of the pack, can be predicted using this modelling algorithm. The pack charging voltage is found to have an impact on the performance as well as the SEI layer growth. Numerical studies are conducted by keeping the cells at different thermal conditions and the results show the necessity to increase the heat transfer coefficient to cool the pack, compared to single cell. The results show that the thermal imbalance has more impact than the change in inter-connecting resistance on the split current distribution, which accelerates the irreversible porous filling and ageing.

  17. Use of SAMC for Bayesian analysis of statistical models with intractable normalizing constants

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Statistical inference for the models with intractable normalizing constants has attracted much attention. During the past two decades, various approximation- or simulation-based methods have been proposed for the problem, such as the Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method and the auxiliary variable Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm specifically addresses this problem: It works by sampling from a sequence of approximate distributions with their average converging to the target posterior distribution, where the approximate distributions can be achieved using the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm. A strong law of large numbers is established for the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo estimator under mild conditions. Compared to the Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method, the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm is more robust to the initial guess of model parameters. Compared to the auxiliary variable MCMC methods, the Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm avoids the requirement for perfect samples, and thus can be applied to many models for which perfect sampling is not available or very expensive. The Bayesian stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm also provides a general framework for approximate Bayesian analysis. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bianchi type-I transit cosmological models with time dependent gravitational and cosmological constants

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Rikhvitsky, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The present study deals with the exact solutions of the Einstein's field equations with variable gravitational and cosmological "constants" for a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-I space-time. To study the transit behaviour of Universe, we consider a law of variation of scale factor $a(t) = \\left(t^{k} e^{t}\\right)^{\\frac{1}{n}}$ which yields a time dependent deceleration parameter (DP) $q = - 1 + \\frac{nk}{(k + t)^{2}}$, comprising a class of models that depicts a transition of the universe from the early decelerated phase to the recent accelerating phase. We find that the time dependent DP is reasonable for the present day Universe and give an appropriate description of the evolution of the universe. For $n = 0.27k$, we obtain $q_{0} = -0.73$ which is similar to observed value of DP at present epoch. It is also observed that for $n \\geq 2$ and $k = 1$, we obtain a class of transit models of the universe from early decelerating to present accelerating phase. For $k = 0$, the universe has no...

  19. Convective organization in the super-parameterized community atmosphere model with constant surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Organization in a moist convecting atmosphere is investigated using the super-parameterized community atmosphere model (SPCAM) in aquaplanet setting with constant surface temperature, with and without planetary rotation. Without radiative and surface feedbacks, convective organization is dominated by convectively coupled gravity waves without planetary rotation and convectively coupled equatorial waves when there is planetary rotation. This behavior is well captured when the cloud resolving model (CRM) in SPCAM is replaced by its linear response function, computed following Kuang (2010), for the state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). With radiative feedback, however, convection self-aggregates, and with planetary rotation, the tropical zonal wavenumber-frequency spectrum features a red noise background. These behaviors in the presence of the radiative feedback are not captured when the CRM is replaced by its linear response function around the RCE state with radiative feedback included in the construction. Implications to organization in a moist convecting atmosphere will be discussed. Kuang, Z., Linear response functions of a cumulus ensemble to temperature and moisture perturbations and implication to the dynamics of convectively coupled waves, J. Atmos. Sci., 67, 941-962, (2010)

  20. Model predictive control of servo motor driven constant pump hydraulic system in injection molding process based on neurodynamic optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-gang PENG; Jun WANG; Wei WEI

    2014-01-01

    In view of the high energy consumption and low response speed of the traditional hydraulic system for an injection molding machine, a servo motor driven constant pump hydraulic system is designed for a precision injection molding process, which uses a servo motor, a constant pump, and a pressure sensor, instead of a common motor, a constant pump, a pressure pro-portion valve, and a flow proportion valve. A model predictive control strategy based on neurodynamic optimization is proposed to control this new hydraulic system in the injection molding process. Simulation results showed that this control method has good control precision and quick response.

  1. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Christopher M P; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Hillier, D John

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray emission of $\\eta$ Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind--wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the $\\sim$2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred pr...

  2. Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alice H; Raubenheimer, David; Green, Mark P; Cupido, Cinda L; Gluckman, Peter D; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

  3. A new analysis of fine-structure constant measurements and modelling errors from quasar absorption lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczynska, Michael R; King, Julian A; Murphy, Michael T; Bainbridge, Matthew B; Flambaum, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of 23 absorption systems along the lines of sight towards 18 quasars in the redshift range of $0.4 \\leq z_{abs} \\leq 2.3$ observed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Considering both statistical and systematic error contributions we find a robust estimate of the weighted mean deviation of the fine-structure constant from its current, laboratory value of $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha=\\left(0.22\\pm0.23\\right)\\times10^{-5}$, consistent with the dipole variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al. This paper also examines modelling methodologies and systematic effects. In particular we focus on the consequences of fitting quasar absorption systems with too few absorbing components and of selectively fitting only the stronger components in an absorption complex. We show that using insufficient continuum regions around an absorption complex causes a significant increase in the scatter of a sample of $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ measurements, th...

  4. Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice H Tait

    Full Text Available Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

  5. Automated Method for Estimating Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for Spacecraft Spinning on Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant (NTC), or nutation rate of growth, for a spinning upper stage is important for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation, or wobble, is caused by energy dissipation anywhere in the system. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and, if it is in a state of resonance, the NTC can become short enough to violate mission constraints. The Spinning Slosh Test Rig (SSTR) is a forced-motion spin table where fluid dynamic effects in full-scale fuel tanks can be tested in order to obtain key parameters used to calculate the NTC. We accomplish this by independently varying nutation frequency versus the spin rate and measuring force and torque responses on the tank. This method was used to predict parameters for the Genesis, Contour, and Stereo missions, whose tanks were mounted outboard from the spin axis. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical model that uses mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, to simulate the force and torque resonances associated with fluid slosh.

  6. Hyperon puzzle and the RMF model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomeitsev, E E; Voskresensky, D N

    2015-01-01

    The equation of state of cold baryonic matter is studied within a relativistic mean-field model with hadron masses and coupling constants depending on a scalar field. We demonstrate that if the effective nucleon mass stops to decrease with a density increase at densities $n>n_*>n_0$, where $n_0$ is the nuclear saturation density, the equation of state stiffens for these densities and the limiting neutron star mass increases. The stabilization of the nucleon mass can be realised if in the equation of motion for the scalar mean-field there appear a term sharply varying in a narrow vicinity of the field value corresponding to the density $n_*$. We show several possible realizations of this mechanism getting sufficiently stiff equations of state. The appearance of hyperons in dense neutron star interiors is accounted for. The obtained equations of state remain sufficiently stiff if the reduction of the $\\phi$ meson mass is incorporated. Thereby, the hyperon puzzle can be resolved.

  7. Study of Antigravity in an F(R Model and in Brans-Dicke Theory with Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study antigravity, that is, having an effective gravitational constant with a negative sign, in scalar-tensor theories originating from F(R theory and in a Brans-Dicke model with cosmological constant. For the F(R theory case, we obtain the antigravity scalar-tensor theory in the Jordan frame by using a variant of the Lagrange multipliers method and we numerically study the time dependent effective gravitational constant. As we will demonstrate by using a specific F(R model, although there is no antigravity in the initial model, it might occur or not in the scalar-tensor counterpart, mainly depending on the parameter that characterizes antigravity. Similar results hold true in the Brans-Dicke model.

  8. Study of Antigravity in an F(R) Model and in Brans-Dicke Theory with Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, V K

    2014-01-01

    We study antigravity, that is having an effective gravitational constant with a negative sign, in scalar-tensor theories originating from $F(R)$-theory and in a Brans-Dicke model with cosmological constant. For the $F(R)$ theory case, we obtain the antigravity scalar-tensor theory in the Jordan frame by using a variant of the Lagrange multipliers method and we numerically study the time dependent effective gravitational constant. As we shall demonstrate by using a specific $F(R)$ model, although there is no antigravity in the initial model, it might occur or not in the scalar-tensor counterpart, mainly depending on the parameter that characterizes antigravity. Similar results hold true in the Brans-Dicke model.

  9. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of η Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Hillier, D. John

    2016-05-01

    The X-ray emission of η Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind-wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the ˜2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred primary mass-loss rate dot{M}_A≈ 8.5× 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr-1, the model spectra well reproduce the observation as the strong- and no-coupling spectra bound the CCE observation for longitude of periastron ω ≈ 252°, and bound/converge on the observation for ω ≈ 90°. This suggests that η Carinae has moderate coupling between the primary radiation and secondary wind, that both the region between the stars and the comoving collision on the backside of the secondary generate the CCE, and that the CCE cannot place constraints on the binary's line of sight. We also discuss comparisons with common X-ray fitting parameters.

  10. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  11. Model of the universe including dark energy accounted for by both a quintessence field and a (negative) cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Rolando; Gonzalez, Tame; Leiva, Yoelsy; Martin, Osmel; Quiros, Israel

    2003-04-01

    In this work we present a model of the universe in which dark energy is modeled explicitly with both a dynamical quintessence field and a cosmological constant. Our results confirm the possibility of a future collapsing universe (for a given region of the parameter space), which is necessary for a consistent formulation of both string and quantum field theories. The predictions of this model for distance modulus of supernovae are similar to those of the standard ΛCDM model.

  12. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity; Transporte de masa en medio fracturado: impacto del modelo estocastico de conductividad en las fracturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs.

  13. Comparison of Observed, MM5 and WRF-NMM Model-Simulated, and HPAC-Assumed Boundary-Layer Meteorological Variables for 3 Days During the IHOP Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Reen, Brian; Hendrick, Elizabeth; Santos, Lynne; Stauffer, David; Deng, Aijun; McQueen, Jeffrey; Tsidulko, Marina; Janjic, Zavisa; Jovic, Dusan; Sykes, R. Ian

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate operational mesoscale meteorological model atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) outputs for use in the Hazard Prediction Assessment Capability (HPAC)/Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF) transport and dispersion model. HPAC uses the meteorological models’ routine simulations of surface buoyancy flux, winds, and mixing depth to derive the profiles of ABL turbulence. The Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) and the Weather Research and Forecast-Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) ABL outputs and the HPAC ABL parameterisations are compared with observations during the International H2O Project (IHOP). The meteorological models’ configurations are not specially designed research versions for this study but rather are intended to be representative of what may be used operationally and thus have relatively coarse lowest vertical layer thicknesses of 59 and 36 m, respectively. The meteorological models’ simulations of mixing depth are in good agreement (±20%) with observations on most afternoons. Wind speed errors of 1 or 2 ms-1 are found, typical of those found in other studies, with larger errors occurring when the simulated centre of a low-pressure system is misplaced in time or space. The hourly variation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is well-simulated during the daytime, although there is a meteorological model underprediction bias of about 20-40%. At night, WRF-NMM shows fair agreement with observations, and MM5 sometimes produces a very small default TKE value because of the stable boundary-layer parameterisation that is used. The HPAC TKE parameterisation is usually a factor of 5-10 high at night, primarily due to the fact that the meteorological model wind-speed output is at a height of 30 m for MM5 and 18 m for WRF-NMM, which is often well above the stable mixing depth. It is concluded that, before meteorological model TKE

  14. ELEMENTS OF CONTROL OVER HIERARCHIE SYSTEMS WITH ASSUMED HIERARCHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushnir N. V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a mathematical model of control over dynamic hierarchy system. The model was proposed for dealing with systems with assumed order in the technical problem of predicting destructions depending onto the amount of defects on different scale levels. The problem of the closest to a certain point of shelf life of hierarchy system is solved. The example of approach control during the given time is given. The problem concerns mathematic programming. Formulation of multi-parameter vector optimization criteria (improvement with its own hierarchy and the formal exercise of multi-criteria optimization of the model parameters. The research can achieve clarity about the conditions under which the structure is preserved. Managing sustainable development system with a given level of the hierarchy for the technical systems can only be achieved in keeping

  15. Modelling of Spring Constant and Pull-down Voltage of Non-uniform RF MEMS Cantilever Incorporating Stress Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimul Chandra SAHA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a model for spring constant and pull-down voltage of a non-uniform radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS cantilever that works on electrostatic actuation. The residual stress gradient in the beam material that may arise during the fabrication process is also considered in the model. Using basic force deflection calculation of the suspended beam, a stand-alone model for the spring constant and pull-down voltage of the non-uniform cantilever is developed. To compare the model, simulation is performed using standard Finite Element Method (FEM analysis tolls from CoventorWare. The model matches very well with the FEM simulation results. The model will offer an efficient means of design, analysis, and optimization of RF MEMS cantilever switches.

  16. A five dimensional model of varying effective gravitational and fine structure constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbelek, J. P.; Lachièze-Rey, M.

    2003-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the reported time variation of the fine structure constant alpha is due to a coupling between electromagnetism and gravitation. We predict such a coupling from a very simple effective theory of physical interactions, under the form of an improved version of the Kaluza-Klein theory. We show that it precisely leads to a variation of the effective fine structure constant with cosmic conditions, and thus with cosmic time. The comparison with the recent data from distant quasars absorption line spectra gives a good agreement; moreover, this may reconcile the claimed results on alpha with the upper limit from the Oklo naturel Uranium fission reactor.

  17. Helping Children to Model Proportionally in Group Argumentation: Overcoming the "Constant Sum" Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misailidou, Christina; Williams, Jullian

    2004-01-01

    We examine eight cases of argumentation in relation to a proportional reasoning task--the "Paint" task--in which the "constant sum" strategy was a significant factor. Our analysis of argument follows Toulmin's (1958) approach and in the discourse we trace factors which seem to facilitate changes in argument. We find that the arguments of "constant…

  18. The Finite-time Ruin Probability for the Jump-Diffusion Model with Constant Interest Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Hai-feng Yan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the finite-time ruin probability for the jump-diffusion Poisson process.Under the assumptions that the claimsizes are subexponentially distributed and that the interest force is constant, we obtain an asymptotic formula for the finite-time ruin probability. The results we obtain extends the

  19. Plasma expansion into vacuum assuming a steplike electron energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of a semi-infinite plasma slab into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model implying a steplike electron energy distribution function. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the related ion distribution function are derived and compared with one-dimensional numerical simulations. The choice of the specific non-Maxwellian initial electron energy distribution automatically ensures the conservation of the total energy of the system. The estimated ion energies may differ by an order of magnitude from the values obtained with an adiabatic expansion model supposing a Maxwellian electron distribution. Furthermore, good agreement with data from experiments using laser pulses of ultrashort durations τ(L)Maxwellian electron distribution is assumed.

  20. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    A sparsity-exploiting algorithm intended for few-view Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is proposed and characterized. The algorithm models the object as piecewise constant subject to a blurring operation. To validate that the algorithm closely approximates the true...

  1. A Note on the Constant Pressure Phase in an Orthodox Gun with Moderated Charges using Hydro-Dynamical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Narvilkar

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing work on the constant pressure guns has been improved upon by introducing the concept of Lagrange mean density function for the propellant gases behind the shot. Lagrange hydrodynamical model has been considered and the expressions have been established to work out the shape factor of the second component of the moderated charge, which will maintain a constant pressure during the burning of this component. This is followed by the numerical computations of a problem to establish the physical interpretation of the results.

  2. On exponential cosmological type solutions in the model with Gauss-Bonnet term and variation of gravitational constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ivashchuk, V D

    2015-01-01

    A D-dimensional gravitational model with Gauss-Bonnet term is considered. When ansatz with diagonal cosmological type metrics is adopted, we find solutions with exponential dependence of scale factors (with respect to "synchronous-like" variable) which describe an exponential expansion of "our" 3-dimensional factor-space and obey the observational constraints on the temporal variation of effective gravitational constant G. Among them there are two exact solutions in dimensions D = 22, 28 with constant G and also an infinite series of solutions in dimensions D \\ge 2690 with the variation of G obeying the observational data.

  3. Cosmic constraint on the unified model of dark sectors with or without a cosmic string fluid in the varying gravitational constant theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Yanfeng; Wu, Yabo [Liaoning Normal University, Department of Physics, Dalian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Observations indicate that most of the universal matter is invisible and the gravitational constant G(t) maybe depends on time. A theory of the variational G (VG) is explored in this paper, naturally producing the useful dark components in the universe. We utilize the following observational data: lookback time data, model-independent gamma ray bursts, growth function of matter linear perturbations, type Ia supernovae data with systematic errors, CMB, and BAO, to restrict the unified model (UM) of dark components in VG theory. Using the best-fit values of the parameters with the covariance matrix, constraints on the variation of G are ((G)/(G{sub 0})){sub z=3.5} ≅ 1.0015{sub -0.0075}{sup +0.0071} and ((G)/(G)){sub today} ≅ -0.7252{sub -2.3645}{sup +2.3645} x 10{sup -13} year{sup -1}, with small uncertainties around the constants. The limit on the equation of state of dark matter is w{sub 0dm} = 0.0072{sub -0.0170}{sup +0.0170}, assuming w{sub 0de} = -1 in the unified model, and the dark energy is w{sub 0de} = -0.9986{sub -0.0011}{sup +0.0011}, assuming w{sub 0dm} = 0 a priori. The restrictions on the UM parameters are B{sub s} = 0.7442{sub -0.0132-0.0292}{sup +0.0137+0.0262} and α =0.0002{sub -0.0209-0.0422}{sup +0.0206+0.0441} with 1σ and 2σ confidence level. In addition, the effects of a cosmic string fluid on the unified model in VG theory are investigated. In this case it is found that the Λ CDM (Ω{sub s} = 0, β = 0, and α = 0) is included in this VG-UM model at 1σ confidence level, and larger errors are given: Ω{sub s} = -0.0106{sub -0.0305-0.0509}{sup +0.0312+0.0582} (dimensionless energy density of cosmic string), ((G)/(G{sub 0})){sub z=3.5} ≅ 1.0008{sub -0.0584}{sup +0.0620}, and ((G)/(G)){sub today} ≅ -0.3496{sub -26.3135}{sup +26.3135} x 10{sup -13} year{sup -1}. (orig.)

  4. Renormalized. pi. NN coupling constant and the P-italic-wave phase shifts in the cloudy bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, B.C.; Afnan, I.R.

    1986-09-01

    Most applications of the cloudy bag model to ..pi..N scattering involve unitarizing the bare diagrams arising from the Lagrangian by iterating in a Lippmann-Schwinger equation. However, analyses of the renormalization of the coupling constant proceed by iterating the Lagrangian to a given order in the bare coupling constant. These two different approaches means there is an inconsistency between the calculation of phase shifts and the calculation of renormalization. A remedy to this problem is presented that has the added advantage of improving the fit to the phase shifts in the P-italic/sub 11/ channel. This is achieved by using physical values of the coupling constant in the crossed diagram which reduces the repulsion rather than adds attraction. This approach can be justified by examining equations for the ..pi pi..N system that incorporate three-body unitarity.

  5. Renormalized πNN coupling constant and the P-wave phase shifts in the cloudy bag model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, B. C.; Afnan, I. R.

    1986-09-01

    Most applications of the cloudy bag model to πN scattering involve unitarizing the bare diagrams arising from the Lagrangian by iterating in a Lippmann-Schwinger equation. However, analyses of the renormalization of the coupling constant proceed by iterating the Lagrangian to a given order in the bare coupling constant. These two different approaches means there is an inconsistency between the calculation of phase shifts and the calculation of renormalization. A remedy to this problem is presented that has the added advantage of improving the fit to the phase shifts in the P11 channel. This is achieved by using physical values of the coupling constant in the crossed diagram which reduces the repulsion rather than adds attraction. This approach can be justified by examining equations for the ππN system that incorporate three-body unitarity.

  6. A five dimensional model of varying effective gravitational and fine structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Mbelek, J P

    2003-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the reported time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ is due to a coupling between electromagnetism and gravitation. We consider the coupling predicted by a very simple {\\sl effective} theory of physical interactions, under the form of an improved version of the Kaluza-Klein theory. We show that it is precisely expressed by a variation of the effective fine structure constant with cosmic conditions, and thus with cosmic time. We compare the predicted variation with the recent data from distant quasars absorption line spectra: we find a good agreement, which moreover reconcile the claimed results on $\\alpha$ with the upper limit from the Oklo naturel Uranium fission reactor.

  7. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration parameter in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh; S Kumar

    2007-05-01

    Einstein's field equations are considered for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi Type-II space–time in the presence of a massless scalar field with a scalar potential. Exact solutions of scale factors and other physical parameters are obtained by using a special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. To get inflationary solutions, a flat region is considered in which the scalar potential is constant. Power-law and exponential cases are studied and in both solutions there is an anisotropic expansion of the cosmic fluid, but the fluid has vanishing vorticity. A detailed study of geometrical and kinematical properties of solutions has been carried out.

  8. A model of the Universe including Dark Energy accounted for by both a Quintessence Field and a (negative) Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Cardenas, R; Martin, O; Quirós, I; Cardenas, Rolando; Gonzalez, Tame; Martin, Osmel; Quiros, Israel

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present a model of the universe in which dark energy is modelled explicitely with both a dynamical quintessence field and a cosmological constant. Our results confirm the possibility of a collapsing universe (for a given region of the parameter space), which is necessary for an adequate definition of string theory. We have also reproduced the measurements of modulus distance from supernovae with good accuracy.

  9. Examining roles pharmacists assume in disasters: a content analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Heath; Dallas, Cham E; Harris, Curt

    2013-12-01

    Numerous practice reports recommend roles pharmacists may adopt during disasters. This study examines the peer-reviewed literature for factors that explain the roles pharmacists assume in disasters and the differences in roles and disasters when stratified by time. Quantitative content analysis was used to gather data consisting of words and phrases from peer-reviewed pharmacy literature regarding pharmacists' roles in disasters. Negative binomial regression and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric models were applied to the data. Pharmacists' roles in disasters have not changed significantly since the 1960s. Pharmaceutical supply remains their preferred role, while patient management and response integration roles decrease in context of common, geographically widespread disasters. Policy coordination roles, however, significantly increase in nuclear terrorism planning. Pharmacists' adoption of nonpharmaceutical supply roles may represent a problem of accepting a paradigm shift in nontraditional roles. Possible shortages of personnel in future disasters may change the pharmacists' approach to disaster management.

  10. Coordination chemistry of microbial iron transport compounds. IX. Stability constants for catechol models of enterobactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeef, A.; Sofen, S.R.; Bregante, T.L.; Raymond, K.N.

    1978-08-16

    The stability constants of ferric complexes with several substituted catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) ligands in aqueous solutions of low ionic strength have been determined at 27/sup 0/C in the pH range 2 to 11. Enterobactin, the principal siderophore of enteric bacteria, is a tricatechol and, from the formation constants reported here, is estimated to have a formation constant with ferric ion which is greater than 10/sup 45/. The stepwise formation constants, K/sub n/, of the catechol ligands reported here are defined as (ML/sub n/)/(ML/sub n-1/)(L), in units of L mol/sup -1/, where (L) is the concentration of the deprotonated catechol ligand. The constants were determined from potentiometric and spectroscopic data and were refined on pH values by weighted least squares. Qualitative examination of electron spin resonance spectra of the systems indicated some oxidation of the ligand by ferric ions at pH values as high as 4. The ligands studied included catechol (cat) (log K/sub 1/ = 20.01, log K/sub 2/ = 14.69, log K/sub 3/ = 9.01); 4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonate (Tiron) (log K/sub 2/ = 15.12, log K/sub 3/ = 10.10); 4-nitrocatechol (ncat) (log K/sub 1/ = 17.08, log K/sub 2/ = 13.43, log K/sub 3/ = 9.51); 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (dhpa) (log K/sub 1/ = 20.1, log K/sub 2/ = 14.9, log K/sub 3/ = 9.0); and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (dhba) (log K/sub 1/ = 20.5). The acid dissociation constants, K/sub a/s, were determined also. For the catechol protons these follow: cat (pK/sub a/sub 1// = 9.22, pK/sub a/sub 2// = 13.0); Tiron (pK/sub a/sub 1// = 7.70, pK/sub a/sub 2// = 12.63); ncat (pK/sub a/sub 1// = 6.65, pK/sub a/sub 2// = 10.80); dhpa (pK/sub a/sub 1// = 9.49, pK/sub a/sub 2// = 13.7); and dhba (pK/sub a/sub 1// = 10.06, pK/sub a/sub 2// = 13.1). In addition, carboxylate substituents of dhpa and dhba have pK/sub a/s of 4.17 and 2.70, respectively.In solution, exchange is slow between these two types of coordination following changes in pH. 2 tables, 11

  11. Estimation of Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for On-Axis Spinning Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Keith; Sudermann, James

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant for a spinning spacecraft is an important step for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation is caused by energy dissipation about the spin axis. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and can be simulated using a forced motion spin table. Mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, are typically used to simulate propellant slosh. A strong desire exists for an automated method to determine these analog parameters. The method presented accomplishes this task by using a MATLAB Simulink/SimMechanics based simulation that utilizes the Parameter Estimation Tool.

  12. Theoretical investigation on the relationship between the torque correlation and spin correlation models for the Gilbert damping constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between the spin correlation (SC) and torque correlation (TC) models for the Gilbert damping constant, α, we first make a simple consideration on the physical aspect of these models and calculate α for the Fe50Co50 disordered alloy by the two models using the first principles technique. Electron scattering is introduced through the random arrangement of atoms and is treated with coherent potential approximation. The results indicate that in the TC model, vertex correction (VC) does not have significant contribution and the results are insensitive to the infinitesimal positive value, δ, which is used in Green's function. In the SC model, on the other hand, the VC is indispensable and the obtained values of α are found to be considerably sensitive to δ. We confirm that the value of α in the SC model approaches the value obtained in the TC model in the limit δ→+0 .

  13. The effect of inclusion of $\\Delta$ resonances in relativistic mean-field model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, K A; Voskresensky, D N

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the equation of state of the baryon matter plays a decisive role in the description of neutron stars. With an increase of the baryon density the filling of Fermi seas of hyperons and $\\Delta$ isobars becomes possible. Their inclusion into standard relativistic mean-field models results in a strong softening of the equation of state and a lowering of the maximum neutron star mass below the measured values. We extend a relativistic mean-field model with scaled hadron masses and coupling constants developed in our previous works and take into account now not only hyperons but also the $\\Delta$ isobars. We analyze available empirical information to put constraints on coupling constants of $\\Delta$s to mesonic mean fields. We show that the resulting equation of state satisfies majority of presently known experimental constraints.

  14. A model for isotopic sampling and administration in constant infusion experiments: a test with 13C-palmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, R D; Wolfe, R R

    1983-06-01

    We have proposed and tested a model that demonstrates the importance of the site of isotopic sampling relative to the site of infusion for the constant infusion of labeled palmitate. Palmitate enrichment is significantly increased downstream from the infusion catheter. However, palmitate production is underestimated unless sampling is performed upstream from the catheter. There was no significant difference between upstream sampling from the femoral vein versus the right heart, whereas the downstream arterial sampling gave significantly higher enrichments compared to the femoral vein. We have also discussed the importance of sampling sites for other substrates and the constraints that this model places on the design and interpretation of whole body primed constant infusion experiments using labeled substrates.

  15. Hierarchy problem and the cosmological constant in a five-dimensional Brans-Dicke brane world model

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a new solution, admitting the existence of dS_{4} branes, in five-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory. It is shown that, due to a special form of a bulk scalar field potential, for certain values of the model parameters the effective cosmological constant can be made small on the brane, where the hierarchy problem of gravitational interaction is solved. We also discuss new stabilization mechanism which is based on the use of auxiliary fields.

  16. Some heavy vector and tensor meson decay constants in light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing Jiaotong University, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Lih, Chong-Chung [National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Shu-Zen College of Medicine and Management, Department of Optometry, Kaohsiung Hsien (China); Xia, Chuanhui [Chongqing Jiaotong University, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    We study the decay constants (f{sub M}) of the heavy vector (D{sup *}, D{sub s}{sup *}, B{sup *}, B{sub s}{sup *}, B{sub c}{sup *}) and tensor (D{sub 2}{sup *}, D{sub s2}{sup *}, B{sub 2}{sup *}, B{sub s2}{sup *}) mesons in the light-front quarkmodel.With the known pseudoscalar meson decay constants of f{sub D}, f{sub Ds}, f{sub B}, f{sub Bs}, and f{sub Bc} as the input parameters to determine the light-front meson wave functions, we obtain f{sub D{sup *},D{sub s{sup *}B{sup *}B{sub s{sup *},B{sub c{sup *}}}}} = (252.0{sub -11.6}{sup +13.8}, 318.3{sub -12.6}{sup +15.3}, 201.9{sub -41.4}{sup +43.2}, 244.2 ± 7.0, 473.4 ± 18.2) and (264.9{sub -9.5}{sup +10.2}, 330.9{sub -9.0}{sup +9.9}, 220.2{sub -46.2}{sup +49.1}, 265.7 ± 8.0, 487.6 ± 19.2) MeV with Gaussian and power-law wave functions, respectively, while we have f{sub D{sub 2{sup *},D{sub s{sub 2{sup *}B{sub 2{sup *}B{sub s{sub 2{sup *}}}}}}}} = (143.6{sub -21.8}{sup +24.9}, 209.5{sub -24.2}{sup +29.1}, 80.9{sub -27.7}{sup +33.8}, 109.7{sub -15.0}{sup +15.7}) MeV with only Gaussian wave functions. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of the Lazarus Leblond constants in the asymptotic model of the interfacial wavy crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolroaz, A.; Mishuris, G.; Movchan, A. B.

    2007-08-01

    The paper addresses the problem of a semi-infinite plane crack along the interface between two isotropic half-spaces. Two methods of solution have been considered in the past: Lazarus and Leblond [1998a. Three-dimensional crack-face weight functions for the semi-infinite interface crack-I: variation of the stress intensity factors due to some small perturbation of the crack front. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 46, 489-511, 1998b. Three-dimensional crack-face weight functions for the semi-infinite interface crack-II: integrodifferential equations on the weight functions and resolution J. Mech. Phys. Solids 46, 513-536] applied the "special" method by Bueckner [1987. Weight functions and fundamental fields for the penny-shaped and the half-plane crack in three space. Int. J. Solids Struct. 23, 57-93] and found the expression of the variation of the stress intensity factors for a wavy crack without solving the complete elasticity problem; their solution is expressed in terms of the physical variables, and it involves five constants whose analytical representation was unknown; on the other hand, the "general" solution to the problem has been recently addressed by Bercial-Velez et al. [2005. High-order asymptotics and perturbation problems for 3D interfacial cracks. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53, 1128-1162], using a Wiener-Hopf analysis and singular asymptotics near the crack front. The main goal of the present paper is to complete the solution to the problem by providing the connection between the two methods. This is done by constructing an integral representation for Lazarus-Leblond's weight functions and by deriving the closed form representations of Lazarus-Leblond's constants.

  18. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  19. Higher-dimensional cosmological model with variable gravitational constant and bulk viscosity in Lyra geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Singh; R V Deshpande; T Singh

    2004-11-01

    We have studied five-dimensional homogeneous cosmological models with variable and bulk viscosity in Lyra geometry. Exact solutions for the field equations have been obtained and physical properties of the models are discussed. It has been observed that the results of new models are well within the observational limit.

  20. MATHEMATICAL CONSTANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, H.P.; Potter, Elinor

    1971-03-01

    This collection of mathematical data consists of two tables of decimal constants arranged according to size rather than function, a third table of integers from 1 to 1000, giving some of their properties, and a fourth table listing some infinite series arranged according to increasing size of the coefficients of the terms. The decimal values of Tables I and II are given to 20 D.

  1. Hemaka's constant

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    As proposed in a previous paper, the decorations of ancient objects can provide some information on the approximate evaluations of constant {\\pi}, the ratio of circumference to diameter. Here we discuss some disks found in the tomb of Hemaka, the chancellor of a king of the First Dynasty of Egypt, about 3000 BC. The discussion is based on measurements of the dimensionless ratio of lengths.

  2. Assumed Probability Density Functions for Shallow and Deep Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K Krueger

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assumed joint probability density function (PDF between vertical velocity and conserved temperature and total water scalars has been suggested to be a relatively computationally inexpensive and unified subgrid-scale (SGS parameterization for boundary layer clouds and turbulent moments. This paper analyzes the performance of five families of PDFs using large-eddy simulations of deep convection, shallow convection, and a transition from stratocumulus to trade wind cumulus. Three of the PDF families are based on the double Gaussian form and the remaining two are the single Gaussian and a Double Delta Function (analogous to a mass flux model. The assumed PDF method is tested for grid sizes as small as 0.4 km to as large as 204.8 km. In addition, studies are performed for PDF sensitivity to errors in the input moments and for how well the PDFs diagnose some higher-order moments. In general, the double Gaussian PDFs more accurately represent SGS cloud structure and turbulence moments in the boundary layer compared to the single Gaussian and Double Delta Function PDFs for the range of grid sizes tested. This is especially true for small SGS cloud fractions. While the most complex PDF, Lewellen-Yoh, better represents shallow convective cloud properties (cloud fraction and liquid water mixing ratio compared to the less complex Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF, there appears to be no advantage in implementing Lewellen-Yoh for deep convection. However, the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF better represents the liquid water flux, is less sensitive to errors in the input moments, and diagnoses higher order moments more accurately. Between the Lewellen-Yoh and Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDFs, it appears that neither family is distinctly better at representing cloudy layers. However, due to the reduced computational cost and fairly robust results, it appears that the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF could be an ideal family for SGS cloud and turbulence

  3. STEADY-STATE SOLUTIONS FOR A ONE-DIMENSIONAL NONISENTROPIC HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL WITH NON-CONSTANT LATTICE TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yeping

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional stationary nonisentropic hydrodynamic model for semicon-ductor devices with non-constant lattice temperature is studied. This model consists of the equations for the electron density, the electron current density and electron tempera-ture, coupled with the Poisson equation of the electrostatic potential in a bounded interval supplemented with proper boundary conditions. The existence and uniqueness of a strong subsonic steady-state solution with positive particle density and positive temperature is established. The proof is based on the fixed-point arguments, the Stampacchia truncation methods, and the basic energy estimates.

  4. A model for the prediction of the thermal degradation and ignition of wood under constant and variable heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, Rafael; Mastral, Jose F.; Ceamanos, Jesus; Aldea, Maria E.; Betran, Monica [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Sciences,University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, Zaragoza (Spain); Lana, Jose A. [Direction of Technology and Environment, Enagas-Gas Natural, Crta. Madrid, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-01-01

    The ignition of combustible materials is an important aspect of the processes taking place in an unwanted fire. In this work, an experimental and theoretical study of the ignition process of wood has been carried out. Experiments of both spontaneous and piloted ignition have been performed. Constant and decreasing variable heat fluxes have been tested. A mathematical model has been used to predict the time to ignition of wood for the different operating conditions used. The solution of the model provides the temperature at each point of the solid, the local solid conversion and the time to ignition of the material. In general, a good agreement between experimental and theoretical results is obtained.

  5. Comparison of Cole-Cole and Constant Phase Angle modeling in time-domain induced polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajaunie, Myriam; Maurya, Pradip Kumar; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    is reflected in TDIP data, and therefore, at identifying (1) if and when it is possible to distinguish, in time domain, between a Cole-Cole description and a CPA one, and (2) if features of time domain data exist in order to know, from a simple data inspection, which model will be the most adapted to the data......, forward modeling of quadrupolar sequences on 1D and 2D heterogeneous CPA models shows that the CPA decays differ among each other only by a multiplication factor. Consequently, the inspection of field data in log-log plots gives insight on the modeling needed for fitting them: the CPA inversion cannot...

  6. Computer modeling of the vapor compression cycle with constant flow area expansion device: Appendix J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormanski, P.; Didion, D.

    1983-05-01

    The modeling effort emphasis was on the local thermodynamic phenomena which were described by fundamental heat transfer equations and equation of state relationships among material properties. In the compressor model several refrigerant locations were identified and the processes taking place between these locations accounted for all significant heat and pressure losses. Evaporator and condenser models were developed on a tube by tube basis where performance of each coil tube is computed separately by considering the cross flow heat transfer with the external air stream and the appropriate heat and mass transfer relationships. A capillary tube model was formulated with the aid of Fanino flow theory.

  7. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.

  8. Line Defects in the Small Elastic Constant Limit of a Three-Dimensional Landau-de Gennes Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    We consider the Landau-de Gennes variational model for nematic liquid crystals, in three-dimensional domains. More precisely, we study the asymptotic behaviour of minimizers as the elastic constant tends to zero, under the assumption that minimizers are uniformly bounded and their energy blows up as the logarithm of the elastic constant. We show that there exists a closed set S_line of finite length, such that minimizers converge to a locally harmonic map away from S_line . Moreover, S_line restricted to the interior of the domain is a locally finite union of straight line segments. We provide sufficient conditions, depending on the domain and the boundary data, under which our main results apply. We also discuss some examples.

  9. Line Defects in the Small Elastic Constant Limit of a Three-Dimensional Landau-de Gennes Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    We consider the Landau-de Gennes variational model for nematic liquid crystals, in three-dimensional domains. More precisely, we study the asymptotic behaviour of minimizers as the elastic constant tends to zero, under the assumption that minimizers are uniformly bounded and their energy blows up as the logarithm of the elastic constant. We show that there exists a closed set {S_line} of finite length, such that minimizers converge to a locally harmonic map away from {S_line}. Moreover, {S_line} restricted to the interior of the domain is a locally finite union of straight line segments. We provide sufficient conditions, depending on the domain and the boundary data, under which our main results apply. We also discuss some examples.

  10. Constant Latent Odds-Ratios Models and the Mantel-Haenszel Null Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, David J.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a new family of item response theory (IRT) models for dichotomous item scores is proposed. Two basic assumptions define the most general model of this family. The first assumption is local independence of the item scores given a unidimensional latent trait. The second assumption is that the odds-ratios for all item-pairs are…

  11. A Bayesian MCMC method for point process models with intractable normalising constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Kasper Klitgaard; Møller, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    to simulate from the "unknown distribution", perfect simulation algorithms become useful. We illustrate the method in cases whre the likelihood is given by a Markov point process model. Particularly, we consider semi-parametric Bayesian inference in connection to both inhomogeneous Markov point process models...

  12. Modeling of solar radiation management: a comparison of simulations using reduced solar constant and stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidindi, Sirisha; Bala, Govindasamy; Modak, Angshuman; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-05-01

    The climatic effects of Solar Radiation Management (SRM) geoengineering have been often modeled by simply reducing the solar constant. This is most likely valid only for space sunshades and not for atmosphere and surface based SRM methods. In this study, a global climate model is used to evaluate the differences in the climate response to SRM by uniform solar constant reduction and stratospheric aerosols. Our analysis shows that when global mean warming from a doubling of CO2 is nearly cancelled by both these methods, they are similar when important surface and tropospheric climate variables are considered. However, a difference of 1 K in the global mean stratospheric (61-9.8 hPa) temperature is simulated between the two SRM methods. Further, while the global mean surface diffuse radiation increases by ~23 % and direct radiation decreases by about 9 % in the case of sulphate aerosol SRM method, both direct and diffuse radiation decrease by similar fractional amounts (~1.0 %) when solar constant is reduced. When CO2 fertilization effects from elevated CO2 concentration levels are removed, the contribution from shaded leaves to gross primary productivity (GPP) increases by 1.8 % in aerosol SRM because of increased diffuse light. However, this increase is almost offset by a 15.2 % decline in sunlit contribution due to reduced direct light. Overall both the SRM simulations show similar decrease in GPP (~8 %) and net primary productivity (~3 %). Based on our results we conclude that the climate states produced by a reduction in solar constant and addition of aerosols into the stratosphere can be considered almost similar except for two important aspects: stratospheric temperature change and the consequent implications for the dynamics and the chemistry of the stratosphere and the partitioning of direct versus diffuse radiation reaching the surface. Further, the likely dependence of global hydrological cycle response on aerosol particle size and the latitudinal and

  13. Computer modeling of the vapor compression cycle with constant flow area expansion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, P.; Didion, D.

    1983-05-01

    An analysis of the vapor compression cycle and the main components of an air source heat pump during steady state operator was performed with emphasis on fundamental phenomena taking place between key locations in the refrigerant system. The basis of the general heat pump model formulation is the logic which links the analytical models of heat pump components together in a format requiring an iterative solution of refrigerant pressure, enthalpy and mass balances. The modeling effort emphasis was on the local thermodynamic phenomena which were described by fundamental heat transfer equations and equation of state relationships among material properties.

  14. 常弹性方差模型下保险人的最优投资策略%Insurer's optimal investment strategy under constant elasticity of variance model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣喜民; 范立鑫

    2012-01-01

    Research insurance funds investment based on constant elasticity of variance (CEV) model, consider a model which the risky asset is modeled by CEV model and the aggregate claims are modeled by a Brownian motion with drift. As employment of premium is different from ordinary, which means that the insurer should keep an eye on underwrite risk when he use insurance funds, assume that investment risk has a linear correlation with underwrite risk. According to stochastic control theory, derive the HJB equation related with insurance problem. This equation is non-linear partial differential equation, yet it is difficult to solve it, change primary problem to the dual problem by using Legendre transform. Through setting the parameter values, the optimal investment strategy for an insurer with CARA or CRRA utility function is presented and the relevant analysis is given, which provides important practical significance for an insurer to invest.%假设风险资产价格服从常弹性方差(CEV)模型,保险人面临的风险过程是带漂移的布朗运动.投资过程与承保风险过程完全相关.根据随机最优控制理论,建立保险基金投资问题的HJB方程.由于该方程是非线性偏微分方程,不易求解,因此采用Legendre变换将其转换成对偶问题进行研究.最后针对特定参数值分别得到以CARA和CRRA效用函数为目标的保险人的最优投资策略,这样的投资策略更符合金融市场的实际要求.

  15. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hao; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. We propose two types of models to describe the evolutions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\alpha$. Then, we consider the observational constraints on these models, by using the 293 $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, and the data of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), cosmic microwave background (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the narrow ranges of ${\\cal O}(10^{-5})$ t...

  16. Are fMRI event-related response constant in time? A model selection answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnet, Sophie; Lavielle, Marc; Poline, Jean-Baptiste

    2006-07-01

    An accurate estimation of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is crucial for a precise spatial and temporal estimate of the underlying neuronal processes. Recent works have proposed non-parametric estimation of the HRF under the hypotheses of linearity and stationarity in time. Biological literature suggests, however, that response magnitude may vary with attention or ongoing activity. We therefore test a more flexible model that allows for the variation of the magnitude of the HRF with time in a maximum likelihood framework. Under this model, the magnitude of the HRF evoked by a single event may vary across occurrences of the same type of event. This model is tested against a simpler model with a fixed magnitude using information theory. We develop a standard EM algorithm to identify the event magnitudes and the HRF. We test this hypothesis on a series of 32 regions (4 ROIS on eight subjects) of interest and find that the more flexible model is better than the usual model in most cases. The important implications for the analysis of fMRI time series for event-related neuroimaging experiments are discussed.

  17. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Avelino, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe according to their past, present and future evolution. We test the viability of the model performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the Gold 2006 (182 SNe) and ESSENCE + HST (192 SNe) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data sets, imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient and comparing the predicted age of the universe with the constraints in the age of the universe coming from the oldest globular clusters. The age of the universe is found to be 15.507 Gyr and 16.501 Gyr using the Gold 2006 and ESSENCE+HST SNe Ia data sets respectively. The best estimated values obtained for this model are similar to those obtained from the LCDM model for H_0 and \\chi^2_{min} using the same SNe Ia data sets and the estimated ages of the un...

  18. A two-dimensional model of the plasmasphere - Refilling time constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Craig E.; Guiter, Steven M.; Thomas, Steven G.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D model of the plasmasphere has been developed to study the temporal evolution of plasma density in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. This model includes the supply and loss of hydrogen ions due to ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as well as the effects of E x B convection. A parametric model describing the required coupling fluxes has been developed which utilizes empirical models of the neutral atmosphere, the ionosphere and the saturated plasmasphere. The plasmaspheric model has been used to examine the time it takes for the plasmasphere to refill after it has been depleted by a magnetic storm. The time it takes for the plasmasphere to reach 90 percent of its equilibrium level ranges from 3 days at L = 3 during solar minimum to as high as 100 days at L = 5 during solar maximum. Refilling is also dependent on the month of the year, with refilling requiring a longer period of time at solar maximum during June than during December for L greater than 3.2.

  19. Evaluation of Constant Thickness Cartilage Models vs. Patient Specific Cartilage Models for an Optimized Computer-Assisted Planning of Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available Modern computerized planning tools for periacetabular osteotomy (PAO use either morphology-based or biomechanics-based methods. The latter relies on estimation of peak contact pressures and contact areas using either patient specific or constant thickness cartilage models. We performed a finite element analysis investigating the optimal reorientation of the acetabulum in PAO surgery based on simulated joint contact pressures and contact areas using patient specific cartilage model. Furthermore we investigated the influences of using patient specific cartilage model or constant thickness cartilage model on the biomechanical simulation results. Ten specimens with hip dysplasia were used in this study. Image data were available from CT arthrography studies. Bone models were reconstructed. Mesh models for the patient specific cartilage were defined and subsequently loaded under previously reported boundary and loading conditions. Peak contact pressures and contact areas were estimated in the original position. Afterwards we used a validated preoperative planning software to change the acetabular inclination by an increment of 5° and measured the lateral center edge angle (LCE at each reorientation position. The position with the largest contact area and the lowest peak contact pressure was defined as the optimal position. In order to investigate the influence of using patient specific cartilage model or constant thickness cartilage model on the biomechanical simulation results, the same procedure was repeated with the same bone models but with a cartilage mesh of constant thickness. Comparison of the peak contact pressures and the contact areas between these two different cartilage models showed that good correlation between these two cartilage models for peak contact pressures (r = 0.634 ∈ [0.6, 0.8], p 0.8, p < 0.001. For both cartilage models, the largest contact areas and the lowest peak pressures were found at the same position. Our study is

  20. Supersymmetric 3D model for gravity with $SU(2)$ gauge symmetry, mass generation and effective cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Pedro D; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    A Chern--Simons system in $2+1$ dimensions invariant under local Lorentz rotations, $SU(2)$ gauge transformations, and local $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetry transformations is proposed. The field content is that of $(2+1)$-gravity plus an $SU(2)$ gauge field, a spin-1/2 fermion charged with respect to $SU(2)$ and a trivial free abelian gauge field. A peculiarity of the model is the absence of gravitini, although it includes gravity and supersymmetry. Likewise, no gauginos are present. All the parameters involved in the system are either protected by gauge invariance or emerge as integration constants. An effective mass and effective cosmological constant emerge by spontaneus breaking of local scaling invariance. The vacuum sector is defined by configurations with locally flat Lorentz and $SU(2)$ connections sporting nontrivial global charges. Three-dimensional Lorentz-flat geometries are spacetimes of locally constant negative --or zero--, Riemann curvature, which include Minkowski space, AdS$_3$, BTZ black hol...

  1. Sub-millimeter Spatial Oscillations of Newton's Constant: Theoretical Models and Laboratory Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viability of sub-millimeter wavelength oscillating deviations from the Newtonian potential at both the theoretical and the experimental/observational level. At the theoretical level such deviations are generic predictions in a wide range of extensions of General Relativity (GR) including $f(R)$ theories, massive Brans-Dicke (BD)- scalar tensor theories, compactified extra dimension models and nonlocal extensions of GR. However, the range of parameters associated with such oscillating deviations is usually connected with instabilities present at the perturbative level. An important exception emerges in nonlocal gravity theories where oscillating deviations from Newtonian potential occur naturally on sub-millimeter scales without any instabilities. As an example of a model with unstable Newtonian oscillations we review an $f(R)$ expansion around General Relativity of the form $f(R)=R+\\frac{1}{6 m^2} R^2$ with $m^2<0$ pointing out possible stabilization mechanisms. As an example of a model ...

  2. Spectral sensitivity analysis of FWI in a constant-gradient background velocity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from local minima, due to a lack of low frequencies in the data. A reflector below the zone of interest may help in recovering the long-wavelength components of a velocity perturbation, as demonstrated in a paper by Mora. Because smooth models are more popular as init

  3. A Pedagogical Model for the Doppler Effect with Application to Sources with Constant Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaura, Lakshya P. S.; Pathak, Praveen

    2017-01-01

    Kinematic models are often very useful. The back and forth throw of a ball between two ice skaters may help us appreciate the meson exchange theory of Yukawa. If the skaters throw the balls at each other, they move backward, which is equivalent to a repulsive force between them. On the other hand, if they snatch the ball from each other, the…

  4. Toward Improving Atmospheric Models and Ozone Projections: Laboratory UV Absorption Cross Sections and Equilibrium Constant of ClOOCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years have now passed since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, and despite comprehensive international agreements being in place to phase out CFCs and halons, polar ozone losses generally remain severe. The relevant halogen compounds have very long atmospheric lifetimes, which ensures that seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Changes in the climate system can further impact stratospheric ozone abundance through changes in the temperature and water vapor structure of the atmosphere and through the potential initiation of solar radiation management efforts. In many ways, the rate at which climate is changing must now be considered fast relative to the slow removal of halogens from the atmosphere. Photochemical models of Earth's atmosphere play a critical role in understanding and projecting ozone levels, but in order for these models to be accurate, they must be built on a foundation of accurate laboratory data. ClOOCl is the centerpiece of the catalytic cycle that accounts for more than 50% of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere every spring, and so uncertainties in the ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl are particularly important. Additionally, the equilibrium constant of the dimerization reaction of ClO merits further study, as there are important discrepancies between in situ measurements and lab-based models, and the JPL-11 recommended equilibrium constant includes high error bars at atmospherically relevant temperatures (~75% at 200 K). Here we analyze available data for the ClOOCl ultraviolet cross sections and equilibrium constant and present new laboratory spectroscopic results.

  5. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  6. Asymptotic stability of constant steady states for a 2×2 reaction–diffusion system arising in cancer modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The dependence of tumor on essential nutrients is known to be crucial for its evolution and has become one of the targets for medical therapies. Based on this fact a reaction-diffusion system with chemotaxis term and nutrient-based growth of tumors is presented. The formulation of the model considers also an influence of tumor and pharmacological factors on nutrient concentration. In the paper, convergence of solutions to constant, stationary states in the one-dimensional case for small perturbation of the equilibria is investigated. The nonlinear stability results are obtained by means of the classical symmetrization method and energy Sobolev estimates. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Displacement of estimates of chemical equilibrium constants at breaking of determinancy of independent variables of equilibrium system regression models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, L.S.; Prikhod' ko, N.V.; Evseev, A.M.; Rozen, A.M.; Kolychev, A.E.; Gontar, B.G. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Khimicheskij Fakul' tet)

    1982-07-01

    Using as an example regression models of extraction systems HNO/sub 3/-TBP-H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-TBP-H/sub 2/O it has been shown that disregard of errors of the controlled (independent) variables 3% measurement error of UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ equilibrium concentration and 3% error of the determination of HNO/sub 3/ activity coefficient results in the displacement of evaluations of certain equilibria constants and leads to incorrect conclusion on the mechanism of chemical equilibria.

  8. Measurement of microscopic coupling constants between atoms on a surface: Combination of LEEM observation with lattice model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Noriko

    2014-12-01

    We present a method combining low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and lattice model analysis for measuring the microscopic lateral coupling constants between atoms on a surface. The calculated step (interface) stiffness in a honeycomb lattice Ising model with the nearest neighbor and the second nearest neighbor interactions (J1 = 93.8 meV and J2 = 9.38 meV) matched the experimental step quantity values on an Si(111)(1 × 1) surface reported by Pang et al. and Bartelt et al. based on LEEM measurements. The experimental value of step tension obtained by Williams et al. lies on the calculated step tension curve. The polar graphs of the step tension and a two-dimensional island shape at the temperature T = 1163 K also agree well with the experimental graphs reported by Métois and Müller. The close agreement between the LEEM observations and the lattice model calculations on a Si(111) surface suggests that our method is also suitable for measuring microscopic lateral coupling constants on the surface of other materials that are less well-studied than Si.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of a Constant Power Series-Loaded Resonant Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) was programmed using a Xilinx Simulink System Generator toolbox. Using Naval xvi Postgraduate School‟s Student...Xilinx blocks using the Xilinx System Generator Toolbox. The advantage of modeling first with Simulink and then with the Xilinx System Generator Toolbox...gate driver signals. The one aspect of the Xilinx System Generator Toolbox that is different than the Simulink blocks is that Xilinx blocks are going

  10. Model for analysis and definition of the governor constants in hydroelectric power; Modelo para analise e definicao das constantes do regulador em usinas hidreletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Jose Geraldo Pena de; Koelle, Edmundo; Luvizotto Junior, Edevar [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil. Dept. de Hidraulica e Saneamento

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents a complete mathematical and computer model which allows simulating a generic hydroelectric power plant under steady state and transitory regimes, in the extensive time, and also the analysis of the oscillating flows resulting from excitation sources present in the installation, such as vortices in the suction pipe during partial load operation.

  11. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises, E-mail: avelino@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  12. Adhesion Detection Analysis by Modeling Rail Wheel Set Dynamics under the Assumption of Constant Creep Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiqar Ali Soomro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion level control is very necessary to avoid slippage of rail wheelset and track from derailment for smoothing running of rail vehicle. In this paper the proper dynamics of wheelset for velocities acting in three dimensions of wheelset and rail track has been discussed along with creep forces on each wheel in longitudinal, lateral and spin directions has been enumerated and computed for suitable modeling. The concerned results have been simulated by Matlab code to observe the correlation of this phenomenon to compare creepage and creep forces for detecting adhesion level. This adhesion identification is recognized by applying coulomb’s law for sliding friction by comparing tangential and normal forces through co-efficient of friction

  13. Combination of poroelasticity theory and constant strain rate test in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tien Hung; Rühaak, Wolfram; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Extensive groundwater extraction leads to a drawdown of the ground water table. Consequently, soil effective stress increases and can cause land subsidence. Analysis of land subsidence generally requires a numerical model based on poroelasticity theory, which was first proposed by Biot (1941). In the review of regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction, Galloway and Burbey (2011) stated that more research and application is needed in coupling of stress-dependent land subsidence process. In geotechnical field, the constant rate of strain tests (CRS) was first introduced in 1969 (Smith and Wahls 1969) and was standardized in 1982 through the designation D4186-82 by American Society for Testing and Materials. From the reading values of CRS tests, the stress-dependent parameters of poroelasticity model can be calculated. So far, there is no research to link poroelasticity theory with CRS tests in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. One dimensional CRS tests using conventional compression cell and three dimension CRS tests using Rowe cell were performed. The tests were also modelled by using finite element method with mixed elements. Back analysis technique is used to find the suitable values of hydraulic conductivity and bulk modulus that depend on the stress or void ratio. Finally, the obtained results are used in land subsidence models. Biot, M. A. (1941). "General theory of three-dimensional consolidation." Journal of applied physics 12(2): 155-164. Galloway, D. L. and T. J. Burbey (2011). "Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction." Hydrogeology Journal 19(8): 1459-1486. Smith, R. E. and H. E. Wahls (1969). "Consolidation under constant rates of strain." Journal of Soil Mechanics & Foundations Div.

  14. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  15. The electro-mechanical phase transition of Gent model dielectric elastomer tube with two material constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwu; Luo, Xiaojian; Fei, Fan; Wang, Yixing; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2013-04-01

    Applied to voltage, a dielectric elastomer membrane may deform into a mixture of two states under certain conditions. One of which is the flat state and the other is the wrinkled state. In the flat state, the membrane is relatively thick with a small area, while on the contrary, in the wrinkled state, the membrane is relatively thin with a large area. The coexistence of these two states may cause the electromechanical phase transition of dielectric elastomer. The phase diagram of idea dielectric elastomer membrane under unidirectional stress and voltage inspired us to think about the liquid-to-vapor phase transition of pure substance. The practical working cycle of a steam engine includes the thermodynamical process of liquid-to-vapor phase transition, the fact is that the steam engine will do the maximum work if undergoing the phase transition process. In this paper, in order to consider the influence of coexistent state of dielectric elastomer, we investigate the homogeneous deformation of the dielectric elastomer tube. The theoretical model is built and the relationship between external loads and stretch are got, we can see that the elastomer tube experiences the coexistent state before reaching the stretching limit from the diagram. We think these results can guide the design and manufacture of energy harvesting equipments.

  16. Dispersion-model-free determination of optical constants: application to materials for organic thin film devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flämmich, Michael; Danz, Norbert; Michaelis, Dirk; Bräuer, Andreas; Gather, Malte C; Kremer, Jonas H-W M; Meerholz, Klaus

    2009-03-10

    We describe a method to determine the refractive index and extinction coefficient of thin film materials without prior knowledge of the film thickness and without the assumption of a dispersion model. A straightforward back calculation to the optical parameters can be performed starting from simple measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of a 100-250 nm thick supported film. The exact film thickness is found simultaneously by fulfilling the intrinsic demand of continuity of the refractive index as a function of wavelength. If both the layer and the substrate are homogeneous and isotropic media with plane and parallel interfaces, effects like surface roughness, scattering, or thickness inhomogeneities can be neglected. Then, the accuracy of the measurement is approximately 10(-2) and 10(-3) for the refractive index and the extinction coefficient, respectively. The error of the thin film thickness determination is well below 1 nm. Thus this technique is well suited to determine the input parameters for optical simulations of organic thin film devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We apply the method to the electroluminescent polymer poly(2,5-dioctyl-p-phenylene vinylene) (PDO-PPV) and show its applicability by comparing the measured and calculated reflection and transmission spectra of OLED stacks with up to five layers.

  17. How Reliable are Models Based on Topological Index 3χv for the Prediction of Stability Constants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Raos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical models based on valence connectivity index of the 3rd order, 3χv, have been discussed in terms of their ability to predict stability of coordination compounds. The key factors for the success are: (1 the choice of reliable experimental data for the calibration of the model, (2 writing an appropriate constitutional formula (i.e. graph of the complex, and (3 development of proper form of regression function. If these requirements were met, it is possible to obtain theoretical results comensurable with the experimental ones, i.e. of the sufficient quality to evaluate experimental methods or to propose the best values for stability constants. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  18. DEFORMATION RIGIDITY OF ASSUMED STRESS MODES IN HYBRID ELEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Can-hui; HUANG Qian; FENG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The new methods to determine the zero-energy deformation modes in the hybrid elements and the zero-energy stress modes in their assumed stress fields are presented by the natural deformation modes of the elements. And the formula of the additional element deformation rigidity due to additional mode into the assumed stress field is derived.Based on, it is concluded in theory that the zero-energy stress mode cannot suppress the zero-energy deformation modes but increase the extra rigidity to the nonzero-energy deformation modes of the element instead. So they should not be employed to assume the stress field. In addition, the parasitic stress modes will produce the spurious parasitic energy and result the element behaving over rigidity. Thus, they should not be used into the assumed stress field even though they can suppress the zero-energy deformation modes of the element. The numerical examples show the performance of the elements including the zero-energy stress modes or the parasitic stress modes.

  19. Statistical motor number estimation assuming a binomial distribution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, J.H.; Visser, G.H.A.; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Zwarts, M.J.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    The statistical method of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) uses the natural stochastic variation in a muscle's compound response to electrical stimulation to obtain an estimate of the number of recruitable motor units. The current method assumes that this variation follows a Poisson distribution.

  20. Use of weather research and forecasting model outputs to obtain near-surface refractive index structure constant over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xuebin; Zhu, Wenyue; Qiao, Chunhong; Rao, Ruizhong; Mei, Haipin

    2016-06-13

    The methods to obtain atmospheric refractive index structure constant (Cn2) by instrument measurement are limited spatially and temporally and they are more difficult and expensive over the ocean. It is useful to forecast Cn2 effectively from Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) outputs. This paper introduces a method that WRF Model is used to forecast the routine meteorological parameters firstly, and then Cn2 is calculated based on these parameters by the Bulk model from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) over the ocean near-surface. The corresponding Cn2 values measured by the micro-thermometer which is placed on the ship are compared with the ones forecasted by WRF model to determine how this method performs. The result shows that the forecasted Cn2 is consistent with the measured Cn2 in trend and the order of magnitude as a whole, as well as the correlation coefficient is up to 77.57%. This method can forecast some essential aspects of Cn2 and almost always captures the correct magnitude of Cn2, which experiences fluctuations of two orders of magnitude. Thus, it seems to be a feasible and meaningful method that using WRF model to forecast near-surface Cn2 value over the ocean.

  1. PTR-MS measurements and analysis of models for the calculation of Henry's law constants of monosulfides and disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhfried, Erna; Biasioli, Franco; Aprea, Eugenio; Cappellin, Luca; Soukoulis, Christos; Ferrigno, Antonella; Märk, Tilmann D; Gasperi, Flavia

    2011-04-01

    Sulfides are known for their strong odor impact even at very low concentrations. Here, we report Henry's law constants (HLCs) measured at the nanomolar concentration range in water for monosulfides (dimethylsulfide, ethylmethylsulfide, diethylsulfide, allylmethylsulfide) and disulfides (dimethyldisulfide, diethylsulfide, dipropylsulfide) using a dynamic stripping technique coupled to Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). The experimental data were compared with literature values and to vapor/solubility calculations and their consistency was confirmed employing the extra-thermodynamic enthalpy-entropy compensation effect. Our experimental data are compatible with reported literature values, and they are typically lower than averaged experimental literature values by about 10%. Critical comparison with other freely available models (modeled vapor/solubility; group and bond additivity methods; Linear Solvation Energy Relationship; SPARC) was performed to validate their applicability to monosulfides and disulfides. Evaluation of theoretical models reveals a large deviation from our measured values by up to four times (in units of Matm(-1)). Two group contribution models were adjusted in view of the new data, and HLCs for a list of sulfur compounds were calculated. Based on our findings we recommend the evaluation and adaption of theoretical models for monosulfides and disulfides to lower values of solubility and higher values of fugacity.

  2. Multiple oscillator models for the optical constants of polycrystalline zinc oxide thin films over a wide wavelength range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshman, J.M., E-mail: khoshman@ahu.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Maan 71111 (Jordan); College of Engineering, University of Dammam, Dammam 31451 (Saudi Arabia); Hilfiker, J.N. [J.A. Woollam Company, 645 M Street, Suite 102, Lincoln, NE 68508 (United States); Tabet, N. [Physics Department, Center of Research Excellence in Renewable Energy, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Kordesch, M.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) films were prepared on Si(1 1 1) and quartz substrates using RF-magnetron sputtering in N₂ plasma at room temperature. From the X-ray diffraction observations, it was found that all films are polycrystalline with a preferred orientation of (1 0 1). X ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of the films by observing the behavior of the Zn2p3, O1s, N1s, and C1s lines. The thicknesses and optical constants of the ZnO thin films were determined using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry through the Genosc™ Herzinger–Johs parameterized semiconductor oscillator functions and multiple Gaussian oscillator models. Combining multiple oscillator types provided a very flexible approach to fitting optical constants over a wavelength range 190–1400 nm while simultaneously enforcing Kramers–Kronig consistency in the fitted ellipsometric parameters. Refractive indices of the films were determined to be in the range 1.68–1.93 and extinction coefficients in the range 4.56 × 10⁻⁶–0.23. A direct bandgap of 3.38 ± 0.03 eV was calculated from the extinction coefficient. Low temperature photoluminescence studies of the films exhibited one prominent peak at 3.41 eV. The equality of the ZnO thin films was obtained through the depolarization measurements.

  3. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  4. NiTi Alloy Negator Springs for Long-Stroke Constant-Force Shape Memory Actuators: Modeling, Simulation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Andrea; Dragoni, Eugenio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    This work aims at the experimental characterization and modeling validation of shape memory alloy (SMA) Negator springs. According to the classic engineering books on springs, a Negator spring is a spiral spring made of strip of metal wound on the flat with an inherent curvature such that, in repose, each coil wraps tightly on its inner neighbor. The main feature of a Negator springs is the nearly constant force displacement behavior in the unwinding of the strip. Moreover the stroke is very long, theoretically infinite, as it depends only on the length of the initial strip. A Negator spring made in SMA is built and experimentally tested to demonstrate the feasibility of this actuator. The shape memory Negator spring behavior can be modeled with an analytical procedure, which is in good agreement with the experimental test and can be used for design purposes. In both cases, the material is modeled as elastic in austenitic range, while an exponential continuum law is used to describe the martensitic behavior. The experimental results confirms the applicability of this kind of geometry to the shape memory alloy actuators, and the analytical model is confirmed to be a powerful design tool to dimension and predict the spring behavior both in martensitic and austenitic range.

  5. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the 'modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a 'Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  6. Kinetics of the transformation of phenyl-urea herbicides during ozonation of natural waters: rate constants and model predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Garcia, Carolina

    2007-10-01

    Oxidation of four phenyl-urea herbicides (isoproturon, chlortoluron, diuron, and linuron) was studied by ozone at pH=2, and by a combination of O3/H2O2 at pH=9. These experiments allowed the determination of the rate constants for their reactions with ozone and OH radicals. For reactions with ozone, the following rate constants were obtained: 1.9 +/- 0.2, 16.5 +/- 0.6, 393.5 +/- 8.4, and 2191 +/- 259 M(-1) s(-1) for linuron, diuron, chlortoluron, and isoproturon, respectively. The rate constants for the reaction with OH radicals were (7.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for isoproturon, (6.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for chlortoluron, (6.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for diuron, and (5.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for linuron. Furthermore, the simultaneous ozonation of these selected herbicides in some natural water systems (a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and surface water from a reservoir) was studied. The influence of operating conditions (initial ozone dose, nature of herbicides, and type of water systems) on herbicide removal efficiency was established, and the parameter Rct (proposed by Elovitz, M.S., von Gunten, U., 1999. Hydroxyl radical/ozone ratios during ozonation processes. I. The Rct concept. Ozone Sci. Eng. 21, 239-260) was evaluated from simultaneous measurement of ozone and OH radicals. A kinetic model was proposed for the prediction of the elimination rate of herbicides in these natural waters, and application of this model revealed that experimental results and predicted values agreed fairly well. Finally, the partial contributions of direct ozone and radical pathways were evaluated, and the results showed that reaction with OH radicals was the major pathway for the oxidative transformation of diuron and linuron, even when conventional ozonation was applied, while for chlortoluron and isoproturon, direct ozonation was the major pathway.

  7. Assume-Guarantee Synthesis for Digital Contract Signing

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu

    2010-01-01

    We study the automatic synthesis of fair non-repudiation protocols, a class of fair exchange protocols, used for digital contract signing. First, we show how to specify the objectives of the participating agents and the trusted third party (TTP) as path formulas in LTL and prove that the satisfaction of these objectives imply fairness and abuse-freeness; properties required of fair exchange protocols. We then show that weak (co-operative) co-synthesis and classical (strictly competitive) co-synthesis fail, whereas assume-guarantee synthesis (AGS) succeeds. We demonstrate the success of assume-guarantee synthesis as follows: (a) any solution of assume-guarantee synthesis is attack-free; no subset of participants can violate the objectives of the other participants; (b) the Asokan-Shoup-Waidner (ASW) certified mail protocol that has known vulnerabilities is not a solution of AGS; (c) The Garay-Jakobsson-MacKenzie (GJM) protocol, while fair and abuse-free, is not attack-free by our definition and is hence not a ...

  8. Universe of constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  9. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  10. A New Assumed Interaction. Experiments and Manifestations in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Baurov, Yu A

    2008-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a new assumed interaction in nature with the aid of high-current magnets, torsion and piezoresonance balances, high-precision gravimeter, fluctuations in intensity of betta-decay of radioactive elements, plasma devices and manifestations in astrophysics are presented. A possible explanation of the results obtained based on a hypothesis of global anisotropy of physical space caused by the existence of a cosmological vectorial potential A_g, is given. It is shown that the vector A_g has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10.

  11. Crossing the cosmological constant line in a dilatonic brane-world model with and without curvature corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam

    2008-01-01

    We construct a new brane-world model composed of a bulk -with a dilatonic field-, plus a brane -with brane tension coupled to the dilaton-, cold dark matter and an induced gravity term. It is possible to show that depending on the nature of the coupling between the brane tension and the dilaton this model can describe the late-time acceleration of the brane expansion (for the normal branch) as it moves within the bulk. The acceleration is produced together with a mimicry of the crossing of the cosmological constant line (w=-1) on the brane, although this crossing of the phantom divide is obtained without invoking any phantom matter neither on the brane nor in the bulk. The role of dark energy is played by the brane tension, which reaches a maximum positive value along the cosmological expansion of the brane. It is precisely at that maximum that the crossing of the phantom divide takes place. We also show that these results remain valid when the induced gravity term on the brane is switched off.

  12. Crossing the cosmological constant line in a dilatonic brane-world model with and without curvature corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica-CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ferrera, Antonio, E-mail: mariam.bouhmadi@fisica.ist.utl.pt, E-mail: a.ferrera.pardo@gmail.com [Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A Catalan' , Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    We construct a new brane-world model composed of a bulk with a dilatonic field, plus a brane with brane tension coupled to the dilaton, cold dark matter and an induced gravity term. It is possible to show that, depending on the nature of the coupling between the brane tension and the dilaton, this model can describe the late time acceleration of the brane expansion (for the normal branch) as it moves within the bulk. The acceleration is produced together with a mimicry of the crossing of the cosmological constant line (w = -1) on the brane, although this crossing of the phantom divide is obtained without invoking any phantom matter either on the brane or in the bulk. The role of dark energy is played by the brane tension, which reaches a maximum positive value along the cosmological expansion of the brane. It is precisely at that maximum that the crossing of the phantom divide takes place. We also show that these results remain valid when the induced gravity term on the brane is switched off.

  13. Statistical motor number estimation assuming a binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Joleen H; Visser, Gerhard H; de Graaf, Sándor; Zwarts, Machiel J; Stegeman, Dick F

    2005-02-01

    The statistical method of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) uses the natural stochastic variation in a muscle's compound response to electrical stimulation to obtain an estimate of the number of recruitable motor units. The current method assumes that this variation follows a Poisson distribution. We present an alternative that instead assumes a binomial distribution. Results of computer simulations and of a pilot study on 19 healthy subjects showed that the binomial MUNE values are considerably higher than those of the Poisson method, and in better agreement with the results of other MUNE techniques. In addition, simulation results predict that the performance in patients with severe motor unit loss will be better for the binomial than Poisson method. The adapted method remains closer to physiology, because it can accommodate the increase in activation probability that results from rising stimulus intensity. It does not need recording windows as used with the Poisson method, and is therefore less user-dependent and more objective and quicker in its operation. For these reasons, we believe that the proposed modifications may lead to significant improvements in the statistical MUNE technique.

  14. Uniform convergence and a posteriori error estimation for assumed stress hybrid finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guozhu; Carstensen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Assumed stress hybrid methods are known to improve the performance of standard displacement-based finite elements and are widely used in computational mechanics. The methods are based on the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle for the displacement and stress variables. This work analyzes two existing 4-node hybrid stress quadrilateral elements due to Pian and Sumihara [Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng, 1984] and due to Xie and Zhou [Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng, 2004], which behave robustly in numerical benchmark tests. For the finite elements, the isoparametric bilinear interpolation is used for the displacement approximation, while different piecewise-independent 5-parameter modes are employed for the stress approximation. We show that the two schemes are free from Poisson-locking, in the sense that the error bound in the a priori estimate is independent of the relevant Lame constant $\\lambda$. We also establish the equivalence of the methods to two assumed enhanced strain schemes. Finally, we derive reliable ...

  15. Magnetic coupling constants of self-assembled Cu(II) [3×3] grids: alternative spin model from theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Carmen J; Ben Amor, Nadia; Maynau, Daniel

    2014-07-14

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic Cu(II) [3×3] grid. A two-step strategy, combining calculations on the whole grid and on binuclear fragments, has been employed to evaluate all the magnetic interactions in the grid. The calculations confirm an S = 7/2 ground state, which is in accordance with the magnetisation versus field curve and the thermal dependence of the magnetic moment data. Only the first-neighbour coupling terms present non-negligible amplitudes, all of them in agreement with the structure and arrangement of the Cu 3d magnetic orbitals. The results indicate that the dominant interaction in the system is the antiferromagnetic coupling between the ring and the central Cu sites (J3 = J4 ≈ -31 cm(-1)). In the ring two different interactions can be distinguished, J1 = 4.6 cm(-1) and J2 = -0.1 cm(-1), in contrast to the single J model employed in the magnetic data fit. The calculated J values have been used to determine the energy level distribution of the Heisenberg magnetic states. The effective magnetic moment versus temperature plot resulting from this ab initio energy profile is in good agreement with the experimental curve and the fitting obtained with the simplified spin model, despite the differences between these two spin models. This study underlines the role that the theoretical evaluations of the coupling constants can play on the rationalisation of the magnetic properties of these complex polynuclear systems.

  16. Beyond an assumed mother–child symbiosis in nutritional guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    of the child and the interest and focus of the mother. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore mothers’ concerns and feeding practices in the context of everyday life. A total of 45 mothers with children either seven months old or 13 months old participated. The results showed that the need to find......Researchers question the implications of the way in which “motherhood” is constructed in public health discourse. Current nutritional guidelines for Danish parents of young children are part of this discourse. They are shaped by an assumed symbiotic relationship between the nutritional needs...... practical solutions for the whole family in a busy everyday life, to socialise the child into the family and society at large, and to create personal relief from the strain small children put on time and energy all served as socially acceptable reasons for knowingly departing from nutritional...

  17. Tracing of the 1st IEC Secretariat Assumed by China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Introduction The IEC central office informed in 7/543/AC that the secretariat of TC 7 would be taken over by the Chinese National Committee on January 10, 2003 and affirmed subsequently in 7/544/AC that the secretariat of TC 7 has been taken over by the Chinese National Committee which appointing secretary in Shanghai Electric Cable Research Institute as no objection has been raised by the Standardization Management Board members. It's the first IEC secretariat that assumed by China, with great significance, just as commented by the media that the commitment indicate undoubtedly China is to play a much more active and important role in the world especially after its entry into world trade organization as well as the trend of global economic integration.

  18. A quasi-QSPR modelling for the photocatalytic decolourization rate constants and cellular viability (CV%) of nanoparticles by CORAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-01-01

    Most quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) predict various endpoints related to organic compounds. Gradually, the variety of organic compounds has been extended to inorganic, organometallic compounds and polymers. However, the so-called molecular descriptors cannot be defined for super-complex substances such as different nanomaterials and peptides, since there is no simple and clear representation of their molecular structure. Some possible ways to define approaches for a predictive model in the case of super-complex substances are discussed. The basic idea of the approach is to change the traditionally used paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of the molecular structure' with another paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of available eclectic information'. The eclectic data can be (i) conditions of a synthesis, (ii) technological attributes, (iii) size of nanoparticles, (iv) concentration, (v) attributes related to cell membranes, and so on. Two examples of quasi-QSPR/QSAR analyses are presented and discussed. These are (i) photocatalytic decolourization rate constants (DRC) (10(-5)/s) of different nanopowders; and (ii) the cellular viability under the effect of nano-SiO(2).

  19. Bianchi type-I magnetized cosmological models for the Einstein-Boltzmann equation with the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayissi, Raoul Domingo, E-mail: raoulayissi@yahoo.fr; Noutchegueme, Norbert, E-mail: nnoutch@yahoo.fr [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2015-01-15

    Global solutions regular for the Einstein-Boltzmann equation on a magnetized Bianchi type-I cosmological model with the cosmological constant are investigated. We suppose that the metric is locally rotationally symmetric. The Einstein-Boltzmann equation has been already considered by some authors. But, in general Bancel and Choquet-Bruhat [Ann. Henri Poincaré XVIII(3), 263 (1973); Commun. Math. Phys. 33, 83 (1973)], they proved only the local existence, and in the case of the nonrelativistic Boltzmann equation. Mucha [Global existence of solutions of the Einstein-Boltzmann equation in the spatially homogeneous case. Evolution equation, existence, regularity and singularities (Banach Center Publications, Institute of Mathematics, Polish Academy of Science, 2000), Vol. 52] obtained a global existence result, for the relativistic Boltzmann equation coupled with the Einstein equations and using the Yosida operator, but confusing unfortunately with the nonrelativistic case. Noutchegueme and Dongho [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 2979 (2006)] and Noutchegueme, Dongho, and Takou [Gen. Relativ. Gravitation 37, 2047 (2005)], have obtained a global solution in time, but still using the Yosida operator and considering only the uncharged case. Noutchegueme and Ayissi [Adv. Stud. Theor. Phys. 4, 855 (2010)] also proved a global existence of solutions to the Maxwell-Boltzmann system using the characteristic method. In this paper, we obtain using a method totally different from those used in the works of Noutchegueme and Dongho [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 2979 (2006)], Noutchegueme, Dongho, and Takou [Gen. Relativ. Gravitation 37, 2047 (2005)], Noutchegueme and Ayissi [Adv. Stud. Theor. Phys. 4, 855 (2010)], and Mucha [Global existence of solutions of the Einstein-Boltzmann equation in the spatially homogeneous case. Evolution equation, existence, regularity and singularities (Banach Center Publications, Institute of Mathematics, Polish Academy of Science, 2000), Vol. 52] the

  20. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model for small and for large values of the Yukawa coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhold, P

    2007-01-01

    We consider a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model based on the Neuberger overlap operator. As a first step towards the eventual determination of Higgs mass bounds we study the phase diagram of the model analytically in the large Nf-limit. We present an expression for the effective potential at tree-level in the regime of small Yukawa and quartic coupling constants and determine the order of the phase transitions. In the case of strong Yukawa couplings the model effectively becomes an O(4)-symmetric non-linear sigma-model for all values of the quartic coupling constant. This leads to the existence of a symmetric phase also in the regime of large values of the Yukawa coupling constant. On finite and small lattices, however, strong finite volume effects prevent the expectation value of the Higgs field from vanishing thus obscuring the existence of the symmetric phase at strong Yukawa couplings.

  1. Requirement of Working Stably of Compound Negative Binomial Risk Model with Constant Interest rate%常利率复合负二项风险模型下稳定经营的必要条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔克林; 高渊; 张宁

    2015-01-01

    Assume that insurance companies began to hold capital to u,with constane δ is accumulation of interest rates,and policy number always obey hegative binomia process,manage compensate total number follows poisson process. we give the compound negative binomial risk model with constant interest rate and the requirement of insur-ance company working stably.%假设保险公司刚开始持有的资本为u,以常数δ为利率积累,并且保单总份数服从负二项过程,理赔总次数服从Poisson过程,给出常利率复合负二项风险模型以及稳定经营的必要条件。

  2. Quantum-dot size and thin-film dielectric constant: precision measurement and disparity with simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinolds, Darcy D W; Brown, Patrick R; Harris, Daniel K; Bulovic, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2015-01-14

    We study the dielectric constant of lead sulfide quantum dot (QD) films as a function of the volume fraction of QDs by varying the QD size and keeping the ligand constant. We create a reliable QD sizing curve using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), thin-film SAXS to extract a pair-distribution function for QD spacing, and a stacked-capacitor geometry to measure the capacitance of the thin film. Our data support a reduced dielectric constant in nanoparticles.

  3. Modeling and monitoring cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes in a wastewater treatment plant using constant water level sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, De-Gao, E-mail: degaowang@dlmu.edu.cn; Du, Juan; Pei, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Guo, Mingxing

    2015-04-15

    The fate of cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) was evaluated in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using constant water level sequencing batch reactors from Dalian, China. Influent, effluent, and sewage sludge samples were collected for seven consecutive days. The mean concentrations of cyclic VMSs (cVMSs) in influent and effluent samples are 1.05 μg L{sup −1} and 0.343 μg L{sup −1}; the total removal efficiency of VMSs is > 60%. Linear VMS (lVMS) concentration is under the quantification limitation in aquatic samples but is found in sludge samples with a value of 90 μg kg{sup −1}. High solid-water partition coefficients result in high VMS concentrations in sludge with the mean value of 5030 μg kg{sup −1}. No significant differences of the daily mass flows are found when comparing the concentration during the weekend and during working days. The estimated mass load of total cVMSs is 194 mg d{sup −1} 1000 inhabitants{sup −1} derived for the population. A mass balance model of the WWTP was developed and derived to simulate the fate of cVMSs. The removal by sorption on sludge increases, and the volatilization decreases with increasing hydrophobicity and decreasing volatility for cVMSs. Sensitivity analysis shows that the total suspended solid concentration in the effluent, mixed liquor suspended solid concentration, the sewage sludge flow rate, and the influent flow rate are the most influential parameters on the mass distribution of cVMSs in this WWTP. - Highlights: • A mass balance model for siloxanes was developed in sequencing batch reactor. • Total suspended solid in effluent has the most influence on removal efficiency. • Enhancement of suspended solid removal reduces the release to aquatic environment.

  4. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C.; Foster, Kenneth R.

    2017-03-01

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetics. The temperature elevation is then calculated by solving the bioheat transfer equation. The computational results show that the thermal time constants (defined as the time required to reach 63% of the steady state temperature elevation) decrease with the elevation in radiation frequency. For frequencies higher than 4 GHz, the computed thermal time constants are smaller than the averaging time prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines, but larger than the averaging time in the IEEE standard. Significant differences between the different head models are observed at frequencies higher than 10 GHz, which is attributable to the heat diffusion from the power absorbed in the pinna. The time constants for beam exposures become large with the increase in beam diameter. The thermal time constant in the brain is larger than that in the superficial tissues at high frequencies, because the brain temperature elevation is caused by the heat conduction of energy absorbed in the superficial tissue. The thermal time constant is minimized with an ideal beam with a minimum investigated diameter of 10 mm this minimal time constant is approximately 30 s and is almost independent of the radiation frequency, which is supported by analytic methods. In addition, the relation between the time constant, as defined in this paper, and ‘averaging time’ as it appears in the exposure limits is discussed, especially for short intense pulses. Similar to the laser guidelines, provisions should be included in the limits to limit the fluence for such pulses.

  5. Measurement of Setschenow constants for six hydrophobic compounds in simulated brines and use in predictive modeling for oil and gas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2016-02-01

    Treatment and reuse of brines, produced from energy extraction activities, requires aqueous solubility data for organic compounds in saline solutions. The presence of salts decreases the aqueous solubility of organic compounds (i.e. salting-out effect) and can be modeled using the Setschenow Equation, the validity of which has not been assessed in high salt concentrations. In this study, we used solid-phase microextraction to determine Setschenow constants for selected organic compounds in aqueous solutions up to 2-5 M NaCl, 1.5-2 M CaCl2, and in Na-Ca binary electrolyte solutions to assess additivity of the constants. These compounds exhibited log-linear behavior up to these high NaCl concentrations. Log-linear decreases in solubility with increasing salt concentration were observed up to 1.5-2 M CaCl2 for all compounds, and added to a sparse database of CaCl2 Setschenow constants. Setschenow constants were additive in binary electrolyte mixtures. New models to predict CaCl2 and KCl Setschenow constants from NaCl Setschenow constants were developed, which successfully predicted the solubility of the compounds measured in this study. Overall, data show that the Setschenow Equation is valid for a wide range of salinity conditions typically found in energy-related technologies.

  6. Modeling and monitoring cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes in a wastewater treatment plant using constant water level sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Gao; Du, Juan; Pei, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Guo, Mingxing

    2015-04-15

    The fate of cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) was evaluated in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using constant water level sequencing batch reactors from Dalian, China. Influent, effluent, and sewage sludge samples were collected for seven consecutive days. The mean concentrations of cyclic VMSs (cVMSs) in influent and effluent samples are 1.05 μg L(-1) and 0.343 μg L(-1); the total removal efficiency of VMSs is >60%. Linear VMS (lVMS) concentration is under the quantification limitation in aquatic samples but is found in sludge samples with a value of 90 μg kg(-1). High solid-water partition coefficients result in high VMS concentrations in sludge with the mean value of 5030 μg kg(-1). No significant differences of the daily mass flows are found when comparing the concentration during the weekend and during working days. The estimated mass load of total cVMSs is 194 mg d(-1)1000 inhabitants(-1) derived for the population. A mass balance model of the WWTP was developed and derived to simulate the fate of cVMSs. The removal by sorption on sludge increases, and the volatilization decreases with increasing hydrophobicity and decreasing volatility for cVMSs. Sensitivity analysis shows that the total suspended solid concentration in the effluent, mixed liquor suspended solid concentration, the sewage sludge flow rate, and the influent flow rate are the most influential parameters on the mass distribution of cVMSs in this WWTP.

  7. Bench and mathematical modeling of the effects of breathing a helium/oxygen mixture on expiratory time constants in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expiratory time constants are used to quantify emptying of the lung as a whole, and emptying of individual lung compartments. Breathing low-density helium/oxygen mixtures may modify regional time constants so as to redistribute ventilation, potentially reducing gas trapping and hyperinflation for patients with obstructive lung disease. In the present work, bench and mathematical models of the lung were used to study the influence of heterogeneous patterns of obstruction on compartmental and whole-lung time constants. Methods A two-compartment mechanical test lung was used with the resistance in one compartment held constant, and a series of increasing resistances placed in the opposite compartment. Measurements were made over a range of lung compliances during ventilation with air or with a 78/22% mixture of helium/oxygen. The resistance imposed by the breathing circuit was assessed for both gases. Experimental results were compared with predictions of a mathematical model applied to the test lung and breathing circuit. In addition, compartmental and whole-lung time constants were compared with those reported by the ventilator. Results Time constants were greater for larger minute ventilation, and were reduced by substituting helium/oxygen in place of air. Notably, where time constants were long due to high lung compliance (i.e. low elasticity, helium/oxygen improved expiratory flow even for a low level of resistance representative of healthy, adult airways. In such circumstances, the resistance imposed by the external breathing circuit was significant. Mathematical predictions were in agreement with experimental results. Time constants reported by the ventilator were well-correlated with those determined for the whole-lung and for the low-resistance compartment, but poorly correlated with time constants determined for the high-resistance compartment. Conclusions It was concluded that breathing a low-density gas mixture, such

  8. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  9. Modelo de simulação de secagem de produtos agrícolas usando entalpia do ar constante Drying simulation model of agricultural products with constant air enthalpy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir A. Dalpasquale

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A simulação matemática de secagem de produtos agrícolas teve seu auge nas décadas de 1960 e 1970, com destaque para os modelos de Thompson e de Michigan. Entretanto, nenhum deles abordou a condição de entalpia constante do ar de secagem durante o processo, limitando-se a conferir se a umidade relativa do ar não excedia 100%. Estudos conduzidos na Universidade Estadual de Maringá permitiram concluir que os balanços de energia e de massa de um processo de secagem estão incluídos no uso da mesma entalpia do ar durante a secagem, ajustando-se, com ela, a umidade absoluta do ar em função da umidade removida do produto. Com essa nova razão da mistura do ar e com a entalpia constante, avalia-se a nova temperatura do ar de secagem na saída da camada e, com essas duas propriedades psicrométricas, a umidade relativa do ar. Se ela atingir a condição saturada, encerra-se o processo de secagem naquele tempo, a partir daquela posição. Os resultados obtidos por simulação foram conferidos com resultados experimentais de secagem de milho em camadas fixas, com elevada concordância entre eles.Mathematical drying simulation of agricultural products reached its highest point in the decades of 1960 and 1970, with prominence for MSU and Thompson's models. However, none of them used the constant enthalpy condition of drying air during the process, being limited to checking if the relative humidity of the air did not exceed 100%. Studies conducted in the State University of Maringá allowed to conclude that energy and mass balances of a drying process are included when using the same air enthalpy in such process. The absolute humidity of the air is adjusted as a function of the removed humidity of the product. With that new absolute humidity of the air and with the constant enthalpy, the new temperature of the drying air is evaluated in the exit of the layer and, with those two psychrometric properties, the relative humidity of the air. If it

  10. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  11. An innovative method to measure the peripheral arterial elasticity: spring constant modeling based on the arterial pressure wave with radial vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ching-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we propose an innovative method for the direct measurement of the peripheral artery elasticity using a spring constant model, based on the arterial pressure wave equation, vibrating in a radial direction. By means of the boundary condition of the pressure wave equation at the maximum peak, we can derive the spring constant used for evaluating peripheral arterial elasticity. The calculated spring constants of six typical subjects show a coincidence with their proper arterial elasticities. Furthermore, the comparison between the spring constant method and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was investigated in 70 subjects (21-64 years, 47 normotensives and 23 hypertensives). The results reveal a significant negative correlation for the spring constant vs. PWV (correlation coefficient = -0.663, p constant method to assess the arterial elasticity is carefully verified, and it is shown to be effective as well as fast. This method should be useful for healthcare, not only in improving clinical diagnosis of arterial stiffness but also in screening subjects for early evidence of cardio-vascular diseases and in monitoring responses to therapy in the future.

  12. Modeling the downward transport of {sup 210}Pb in Peatlands: Initial Penetration‐Constant Rate of Supply (IP-CRS) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olid, Carolina, E-mail: olid.carolina@gmail.com [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, SE-90187, Umeå (Sweden); Diego, David [Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, NO-5020 Bergen (Norway); Garcia-Orellana, Jordi [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cortizas, Antonio Martínez [Departamento de Edafoloxía e Química Agrícola, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Klaminder, Jonatan [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, SE-90187, Umeå (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    The vertical distribution of {sup 210}Pb is commonly used to date peat deposits accumulated over the last 100–150 years. However, several studies have questioned this method because of an apparent post-depositional mobility of {sup 210}Pb within some peat profiles. In this study, we introduce the Initial Penetration–Constant Rate of Supply (IP-CRS) model for calculating ages derived from {sup 210}Pb profiles that are altered by an initial migration of the radionuclide. This new, two-phased, model describes the distribution of atmospheric-derived {sup 210}Pb ({sup 210}Pb{sub xs}) in peat taking into account both incorporation of {sup 210}Pb into the accumulating peat matrix as well as an initial flushing of {sup 210}Pb through the uppermost peat layers. The validity of the IP-CRS model is tested in four anomalous {sup 210}Pb peat records that showed some deviations from the typical exponential decay profile not explained by variations in peat accumulation rates. Unlike the most commonly used {sup 210}Pb-dating model (Constant Rate of Supply (CRS)), the IP-CRS model estimates peat accumulation rates consistent with typical growth rates for peatlands from the same areas. Confidence in the IP-CRS chronology is also provided by the good agreement with independent chronological markers (i.e. {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs). Our results showed that the IP-CRS can provide chronologies from peat records where {sup 210}Pb mobility is evident, being a valuable tool for studies reconstructing past environmental changes using peat archives during the Anthropocene. - Highlights: • Accurate age dating of peat and sediment cores is critical for evaluating change. • A new {sup 210}Pb dating model that includes vertical transport of {sup 210}Pb was developed. • The IP-CRS model provided consistent peat accumulation rates. • The IP-CRS ages were consistent with independent chronological markers. • The IP-CRS model derives peat ages where downward {sup 210}Pb transport is

  13. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  14. On the smallness of the cosmological constant in SUGRA models with Planck scale SUSY breaking and degenerate vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Froggatt, C; Nielsen, H B; Thomas, A

    2015-01-01

    We argue that the exact degeneracy of vacua in N=1 supergravity can shed light on the smallness of the cosmological constant. The presence of such vacua, which are degenerate to very high accuracy, may also result in small values of the quartic Higgs coupling and its beta function at the Planck scale in the phase in which we live.

  15. Trajectory Simulation of Meteors Assuming Mass Loss and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Saunders, David A

    2015-01-01

    Program used to simulate atmospheric flight trajectories of entry capsules [1] Includes models of atmospheres of different planetary destinations - Earth, Mars, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Titan, ... Solves 3-­-degrees of freedom (3DoF) equations for a single body treated as a point mass. Also supports 6-DoF trajectory simula4on and Monte Carlo analyses. Uses Fehlberg-­-Runge-­-Kuna (4th-5th order) time integraion with automaic step size control. Includes rotating spheroidal planet with gravitational field having a J2 harmonic. Includes a variety of engineering aerodynamic and heat flux models. Capable of specifying events - heatshield jettison, parachute deployment, etc. - at predefined altitudes or Mach number. Has material thermal response models of typical aerospace materials integrated.

  16. Spiral growth and dissolution models with rate constants related to the frequency of partial dehydration of cations and to the surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, J.; Christoffersen, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A rate expression is developed for spiral dissolution, similar to the Nielsen expression for spiral growth, with the rate constant expressed in terms of frequencies related to dehydration frequencies. These models for spiral growth and dissolution are applied to growth and dissolution of brushite, DCPD.

  17. Calculation of the Dielectric Constant as a Function of Temperature Close to the Smectic A-Smectic B Transition in B5 Using the Mean Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Yurtseven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the static dielectric constant ( is calculated close to the smectic A-smectic B ( transition ( = 71.3°C for the liquid crystal compound B5. By expanding the free energy in terms of the order parameter in the mean field theory, the expression for the dielectric susceptibility (dielectric constant is derived and is fitted to the experimental data for which was obtained at the field strengths of 0 and 67 kV/cm from literature. Coefficients in the free energy expansion are determined from our fit for the transition of B5. Our results show that the observed behaviour of the dielectric constant close to the transition in B5 can be described satisfactorily by our mean field model.

  18. Inferring word meanings by assuming that speakers are informative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael C; Goodman, Noah D

    2014-12-01

    Language comprehension is more than a process of decoding the literal meaning of a speaker's utterance. Instead, by making the assumption that speakers choose their words to be informative in context, listeners routinely make pragmatic inferences that go beyond the linguistic data. If language learners make these same assumptions, they should be able to infer word meanings in otherwise ambiguous situations. We use probabilistic tools to formalize these kinds of informativeness inferences-extending a model of pragmatic language comprehension to the acquisition setting-and present four experiments whose data suggest that preschool children can use informativeness to infer word meanings and that adult judgments track quantitatively with informativeness.

  19. The Einstein-Vlasov system with cosmological constant in a surface-symmetric cosmological model local existence and continuation criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tchapnda, S B; Tchapnda, Sophonie Blaise; Noutchegueme, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    The Einstein-Vlasov system describes a self-gravitating, collisionless gas within the framework of general relativity. We investigate the initial value problem in a cosmological setting with surface symmetry and a non-zero cosmological constant and prove local existence and continuation criteria in both time directions. The continuation criterion says that as long as the maximum velocity remains bounded and the lapse function remains bounded then the solution can be continued. This applies to either time direction.

  20. The thermal coupling constant and the gap equation in the {lambda}phi (cursive,open) Greek{sub D}{sup 4} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananos, G.N.J. E-mail: gino@lafex.cbpf.br; Malbouisson, A.P.C. E-mail: adolfo@lafex.cbpf.bf; Svaiter, N.F. E-mail: nfuxsvai@lafex.cbpf.br

    1999-05-10

    By the concurrent use of two different resummation methods, the composite operator formalism and the Dyson-Schwinger equation, we re-examine the behavior at finite temperature of the O(N)-symmetric{lambda}phi (cursive,open) Greek{sup 4} model in a generic D-dimensional Euclidean space. In the cases D = 3 and D = 4, an analysis of the thermal behavior of the renormalized squared mass and coupling constant are carried out for all temperatures. It results that the thermal renormalized squared mass is positive and increases monotonically with the temperature. The behavior of the thermal coupling constant is quite different in odd- or even-dimensional space. In D = 3, the thermal coupling constant decreases up to a minimum value different from zero and then grows monotonically as the temperature increases. In the case D = 4, it is found that the thermal renormalized coupling constant tends, in the high-temperature limit, to a constant asymptotic value. Also for general D-dimensional Euclidean space, we are able to obtain a formula for the critical temperature of the second-order phase transition. This formula agrees with previous known values at D = 3 and D = 4.

  1. The thermal coupling constant and the gap equation in the lambda phi (cursive,open) Greek sub D sup 4 model

    CERN Document Server

    Ananos, G N J; Svaiter, N F

    1999-01-01

    By the concurrent use of two different resummation methods, the composite operator formalism and the Dyson-Schwinger equation, we re-examine the behavior at finite temperature of the O(N)-symmetric lambda phi (cursive,open) Greek sup 4 model in a generic D-dimensional Euclidean space. In the cases D = 3 and D = 4, an analysis of the thermal behavior of the renormalized squared mass and coupling constant are carried out for all temperatures. It results that the thermal renormalized squared mass is positive and increases monotonically with the temperature. The behavior of the thermal coupling constant is quite different in odd- or even-dimensional space. In D = 3, the thermal coupling constant decreases up to a minimum value different from zero and then grows monotonically as the temperature increases. In the case D = 4, it is found that the thermal renormalized coupling constant tends, in the high-temperature limit, to a constant asymptotic value. Also for general D-dimensional Euclidean space, we are able to ...

  2. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Storer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method. The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and mid-latitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak. The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.

  3. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  4. Assuming too much? Participatory water resource governance in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that participation in natural resource management, which is often coupled with moves for more local ownership of decision making, is based on three sets of assumptions: about the role of the state, the universality of application of such approaches and the transformatory potential of institutional reform. The validity of these assumptions requires investigation in view of the rapid institutionalisation and scaling-up of participatory approaches, particularly in developing country contexts. Post-apartheid South Africa is widely recognised as a pioneer of participatory and devolutionary approaches, particularly in the field of water resources. It is 12 years since the promulgation of the forward-thinking 1998 National Water Act, and thus an opportune moment to reflect on South Africa's experiences of participatory governance. Drawing on empirical research covering the establishment of the first Catchment Management Agency, and the transformation of existing Irrigation Boards into more inclusive Water User Associations in the Inkomati Water Management Area, it emerges that there may be fundamental weaknesses in the participatory model and underlying assumptions, and indeed such approaches may actually reinforce inequitable outcomes: the legacy of long-established institutional frameworks and powerful actors therein continues to exert influence in post-apartheid South Africa, and has the potential to subvert the democratic and redistributive potential of the water reforms. It is argued that a reassessment of the role of the state is necessary: where there is extreme heterogeneity in challenging catchments more, rather than less, state intervention may be required to uphold the interests of marginalised groups and effect redistribution.

  5. Acidity constants and its dependence on solvent selection from first-principles calculations using cluster-continuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hieu H.; Taylor, Christopher D.; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-08-01

    Dissociation constants of selected carboxylic acids in aqueous and organic solvents were calculated at quantum chemical level. We considered cases in which trace quantities of water may be present, as well as cases in which water was entirely absent. In the latter cases, alternative proton acceptors need to be considered. For aqueous solvent, short-range solvation effects are considered by adding explicit water molecules as the first solvent shell. In the absence of water, corresponding organic solvents are used directly as the proton acceptors and the resulted pKa are quite comparable to those obtained from previous case of aqueous solvent.

  6. Universal solvation model based on solute electron density and on a continuum model of the solvent defined by the bulk dielectric constant and atomic surface tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-07

    We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the "D" stands for "density" to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. "Continuum" denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute-solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where "universal" denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for electrostatics in terms of the integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). The cavities for the bulk electrostatic calculation are defined by superpositions of nuclear-centered spheres. The second component is called the cavity-dispersion-solvent-structure term and is the contribution arising from short-range interactions between the solute and solvent molecules in the first solvation shell. This contribution is a sum of terms that are proportional (with geometry-dependent proportionality constants called atomic surface tensions) to the solvent-accessible surface areas of the individual atoms of the solute. The SMD model has been parametrized with a training set of 2821 solvation data including 112 aqueous ionic solvation free energies, 220 solvation free energies for 166 ions in acetonitrile, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide, 2346 solvation free energies for 318 neutral solutes in 91 solvents (90 nonaqueous

  7. Cosmological constant and curved 5D geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, M

    2002-01-01

    We study the value of cosmological constant in de Sitter brane embedded in five dimensions with positive, vanishing and negative bulk cosmological constant. In the case of negative bulk cosmological constant, we show that not zero but tiny four-dimensional cosmological constant can be realized by tiny deviation from bulk curvature of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  8. The melatonin action on stromal stem cells within pericryptal area in colon cancer model under constant light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannen, Vinicius; Marini, Tassiana; Zanette, Dalila L; Frajacomo, Fernando T; Silva, Gyl E B; Silva, Wilson A; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2011-02-25

    Constant light (LL) is associated with high incidence of colon cancer. MLT supplementation was related to the significant control of preneoplastic patterns. We sought to analyze preneoplastic patterns in colon tissue from animals exposed to LL environment (14 days; 300 lx), MLT-supplementation (10mg/kg/day) and DMH-treatment (1,2 dimethylhydrazine; 125 mg/kg). Rodents were sacrificed and MLT serum levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicated that LL induced ACF development (p colonic stroma (PCCS). However, MLT-supplementation controlled the development of dysplastic ACF (p < 0.001) diminishing preneoplastic patterns into PCCS as CD133 and CD68 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). These events were relative to decreased PCNA-Li index and higher expression of caspase-3 protein. Thus, MLT showed a great potential to control the preneoplastic patterns induced by LL.

  9. The melatonin action on stromal stem cells within pericryptal area in colon cancer model under constant light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannen, Vinicius, E-mail: kannen71@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Marini, Tassiana [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Zanette, Dalila L. [National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Frajacomo, Fernando T.; Silva, Gyl E.B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil); Silva, Wilson A. [Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, Center for Cell Therapy and Regional Blood Center, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garcia, Sergio B. [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto - Sao Paulo 14049-900 (Brazil)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated melatonin against the malignant effects of constant light. {yields} Melatonin supplementation increased its serum levels and its receptor expression. {yields} Melatonin decreased cancer stem cells and dysplastic injuries in colon tissue. {yields} Melatonin controlled proliferative process and apoptosis induction. -- Abstract: Constant light (LL) is associated with high incidence of colon cancer. MLT supplementation was related to the significant control of preneoplastic patterns. We sought to analyze preneoplastic patterns in colon tissue from animals exposed to LL environment (14 days; 300 lx), MLT-supplementation (10 mg/kg/day) and DMH-treatment (1,2 dimethylhydrazine; 125 mg/kg). Rodents were sacrificed and MLT serum levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicated that LL induced ACF development (p < 0.001) with a great potential to increase the number of CD133(+) and CD68(+) cells (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). LL also increased the proliferative process (PCNA-Li; p < 0.001) as well as decreased caspase-3 protein (p < 0.001), related to higher COX-2 protein expression (p < 0.001) within pericryptal colonic stroma (PCCS). However, MLT-supplementation controlled the development of dysplastic ACF (p < 0.001) diminishing preneoplastic patterns into PCCS as CD133 and CD68 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). These events were relative to decreased PCNA-Li index and higher expression of caspase-3 protein. Thus, MLT showed a great potential to control the preneoplastic patterns induced by LL.

  10. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification

    KAUST Repository

    Sudhakaran, Sairam

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (kOH and kO3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O3 and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, kOH and kO3, were predicted based on target compound properties. The kO3 and kOH values ranged from 5 * 10-4 to 105 M-1s-1 and 0.04 to 18 * (109) M-1 s-1, respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O3 and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r2 (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. An analytical model for flow induced by a constant-head pumping in a leaky unconfined aquifer system with considering unsaturated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Li, Ming-Hsu; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2017-09-01

    A new mathematical model is developed to describe the flow in response to a constant-head pumping (or constant-head test, CHT) in a leaky unconfined aquifer system of infinite lateral extent with considering unsaturated flow. The model consists of an unsaturated zone on the top, an unconfined aquifer in the middle, and a second aquifer (aquitard) at the bottom. The unsaturated flow is described by Richard's equation, and the flows in unconfined aquifer and second layer are governed by the groundwater flow equation. The well partially penetrates the unconfined aquifer with a constant head in the well due to CHT. The governing equations of the model are linearized by the perturbation method and Gardner's exponential model is adopted to describe the soil retention curves. The solution of the model for drawdown distribution is obtained by applying the methods of Laplace transform and Weber transform. Then the solution for the wellbore flowrate is derived from the drawdown solution with Darcy's law. The issue of the equivalence of normalized drawdown predicted by the present solution for constant-head pumping and Tartakovsky and Neuman's (2007) solution for constant-rate pumping is discussed. On the basis of the wellbore flowrate solution, the results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that the wellbore flowrate is very sensitive to the changes in the radial hydraulic conductivity and the thickness of the saturated zone. Moreover, the results predicted from the present wellbore flowrate solution indicate that this new solution can reduce to Chang's et al. (2010a) solution for homogenous aquifers when the dimensionless unsaturated exponent approaches 100. The unsaturated zone can be considered as infinite extent in the vertical direction if the thickness ratio of the unsaturated zone to the unconfined aquifer is equal to or greater than one. As for the leakage effect, it can be ignored when the vertical hydraulic conductivity ratio (i.e., the vertical hydraulic

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Predictions for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Mixing with Constant and Complex Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Two-, three- and four-equation, single-velocity, multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate or lengthscale, are used to simulate At = 0 . 5 Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing with constant and complex accelerations. The constant acceleration case is inspired by the Cabot and Cook (2006) DNS, and the complex acceleration cases are inspired by the unstable/stable and unstable/neutral cases simulated using DNS (Livescu, Wei & Petersen 2011) and the unstable/stable/unstable case simulated using ILES (Ramaprabhu, Karkhanis & Lawrie 2013). The four-equation models couple equations for the mass flux a and negative density-specific volume correlation b to the K- ɛ or K- L equations, while the three-equation models use a two-fluid algebraic closure for b. The lengthscale-based models are also applied with no buoyancy production in the L equation to explore the consequences of neglecting this term. Predicted mixing widths, turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these models to identify similarities and differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion physics represented by the closures used in these models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. An initial abstraction and constant loss model, and methods for estimating unit hydrographs, peak streamflows, and flood volumes for urban basins in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow data, basin characteristics, and rainfall data from 39 streamflow-gaging stations for urban areas in and adjacent to Missouri were used by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Metropolitan Sewer District of St. Louis to develop an initial abstraction and constant loss model (a time-distributed basin-loss model) and a gamma unit hydrograph (GUH) for urban areas in Missouri. Study-specific methods to determine peak streamflow and flood volume for a given rainfall event also were developed.

  14. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  15. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed to be higher with the cyclic flow (170 as MIF) than with the equivalent

  16. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  17. Renormalization constants and beta functions for the gauge couplings of the Standard Model to three-loop order

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, Luminita N; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We compute the beta functions for the three gauge couplings of the Standard Model in the minimal subtraction scheme to three loops. We take into account contributions from all sectors of the Standard Model. The calculation is performed using both Lorenz gauge in the unbroken phase of the Standard Model and background field gauge in the spontaneously broken phase. Furthermore, we describe in detail the treatment of $\\gamma_5$ and present the automated setup which we use for the calculation of the Feynman diagrams. It starts with the generation of the Feynman rules and leads to the bare result for the Green's function of a given process.

  18. Computational modeling of the class I low-mass protostar Elias 29 applying optical constants of ices processed by high energy cosmic ray analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, W R M

    2015-01-01

    We present the study of the effects of high energy cosmic rays (CRs) over the astrophysical ices, observed toward the embedded class I protostar Elias 29, by using computational modeling and laboratory data. Its spectrum was observed with {\\it Infrared Space Observatory - ISO}, covering 2.3 - 190 $\\mu$m. The modeling employed the three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RADMC-3D (Dullemond et al. 2012) and laboratory data of bombarded ice grains by CRs analogs, and unprocessed ices (not bombarded). We are assuming that Elias 29 has a self-irradiated disk with inclination $i =$ 60$^{\\circ}$, surrounded by an envelope with bipolar cavity. The results show that absorption features toward Elias 29, are better reproduced by assuming a combination between unprocessed astrophysical ices at low temperature (H$_2$O, CO, CO$_2$) and bombarded ices (H$_2$O:CO$_2$) by high energy CRs. Evidences of the ice processing around Elias 29 can be observed by the good fitting around 5.5-8.0 $\\mu$m, by polar and apola...

  19. QED Based Calculation of the Fine Structure Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. Here, semi-classical approaches are used to obtain a more intuitive feel for what causes electrostatics, and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. These intuitive arguments lead to a possible answer to the question of the nature of charge. Virtual photons, with a reduced wavelength of λ, are assumed to interact with isolated electrons with a cross section of πλ2. This interaction is assumed to generate time-reversed virtual photons that are capable of seeking out and interacting with other electrons. This exchange of virtual photons between particles is assumed to generate and define the strength of electromagnetism. With the inclusion of near-field effects the model presented here gives a fine structure constant of ~1/137 and an anomalous magnetic moment of the electron of ~0.00116. These calculations support the possibility that near-field corrections are the key to understanding the numerical value of the dimensionless fine structure constant.

  20. Federal and state management of inland wetlands: Are states ready to assume control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glubiak, Peter G.; Nowka, Richard H.; Mitsch, William J.

    1986-03-01

    As inland wetlands face increasing pressure for development, both the federal government and individual states have begun reevaluating their respective wetland regulatory schemes. This article focuses first on the effectiveness of the past, present, and proposed federal regulations, most notably the Section 404, Dredge and Fill Permit Program, in dealing with shrinking wetland resources. The article then addresses the status of state involvement in this largely federal area, as well as state preparedness to assume primacy should federal priorities change. Finally, the subject of comprehensive legislation for wetland protection is investigated, and the article concludes with some procedural suggestions for developing a model law.

  1. Phase tuning in Michelson-Morley experiments performed in vacuum, assuming length contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In agreement with Michelson-Morley experiments performed in vacuum, we show that, assuming the existence of a fundamental aether frame and of a length contraction affecting the material bodies in the direction of the Earth absolute velocity, the light signals, travelling along the arms of the interferometer arrive in phase whatever their orientation, a result which responds to an objection opposed to the non-entrained aether theory. This result constitutes a strong argument in support of length contraction and of the existence of a model of aether non-entrained by the motion of celestial bodies.

  2. Variable Cosmological Constant as a Planck Scale Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, I L; Espana-Bonet, C; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Sola, Joan; Espana-Bonet, Cristina; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    We construct a semiclassical FLRW cosmological model assuming a running cosmological constant (CC). It turns out that the CC becomes variable at arbitrarily low energies due to the remnant quantum effects of the heaviest particles, e.g. the Planck scale physics. These effects are universal in the sense that they lead to a low-energy structure common to a large class of high-energy theories. Remarkably, the uncertainty concerning the unknown high-energy dynamics is accumulated into a single parameter \

  3. Energy balance in the solar transition region. III - Helium emission in hydrostatic, constant-abundance models with diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1993-01-01

    In our previous papers we described the mathematical formalism and the computed results for energy-balance hydrostatic models of the solar transition region. In this paper we discuss in some detail the limitations of the hydrostatic and one-dimensional assumptions used. Then we analyze the determination of helium emission when diffusion is included. We use transport coefficients estimated from kinetic theory to determine the helium departures from local ionization balance. We calculate the helium spectra for each of our models and evaluate the role of helium in the energy transport. Also, we investigate the effects of coronal illumination on the structure of the transition region and upper chromosphere, and show how coronal illumination affects various EUV lines and the He I 10830 A line. Comparing with both absolute intensities and detailed line profiles, we show that our models are consistent not only with the observed hydrogen spectra but also with the available helium spectra.

  4. Determination of the adsorption parameters in the grahame-Parsons model for mixed solutions of constant ionic strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damaskin, B.B.; Ivanova, R.V.; Palm, U.V.; Salve, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    The adsorption parameters for the specific adsorption of Cs/sup +/ at the Hg/H/sub 2/O and Bi/H/sub 2/O interface from solutions are presented and the rms differences between theory and experiment found for these parameters are shown. The experimental data for the specific adsorption of Cs/sup +/ ions at the interfaces from the solutions obey the Grahame-Parsons model only to a first, rather than rough approximation, while more sensitive criteria reveal conflicts with this model.

  5. Interacting Viscous Modified Chaplygin Gas Cosmology in Presence of Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimiyan, K.; Naji, J.

    2014-07-01

    Here, we consider interacting viscous modified Chaplygin gas in presence of cosmological constant. We assumed bulk viscosity as a function of density. We consider interaction between modified Chaplygin gas and baryonic matter. Then, the effects of viscosities on the cosmological parameters such as energy, density, Hubble expansion parameter, scale factor and deceleration parameter investigated. This model may be considered as a toy model of our universe.

  6. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  7. A model of mitochondrial creatine kinase binding to membranes: adsorption constants, essential amino acids and the effect of ionic strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey; Belousova, Lubov; Plesner, Igor

    1993-01-01

    The quantitative aspects of mitochondrial creatinekinase (mitCK) binding to mitochondrial membranes were investigated. A simple adsorption and binding model was used for data fitting, taking into account the influence of protein concentration, pH, ionic strength and substrate concentration on the...

  8. Convective heat transfer enhancement of laminar flow of latent functionally thermal fluid in a circular tube with constant heat flux: internal heat source model and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张寅平; 胡先旭; 郝磬; 王馨

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective heat transfer enhancement mechanism of latent heat functionally thermal fluid. By using the proposed internal heat source model, the influence of each factor affecting the heat transfer enhancement of laminar flow in a circular tube with constant heat flux is analyzed. The main influencing factors and the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement are clarified, and the influences of the main factors on the heat transfer enhancement are quantitatively analyzed. A modified Nusselt number for internal flow is introduced to describe more effectively the degree of heat transfer enhancement for latent functionally thermal fluid.

  9. An Inventory Model for Two Warehouses with Constant Deterioration and Quadratic Demand Rate under Inflation and Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Gothi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have analysed a two-warehouse inventory model for deteriorating items with quadratic demand with time varying holding cost. The effect of permissible delay in payments is also considered, which is usual practice in most of the businesses i.e. purchasers are allowed a period to pay back for the goods brought without paying any interest. To make it more suitable to the present environment the effect of inflation is also considered. Our objective is to minimize the average total cost per time unit under the influence of inflation. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the model and sensitivity analysis is also carried out for the parameters

  10. Field theory model giving rise to "quintessential inflation" without the cosmological constant and other fine tuning problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kaganovich, A B

    2001-01-01

    A field theory is developed based on the idea that the effective action of yet unknown fundamental theory, at energy scale below M_{p} has the form of expansion in two measures: S=\\intd^{4}x[\\Phi L_{1}+\\sqrt{-g}L_{2}] where the new measure \\Phi is defined using the third-rank antisymmetric tensor. In the new variables (Einstein frame) all equations of motion take canonical GR form and therefore models are free of the well-known "defects" that distinguish the Brans-Dicke type theories from GR. All novelty is revealed only in an unusual structure of the effective potential U(\\phi) and interactions which turns over intuitive ideas based on our experience in field theory. E.g. the greater \\Lambda we admit in L_{2}, the smaller U(\\phi) will be in the Einstein picture. Field theory models are suggested with explicitly broken global continuos symmetry which in the Einstein frame has the form \\phi\\to\\phi+const. The symmetry restoration occurs as \\phi\\to\\infty. A few models are presented where U is produced with the f...

  11. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENCE-TIME DISTRIBUTION ON A SURFACE-RENEWAL MODEL OF CONSTANT-PRESSURE CROSS-FLOW MICROFILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work examines the influence of the residence-time distribution (RTD of surface elements on a model of cross-flow microfiltration that has been proposed recently (Hasan et al., 2013. Along with the RTD from the previous work (Case 1, two other RTD functions (Cases 2 and 3 are used to develop theoretical expressions for the permeate-flux decline and cake buildup in the filter as a function of process time. The three different RTDs correspond to three different startup conditions of the filtration process. The analytical expressions for the permeate flux, each of which contains three basic parameters (membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal, are fitted to experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units. All three expressions for the permeate flux fit the experimental data fairly well with average root-mean-square errors of 4.6% for Cases 1 and 2, and 4.2% for Case 3, respectively, which points towards the constructive nature of the model - a common feature of theoretical models used in science and engineering.

  12. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henry’s Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aq...

  13. Dual electron-phonon coupling model for gigantic photoenhancement of the dielectric constant and electronic conductivity in SrTi O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y.; Wu, C. Q.; Nasu, K.

    2005-12-01

    In connection with the recent experimental discovery on photoenhancements of the electronic conductivity and the quasi-static electric susceptibility in SrTiO3 , we theoretically study a photogeneration mechanism of charged and conductive ferroelectric domains in this perovskite type quantum dielectric. The photo-generated electron, being quite itinerant in the 3d band of Ti4+ , is assumed to couple weakly but quadratically with soft-anharmonic T1u phonons in this quantum dielectric, in view of the parity of this lattice vibration. The photo-generated electron is also assumed to couple strongly but linearly with the breathing type high energy phonons. Using a tight-binding model for electrons, we will show that this dual electron-phonon coupling results in two types of polarons, a “super-para-electric (SPE) large polaron” with a quasi-globle parity violation, and an “off-center type self-trapped polaron” with only a local parity violation. This SPE large polaron is shown to be equal to a singly charged (e-) and conductive ferroelectric domain with a quasi-macroscopic range. Two of such large polarons are shown to aggregate and form an SPE large bipolaron, which is still conductive. Various other bipolaron clusters are also shown to be formed in this electron-phonon coupled system. These large polarons have a high mobility and an enhanced quasi-static dielectric susceptibility. Effect of adulteration is also discussed.

  14. On the Evidence for Cosmic Variation of the Fine Structure Constant (II): A Semi-Parametric Bayesian Model Selection Analysis of the Quasar Dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    In the second paper of this series we extend our Bayesian reanalysis of the evidence for a cosmic variation of the fine structure constant to the semi-parametric modelling regime. By adopting a mixture of Dirichlet processes prior for the unexplained errors in each instrumental subgroup of the benchmark quasar dataset we go some way towards freeing our model selection procedure from the apparent subjectivity of a fixed distributional form. Despite the infinite-dimensional domain of the error hierarchy so constructed we are able to demonstrate a recursive scheme for marginal likelihood estimation with prior-sensitivity analysis directly analogous to that presented in Paper I, thereby allowing the robustness of our posterior Bayes factors to hyper-parameter choice and model specification to be readily verified. In the course of this work we elucidate various similarities between unexplained error problems in the seemingly disparate fields of astronomy and clinical meta-analysis, and we highlight a number of sop...

  15. [Macrokinetic basis for the model of microbial growth in a limited volume under constant conditions with a single leading substrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendugov, V M; Glazunov, G P

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the macrokinetic approach and continuum and chemical/biochemical gross reaction conceptions, an equation describing the complete dynamics of microbial growth and decline as function of a variable concentration of the leading substrate was deduced. This equation allows us to distinguish quantitatively and qualitatively the stages of microbial growth and the intervals of microbial tolerance to the initial concentration of the leading substrate. Adequacy of the model was confirmed by comparison with experimental dynamics of aerobic microorganisms in the samples of groundwater collected from a region polluted with uranium.

  16. An economic order quantity model with ramp type demand rate, constant deterioration rate and unit production cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an order level inventory system for deteriorating items with demand rate as a ramp type function of time. The finite production rate is proportional to the demand rate and the deterioration rate is independent of time. The unit production cost is inversely proportional to the demand rate. The model with no shortages case is discussed considering that: (a the demand rate is stabilized after the production stopping time and (b the demand is stabilized before the production stopping time. Optimal costs are determined for two different cases.

  17. Untangling Fixed Effects and Constant Regressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.; Teulings, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fixed effects (FE) in panel data models overlap each other and prohibit the identification of the impact of "constant" regressors. Think of regressors that are constant across countries in a country-time panel with time FE. The traditional approach is to drop some FE and constant regressors by

  18. Untangling Fixed Effects and Constant Regressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.; Teulings, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fixed effects (FE) in panel data models overlap each other and prohibit the identification of the impact of "constant" regressors. Think of regressors that are constant across countries in a country-time panel with time FE. The traditional approach is to drop some FE and constant regressors by norma

  19. Accurate Three States Model for Amino Acids with Two Chemically Coupled Titrating Sites in Explicit Solvent Atomistic Constant pH Simulations and pKa Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Plamen; Donnini, Serena; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-01-10

    Correct protonation of titratable groups in biomolecules is crucial for their accurate description by molecular dynamics simulations. In the context of constant pH simulations, an additional protonation degree of freedom is introduced for each titratable site, allowing the protonation state to change dynamically with changing structure or electrostatics. Here, we extend previous approaches for an accurate description of chemically coupled titrating sites. A second reaction coordinate is used to switch between two tautomeric states of an amino acid with chemically coupled titratable sites, such as aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), and histidine (His). To this aim, we test a scheme involving three protonation states. To facilitate charge neutrality as required for periodic boundary conditions and Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) electrostatics, titration of each respective amino acid is coupled to a "water" molecule that is charged in the opposite direction. Additionally, a force field modification for Amber99sb is introduced and tested for the description of carboxyl group protonation. Our three states model is tested by titration simulations of Asp, Glu, and His, yielding a good agreement, reproducing the correct geometry of the groups in their different protonation forms. We further show that the ion concentration change due to the neutralizing "water" molecules does not significantly affect the protonation free energies of the titratable groups, suggesting that the three states model provides a good description of biomolecular dynamics at constant pH.

  20. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  1. A comparison of the Wheeler-Jonas model and the linear driving force at constant-pattern model for the prediction of the service time of activated carbon cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grévillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Vallières, Cécile

    2011-05-01

    The linear driving force (LDF) model is applied to predict the service life of activated carbon cartridges. It is compared with the currently used Wheeler-Jonas equation, which results from a model of chemical reaction kinetics. The LDF model is based on a mass transfer model of adsorbate into the particle. The two models are studied in constant-pattern conditions. The properties of the two models are first clarified and then compared. It is shown that the Wheeler-Jonas equation leads to symmetrical breakthrough curves, whereas the constant-pattern LDF equation results in asymmetrical curves. Thus, the curvature of the isotherm has no influence on the shape of the Wheeler-Jonas curve. For the LDF breakthrough curve, it is shown that the asymmetry increases with the curvature of the isotherm. Wheeler-Jonas can be used with a Dubinin-Raduskevitch isotherm, whereas the LDF model analytical solution is valid for a Langmuir isotherm only. The LDF model can be used with the DR isotherm, but a numerical solution is required. At very low concentrations where the isotherm is linear, the constant pattern no longer exists and both models fail. The Dubinin-Raduskevitch isotherm must be fitted with a Langmuir isotherm to use the analytical solution of the LDF model.

  2. 25 CFR 224.65 - How may a tribe assume additional activities under a TERA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may a tribe assume additional activities under a TERA... Procedures for Obtaining Tribal Energy Resource Agreements Tera Requirements § 224.65 How may a tribe assume additional activities under a TERA? A tribe may assume additional activities related to the development...

  3. Generalized Pickands constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debicki, K.G.

    2001-01-01

    Pickands constants play an important role in the exact asymptotic of extreme values for Gaussian stochastic processes. By the {it generalized Pickands constant ${cal H_{eta$ we mean the limit begin{eqnarray* {cal H_{eta= lim_{T to inftyfrac{ {cal H_{eta(T){T, end{eqnarray* where ${cal H_{eta(T)= Exp

  4. Photocatalytic mineralization of commercial herbicides in a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor: photoreactor modeling and reaction kinetics constants independent of radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina-Márquez, Jose; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2009-12-01

    The six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM) of the radiation field in the photoreactor, combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models, has proved to be suitable to describe the degradation of water pollutants in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactors, combining simplicity and accuracy. In this study, the above approach was extended to model the photocatalytic mineralization of a commercial herbicides mixture (2,4-D, diuron, and ametryne used in Colombian sugar cane crops) in a solar, pilot-scale, compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor using a slurry suspension of TiO(2). The ray-tracing technique was used jointly with the SFM to determine the direction of both the direct and diffuse solar photon fluxes and the spatial profile of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) in the CPC reactor. Herbicides mineralization kinetics with explicit photon absorption effects were utilized to remove the dependence of the observed rate constants from the reactor geometry and radiation field in the photoreactor. The results showed that the overall model fitted the experimental data of herbicides mineralization in the solar CPC reactor satisfactorily for both cloudy and sunny days. Using the above approach kinetic parameters independent of the radiation field in the reactor can be estimated directly from the results of experiments carried out in a solar CPC reactor. The SFM combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models proved to be a simple, but reliable model, for solar photocatalytic applications.

  5. Aseismic Slips Preceding Ruptures Assumed for Anomalous Seismicities and Crustal Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Y.

    2007-12-01

    If aseismic slips occurs on a fault or its deeper extension, both seismicity and geodetic records around the source should be affected. Such anomalies are revealed to have occurred during the last several years leading up to the October 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake of M6.8, the March 2007 Noto Peninsula Earthquake of M6.9, and the July 2007 Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake of M6.8, which occurred successively in the near-field, central Japan. Seismic zones of negative and positive increments of the Coulomb failure stress, assuming such slips, show seismic quiescence and activation, respectively, relative to the predicted rate by the ETAS model. These are further supported by transient crustal movement around the source preceding the rupture. Namely, time series of the baseline distance records between a numbers of the permanent GPS stations deviated from the predicted trend, with the trend of different slope that is basically consistent with the horizontal displacements of the stations due to the assumed slips. References Ogata, Y. (2007) Seismicity and geodetic anomalies in a wide area preceding the Niigata-Ken-Chuetsu Earthquake of October 23, 2004, central Japan, J. Geophys. Res. 112, in press.

  6. Can dark matter induce cosmological evolution of the fundamental constants of Nature?

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2015-01-01

    Traditional theories, which predict the cosmological evolution of the fundamental constants of Nature, assume that the underlying fields, which give rise to this evolution, are unnaturally light. We demonstrate that massive fields, such as dark matter, also directly produce a cosmological evolution of the fundamental constants. We consider the specific model of a scalar dark matter field $\\phi$, which interacts with Standard Model particles via quadratic couplings in $\\phi$. In this particular model, cosmological evolution of the fundamental constants arises due to changes in $\\left$ in time and space. The most stringent constraints on the physical parameters of the present model come from measurements of the neutron-proton mass difference at the time of the weak interaction freeze-out.

  7. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt;

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...

  8. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  9. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    CERN Document Server

    de Cesare, Marco; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-01-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  10. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Damos

    Full Text Available Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off, but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard

  11. Application of a Genetic Algorithm to the Optimization of Rate Constants in Chemical Kinetic Models for Combustion Simulation of HCCI Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kyu; Ito, Kazuma; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Wakisaka, Tomoyuki

    For numerically predicting the combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, practical chemical kinetic models have been explored. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied to the optimization of the rate constants in detailed chemical kinetic models, and a detailed kinetic model (592 reactions) for gasoline reference fuels with arbitrary octane number between 60 and 100 has been obtained from the detailed reaction schemes for iso-octane and n-heptane proposed by Golovitchev. The ignition timing in a gasoline HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well by zero-dimensional simulation using the CHEMKIN code with this detailed kinetic model. An original reduced reaction scheme (45 reactions) for dimethyl ether (DME) has been derived from Curran’s detailed scheme, and the combustion process in a DME HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well in a practical computation time by three-dimensional simulation using the authors’ GTT code, which has been linked to the CHEMKIN subroutines with the proposed reaction scheme and also has adopted a modified eddy dissipation combustion model.

  12. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models using the constant and variable crust-mantle density contrast – a case study of Zealandia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Bagherbandi; Robert Tenzer

    2013-04-01

    We compare three different numerical schemes of treating the Moho density contrast in gravimetric inverse problems for finding the Moho depths. The results are validated using the global crustal model CRUST2.0, which is determined based purely on seismic data. Firstly, the gravimetric recovery of the Moho depths is realized by solving Moritz’s generalization of the Vening-Meinesz inverse problem of isostasy while the constant Moho density contrast is adopted. The Pratt-Hayford isostatic model is then facilitated to estimate the variable Moho density contrast. This variable Moho density contrast is subsequently used to determine the Moho depths. Finally, the combined least-squares approach is applied to estimate jointly the Moho depths and density contract based on a priori error model. The EGM2008 global gravity model and the DTM2006.0 global topographic/bathymetric model are used to generate the isostatic gravity anomalies. The comparison of numerical results reveals that the optimal isostatic inverse scheme should take into consideration both the variable depth and density of compensation. This is achieved by applying the combined least-squares approach for a simultaneous estimation of both Moho parameters. We demonstrate that the result obtained using this method has the best agreement with the CRUST2.0 Moho depths. The numerical experiments are conducted at the regional study area of New Zealand’s continental shelf.

  13. Lens galaxies in the Illustris simulation: power-law models and the bias of the Hubble constant from time-delays

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Dandan; Schneider, Peter; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The combination of dynamical and strong gravitational lensing studies of massive galaxies shows that their total density profile in the central region (i.e. up to a few half-light radius) can be described by a power law, $\\rho(r)\\propto r^{-\\gamma}$. Therefore, such a power-law model is employed for a large number of strong-lensing applications, including the so-called time-delay technique used to infer the Hubble constant $H_0$. However, since the radial scale at which strong lensing features are formed (i.e., the Einstein radius) corresponds to the transition from the dominance of baryonic matter to dark matter, there is no known reason why galaxies should follow a power law in density. The assumption of a power law artificially breaks the mass-sheet degeneracy, a well-known invariance transformation in gravitational lensing which affects the product of Hubble constant and time delay and can therefore cause a bias in the determination of $H_0$ from the time-delay technique. In this paper, we use the Illustr...

  14. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-01

    The complex index of refraction, ñ = n + ik, has two components, n(ν) and k(ν), both a function of frequency, ν. The constant n is the real component, and k is the complex component, proportional to the absorption. In combination with other parameters, n and k can be used to model infrared spectra. However, obtaining reliable n/k values for solid materials is often difficult. In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, polished homogeneous materials free of defects; i.e. materials where the Fresnel equations are valid and there is no appreciable light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain such pure macroscopic samples, the alternative is to press the powder form of the material into a uniform disk. Recently, we have pressed such pellets from ammonium sulfate powder, and have measured the pellets' n and k values via two independent methods: 1) ellipsometry, which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) single-angle reflectance using a specular reflectance device within a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. This technique measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength over a wide spectral domain. The optical constants are determined from the single-angle measurements using the Kramers-Kronig relationship, whereas an oscillator model is used to analyze the ellipsometric measurements. The n(ν) and k(ν) values determined by the two methods were compared to previous values determined from single crystal samples from which transmittance and reflectance measurements were made and converted to n(ν) and k(ν) using a simple dispersion model. [Toon et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 81, 5733-5748, (1976)]. Comparison with the literature values shows good agreement, indicating that these are promising techniques to measure the optical constants

  15. New representation of water activity based on a single solute specific constant to parameterize the hygroscopic growth of aerosols in atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water activity is a key factor in aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth. We introduce a new representation of water activity (aw, which is empirically related to the solute molality (μs through a single solute specific constant, νi. Our approach is widely applicable, considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at high relative humidity (RH, including cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation. It also encompasses concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD. The constant νi can thus be used to parameterize the aerosol hygroscopic growth over a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. In contrast to other aw-representations, our νi factor corrects the solute molality both linearly and in exponent form x · ax. We present four representations of our basic aw-parameterization at different levels of complexity for different aw-ranges, e.g. up to 0.95, 0.98 or 1. νi is constant over the selected aw-range, and in its most comprehensive form, the parameterization describes the entire aw range (0–1. In this work we focus on single solute solutions. νi can be pre-determined with a root-finding method from our water activity representation using an aw−μs data pair, e.g. at solute saturation using RHD and solubility measurements. Our aw and supersaturation (Köhler-theory results compare well with the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH42SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. Envisaged applications include regional and global atmospheric chemistry and

  16. Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino, Yosuke; Akimoto, Keigo; Sano, Fuminori; Homma, Takashi; Oda, Junichiro; Tomoda, Toshimasa

    2016-05-24

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) might play a role as an emergency geoengineering measure, its potential risks remain uncertain, and hence there are ethical and governance issues in the face of SRM's actual deployment. By using an integrated assessment model, we first present one possible methodology for evaluating the value arising from retaining an SRM option given the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, and also examine sensitivities of the option value to SRM's side effects (damages). Reflecting the governance challenges on immediate SRM deployment, we assume scenarios in which SRM could only be deployed with a limited degree of cooling (0.5 °C) only after 2050, when climate sensitivity uncertainty is assumed to be resolved and only when the sensitivity is found to be high (T2x = 4 °C). We conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis with constraining temperature rise as the objective. The SRM option value is originated from its rapid cooling capability that would alleviate the mitigation requirement under climate sensitivity uncertainty and thereby reduce mitigation costs. According to our estimates, the option value during 1990-2049 for a +2.4 °C target (the lowest temperature target level for which there were feasible solutions in this model study) relative to preindustrial levels were in the range between $2.5 and $5.9 trillion, taking into account the maximum level of side effects shown in the existing literature. The result indicates that lower limits of the option values for temperature targets below +2.4 °C would be greater than $2.5 trillion.

  17. Causal Bulk Viscous Dissipative Isotropic Cosmologies with Variable Gravitational and Cosmological Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, M K; Harko, T

    2001-01-01

    We consider the evolution of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, filled with a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid, in the presence of variable gravitational and cosmological constants. The basic equation for the Hubble parameter, generalizing the evolution equation in the case of constant gravitational coupling and cosmological term, is derived, under the supplementary assumption that the total energy of the Universe is conserved. By assuming that the cosmological constant is proportional to the square of the Hubble parameter and a power law dependence of the bulk viscosity coefficient, temperature and relaxation time on the energy density of the cosmological fluid, two classes of exact solutions of the field equations are obtained. In the first class of solutions the Universe ends in an inflationary era, while in the second class of solutions the expansion of the Universe is non-inflationary for all times. In both models the cosmological "constant" is a decreasing function of time, while the grav...

  18. Development of Monopole Interaction Models for Ionic Compounds. Part I: Estimation of Aqueous Henry's Law Constants for Ions and Gas Phase pKa Values for Acidic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, S H; Saravanaraj, A N; Carreira, L A

    2014-02-01

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) physicochemical mechanistic models for neutral compounds have been extended to estimate Henry's Law Constant (HLC) for charged species by incorporating ionic electrostatic interaction models. Combinations of absolute aqueous pKa values, relative pKa values in the gas phase, and aqueous HLC for neutral compounds have been used to develop monopole interaction models that quantify the energy differences upon moving an ionic solute molecule from the gas phase to the liquid phase. Inter-molecular interaction energies were factored into mechanistic contributions of monopoles with polarizability, dipole, H-bonding, and resonance. The monopole ionic models were validated by a wide range of measured gas phase pKa data for 450 acidic compounds. The RMS deviation error and R(2) for the OH, SH, CO2 H, CH3 and NR2 acidic reaction centers (C) were 16.9 kcal/mol and 0.87, respectively. The calculated HLCs of ions were compared to the HLCs of 142 ions calculated by quantum mechanics. Effects of inter-molecular interaction of the monopoles with polarizability, dipole, H-bonding, and resonance on acidity of the solutes in the gas phase are discussed.

  19. Dehydrogenation Kinetics and Modeling Studies of MgH2 Enhanced by Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts Using Constant Pressure Thermodynamic Driving Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Temitope Sabitu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transition metal oxide catalysts (ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and Nb2O5 on the hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2 was investigated using constant pressure thermodynamic driving forces in which the ratio of the equilibrium plateau pressure (pm to the opposing plateau (pop was the same in all the reactions studied. The results showed Nb2O5 to be vastly superior to other catalysts for improving the thermodynamics and kinetics of MgH2. The modeling studies showed reaction at the phase boundary to be likely process controlling the reaction rates of all the systems studied.

  20. Performance Analysis of Selection Combining Over Correlated Nakagami-m Fading Channels with Constant Correlation Model for Desired Signal and Cochannel Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stefanovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A very efficient technique that reduces fading and channel interference influence is selection diversity based on the signal to interference ratio (SIR. In this pa¬per, system performances of selection combiner (SC over correlated Nakagami-m channels with constant correlation model are analyzed. Closed-form expressions are obtained for the output SIR probability density function (PDF and cumulative distribution function (CDF which is main contribution of this paper. Outage probability and the average error probability for coherent, noncoherent modulation are derived. Numerical results presented in this paper point out the effects of fading severity and cor¬relation on the system performances. The main contribu¬tion of this analysis for multibranch signal combiner is that it has been done for general case of correlated co-channel interference (CCI.

  1. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  2. Cosmological constant and Brane New World

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Odintsov, S D; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Obregon, Octavio; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2001-01-01

    The estimation of the cosmological constant in inflationary Brane New World models is done. It is shown that basically it is quite large, of the same order as in anomaly-driven inflation. However, for some fine-tuning of bulk gravitational constant and AdS scale parameter $l^2$ it may be reduced to sufficiently small value. Bulk higher derivative AdS gravity with quantum brane matter may also serve as the model where small positive cosmological constant occurs.

  3. Coasting cosmologies with time dependent cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, L O; Pimentel, Luis O.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a time dependent cosmological constant is considered in a family of scalar tensor theories. Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models for vacumm and perfect fluid matter are found. They have a linear expansion factor, the so called coasting cosmology, the gravitational "constant" decreace inversely with time; this model satisfy the Dirac hipotesis. The cosmological "constant" decreace inversely with the square of time, therefore we can have a very small value for it at present time.

  4. 76 FR 4933 - Environmental Review Procedures for Entities Assuming HUD Environmental Review Responsibilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... Responsibilities; Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...: Environmental Review Procedures for Entities Assuming HUD Environmental Responsibilities. OMB Control...

  5. The 1% concordance Hubble constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hinshaw, G., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-10-20

    The determination of the Hubble constant has been a central goal in observational astrophysics for nearly a hundred years. Extraordinary progress has occurred in recent years on two fronts: the cosmic distance ladder measurements at low redshift and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at high redshift. The CMB is used to predict the current expansion rate through a best-fit cosmological model. Complementary progress has been made with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at relatively low redshifts. While BAO data do not independently determine a Hubble constant, they are important for constraints on possible solutions and checks on cosmic consistency. A precise determination of the Hubble constant is of great value, but it is more important to compare the high and low redshift measurements to test our cosmological model. Significant tension would suggest either uncertainties not accounted for in the experimental estimates or the discovery of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology. In this paper we examine in detail the tension between the CMB, BAO, and cosmic distance ladder data sets. We find that these measurements are consistent within reasonable statistical expectations and we combine them to determine a best-fit Hubble constant of 69.6 ± 0.7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. This value is based upon WMAP9+SPT+ACT+6dFGS+BOSS/DR11+H {sub 0}/Riess; we explore alternate data combinations in the text. The combined data constrain the Hubble constant to 1%, with no compelling evidence for new physics.

  6. Variation of Fundamental Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-11-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. The spatial variation can explain a fine tuning of the fundamental constants which allows humans (and any life) to appear. We appeared in the area of the Universe where the values of the fundamental constants are consistent with our existence. We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant α, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feshbach resonance.

  7. Expanding Taylor bubble under constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voirand, Antoine; Benselama, Adel M.; Ayel, Vincent; Bertin, Yves

    2016-09-01

    Modelization of non-isothermal bubbles expanding in a capillary, as a contribution to the understanding of the physical phenomena taking place in Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs), is the scope of this paper. The liquid film problem is simplified and solved, while the thermal problem takes into account a constant heat flux density applied at the capillary tube wall, exchanging with the liquid film surrounding the bubble and also with the capillary tube outside medium. The liquid slug dynamics is solved using the Lucas-Washburn equation. Mass and energy balance on the vapor phase allow governing equations of bubble expansion to be written. The liquid and vapor phases are coupled only through the saturation temperature associated with the vapor pressure, assumed to be uniform throughout the bubble. Results show an over-heating of the vapor phase, although the particular thermal boundary condition used here always ensures an evaporative mass flux at the liquid-vapor interface. Global heat exchange is also investigated, showing a strong decreasing of the PHP performance to convey heat by phase change means for large meniscus velocities.

  8. Estimation of Stability Constants of Copper(Ⅱ) Complexes with a-Amino Acids Using Connectivity Index 3xV, Common Model for the Binary and Ternary Complexes%Estimation of Stability Constants of Copper(Ⅱ) Complexes with a-Amino Acids Using Connectivity Index 3xV, Common Model for the Binary and Ternary Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milicevic, Ante; Raos, Nenad

    2011-01-01

    Models for estimation of the first (K1), second (K2), and overall stability constant (β2) of copper(II) chelates with naturally occurring amino acids, based on the valence connectivity index of the 3rd order (3Xr), were improved by introduction of a square term and a new graph representation for mono-complexes (MLCor). The models gave SE = 0.07, 0.05--0.07 and 0.05--0.08 for lg Ki, lg K2 and lg ,62 constants, respectively; models that encompass both bi- nary and ternary bis-complexes included indicator variable. We also validated our models on the test set which in- cluded two mono-, two binary and two ternary Cu(II) chelates with a-aminobutanoic acid and a-aminopentanoic acid, not included into the calibration. The absolute differences between experimental and predicted stability con- stants were in the range of 0.01--0.16.

  9. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Algorithm for structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, F M

    2011-01-01

    In a $n$-dimensional Lie algebra, random numerical values are assigned by computer to $n(n-1)$ especially selected structure constants. An algorithm is then created, which calculates without ambiguity the remaining constants, obeying the Jacobi conditions. Differently from others, this algorithm is suitable even for poor personal computer. ------------- En $n$-dimensia algebro de Lie, hazardaj numeraj valoroj estas asignitaj per komputilo al $n(n-1)$ speciale elektitaj konstantoj de strukturo. Tiam algoritmo estas kreita, kalkulante senambigue la ceterajn konstantojn, obeante kondicxojn de Jacobi. Malsimile al aliaj algoritmoj, tiu cxi tauxgas ecx por malpotenca komputilo.

  11. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  12. The aliquot constant

    CERN Document Server

    Bosma, Wieb

    2009-01-01

    The average value of log s(n)/n taken over the first N even integers is shown to converge to a constant lambda when N tends to infinity; moreover, the value of this constant is approximated and proven to be less than 0. Here s(n) sums the divisors of n less than n. Thus the geometric mean of s(n)/n, the growth factor of the function s, in the long run tends to be less than 1. This could be interpreted as probabilistic evidence that aliquot sequences tend to remain bounded.

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Personal Epistemic Beliefs and the Beliefs They Assume Their Pupils to Have

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Karin; Schloemer, Tobias; Berding, Florian; Luttenberger, Silke; Paechter, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In their workaday life, teachers are faced with multiple complex tasks. How they carry out these tasks is also influenced by their epistemic beliefs and the beliefs they assume their pupils hold. In an empirical study, pre-service teachers' epistemic beliefs and those they assume of their pupils were investigated in the setting of teacher…

  14. Wetware, Hardware, or Software Incapacitation: Observational Methods to Determine When Autonomy Should Assume Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2014-01-01

    Control-theoretic modeling of human operator's dynamic behavior in manual control tasks has a long, rich history. There has been significant work on techniques used to identify the pilot model of a given structure. This research attempts to go beyond pilot identification based on experimental data to develop a predictor of pilot behavior. Two methods for pre-dicting pilot stick input during changing aircraft dynamics and deducing changes in pilot behavior are presented This approach may also have the capability to detect a change in a subject due to workload, engagement, etc., or the effects of changes in vehicle dynamics on the pilot. With this ability to detect changes in piloting behavior, the possibility now exists to mediate human adverse behaviors, hardware failures, and software anomalies with autono-my that may ameliorate these undesirable effects. However, appropriate timing of when au-tonomy should assume control is dependent on criticality of actions to safety, sensitivity of methods to accurately detect these adverse changes, and effects of changes in levels of auto-mation of the system as a whole.

  15. Time-Varying Fundamental Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Keith

    2003-04-01

    Recent data from quasar absorption systems can be interpreted as arising from a time variation in the fine-structure constant. However, there are numerous cosmological, astro-physical, and terrestrial bounds on any such variation. These includes bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (from the ^4He abundance), the Oklo reactor (from the resonant neutron capture cross-section of Sm), and from meteoretic lifetimes of heavy radioactive isotopes. The bounds on the variation of the fine-structure constant are significantly strengthened in models where all gauge and Yukawa couplings vary in a dependent manner, as would be expected in unified theories. Models which are consistent with all data are severly challenged when Equivalence Principle constraints are imposed.

  16. Bianchi type Ⅴ universe with bulk viscous matter and time varying gravitational and cosmological constants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prashant Singh Baghel; Jagdish Prasad Singh

    2012-01-01

    We consider spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type Ⅴ space-time with a bulk viscous fluid source,and time varying gravitational constant G and cosmological term A.The coefficient of bulk viscosity ζ is assumed to be a simple linear function of the Hubble parameter H (i.e.ζ=ζ0 + ζ1H,where ζ0 and ζ1 are constants).The Einstein field equations are solved explicitly by using a law of variation for the Hubble parameter,which yields a constant value of the deceleration parameter.Physical and kinematical parameters of the models are discussed.The models are found to be compatible with the results of astronomical observations.

  17. Compassion is a constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tricia

    2015-11-01

    Compassion is a powerful word that describes an intense feeling of commiseration and a desire to help those struck by misfortune. Most people know intuitively how and when to offer compassion to relieve another person's suffering. In health care, compassion is a constant; it cannot be rationed because emergency nurses have limited time or resources to manage increasing demands.

  18. Modeling Heterogeneous Variance-Covariance Components in Two-Level Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, George; French, Robert; Charlton, Chris; Browne, William

    2014-01-01

    Applications of multilevel models to continuous outcomes nearly always assume constant residual variance and constant random effects variances and covariances. However, modeling heterogeneity of variance can prove a useful indicator of model misspecification, and in some educational and behavioral studies, it may even be of direct substantive…

  19. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  1. Climate studies with a multi-layer energy balance model. I - Model description and sensitivity to the solar constant. II - The role of feedback mechanisms in the CO2 problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, L.; Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1982-01-01

    A nine-layer zonally averaged, steady-state model, based upon thermal energy balance, is developed for use in climate sensitivity studies and includes an accurate treatment of radiative transfer, parameterized meridional and vertical energy transport, and thermodynamic interaction between the surface and the atmosphere. A high degree of nonlinearity is exhibited by the model in a study of sensitivity to changes in the solar constant. The change in the hemispheric mean surface temperature is +3.1 C in response to a 2% increase in the solar constant and -4.3 C in response to a 2% decrease in the solar constant. The sensitivity varies with latitude, and the response of atmospheric temperature varies with height. In addition, the model is used to study the sensitivity of climate to a doubling of the atmospheric CO2 content. It is found that the tropospheric temperature lapse rate decreases at low latitudes but increases at high latitudes in response to a doubled CO2 content. Averaged over the Northern Hemisphere, the change is +2.3 C in the surface temperature and +0.47 C in the earth's brightness temperature. The effects of some feedback mechanisms on the climate sensitivity to a doubled CO2 content show that the sensitivity of surface temperature approximately doubles at all latitudes due to the change in water vapor content.

  2. Modeling of Filtration Processes—Microfiltration and Depth Filtration for Harvest of a Therapeutic Protein Expressed in Pichia pastoris at Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Sampath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration steps are ubiquitous in biotech processes due to the simplicity of operation, ease of scalability and the myriad of operations that they can be used for. Microfiltration, depth filtration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are some of the most commonly used biotech unit operations. For clean feed streams, when fouling is minimal, scaling of these unit operations is performed linearly based on the filter area per unit volume of feed stream. However, for cases when considerable fouling occurs, such as the case of harvesting a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris, linear scaling may not be possible and current industrial practices involve use of 20–30% excess filter area over and above the calculated filter area to account for the uncertainty in scaling. In view of the fact that filters used for harvest are likely to have a very limited lifetime, this oversizing of the filters can add considerable cost of goods for the manufacturer. Modeling offers a way out of this conundrum. In this paper, we examine feasibility of using the various proposed models for filtration of a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris at constant pressure. It is observed that none of the individual models yield a satisfactory fit of the data, thus indicating that more than one fouling mechanism is at work. Filters with smaller pores were found to undergo fouling via complete pore blocking followed by cake filtration. On the other hand, filters with larger pores were found to undergo fouling via intermediate pore blocking followed by cake filtration. The proposed approach can be used for more accurate sizing of microfilters and depth filters.

  3. A Concept Analysis: Assuming Responsibility for Self-Care among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Kathleen M.; Decker, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This concept analysis clarifies “assuming responsibility for self-care” by adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods Walker and Avant’s (2005) methodology guided the analysis. Results Assuming responsibility for self-care was defined as a process specific to diabetes within the context of development. It is daily, gradual, individualized to person, and unique to task. The goal is ownership that involves autonomy in behaviors and decision-making. Practice Implications Adolescents with type 1 diabetes need to be assessed for assuming responsibility for self-care. This achievement has implications for adolescents’ diabetes management, short- and long-term health, and psychosocial quality of life. PMID:20367781

  4. Variation of fundamental constants: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flambaum, Victor

    2008-05-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. There are some hints for the variation of different fundamental constants in quasar absorption spectra and Big Bang nucleosynthesis data. A large number of publications (including atomic clocks) report limits on the variations. We want to study the variation of the main dimensionless parameters of the Standard Model: 1. Fine structure constant alpha (combination of speed of light, electron charge and Plank constant). 2. Ratio of the strong interaction scale (LambdaQCD) to a fundamental mass like electron mass or quark mass which are proportional to Higgs vacuum expectation value. The proton mass is propotional to LambdaQCD, therefore, the proton-to-electron mass ratio comes into this second category. We performed necessary atomic, nuclear and QCD calculations needed to study variation of the fundamental constants using the Big Bang Nucleosynthsis, quasar spectra, Oklo natural nuclear reactor and atomic clock data. The relative effects of the variation may be enhanced in transitions between narrow close levels in atoms, molecules and nuclei. If one will study an enhanced effect, the relative value of systematic effects (which are not enhanced) may be much smaller. Note also that the absolute magnitude of the variation effects in nuclei (e.g. in very narrow 7 eV transition in 229Th) may be 5 orders of magnitude larger than in atoms. A different possibility of enhancement comes from the inversion transitions in molecules where splitting between the levels is due to the quantum tunneling amplitude which has strong, exponential dependence on the electron to proton mass ratio. Our study of NH3 quasar spectra has already given the best limit on the variation of electron to proton mass ratio.

  5. Influence of the gap size and dielectric constant of the packing on the plasma discharge in a packed bed dielectric barrier discharge reactor: a fluid modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laer, Koen; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-09-01

    Packed bed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactors have proven to be very useful sources of non-thermal plasma for a wide range of applications, of which the environmental applications have received most attention in recent years. Compared to an empty DBD reactor, a packing was introduced to either enhance the energy efficiency of the process, or, if the packing is catalytically active, steer the process towards a preferred end product. A wide range of geometries, bead sizes and bead materials have been tested experimentally in the past. However, since experimental diagnostics become more difficult with a packing present, a computational study is proposed to gain more insight. Using COMSOL's built in plasma module, a 2D axisymmetric fluid model is developed to study the influence of the gap size and the dielectric constant (ɛ) of the packing. Helium is used as discharge gas, at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. By decreasing the gas gap, the electric field strength is enhanced, resulting in a higher number of current peaks per half cycle of applied rf potential. Increasing ɛ also enhances the electric field strength. However, after a certain ɛ, its influence saturates. The electric field strength will no longer increase, leaving the discharge behavior unchanged.

  6. Sieve estimation of constant and time-varying coefficients in nonlinear ordinary differential equation models by considering both numerical error and measurement error

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Hongqi; Wu, Hulin; 10.1214/09-AOS784

    2010-01-01

    This article considers estimation of constant and time-varying coefficients in nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) models where analytic closed-form solutions are not available. The numerical solution-based nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is investigated in this study. A numerical algorithm such as the Runge--Kutta method is used to approximate the ODE solution. The asymptotic properties are established for the proposed estimators considering both numerical error and measurement error. The B-spline is used to approximate the time-varying coefficients, and the corresponding asymptotic theories in this case are investigated under the framework of the sieve approach. Our results show that if the maximum step size of the $p$-order numerical algorithm goes to zero at a rate faster than $n^{-1/(p\\wedge4)}$, the numerical error is negligible compared to the measurement error. This result provides a theoretical guidance in selection of the step size for numerical evaluations of ODEs. Moreover, we h...

  7. Mixed convection flow over a horizontal circular cylinder with constant heat flux embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid: Buongiorno-Darcy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Leony; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-09-01

    The steady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder in a nanofluid embedded in a porous medium, which is maintained at a constant surface heat flux, has been studied by using the Buongiorno-Darcy nanofluid model for both cases of a heated and cooled cylinder. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller box method. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically and studied for various values of the governing parameters, namely the Lewis number, Brownian number, mixed convection parameter, buoyancy ratio parameter and thermophoresis parameter. It is also found that the boundary layer separation occurs at the opposing fluid flow, that is when the mixed convection parameter is negative. It is also observed that increasing the mixed convection parameter delays the boundary layer separation and the separation can be completely suppressed for sufficiently large values of the mixed convection parameter. The Brownian and buoyancy ratio parameters appear to affect the fluid flow and heat transfer profiles.

  8. 具有变系数和红利的多维Black-Scholes模型%Multi-dimensional Black-Scholes Model with Non-constant Coefficients and Dividends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛红; 聂赞坎

    2000-01-01

    本文提出具有变系数和红利的多维Black-Scholes模型,利用倒向随机微分方程和鞅方法, 得到欧式未定权益的一般定价公式及套期保值策略.在具体金融市场,给出欧式期权的定价公式和套期保值策略,以及美式看涨期权价格的界.%For discussing the arbitrage-free pricing of European contingent claim, this paper proposes multi-dimensional Black-Scho les model with non-constant coefficients and the underlying stocks pay dividends . By means of backward stochastic different equation and martingale methods, we obtain general pricing formula and hedging strategy of European contingent claim . In the particular financial market, the pricing formula and hedging strategy o f European option and bounds of the price on American call option are also consi dered.

  9. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose K.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-05

    The optical constants n and k can be used to model infrared spectra, including refraction, absorption, reflectance, and emissivity, but obtaining reliable values for solid materials (pure or otherwise) presents a challenge: In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, homogeneous materials, free of defects. That is, materials where the Fresnel equations are operant since there is no light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain a pure macroscopic (crystalline) material, it may be possible to press the material into a (uniform, void-free) disk. We have recently been able to do this with ammonium sulfate powder and then measured the n & k values via two independent methods: 1) Ellipsometry - which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) Single angle specular reflectance with an FT spectrometer using a specular reflectance device within an FT instrument which measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence over a wide wavelength range. The quality of the derived n & k values was tested by generating the reflectance spectra of the pellet and comparing to the calculated to measured reflectance spectra of the pure material which has been previously published. The comparison to literature values showed good accuracy and good agreement, indicating promise to measure other materials by such methods.

  10. Discrete-state representation of ion permeation coupled to fast gating in a model of CLC-chloride channels: analytic estimation of the state-to-state rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalson, Rob D; Cheng, Mary Hongying

    2011-09-01

    Analytical estimation of state-to-state rate constants is carried out for a recently developed discrete state model of chloride ion motion in a CLC chloride channel (Coalson and Cheng, J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 1424). In the original presentation of this model, the same rate constants were evaluated via three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations. The underlying dynamical theory is an appropriate single- or multiparticle three-dimensional Smoluchowski equation. Taking advantage of approximate geometric symmetries (based on the details of the model channel geometry), well-known formulas for state-to-state transition rates are appealed to herein and adapted as necessary to the problem at hand. Rates of ionic influx from a bulk electrolyte reservoir to the nearest binding site within the channel pore are particularly challenging to compute analytically because they reflect multi-ion interactions (as opposed to single-ion dynamics). A simple empirical correction factor is added to the single-ion rate constant formula in this case to account for the saturation of influx rate constants with increasing bulk Cl(-) concentration. Overall, the agreement between all analytically estimated rate constants is within a factor of 2 of those computed via three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations, and often better than this. Current-concentration curves obtained using rate constants derived from these two different computational approaches agree to within 25%.

  11. Artificially introduced aneuploid chromosomes assume a conserved position in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundan Sengupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosomal aneuploidy is a defining feature of carcinomas. For instance, in colon cancer, an additional copy of Chromosome 7 is not only observed in early pre-malignant polyps, but is faithfully maintained throughout progression to metastasis. These copy number changes show a positive correlation with average transcript levels of resident genes. An independent line of research has also established that specific chromosomes occupy a well conserved 3D position within the interphase nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated whether cancer-specific aneuploid chromosomes assume a 3D-position similar to that of its endogenous homologues, which would suggest a possible correlation with transcriptional activity. Using 3D-FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that Chromosomes 7, 18, or 19 introduced via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer into the parental diploid colon cancer cell line DLD-1 maintain their conserved position in the interphase nucleus. CONCLUSIONS: Our data is therefore consistent with the model that each chromosome has an associated zip code (possibly gene density that determines its nuclear localization. Whether the nuclear localization determines or is determined by the transcriptional activity of resident genes has yet to be ascertained.

  12. Assuming it is all about conditions : Framing a simulation model for complex, adaptive urban space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamu, Claudia; de Roo, Gert; Frankhauser, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the route beyond the conventional, linear attitude within planning and its rationality debate. We combine our theoretical reasoning with a multiscale approach and with fractal-like argumentation which results in a frame of conditions which is supported by the outline of a

  13. Variation of fundamental constants

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant alpha, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feschbach resonance.

  14. Constant-pressure Blowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  15. String Scale Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    The cosmological constant is an unexplained until now phenomena of nature that requires an explanation through string effects. The apparent discrepancy between theory and experiment is enourmous and has already been explained several times by the author including mechanisms. In this work the string theory theory of abolished string modes is documented and given perturbatively to all loop orders. The holographic underpinning is also exposed. The matching with the data of the LIGO and D0 experi...

  16. The Hubble Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  17. Time-Variation of the Gravitational Constant and the Machian Solution in the Brans-Dicke Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, A

    2001-01-01

    The Machian cosmological solution satisfying $\\phi =O(\\rho /\\omega)$ for the perfect-fluid with negative pressure is discussed. When the coefficient of the equation of state $\\gamma \\to -1/3$, the gravitational constant approaches to constant. If we assume the present mass density $\\rho_{0}\\sim \\rho_{c}$ (critical density), the parameter $\\epsilon$ ($\\gamma =(\\epsilon -1)/3$) has a value of order $10^{-3}$ to support the present gravitational constant. The closed model is valid for $\\omega <-3/2\\epsilon$ and exhibits the slow accelerating expansion. We understand why the coupling parameter $| \\omega |$ is so large ($\\omega \\sim -10^{3}$). The time-variation of the gravitational constant $| \\dot{G}/G| \\sim 10^{-13} yr^{-1}$ at present is derived in this model.

  18. Preparing for Upheaval in North Korea: Assuming North Korean Regime Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    defense agreement between North Korea and China but also pro-Chinese North Korean elites’ requests for Chinese help are likely to justify Chinese...PREPARING FOR UPHEAVAL IN NORTH KOREA : ASSUMING NORTH KOREAN REGIME COLLAPSE by Kwonwoo Kim December 2013 Thesis Advisor: Wade Huntley Second...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PREPARING FOR UPHEAVAL IN NORTH KOREA : ASSUMING NORTH KOREAN REGIME COLLAPSE 5

  19. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horatiu Nastase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now.

  20. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Ariel; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a mere coincidence, rather than an inkling of some theory? We answer the question in the most naive form.

  1. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastase, Horatiu, E-mail: nastase@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Weltman, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.weltman@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology & Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2015-07-30

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  2. Simulated constant-head boundary for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the constant head-boundary used to simulate ground-water inflow or outflow at the lateral boundary of the Death Valley regional...

  3. Simulated constant-head boundary for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the constant head-boundary used to simulate ground-water inflow or outflow at the lateral boundary of the Death Valley regional...

  4. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and kinetic modeling applied to near-infrared data from curing reactions of epoxy resins: mechanistic approach and estimation of kinetic rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2006-02-01

    This study describes the combination of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares with a kinetic modeling strategy for obtaining the kinetic rate constants of a curing reaction of epoxy resins. The reaction between phenyl glycidyl ether and aniline is monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy under isothermal conditions for several initial molar ratios of the reagents. The data for all experiments, arranged in a column-wise augmented data matrix, are analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. The concentration profiles recovered are fitted to a chemical model proposed for the reaction. The selection of the kinetic model is assisted by the information contained in the recovered concentration profiles. The nonlinear fitting provides the kinetic rate constants. The optimized rate constants are in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  5. Investigation of thickness effects on the dielectric constant barium strontium titanate thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Grattan, L J

    2002-01-01

    The collapse in dielectric constant at small thickness commonly observed in ferroelectric thin films was measured and investigated in barium strontium titanate (Ba sub 0 sub . sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 TiO sub 3). The possible mechanisms responsible for this effect are reviewed. Functional measurements were performed on BST thin films, of 7.5 to 950 nm, by incorporating them into capacitor structures with bottom electrodes of strontium ruthenate (SRO) and thermally- evaporated Au top electrodes. A discussion on thin film growth considerations, optimal PLD conditions and the measurement techniques employed in the project is presented. The experimentally determined dielectric constant - thickness profile was fitted using the series capacitor model assuming low dielectric constant interfacial layers in series with the bulk. Consideration of the case where the combined 'dead layer' thickness was close to the total BST thickness revealed that, for this system, the total 'dead layer' thickness had to be less than ...

  6. Type Ia Supernovae Progenitor Problem and the Variation of Fundamental Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybicki M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological observations strongly suggest our universe is the interior of an expanding black hole. If the constant mass of the universe is assumed then from the equation for Schwarzschild radius: r S = 2 Gmc it follows that proportionality constant Gc depends linearly on the universe’s radius R u , identified with r S , i.e. Gc Because the Chandrasekhar limit M Ch relates to the speed of light and to the Newton’s constant as M Ch ( c = G 3 = 2 so expansion involves gradual decrease of M Ch . In result, a single white dwarf can alone become the Type Ia supernova progenitor, which provides a complementary solution to single-degenerate and double-degenerate models for SNe Ia. Both alternative scenarios: G R u and c R are analyzed in regard of their consistence with observations, and their consequences to cosmology.

  7. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  8. Environment-Dependent Fundamental Physical Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2012-01-01

    A theory of special inconstancy, in which some fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure and gravitational constants may vary, is proposed in pregeometry. In the special theory of inconstancy, the \\alpha-G relation of \\alpha=3\\pi/[16ln(4\\pi/5GM_W^2)] between the varying fine-structure and gravitaional constants (where M_W is the charged weak boson mass) is derived from the hypothesis that both of these constants are related to the same fundamental length scale in nature. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(-0.8\\pm2.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} from the most precise limit of dot{G}/G=(-0.6\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-12}yr^{-1} by Thorsett, which is not only consistent with the recent observation of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(0.5\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} by Webb et al. but also feasible for future experimental tests. Also a theory of general inconstancy, in which any fundamental physical constants may vary, is proposed in "more general relativity", by assuming that the space-time is ...

  9. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  10. SOLAR DRYING KINETICS OF DATE PALM FRUITS ASSUMING A STEP-WISE AIR TEMPERATURE CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELGHANI BOUBEKRI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drying using a step-wise temperature change was studied considering the case of indirect solar drying of the date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L.. The followed procedure consists of building drying kinetics by stages of temperatures resulting from drying, in constant conditions, of the same variety of dates from Algerian and Tunisian origin. A law of daily temperature variation prevailed by 60°C, was deduced from a statement of temperature collected on a laboratory solar dryer prototype. Two drying curve equation models were used and some comparisons were discussed. The results obtained for dates from the two origins highlighted different response times by changing the air temperature and showed the possibility of reaching a fruit with standard moisture content in only one day of drying on the basis of initial water contents ranging from 0.40 to 0.65. This moisture range is in practice allotted to rehydrated dates by water immersion in order to enhance their quality. Experiments conducted in a laboratory solar drier under temperatures oscillating around 50°C and 60°C led to the same end up regarding the drying time ensuring a visually appreciable fruit quality. Results obtained by a simple sensorial test revealed a better quality of date fruits treated by solar drying comparing to those issued from industrial heat treatment units.

  11. String theory, cosmology and varying constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damour, Thibault

    In string theory the coupling `constants' appearing in the low-energy effective Lagrangian are determined by the vacuum expectation values of some (a priori) massless scalar fields (dilaton, moduli). This naturally leads one to expect a correlated variation of all the coupling constants, and an associated violation of the equivalence principle. We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate such a spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring a very unnatural fine-tuning of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently `observed' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP.

  12. String theory, cosmology and varying constants

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    In string theory the coupling ``constants'' appearing in the low-energy effective Lagrangian are determined by the vacuum expectation values of some (a priori) massless scalar fields (dilaton, moduli). This naturally leads one to expect a correlated variation of all the coupling constants, and an associated violation of the equivalence principle. We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate such a spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring a very unnatural fine-tuning of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently ``observed'' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universa...

  13. The Effects on Tsunami Hazard Assessment in Chile of Assuming Earthquake Scenarios with Spatially Uniform Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Matías; Gubler, Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the effect that along-dip slip distribution has on the near-shore tsunami amplitudes and on coastal land-level changes in the region of central Chile (29°-37°S). Here and all along the Chilean megathrust, the seismogenic zone extends beneath dry land, and thus, tsunami generation and propagation is limited to its seaward portion, where the sensitivity of the initial tsunami waveform to dislocation model inputs, such as slip distribution, is greater. We considered four distributions of earthquake slip in the dip direction, including a spatially uniform slip source and three others with typical bell-shaped slip patterns that differ in the depth range of slip concentration. We found that a uniform slip scenario predicts much lower tsunami amplitudes and generally less coastal subsidence than scenarios that assume bell-shaped distributions of slip. Although the finding that uniform slip scenarios underestimate tsunami amplitudes is not new, it has been largely ignored for tsunami hazard assessment in Chile. Our simulations results also suggest that uniform slip scenarios tend to predict later arrival times of the leading wave than bell-shaped sources. The time occurrence of the largest wave at a specific site is also dependent on how the slip is distributed in the dip direction; however, other factors, such as local bathymetric configurations and standing edge waves, are also expected to play a role. Arrival time differences are especially critical in Chile, where tsunamis arrive earlier than elsewhere. We believe that the results of this study will be useful to both public and private organizations for mapping tsunami hazard in coastal areas along the Chilean coast, and, therefore, help reduce the risk of loss and damage caused by future tsunamis.

  14. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2017-05-01

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Curved dilatonic brane-worlds and the cosmological constant problem

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Alberca, N; Silva, P J; Alonso-Alberca, Natxo; Janssen, Bert; Silva, Pedro J.

    2000-01-01

    We construct a model for dilatonic brane worlds with constant curvature on the brane, i.e. a non-zero four-dimensional cosmological constant, given in function of the dilaton coupling and the cosmological constant of the bulk. It is shown that the brane cosmological constant does not change under quantum fluctuations in the brane tension.

  16. Assuming a Pharmacy Organization Leadership Position: A Guide for Pharmacy Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Blake; Weber, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Important and influential pharmacy organization leadership positions, such as president, board member, or committee chair, are volunteer positions and require a commitment of personal and professional time. These positions provide excellent opportunities for leadership development, personal promotion, and advancement of the profession. In deciding to assume a leadership position, interested individuals must consider the impact on their personal and professional commitments and relationships, career planning, employer support, current and future department projects, employee support, and personal readiness. This article reviews these factors and also provides an assessment tool that leaders can use to determine their readiness to assume leadership positions. By using an assessment tool, pharmacy leaders can better understand their ability to assume an important and influential leadership position while achieving job and personal goals.

  17. Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Mahesh Kumar Yadav

    2005-02-01

    Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model is investigated. To get a deterministic model, we have assumed the condition = ( is a constant) between metric potentials and where is the coefficient of shear viscosity and the scalar of expansion in the model. The coefficient of bulk viscosity () is taken as constant. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model are also discussed.

  18. A URI 4-NODE QUADRILATERAL ELEMENT BY ASSUMED STRAIN METHOD FOR NONLINEAR PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinyan; CHEN Jun; LI Minghui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper one-point quadrature "assumed strain" mixed element formulation based on the Hu-Washizu variational principle is presented. Special care is taken to avoid hourglass modes and volumetric locking as well as shear locking. The assumed strain fields are constructed so that those portions of the fields which lead to volumetric and shear locking phenomena are eliminated by projection, while the implementation of the proposed URI scheme is straightforward to suppress hourglass modes. In order to treat geometric nonlinearities simply and efficiently, a corotational coordinate system is used. Several numerical examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the suggested formulation, including nonlinear static/dynamic mechanical problems.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Wind Fields Calculated from Assumed Mode S Data Link Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    U) JAN 82 A CARRO . R C G0FF UNLSIIDFAA/CT-a/?, FAA-RD-81/100 N I31 uuuHu.. 2 DOT/FAA/RD81/lOO Numerical Simulation of Wind Fields Calculated From...Assumed Mode S Data Link Inputs Anthony Carro R. Craig Goff ~IIE~Prepared By FAA Technical Center Atlantic City Airport, N.J. 08405 January 1982 Final...FROM January 1982 ASSUMED MODE S DATA LINK INPUTS 6. Performing Organization Code 8. Performing Organization Report No. 7. Author{ s) Anthony Carro and K

  20. How Public High School Students Assume Cooperative Roles to Develop Their EFL Speaking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Natalie Parra Espinel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an investigation we carried out in order to identify how the specific roles that 7th grade public school students assumed when they worked cooperatively were related to their development of speaking skills in English. Data were gathered through interviews, field notes, students’ reflections and audio recordings. The findings revealed that students who were involved in cooperative activities chose and assumed roles taking into account preferences, skills and personality traits. In the same manner, when learners worked together, their roles were affected by each other and they put into practice some social strategies with the purpose of supporting their embryonic speaking development.

  1. Internal Structure and Mineralogy of Differentiated Asteroids Assuming Chondritic Bulk Composition: The Case of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk composition (including oxygen content) is a primary control on the internal structure and mineralogy of differentiated asteroids. For example, oxidation state will affect core size, as well as Mg# and pyroxene content of the silicate mantle. The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite class of meteorites (HED) provide an interesting test-case of this idea, in particular in light of results of the Dawn mission which provide information on the size, density and differentiation state of Vesta, the parent body of the HED's. In this work we explore plausible bulk compositions of Vesta and use mass-balance and geochemical modelling to predict possible internal structures and crust/mantle compositions and mineralogies. Models are constrained to be consistent with known HED samples, but the approach has the potential to extend predictions to thermodynamically plausible rock types that are not necessarily present in the HED collection. Nine chondritic bulk compositions are considered (CI, CV, CO, CM, H, L, LL, EH, EL). For each, relative proportions and densities of the core, mantle, and crust are quantified. Considering that the basaltic crust has the composition of the primitive eucrite Juvinas and assuming that this crust is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the residual mantle, it is possible to calculate how much iron is in metallic form (in the core) and how much in oxidized form (in the mantle and crust) for a given bulk composition. Of the nine bulk compositions tested, solutions corresponding to CI and LL groups predicted a negative metal fraction and were not considered further. Solutions for enstatite chondrites imply significant oxidation relative to the starting materials and these solutions too are considered unlikely. For the remaining bulk compositions, the relative proportion of crust to bulk silicate is typically in the range 15 to 20% corresponding to crustal thicknesses of 15 to 20 km for a porosity-free Vesta-sized body. The mantle is predicted to be largely

  2. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  3. When constants are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  4. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio insurance, as practiced in 1987, consisted of trading between an underlying stock portfolio and cash, using option theory to place a floor on the value of the position, as if it included a protective put. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance (CPPI) is an option-free variation...... on the theme, originally proposed by Fischer Black. In CPPI, a financial institution guarantees a floor value for the “insured” portfolio and adjusts the stock/bond mix to produce a leveraged exposure to the risky assets, which depends on how far the portfolio value is above the floor. Plain-vanilla portfolio...... insurance largely died with the crash of 1987, but CPPI is still going strong. In the frictionless markets of finance theory, the issuer’s strategy to hedge its liability under the contract is clear, but in the real world with transactions costs and stochastic jump risk, the optimal strategy is less obvious...

  5. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  6. Prediction of ion-exchange column breakthrough curves by constant-pattern wave approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Hsien; Kuan, Yu-Chung; Chern, Jia-Ming

    2008-03-21

    The release of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters represents one of major threats to environment. Compared with chemical precipitation method, fixed-bed ion-exchange process can effectively remove heavy metals from wastewaters and generate no hazardous sludge. In order to design and operate fixed-bed ion-exchange processes successfully, it is very important to understand the column dynamics. In this study, the column experiments for Cu2+/H+, Zn2+/H+, and Cd2+/H+ systems using Amberlite IR-120 were performed to measure the breakthrough curves under varying operating conditions. The experimental results showed that total cation concentration in the mobile-phase played a key role on the breakthrough curves; a higher feed concentration resulted in an earlier breakthrough. Furthermore, the column dynamics was also predicted by self-sharpening and constant-pattern wave models. The self-sharpening wave model assuming local ion-exchange equilibrium could provide a simple and quick estimation for the breakthrough volume, but the predicted breakthrough curves did not match the experimental data very well. On the contrary, the constant-pattern wave model using a constant driving force model for finite ion-exchange rate provided a better fit to the experimental data. The obtained liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient was correlated to the flow velocity and other operating parameters; the breakthrough curves under varying operating conditions could thus be predicted by the constant-pattern wave model using the correlation.

  7. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  8. Incompressible flows with piecewise constant density

    CERN Document Server

    Danchin, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with variable density. The aim is to prove existence and uniqueness results in the case of discontinuous ini- tial density. In dimension n = 2, 3, assuming only that the initial density is bounded and bounded away from zero, and that the initial velocity is smooth enough, we get the local-in-time existence of unique solutions. Uniqueness holds in any dimension and for a wider class of velocity fields. Let us emphasize that all those results are true for piecewise constant densities with arbitrarily large jumps. Global results are established in dimension two if the density is close enough to a positive constant, and in n-dimension if, in addition, the initial velocity is small. The Lagrangian formula- tion for describing the flow plays a key role in the analysis that is proposed in the present paper.

  9. On the Estimation of Complex Speech DFT Coefficients Without Assuming Independent Real and Imaginary Parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, J.S.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.

    2008-01-01

    This letter considers the estimation of speech signals contaminated by additive noise in the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) domain. Existing complex-DFT estimators assume independency of the real and imaginary parts of the speech DFT coefficients, although this is not in line with measurements. In

  10. Application of the Perturbation Method for Determination of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors for the Assumed Static Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Izabela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the perturbation method which was used for computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for the assumed homogeneous state of strain in the hyperelastic Murnaghan material. The values calculated might be used for determination of the rate of propagation of unit vectors of wave amplitude for other non-linear

  11. ASSUMED OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION BASED ON CALCULATION FROM DYE DILUTION CARDIAC-OUTPUT - AN IMPROVED FORMULA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERGSTRA, A; VANDIJK, RB; HILLEGE, HL; LIE, KI; MOOK, GA

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed because of observed differences between dye dilution cardiac output and the Fick cardiac output, calculated from estimated oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen, and to find a better formula for assumed oxygen consumption. In 250 patients who underwent left a

  12. Partial sums of the M\\"obius function in arithmetic progressions assuming GRH

    CERN Document Server

    Halupczok, Karin

    2011-01-01

    We consider Mertens' function M(x,q,a) in arithmetic progression, Assuming the generalized Riemann hypothesis (GRH), we show an upper bound that is uniform for all moduli which are not too large. For the proof, a former method of K. Soundararajan is extended to L-series.

  13. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nesseris, Savvas; Davis, Tamara; Parkinson, David

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of large-scale structure measured by the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey in the redshift range $0.1 < z < 0.9$. We use this data in two ways. Firstly we constrain the matter density of the Universe, $\\Omega_m$ (assuming General Relativity), and use this to construct a diagnostic to detect the presence of an evolving Newton's constant. Secondly we directly measure the evolution of Newton's constant, $G_{eff}$, that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these approaches are that, contrary to other methods, they do not require knowledge of the expansion history of the Universe, $H(z)$, making them model independent tests. Our constraints for the second derivative of Newton's constant at the present day, assuming it is slowly evolving as suggested by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints, using the WiggleZ data is $\\ddotGeff(t_0)=-1.19\\pm 0.95\\cdot 10^{-20}h^2 yr^{-2}$, where $h$ is...

  14. Constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younan HC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen-Cara Younan, Rishi Iyer, Janaki Natasha DesaiFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the review by Ricci and Ferraz on the advances in training and practice in ophthalmoscopy simulation.1As final year medical students, we have recently experienced direct ophthalmoscopy teaching and agree with the authors that “simulation is a helpful tool in ophthalmoscopy training”.1 Indeed, in our experience, simulation is useful in teaching a wide variety of clinical skills including venepuncture, intravenous cannulation, and catheterization. We were taught all of these clinical skills in our first clinical year of study through use of simulation models. With regards to our direct ophthalmoscopy teaching, we were first taught to recognize the normal retina and different retinal pathologies using images, before practicing our technique and recognition of those images in a model similar to the THELMA (The Human Eye Learning Model Assistant described by the authors.1However, we feel that the use of simulation models alone is not enough to provide confidence and competency in direct ophthalmoscopy among medical students. The authors conclude that “constant training is a well-known strategy for skill enhancement”,1 and we have found that a lack of constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy is evident. After learning venepuncture, cannulation, and catheterization on the simulation models, we were able to observe doctors performing these skills before performing them on patients either in the wards or in theatre. These are skills that we are constantly trained in across a wide variety of medical and surgical attachments. However, opportunities to observe and practice ophthalmoscopy during our attachments are more limited, and thus we are not continuing to use the skills we learn.Authors' replyLucas Holderegger Ricci,1 Caroline Amaral Ferraz21Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Laureate

  15. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    be made arbitrarily small—and thus the credit rating arbitrarily high—by increasing leverage, but the ratings obtained strongly depend on assumptions on the credit environment (high spread or low spread). More importantly, CPDO loss distributions are found to exhibit a wide range of tail risk measures......Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from...... the major rating agencies, based on complex models for the joint transition of ratings and spreads for all names in the underlying portfolio. We propose a parsimonious model for analysing the performance of CPDO strategies using a top-down approach that captures the essential risk factors of the CPDO. Our...

  16. The Interacting and Non-constant Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Murli Manohar

    2009-01-01

    We propose a time-varying cosmological constant with a fixed equation of state, which evolves mainly through its interaction with the background during most of the long history of the universe. However, such interaction does not exist in the very early and the late-time universe and produces the acceleration during these eras when it becomes very nearly a constant. It is found that after the initial inflationary phase, the cosmological constant, that we call as lambda parameter, rolls down from a large constant value to another but very small constant value and further dominates the present epoch showing up in form of the dark energy driving the acceleration.

  17. Quantum Theory without Planck's Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ralston, John P

    2012-01-01

    Planck's constant was introduced as a fundamental scale in the early history of quantum mechanics. We find a modern approach where Planck's constant is absent: it is unobservable except as a constant of human convention. Despite long reference to experiment, review shows that Planck's constant cannot be obtained from the data of Ryberg, Davisson and Germer, Compton, or that used by Planck himself. In the new approach Planck's constant is tied to macroscopic conventions of Newtonian origin, which are dispensable. The precision of other fundamental constants is substantially improved by eliminating Planck's constant. The electron mass is determined about 67 times more precisely, and the unit of electric charge determined 139 times more precisely. Improvement in the experimental value of the fine structure constant allows new types of experiment to be compared towards finding "new physics." The long-standing goal of eliminating reliance on the artifact known as the International Prototype Kilogram can be accompl...

  18. COUPLING OF ASSUMED STRESS FINITE ELEMENT AND BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS WITH STRESS-TRACTION EQUILIBRIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUZELBEY Ibrahim H.; KANBER Bahattin; AKPOLAT Abdullah

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the stress based finite element method is coupled with the boundary element method in two different ways. In the first one, the ordinary distribution matrix is used for coupling. In the second one, the stress traction equilibrium is used at the interface line of both regions as a new coupling process. This new coupling procedure is presented without a distribution matrix. Several case studies are solved for the validation of the developed coupling procedure. The results of case studies are compared with the distribution matrix coupling, displacement based finite element method, assumed stress finite element method, boundary element method, ANSYS and analytical results whenever possible. It is shown that the coupling of the stress traction equilibrium with assumed stress finite elements gives as accurate results as those by the distribution matrix coupling.

  19. Three-dimensional base isolation system for assumed FBR reactor building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, N.; Kashiwazaki, A.; Omata, I. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Ohnaka, T. [Yokohama Rubber Co. Ltd., Hiratsuka (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    A three-dimensional base isolation system for an assumed FBR reactor building is proposed, where a horizontally isolated building by laminated rubber bearings is supported by an intermediate slab which is vertically isolated by using air springs of high pressure. From some fundamental investigations on the above system, it is concluded that the system can be sufficiently practical by using the current industrially available techniques. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Inflationary Phase with Time Varying Fundamental Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, M S; Berman, Marcelo S.; Trevisan, Luis A.

    2002-01-01

    Following Barrow, and Barrow and collaborators, we find a cosmological JBD model, with varying speed of light and varying fine structure constant, where the deceleration parameter is -1,causing acceleration of the Universe.Indeed, we have an exponential inflationary phase. Plancks time, energy, length,etc.,might have had different numerical values in the past, than those available in the litterature, due to the varying values for speed of light, and gravitational constant.

  1. Decoherence at constant excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. M.; Sadurní, E.; Seligman, T. H.

    2012-02-01

    We present a simple exactly solvable extension of the Jaynes-Cummings model by adding dissipation. This is done such that the total number of excitations is conserved. The Liouville operator in the resulting master equation can be reduced to blocks of 4×4 matrices.

  2. Decoherence at constant excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Seligman, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple exactly solvable extension of of the Jaynes-Cummings model by adding dissipation. This is done such that the total number of excitations is conserved. The Liouville operator in the resulting master equation can be reduced to blocks of $4\\times 4$ matrices.

  3. Theoretical Derivation of the Cosmological Constant in the Framework of the Hydrodynamic Model of Quantum Gravity: Can the Quantum Vacuum Singularity Be Overcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Chiarelli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, it is shown that the problem of the cosmological constant (CC is practically the consequence of the inadequacy of general relativity to take into account the quantum property of the space. The equations show that the cosmological constant naturally emerges in the hydrodynamic formulation of quantum gravity and that it does not appear in the classical limit because the quantum energy-impulse tensor gives an equal contribution with opposite sign. The work shows that a very large local value of the CC comes from the space where the mass of a quasi-punctual particle is present but that it can be as small as measured on cosmological scale. The theory shows that the small dependence of the CC from the mean mass density of the universe is due to the null contribution coming from the empty space. This fact gives some hints for the explanation of the conundrum of the cosmic coincidence by making a high CC value of the initial instant of universe compatible with the very small one of the present era.

  4. SOLAR DRYING KINETICS OF DATE PALM FRUITS ASSUMING A STEP-WISE AIR TEMPERATURE CHANGE

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELGHANI BOUBEKRI; HOCINE BENMOUSSA; DJAMAL MENNOUCHE

    2009-01-01

    The effect of drying using a step-wise temperature change was studied considering the case of indirect solar drying of the date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L.). The followed procedure consists of building drying kinetics by stages of temperatures resulting from drying, in constant conditions, of the same variety of dates from Algerian and Tunisian origin. A law of daily temperature variation prevailed by 60°C, was deduced from a statement of temperature collected on a laboratory solar dry...

  5. Geometric random walk of finite number of agents under constant variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-05-01

    The characteristics of the 1D geometric random walk of a finite number of agents are investigated by assuming constant variance. Firstly, the characteristics of the steady state solution of the distribution function, which is obtained using the extended geometric Brownian motion (EGBM), are investigated in the framework of the 1D Fokker-Planck type equation. The uniqueness and existence of the steady state solution of the distribution function requires the number of particles to be finite. To avoid the divergence of the steady state solution of the distribution function at the mean value in the 1D Fokker-Planck type equation, the hybrid model, which is a combination of EGBM and normal BM, is proposed. Next, the steady state solution of the distribution function, which is obtained using the geometric Lévy flight, is investigated under constant variance in the framework of the space fractional 1D Fokker-Planck type equation. Additionally, we confirm that the solution of the distribution function obtained using the super-elastic and inelastic (SI-) Boltzmann equation under constant variance approaches the Cauchy distribution, when the power law number of the relative velocity increases. Finally, dissipation processes of the pressure deviator and heat flux are numerically investigated using the 2D space fractional Fokker-Planck type equations for Lévy flight and SI-Boltzmann equation by assuming their linear response relations.

  6. Rate constants for the formation of SiO by radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairnie, M.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.; Stancil, P. C.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2017-10-01

    Accurate molecular data for the low-lying states of SiO are computed and used to calculate rate constants for radiative association (RA) of Si and O. Einstein A-coefficients are also calculated for transitions between all of the bound and quasi-bound levels for each molecular state. The radiative widths are used together with elastic tunnelling widths to define effective RA rate constants which include both direct and indirect (inverse pre-dissociation) formation processes. The indirect process is evaluated for two kinetic models which represent limiting cases for astrophysical environments. The first case scenario assumes an equilibrium distribution of quasi-bound states and would be applicable whenever collisional and/or radiative excitation mechanisms are able to maintain the population. The second case scenario assumes that no excitation mechanisms are available which corresponds to the limit of zero radiation temperature and zero atomic density. Rate constants for SiO formation in realistic astrophysical environments would presumably lie between these two limiting cases.

  7. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  8. Another Look at the Method of Y-Standardization in Logit and Probit Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    assuming that the logit or probit fixes the variance of the latent error at a known constant, it suffices to assume that the variance of the error is unknown. A further result suggests that using Y-standardization for cross-model comparisons is likely to be biased by model differences in the fit...

  9. Comparing nadir and limb observations of polar mesospheric clouds: The effect of the assumed particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Randall, Cora E.; Carstens, Justin N.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Rusch, David W.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2015-05-01

    Nadir viewing observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft are compared to Common Volume (CV), limb-viewing observations by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) also on AIM. CIPS makes multiple observations of PMC-scattered UV sunlight from a given location at a variety of geometries and uses the variation of the radiance with scattering angle to determine a cloud albedo, particle size distribution, and Ice Water Content (IWC). SOFIE uses IR solar occultation in 16 channels (0.3-5 μm) to obtain altitude profiles of ice properties including the particle size distribution and IWC in addition to temperature, water vapor abundance, and other environmental parameters. CIPS and SOFIE made CV observations from 2007 to 2009. In order to compare the CV observations from the two instruments, SOFIE observations are used to predict the mean PMC properties observed by CIPS. Initial agreement is poor with SOFIE predicting particle size distributions with systematically smaller mean radii and a factor of two more albedo and IWC than observed by CIPS. We show that significantly improved agreement is obtained if the PMC ice is assumed to contain 0.5% meteoric smoke by mass, in agreement with previous studies. We show that the comparison is further improved if an adjustment is made in the CIPS data processing regarding the removal of Rayleigh scattered sunlight below the clouds. This change has an effect on the CV PMC, but is negligible for most of the observed clouds outside the CV. Finally, we examine the role of the assumed shape of the ice particle size distribution. Both experiments nominally assume the shape is Gaussian with a width parameter roughly half of the mean radius. We analyze modeled ice particle distributions and show that, for the column integrated ice distribution, Log-normal and Exponential distributions better represent the range

  10. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varun Sahni

    2000-07-01

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe. A flat accelerating universe is strongly favoured by combining supernovae observations with observations of CMB anisotropies on degree scales which give the `best-fit’ values ≃ 0.7 and m ≃ 0.3. A time dependent cosmological -term can be generated by scalar field models with exponential and power law potentials. Some of these models can alleviate the `fine tuning’ problem which faces the cosmological constant.

  11. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous.

  12. Perceiving others' personalities: examining the dimensionality, assumed similarity to the self, and stability of perceiver effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Guglielmo, Steve; Beer, Jennifer S

    2010-03-01

    In interpersonal perception, "perceiver effects" are tendencies of perceivers to see other people in a particular way. Two studies of naturalistic interactions examined perceiver effects for personality traits: seeing a typical other as sympathetic or quarrelsome, responsible or careless, and so forth. Several basic questions were addressed. First, are perceiver effects organized as a global evaluative halo, or do perceptions of different traits vary in distinct ways? Second, does assumed similarity (as evidenced by self-perceiver correlations) reflect broad evaluative consistency or trait-specific content? Third, are perceiver effects a manifestation of stable beliefs about the generalized other, or do they form in specific contexts as group-specific stereotypes? Findings indicated that perceiver effects were better described by a differentiated, multidimensional structure with both trait-specific content and a higher order global evaluation factor. Assumed similarity was at least partially attributable to trait-specific content, not just to broad evaluative similarity between self and others. Perceiver effects were correlated with gender and attachment style, but in newly formed groups, they became more stable over time, suggesting that they grew dynamically as group stereotypes. Implications for the interpretation of perceiver effects and for research on personality assessment and psychopathology are discussed.

  13. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Sudarshan Reddy; N Ravi Kumar Reddy; V Sridhar; S Satyanarayana

    2002-02-01

    Equilibria of the axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloximes by imidazole, 1-methyl imidazole, histidine, histamine, glycine, ethyl glycine ester, thiourea and urea have been spectrophotometrically measured in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KCl) at 25°C as a function of H. The equilibrium constants are in the order CN- > 1-methyl imidazole > imidazole > histidine > histamine > glycine > ethyl glycine ester > thiourea > urea. The order of stability of benzyl(ligand)cobaloxime is explained based on the basicity of the ligand, Co(III) → - back bonding and soft-soft and soft-hard interaction. Imidazole, substituted imidazoles, histidine and histamine form more stable complexes than glycine, ethyl glycine ester in contrast to the basicity of the ligands. Benzyl(ligand)cobaloximes were isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra.

  14. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Manwen, E-mail: mwliu1993@163.com; Li, Zheng, E-mail: zhengli58@gmail.com

    2016-07-11

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R–d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  15. Generalization of the one dimensional modeling and design considerations of spiral Si drift detectors: Flat (straight) drift channels and constant drift fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Manwen; Li, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional design consideration for the spiral (cylindrical geometry) Si drift detector (SDD) has been modified and generalized for small drift distance (R) compatible to the detector thickness (d), i.e. for R-d, and for non uniform backside biasing situations. By applying a non uniform biasing voltage with a gradient similar (proportional) to the front side, one can increase the reach-through voltage, resulting in a large drift field for carriers. This can be important for large R (>3 mm). With a careful design of electric field profiles on both sides, one can obtain the optimum case of a spiral SDD with a straight (flat) drift channel and constant drift field throughout the carrier drift channel. The previous solution in the literature is an approximation of this work for R»d and with a curved drift channel.

  16. New parameterization of external and induced fields in geomagnetic field modeling, and a candidate model for IGRF 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, T.J.; Lowes, F.

    2005-01-01

    When deriving spherical harmonic models of the Earth's magnetic field, low-degree external field contributions are traditionally considered by assuming that their expansion coefficient q(1)(0) varies linearly with the D-st-index, while induced contributions are considered assuming a constant ratio...

  17. 42 CFR 137.292 - How do Self-Governance Tribes assume environmental responsibilities for construction projects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do Self-Governance Tribes assume environmental...-Governance Tribes assume environmental responsibilities for construction projects under section 509 of the Act ? Self-Governance Tribes assume environmental responsibilities by: (a) Adopting a resolution...

  18. Assessment of the time constant of relaxation: insights from simulations and hemodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mey, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Verdonck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use high-fidelity animal data and numerical simulations to gain more insight into the reliability of the estimated relaxation constant derived from left ventricular pressure decays, assuming a monoexponential model with either a fixed zero or free moving pressure asymptote. Comparison of the experimental data with the results of the simulations demonstrated a trade off between the fixed zero and the free moving asymptote approach. The latter method more closely fits the pressure curves and has the advantage of producing an extra coefficient with potential diagnostic information. On the other hand, this method suffers from larger standard errors on the estimated coefficients. The method with fixed zero asymptote produces values of the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) within a narrow confidence interval. However, if the pressure curve is actually decaying to a nonzero pressure asymptote, this method results in an inferior fit of the pressure curve and a biased estimation of tau.

  19. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda Labor and Munoz).

  20. Analysis of an object assumed to contain “Red Mercury”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obhođaš, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Blagus, Saša; Valković, Vladivoj

    2007-08-01

    After having been informed about an attempt of illicit trafficking, the Organized Crime Division of the Zagreb Police Authority confiscated in November 2003 a hand size metal cylinder suspected to contain "Red Mercury" (RM). The sample assumed to contain RM was analyzed with two nondestructive analytical methods in order to obtain information about the nature of the investigated object, namely, activation analysis with 14.1 MeV neutrons and EDXRF analysis. The activation analysis with 14.1 MeV neutrons showed that the container and its contents were characterized by the following chemical elements: Hg, Fe, Cr and Ni. By using EDXRF analysis, it was shown that the elements Fe, Cr and Ni were constituents of the capsule. Therefore, it was concluded that these three elements were present in the capsule only, while the content of the unknown material was Hg. Antimony as a hypothetical component of red mercury was not detected.

  1. Measurable values, numbers and fundamental physical constants: Is the Boltzmann constant Kb a fundamental physical constant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bormashenko Edward

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of fundamental physical constants is discussed. The nature of fundamental physical constants is cleared up, based on the analysis of the Boltzmann constant. A new definition of measurable values, 'mathematical' and 'physical' numbers and fundamental physical constants is proposed. Mathematical numbers are defined as values insensitive to the choice of both units and frames of reference, whereas 'physical numbers' are dimensionless values, insensitive to transformations of units and sensitive to the transformations of the frames of reference. Fundamental constants are classified as values sensitive to transformations of the units and insensitive to transformations of the frames of reference. It is supposed that a fundamental physical constant necessarily allows diminishing the number of independent etalons in a system of units.

  2. Can compactifications solve the cosmological constant problem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzberg, Mark P. [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University,574 Boston Ave, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics,Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Masoumi, Ali [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University,574 Boston Ave, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant Λ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at Λ=0. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain Λ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why Λ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cosmological constant to zero. We also show that the fundamental Planck mass is being sent to zero, and so the central problem is trivially avoided by removing high energy physics altogether. On the other hand, by including various large mass scales from particle physics with a high fundamental Planck mass, one is faced with a real problem, whose only known solution involves accidental cancellations in a landscape.

  3. Insurance Calculation of Bankruptcy Probability of Constant Interest Rate Model under Dependent Negative%负相依下带常数利率模型的破产概率的保险计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明倩

    2014-01-01

    本文研究了负相依索赔条件下带常数利率的风险模型在随机区间上的破产问题,最终得到了该模型破产概率的渐进表达式。%This paper studies the risk model under conditions of constant interest rates negatively correlated claims in the bankruptcy issue random intervals, and finally get the asymptotic expression of the model the probability of bankruptcy.

  4. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next large survey

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charg...

  6. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charge...

  8. A determination of H-0 with the class gravitational lens B1608+656. II. Mass models and the Hubble constant from lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, LVE; Fassnacht, CD

    1999-01-01

    We present mass models of the four-image gravitational lens system B1608 + 656, based on information obtained through VLBA imaging, VLA monitoring, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS imaging. We have determined a mass model for the lens galaxies that reproduces (1) all image positions

  9. MID IR Optical Constants of Orthopyroxenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucks, M.; Glotch, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    Orthopyroxenes are common rock forming minerals that are present on many planetary bodies as well as meteorites and cosmic dust. The presence of these minerals can give implications to the petrogenic history of these planetary bodies. Optical constants, n and k, are essential inputs into radiative transfer models which are used in remote sensing techniques. [1,2] While optical constants have been determined for orthopyroxenes with high Mg content, Fe rich orthopyroxenes have not been studied as extensively. [3] The goal of this research is to determine the optical constants of orthopyroxenes ranging in composition along the enstatite-ferrosilite solid solution, to gain a more comprehensive list of these values. Specular reflectance spectra, in the range of 250-4000 cm-1, were obtained for several oriented single crystal samples at three crystallographic orientations for each sample. Optical constants, n and k, were then derived through modeling of measured spectra using the Matlab lsqcurvefit function. Preveous work has identified the optical constants for two Mg rich natural samples, enstatite and hypersthene. Current research applies the above methodology to synthetic ferrosilite, the Fe rich end-member of the orthopyroxene mineral series. Future studies will provide a more comprehensive look at the variation of n and k as a function of the Mg:Fe composition. [1] Arnold, J.A. et al (2013) (under review), [2] Glotch, T.D. and Rossman, G.R. (2009) Icarus, [3] Jäger, C. et al (1998) Astron. Astrophys.

  10. Cosmological Constant or Variable Dark Energy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu; LIU Hong-Ya

    2007-01-01

    @@ Selection statics of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) model and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC)model are applied to the Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model, the constant equation of state of dark energy, w =constant, and the parametrized equation of state of dark energy, w(z) = w0 + w1z/(1 + z),to determine which one is the better cosmological model to describe the evolution of the universe by combining the recent cosmic observational data including Sne Ia, the size of baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from SDSS, the three-year WMAP CMB shift parameter. The results show that AIC, BIC and current datasets are not powerful enough to discriminate one model from the others, though odds suggest differences between them.

  11. Discrete Higgs and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Amore, Paolo; Diaz-Cruz, J Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    It is proposed that the Higgs vacuum possesses a small-scale structure that can explain the large discrepancy between the predicted electroweak vacuum energy density and the observed cosmological constant. An effective Lagrangian description is employed to obtain modifications to the Standard Model predictions that can be tested at collider experiments.

  12. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning for Omega-Regular Systems and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sagar; Gurfinkel, Arie

    2010-01-01

    We develop a learning-based automated Assume-Guarantee (AG) reasoning framework for verifying omega-regular properties of concurrent systems. We study the applicability of non-circular (AGNC) and circular (AG-C) AG proof rules in the context of systems with infinite behaviors. In particular, we show that AG-NC is incomplete when assumptions are restricted to strictly infinite behaviors, while AG-C remains complete. We present a general formalization, called LAG, of the learning based automated AG paradigm. We show how existing approaches for automated AG reasoning are special instances of LAG.We develop two learning algorithms for a class of systems, called infinite regular systems, that combine finite and infinite behaviors. We show that for infinity-regular systems, both AG-NC and AG-C are sound and complete. Finally, we show how to instantiate LAG to do automated AG reasoning for infinite regular, and omega-regular, systems using both AG-NC and AG-C as proof rules

  13. Cardiovascular Responses during Head-Down Crooked Kneeling Position Assumed in Muslim Prayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Ahmad Rufa’i

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Movement dysfunction may be expressed in terms of symptoms experienced in non-physiological postures, and head-down crooked kneeling (HDCK is a posture frequently assumed by Muslims during prayer activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular responses in the HDCK posture. Methods: Seventy healthy volunteers, comprising 35 males and 35 females, participated in the study. Cardiovascular parameters of blood pressure and pulse rate of the participants were measured in rested sitting position and then at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine the differences between cardiovascular responses at rest and in the HDCK posture, and the Student t test was utilized to determine gender difference in cardiovascular responses at rest and at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture. Results: The study showed a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressures at one minute into the HDCK posture and an increase in pulse rate at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture, as compared to the resting values. Rate pressure product also rose at one minute into the HDCK posture, whereas pulse pressure increased at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture, as compared with the resting values. However, no significant change was observed in the mean arterial pressure values. Conclusion: The findings from this study suggest that no adverse cardiovascular event can be expected to occur for the normal duration of this posture during Muslim prayer activities.

  14. Cardiovascular Responses during Head-Down Crooked Kneeling Position Assumed in Muslim Prayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Rufa’i, Adamu; Hamu Aliyu, Hadeezah; Yunoos Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje; Lukman Oyeyemi, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    Background: Movement dysfunction may be expressed in terms of symptoms experienced in non-physiological postures, and head-down crooked kneeling (HDCK) is a posture frequently assumed by Muslims during prayer activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular responses in the HDCK posture. Methods: Seventy healthy volunteers, comprising 35 males and 35 females, participated in the study. Cardiovascular parameters of blood pressure and pulse rate of the participants were measured in rested sitting position and then at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine the differences between cardiovascular responses at rest and in the HDCK posture, and the Student t test was utilized to determine gender difference in cardiovascular responses at rest and at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture. Results: The study showed a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressures at one minute into the HDCK posture and an increase in pulse rate at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture, as compared to the resting values. Rate pressure product also rose at one minute into the HDCK posture, whereas pulse pressure increased at one and three minutes into the HDCK posture, as compared with the resting values. However, no significant change was observed in the mean arterial pressure values. Conclusion: The findings from this study suggest that no adverse cardiovascular event can be expected to occur for the normal duration of this posture during Muslim prayer activities. PMID:24031108

  15. Prediction for Nonabelian Fine Structure Constants from Multicriticality

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Holger Bech

    1994-01-01

    In developing a model for predicting the nonabelian gauge coupling constants we argue for the phenomenological validity of a ``principle of multiple point criticality''. This is supplemented with the assumption of an ``(grand) anti-unified'' gauge group $SMG^{N_{gen.}}\\sim U(1)^{N_{gen.}}\\times SU(2)^{N_{gen.}}\\times SU(3)^{N_{gen.}}$ that, at the Planck scale, breaks down to the diagonal subgroup. Here $N_{gen}$ is the number of generations which is assumed to be 3. According to this ``multiple point criticality principle'', the Planck scale experimental couplings correspond to multiple point couplings of the bulk phase transition of a lattice gauge theory (with gauge group $SMG^{N_{gen.}}$). Predictions from this principle agree with running nonabelian couplings (after an extrapolation to the Planck scale using the assumption of a ``desert'') to an accuracy of 7\\%. As an explanation for the existence of the multiple point, a speculative model using a glassy lattice gauge theory is presented.

  16. The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  17. The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  18. Variations of fundamental constants and multidimensional gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikova, K. A.; Skvortsova, M. V.

    We try to explain the recently reported large-scale spatial variations of the fine structure constant α, in agreement with other cosmological observations, in the framework of curvature-nonlinear multidimensional gravity. The original theory is reduced to a scalar-tensor theory in four dimensions, and the corresponding isotropic cosmologies are considered in both Einstein and Jordan conformal frames. In the Jordan frame one obtains simultaneous variations of α and the gravitational constant G, equal in magnitude. Long-wave small inhomogeneous perturbations of isotropic models allow for explaining spatial variations of α.

  19. 恒电流刺激下神经元Chay模型的Hopf分岔分析%The Hopf Bifurcation Analysis of the Neuronal Chay Model under Constant Current Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洪明; 张素丽

    2013-01-01

    The Hopf bifurcation of the neuronal Chay model under constant current stimulation is analyzed. Firstly, with the help of software Matlab, the equilibrium point of the Chay model under the considered parameters was found and the stability of equilibrium point was established according to its Jacobian matrix. Secondly, the stability theory was used to study the neuronal Chay model under constant current stimulation. The results show that the the Hopf bifurcation of the Chay model occurs as the considered parameter Ⅰ varies. Finally, the software Mat-lab was employed to support the above theoretical analysis and present numeric simulations.%研究了恒电流刺激下神经元Chay模型的Hopf分岔.首先,利用Matlab软件计算出系统在给定参数下的平衡点,据其Jacobian矩阵得到平衡点的稳定性.其次,根据稳定性理论,研究了恒电流刺激下神经元Chay模型,结果表明随着控制参数I的变化,系统将发生Hopf分岔.最后利用Matlab给出了支持理论分析的数值模拟.

  20. Estimating reaction constants by ab initio molecular modeling: a study on the oxidation of phenol to catechol and hydroquinone in advanced oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ramos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular modeling is growing as a research tool in Chemical Engineering studies, as can be seen by a simple research on the latest publications in the field. Molecular investigations retrieve information on properties often accessible only by expensive and time-consuming experimental techniques, such as those involved in the study of radical-based chain reactions. In this work, different quantum chemical techniques were used to study phenol oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in Advanced Oxidation Processes used for wastewater treatment. The results obtained by applying a DFT-based model showed good agreement with experimental values available, as well as qualitative insights into the mechanism of the overall reaction chain. Solvation models were also tried, but were found to be limited for this reaction system within the considered theoretical level without further parameterization.

  1. The effects of reasoning, use of models, sex type, and their interactions on posttest achievement in chemical bonding after constant instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to determine the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Eighty-four high school students taking chemistry were randomly assigned within their classes to models and no models groups for the posttest. Reasoning capabilities were assessed by the Piagetian Logical Operations Test (PLOT) (Staver & Gabel, JRST, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1979), prior to instruction. All students then received the same instruction on chemical bonding which included teacher demonstrations of concepts with three-dimensional molecular models, interspersed teacher questions during the introduction and development of concepts, student manipulation of three-dimensional molecular models during laboratory experiments, and text reading assignments on concepts prior to their instruction in class. The posttest on molecular geometry and shape contained three sections requiring memory and application (Bloom, Taxonomy of educational objective, handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay, 1956). Data were analyzed by regression (Nie et al., Statistical package for the social sciences, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975). Results indicate that reasoning accounted for a significant portion (p 0.05) portion of the variance on total scores or any section of posttest. The three-way interaction of reasoning, model usage, and sex type accounted for a significant portion (p < 0.05) of the variance in total scores, and in the memory and application sections of the posttest. Discussion focused on the results, conclusions, and implications for science teaching.

  2. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION ... constants of manganese (II) amino acid complexes using potentiometer. .... Principles of Biochemistry Third Edition,. Worth publishers, 41 ...

  3. Constant harvest rate for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California based on catchability-at-length estimations

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Constant harvest rate as a management strategy for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California is supported by an analysis of variations in the catchability coefficient (q), stock abundance and commercial catch. Catchability was analyzed based on population length-structured data standard length (SL), expressed as CPUE, for 26 fishing seasons (1972-1973 to 1997-1998). We used a deterministic model of catchability to estimate the catchability-at-length assuming ...

  4. Variation of fundamental constants: theory and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2007-01-01

    Review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fundamental constants is presented including atomic clocks, quasar absorption spectra, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. Assuming linear variation with time we can compare different results. From the quasar absorption spectra: $\\dot{\\mu}/\\mu=(1 \\pm 3) \\times 10^{-16}$ yr$^{-1}$. A combination of this result and the atomic clock results gives the best limt on variation of $\\alpha$: $\\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha=(-0.8 \\pm 0.8) \\times 10^{-16}$ yr$^{-1}$. The Oklo natural reactor gives the best limit on the variation of $m_s/\\Lambda_{QCD}$ where $m_s$ is the strange quark mass. Huge enhancement of the relative variation effects happens in transitions between close atomic, molecular and nuclear energy levels. We suggest several new cases where the levels are very narrow. Large enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feshbach resonance. Massive bodies (stars or galaxies) can also affect physical constants....

  5. Varying constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. It is thus of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We thus detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, Solar system observations, meteorites dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describ...

  6. Ruzsa's Constant on Additive Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Hui FANG; Yong Gao CHEN

    2013-01-01

    A function f:N → R is called additive if f(mn) =f(m)+f(n) for all m,n with (m,n) =1.Let μ(x) =maxn≤x(f(n)-f(n + 1)) and v(x) =maxn≤x(f(n + 1)-f(n)).In 1979,Ruzsa proved that there exists a constant c such that for any additive function f,μ(x) ≤ cv(x2) + cf,where cf is a constant depending only on f.Denote by Raf the least such constant c.We call Raf Ruzsa's constant on additive functions.In this paper,we prove that Raf ≤ 20.

  7. Naturally Time Dependent Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Gregori, A

    2004-01-01

    In the light of the proposal of hep-th/0207195, we discuss in detail the issue of the cosmological constant, explaining how can string theory naturally predict the value which is experimentally observed, without low-energy supersymmetry.

  8. The Effects of Reasoning, Use of Models, Sex Type, and Their Interactions on Posttest Achievement in Chemical Bonding after Constant Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    Determined the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Indicates that chemistry students' (N=84) reasoning capabilities influenced performance; other variables were not significant. Other conclusions are noted and discussed. (DH)

  9. Ion transport in thin cell electrodeposition: modelling three-ion electrolytes in dense branched morphology under constant voltage and current conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States) and Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: marshalg@mail.retina.ar; Molina, F.V. [INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Soba, A. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2005-05-30

    Electrochemical deposition (ECD) and spatially coupled bipolar electrochemistry (SCBE) experiments in thin-layer cells are known to produce complex ion transport patterns concomitantly with the growth of dendrite-like structures. Here we present a macroscopic model of ECD and SCBE with a three-ion electrolyte in conditions of dense branched morphology. The model describes ion transport and deposit growth through the one-dimensional Nernst-Planck equations for ion transport, the Poisson equation for the electric field and, for ECD, a growth law for deposit evolution. We present numerical simulations for typical electrochemical deposition experiments: dense branched morphology in ECD and the incubation period in SCBE. In ECD the model predicts cation, anion and proton concentration profiles, electric field variations and deposit growth speed, that are in qualitative agreement with experiments; the predicted evolution and collision of the deposit and proton fronts reveal a time scaling close to those observed in experiments. In SCBE, the model predicts that the inverse of the incubation time scales linearly with the applied voltage. Such behaviour was observed in experiments.

  10. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jenkins, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study.

  11. The background Friedmannian Hubble constant in relativistic inhomogeneous cosmology and the age of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F.; Mourier, Pierre; Buchert, Thomas; Ostrowski, Jan J.

    2017-02-01

    Context. In relativistic inhomogeneous cosmology, structure formation couples to average cosmological expansion. A conservative approach to modelling this assumes an Einstein-de Sitter model (EdS) at early times and extrapolates this forward in cosmological time as a "background model" against which average properties of today's Universe can be measured. Aims: This modelling requires adopting an early-epoch-normalised background Hubble constant . Methods: Here, we show that the ΛCDM model can be used as an observational proxy to estimate rather than choose it arbitrarily. We assume (i) an EdS model at early times; (ii) a zero dark energy parameter; (iii) bi-domain scalar averaging-division of the spatial sections into over- and underdense regions; and (iv) virialisation (stable clustering) of collapsed regions. Results: We find km s-1/ Mpc (random error only) based on a Planck ΛCDM observational proxy. Conclusions: Moreover, since the scalar-averaged expansion rate is expected to exceed the (extrapolated) background expansion rate, the expected age of the Universe should be much younger than Gyr. The maximum stellar age of Galactic bulge microlensed low-mass stars (most likely: 14.7 Gyr; 68% confidence: 14.0-15.0 Gyr) suggests an age of about a Gyr older than the (no-backreaction) ΛCDM estimate.

  12. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  13. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  14. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  15. Early Universe Constraints on Time Variation of Fundamental Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Susana J; Scoccola, Claudia G; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-01-01

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, CMB and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, and the Higgs vacuum expectation value $$ without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in $$ leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of $\\alpha$ and the electron mass $m_e$. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  16. When is the growth index constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polarski, David; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Giacomini, Hector

    2016-12-01

    The growth index γ is an interesting tool to assess the phenomenology of dark energy (DE) models, in particular of those beyond general relativity (GR). We investigate the possibility for DE models to allow for a constant γ during the entire matter and DE dominated stages. It is shown that if DE is described by quintessence (a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity), this behaviour of γ is excluded either because it would require a transition to a phantom behaviour at some finite moment of time, or, in the case of tracking DE at the matter dominated stage, because the relative matter density Ωm appears to be too small. An infinite number of solutions, with Ωm and γ both constant, are found with wDE = 0 corresponding to Einstein-de Sitter universes. For all modified gravity DE models satisfying Geff >= G, among them the f(R) DE models suggested in the literature, the condition to have a constant wDE is strongly violated at the present epoch. In contrast, DE tracking dust-like matter deep in the matter era, but with Ωm G and an example is given using scalar-tensor gravity for a range of admissible values of γ. For constant wDE inside GR, departure from a quasi-constant value is limited until today. Even a large variation of wDE may not result in a clear signature in the change of γ. The change however is substantial in the future and the asymptotic value of γ is found while its slope with respect to Ωm (and with respect to z) diverges and tends to ‑∞.

  17. Resonances in the rotational constants of 0_{g}^{-}(6s_{1/2}+6p_{1/2}) Cs2 levels analysed by an improved-Bv-formula associated to a 2-channel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelassi, Haikel; Pruvost, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in 0g-(6s1/2+6p1/2) long-range molecular levels of Cs2 assigned to resonances in the rotational constant (Bv) spectrum (Lignier L. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 13 (2011) 18910; Pichler M. et al., J. Chem. Phys., 121 (2004) 1796) has been analyzed with a model which associates an improved-B v -formula (established here) and a 2-channel model. The approach explains the Lorentzian shape of the observed resonances superimposing a non-horizontal background and the fit of the B v -spectrum allows us to deduce the spin-orbit coupling parameters. We compare this approach with an analysis of the binding energies using the vibrational quantum defect (VQD). The good agreement between the methods lets one conclude that the improved-B v -formula associated with a 2-channel model provides a pertinent approach for analyzing coupled molecular series.

  18. Bayesian Approach for Constant-Stress Accelerated Life Testing for Kumaraswamy Weibull Distribution with Censoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Abd-Alla EL-Helbawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated life tests provide quick information on the life time distributions by testing materials or products at higher than basic conditional levels of stress such as pressure, high temperature, vibration, voltage or load to induce failures. In this paper, the acceleration model assumed is log linear model. Constant stress tests are discussed based on Type I and Type II censoring. The Kumaraswmay Weibull distribution is used. The estimators of the parameters, reliability, hazard rate functions and p-th percentile at normal condition, low stress, and high stress are obtained. In addition, credible intervals for parameters of the models are constructed. Optimum test plan are designed. Some numerical studies are used to solve the complicated integrals such as Laplace and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods.

  19. Negative Energy Cosmology and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Prokopec, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that string theories naturally compactify on anti-de Sitter spaces, and yet cosmological observations show no evidence of a negative cosmological constant in the early Universe's evolution. In this letter we present two simple nonlocal modifications of the standard Friedmann cosmology that can lead to observationally viable cosmologies with an initial (negative) cosmological constant. The nonlocal operators we include are toy models for the quantum cosmological backreaction. In Model I an initial quasiperiodic oscillatory epoch is followed by inflation and a late time matter era, representing a dark matter candidate. The backreaction in Model II quickly compensates the negative cosmological term such that the Ricci curvature scalar rapidly approaches zero, and the Universe ends up in a late time radiation era.

  20. Measurement and modeling of acid dissociation constants of tri-peptides containing Glu, Gly, and His using potentiometry and generalized multiplicative analysis of variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Rima Raffoul; Sutton, Gordon J; Hibbert, D Brynn; Ebrahimi, Diako

    2013-02-28

    We report pK(a) values with measurement uncertainties for all labile protons of the 27 tri-peptides prepared from the amino acids glutamic acid (E), glycine (G) and histidine (H). Each tri-peptide (GGG, GGE, GGH, …, HHH) was subjected to alkali titration and pK(a) values were calculated from triplicate potentiometric titrations data using HyperQuad 2008 software. A generalized multiplicative analysis of variance (GEMANOVA) of pK(a) values for the most acidic proton gave the optimum model having two terms, an interaction between the end amino acids plus an isolated main effect of the central amino acid.