WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling radionuclide transport

  1. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  2. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  3. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2005-11-01

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  4. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  5. Natural analogues and radionuclide transport model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, some possible roles for natural analogues are discussed from the point of view of those involved with the development of mathematical models for radionuclide transport and with the use of these models in repository safety assessments. The characteristic features of a safety assessment are outlined in order to address the questions of where natural analogues can be used to improve our understanding of the processes involved and where they can assist in validating the models that are used. Natural analogues have the potential to provide useful information about some critical processes, especially long-term chemical processes and migration rates. There is likely to be considerable uncertainty and ambiguity associated with the interpretation of natural analogues, and thus it is their general features which should be emphasized, and models with appropriate levels of sophistication should be used. Experience gained in modelling the Koongarra uranium deposit in northern Australia is drawn upon. (author)

  6. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 240 Pu, and 3 H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay

  7. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  8. A model for radionuclide transport in the Cooling Water System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahook, S.D.

    1992-08-01

    A radionuclide transport model developed to assess radiological levels in the K-reactor Cooling Water System (CWS) in the event of an inadvertent process water (PW) leakage to the cooling water (CW) in the heat exchangers (HX) is described. During and following a process water leak, the radionuclide transport model determines the time-dependent release rates of radionuclide from the cooling water system to the environment via evaporation to the atmosphere and blow-down to the Savannah River. The developed model allows for delay times associated with the transport of the cooling water radioactivity through cooling water system components. Additionally, this model simulates the time-dependent behavior of radionuclides levels in various CWS components. The developed model is incorporated into the K-reactor Cooling Tower Activity (KCTA) code. KCTA allows the accident (heat exchanger leak rate) and the cooling tower blow-down and evaporation rates to be described as time-dependent functions. Thus, the postulated leak and the consequence of the assumed leak can be modelled realistically. This model is the first of three models to be ultimately assembled to form a comprehensive Liquid Pathway Activity System (LPAS). LPAS will offer integrated formation, transport, deposition, and release estimates for radionuclides formed in a SRS facility. Process water and river water modules are forthcoming as input and downstream components, respectively, for KCTA

  9. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada

  10. LASL models for environmental transport of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Smith, W.J.; Johnson, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been developing techniques for evaluating the adequacy of shallow land radioactive disposal sites to contain disposed radionuclides. This report discusses developments in applying a Biological Transport Model to simulate the cycling of plutonium in pinyon-juniper, and ponderosa pine forest ecosystems through serial stage developments using plant growth dynamics created in the model

  11. Modelling of radionuclide transport in forests: Review and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.; Schell, W.; Linkov, I.

    1997-01-01

    Ecological modeling is a powerful tool which can be used to synthesize information on the dynamic processes which occur in ecosystems. Models of radionuclide transport in forests were first constructed in the mid-1960's, when the consequences of global fallout from nuclear weapons tests and waste disposal in the environment were of great concern. Such models were developed based on site-specific experimental data and were designed to address local needs. These models had a limited applicability in evaluating distinct ecosystems and deposition scenarios. Given the scarcity of information, the same experimental data sets were often used both for model calibration and validation, an approach which clearly constitutes a methodological error. Even though the carry modeling attempts were far from being faultless, they established a useful conceptual approach in that they tried to capture general processes in ecosystems and thus had a holistic nature. Later, radioecological modeling attempted to reveal ecosystem properties by separating the component parts from the whole system, as an approach to simplification. This method worked well for radionuclide transport in agricultural ecosystems, in which the biogeochemistry of radionuclide cycling is relatively well understood and can be influenced by fertilization. Several models have been successfully developed and applied to human dose evaluation and emergency response to contaminating events in agricultural lands

  12. GIS Modelling of Radionuclide Transport from the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakay, L.; Zakarin, E.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the software complex GIS-project MigRad (Migration of Radionuclide) was developed, tested and applied for the territory of the Semipalatinsk test site/ polygon (Republic of Kazakhstan), where since 1961, in total 348 underground nuclear explosions were conducted. The MigRad is oriented on integration of large volumes of different information (mapping, ground-based, and satellite-based survey): and also includes modeling on its base local redistribution of radionuclides by precipitation and surface waters and by long-range transport of radioactive aerosols. The existing thermal anomaly on territory of the polygon was investigated in details, and the object-oriented analysis was applied for the studied area. Employing the RUNOFF model, the simulation of radionuclides migration with surface waters was performed. Employing the DERMA model, the simulation of long-term atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition patterns for cesium was conducted from 3 selected locations (Balapan, Delegen, and Experimental Field). Employing geoinformation technology, the mapping of the of the high temperature zones and epicenters of radioactive aerosols transport for the territory of the test site was carried out with post-processing and integration of modelling results into GIS environment. Contamination levels of pollution due to former nuclear explosions for population and environment of the surrounding polygon territories of Kazakhstan as well as adjacent countries were analyzed and evaluated. The MigRad was designed as instrument for comprehensive analysis of complex territorial processes influenced by former nuclear explosions on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. It provides possibilities in detailed analyses for (i) extensive cartographic material, remote sensing, and field measurements data collected in different level databases; (ii) radionuclide migration with flows using accumulation and redistribution of soil particles; (iii) thermal anomalies

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the PATHWAY radionuclide transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otis, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Procedures were developed for the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a dynamic model of radionuclide transport through human food chains. Uncertainty in model predictions was estimated by propagation of parameter uncertainties using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Sensitivity of model predictions to individual parameters was investigated using the partial correlation coefficient of each parameter with model output. Random values produced for the uncertainty analysis were used in the correlation analysis for sensitivity. These procedures were applied to the PATHWAY model which predicts concentrations of radionuclides in foods grown in Nevada and Utah and exposed to fallout during the period of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in Nevada. Concentrations and time-integrated concentrations of iodine-131, cesium-136, and cesium-137 in milk and other foods were investigated. 9 figs., 13 tabs

  14. ITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT CONCEPTUAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUBSURFACE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of radionuclide contaminants in ground water often begins with the development of conceptual and analytical models that guide our understanding of the processes controlling radionuclide transport. The reliability of these models is often predicated on the collection o...

  15. Modelling the transport of radionuclides through the freshwater environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, J.; Galvao, J.P.; Foulquier; Pieri, J.; Belli, M.; Vanderbourght, O.

    1993-01-01

    The main objectives of the project are to identify areas where the present generation of models are breaking down, and to improve the fundamental knowledge in these areas so that more easily transportable (generic) models can be developed. Preliminary studies on the importance of bacteria in the food chain have also been included. Several areas of model limitation have been identified and potential causes have been hypothesized. Steady progress is being made towards the verification of these hypotheses and the ultimate goal of a generic model of radionuclide transport in the aquatic environment. Objectives and results of the nine contributions of the project for the reporting period are discussed. (R.P.) 13 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Simplified analytical model for radionuclide transport simulation in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromoto, G.

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from a low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, an integrated safety assessment methodology has being developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The source-term modelling approach adopted in this system is described and the results obtained in the IAEA NSARS 'The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities' programme for model intercomparison studies are presented. The radionuclides released from the waste are calculated using a simple first order kinetics model, and the transport, through porous media below the waste is determined by using an analytical solution of the mass transport equation. The methodology and the results obtained in this work are compared with those reported by others participants of the NSARS programme. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  17. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  19. A model for radionuclide transport by colloids in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, E.

    1993-01-01

    This research project finds its place in the framework of the coordinated RADWAS-program and is found under the contract F12W-CT91-0079 of the Commission of European Communities. Five partners are involved in the project: Ecole des Mines de Paris/ARMINES (E. Ledoux, J. van der Lee); INTAKTA (M.D. de Cayeux); Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene (R. van der Weerd); CNRS-Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (J. Dodds, M. Sardin, E. Rodier); ENRESA-CIEMAT (J. Astudillo, A. Hernandez). The main objective of the project is the development of a mathematical model for the migration of colloids and associated radionuclides in groundwaters through geological media. Laboratory migration experiments support the model development and will be used to test the validity of the computer codes. Furthermore, the model must be able to interpret field experiments in order to be applicable as a safety assessment tool for radioactive waste disposals. The project work can be divided into three parts: 1. Theoretical work including a literature survey, formulation of conceptual models, screening of phenomena by means of simple calculations and development of preliminary computer codes. Formulation of the general outline of a final mathematical concept. 2. Migration experiments in laboratory aimed at studying the fundamental transport mechanisms for colloidal substances. Model or artificial colloids are preferable in this stage to achieve fully controlled conditions. Modeling results will stimulate experimental design. Finally, natural geological media will be used to investigate the applicability of fundamental transport mechanisms to a more realistic environment. 3. Final model development, resulting in an operational tool for column experiments and long term safety assessment. A field data base will be compiled and applied to the model for validation purposes. 3 figs

  20. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  2. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  3. PATHWAY: a simulation model of radionuclide-transport through agricultural food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Otis, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    PATHWAY simulates the transport of radionuclides from fallout through an agricultural ecosystem. The agro-ecosystem is subdivided into several land management units, each of which is used either for grazing animals, for growing hay, or for growing food crops. The model simulates the transport of radionuclides by both discrete events and continuous, time-dependent processes. The discrete events include tillage of soil, harvest and storage of crops,and deposition of fallout. The continuous processes include the transport of radionuclides due to resuspension, weathering, rain splash, percolation, leaching, adsorption and desorption of radionuclides in the soil, root uptake, foliar absorption, growth and senescence of vegetation, and the ingestion assimilation, and excretion of radionuclides by animals. Preliminary validation studies indicate that the model dynamics and simulated values of radionuclide concentrations in several agricultural products agree well with measured values when the model is driven with site specific data on deposition from world-wide fallout

  4. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  5. Modelling of the radionuclide transport through terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanusik, V.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a terrestrial food chains model for computing potential human intake of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during normal NPP operation. Attention is paid to the choice of model parameter values. Results obtained by our approach are compared to those applied in current methodology. (orig.) [de

  6. Modelling radionuclide transport in the geosphere: a review of the models available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacas, M.C.; Cordier, E.; Coudrain-Ribstein, A.; Fargue, D.; Goblet, P.; Jamet, Ph.; Ledoux, E.; Marsily, G. de; Vinsot, A.; Brun, Ch.; Cernes, A.; Jacquier, Ph.; Lewi, J.; Priem, Th.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last twelve years, several models have been developed to simulate the transport of radionuclides in the environment of a radioactive waste repository: - continuous equivalent porous media flow and transport models using the finite element method in 1, 2 or 3 dimensions and taking into account various coupled mechanisms; - discontinuous stochastic fracture network models in 3 dimensions representing flow, transport, matrix diffusion, heat flow and mechanical stress; - geochemical models representing interactions between transported elements and a solid matrix; - transport process models coupling non dominant phenomena such as thermo-diffusion or thermo-gravitation. This paper reviews the role that each of these models can play in safety analyses. 3 refs [fr

  7. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  8. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the work was to provide supplementary input to the risk assessment of a planned final nuclear waste repository at Forsmark. The main deliverable was a computed water exchange between basins in the Forsmark marine area for the period 6500 BC to 9000 AD - based on the hydrodynamic modelling - to be used as input to the landscape dose model. In addition and what is described in this report, a second deliverable was development and application of high-resolution models for the marine ecosystem and radionuclide processes. The purpose of this deliverable was to illustrate the spatial and temporal variation in important processes and parameters, while constituting a complement to previous modelling approaches and providing supporting information to discussions of the marine ecosystem, parameters and variation (see Chapter 4 and 6).To this end, a hydrodynamic model of high temporal and spatial resolution was constructed and calibrated for the Forsmark area. An ecosystem model was then developed and coupled to the hydrodynamic model. In turn, a detailed radionuclide model was coupled to the ecosystem model to provide detailed predictions of radionuclide transport and accumulation in the coastal ecosystem. The ecosystem and radionuclide models were developed in the equation solver MIKE ECOLab that links seamless to the MIKE3 FM hydrodynamic model. The 'standard' ECOLab ecosystem model was extended with six biological state variables, perennial macroalgae, benthic herbivors, detritus feeders, planktivorus fish and, benthic predators representing the relict isopod Saduria and cod. In contrast to the ecosystem model, the radionuclide model was developed from scratch but building on the structure of the ecosystem model and using the output (process rates linking state variables) from the ecosystem model as input to the radionuclide model. Both the ecosystem model and the radionuclide model were run for several years (5-8 years) to bring state variables into quasi

  9. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes [DHI, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of the work was to provide supplementary input to the risk assessment of a planned final nuclear waste repository at Forsmark. The main deliverable was a computed water exchange between basins in the Forsmark marine area for the period 6500 BC to 9000 AD - based on the hydrodynamic modelling - to be used as input to the landscape dose model. In addition and what is described in this report, a second deliverable was development and application of high-resolution models for the marine ecosystem and radionuclide processes. The purpose of this deliverable was to illustrate the spatial and temporal variation in important processes and parameters, while constituting a complement to previous modelling approaches and providing supporting information to discussions of the marine ecosystem, parameters and variation (see Chapter 4 and 6).To this end, a hydrodynamic model of high temporal and spatial resolution was constructed and calibrated for the Forsmark area. An ecosystem model was then developed and coupled to the hydrodynamic model. In turn, a detailed radionuclide model was coupled to the ecosystem model to provide detailed predictions of radionuclide transport and accumulation in the coastal ecosystem. The ecosystem and radionuclide models were developed in the equation solver MIKE ECOLab that links seamless to the MIKE3 FM hydrodynamic model. The 'standard' ECOLab ecosystem model was extended with six biological state variables, perennial macroalgae, benthic herbivors, detritus feeders, planktivorus fish and, benthic predators representing the relict isopod Saduria and cod. In contrast to the ecosystem model, the radionuclide model was developed from scratch but building on the structure of the ecosystem model and using the output (process rates linking state variables) from the ecosystem model as input to the radionuclide model. Both the ecosystem model and the radionuclide model were run for several years (5-8 years) to bring state variables into quasi

  10. A study on the radionuclide transport through fractured porous media based on the network resistance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ki Ha

    2000-02-01

    Before the actual construction of radioactive waste repository, analysis of radionuclide transport is required to predict the radiological effect on public and environment. Many models have been developed to predict the realistic radionuclide transport through the repository. In this study, Network Resistance Model (NRM) that is similar to electrical circuit network is adopted to simulate the radionuclide transport. NRM assume the media of repository as the resistance of the radionuclide transport and describes the transport phenomena of radionuclide by connecting the resistance as network. NRM is easy to apply to describe complex system and take less calculation time compared to the other model. The object of this study is to develop the fast, simple and efficient calculation method to simulate the radionuclide with the newly adopted concept using network resistance. New system configuration specially focused on rock edge region is introduced by dividing the rock matrix. By dividing the rock edge from the main rock matrix region, the rock edge region is more carefully analyzed and compared. Rock edge region can accelerate radionuclide transport due to the reducing effect on the total resistivity of rock matrix. Therefore, increased radioactive dose is expected when we apply NRM methodology in the performance assessment of the repository. Result of the performance assessment can be more conservative and reliable. NRM can be applied to other system configuration and for more complex pathways. NRM is simple to us e and easy to modify than any other modeling method

  11. MIGFRAC - a code for modelling of radionuclide transport in fracture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayana, S.V.M.; Mohankumar, N.; Sasidhar, P.

    2002-05-01

    Radionuclides migrate through diffusion process from radioactive waste disposal facilities into fractures present in the host rock. The transport phenomenon is aided by the circulating ground waters. To model the transport of radionuclides in the charnockite rock formations present at Kalpakkam, a numerical code - MIGFRAC has been developed at SHINE Group, IGCAR. The code has been subjected to rigorous tests and the results of the build up of radionuclide concentrations are validated with a test case up to a distance of 100 meter along the fracture. The report discusses the model, code features and the results obtained up to a distance of 400 meter are presented. (author)

  12. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  13. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  14. Capabilities and requirements for modelling radionuclide transport in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, R.W.; Piper, D.

    1989-02-01

    This report gives an overview of geosphere flow and transport models suitable for use by the Department of the Environment in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal sites. An outline methodology for geosphere modelling is proposed, consisting of a number of different types of model. A brief description of each of the component models is given, indicating the purpose of the model, the processes being modelled and the methodologies adopted. Areas requiring development are noted. (author)

  15. Mathematical Basis and Test Cases for Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport Modeling in GDSA-PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report provides documentation of the mathematical basis for a colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport modeling capability that can be incorporated into GDSA-PFLOTRAN. It also provides numerous test cases against which the modeling capability can be benchmarked once the model is implemented numerically in GDSA-PFLOTRAN. The test cases were run using a 1-D numerical model developed by the author, and the inputs and outputs from the 1-D model are provided in an electronic spreadsheet supplement to this report so that all cases can be reproduced in GDSA-PFLOTRAN, and the outputs can be directly compared with the 1-D model. The cases include examples of all potential scenarios in which colloid-facilitated transport could result in the accelerated transport of a radionuclide relative to its transport in the absence of colloids. Although it cannot be claimed that all the model features that are described in the mathematical basis were rigorously exercised in the test cases, the goal was to test the features that matter the most for colloid-facilitated transport; i.e., slow desorption of radionuclides from colloids, slow filtration of colloids, and equilibrium radionuclide partitioning to colloids that is strongly favored over partitioning to immobile surfaces, resulting in a substantial fraction of radionuclide mass being associated with mobile colloids.

  16. Implementation of the aquatic radionuclide transport models RIVTOX and COASTOX into the RODOS System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, D.; Lyashenko, G.; Marinets, A.; Mezhueva, I.; Shepeleva, T.; Tkalich, P.; Zheleznyak, M.

    1996-01-01

    The one -dimensional model of radionuclide transport in a network of river channel RIVTOX and two-dimensional lateral-longitudinal model of radionuclide transport in rivers, reservoirs and shallow lakes COASTOX have been implemented into the hydrological model chain of the decision support system RODOS. The software framework is developed to operate the models and to support their coupling with the other parts of RODOS hydrological model chain. The validation studies were performed for RIVTOX and COASTOX on the base of the data sets from Ukrainian, German and United States rivers

  17. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9

  18. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes

  19. Preliminary integrated calculation of radionuclide cation and anion transport at Yucca Mountain using a geochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsell, K.H.; Campbell, K.; Eggert, K.G.; Travis, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary transport calculations for radionuclide movement at Yucca Mountain using preliminary data for mineral distributions, retardation parameter distributions, and hypothetical recharge scenarios. These calculations are not performance assessments, but are used to study the effectiveness of the geochemical barriers at the site at mechanistic level. The preliminary calculations presented have many shortcomings and should be viewed only as a demonstration of the modeling methodology. The simulations were run with TRACRN, a finite-difference porous flow and radionuclide transport code developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. Approximately 30,000 finite-difference nodes are used to represent the unsaturated and saturated zones underlying the repository in three dimensions. Sorption ratios for the radionuclides modeled are assumed to be functions of mineralogic assemblages of the underlying rock. These transport calculations present a representative radionuclide cation, 135 Cs and anion, 99 Tc. The effects on transport of many of the processes thought to be active at Yucca Mountain may be examined using this approach. The model provides a method for examining the integration of flow scenarios, transport, and retardation processes as currently understood for the site. It will also form the basis for estimates of the sensitivity of transport calculations to retardation processes. 11 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  20. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  1. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive

  2. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes (DHI, Hoersholm (Denmark))

    2010-06-15

    The aim of the work was to provide supplementary input to the risk assessment of a planned final nuclear waste repository at Forsmark. The main deliverable was a computed water exchange between basins in the Forsmark marine area for the period 6500 BC to 9000 AD - based on the hydrodynamic modelling - to be used as input to the landscape dose model. In addition and what is described in this report, a second deliverable was development and application of high-resolution models for the marine ecosystem and radionuclide processes. The purpose of this deliverable was to illustrate the spatial and temporal variation in important processes and parameters, while constituting a complement to previous modelling approaches and providing supporting information to discussions of the marine ecosystem, parameters and variation (see Chapter 4 and 6).To this end, a hydrodynamic model of high temporal and spatial resolution was constructed and calibrated for the Forsmark area. An ecosystem model was then developed and coupled to the hydrodynamic model. In turn, a detailed radionuclide model was coupled to the ecosystem model to provide detailed predictions of radionuclide transport and accumulation in the coastal ecosystem. The ecosystem and radionuclide models were developed in the equation solver MIKE ECOLab that links seamless to the MIKE3 FM hydrodynamic model. The 'standard' ECOLab ecosystem model was extended with six biological state variables, perennial macroalgae, benthic herbivors, detritus feeders, planktivorus fish and, benthic predators representing the relict isopod Saduria and cod. In contrast to the ecosystem model, the radionuclide model was developed from scratch but building on the structure of the ecosystem model and using the output (process rates linking state variables) from the ecosystem model as input to the radionuclide model. Both the ecosystem model and the radionuclide model were run for several years (5-8 years) to bring state variables into

  3. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis

  4. Evaluation of selected predictive models and parameters for the environmental transport and dosimetry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Etnier, E.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Little, C.A.; Meyer, H.R.; Shaeffer, D.L.; Till, J.E.

    1979-07-01

    Evaluations of selected predictive models and parameters used in the assessment of the environmental transport and dosimetry of radionuclides are summarized. Mator sections of this report include a validation of the Gaussian plume disperson model, comparison of the output of a model for the transport of 131 I from vegetation to milk with field data, validation of a model for the fraction of aerosols intercepted by vegetation, an evaluation of dose conversion factors for 232 Th, an evaluation of considering the effect of age dependency on population dose estimates, and a summary of validation results for hydrologic transport models

  5. Box modelling approach for evaluation of influence of ice transport of radionuclides for doses to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iospje, M.

    2002-01-01

    Modelling of the ice transport of radionuclides, which is a unique pathway in the Arctic ocean and adjacent sea areas, is limited by necessity to describe complete processes of incorporation of radioactivity into ice and ice sediment. Freezing / melting processes and transport of 'clean' ice can be described with a good accuracy for relatively short time scale on the basis of the present level of modelling, but detailed description of the sediment entrainment into ice based on the Reynolds equations with attention to coagulation processes is limited by low concentration of particles (grease ice cannot be described) and time scale up to 5 . 10 -2 s (1 . 10 -9 y) what is not available for large time scale and ice masses. Adding the radioactivity incorporation into the ice with following description of transport and fate of radionuclides will lead to further increasing of the complexity of the modelling. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an alternative approach for purposes of radiological assessment on the basis of the box modelling to describe the incorporation of radioactivity into ice and ice sediment, transport of radioactivity by ice and incorporation of radioactivity into sea areas through melding processes. It is shown that the ice transport of radionuclides can be a significant factor for some scenarios and radionuclides. The influence of the ice transport increases with increasing K d values for radionuclides. It is necessary to note that the content and structure of the sediment load in ice vary within wide limits, and therefore, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis can improve the possibility to represent model results satisfactorily. (LN)

  6. Distributed models of radionuclide transport on watersheds: development and implementation for the Chernobyl and Fukushima catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivva, S.; Zheleznyak, M. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The distributed hydrological 'rainfall- runoff' models provide possibilities of the physically based simulation of surface and subsurface flow on watersheds based on the GIS processed data. The success of such modeling approaches for the predictions of the runoff and soil erosion provides a basis for the implementation of the distributed radionuclide transport watershed models. Two distributed watershed models of radionuclide transport - RUNTOX and DHSVM-R have been used to simulate the radionuclide transport in the basin of the Dnieper River, Ukraine and watersheds of Prefecture Fukushima. RUNTOX is used for the simulation of radionuclide wash off from the experimental plots and small watersheds, and DHSVM-R is used for medium and large watersheds RUNTOX is two dimensional distributed hydrological model based on the finite-difference solution of the coupled equations the surface flow, subsurface flow, groundwater flow and advection- dispersion equations of the sediments (eroded soil) and radionuclide transport in liquid and solid phases, taking into parameterize the radionuclide exchanges between liquid and solid phases.. This model has been applied to the experimental plots in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident and experimental plots in the Fukushima Prefecture. The experience of RUNTOX development and application has been used for the extension of the distributed hydrological model DHSVM by the including of the module of the watershed radionuclide transport. The updated model was named by DHSMV-R. The original DHSVM (Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model) was developed in the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. DHSVM is a physical distributed hydrology-vegetation model for complex terrain based on the numerical solution of the network of one dimensional equations. The model accounts explicitly for the spatial distribution of land-surface processes, and can be applied over a range of scales, from plot to large

  7. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab

  8. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas

  9. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-01-01

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  10. Modified finite element transport model, FETRA, for sediment and radionuclide migration in open coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Arnold, E.M.; Mayer, D.W.

    1979-08-01

    The finite element model, FETRA, simulates transport of sediment and radionuclides (and other contaminants, such as heavy metals, pesticides, and other toxic substances) in surface water bodies. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model which consists of the following three submodels coupled to include sediment-contaminant interactions: (1) sediment transport submodel, (2) dissolved contaminant transport submodel, and (3) particulate contaminant (contaminant adsorbed by sediment) transport submodel. Under the current phase of the study, FETRA was modified to include sediment-wave interaction in order to extend the applicability of the model to coastal zones and large lakes (e.g., the Great Lakes) where wave actions can be one of the dominant mechanisms to transport sediment and toxic contaminant. FETRA was further modified to handle both linear and quadratic approximations to velocity and depth distributions in order to be compatible with various finite element hydrodynamic models (e.g., RMA II and CAFE) which supply hydrodynamic input data to FETRA. The next step is to apply FETRA to coastal zones to simulate transport of sediment and radionuclides with their interactions in order to test and verify the model under marine and large lacustrine environments

  11. A simplified model for calculating atmospheric radionuclide transport and early health effects from nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1995-01-01

    During certain hypothetical severe accidents in a nuclear power plant, radionuclides could be released to the environment as a plume. Prediction of the atmospheric dispersion and transport of these radionuclides is important for assessment of the risk to the public from such accidents. A simplified PC-based model was developed that predicts time-integrated air concentration of each radionuclide at any location from release as a function of time integrated source strength using the Gaussian plume model. The solution procedure involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position, using simplified meteorology. The formulation allows for dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and daughter buildup, reactor building wake effects, the inversion lid effect, plume rise due to buoyancy or momentum, release duration, and grass height. Based on air and ground concentrations of the radionuclides, the early dose to an individual is calculated via cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation. The model also calculates early health effects based on the doses. This paper presents aspects of the model that would be of interest to the prediction of environmental flows and their public consequences

  12. RETADDII: modeling long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    A versatile model is described which estimates atmospheric dispersion based on plume trajectories calculated for the mixed layer. This model allows the treatment of the dispersal from a source at an arbitrary height while taking account of plume depletion by dry and wet deposition together with the decay of material to successor species. The plume depletion, decay and growth equations are solved in an efficient manner which can accommodate up to eight pollutants (i.e. a parent and seven serial decay products). The code is particularly suitable for applications involving radioactive chain decay or for cases involving chemical species with successor decay products. Arbitrary emission rates can be specified for the members of the chain or, as is commonly the case, a sole emission rate can be specified for the first member. The code, in its current configuration, uses readily available upper-air wind data for the North American continent

  13. Handling Interfaces and Time-varying Properties in Radionuclide Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter; Watson, Claire (Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom))

    2010-12-15

    This report documents studies undertaken by Quintessa during 2010 in preparation for the SR-Site review that will be initiated by SSM in 2011. The studies relate to consequence analysis calculations, that is to the calculation of radionuclide release and transport if a canister is breached. A sister report documents modelling work undertaken to investigate the coupled processes relevant to copper corrosion and buffer erosion. The Q{sub eq} concept is an important part of SKB's current methodology for radionuclide transport using one-dimensional transport modelling; it is used in particular to model transport at the buffer/fracture interface. Quintessa's QPAC code has been used to investigate the Q{sub eq} approach and to explore the importance of heterogeneity in the fracture and spalling on the deposition hole surface. The key conclusions are that: - The basic approach to calculating Q{sub eq} values is sound and can be reproduced in QPAC. - The fracture resistance dominates over the diffusive resistance in the buffer except for the highest velocity cases. - Heterogeneity in the fracture, in terms of uncorrelated random variations in the fracture aperture, tends to reduce releases, so the use of a constant average aperture approach is conservative. - Narrow channels could lead to the same release as larger fractures with the same pore velocity, so a channel enhancement factor of sq root10 should be considered. - A spalling zone that increases the area of contact between flowing water and the buffer has the potential to increase the release significantly and changes the functional dependence of Q{sub eq}frac on the flowing velocity. Quintessa's AMBER software has previously been used to reproduce SKB's one-dimensional transport calculations and AMBER allows the use of time varying properties. This capability has been used to investigate the effects of glacial episodes on radionuclide transport. The main parameters that could be affected are

  14. Handling Interfaces and Time-varying Properties in Radionuclide Transport Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Peter; Watson, Claire

    2010-12-01

    This report documents studies undertaken by Quintessa during 2010 in preparation for the SR-Site review that will be initiated by SSM in 2011. The studies relate to consequence analysis calculations, that is to the calculation of radionuclide release and transport if a canister is breached. A sister report documents modelling work undertaken to investigate the coupled processes relevant to copper corrosion and buffer erosion. The Q eq concept is an important part of SKB's current methodology for radionuclide transport using one-dimensional transport modelling; it is used in particular to model transport at the buffer/fracture interface. Quintessa's QPAC code has been used to investigate the Q eq approach and to explore the importance of heterogeneity in the fracture and spalling on the deposition hole surface. The key conclusions are that: - The basic approach to calculating Q eq values is sound and can be reproduced in QPAC. - The fracture resistance dominates over the diffusive resistance in the buffer except for the highest velocity cases. - Heterogeneity in the fracture, in terms of uncorrelated random variations in the fracture aperture, tends to reduce releases, so the use of a constant average aperture approach is conservative. - Narrow channels could lead to the same release as larger fractures with the same pore velocity, so a channel enhancement factor of √10 should be considered. - A spalling zone that increases the area of contact between flowing water and the buffer has the potential to increase the release significantly and changes the functional dependence of Q eq frac on the flowing velocity. Quintessa's AMBER software has previously been used to reproduce SKB's one-dimensional transport calculations and AMBER allows the use of time varying properties. This capability has been used to investigate the effects of glacial episodes on radionuclide transport. The main parameters that could be affected are sorption coefficients and flow rates. For both

  15. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and point source released radionuclides to an aquatic ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumblad, Linda [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology; Kautsky, Ulrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    In this report three ecosystem models are described in terms of structure, initial data, and results. All models are dynamic, mass-balanced and describe the transport and fate of elements in an open aquatic ecosystem. The models are based on ecologically sound principles, provide model results with high resolution and transparency, and are constrained by the nutrient dynamics of the ecosystem itself. The processes driving the transport in all the models are both the biological processes such as primary production, consumption, respiration and excretion, and abiotic e.g. water exchange and air-sea exchange. The first model, the CNP-model, describes the distribution and fluxes of carbon and nutrients for the coastal ecosystem off Forsmark. The second model, the C-14 model, is an extension of the CNP-model and describes the transport and distribution of hypothetically released C-14 from the underground repository SFR-1 to the ecosystem above. The third model, the RN-model, is a generic radionuclide flow model that models the transport and distribution of radionuclides other than C-14 hypothetically discharged to the ecosystem. The model also analyses the importance of some radionuclide specific mechanisms for the radionuclide flow. The generic radionuclide model is also based on the CNP-model, but has radionuclide specific mechanisms connected to each compartment.

  16. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and point source released radionuclides to an aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumblad, Linda

    2004-09-01

    In this report three ecosystem models are described in terms of structure, initial data, and results. All models are dynamic, mass-balanced and describe the transport and fate of elements in an open aquatic ecosystem. The models are based on ecologically sound principles, provide model results with high resolution and transparency, and are constrained by the nutrient dynamics of the ecosystem itself. The processes driving the transport in all the models are both the biological processes such as primary production, consumption, respiration and excretion, and abiotic e.g. water exchange and air-sea exchange. The first model, the CNP-model, describes the distribution and fluxes of carbon and nutrients for the coastal ecosystem off Forsmark. The second model, the C-14 model, is an extension of the CNP-model and describes the transport and distribution of hypothetically released C-14 from the underground repository SFR-1 to the ecosystem above. The third model, the RN-model, is a generic radionuclide flow model that models the transport and distribution of radionuclides other than C-14 hypothetically discharged to the ecosystem. The model also analyses the importance of some radionuclide specific mechanisms for the radionuclide flow. The generic radionuclide model is also based on the CNP-model, but has radionuclide specific mechanisms connected to each compartment

  17. Analysis gives sensibility two models gives migration and transport gives radionuclides in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Berdeguez, M. B.; Gil Castillo, R.; Peralta Vidal, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    An sensibility analysis it was applied two models, the first one, a model compressible for the near field (I finish source) The second, a simple model gives migration and transport radionuclides in the geosphere. The study was developed varying the securities ed simultaneously at the same time each parameter and observing the results in changes in the output and input. The intention in analysis it is to determine the parameter that but it influences in the variation the concentration. The statistical technique Regression it was employee in the study. This statistical method is used to analyze the dependence between a dependent variable and an or but independent variables

  18. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-12-08

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model

  19. Development and testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rock. An overview of the Nagra/JNC radionuclide retardation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Alexander, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    The joint Nagra/JNC radionuclide Retardation Programme has now been ongoing for more thean 10 years with the main aim of direct testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rocks in as realistic a manner as possible. A large programme of field, laboratory and natural analogue studies has been carried out at the Grimsel Test Site in the central Swiss Alps. The understanding and modelling of both the processes and the structures influencing radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rocks have matured as has the experimental technology, which has contributed to develop confidence in the applicability of the underlying research models in a repository performance assessment. In this report, the successes and set-backs of this programme are discussed as is the general approach to the thorough testing of the process models and of model assumptions. (author)

  20. Radionuclide transport modelling for a buried near surface low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzi, R.

    2004-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste, which is the last step of any radioactive waste management policy, has not yet been developed in Turkey. The existing legislation states only the discharge limits for the radioactive wastes to be discharged to the environment. The objective of this modelling study is to assist in safety assessment and selecting disposal site for gradually increasing non-nuclear radioactive wastes. This mathematical model has been developed for the environmental radiological assessment of near surface disposal sites for the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The model comprised of three main components: source term, geosphere transport and radiological assessment. Radiation dose for the babies (1 years age) and adults (≥17 years age) have been computed for the radionuclides Cesium 137 (Cs-137) and Strontium 90 (Sr-90), having the activity of 1.10 12 Becquerel(Bq), in radioactive waste through transport of radionuclide in liquid phase with the various pathways. The model consisted of first order ordinary differential equations was coded as a TCODE file in MATLAB program. The radiation dose to man for the realist case and low probability case have been calculated by using Runge-Kutta solution method in MATLAB programme for radionuclide transport from repository to soil layer and then to the ground water(saturated zone) through drinking water directly and consuming agricultural and animal products pathways in one year period. Also, the fatal cancer risk assessment has been made by taking into account the annual dose received by people. Various dose values for both radionuclides have been found which depended on distribution coefficient, retardation factor and dose conversion factors. The most important critical parameters on radiological safety assessment are the distribution coefficient in soil layer, seepage velocity in unsaturated zone and thickness of the unsaturated zone (soil zone). The highest radiation dose and average dose to

  1. Conceptual and Numerical Modeling of Radionuclide Transport and Retention in Near-Surface Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pique, Angels; Arcos, David; Grandia, Fidel; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Berglund, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Scenarios of barrier failure and radionuclide release to the near-surface environment are important to consider within performance and safety assessments of repositories for nuclear waste. A geological repository for spent nuclear fuel is planned at Forsmark, Sweden. Conceptual and numerical reactive transport models were developed in order to assess the retention capacity of the Quaternary till and clay deposits for selected radionuclides, in the event of an activity release from the repository. The elements considered were carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), cesium (Cs), iodine (I), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), radium (Ra), selenium (Se), strontium (Sr), technetium (Tc), thorium (Th), and uranium (U). According to the numerical predictions, the repository-derived nuclides that would be most significantly retained are Th, Ni, and Cs, mainly through sorption onto clays, followed by U, C, Sr, and Ra, trapped by sorption and/or incorporation into mineral phases

  2. Modeling of U-series Radionuclide Transport Through Soil at Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekar, K. E.; Goodell, P. C.; Walton, J. C.; Anthony, E. Y.; Ren, M.

    2007-05-01

    . Independent multi-element analyses of three samples by ICP-MS show decreasing uranium concentration with depth as well. The transport of the radionuclides is evaluated using STANMOD, a Windows-based software package for evaluating solute transport in porous media using analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation. The package allows various one-dimensional, advection-dispersion parameters to be determined by fitting mathematical solutions of theoretical transport models to observed data. The results are promising for future work on the release rate of radionuclides from the boulder, the dominant mode of transport (e.g., particulate or dissolution), and the movement of radionuclides through porous media. The measured subsurface transport rates provide modelers with a model validation dataset.

  3. A regional sediment transport modeling for fluvial influx and redistribution of suspended radionuclide in the Fukushima coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yusuke; Yamanishi, Takafumi; Tsumune, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial discharge from the rivers is viewed as a missing piece for the inventory of the radionuclides in the ocean during the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The land-derived input introduces a time lag behind the direct release through hydrological process because these radionuclides mostly attach to suspended particles (sediments) that are transported quite differently to the dissolved matter in the ocean. We therefore develop a regional sediment transport model consisting of a multi-class non-cohesive sediment transport module, a wave-enhanced bed boundary layer model and a stratigraphy model proposed by Blaas et al. (2007) based on ROMS. (author)

  4. Flow modelling and radionuclide transport research and development in saturated and unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Filho, Carlos Alberto de; Branco, Otavio Eurico de Aquino; Loureiro, Celso de Oliveira

    1996-01-01

    The Engenho Nogueira Hydrogeological Project, PROHBEN, was idealized with the goal of implementing an Experimental Hydrogeological basin within its limits, in order to permit the development of hydrogeological studies and techniques, mainly in the modeling of flow and transport of contaminants (radionuclides) in the saturated and unsaturated porous media. The PROHBEN is located in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, amounting a 5 km 2 area. The local porous-granular, heterogeneous and anisotropic, water-table aquifer reaches 40 meters of thickness, and is compound mainly by alluvial deposits and alteration rocks products, with a sandy texture. The flow and transport modeling are being done using the Modflow and MT3D codes. Three master degree researches are being done in the PROHBEN area and one expects is that more researchers come to use this experimental site. (author)

  5. Modelling of radionuclide transport along the underground access structures of deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poller, A. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [SAM Switzerland GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mayer, G.; Hayek, M. [AF-Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    The arrangement and sealing of the access routes to a deep geological repository for radioactive waste should ensure that any radionuclide release from the emplacement rooms during the post closure phase does not by-pass the geological barriers of the repository system to a significant extent. The base case of the present study, where realistic values for the hydraulic properties of the seals and the associated excavation damage zones were assumed, assesses to what extent this is actually the case for different layout variants (ramp and shaft access and shaft access only). Furthermore, as a test of robustness of system performance against uncertainties related to such seals and the associated excavation damage zones, the present study also considers a broad spectrum of calculation cases including the hypothetical possibility that the seals perform much more poorly than expected and to check whether, consequently, the repository tunnel system and the access structures may provide significant release pathways. The study considers a generic repository system for high-level waste (HLW repository) and for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW repository), both with Opalinus Clay as the host rock. It also considers the alternative possibilities of a ramp or a shaft as the access route for material transport (waste packages, etc.) to the underground facilities. Additional shafts, e.g. for the transport of persons and for ventilation, are included in both cases. The overall modelling approach consists of three broad steps: (a) the network of tunnels and access structures is implemented in a flow model, which serves to calculate water flow rates along the tunnels and through the host rock; (b) all relevant transport paths are implemented in a radionuclide release and transport model, the water flow rates being obtained from the preceding flow model calculations; (c) individual effective dose rates arising from the radionuclides released from the considered repository

  6. Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution

  7. Field verification of advanced transport models of radionuclides in heterogeneous soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, W.; Meurs, G.A.M.; Weststrate, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with a verification study of advanced transport models of radionuclides in heterogeneous soils. The study reported here is the third phase of a research program carried out by Delft Geotechnics concerning the influence of soil heterogeneities on the migration of radionuclides in the soil and soil-water system. Phases 1 and 2 have been reported earlier in the EC Nuclear Science and technology series (EUR 12111 EN, 1989). The verification study involves the predictive modelling of a field tracer experiment carried out by the British Geological Survey (BGS) at Drigg, Cumbria (UK). Conservative (I 131 , Cl-, H 3 ) as well as non-conservative (Co-EDTA) tracers were used. The inverse modelling shows that micro dispersion may be considered as a soil constant related to grainsize. Micro dispersion shows a slow increase with distance from the source. This increase is caused by mass transfer between adjacent layers of different permeability. Macro dispersion is observed when sampling over a larger interval then permitted by the detail with which the heterogeneity is described in the model. The prediction of the migration of radionuclides through heterogeneous soils is possible. The advection dispersion equation seems to be an adequate description of the migration of conservative tracers. The models based on this equation give comparable results on a small field test scale (3.5 m). The prediction of the migration of adsorbing species is more difficult. The mathematical descriptions seem appropriate, but the heterogeneity in soils seems to create a higher order of uncertainty which can not be described as yet with calculation strategies available at this moment

  8. Modeling of radionuclide transport through rock formations and the resulting radiation exposure of reference persons. Calculations using Asse II parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueppers, Christian; Ustohalova, Veronika; Steinhoff, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The long-term release of radioactivity into the ground water path cannot be excluded for the radioactive waste repository Asse II. The possible radiological consequences were analyzed using a radio-ecological scenario developed by GRS. A second scenario was developed considering the solubility of radionuclides in salt saturated solutions and retarding/retention effects during the radionuclide transport through the cap rock layers. The modeling of possible radiation exposure was based on the lifestyle habits of reference persons. In Germany the calculation procedure for the prediction of radionuclide release from final repositories is not defined by national standards, the used procedures are based on analogue methods from other radiation protection calculations.

  9. Developing of Watershed Radionuclide Transport Model DHSVM-R as Modification and Extension of Distributed Hydrological and Sediment Dynamics Model DHSVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Kivva, S.; Onda, Y.; Nanba, K.; Wakiyama, Y.; Konoplev, A.

    2015-12-01

    The reliable modeling tools for prediction wash - off radionuclides from watersheds are needed as for assessment the consequences of accidental and industrial releases of radionuclides, as for soil erosion studies using the radioactive tracers. The distributed model of radionuclide transport through watershed in exchangeable and nonexchangeable forms in solute and with sediments was developed and validated for small Chernobyl watersheds in 90th within EU SPARTACUS project (van der Perk et al., 1996). New tendency is coupling of radionuclide transport models and the widely validated hydrological distributed models. To develop radionuclide transport model DHSVM-R the open source Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model -DHSVM http://www.hydro.washington.edu/Lettenmaier/Models/DHSVM was modified and extended. The main changes provided in the hydrological and sediment transport modules of DHSVM are as follows: Morel-Seytoux infiltration model is added; four-directions schematization for the model's cells flows (D4) is replaced by D8 approach; the finite-difference schemes for solution of kinematic wave equations for overland water flow, stream net flow, and sediment transport are replaced by new computationally efficient scheme. New radionuclide transport module, coupled with hydrological and sediment transport modules, continues SPARTACUS's approach, - it describes radionuclide wash-off from watershed and transport via stream network in soluble phase and on suspended sediments. The hydrological module of DHSVM-R was calibrated and validated for the watersheds of Ukrainian Carpathian mountains and for the subwatersheds of Niida river flowing 137Cs in solute and with suspended sediments to Pacific Ocean at 30 km north of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The modules of radionuclide and sediment transport were calibrated and validated versus experimental data for USLE experimental plots in Fukushima Prefecture and versus monitoring data collected in Niida watershed. The role

  10. Development of radionuclide transport model in the ecosystem of brackish lake Obuchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shinji; Kondo, Kunio; Chikuchi, Yuki; Inaba, Jiro

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer code for a radionuclide transport model in Lake Obuchi which is adjacent to nuclear fuel cycle facilities including a nuclear spent-fuel reprocessing plant under construction in Rokkasho-mura. The lake is brackish and this fact makes the entry mode of radionuclides into the lake and its ecosystem very characteristic. For the construction of the code, it is important to incorporate the characteristics of the ecosystem as well as the hydraulic movements into the model. In the present study we report the biological parameters related to the transport model obtained from field observations and a laboratory experiment. We also give results from development of an advective-diffusion model. Monthly field observations revealed that 18 to 47 species of phytoplankton, 9 to 20 species of zooplankton and 0 to 21 species of benthos were present in the lake. A marked seasonal change was observed in the dominant species for both planktons. Mean carbon masses of DOC, POC, phytoplankton and zooplankton in the lake were 16 x 10 4 , 5.9 x 10 4 , 3.7 x 10 4 and 0.20 x 10 4 kg-C, respectively. Phytoplanktons of 10 species in 8 genera were isolated and maintained in a bacteria-free medium in the laboratory. Some physiological and metabolic characteristics of the planktons were studied under those conditions. An advective-diffusion model was developed for particles in the lake. Field observations showed that the model could simulate formation and elimination of the water current. (author)

  11. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 131 I, 3 H, and 239 Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs

  12. Predictive capabilities of a two-dimensional model in the ground water transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gureghian, A.B.; Beskid, N.J.; Marmer, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The discharge of low-level radioactive waste into tailings ponds is a potential source of ground water contamination. The estimation of the radiological hazards related to the ground water transport of radionuclides from tailings retention systems depends on reasonably accurate estimates of the movement of both water and solute. A two-dimensional mathematical model having predictive capability for ground water flow and solute transport has been developed. The flow equation has been solved under steady-state conditions and the mass transport equation under transient conditions. The simultaneous solution of both equations is achieved through the finite element technique using isoparametric elements, based on the Galerkin formulation. However, in contrast to the flow equation solution, the weighting functions used in the solution of the mass transport equation have a non-symmetric form. The predictive capability of the model is demonstrated using an idealized case based on analyses of field data obtained from the sites of operating uranium mills. The pH of the solution, which regulates the variation of the distribution coefficient (K/sub d/) in a particular site, appears to be the most important factor in the assessment of the rate of migration of the elements considered herein

  13. Modelling of natural organic matter-linked radionuclide transport in Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govaerts, J.; Maes, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of the Belgian research program on long term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive wastes coordinated by ONDRAF/NIRAS, Boom Clay is investigated for its potential to host a deep geological disposal repository. In order to demonstrate the suitability of the Boom Clay as a host rock, the mobility of critical radionuclides in this clay layer has been the subject of research during many years. As actinides, lanthanides and transition metals are known to form strong complexes with organic substances, the influence of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) present in Boom Clay on the mobility of these critical radionuclides is of crucial importance. Interaction of radionuclides with OM present in Boom Clay could on the one hand retard the migration due to complexation/colloid interaction with the immobile OM, and on the other hand the mobility and solubility of the radionuclide can be enhanced by the formation of complexes/colloids with the mobile OM. The conceptual understanding (and its numerical modelling) of the kinetic stability and transport of these complexes/colloids is therefore regarded as highly important for the the long-term safety assesment of the geological disposal. This can be broken down into two subproblems: 1. Describing the transport behaviour of mobile OM in Boom Clay; 2. Describing the interaction of RN with mobile OM and the transport behaviour of the resulting complexes in Boom Clay. The first part of this paper revolves around the first subproblem, where a robust model for the description of the migration behaviour of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is derived based on data from column migration experiments using 14 C-labelled NOM Tracer solution, obtained in the framework of the EC TRANCOM-II project. Clay plugs of different lengths and different Darcy velocities were used. Inverse modelling with the MATLAB and COMSOL numerical code was done in order to identify the

  14. Radionuclide transport in running waters, sensitivity analysis of bed-load, channel geometry and model discretisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2006-08-01

    In this report, further investigations of the model concept for radionuclide transport in stream, developed in the SKB report TR-05-03 is presented. Especially three issues have been the focus of the model investigations. The first issue was to investigate the influence of assumed channel geometry on the simulation results. The second issue was to reconsider the applicability of the equation for the bed-load transport in the stream model, and finally the last issue was to investigate how the model discretisation will influence the simulation results. The simulations showed that there were relatively small differences in results when applying different cross-sections in the model. The inclusion of the exact shape of the cross-section in the model is therefore not crucial, however, if cross-sectional data exist, the overall shape of the cross-section should be used in the model formulation. This could e.g. be accomplished by using measured values of the stream width and depth in the middle of the stream and by assuming a triangular shape. The bed-load transport was in this study determined for different sediment characteristics which can be used as an order of magnitude estimation if no exact determinations of the bed-load are available. The difference in the calculated bed-load transport for the different materials was, however, found to be limited. The investigation of model discretisation showed that a fine model discretisation to account for numerical effects is probably not important for the performed simulations. However, it can be necessary for being able to account for different conditions along a stream. For example, the application of mean slopes instead of individual values in the different stream reaches can result in very different predicted concentrations

  15. Transport in biosphere of radionuclides released from finally disposed nuclear waste - background information for transport and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulmi, R.; Savolainen, I.

    1981-07-01

    An outline is made about the biosphere transport and dose models employed in the estimation of doses due to releases from finally disposed nuclear waste. The models often divide into two parts; the first one describes the transport of radionuclides in those parts of biosphere where the time scale is large (e.g. soil, sea and sea sediment), the second part of the model describes the transport of nuclides in the systems where the time scale is small (e.g. food chains, plants and animals). The description of biosphere conditions includes remarkable uncertainty due to the complexity of the biosphere and its ecosystems. Therefore studies of scenario type are recommended: some values of parametres describing the conditions are assumed, and the consequences are estimated by using these values. The effect of uncertainty in various factors on the uncertainty of final results should be investigated with the employment of alternative scenarios and parametric sensitivity studies. In addition to the ordinary results, intermediate results should be presented. A proposal for the structure of a transport and dose program based on dynamic linear compartment model is presented and mathematical solution alternatives are studied also

  16. Model validation studies of water flow and radionuclide transport in vegetated soils using lysimeter data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, A.; Jining Chen [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Model Uncertainty and Validation was one of the four themes of BIOMOVS II which had been identified by the programme's steering committee. It arose out of a concern that biosphere assessment models are generally simplified representations of highly complex environmental systems which, therefore, include a degree of uncertainty in their outputs. This uncertainty may be due to inadequate representations of the physical, chemical and biological processes; issues associated with scaling up highly non-linear systems; problems of model identification, in particular user interpretation. Therefore, during the course of the 5 year (1991-1996) BIOMOVS II programme a number of working sub-groups reestablished to address these issues. This document is the final report of the Prediction of Upward Migration of Radionuclides in Lysimeters sub-group which was established towards the end of the programme, late in 1994. It describes the 'blind' application of various hydrological and radiochemical transport models to experiment data derived from vegetated lysimeters. In order to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes affecting the radionuclide migration from contaminated near surface water tables into arable crops, a lysimeter experiment has been undertaken at Imperial College, funded by UK Nirex Ltd. Detailed observations of climate, soil hydrology, plant growth and radiochemical migration were collected on the uptake of various radionuclides by a winter wheat crop. A selected set of data was made available to members of BIOMOVS II in order to allow them to test relevant components of current versions of assessment code. This was a challenging task owing to the rather unusual experimental design, in particular, the introduction of radionuclides at the base of the lysimeter, 5 cm below a fixed water table, and their subsequent upward migration through the soil. The comprehensive hydrological data set available provided various modelers, particularly those

  17. Model validation studies of water flow and radionuclide transport in vegetated soils using lysimeter data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, A.; Jining Chen

    1996-09-01

    Model Uncertainty and Validation was one of the four themes of BIOMOVS II which had been identified by the programme's steering committee. It arose out of a concern that biosphere assessment models are generally simplified representations of highly complex environmental systems which, therefore, include a degree of uncertainty in their outputs. This uncertainty may be due to inadequate representations of the physical, chemical and biological processes; issues associated with scaling up highly non-linear systems; problems of model identification, in particular user interpretation. Therefore, during the course of the 5 year (1991-1996) BIOMOVS II programme a number of working sub-groups reestablished to address these issues. This document is the final report of the Prediction of Upward Migration of Radionuclides in Lysimeters sub-group which was established towards the end of the programme, late in 1994. It describes the 'blind' application of various hydrological and radiochemical transport models to experiment data derived from vegetated lysimeters. In order to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes affecting the radionuclide migration from contaminated near surface water tables into arable crops, a lysimeter experiment has been undertaken at Imperial College, funded by UK Nirex Ltd. Detailed observations of climate, soil hydrology, plant growth and radiochemical migration were collected on the uptake of various radionuclides by a winter wheat crop. A selected set of data was made available to members of BIOMOVS II in order to allow them to test relevant components of current versions of assessment code. This was a challenging task owing to the rather unusual experimental design, in particular, the introduction of radionuclides at the base of the lysimeter, 5 cm below a fixed water table, and their subsequent upward migration through the soil. The comprehensive hydrological data set available provided various modelers, particularly those involved in tritium

  18. Modeling of the geochemical behaviour and of the radionuclide transport in the presence of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Lee, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Over the past ten years, colloids have been introduced in the already complex subject of waste storage safety analysis. They are indeed often considered as rapid carriers for otherwise insoluble radioactive elements, and therefore potentially decrease the effective barrier function of the geological rock surrounding the waste. The problem is therefore to understand colloid behaviour and quantify their stability and reactivity with respect to the radionuclides. The subject reveals three different levels of phenomena: the geochemical mechanisms, the micro-physical and electrostatic behaviour of colloids and the transport mechanisms. The topics of this thesis therefore cover a wide range of disciplines, such as geochemistry, radiochemistry, physics, hydrogeology, mathematics and computer science. Given the complexity of the subject, only strongly simplified models are used for safety assessment including the impact of colloids. Henceforth, the objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive theoretical basis for modelling the impact of colloids according to a deterministic approach, in the hope to pave the road towards predictive modelling of a waste repository performance. This thesis is the result of work carried out in different European Community projects in the framework of the fourth R and D program on 'Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste'. part A, task 4, 'Disposal of Radioactive Waste'. Grateful use has been made of many chemical and hydrogeological experiments carried out by many different laboratories all over Europe. The main results can be classified according to three principal topics: - geochemistry and the chemical behaviour of actinides, lanthanides and fission products; - retention mechanisms of colloidal particles; - transport mechanism in geological medium. The first topic is fundamental: geochemistry forms the basis of e.g. the retention model for aqueous and colloidal species. The principal result of this topic is

  19. Development of repository-wide radionuclide transport model considering the effects of multiple sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Watari, Shingo; Ijiri, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    Safety assessment of the geological isolation system according to the groundwater scenario has traditionally been conducted based on the signal canister configuration and then the safety of total system has been evaluated based on the dose rates which were obtained by multiplying the migration rates released from the engineered barrier and/or the natural barrier by dose conversion factors and total number of canisters disposed in the repository. The dose conversion factors can be obtained from the biosphere analysis. In this study, we focused on the effect of multiple sources due to the disposal of canisters at different positions in the repository. By taking the effect of multiple sources into consideration, concentration interference in the repository region is possible to take place. Therefore, radionuclide transport model/code considering the effect of concentration interference due to the multiple sources was developed to make assessments of the effect quantitatively. The newly developed model/code was verified through the comparison analysis with the existing radionuclide transport analysis code used in the second progress report. In addition, the effect of the concentration interference was evaluated by setting a simple problem using the newly developed analysis code. This results shows that the maximum park value of the migration rates from the repository was about two orders of magnitude lower than that based on single canister configuration. Since the analysis code was developed by assuming that all canisters disposed of along the one-dimensional groundwater flow contribute to the concentration interference in the repository region, the assumption should be verified by conducting two or three-dimensional analysis considering heterogeneous geological structure as a future work. (author)

  20. Radionuclide transport in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, the classical advective-dispersive transport equation was considered to be an adequate model for describing the motion of a solute (e.g. radionuclides) in porous and fractured media. In this model, the dispersion coefficient is either obtained from a microscopic model of the porous medium or by carefully controlled experiments. As a result of such experiments, a large body of data has been accumulated on the dispersivity. Detailed examination of these data has resulted in a curious phenomenon being discovered; namely, that the longitudinal dispersion length is 'scale-dependent'. That is to say the value deduced depends on the 'size' of the experiment, i.e. on the distance over which measurements are made. Several interesting attempts have been made to develop theories which explain this phenomenon, all based on treating the velocity of the water in the porous medium as a spatially random variable, but retaining the advective-dispersive balance equation. In this work we present an entirely new approach to the problem of solute transport in fractured media based upon an analogy with neutron transport. The new method has several advantages over the previous theories and these will be explained below. Results from the new theory are in agreement with experimental trends and do not require any further adjustment to explain the scale-dependent effect

  1. Modeling of the regional and global transport of radionuclides from the Kola NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, G.I.; Aloyan, A.E.; Arutyunyan, V.O.; Louzan, P.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Numerical Mathematics; Bergman, R. [ed.] [Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden). Div. of NBC Defence

    2000-05-01

    This Technical Report belongs to the INTAS project 96-1802: Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia. The aim of this INTAS project is to assess the potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear units in northwest Russia and resulting impacts on population and terrestrial ecosystems in the north. The work focuses mainly on airborne radioactive contamination, but some case studies also deal with accidental leakage from terrestrial nuclear sites to soil and coastal waters. The main aim in this technical report is to calculate and describe radioactive contamination levels in the Kola Peninsula resulting from a hypothetical accidental release from the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP). The method of assessment of radioactive contamination in the Kola Peninsula described here is based on the mathematical models developed at the Institute for Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS). Model validation was performed several times on a wide variety of actual problems and case studies. The validation procedure indicated good capabilities in predicting the qualitative and quantitative contamination patterns resulting from the processes under consideration. Various scenarios reflecting typical meteorological conditions in a specific area are used in the numerical simulation. The conclusions resulting from analysis of such scenario calculations are of rather general character, and can be extrapolated in time provided that climate remains relatively stable. The employed 3D numerical model of radionuclide transport in the Northern hemisphere takes into account the interaction between boundary layers of the ocean and atmosphere, long term tracing of the radionuclides evolution in the atmosphere, their deposition on the earth surface, and migration in soil and sea water.

  2. Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modelling using CONNECTFLOW in support of the SR Can assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, Lee; Cox, Ian; Holton, David; Hunter, Fiona; Joyce, Steve; Gylling, Bjoern; Lindgren, Maria

    2004-09-01

    SKB is currently pursuing site investigations for a deep repository in the municipalities of Oesthammar and Oskarshamn. The investigations are conducted in two stages; an initial phase followed by a complete site investigation phase. The favoured alternative for the location of the encapsulation plant is at Oskarshamn, where it would operate in conjunction with the existing interim storage facility. These two planning applications will each require a report on the long-term safety of the deep repository. In the case of the encapsulation plant, such a report will demonstrate that a repository for the sealed canisters will meet the requirements on long-term safety set up by the Swedish authorities. The two safety reports will be referred to as SR-Can and SR-Site, for the encapsulation plant and repository, respectively. SR-Can will be based on site data from the initial site investigation phase and SR-Site on data from the complete site investigation. The preliminary safety evaluations for each site will be carried out as sub-tasks within the SR-Can project. The main purposes of those evaluations are to: Determine whether earlier judgements of the suitability of the candidate area for a deep repository with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of borehole data; Provide feed-back to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design. A proposed methodology for the SR-Can assessment has been published in SKB TR-03-08. The methodology envisaged the use of both continuum porous medium (CPM) and discrete fracture network (DFN) models on a range of scales to investigate the groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from a deep disposal facility to the biosphere. The modelling must address the effects of variable groundwater density and transients. Transients occur naturally as a consequence of changes in climate states (temperate, periglacial and glacial) and during the operational and immediate post-closure phases of the repository. Key

  3. Modelling of Radionuclide Transport by Groundwater Motion in Fractured Bedrock for Performance Assessment Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerman, Anders; Shulan Xu

    2003-10-01

    Field data of physical properties in heterogeneous crystalline bedrock, like fracture zones, fracture connectivity, matrix porosity and fracture aperture, is associated with uncertainty that can have a significant impact on the analysis of solute transport in fractured rock. The purpose of this study is to develop a performance assessment (PA) model for analyses of radionuclide transport in the geosphere, in which the model takes into account both the effect of heterogeneities of hydrological and geochemical rock properties. By using a travel time description of radionuclide transport in rock fractures, we decompose the transport problem into a one-dimensional mass transfer problem along a distribution of transport pathways and a multi-dimensional flow problem in the fractured bedrock. The hydraulic/flow problem is solved based on a statistical discrete-fracture model (DFM) that represents the network of fractures around the repository and in the surrounding geosphere. A Monte Carlo technique reflects the fact that the representation of the fracture network is uncertain. If the flow residence time PDF exhibits multiple peaks or in another way shows a more erratic hydraulic response on the network scale, the three-dimensional travel time approach is superior to a one-dimensional transport modeling. Examples taken from SITE 94, a study performed by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, showed that such cases can be found in safety assessments based on site data. The solute transport is formulated based on partial, differential equations and perturbations (random spatial variability in bedrock properties) are introduced in the coefficients to reflect an uncertainty of the exact appearance of the bedrock associated with the discrete data collection. The combined approach for water flow and solute transport, thereby, recognises an uncertainty in our knowledge in both 1) bedrock properties along individual pathways and 2) the distribution of pathways. Solutions to the

  4. Biosphere transport of radionuclides. First modelling by using a selected example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundi, A.

    1984-12-01

    The dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and their uptake by man via various nutritional pathways is studied using a compartment model. The sample environment is the area of the lower Limmat and Aare valleys. General considerations of the compartmental description of the biosphere are made. The problem of the description of surface features, in particular soil, sediment and water, is studied in detail using the code BIOPATH. This study is intended to be an example of how a model of the biosphere could be constructed. It is shown that this is a reasonable model to calculate the spreading of radionuclides in the biosphere and that it indicates the relative significance of individual compartments, pathways and radionuclides. Calculated values of doses to man, however, should not be used as reference data for safety analyses. (author)

  5. Integrated Analytic Radionuclide Transport Model for a Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository in Saturated Fractured Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan

    2002-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions are presented for radionuclide transport from a KBS 3-type repository, where spent nuclear fuel is placed in copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at a depth of 500 m in fractured granitic rock.Dissolution of readily accessible and fuel matrix embedded nuclides, chain decay, and nuclide precipitation is treated within the canister. Transport in the canister void and buffer is modeled with a dual stirred tank analogy, where transport resistances represent an assumed small initial damage in the canister and transport features of the buffer-geosphere interface. Initial, transient diffusion in the buffer is treated with a simple correction term. Chain decay is not included in the buffer.Geosphere transport expressions handle advection, longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion, sorption, and radioactive decay, but not chain decay. The treatment is based on earlier results for an instantaneous inlet and for a constant inlet to the geosphere in the nondispersive case. A correction is added so that longitudinal dispersion is taken approximately into account. The correction utilizes analytical expressions for the temporal moments of the geosphere release curve in the dispersive case.The near-field/geosphere integration is treated in a simplified manner avoiding numerical convolutions. The instantaneous inlet expression for the geosphere release is used when the near-field release decreases rapidly in comparison to a typical response time in the geosphere; the constant inlet expression is used in the opposite case.Twenty-seven calculation cases from a safety assessment of a KBS 3 repository using borehole data from three different field investigation sites were repeated with the analytic expressions. The agreement in both near-field and geosphere releases is in general well within an order of magnitude for the variety of long- and short-lived, sorbing, nonsorbing, solubility limited, immediately accessible, and fuel matrix

  6. RADTRAD: A simplified model for RADionuclide Transport and Removal And Dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, S.L.; Miller, L.A.; Monroe, D.K.; Heames, T.J.

    1998-04-01

    This report documents the RADTRAD computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to estimate transport and removal of radionuclides and dose at selected receptors. The document includes a users' guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, the quality assurance and code acceptance testing documentation, and a programmers' guide. The RADTRAD code can be used to estimate the containment release using either the NRC TID-14844 or NUREG-1465 source terms and assumptions, or a user-specified table. In addition, the code can account for a reduction in the quantity of radioactive material due to containment sprays, natural deposition, filters, and other natural and engineered safety features. The RADTRAD code uses a combination of tables and/or numerical models of source term reduction phenomena to determine the time-dependent dose at user-specified locations for a given accident scenario. The code system also provides the inventory, decay chain, and dose conversion factor tables needed for the dose calculation. The RADTRAD code can be used to assess occupational radiation exposures, typically in the control room; to estimate site boundary doses; and to estimate dose attenuation due to modification of a facility or accident sequence

  7. Application of two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water for analyzing artificial radionuclide release from containers with radioactive waste dumped in Kara Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, Denis S.; Laykin, Andrey I.; Kuchin, Nickolay L.; Platovskikh, Yuri A. [Krylov State Research Center, Saint Petersburg, 44 Moskovskoe shosse, 196158 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Modeling of artificial radionuclide transport in sea water is crucial for prognosis of radioecological situation in regions where dumping of radioactive waste had been made and/or accidents with nuclear submarines had taken place. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in bottom sediments can be a detector of radionuclide release from dumped or sunk objects to marine environment. Proper model can determine the dependence between radionuclide distribution in sediments and radionuclide release. Following report describes two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water. It was tested on data from 1994 - 2013 expeditions to Novaya Zemlya bays, where regular dumping of solid radioactive waste was practiced by the former USSR from the early 1960's until 1990. Two-barrier model agrees with experimental data and allows more accurate determination of time and intensity of artificial radionuclide release from dumped containers. (authors)

  8. Modeling the Hydrogeochemical Transport of Radionuclides through Engineered Barriers System in the Proposed LLW Disposal Site of Taiwan - 12082

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tsao, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    A proposed site for final disposal of low-level radioactive waste located in Daren Township of Taitung County along the southeastern coast has been on the selected list in Taiwan. The geology of the Daren site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. A mined cavern design with a tunnel system of 500 m below the surface is proposed. Concrete is used as the main confinement material for the engineered barrier. To investigate the hydrogeochemical transport of radionuclides through engineered barriers system, HYDROGEOCHEM5.0 model was applied to simulate the complex chemical interactions among radionuclides, the cement minerals of the concrete, groundwater flow, and transport in the proposed site. The simulation results showed that the engineered barriers system with the side ditch efficiently drained the ground water and lowered the concentration of the concrete degradation induced species (e.g., hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride). The velocity of groundwater observed at side ditch gradually decreased with time due to the fouling of pore space by the mineral formation of ettringite and thaumasite. The short half-life of Co-60, Sr-90 and Cs-137 significantly reduced the concentrations, whereas the long half-life of I-129(1.57x10{sup 7} years) and Am-241(432 years) remain stable concentrations at the interface of waste canister and concrete barrier after 300 years. The mineral saturation index (SI) was much less than zero due to the low aqueous concentration of radionuclide, so that the precipitation formation of Co-60, Sr-90, I-129, Cs-137 and Am-241 related minerals were not found. The effect of adsorption/desorption (i.e., surface complexation model) could be a crucial geochemical mechanism for the modeling of liquid-solid phase behavior of radionuclide in geochemically dynamic environments. Moreover, the development of advanced numerical models that are coupled with hydrogeochemical transport and dose assessment of radionuclide is required in the future

  9. Mathematical modelling of radionuclide transport through fractured rock using numerical inversion of Laplace transforms: applications to INTRACOIN Level 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgkinson, D.P.; Lever, D.A.; England, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the transport of radionuclides through fractured rock has been developed and used to study a problem which forms part of Level 3 of the INTRACOIN project (the international exercise in which the results from various radionuclide-migration computer programs are compared). The model includes the effects of 1-D advection, dispersion, kinetic and/or equilibrium surface sorption, diffusion into the rock matrix with equilibrium bulk sorption and radioactive decay, and incorporates flexible input and output boundary conditions. It is evaluated by numerically inverting the analytical solution to the Laplace-transformed transport equations. Matrix diffusion was found to be the most important retardation mechanism for Np based on data reflecting the conditions at the Finnsjeeo site in east central Sweden. However, improved data and field testing are required to make the predictions of such models more reliable. (author)

  10. Performance assessment model development and parameter acquisition for analysis of the transport of natural radionuclides in a Mediterranean watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueero, Almudena

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed to construct a model for predicting the behaviour of the natural radioisotopes of U, Th and Ra in a Mediterranean watershed. The methodology includes the development of the performance assessment model, obtaining water flow and radiological parameters based on experimental data and analysis of results. The model, which accounts for both water flows and mass balances of the radionuclides in a semi-natural environment, provides assessments of radionuclide behaviour in grassland and agricultural soils, rivers and reservoirs, including the processes of radionuclide migration through land and water and interactions between both. From field and laboratory data, it has been possible to obtain parameters for the driving processes considered in the model, water fluxes, source term definition, soil to plant transfer factors and distribution coefficient values. Ranges of parameter values obtained have shown good agreement with published literature data. This general methodological approach was developed to be extended to other radionuclides for the modelling of a biosphere watershed in the context of performance assessment of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository under Mediterranean climate conditions, as well as for forecasting radionuclide transport under similar Mediterranean conditions that will occur in the future in other areas. The application of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was intended to identify key uncertainties with the aim of setting priorities for future research. The model results for the activity concentration in the reservoir indicate that for 238 U and 230 Th the most relevant parameter is the initial concentrations of the radionuclides in the reservoir sediments. However, for 226 Ra the most important parameter is the precipitation rate over the whole watershed

  11. The landscape-scale radionuclide transport model used in Posiva biosphere assessment 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broed, R. [Facilia A (Finland); Hjerpe, T. [Facilia AB (Finland); Ikonen, A.T.K. [Environmental Research and Assessment EnviroCase, Ltd. (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    Construction of a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in the Olkiluoto Island on the south-western coast of Finland is under preparation. This work presents the reference landscape-scale model for radionuclide fate and transport in the biosphere that was implemented as a part of the safety case underpinning the nuclear construction license of the repository in 2012. The model was implemented with a large number of biosphere objects, covering any radiologically significant areas of the site and downstream locations, in order to account for the uncertainty in the geosphere release location. One important factor considered is the effect of land uplift, which has the consequence that the modelled landscape evolves with time, i.e. new land areas is continuously emerging from the sea and by overgrowth of lakes, and the modelled biosphere objects can change their biotope and composition over time. For example, a biosphere object that initially represents a part of the coast, can due to the land uplift eventually represent a lake. This lake might then at a later stage have dried up and formed a wetland that eventually is turned into a cropland. This means that the ecosystem-specific model parts used in one biosphere object, the related model parameters, and the available exposure pathways vary with time. A time-period of 10,000 years is simulated, with the assumption that a single spent fuel disposal canister initially fails its containment functions. The resulting activity concentrations in the environmental media that are produced by the simulation with the landscape model are used to estimate the doses to members of the public and dose-rates to non-human biota inhabiting the modelled region. In this work the focus is on the reference case model which represents a defective canister in a deposition hole that is cautiously selected, leading to geosphere releases just north of the current northern shoreline, but also a brief overview of two alternative models

  12. The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Selvi Viswanathan

    1999-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes that influence radionuclide migration while being computationally efficient. The conventional method of modeling reactive transport models is to solve a coupled set of multi-dimensional partial differential equations for the relevant chemical components in the system. We have developed an iterative solution technique, denoted the selective coupling method, that represents a versatile alternative to traditional uncoupled iterative techniques and the filly coupled global implicit method. We show that selective coupling results in computational and memory savings relative to these approaches. We develop RST as an alternative to the CDR method for solving large two- or three-dimensional reactive transport simulations for cases in which one is interested in predicting the flux across a specific control plane. In the RST method, the multidimensional problem is reduced to a series of one-dimensional transport simulations along streamlines. The key assumption with RST is that mixing at the control plane approximates the transverse dispersion between streamlines. We compare the CDR and RST approaches for several scenarios that are relevant to the Yucca Mountain Project. For example, we apply the CDR and RST approaches to model an ongoing field experiment called the Unsaturated Zone

  13. Modeling the Long-term Transport and Accumulation of Radionuclides in the Landscape for Derivation of Dose Conversion Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo Moreno; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological impact of potential releases to the biosphere from a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, it is necessary to assess the long-term dynamics of the distribution of radionuclides in the environment. In this paper, we propose an approach for making prognoses of the distribution and fluxes of radionuclides released from the geosphere, in discharges of contaminated groundwater, to an evolving landscape. The biosphere changes during the temperate part (spanning approximately 20,000 years) of an interglacial period are handled by building biosphere models for the projected succession of situations. Radionuclide transport in the landscape is modeled dynamically with a series of interconnected radioecological models of those ecosystem types (sea, lake, running water, mire, agricultural land and forest) that occur at present, and are projected to occur in the future, in a candidate area for a geological repository in Sweden. The transformation between ecosystems is modeled as discrete events occurring every thousand years by substituting one model by another. Examples of predictions of the radionuclide distribution in the landscape are presented for several scenarios with discharge locations varying in time and space. The article also outlines an approach for estimating the exposure of man resulting from all possible reasonable uses of a potentially contaminated landscape, which was used for derivation of Landscape Dose Factors

  14. Supplementary investigations on the validation of the atmospheric radionuclide transport model (ARTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Cornelia; Thielen, Harald; Sogalla, Martin

    2015-09-01

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SBG) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of non-radioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. The research project 3612S50007 serves, on the one hand, to validate ARTM systematically. On the other hand, the development of science and technology were investigated and, if reasonable and possible, were implemented to the program system. The dispersion model and the user interface were advanced and optimized. The program package was provided to the users as a free download. Notably t he work program comprises the validation of the approach used in ARTM to model short emission periods, which are of interest in view of the SBG. The simulation results of the diagnostic wind and turbulence model TALdia, which is part of the GO-ARTM program package, were evaluated with focus on the influence of buildings on the flow field. The user interface was upgraded with a wind field viewer. To simplify the comparison with the model still in use, a Gaussian plum e model was implemented into the graphical user interface. The ARTM web page was maintained, user questions and feedback were answered and analysed concerning possible improvements and further developments of the program package. Numerous improvements were implemented. An ARTM user workshop was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation

  15. Processes and parameters involved in modeling radionuclide transport from bedded salt repositories. Final report. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, D.E.; Prickett, T.A.; Showalter, P.A.

    1979-07-01

    The parameters necessary to model radionuclide transport in salt beds are identified and described. A proposed plan for disposal of the radioactive wastes generated by nuclear power plants is to store waste canisters in repository sites contained in stable salt formations approximately 600 meters below the ground surface. Among the principal radioactive wastes contained in these canisters will be radioactive isotopes of neptunium, americium, uranium, and plutonium along with many highly radioactive fission products. A concern with this form of waste disposal is the possibility of ground-water flow occurring in the salt beds and endangering water supplies and the public health. Specifically, the research investigated the processes involved in the movement of radioactive wastes from the repository site by groundwater flow. Since the radioactive waste canisters also generate heat, temperature is an important factor. Among the processes affecting movement of radioactive wastes from a repository site in a salt bed are thermal conduction, groundwater movement, ion exchange, radioactive decay, dissolution and precipitation of salt, dispersion and diffusion, adsorption, and thermomigration. In addition, structural changes in the salt beds as a result of temperature changes are important. Based upon the half-lives of the radioactive wastes, he period of concern is on the order of a million years. As a result, major geologic phenomena that could affect both the salt bed and groundwater flow in the salt beds was considered. These phenomena include items such as volcanism, faulting, erosion, glaciation, and the impact of meteorites. CDM reviewed all of the critical processes involved in regional groundwater movement of radioactive wastes and identified and described the parameters that must be included to mathematically model their behavior. In addition, CDM briefly reviewed available echniques to measure these parameters

  16. Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2003-01-01

    We investigate radionuclide transport from a high-level nuclear waste repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Several radioactive solutes (that cover the range of sorption behavior) and colloids of various sizes are studied. The results of the study indicate the importance of the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The effects of the climatic conditions, diffusion, and sorption (for solutes) or infiltration (for colloids) onto the matrix are discussed. The influence of the colloid size on transport is also investigated

  17. Updated model for radionuclide transport in the near-surface till at Forsmark - Implementation of decay chains and sensitivity analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pique, Angels; Pekala, Marek; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Trinchero, Paolo; Vries, Luis Manuel de

    2013-02-01

    The Forsmark area has been proposed for potential siting of a deep underground (geological) repository for radioactive waste in Sweden. Safety assessment of the repository requires radionuclide transport from the disposal depth to recipients at the surface to be studied quantitatively. The near-surface quaternary deposits at Forsmark are considered a pathway for potential discharge of radioactivity from the underground facility to the biosphere, thus radionuclide transport in this system has been extensively investigated over the last years. The most recent work of Pique and co-workers (reported in SKB report R-10-30) demonstrated that in case of release of radioactivity the near-surface sedimentary system at Forsmark would act as an important geochemical barrier, retarding the transport of reactive radionuclides through a combination of retention processes. In this report the conceptual model of radionuclide transport in the quaternary till at Forsmark has been updated, by considering recent revisions regarding the near-surface lithology. In addition, the impact of important conceptual assumptions made in the model has been evaluated through a series of deterministic and probabilistic (Monte Carlo) sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity study focused on the following effects: 1. Radioactive decay of 135 Cs, 59 Ni, 230 Th and 226 Ra and effects on their transport. 2. Variability in key geochemical parameters, such as the composition of the deep groundwater, availability of sorbing materials in the till, and mineral equilibria. 3. Variability in hydraulic parameters, such as the definition of hydraulic boundaries, and values of hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the deep groundwater inflow rate. The overarching conclusion from this study is that the current implementation of the model is robust (the model is largely insensitive to variations in the parameters within the studied ranges) and conservative (the Base Case calculations have a tendency to

  18. Updated model for radionuclide transport in the near-surface till at Forsmark - Implementation of decay chains and sensitivity analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Pekala, Marek; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Trinchero, Paolo; Vries, Luis Manuel de [Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The Forsmark area has been proposed for potential siting of a deep underground (geological) repository for radioactive waste in Sweden. Safety assessment of the repository requires radionuclide transport from the disposal depth to recipients at the surface to be studied quantitatively. The near-surface quaternary deposits at Forsmark are considered a pathway for potential discharge of radioactivity from the underground facility to the biosphere, thus radionuclide transport in this system has been extensively investigated over the last years. The most recent work of Pique and co-workers (reported in SKB report R-10-30) demonstrated that in case of release of radioactivity the near-surface sedimentary system at Forsmark would act as an important geochemical barrier, retarding the transport of reactive radionuclides through a combination of retention processes. In this report the conceptual model of radionuclide transport in the quaternary till at Forsmark has been updated, by considering recent revisions regarding the near-surface lithology. In addition, the impact of important conceptual assumptions made in the model has been evaluated through a series of deterministic and probabilistic (Monte Carlo) sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity study focused on the following effects: 1. Radioactive decay of {sup 135}Cs, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra and effects on their transport. 2. Variability in key geochemical parameters, such as the composition of the deep groundwater, availability of sorbing materials in the till, and mineral equilibria. 3. Variability in hydraulic parameters, such as the definition of hydraulic boundaries, and values of hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the deep groundwater inflow rate. The overarching conclusion from this study is that the current implementation of the model is robust (the model is largely insensitive to variations in the parameters within the studied ranges) and conservative (the Base Case calculations have a

  19. Conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide transport in near-surface systems at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pique, Angels; Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2010-11-01

    In the framework of the SR-Site safety assessment, a conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide reactive transport in near-surface systems (including till and clay systems) at Forsmark has been carried out. The objective was to evaluate the retention capacity of the near-surface systems, composed of Quaternary deposits, which would be the last natural barrier for an eventual radionuclide release from the deep repository prior to reaching the biosphere. The studied radionuclides are 14 C, 129 I, 36 Cl, 94 Nb, 59 Ni, 93 Mo, 79 Se, 99 Tc, 230 Th, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 135 Cs and U. Conceptual description and numerical simulations of radionuclide reactive transport show that cation exchange and surface complexation on illite are active processes for the retention of several radionuclides (U, Th, Ni, Cs, Sr, Ra). Surface complexation on iron hydroxide is an active process in the till system, able to effectively retain U and Ni. Another retention process of importance is the incorporation of the radionuclides into mineral phases, either by the precipitation of pure phases or solid solutions. Quantitative modelling has been useful to illustrate the incorporation of C and Sr in the carbonate solid solution in the considered model domains (till and clay), as well as the precipitation of uraninite in the clay sediments and the precipitation of native selenium and radiobarite in the till. Other mineral phases that could, a priori, retain U, Se, Nb and Tc do not precipitate in the simulations, either due to the pH-Eh conditions and/or because the dissolved concentration of the element is not high enough under the considered simulation conditions. It is important to keep in mind that changes in these parameters and in the boundary conditions could modify the predicted behaviour of these elements. The radionuclides that are most significantly retarded are Th, Ni and Cs, mainly through sorption onto illite. Therefore, if the amount of illite (or available sorption sites

  20. Conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide transport in near-surface systems at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-11-15

    In the framework of the SR-Site safety assessment, a conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide reactive transport in near-surface systems (including till and clay systems) at Forsmark has been carried out. The objective was to evaluate the retention capacity of the near-surface systems, composed of Quaternary deposits, which would be the last natural barrier for an eventual radionuclide release from the deep repository prior to reaching the biosphere. The studied radionuclides are 14C, 129I, 36Cl, 94Nb, 59Ni, 93Mo, 79Se, 99Tc, 230Th, 90Sr, 226Ra, 135Cs and U. Conceptual description and numerical simulations of radionuclide reactive transport show that cation exchange and surface complexation on illite are active processes for the retention of several radionuclides (U, Th, Ni, Cs, Sr, Ra). Surface complexation on iron hydroxide is an active process in the till system, able to effectively retain U and Ni. Another retention process of importance is the incorporation of the radionuclides into mineral phases, either by the precipitation of pure phases or solid solutions. Quantitative modelling has been useful to illustrate the incorporation of C and Sr in the carbonate solid solution in the considered model domains (till and clay), as well as the precipitation of uraninite in the clay sediments and the precipitation of native selenium and radiobarite in the till. Other mineral phases that could, a priori, retain U, Se, Nb and Tc do not precipitate in the simulations, either due to the pH-Eh conditions and/or because the dissolved concentration of the element is not high enough under the considered simulation conditions. It is important to keep in mind that changes in these parameters and in the boundary conditions could modify the predicted behaviour of these elements. The radionuclides that are most significantly retarded are Th, Ni and Cs, mainly through sorption onto illite. Therefore, if the amount of illite (or available sorption sites) decreases, the

  1. Development of the numerical model for reactive transport of radionuclide and bacteria in the single fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Baik, Min Hoon

    2010-12-01

    On the aspects of safety case of HLW deep geological disposal system, recently, many researchers in the world have been actively studying about the bacterial effects on the radionuclide transport in the fractured rock. However, the domestic research level related on the area is still insufficient. Therefore, the objective of the research is to introduce the theory and development process of the numerical model, which was newly developed to examine the bacterial effects on the radionuclide transport in the single fractured rock, and to test the model by simulating in some imaginary conditions. From the verification by comparing the simulation results with analytical solution considering only solute transport and rock diffusion, the Pearson's correlation coefficient was greater than 0.99 which demonstrates the accuracy of the model. Since the simulation in the model domain of the single fractured core rock resulted in well-matched mass-balances for all solutes, the robustness and stability of the model could be proved again. Therefore, it is expected that the report can guide the potential model users and can be a referring material for a model developer who is trying to expand and/or update the model

  2. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions

  3. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,YIFENG; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.

    2000-05-04

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

  4. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yifeng; Papenguth, Hans W.

    2000-01-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation

  5. Radionuclide transport through heteogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.

    1980-01-01

    One-dimensional radionuclide migration for conevective water transport with sorption and longitudinal dispersion is investigated. A semianalytic solution for layered media with piecewise constant parametes can be written when taking into account mass conservation and approximate flux conservation at interlayer boundaries. The solution is analytic in the first layer and allows for a recursive calculation in the following layers. Scaling laws for the relevant parameters can be formulated. Numerical examples exhibit the importance of at least a single highly sorbing layer. Small values of dispersivity may not lead to a conservative estimate of conservation at the geological column's end

  6. Transport and accumulation of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frissel, M.J.; Jakubick, A.T.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1979-01-01

    The movement of radioactive isotopes through the water phase of soils is by far the most important. Most of the water-transported radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) occur via their dissolved salts, while the rest is carried by small soil particles to which the radionuclides are adsorbed. In the case of many chemicals, it is possible to calculate the movement or migration through soil from adsorption measurements made in the laboratory and from knowledge of the flow pattern of soil water. With increasing complexity of the chemical-soil-water system predictions become more uncertain. In the case of radionuclides the amounts expressed in units of weight are extremely small. This renders terms such as 'soluble' or 'insoluble' inapplicable. In these cases transport of 'radiocolloids' and adsorbed particles as 'insoluble' compounds may be more significant. For fallout strontium and cesium reliable predictive models have been developed. For fallout plutonium such models are under development. For calculations or predictions of the migration of radioactive material from deep soil layers to the soil surface fewer mathematical models are available. Many laboratory studies cannot yet be made due to lack of suitable soil samples from the sites under study. Nevertheless safety studies already carried out in a preliminary way are reliable, since factos such as adsorption of radionuclides on soils are neglected; consequently most safety studies overestimate possible risks. Further studies are required to ascertain how 'pessimistic' are the present safety criteriy. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Online estimation of radionuclide transportation in water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi-Jing Zhang; Li-Sheng Hu

    2017-01-01

    Transportation evaluation of the radionuclide waste discharged from nuclear power plants is an essential licensing issue, especially for inland sites. Basically, the dynamics of radionuclide transportation are nonlinear and time-varying. Motivated by its time-consuming computation, the work proposed an online estimation method for the radionuclide waste in water surface. After extracting the nonlinearity of factors influencing radionuclide transportation, the method utilizes transfer function and generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity models to perform deterministic and probabilistic estimations. It turns out that, the resulting predictions show high accuracy and can optimize the online discharge management of radioactive waste for nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. Particle and solute migration in porous media. Modeling of simultaneous transport of clay particles and radionuclides in a salinity gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.H.

    1994-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms which control the transient transport of particles and radionuclides in natural and artificial porous media is a key problem for the assessment of safety of radioactive waste disposals. An experimental study has been performed to characterize the clayey particle mobility in porous media: a laboratory- made column, packed with an unconsolidated sand bentonite (5% weight) sample, is flushed with a salt solution. An original method of salinity gradient allowed us to show and to quantify some typical behaviours of this system: threshold effects in the peptization of particles, creation of preferential pathways, formation of immobile water zones induce solute-transfer limitation. The mathematical modelling accounts for a phenomenological law, where the distribution of particles between the stagnant water zone and the porous medium is a function of sodium chloride concentration. This distribution function is associated with a radionuclide adsorption model, and is included in a convective dispersive transport model with stagnant water zones. It allowed us to simulate the particle and solute transport when the salt environment is modified. The complete model has been validated with experiments involving cesium, calcium and neptunium in a sodium chloride gradient. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  9. A model for the transport of radionuclides and their decay products through geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1979-09-01

    The one-dimensional trasport of radionuclides and their decay products from an underground nuclear waste isolation site through the surrounding geologic media to a surface environment is modeled. An ambiguity in the application of the previously-reported mathematical solution for this problem has been clarified. The results of applying the solution described here compare favorably with those of the former solution, but the present solution is computatonally more efficient and less subject to numerical errors. This solution is being used by the authors and others to evaluate the sensitivity of potential radoactivity releases into the environment to the characteristics of various nuclear waste isolation systems. (author)

  10. A probabilistic dispersion model applied to the long-range transport of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.; Mikkelsen, T.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident is modelled as an Eulerian diffusion process. From observations of the gross deposition pattern of particulate radiocaesium an effective long-range Eddy diffusivity K of the order of 10(6) m(2) s(-1) is inferred....... A corresponding effective deposition length for caesium, R-Cs, defined las the effective distance from Chernobyl to where the aerosols have been deposited, is found to be R-Cs approximate to 1000 km. From the observations of the regional variability of the Chernobyl fallout a simple probabilistic assessment...

  11. A meshless approach to radionuclide transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perko, J.; Sarler, B.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past thirty years numerical modelling has emerged as an interdisciplinary scientific discipline which has a significant impact in engineering and design. In the field of numerical modelling of transport phenomena in porous media, many commercial codes exist, based on different numerical methods. Some of them are widely used for performance assessment and safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories and groundwater modelling. Although they proved to be an accurate and reliable tool, they have certain limitations and drawbacks. Realistic problems often involve complex geometry which is difficult and time consuming to discretize. In recent years, meshless methods have attracted much attention due to their flexibility in solving engineering and scientific problems. In meshless methods the cumbersome polygonization of calculation domain is not necessary. By this the discretization time is reduced. In addition, the simulation is not as discretization density dependent as in traditional methods because of the lack of polygon interfaces. In this work fully meshless Diffuse Approximate Method (DAM) is used for calculation of radionuclide transport. Two cases are considered; First 1D comparison of 226 Ra transport and decay solved by the commercial Finite Volume Method (FVM) and Finite Element Method (FEM) based packages and DAM. This case shows the level of discretization density dependence. And second realistic 2D case of near-field modelling of radionuclide transport from the radioactive waste repository. Comparison is made again between FVM based code and DAM simulation for two radionuclides: Long-lived 14 C and short-lived 3 H. Comparisons indicate great capability of meshless methods to simulate complex transport problems and show that they should be seriously considered in future commercial simulation tools. (author)

  12. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  13. Mathematical modeling and evaluation of radionuclide transport parameters from the ANL Laboratory Analog Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, B.C.J.; Hull, J.R.; Seitz, M.G.; Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.; Soo, S.L.

    1984-07-01

    Computer model simulation is required to evaluate the performance of proposed or future high-level radioactive waste geological repositories. However, the accuracy of a model in predicting the real situation depends on how well the values of the transport properties are prescribed as input parameters. Knowledge of transport parameters is therefore essential. We have modeled ANL's Experiment Analog Program which was designed to simulate long-term radwaste migration process by groundwater flowing through a high-level radioactive waste repository. Using this model and experimental measurements, we have evaluated neptunium (actinide) deposition velocity and analyzed the complex phenomena of simultaneous deposition, erosion, and reentrainment of bentonite when groundwater is flowing through a narrow crack in a basalt rock. The present modeling demonstrates that we can obtain the values of transport parameters, as added information without any additional cost, from the available measurements of laboratory analog experiments. 8 figures, 3 tables

  14. Marine radionuclide transport in the northern North Atlantic estimated with an eddy-permitting ocean model - Marine radionuclide transport in the Northern North Atlantic estimated with an Eddy-resolving ocean model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Magne [Norwegian Meteorological institute, P.O. Box 43 Blindern, N-0313 Oslo (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas (Norway); Isachsen, Paal E.; Saetra, Oeyvind; Klein, Heiko; Bartnicki, Jerzy [Norwegian Meteorological institute, P.O. Box 43 Blindern, N-0313 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Lind, Ole C. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    As a part of the Norwegian Centre for Environmental Radioactivity (CERAD), we have studied transport of radionuclides in the Nordic Seas using an eddy-resolving ocean model. Transport and dispersion is estimated by both Lagrangian (particle) and Eulerian (tracer) methods using currents generated by the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) at 4 km horizontal resolution. This relatively high resolution gives a more accurate description of the impact of macro-turbulent advection on transport paths and transport times than achieved in previous studies. The experiments cover historical discharges from the Sellafield reprocessing plant as well as hypothetical accident scenarios from power plants in Great Britain. For the historical Sellafield discharges, model calculations are compared to isotope concentrations observed along the Norwegian Coast and in the Barents Sea. For the accident scenarios, the likely impact on the Norwegian coastal zone is studied considering three different sources for the ocean: direct local discharge, far-field deposition from the atmosphere, and discharge via Norwegian rivers (via atmospheric deposition over land). (authors)

  15. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-01-01

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for

  16. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-09-28

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for

  17. Modelling of radionuclide migration and heat transport from an High-Level-Radioactive-Waste-repository (HLW) in Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.; Henrion, P.

    1992-01-01

    For the modelling of the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay formation, the analytical code MICOF has been updated with a 3-dimensional analytical solution for discrete sources. the MICOF program is used for the calculation of the release of α and β emitters from the HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES (HLW). A coherent conceptual model is developed which describes all the major physico-chemical phenomena influencing the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay. The concept of the diffusion accessible porosity is introduced and included in the MICOF code. Different types of migration experiments are described with their advantages and disadvantages. The thermal impact of the HLW disposal in the stratified Boom clay formation has been evaluated by a finite element simulation of the coupled heat and mass transport equation. The results of the simulations show that under certain conditions thermal convection cells may form, but the convective heat transfer in the clay formation is negligible. 6 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  18. Development of thermodynamic databases and geochemical/transport models for prediction of long-term radionuclide migration (Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, B.

    2000-01-01

    The isolation capacity of a repository system for radionuclides is described by geochemical modeling. The models for interpretation of experimental findings and for long-term extrapolation of experimental results are based on thermodynamic approaches. The geochemical models include dissolution reactions of waste forms, the evolution of the geochemical milieu, interactions of radionuclides with constituents of the groundwater (brines) and the precipitation of new solid phases. Reliable thermodynamic data, understanding of radionuclide complexation in aqueous multi-electrolyte solutions at the relevant ionic strength and knowledge on the formation of pure and mixed solids and on sorption processes are urgently needed for such model calculations. (author)

  19. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  20. Radionuclide transport and retardation in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, E.N.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; DeVilliers, S.J.; Erdal, B.R.; Lawrence, F.O.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1980-01-01

    Batch measurements provide an understanding of which experimental variables are important. For example, sorption ratios vary little with particle size (and surface area); however, groundwater composition and rock composition are quite important. A general correlation has been identified between mineralogy (major phases) and degree of sorption for strontium, cesium, and barium. Although these are approximate, a more detailed analysis may be possible as more samples are studied and the data base increased. Data from crushed tuff columns indicate that, except in simple cases where sorption coefficients are relatively low, and ion-exchange equilibria not only exist but are the dominant mechanism for removal of radioisotopes from solution, the simple relation between the sorption ratio R/sub d/ (or K/sub d/) and the relative velocity of radionuclides with respect to groundwater velocity may be insufficient to permit accurate modeling of the retardation of radionuclides. Additional work on whole core columns and larger blocks of intact material is required to better understand radionuclide sorption and transport through rock

  1. Characterizing and modelling the radionuclide transport properties of fracture zones in plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Kozak, E.T.; Frost, L.H.; Everitt, R.A.; Brown, A.; Gascoyne, M.; Scheier, N.W.

    1999-01-01

    Plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield were investigated as a potential host medium for nuclear fuel waste disposal of used CANDU nuclear fuel. Field investigations at several geologic research areas on the Shield have shown that major fracture zones are the dominant pathways for the large scale movement of groundwater and solutes through plutonic rock bodies. Because of this, a significant amount of the geoscience work has focused on methods to identify, characterize and model the radionuclide transport properties of major fracture zones in the fractured plutonic rocks of the Shield. In order to quantify the transport properties of such fracture zones a series of, groundwater tracer tests were performed over a period of several years in several major, low dipping fracture zones. Sixteen tracer tests were performed using dipole recirculation methods to evaluate transport over distance scales ranging from 17 m to 700 m. It was concluded that only tracer tests can provide useful estimates of the effective porosity and dispersivity characteristics of these large fracture zones in plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield. (author)

  2. Use of natural analogues to support radionuclide transport models for deep geological repositories for long lived radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Plans to dispose high level and long lived radioactive wastes in deep geological repositories have raised a number of unique problems, mainly due to the very long time-scales which have to be considered. An important way to help to evaluate performance and provide confidence in the assessment of safety in the long term is to carry out natural analogue studies. Natural analogues can be regarded as long term natural experiments the results or outcome of which can be observed, but which, by definition, are uncontrolled by humans. Studies of natural analogues have been carried out for more than two decades, although the application of information from them is only relatively recently becoming scientifically well ordered. This report is part of a the IAEA's programme on radioactive waste management dealing with disposal system technology for high level and long lived radioactive waste. It presents the current status of natural analogue information in evaluating models for radionuclide transport by groundwater. In particular, emphasis is given to the most useful aspects of quantitative applications for model development and testing (geochemistry and coupled transport models). The report provides an overview of various natural analogues as reference for those planning to develop a research programme in this field. Recommendations are given on the use of natural analogues to engender confidence in the safety of disposal systems. This report is a follow up of Technical Reports Series No. 304 on Natural Analogues in Performance Assessments for the Disposal of Long Lived Radioactive Waste (1989)

  3. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide migration have been studied in natural fissures orieted parallel to the axis of granite drill cores. A short pulse of the radionuclides solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. After several hundred fissure volumes water had been pumped through the fissure following the radionuclide pulse the activity distribution on the fissure surfaces was measured. From the retardation of 152 Eu, 235 Np and 237 Pu it is concluded that these radionuclides are transported in the oxidation states Eu(III), Pu(IV) and Np(V). The distribution coefficients K sub (d) calculated from flow and activity distribution data on the basis of geometric surface area/volume ratios are of the same order as published K sub (d) values obtained from batch equilibrium experiments. (Author)

  4. GETOUT - a one-dimensional model for groundwater transport of radionuclide decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundfelt, B.; Elert, M.

    1980-01-01

    The GETOUT-code, originally developed at Batelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), was used in the KBS-project to calculate the radionuclide discharges from the repository. The version used in KBS was a translation of the PNL BASIC-language version as by December 1976. In this report a new version, mathematically compatible with the PNL FORTRAN version as by 1979-08-15, is documented. Details are given on the differences between this new version and the version used in the KBS project up to now. (author)

  5. Transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere during complex meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, D.; Telenta, B.

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclides from various sources (nuclear and fossil fuel power plants, nuclear facilities, medical facilities, etc.) are being released to the atmosphere. The meteorological conditions determine the atmospheric turbulence, dispersion, and removal processes of the radionuclides. A two-dimensional version of the cloud model based on the Klemp-Wilhelmson dynamic and Lin et al.'s microphysics and thermodynamics has been adapted and used to simulate the transport of radionuclides emitted from a power plant or other source to the atmosphere. Calculations of the trajectories and radii for a few puffs are included in this paper. These numerical investigations show that the presented model can be used for the transport simulation of radionuclides and for the assessment of the radiological impact of power plants and other sources in safety assessments and comparative studies. Because it can simulate puff trajectories, this model is especially valuable in the presence of complex meteorological conditions

  6. RIVER-RAD, Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RIVER-RAD assesses the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. 2 - Method of solution: A compartmental linear transfer model is used in RIVER-RAD. The river system model in the code is divided into reaches (compartments) of equal size, each with a sediment compartment below it. The movement of radionuclides is represented by a series of transfers between the reaches, and between the water and sediment compartments of each reach. Within each reach (for both the water and sediment compartments), the radionuclides are assumed to be uniformly mixed. Upward volatilization is allowed from the water compartment, and the transfer of radionuclides between the reaches is determined by the flow rate of the river. Settling and resuspension velocities determine the transfer of absorbed radionuclides between the water and sediment compartments. Radioactive decay and decay-product buildup are incorporated into all transport calculations for all radionuclide chains specified by the user. Each nuclide may have unique input and removal rates. Volatilization and radiological decay are considered as linear rate constants in the model. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None noted

  7. Database for radionuclide transport in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiskra, J.

    1985-01-01

    The biosphere model is the final link in the chain of radionuclide transport models, used for radiation dose calculations from high level waste repositories. This report presents the data needed for biosphere calculations and discusses them where necessary. The first part is dedicated to the nuclide specific parameters like distribution coefficients (water - soil), concentration ratios (soil - plant) and distribution factors (for milk, meat etc.) which are reported in the literature. The second part contains the choice of regions, their division into compartments and the discussion of nutritional habits for man and animals. At the end a theoretical population for each region is estimated based on the consumption rates and on the yield of agricultural products, assuming an autonomous nutrition. (Auth.)

  8. Integration into JRODOS the models of radionuclide transport in rivers, reservoirs and coastal waters to support the emergency response in early accidental stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Bezhenar, R.; Boyko, O.; Ievdin, I.; Koshebutsky, V.; Maderich, V. [Institute of Mathematical Machines and Systems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Ukraine); Raskob, W.; Trybushnyi, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Kern- und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The decision support system for offsite nuclear emergency management RODOS (Real-time on-line decision support), developed under several EC RTD Framework Programs, contains many models related to support decision making in case of a nuclear or radiological emergency. Based on the request of the end users, it was re-engineered based on the JAVA technology and further named JRODOS. The consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident clearly demonstrated the importance of modeling tools predicting the radionuclide transport in marine and freshwater environment and assessing the doses to the public via the aquatic food chain to improve decision making in general. As a consequence, such an activity was launched as part of the European project PREPARE aiming to integrate the 3-dimensional model THREETOX for the radionuclide transport in coastal waters, estuaries, deep lakes, and reservoirs into hydrological model chain of JRODOS - JHDM (JRODOS Hydrological Dispersion Module). So far JHDM contains several aquatic radionuclide transport models describing the sequence of the processes 'atmospheric fallout to watershed' - 'radionuclide inflow to a river net' - 'radionuclide transport in river' - 'doses via aquatic pathways'. The implementation of the THREETOX model into this chain by developing also a user friendly interface will extend the applicability of JRODOS to deep fresh water bodies and marine coastal waters. This paper describes the assessment capabilities of this advanced model chain for two examples of the JRODOS implementation in Ukraine. JRODOS is installed in the emergency centers for two Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) - Zaporizzhya NPP (ZNPP) and Rivne NPP (RNPP). The different models of the JHDM were customized for these NPPs taking into account the characteristics of the water bodies in the surroundings of the NPPs. For the RNPP, located at the bank of the Sozh River which is a tributary of the

  9. Radionuclide transport behavior in a generic geological radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens T

    2015-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport to study the influence of several factors, including the ambient hydraulic gradient, groundwater pressure anomalies, and the properties of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ), on the prevailing transport mechanism (i.e., advection or molecular diffusion) in a generic nuclear waste repository within a clay-rich geological formation. By comparing simulation results, we show that the EDZ plays a major role as a preferential flowpath for radionuclide transport. When the EDZ is not taken into account, transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in almost the totality of the simulated domain, and transport velocity is about 40% slower. Modeling results also show that a reduction in hydraulic gradient leads to a greater predominance of diffusive transport, slowing down radionuclide transport by about 30% with respect to a scenario assuming a unit gradient. In addition, inward flow caused by negative pressure anomalies in the clay-rich formation further reduces transport velocity, enhancing the ability of the geological barrier to contain the radioactive waste. On the other hand, local high gradients associated with positive pressure anomalies can speed up radionuclide transport with respect to steady-state flow systems having the same regional hydraulic gradients. Transport behavior was also found to be sensitive to both geometrical and hydrogeological parameters of the EDZ. Results from this work can provide useful knowledge toward correctly assessing the post-closure safety of a geological disposal system. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  11. A new statistical method for transfer coefficient calculations in the framework of the general multiple-compartment model of transport for radionuclides in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F; Arruda-Neto, J D; Manso, M V; Helene, O M; Vanin, V R; Rodriguez, O; Mesa, J; Likhachev, V P; Filho, J W; Deppman, A; Perez, G; Guzman, F; de Camargo, S P

    1999-10-01

    A new and simple statistical procedure (STATFLUX) for the calculation of transfer coefficients of radionuclide transport to animals and plants is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. By using experimentally available curves of radionuclide concentrations versus time, for each animal compartment (organs), flow parameters were estimated by employing a least-squares procedure, whose consistency is tested. Some numerical results are presented in order to compare the STATFLUX transfer coefficients with those from other works and experimental data.

  12. A new statistical method for transfer coefficient calculations in the framework of the general multiple-compartment model of transport for radionuclides in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, F.; Manso, M.V.; Rodriguez, O.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Helene, O.M.; Vanin, V.R.; Likhachev, V.P.; Pereira Filho, J.W.; Deppman, A.; Perez, G.; Guzman, F.; Camargo, S.P. de

    1999-01-01

    A new and simple statistical procedure (STATFLUX) for the calculation of transfer coefficients of radionuclide transport to animals and plants is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. By using experimentally available curves of radionuclide concentrations versus time, for each animal compartment (organs), flow parameters were estimated by employing a least-squares procedure, whose consistency is tested. Some numerical results are presented in order to compare the STATFLUX transfer coefficients with those from other works and experimental data. (author)

  13. Radionuclide release, transport, and consequence modeling for WIPP: a report of a workshop held on September 16-17, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss potential mechanisms for release of radionuclides from the WIPP repository years after waste emplacement and termination of institutional controls, and the resultant radiological consequences. Opportunity was also provided for the exchange of information on meaningful release and transport models, and the availability, reliability and significance of data for the parameters applicable to those models. Other than those scenarios provided in draft by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) (Appendix II), there were no new breach scenarios postulated. Also there were no major objections posed to the EEG proposals or the approaches taken in these drafts. Although there were no formal conclusions highlighted by the Conference, the EEG has concluded that the statements below provide a summary of EEG's views concerning the topics covered. These views are based upon the discussions at the Conference, the subsequent comments of the conferees, the information provided in the preceding EEG sponsored geological meeting and field trip, and the information contained in the EEG draft reports

  14. Modeling of radionuclide transport through rock formations and the resulting radiation exposure of reference persons. Calculations using Asse II parameters; Modellierung des Transports von Radionukliden durch Gesteinsschichten und der resultierenden Strahlenexposition von Referenzpersonen. Berechnungen mit Parametern der Asse II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, Christian; Ustohalova, Veronika; Steinhoff, Mathias

    2012-05-21

    The long-term release of radioactivity into the ground water path cannot be excluded for the radioactive waste repository Asse II. The possible radiological consequences were analyzed using a radio-ecological scenario developed by GRS. A second scenario was developed considering the solubility of radionuclides in salt saturated solutions and retarding/retention effects during the radionuclide transport through the cap rock layers. The modeling of possible radiation exposure was based on the lifestyle habits of reference persons. In Germany the calculation procedure for the prediction of radionuclide release from final repositories is not defined by national standards, the used procedures are based on analogue methods from other radiation protection calculations.

  15. Radionuclide migration in ground water at a low-level waste disposal site: a comparison of predicted radionuclide transport modeling versus field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, M.P.; Robertson, D.E.; Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    At the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), in Ontario, Canada, a number of LLW shallow-land burial facilities have existed for 25-30 years. These facilities are useful for testing the concept of site modelability. In 1984, CRNL and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) established a cooperative research program to examine two disposal sites having plumes of slightly contaminated ground water for study. This report addresses the LLW Nitrate Disposal Pit site, which received liquid wastes containing approximately 1000-1500 curies of mixed fission products during 1953-54. The objective of this study is to test the regulatory requirement that a site be modeled and to use the Nitrate Disposal Pit site as a field site for testing the reliability of models in predicting radionuclide movement in ground water. The study plan was to approach this site as though it were to be licensed under the requirements of 10 CFR 61. Under the assumption that little was known about this site, a characterization plan was prepared describing the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical information needed to assess site performance. After completion of the plan, site data generated by CRNL were selected to fill the plan data requirements. This paper describes the site hydrogeology, modeling of ground water flow, the comparison of observed and predicted radionuclide movement, and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations. 3 references, 10 figures

  16. Supplementary investigations on the validation of the atmospheric radionuclide transport model (ARTM); Ergaenzende Untersuchungen zur Validierung des Atmosphaerischen Radionuklid-Transport-Modells (ARTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Thielen, Harald; Sogalla, Martin

    2015-09-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SBG) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of non-radioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. The research project 3612S50007 serves, on the one hand, to validate ARTM systematically. On the other hand, the development of science and technology were investigated and, if reasonable and possible, were implemented to the program system. The dispersion model and the user interface were advanced and optimized. The program package was provided to the users as a free download. Notably t he work program comprises the validation of the approach used in ARTM to model short emission periods, which are of interest in view of the SBG. The simulation results of the diagnostic wind and turbulence model TALdia, which is part of the GO-ARTM program package, were evaluated with focus on the influence of buildings on the flow field. The user interface was upgraded with a wind field viewer. To simplify the comparison with the model still in use, a Gaussian plum e model was implemented into the graphical user interface. The ARTM web page was maintained, user questions and feedback were answered and analysed concerning possible improvements and further developments of the program package. Numerous improvements were implemented. An ARTM user workshop was hosted by the Federal Office for Radiation

  17. Modelling of near-field radionuclide transport phenomena in a KBS-3V type of repository for nuclear waste with Goldsim Code - and verification against previous methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Nordman, H.

    2010-03-01

    Traditional radionuclide transport models overestimate significantly some phenomena, or completely ignore them. This motivates the development of new more precise models. As a result, this work is a description of commissioning of a new KBS-3V near-field radionuclide transport model, which has been done with a commercial software called GoldSim. According to earlier models, GoldSim model uses rz coordinates, but the solubilities of radionuclides have been treated more precisely. To begin with, the physical phenomena concerning near-field transport have been introduced according to GoldSim way of thinking. Also, the computational methods of GoldSim have been introduced and compared to methods used earlier. The actual verification of GoldSim model has been carried out by comparing the GoldSim results from simple cases to the corresponding results obtained with REPCOM, a software developed by VTT and used in several safety assessments. The results agree well. Finally, a few complicated cases were studied. In these cases, the REPCOM's limitations in handling of some phenomena become evident. The differences in the results are caused especially by the extension of the solubility limit to the whole computational domain, and the element-wise treatment of the solubilities which was used instead of nuclide-wise treatment. This work has been carried out as a special assignment to the former laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems in Helsinki University of Technology. The work was done at VTT. (orig.)

  18. Solubility limited radionuclide transport through geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Iwamoto, Fumio; Pigford, T.H.

    1980-11-01

    Prior analyses for the migration of radionuclides neglect solubility limits of resolved radionuclide in geologic media. But actually some of the actinides may appear in chemical forms of very low solubility. In the present report we have proposed the migration model with no decay parents in which concentration of radionuclide is limited in concentration of solubility in ground water. In addition, the analytical solutions of the space-time-dependent concentration are presented in the case of step release, band release and exponential release. (author)

  19. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindstroem, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10{sup -5} per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10{sup -5} per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10{sup -5} Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10{sup -7} Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable

  20. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, Maria; Lindstroem, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10 -8 Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10 -5 per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10 -5 per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10 -5 Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10 -7 Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable values. In that case almost all

  1. Dynamic models for radionuclide transport in agricultural ecosystems: summary of results from a UK code comparison exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meekings, G.F.; Walters, B.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, models have been developed by three organisations in the UK to represent the time-dependent behaviour of radionuclides in agricultural ecosystems. These models were developed largely independently of each other and, in view of their potential applications in relation to radioactive waste management and discharge, the Food Science Division of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food initiated a calculational intercomparison exercise with the agreement and cooperation of all three organisations involved. A subset of the results obtained is reported here. In general a high degree of consistency between the results of the various models was obtained particularly regarding the responses with time. The exercise supported the case for using dynamic models in radiological assessment studies. It also demonstrated areas where differences in results from the models are a consequence of a lack of appropriate data on the environmental behaviour of the radionuclides considered. (author)

  2. The Grimsel radionuclide migration experiment - a contribution to raising confidence in the validity of solute transport models used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, U.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to provide confidence that the predictive models utilized are applicable for the specific repository systems. Nagra has carried out radionuclide migration experiments at the Grimsel underground test site (Switzerland) for testing of currently used methodologies, data bases, conceptual approaches and codes for modeling radionuclide transport through fractured host rocks. Specific objectives included: identification of the relevant transport processes, to test the extrapolation of laboratory sorption data to field conditions, and to demonstrate the applicability of currently used methodology for conceptualizing or building realistic transport models. Field tests and transport modeling work are complemented by an extensive laboratory program. The field experimental activities focused predominantly on establishing appropriate conditions for identifying relevant transport mechanisms on the scale of a few meters, aiming at full recovery of injected tracers, simple geometry and long-term stability of induced dipole flow fields. A relatively simple homogeneous, dual-porosity advection/diffusion model was built with input from a state of the art petrographic characterisation of the water conducting feature. It was possible to calibrate the model from conservative tracer breakthrough curves. (J.S.). 21 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Field studies of radionuclide transport at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors summarize the results of: in situ field column experiments to study the transport behaviour of several long-lived radionuclides, 4 natural gradient non-reactive radiotracer injection experiments at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) Twin Lake Tracer Test Site, and a model validation study that used data for 90 Sr from two well-defined contaminated groundwater flow systems at CRL. The paper also describes a current re-evaluation of radionuclide release and transport from a 1960 experimental burial (in a CRL sand aquifer) of glass blocks containing fission and activation products. (J.P.N.)

  4. Modeling of external radiation from the transport of radionuclides across a canyon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Van Etten, D.; Chen, I-li.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is an 800-million electron volt, l mA intensity linear proton accelerator used for studying subatomic particles at relativistic velocities. Routine operation of the accelerator results in the formation of short-lived air activation products, primarily in the beam stop section of LAMPF. This study presents the results of monitoring and modeling external radiation levels from LAMPF emissions at three locations during 1984. Measured radiation exposures are presented for all three locations during a 49-day period. Hourly radiation levels are calculated for all sites and compared with the prevalent wind patterns during the study period. Predicted daily levels are compared with measured values at all of the sites. Accuracy of the model is compared for day and night conditions. Annual model predictions are also compared with TLD measurements

  5. EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-11-01

    EOS7R provides radionuclide transport capability for TOUGH2. EOS7R extends the EOS7 module (water, brine, and optional air) to model water, brine, parent component, daughter component, and optional air and heat. The radionuclide components follow a first-order decay law, and may adsorb onto the solid grains. Volatilization of the decaying components is modeled by Henry's Law. The decaying components are normally referred to as radionuclides, but they may in fact by any trace components that decay, adsorb, and volatilize. The decay process need not be radioactive decay, but could be any process that follows a first-order decay law, such as biodegradation. EOS7R includes molecular diffusion for all components in gaseous and aqueous phases using a simplified binary diffusion model. When EOS7R is used with standard TOUGH2, transport occurs by advection and molecular diffusion in all phases. When EOS7R is coupled with the dispersion module T2DM, one obtains T2DMR, the radionuclide transport version of T2DM. T2DMR models advection, diffusion, and hydrodynamic dispersion in rectangular two-dimensional regions. Modeling of radionuclide transport requires input parameters specifying the half-life for first-order decay, distribution coefficients for each rock type for adsorption, and inverse Henry's constants for volatilization. Options can be specified in the input file to model decay in inactive grid blocks and to read from standard EOS7 INCON files. The authors present a number of example problems to demonstrate application and accuracy of TOUGH2/EOS7R. One-dimensional simulation results agree well with analytical solutions. For a two-dimensional salt-dome flow problem, the final distribution of daughter radionuclide component is complicated by the presence of weak recirculation caused by density effects due to salinity

  6. Radionuclide Transport Modelling: Current Status and Future Needs. Synthesis, Work Group Reports and Extended Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The workshop identified a set of critical issues for the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to address in preparing for future reviews of license applications, which have subsequently been considered in preparing this synthesis. Structure for organising expert participation: A structure for organising expert participation in future reviews is proposed based on clearinghouses for (1) regulatory application and context, (2) engineered barrier systems, (3) geosphere, (4) biosphere, and (5) performance assessment integration and calculations. As part of their work, these clearinghouses could identify key issues that need to be resolved prior to future reviews. Performance assessment strategy and review context: Future reviews will be conducted in the context of regulations based on risk criteria; this leads to a need to review the methods used in probabilistic risk assessment, as well as the underlying process models. A plan is needed for accomplishing both aims. Despite the probabilistic framework, a need is anticipated for targeted, deterministic calculations to check particular assumptions. Priorities and ambition level for reviews: SKI's and SSI's resources can be more efficiently utilised by an early review of SKB's safety case, so that if necessary the authorities can make an early start on evaluating topics that are of primary significance to the safety case. As a guide to planning for allocation of effort in future reviews, this workshop produced a preliminary ranking of technical issues, on a scale from 'non-controversial' to 'requiring independent modelling,' Analysis of repository system and scenarios: Systems analysis tools including features/events/processes encyclopaedias, process-influence diagrams, and assessment-model flowcharts should be used as review tools, to check the processes and influences considered in SKB's analyses, and to evaluate the comprehensiveness of the scenarios that are

  7. Radionuclide Transport Modelling: Current Status and Future Needs. Synthesis, Work Group Reports and Extended Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The workshop identified a set of critical issues for the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to address in preparing for future reviews of license applications, which have subsequently been considered in preparing this synthesis. Structure for organising expert participation: A structure for organising expert participation in future reviews is proposed based on clearinghouses for (1) regulatory application and context, (2) engineered barrier systems, (3) geosphere, (4) biosphere, and (5) performance assessment integration and calculations. As part of their work, these clearinghouses could identify key issues that need to be resolved prior to future reviews. Performance assessment strategy and review context: Future reviews will be conducted in the context of regulations based on risk criteria; this leads to a need to review the methods used in probabilistic risk assessment, as well as the underlying process models. A plan is needed for accomplishing both aims. Despite the probabilistic framework, a need is anticipated for targeted, deterministic calculations to check particular assumptions. Priorities and ambition level for reviews: SKI's and SSI's resources can be more efficiently utilised by an early review of SKB's safety case, so that if necessary the authorities can make an early start on evaluating topics that are of primary significance to the safety case. As a guide to planning for allocation of effort in future reviews, this workshop produced a preliminary ranking of technical issues, on a scale from 'non-controversial' to 'requiring independent modelling,' Analysis of repository system and scenarios: Systems analysis tools including features/events/processes encyclopaedias, process-influence diagrams, and assessment-model flowcharts should be used as review tools, to check the processes and influences considered in SKB's analyses, and to evaluate the comprehensiveness of the scenarios that are

  8. Short description of the BIOS-model, and selection of biosphere parameters to be used in radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, E.J. de; Koester, H.W.; Vries, W.J. de.

    1990-02-01

    In the framework of the PACOMA-project (Performance assessment of confinements for medium and alpha waste), initiated by the European Commission, possible future radiation doses, due to contamination of the biosphere by radionuclides originating from radioactive waste disposed in salt-formations, were calculated. In all cases considered radionuclides coming out of the geosphere enter a river. For the biosphere calculations the BIOS-model, developed by the NRPB in England, is used. A short description of the model, as well as of the adjustments made at the RIVM to calculate the total individual and collective doses and the subdoses of different exposure pathways is given. The values of biosphere parameters selected for the model are presented, together with the literature consulted. (author). 17 refs., 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Chemical controls on subsurface radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.J.; Killey, R.W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical and biochemical processes can affect the movement of contaminants in groundwater. Materials can be almost completely removed from circulation by processes such as precipitation and coprecipitation. Organic compounds or contaminants that are hazardous may be degraded or formed during groundwater transport. Studies at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL have focused on radionuclide transport, although other contaminants have been and are being investigated. This paper summarizes findings from research that extends back more than 30 years. Much of the work on reactive contaminant transport has centered on 90 Sr; other contaminants have also been considered, however, and features of their behaviour are also reviewed. (25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.)

  10. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  11. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose FR-om /sup 239/Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose FR-om the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  12. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1988-12-01

    The study of radionuclide migration through rock is currently of great interest due to its relevance to the possible escape paths into the biosphere of radionuclides released from high level radioactive wastes burried in deep geological repositories. While water will provide the vehicle for transportation, interaction with geological material may greatly influence the radionuclide movement relative that of water. A flow system for laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in natural fissures in granitic rock under reducing conditions is described. The system based on the use of synthetic ground water equilibrated with granitic rock in a well sealed system, allow experiments to be carried out at -240 mV reduction potential. In flow experiments with technetium the retardation was found to be dependent on the method used for reducing TcO 4 - . The preparation of the tracer solutions is crucial, as some of the redox-reactions may be very slow. The dynamics of the Tc(VII) reduction and also speciation need to be carried out in separate experiments. (4 illustrations, 5 tables)

  13. Analysis of the Nevada-Applied-Ecology-Group model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the inhalation pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The inhalation pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of the dose to liver, bone, kidney and total body. The GI tract receives 99% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5% ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph nodes. (author)

  14. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  15. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  16. Transport of radionuclides in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundi, A.

    1983-10-01

    The dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and their uptake by man via various nutritional pathways is studied using a compartment model. The sample environment is the area of the lower Limmat and Aare valleys. General considerations of the compartmental description of the biosphere are made. The problem of the description of surface features, in particular soil, sediment and water, is studied in detail using the code BIOPATH. This study is intended to be an example of how a model of the biosphere could be constructed. It is shown that this is a reasonable model to calculate the spreading of radionuclides in the biosphere and that it indicates the relative significance of individual compartments, pathways and radionuclides. Calculated values of dose committment, however, should not be used as reference data for safety analyses. (Auth.)

  17. Complementary modelling of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Grandia, Fidel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2008-10-15

    sensitivity analysis of the more relevant parameters considered in the reactive transport numerical models is also presented here. From the main report of the SR-Can project it is stated that Ra is one of the radionuclides with greater contribution to the radioactive doses that might be transferred to the biosphere in the context of repository release. For this reason, Ra was added to the set of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, and U). Another improvement in the numerical simulations presented here is the calculation of the hydrogeochemical steady state of the near-surface system, prior to repository release. This is done to approach the present-day conditions at Forsmark. In addition, radionuclides derived from repository release have been discriminated from those of natural origin, already present in the groundwaters. Radionuclides coming from repository were labelled as RDCs, RDSr, and RDU (RD stands for repository-derived). Ra was not labelled since the presence of this radionuclide in the modelled domain is exclusively attributed to repository release due to the extremely low concentrations observed in the natural waters of Forsmark. The results attained in the reactive transport models built in this work show that the near-surface systems at Forsmark constitute a geochemical reactive barrier able to retain radionuclides by several key processes, namely cation exchange, adsorption on mineral surfaces and precipitation of pure phases and solid solutions. The reactive transport simulations predict that repository-derived Sr, U, and Cs are retained in the solid phase of both Quaternary deposits under study, while Ra is effectively retained in the till deposit only. Ra is not retained in the glacial clay deposit since saturation of barite, which is the only retention mechanism considered in the simulations for this radionuclide, is not reached in this system. The simulations indicate that, in the till deposit, Sr is retained via cation exchange and coprecipitation with calcite, U is

  18. Simulation of radionuclide transport in U.S. agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.D.; Baes, C.F. III.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the recent concern about the impact of energy technologies on man and related health effects, there has emerged a need for models to calculate or predict the effects of radionuclides on man. A general overview is presented of a model that calculates the ingrowth of radionuclides into man's food chain. The FORTRAN IV computer program TERRA, Transport of Environmentally Released Radionuclides in Agriculture, simulates the build-up of radionuclides in soil, four plant food compartments, in meat and milk from beef, and in the livestock food compartments that cause radionuclide build-up in milk and meat from beef. A large data set of spatially oriented parameters has been developed in conjunction with TERRA. This direct-access data set is called SITE, Specific Information on the Terrestrial Environment, and contains 35 parameters for each of 3525 half-degree longitude-latitude cells which define the lower 48 states. TERRA and SITE are used together as a package for determining radionuclide concentrations in man's food anywhere within the conterminous 48 states due to atmospheric releases

  19. Resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: part II. Modeling the transport process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoschenko, V.I.; Kashparov, V.A.; Levchuk, S.E.; Glukhovskiy, A.S.; Khomutinin, Yu.V.; Protsak, V.P.; Lundin, S.M.; Tschiersch, J.

    2006-01-01

    To predict parameters of radionuclide resuspension, transport and deposition during forest and grassland fires, several model modules were developed and adapted. Experimental data of controlled burning of prepared experimental plots in the Chernobyl exclusion zone have been used to evaluate the prognostic power of the models. The predicted trajectories and elevations of the plume match with those visually observed during the fire experiments in the grassland and forest sites. Experimentally determined parameters could be successfully used for the calculation of the initial plume parameters which provide the tools for the description of various fire scenarios and enable prognostic calculations. In summary, the model predicts a release of some per mille from the radionuclide inventory of the fuel material by the grassland fires. During the forest fire, up to 4% of 137 Cs and 9 Sr and up to 1% of the Pu isotopes can be released from the forest litter according to the model calculations. However, these results depend on the parameters of the fire events. In general, the modeling results are in good accordance with the experimental data. Therefore, the considered models were successfully validated and can be recommended for the assessment of the resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in contaminated territories

  20. Effects of macropores on groundwater flow and transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, D.D.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    In humid environments, recent findings have shown that an important component of runoff and associated solute moves rapidly through large continuous voids. Thus, consideration of radionuclide transport in subsurface flow is incomplete without explicit treatment of continuous macropores and interaction between macropore flow and the soil matrix. A computer model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix has been developed. The model employs the Integrated Compartment Method and uses the approach of dividing the porous media into compartments comprising fractures or porous material. The fracture region and a small portion of the porous matrix are simulated using a shorter time step than for the remaining porous matrix. This allows substantial savings in computational time. The model should be useful for analyses of generic problems associated with water and radionuclide transport in macropore systems at shallow-land disposal sites in humid environments. 14 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  1. Speciation and transport of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.E.; Toste, A.P.; Abel, K.H.; Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the chemical speciation of a number of radionuclides migrating in a slightly contaminated ground water plume are identifying the most mobile species and providing an opportunity to test and/or validate geochemical models of radionuclide transport in ground waters. Results to date have shown that most of the migrating radionuclides are present in anionic or nonionic forms. These include anionic forms of 55 Fe, 60 Co, /sup 99m/Tc, 106 Ru, 131 I, and nonionic forms of 63 Ni and 125 Sb. Strontium-70 and a small fraction of the mobile 60 Co are the only cationic radionuclides which have been detected moving in the ground water plume beyond 30 meters from the source. A comparison of the observed chemical forms with the predicted species calculated from modeling thermodynamic data and ground water chemical parameters has indicated a good agreement for most of the radioelements in the system, including Tc, Np, Cs, Sr, Ce, Ru, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The discrepancies between observed and calculated solutions species were noted for Fe, Co, Ni and I. Traces of Fe, Co, and Ni were observed to migrate in anionic or nonionic forms which the calculations failed to predict. These anionic/nonionic species may be organic complexes having enhanced mobility in ground waters. The radioiodine, for example, was shown to behave totally as an anion but further investigation revealed that 49-57% of this anionic iodine was organically bound. The ground water and aqueous extracts of trench sediments contain a wide variety of organic compounds, some of which could serve as complexing agents for the radionuclides. These results indicate the need for further research at a variety of field sites in defining precisely the chemical forms of the mobile radionuclide species, and in better understanding the role of dissolved organic materials in ground water transport of radionuclides

  2. Evaluation of conceptual, mathematical and physical-and-chemical models for describing subsurface radionuclide transport at the Lake Karachai Waste Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Sindalovsky, L.N.; Boronina, A.V.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pozdniakov, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop the methodology and to improve understanding of subsurface radionuclide transport for application to the Lake Karachai Site and to identify the influence of the processes and interactions involved into transport and fate of the radionuclides. The report is focused on two sets of problems, which have to do both with, hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical aspects of the contaminant transport

  3. Development of computation model on the GoldSim platform for the radionuclide transport in the geosphere with the time-dependent parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Shigeru; Inagaki, Manabu

    2010-06-01

    In the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system, numerical evaluation for radionuclide transport with the time-dependent parameters is necessary to evaluate various scenarios. In H12 report, numerical calculation code MESHNOTE and TIGER were used for the evaluation of some natural phenomena scenarios that had to handle the time-dependent parameters. In the future, the necessity of handling the time-dependent parameters will be expected to increase, and more efficient calculation and improvement of quality control of input/output parameters will be required. Therefore, for the purpose of corresponding this requirement, a radionuclide transport model has been developed on the GoldSim platform. The GoldSim is a general simulation software, that was used for the computation modeling of Yucca Mountain Project. The conceptual model, the mathematical model and the verification of the GoldSim model are described in this report. In the future, application resources on this report will be able to upgrade for perturbation scenarios analysis model and other conceptual models. (author)

  4. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0; ARTM. Atmosphaerisches Radionuklid-Transport-Modell mit Radon Postprozessor und SBG-Modul. Modellbeschreibung zu Version 2.8.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald; Martens, Reinhard

    2015-04-20

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  5. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  6. Sediment transport modelling in the Gulf of Lion with the perspective of studying the fate of radionuclides originated by the Rhone River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufois, Francois

    2008-01-01

    Among the various contaminants introduced in the environment, artificial radionuclides appear particularly important to consider because of their chemical toxicity and / or of their radio-toxicity. Some radionuclides present a high affinity with particles so that the study of the sediment dynamics is a useful preliminary to the study of their dispersion on the open sea. This thesis is focused on the fate of sediments in the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean sea) and in particular on the impact of the Rhone River, which is the main source of particulate matter in the Gulf of Lion. In order to study the sediment transport mechanisms on various space and time scales, this thesis is based on mathematical modelling. The hydro-sedimentary model set up in the Gulf of Lion, which takes into account the gathered effect of waves and currents, was supported by recent hydro-sedimentary data analyses. CARMA (winter 2006/2007) and SCOPE (winter 2007/2008) experiments were used to better understand the physical processes which control the sediment transport on the Rhone pro-delta and to validate the model. The period of the centennial Rhone River flood of December 2003 was also simulated in order to determine the impact of such extreme events on the fate of sediments. Both observations and simulations of the studied periods highlight the high capacity of erosion and transport induced by south-eastern storms on the pro-delta

  7. The role of particulates in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Bachinski, D.B.; Vandergraaf, T.T.

    1991-01-01

    The colloid program at AECL Research is focused on characterizing natural particles in groundwater to evaluate their potential role in radiocolloid formation and to form a database for particle migration studies. The main objective of this program has been the study of colloids (1 to 450 nm) and suspended particles (> 450 nm) in fractured granites and sandstone in various locations in Canada and Switzerland. Groundwater particles were found to consist of clay minerals, micas, quartz, feldspar, iron-silica oxides and organic material. In groundwaters from granite, sandstone and clay-rich rock colloid concentrations were less than 5 mg/L. Some of these groundwaters may contain up to 260 mg/L of suspended particles. However, these particles are not expected to be mobile under the natural flow regimes of deep groundwaters. Provided radiocolloid formation is reversible, it is shown that the colloid concentrations observed in groundwaters from granites will have a negligible effect on radionuclide transport even when making the conservative assumption that these particles travel with the velocity of groundwater. For the case of irreversible radiocolloid formation, an equation is presented to calculate the fraction of total radionuclides in the geosphere which will form radiocolloids. The significance of these radiocolloids will depend upon the total amount of radionuclides released to the geosphere and on particle migration properties. (author)

  8. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golian, C.; Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.; Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K.; Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that 234 U is preferentially mobile relative to 238 U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ( 234

  9. Transient simulation and sensitivity analysis for transport of radionuclides in a saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide transport by groundwater flow is an important pathway in the assessment of the environmental impact of radioactive waste disposal to the biosphere. A numerical model was developed to simulate radionuclide transport by groundwater flow and predict the radionuclide discharge rate to the biosphere. A sensitivity analysis methodology was developed to address the sensitivity of the input parameters of the radionuclide transport equation to the specified response of interest

  10. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  11. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach Transport, and Equilibrium Chemistry), a finite-element model for assessing the release of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal units: Background, theory, and model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Sullivan, T.M.; Simonson, S.A.; Suen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K d that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K d models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessary to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems

  12. A study on the characteristics of colloid-associated radionuclide transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yun Chang

    1997-02-01

    Recently, the radionuclide transport in the form of colloids has been focused intensively in the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository. As colloids are considered to be able to increase the transport rate of radionuclide through geologic media, the transport of radionuclide should be adjusted by the presence of colloids. The migration of dissolved radionuclide is expected to depend on various process such as advection, dispersion and interactions with soils, and, in addition, the transport of colloid-mediated radionuclide is considered to be more complicated because of the interactions between radionuclides and colloids. In this paper the migration behavior of colloid-associated radionuclides within subsurface are reviewed and studied in detail. The colloid-mediated transport system was modelled and simulated in order to illustrate the effects of colloids on the transport of radionuclide in the aquifer system. The transport rate of radionuclide is mainly controlled by a retardation factor which is controlled by colloidal behaviors, degree of adsorption, and the related geologic parameters. Therefore it is necessary to carefully understand the accelerating tendency of the retardation difference factor, and in this study the trends are analyzed, described and the retardation difference factor is mathematically defined, simplified and applied practically to the safety and performance assessment of a future repository

  13. Numerical solution of the radionuclide transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.; Roesel, F.

    1983-11-01

    A numerical solution of the one-dimensional geospheric radionuclide chain transport equation based on the pseudospectral method is developed. The advantages of this approach are flexibility in incorporating space and time dependent migration parameters, arbitrary boundary conditions and solute rock interactions as well as efficiency and reliability. As an application the authors investigate the impact of non-linear sorption isotherms on migration in crystalline rock. It is shown that non-linear sorption, in the present case a Freundlich isotherm, may reduce concentration at the geosphere outlet by orders of magnitude provided the migration time is comparable or larger than the half-life of the nuclide in question. The importance of fixing dispersivity within the continuum approach is stressed. (Auth.)

  14. Specifications for the development of a fully three-dimensional numerical groundwater model for regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prickett, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Specifications are given which are necessary to develop a three-dimensional numerical model capable of simulating regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository. The model to be developed will include all of the significant mass transport processes including flow, chemical, and thermal advection, mechanical dispersion, molecular diffusion, ion exchange reactions, and radioactive decay. The model specifications also include that density and viscosity fluid properties be functions of pressure, temperature, and concentration and take into account fluid and geologic heterogenieties by allowing possible assignment of individual values to every block of the model. The model specifications furthermore include the repository shape, input/output information, boundary conditions, and the need for documentation and a user's manual. Model code validation can be accomplished with the included known analytical or laboratory solutions. It is recommended that an existing finite-difference model (developed by INTERCOMP and INTERA, Inc.) be used as a starting point either as an acceptable basic code for modification or as a pattern for the development of a completely different numerical scheme. A ten-step plan is given to outline the general procedure for development of the code.

  15. Specifications for the development of a fully three-dimensional numerical groundwater model for regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prickett, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Specifications are given which are necessary to develop a three-dimensional numerical model capable of simulating regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository. The model to be developed will include all of the significant mass transport processes including flow, chemical, and thermal advection, mechanical dispersion, molecular diffusion, ion exchange reactions, and radioactive decay. The model specifications also include that density and viscosity fluid properties be functions of pressure, temperature, and concentration and take into account fluid and geologic heterogenieties by allowing possible assignment of individual values to every block of the model. The model specifications furthermore include the repository shape, input/output information, boundary conditions, and the need for documentation and a user's manual. Model code validation can be accomplished with the included known analytical or laboratory solutions. It is recommended that an existing finite-difference model (developed by INTERCOMP and INTERA, Inc.) be used as a starting point either as an acceptable basic code for modification or as a pattern for the development of a completely different numerical scheme. A ten-step plan is given to outline the general procedure for development of the code

  16. Compilation of data for radionuclide transport analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This report is one of the supporting documents to the updated safety assessment (project SAFE) of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste, SFR 1. A number of calculation cases for quantitative analysis of radionuclide release and dose to man are defined based on the expected evolution of the repository, geosphere and biosphere in the Base Scenario and other scenarios selected. The data required by the selected near field, geosphere and biosphere models are given and the values selected for the calculations are compiled in tables. The main sources for the selected values of the migration parameters in the repository and geosphere models are the safety assessment of a deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, and the preliminary safety assessment of a repository for long-lived, low- and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5. For the biosphere models, both site-specific data and generic values of the parameters are selected. The applicability of the selected parameter values is discussed and the uncertainty is qualitatively addressed for data to the repository and geosphere migration models. Parameter values selected for these models are in general pessimistic in order not to underestimate the radionuclide release rates. It is judged that this approach combined with the selected calculation cases will illustrate the effects of uncertainties in processes and events that affects the evolution of the system as well as in quantitative data that describes this. The biosphere model allows for probabilistic calculations and the uncertainty in input data are quantified by giving minimum, maximum and mean values as well as the type of probability distribution function.

  17. Compilation of data for radionuclide transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This report is one of the supporting documents to the updated safety assessment (project SAFE) of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste, SFR 1. A number of calculation cases for quantitative analysis of radionuclide release and dose to man are defined based on the expected evolution of the repository, geosphere and biosphere in the Base Scenario and other scenarios selected. The data required by the selected near field, geosphere and biosphere models are given and the values selected for the calculations are compiled in tables. The main sources for the selected values of the migration parameters in the repository and geosphere models are the safety assessment of a deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, and the preliminary safety assessment of a repository for long-lived, low- and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5. For the biosphere models, both site-specific data and generic values of the parameters are selected. The applicability of the selected parameter values is discussed and the uncertainty is qualitatively addressed for data to the repository and geosphere migration models. Parameter values selected for these models are in general pessimistic in order not to underestimate the radionuclide release rates. It is judged that this approach combined with the selected calculation cases will illustrate the effects of uncertainties in processes and events that affects the evolution of the system as well as in quantitative data that describes this. The biosphere model allows for probabilistic calculations and the uncertainty in input data are quantified by giving minimum, maximum and mean values as well as the type of probability distribution function

  18. Development of a transportable system for radionuclide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, W.C.; Anderson, D.L.; Lamont, W.H.; South, P.K.; Rury, M.A.; Beachley, G.M.; Ondov, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Transportable radioanalytical systems were assembled and tested for quantitative determination of γ-emitting radionuclides and screening of β- emitting radionuclides. Standard operating procedures (SOPs), including instructions for assembly, disassembly, operation, sample collection and analysis, and all other procedures needed, were developed. Foods, as well as National Institute of Standards and Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, and in-house Reference Materials were analyzed. An SOP for γ-emitting radionuclides was successfully tested at 3 locations. (author)

  19. Uncertainties in geologic disposal of high-level wastes - groundwater transport of radionuclides and radiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Bard, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis for radionuclide transport in groundwater considers models and methods for characterizing (1) the present geologic environment and its future evolution due to natural geologic processes and to repository development and waste emplacement, (2) groundwater hydrology, (3) radionuclide geochemistry, and (4) the interactions among these phenomena. The discussion of groundwater transport focuses on the nature of the sources of uncertainty rather than on quantitative estimates of their magnitude, because of the lack of evidence that current models can provide realistic quantitative predictions of radionuclide transport in groundwater for expected repository environments. The analysis for the long-term health risk to man following releases of long-lived radionuclides to the biosphere is more quantitative and involves estimates of uncertainties in (1) radionuclide concentrations in man's exposure environment, (2) radionuclide intake by exposed individuals per unit concentration in the environment, (3) the dose per unit intake, (4) the number of exposed individuals, and (5) the health risk per unit dose. For the important long-lived radionuclides in high-level waste, uncertainties in most of the different components of a calculation of individual and collective dose per unit release appear to be no more than two or three orders of magnitude; these uncertainties are certainly much less than uncertainties in predicting groundwater transport of radionuclides between a repository and the biosphere. Several limitations in current models for predicting the health risk to man per unit release to the biosphere are discussed

  20. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D A; Baker, A J; Connell, L D [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D G; Read, D [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M; Pers, K; Skagius, K [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T; Ohnuki, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater

  2. One-dimensional radionuclide transport under time-varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbard, F.; Olague, N.E.; Longsine, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses new analytical and numerical solutions presented for one-dimensional radionuclide transport under time-varying fluid-flow conditions including radioactive decay. The analytical solution assumes that all radionuclides have identical retardation factors, and is limited to instantaneous releases. The numerical solution does not have these limitations, but is tested against the limiting case given for the analytical solution. Reasonable agreement between the two solutions was found. Examples are given for the transport of a three-member radionuclide chain transported over distances and flow rates comparable to those reported for Yucca Mountain, the proposed disposal site for high-level nuclear waste

  3. A study on the radionuclide transport by bacteria in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous and fractured media. The mass balance for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase, rock matrix and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of the radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacteria and supplied primary substrate as limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. We also found that, depend on the transport of bacteria the temporal and spatial distribution of radionuclide concentration was significantly altered. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria in the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model would be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety

  4. The effect of bacterial generation on the transport of radionuclide in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to develop a predictive model based on a conceptual three-phase system and to investigate the influence of bacteria and their generation on the radionuclide transport in porous media. The mass balance equations for bacteria, substrate and radionuclide were formulated. To illustrate the model simply, an equilibrium condition was assumed to partition the substrate, bacteria and radionuclide concentrations, between the solid soil matrix, aqueous phase and bacterial surface. From the numerical calculation of radionuclide transport in the presence of bacteria, it was found that the growth of bacterial and supplied primary substrate as a limiting or stimulating growth factor of bacteria are the most important factors of the radionuclide transport. It was also found that, depending on the transport of bacteria, the temporal and spatial distribution of the radionuclide concentration was significantly affected. The model proposed in this study will improve the evaluation of the role of the bacteria to the transport of radionuclide in groundwater systems. Furthermore, this model can be usefully utilized in analyzing the important role of colloidal particulate on the overall performance of radioactive waste safety. (Author)

  5. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

    2002-11-19

    Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized

  6. The RADionuclide Transport, Removal, and Dose (RADTRAD) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.A.; Chanin, D.I.; Lee, J.

    1993-01-01

    The RADionuclide Transport, Removal, And Dose (RADTRAD) code is designed for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) use to calculate the radiological consequences to the offsite population and to control room operators following a design-basis accident at Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This code utilizes updated reactor accident source terms published in draft NUREG-1465, ''Accident Source Terms for Light-Water Nuclear Power Plants.'' The code will track the transport of radionuclides as they are released from the reactor pressure vessel, travel through the primary containment and other buildings, and are released to the environment. As the radioactive material is transported through the primary containment and other buildings, credit for several removal mechanisms may be taken including sprays, suppression pools, overlying pools, filters, and natural deposition. Simple models are available for these different removal mechanisms that use, as input, information about the conditions in the plant and predict either a removal coefficient (λ) or decontamination factor. The user may elect to use these models or input a single value for a removal coefficient or decontamination factor

  7. Study of groundwater colloids and their ability to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjus, K.; Wikberg, P.

    1987-03-01

    Natural occurring colloids in groundwater can adsorb and transport released radionuclides. In this work groundwater colloids have been investigated with zeta potential measurements and dynamic light scattering. The goal was i) to estimate the detection limits of the Institute's equipment for particle size estimation with dynamic light scattering and zeta potential with dynamic light scattering combined with estimation of Doppler shift in the scattered light frequency; ii) to examine several different groundwaters (Stripa, Kamlunge, Svartboberget). The possibility to apply a theoretical adsorption model for interpreting the results is also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Radionuclide transport report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This document compiles radionuclide transport calculations of a KBS-3 repository for the safety assessment SR-Site. The SR-Site assessment supports the licence application for a final repository at Forsmark, Sweden

  9. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide migration has been studied in natural fissures running parallel to the axes of granitic drill cores. A short pulse of radionuclide solution was injected at one end of the fissure and the temporal change in radionuclide concentration of the eluate measured. At the end of each experiment the fissure was opened and the radionuclide distribution on the fissure surfaces measured. The retardation of 241 Am(III) at pH 8.2 as well as the variation in 235 Np(V) retardation with pH are found to be in good agreement with K d-values obtained in batch experiments. The reduction of (TcO - 4 ) to Tc(IV) leads as expected to increasing retardation.(author)

  10. Transport of radionuclides from the LAMPF lagoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Purtymun, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the discharge water from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility lagoons continued during June and December of 1983. The list of radionuclides being monitoring includes 7 Be, 57 Co, 134 Cs, 3 H, 54 Mn, 22 Na, and 83 Rb. The sampling locations and the data obtained to date are presented. Movement of radionuclides around the lagoons has been described in a previous report. 1 reference, 1 table

  11. Acceptable-doses exceeding in radionuclides transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delabarre, P.

    2006-01-01

    Without any foregoing signal, the 12-gliding month dose in an employee of a radionuclides transporting firm raised to 44,30 mSv (over the double of the ICRP recommended yearly maximum of 20 mSv). Apart from immediate prohibition of any further professional exposure to ionising radiation for the employee concerned, and an inquiry for possible explanations concerning as well the employer as the employee, an in-depth investigation of the employees previous records took place. Except from the sudden rise, the investigation showed that the personal dosimeter was mostly presented for analysis weeks, even months, too late, what made any immediate action from occupational health and radioprotection side difficult and anyhow far too late. Investigation of the records of the other 30 employees showed that 1) mostly the dosimeters were not presented on the assumed date for analysis, but months to (sometimes) nearly one year late behind schedule 2) for the same job in the same period, registered doses varied from naught to over 8,00 mSv, depending on the employee 3) several employees had a 12-gliding months dose of over 10,00 mSv, even over 15,00 mSv During discussion with employee, employer, occupational physician and an agent of the qualified organisation for dosimeter analysis, the employer was anything but cooperative; the employee also was rather reluctant to answer questions, and given possible causes could not be corroborated. In an attempt to clarify the multiple problems, the Governmental Agency for Nuclear Control was involved, which imposed in a first time a( not very stringent, rather indulgent) action plan. Meanwhile, a written comment on the monthly dosimeter analyses was sent from as well the occupational physician as the analytical firm to the employer and to the concerned employees if a 12-gliding months dose exceeding 10 mSv was determined, without any reaction neither from the employer nor the employees. At the moment of the abstract submission (sept 05

  12. The radionuclide migration model in river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, O.M.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, M.K.; Shagalova, Eh.D.; Denisova, V.V.; Skurat, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    It was propose the model of radionuclide migration in river system based on principle of the compartmental model at hydraulically stationary and chemically equilibrium conditions of interaction of radionuclides in system water-dredge, water-sediments. Different conditions of radioactive contamination entry in river system were considered. The model was verified on the data of radiation monitoring of Iput' river

  13. Radionuclide transport in fractured porous media -- Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures with a kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.H.; Chen, C.T.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical solutions are developed for the problem of radionuclide transport in a system of parallel fractures situated in a porous rock matrix. A kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model is used as the inlet boundary condition. The solutions consider the following processes: (a) advective transport in the fractures, (b) mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion along the fractures, (c) molecular diffusion from a fracture to the porous matrix, (d) molecular diffusion within the porous matrix in the direction perpendicular to the fracture axis, (e) adsorption onto the fracture wall, (f) adsorption within the porous matrix, and (g) radioactive decay. The solutions are based on the Laplace transform method. The general transient solution is in the form of a double integral that is evaluated using composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature. A simpler transient solution that is in the form of a single integral is also presented for the case that assumes negligible longitudinal dispersion along the fractures. The steady-state solutions are also provided. A number of examples are given to illustrate the effects of the following important parameters: (a) fracture spacings, (b) dissolution-rate constants, (c) fracture dispersion coefficient, (d) matrix retardation factor, and (e) fracture retardation factor

  14. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user's manual for the FORTRAN computer code

  15. Evidence for radionuclide transport by sea ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meese, D.A.; Tucker, W.B.; Gow, A.J.; Reimnitz, E.; Bischof, J.; Darby, D.

    1997-01-01

    Ice and ice-borne sediments were collected across the Arctic Basin during the Arctic Ocean Section, 1994 (AOS-94), a recent US/Canada trans-Arctic expedition. Sediments were analysed for 137 Cs, clay mineralogy and carbon. Concentrations of 137 Cs ranged from 5 to 73 Bq kg -1 in the ice-borne sediments. Concentrations of ice samples without sediment were all less than 1 Bq m -3 . The sediment sample with the highest 137 Cs concentration (73 Bq kg -1 ) was collected in the Beaufort Sea. This concentration was significantly higher than in bottom sediments collected in the same area, indicating an ice transport mechanism from an area with correspondingly higher concentrations. Recent results from the application of ice transport models and sediment analyses indicate that it is very likely that sediments are transported by ice, from the Siberian shelf areas to the Beaufort Sea

  16. Fundamental approach to the analysis of radionuclide transport resulting from fluid flow through jointed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1981-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental basis is being developed for analysis of radionuclide transport in jointed geologic media. Batch equilibration and rate experiments involving samples of Eleana argillite and Tertiary silicic tuffs in contact with solutions containing Cs, Sr or Pm indicated that most radionuclide sorption is associated with the surfaces of very small intergranular regions and that the rate of sorption is controlled by diffusion of the nuclides into such regions. Based on these experimental results, the continuity equations for radionuclides in the mobile and immobile phases were reduced to a model analogous to Rosen's equations for packed beds and were solved similarly to Rosen's solutions. Using the model and experimental data, limited radionuclide transport analyses were made which indicated that important parameters controlling transport include the intergranular porosity and nuclide penetration depth, fracture plate spacing and length, fluid velocity, and sorption distribution coefficient

  17. Effects of bedrock fractures on radionuclide transport near a vertical deposition hole for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Nordman, H.

    2011-12-01

    Effects of bedrock fractures on radionuclide transport near a vertical deposition hole for spent nuclear fuel are studied computationally. The studied fractures are both natural and excavation damage fractures. The emphasis is on the detailed modelling of geometry in 3D in contrast to the traditional radionuclide transport studies that often concentrate on chain decays, sorption, and precipitation at the expense of the geometry. The built computer model is used to assess the significance of components near a deposition hole for radionuclide transport and to estimate the quality of previously used modelling techniques. The results show nearly exponential decrease of radionuclide mass in the bentonite buffer when the release route is a thin natural fracture. The results also imply that size is the most important property of the tunnel section for radionuclide transport. In addition, the results demonstrate that the boundary layer theory can be used to approximate the release of radionuclides with certain accuracy and that a thin fracture in rock can be modelled, at least to a certain limit, by using a fracture with wider aperture but with same flow rate as the thin fracture. (orig.)

  18. RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.; Goodell, P.; Brashears, C.; French, D.; Kelts, A.

    2005-01-01

    Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms

  19. RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Walton; P. Goodell; C. Brashears; D. French; A. Kelts

    2005-07-11

    Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.

  20. The separation of radionuclide migration by solution and particle transport in LLRW repository buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.; Woods, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory-scale lysimeter experiments were performed with simulated waste forms placed in candidate buffer materials which have been chosen for a low-level radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide releases into the effluent water and radionuclide capture by the buffer material were determined. The results could not be explained by traditional solution transport mechanisms, and transport by particles released from the waste form and/or transport by buffer particles were suspected as the dominant mechanism for radionuclide release from the lysimeters. To elucidate the relative contribution of particle and solution transport, the waste forms were replaced by a wafer of neutron-activated buffer soaked with selected soluble isotopes. Particle transport was determined by the movement of gamma-emitting neutron-activation products through the lysimeter. Solution transport was quantified by comparing the migration of soluble radionuclides relative to the transport of neutron activation products. The new approach for monitoring radionuclide migration in soil is presented. It facilitates the determination of most of the fundamental coefficients required to model the transport process

  1. The influence of the unsaturated zone on the upward transport of radionuclides in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elert, M.; Lindgren, M.

    1993-07-01

    The transport of radionuclides from the deep soil to the surface soil is an important part of biosphere modelling. In this study the effect of transient hydrological conditions on the upward transport of radionuclides through soils has been studied. The effect of varying soil properties, climate conditions have been considered as well as the effect of a fluctuating groundwater level. It was shown that the soil characteristics influences the radionuclide concentration; an increased hydraulic conductivity leads to increase in the concentration in the root zone. The climate conditions were shown to be of major importance. A dispersion dependent on both velocity and saturation leads to a more effective upward transport of radionuclides to the root zone than if dispersion is assumed to be dependent only on the saturation. The boundary condition used in the case with varying groundwater level may be more realistic than the boundary condition applied for the case with a constant groundwater level. All calculations with varying groundwater level gave lower radionuclide concentration in the root zone. Sorption is redox sensitive for many radionuclides and the redox potential in the soil will be affected by the degree of water saturation. The performed calculations did, however, not result in any significant change in the radionuclide concentration in the root zone due to variation in sorption. A comparison between the results of the two models show that the compartment model in all studied cases predicts a higher annual average radionuclide concentration in the root zone than the numerical model. Annual variation in soil water flow were not included in the compartment model. During the summer the concentration in the root zone may be several times higher than the annual average. This may be important for plant uptake, since this increased concentrations coincides with the plant growing season. The calculations made with the simple compartment model also show that these

  2. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ

  3. Hydrologic transport of radionuclides from low-level waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the virgin site and of the disturbed site after burial drastically affect the transport of radionuclides from buried waste. The disturbance of the land surface during the waste burial operation causes changes in the local ground-water regimen. These changes can increase the water table elevation and cause the occurrence of perched water in burial trenches. The combination of these changes may lead to submersion of the waste and to increased radionuclide transport from the burial site in both surface and groundwater. Factors such as ion exchange can retard or in some cases, with competing ions, can also mobilize radionuclides and increase their discharge into ground and surface water. Because of complexing agents (organics) contained in the waste, increased mobility of some radionuclides can be expected. The chemical form of radionuclides in the water, the ground-water quality, and the chemistry of the geologic formation in which the waste is buried all influence the movement of radionuclides in the hydrologic system. For the assessment of the environmental impact of low-level waste burial, models capable of simulating both the chemical and the physical factors that affect hydrologic transport must be available. Several models for conducting such simulation are presently available. However, the input parameters used in these models are highly variable; and the accuracy of parameter measurement must be considered in evaluating the reliability of simulated results

  4. Hydrologic transport of radionuclides from low-level waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.

    1977-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the virgin site and of the disturbed site after burial drastically affect the transport of radionuclides from buried waste. The disturbance of the land surface during the waste burial operation causes changes in the local ground-water regimen. These changes can increase the water table elevation and cause the occurrence of perched water in burial trenches. The combination of these changes may lead to submersion of the waste and to increased radionuclide transport from the burial site in both surface and ground water. Factors such as ion exchange can retard or in some cases, with competing ions, can also mobilize radionuclides and increase their discharge into ground and surface water. Because of complexing agents (organics) contained in the waste, increased mobility of some radionuclides can be expected. The chemical form of radionuclides in the water, the ground-water quality, and the chemistry of the geologic formation in which the waste is buried all influence the movement of radionuclides in the hydrologic system. For the assessment of the environmental impact of low-level waste burial, models capable of simulating both the chemical and the physical factors that affect hydrologic transport must be available. Several models for conducting such simulation are presently available. However,the input parameters used in these models are highly variable, and the accuracy of parameter measurement must be considered in evaluating the reliability of simulated results

  5. Transport of radionuclides by concentrated brine in a porous medium with micropore-macropore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This work concerns itself with the study of effects of soil aggregation and high salt concentrations on the transport of radionuclides by concentrated brine flowing through an aggregated porous medium. The medium is considered to be composed of porous rock aggregates separated by macropores through which the brine flows and transport of salt and radionuclides takes place. The aggregates contain dead-end pores, cracks, and stationary pockets collectively called micropores. The micropore space does not contribute to the flow, but it serves as a storage for salt and radionuclides. Adsorption of radionuclides takes place at internal surfaces of aggregates where they assume that a linear equilibrium isotherm describes the process. A one-dimensional numerical model is developed which is based on two sets of equations: one set for the flow and transport of salt and another set for transport of radionuclides. Results of numerical experiments clearly indicate that the existence of high salt concentrations markedly reduces the peak of nuclides concentration and slows down their movement. Also, it is found that diffusive mass exchange between macropores and aggregates results in a pronounced lowering of the radionuclides concentration peaks. 9 references, 7 figures

  6. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetharam, S.C., E-mail: suresh.seetharam@sckcen.be [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Perko, J.; Jacques, D. [Performance Assessments Unit, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mallants, D. [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Road – Gate 4, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry. • Time of peak radionuclide fluxes is sensitive to the fracture networks. • Uniform flow model mimics a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures. • Effect of fracture width on radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity. • Effect of increased dispersivity in fractured media does not always result in a lower peak flux for specific fracture networks due to higher concentrations adjacent to the fracture plane. - Abstract: Analysis of the effect of fractures in porous media on fluid flow and mass transport is of great interest in many fields including geotechnical, petroleum, hydrogeology and waste management. This paper presents sensitivity analyses examining the effect of various hypothetical fracture networks on the performance of a planned near surface disposal facility in terms of radionuclide transport behaviour. As it is impossible to predict the initiation and evolution of fracture networks and their characteristics in concrete structures over time scales of interest, several fracture networks have been postulated to test the sensitivity of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Fluid flow through concrete matrix and fracture networks are modelled via Darcy's law. A single species radionuclide transport equation is employed for both matrix and fracture networks, which include the processes advection, diffusion, dispersion, sorption/desorption and radioactive decay. The sensitivity study evaluates variations in fracture network configuration and fracture width together with different sorption/desorption characteristics of radionuclides in a cement matrix, radioactive decay constants and matrix dispersivity. The effect of the fractures is illustrated via radionuclide breakthrough curves, magnitude and time of peak mass flux, cumulative mass flux and concentration profiles. For the

  7. Influence of fracture networks on radionuclide transport from solidified waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharam, S.C.; Perko, J.; Jacques, D.; Mallants, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnitude of peak radionuclide fluxes is less sensitive to the fracture network geometry. • Time of peak radionuclide fluxes is sensitive to the fracture networks. • Uniform flow model mimics a limiting case of a porous medium with large number of fine fractures. • Effect of fracture width on radionuclide flux depends on the ratio of fracture to matrix conductivity. • Effect of increased dispersivity in fractured media does not always result in a lower peak flux for specific fracture networks due to higher concentrations adjacent to the fracture plane. - Abstract: Analysis of the effect of fractures in porous media on fluid flow and mass transport is of great interest in many fields including geotechnical, petroleum, hydrogeology and waste management. This paper presents sensitivity analyses examining the effect of various hypothetical fracture networks on the performance of a planned near surface disposal facility in terms of radionuclide transport behaviour. As it is impossible to predict the initiation and evolution of fracture networks and their characteristics in concrete structures over time scales of interest, several fracture networks have been postulated to test the sensitivity of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Fluid flow through concrete matrix and fracture networks are modelled via Darcy's law. A single species radionuclide transport equation is employed for both matrix and fracture networks, which include the processes advection, diffusion, dispersion, sorption/desorption and radioactive decay. The sensitivity study evaluates variations in fracture network configuration and fracture width together with different sorption/desorption characteristics of radionuclides in a cement matrix, radioactive decay constants and matrix dispersivity. The effect of the fractures is illustrated via radionuclide breakthrough curves, magnitude and time of peak mass flux, cumulative mass flux and concentration profiles. For the

  8. The vertical distribution of radionuclides in a Ribble Estuary saltmarsh: transport and deposition of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; McDonald, P.; Parker, A.; Rae, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Routine discharges of low-level liquid radioactive waste by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Sellafield and Springfields have resulted in enhanced levels of radionuclides in sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England, UK. Variations in radionuclide concentrations ( 137 Cs, 230 Th, and 239240 Pu) with depth in a mature saltmarsh core were analysed in order to investigate historical discharge trends and waste-dispersal mechanisms. Core samples from Longton/Hutton Marsh were analysed by gamma-spectrometry and α-spectrometry for radionuclides and by laser granulometry to establish grain-size variations with depth. Distinct subsurface maxima were present for 137 Cs and 239240 Pu with activities as high as 4500 Bq kg -1 for 137 Cs and 600 Bq kg -1 for 239240 Pu. Thorium-230 exhibited complex activity profiles with depth, specific activities ranging between 200 and 2400 Bq kg -1 . The vertical distributions of Sellafield-derived radionuclides ( 137 Cs and 239240 Pu) in mature saltmarsh deposits reflect the time-integrated discharge pattern from Sellafield, implying a transport mechanism that has involved the mixing of sediment labelled with radioactivity from recent discharges and sediment labelled from historical discharge events before deposition. A mechanism involving the transport of contaminated silt therefore seems to dominate. The vertical distribution of Springfields-derived 230 Th in the same areas reflects the annual gross-α discharge pattern from BNFL Springfields. In contrast to the Sellafield-derived radionuclides, a fairly rapid transport mechanism from source to sink is implied, with little or no time for mixing with radionuclides discharged years earlier. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Sediment-associated transport and redistribution of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, D.E.; Rowan, J.S.; Bradley, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Fallout of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides over the United Kingdom evidenced marked spatial variation. Relatively high levels were recorded in central Wales, but they declined rapidly to the east. As a result the headwaters of the River Severn received significant inputs of fallout, whereas only low levels were recorded over the middle and lower reaches. Measurements of the caesium-137 content of suspended sediment transported by the River Severn and of channel and floodplain sediments collected from various locations within the basin have been used to assess the importance of fluvial transport and redistribution of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides. High concentrations of caesium-137 (up to 1450 mBqg -1 ) were recorded in suspended sediment collected from the lower reaches of the river shortly after the Chernobyl incident and substantial accumulations of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides have been detected in floodplain and channel sediments collected from areas which received only low levels of fallout directly. (author)

  10. SCATTER: Source and Transport of Emplaced Radionuclides: Code documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longsine, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    SCATTER simulated several processes leading to the release of radionuclides to the site subsystem and then simulates transport via the groundwater of the released radionuclides to the biosphere. The processes accounted for to quantify release rates to a ground-water migration path include radioactive decay and production, leaching, solubilities, and the mixing of particles with incoming uncontaminated fluid. Several decay chains of arbitrary length can be considered simultaneously. The release rates then serve as source rates to a numerical technique which solves convective-dispersive transport for each decay chain. The decay chains are allowed to have branches and each member can have a different radioactive factor. Results are cast as radionuclide discharge rates to the accessible environment

  11. Atmospheric transport modelling for the CTBT radionuclide network in routine operation and after the Fukushima releases; Atmosphaerische Transportmodellierung fuer das Radionuklidmessnetz zur Ueberwachung des Kernwaffenteststoppvertrages im Regelbetrieb und nach den Freisetzungen in Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J.O.; Ceranna, L.; Boennemann, C. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany). B4.3; Schlosser, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Freiburg (Germany). SW2.5

    2014-01-20

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) bans all types of nuclear explosions. For verification of compliance with Treaty the International Monitoring System (IMS) is being built up by the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the CTBT-Organisation in Vienna. The IMS observes waveform signals (seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic) of explosions and traces of radionuclides in the atmosphere to proof the nuclear character of an event. The International Data Centre (IDC) provides analysis products for the IMS data such as various event bulletins, radionuclide reports, and atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) results confining the possible source region of detected radionuclides. The judgment on the character of a suspicious event remains with the member states. The German National Data Centre for verification of CTBT is hosted by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) in Hannover. The BGR operates four IMS stations (IS26, IS27, PS19, and AS35) and cooperates closely with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) who operates the radionuclide station RN33 at mount Schauinsland and supports the NDC with radionuclide expertise. In response to the Fukushima accident caused by the large magnitude 9.0 Tohuku Earthquake and Tsunami the HSYSPLIT model driven by 0.5 degree NCEP data was used at the German NDC to simulate the primary transport pathways of potentially emitted radioisotopes. The analysis focuses on arrival times and dilution ratios at the radionuclide stations of the IMS. The arrival times were predicted correctly at most stations for ten days after the accident. Traces of the Fukushima emissions were detected at all IMS radionuclide stations on the Northern Hemisphere end of March. In April also some stations on the Southern Hemisphere detected some traces which passed the ITCZ. In respect to the CTBT context the influence of the Tohoku earthquake and the Fukushima emissions on the network capability to detect a

  12. Simple evaluation of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport at Aespoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dverstorp, B.; Geier, J.; Voss, C.

    1996-12-01

    A simple evaluation of groundwater flux and potential for radionuclide transport at the Aespoe site, from fundamental hydrologic principles, indicates that, based upon data that are available from surface-based investigations, it is not possible to confirm that the bedrock has a high capacity to retard radionuclide release to the surface environment. This result is primarily due to the high spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, and high uncertainty regarding the relationship among hydrologic and transport parameters within conductive elements of the bedrock. A comparison between Aespoe and seven other study sites in Sweden indicates that it is difficult or impossible to discriminate among these sites in terms of the geologic barrier function, based upon the types of data that are available from present-day methods of site characterization. Groundwater flux is evaluated by a one-dimensional application of Darcy's law to a set of simple, potential pathways for groundwater flow from the repository, which are chosen to yield an appraisal of the wide bounds of possible system behaviour. The configurations of the pathways are specified based on simple assumptions of flow-field structure, and hydraulic driving forces are specified from consideration of regional and local topographic differences. Results are expressed in terms of a parameter group that has been shown to control the barrier function. Comparisons with more detailed hydrological modelling of Aespoe show that, although a reduction in uncertainty is achieved, this reduction is not sufficient to distinguish between good and poor performance of the geologic barrier at the site. 38 refs

  13. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Markus

    2003-01-01

    close relations to the following EMSP projects: Project: 70126, Interfacial Soil Chemistry of Radionuclides in the Unsaturated Zone (PI: Jon Chorover) Project: 70070, Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates (PI: Kathy Nagy) Cesium Transport in Hanford Sediments: Application of an Experimentally Based Cation Exchange Model (PI: Susan Carroll and Carl Steefel)

  14. Solute transport in fractured rock - applications to radionuclide waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1990-12-01

    Flow and solute transport in fractured rocks has been intensively studied in the last decade. The increased interest is mainly due to the plans in many countries to site repositories for high level nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. All investigated crystalline rocks have been found to be fractured and most of the water flows in the fractures and fracture zones. The water transports dissolved species and radionuclides. It is thus of interest to be able to understand and to do predictive modelling of the flowrate of water, the flowpaths and the residence times of the water and of the nuclides. The dissolved species including the nuclides will interact with the surrounding rock in different ways and will in many cases be strongly retarded relative to the water velocity. Ionic species may be ion exchanged or sorbed in the mineral surfaces. Charges and neutral species may diffuse into the stagnant waters in the rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the mobile water. These effects will be strongly dependent on how much rock surface is in contact with the flowing water. It has been found in a set of field experiments and by other observations that not all fractures conduct water. Furthermore it is found that conductive fractures only conduct the water in a small part of the fracture in what is called channels or preferential flowpaths. This report summarizes the present concepts of water flow and solute transport in fractured rocks. The data needs for predictive modelling are discussed and both field and laboratory measurement which have been used to obtain data are described. Several large scale field experiments which have been specially designed to study flow and tracer transport in crystalline rocks are described. In many of the field experients new techniques have been developed and used. (81 refs.) (author)

  15. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rio Blanco underground nuclear test site, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.; Earman, S.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-10-01

    DOE is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater is part of preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations allow prioritization of test areas in terms of risk, provide a basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work, and provide a framework for assessing site characterization data needs. The Rio Blanco site in Colorado was the location of the simultaneous detonation of three 30-kiloton nuclear devices. The devices were located 1780, 1899, and 2039 below ground surface in the Fort Union and Mesaverde formations. Although all the bedrock formations at the site are thought to contain water, those below the Green River Formation (below 1000 in depth) are also gas-bearing, and have very low permeabilities. The transport scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Fort Union Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affect radionuclide transport at the site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values. Given the sparse data, the modeling results may differ significantly from reality. Confidence in transport predictions can be increased by obtaining more site data, including the amount of radionuclides which would have been available for transport (i.e., not trapped in melt glass or vented during gas flow testing), and the hydraulic properties of the formation. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. The Influence of Fractures on Radionuclide Transport in Granite Formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarracino, Luis; Quintana, Fernando; Bevilacqua, Arturo

    2003-01-01

    Simulation of radionuclide transport in fractured hard rocks is of interest to many research areas like geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes.The objective of this study is to present a numerical simulation of water flow and radionuclide transport near a hypothetical repository in deep geological formations.The water flow is assumed to obey the highly nonlinear Richards' equation, which is approximated using a finite element method for the spatial discretization combined with a third order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme in time.A Picard iteration scheme is used to treat the non-linear terms of the equation.Contaminant transport is described by the advection-diffusion-reaction equation, assuming linear adsorption and first order decay.This equation is solved using a Sub Grid Scale algorithm.Illustrative examples showing the influence of fractures in the contaminant process for different radioisotopes are presented

  17. The biological transport of radionuclides in grassland and freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, S.A.

    1989-12-01

    This thesis examines the biological transport of radionuclides through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with particular reference to radiocaesium. The semi-natural grassland habitat was located at Drigg, W. Cumbria, contaminated primarily by radioactive fallout, from several sources over the past decade. Advantage was made of the deposition of radionuclides from the Chernobyl reactor incident, which occurred during the early stages of the investigation. The study examined the distribution of radiocaesium for the major components of the grassland ecosystem, within the soil-plant-invertebrate-small mammal food chain. Data concerning temporal fluctuation of radionuclide transfer factors between food chain components are presented. The final section examines the spatial distribution of radiocaesium in sediment and the freshwater eel (Anguilla anguilla) in a small stream contaminated by radioactive effluent. The relationship between activity levels in eels and the sediments in which they rest and forage was investigated. Factors influencing uptake of radiocaesium in freshwater fish were also examined. (author)

  18. The computer model development for radionuclide migration analysis in geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanto

    1998-01-01

    1-D numerical model for safety assessment of spent fuel disposal have been developed. The numerical solution with planar geometric was developed in order to solve mass transport in heterogenous geological media. In this paper, Crank-Nicolson method was discussed for solving of radionuclide migration equation. Demonstration was done for calculation of concentration distribution of several radionuclides in the exclusion zone. It was concluded that the exclusion zone was an important concept should be adopted in determination of disposal site. Site should be selected as far as possible from fracture or as long as possible exclusion zone. (author)

  19. Radionuclide transport as vapor through unsaturated fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify and examine potential mechanisms of radionuclide transport as vapor at a high-level radioactive waste repository located in unsaturated fractured rock. Transport mechanisms and processes have been investigated near the repository and at larger distances. Transport mechanisms potentially important at larger distances include ordinary diffusion, viscous flow and free convection. Ordinary diffusion includes self and binary diffusion, Knudsen flow and surface diffusion. Pressure flow and slip flow comprise viscous flow. Free convective flow results from a gas density contrast. Transport mechanisms or processes dominant near the repository include ordinary diffusion, viscous flow plus several mechanisms whose driving forces arise from the non-isothermal, radioactive nature of high-level waste. The additional mechanisms include forced diffusion, aerosol transport, thermal diffusion and thermophoresis. Near a repository vapor transport mechanisms and processes can provide a significant means of transport from a failed canister to the geologic medium from which other processes can transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. These issues are believed to be important factors that must be addressed in the assessment of specific engineering designs and site selection of any proposed HLW repository

  20. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of 3 H, /sup 95m/Tc, and 85 Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for 85 Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for 85 Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta

  1. Experimental and modelling studies of radionuclide migration from contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompkins, J. A.; Butler, A. P.; Wheater, H. S.; Shaw, G.; Wadey, P.; Bell, J. N. B.

    1994-01-01

    Lysimeter-based studies of radionuclide uptake by winter wheat are being undertaken to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes. A five year multi-disciplinary research project has concentrated on the upward migration of contaminants from near surface water-tables and their subsequent uptake by a winter wheat crop. A weighted transfer factor approach and a physically based modelling methodology, for the simulation and prediction of radionuclide uptake, have been developed which offer alternatives to the traditional transfer factor approach. Integrated hydrological and solute transport models are used to simulate contaminant movement and subsequent root uptake. This approach enables prediction of radionuclide transport for a wide range of soil, plant and radionuclide types. This paper presents simulated results of 22 Na plant uptake and soil activity profiles, which are verified with respect to lysimeter data. The results demonstrate that a simple modelling approach can describe the variability in radioactivity in both the harvested crop and the soil profile, without recourse to a large number of empirical parameters. The proposed modelling technique should be readily applicable to a range of scales and conditions, since it embodies an understanding of the underlying physical processes of the system. This work constitutes part of an ongoing research programme being undertaken by UK Nirex Ltd., to assess the long term safety of a deep level repository for low and intermediate level nuclear waste. (author)

  2. Bioturbation as a mechanism for radionuclide transport in soil: relevance of earthworms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Lemans, H.; Dorp, F. van

    1996-01-01

    In the context of safety analyses performed for radioactive waste repositories, one important group of scenarios assumes that radionuclides escaping from a repository will reach the biosphere via groundwater. Consequently, when calculating radionuclide migration in the biosphere, most of the models used to date concentrate on transport in the liquid phase. In the soil, however, transport in the solid phase can also be important, particularly when burrowing animals displace the soil together with sorbed and low-solubility radionuclides. Given the conditions prevailing in agricultural areas of central Europe, it is mainly earthworms which play a significant role in material displacement and these will be the subject of this report. A numerical example is used to present the equations which, for given distribution coefficients, can be applied to calculate the portions of the transfer coefficient which can be attributed to transport in the liquid and solid phases. The results demonstrate that material transport by soil fauna, and particularly by earthworms, is a relevant mechanism in many cases, especially for the upward transport of strongly sorbing radionuclides. It should therefore be considered in biosphere models. (Author)

  3. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, 85 Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas 137 Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less 137 Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 μm and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10 -3 m/s were calculated from the core measurements

  4. Impact assessment of shallow land burial for low-level waste: modelling of the water flow and transport of radionuclides in the near-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walravens, J; Volckaert, G

    1996-09-18

    The Belgian concept for disposal of low-level waste consists of storage of waste drums into a concrete vault backfilled with a cementitious grout. The vault is placed above the water table and will be covered with a multilayer cap of clay, gravel, and sandy materials. The SCK/CEN is charged with the long-term performance assessment of the disposal site. The main processes and parameters determining the radioactivity release from the site are identified. The principal processes are the infiltration through the top cover and the sorption of waste on the backfill. The release of radionuclides from the site was modelled with the PORFLOW numerical code.

  5. Quantification of glacial effects on radionuclide transport: transport sensitivity studies for SKI's SITE-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King-Clayton, L.M.; Smith, P.A.; Dverstorp, B.

    1996-01-01

    Site-scale radionuclide transport calculations have been carried out for a hypothetical deep repository at the Aespoe site, southeast Sweden. The work complements and utilizes results from regional-scale, variable density flow modelling in which the groundwater flow field is time-dependent, reflecting the impact of climate evolution over the next 130,000 years at the site. The climate evolution and its impacts are qualitatively described in the Central Climate Change Scenario, which specifies a hypothetical evolution of the local climate over the period modelled, including the periodic development of permafrost conditions and ice sheet advance and retreat. The work summarised here is complementary to the transport calculations undertaken as part of the SKI SITE-94 performance assessment project, with the specific objective of quantifying the impact of transient changes in flow direction and magnitude. The spatial evolution of 79 Se and 129 I contaminant plumes, released from the hypothetical repository under the influence of time-dependent (step-wise varying) head boundary conditions associated with ice sheet and permafrost development, is compared with that of a steady-state Base Case based on continuing present-day conditions. The results indicate that temporal changes in flow conditions due to future climate changes can have a significant effect on the transport of radionuclides from a source at depth. A case with high sub-ice sheet recharge and taliks (ie. gaps in the permafrost), creating groundwater fluxes up to an order of magnitude greater than the Base Case, has the greatest impact on radionuclide flux out of the geosphere, with a maximum 79 Se flux of over three orders of magnitude greater than that of the Base Case. The maximum 129 I flux is nearer one order of magnitude greater than the Base Case. In all cases modelled with time dependent boundary conditions, the greatest radionuclide fluxes occur towards the end of the main glacial periods (periods

  6. Development of COLLAGE 3; Role for colloids in the transport of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard (Aleksandria Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom)); Bath, Adrian (Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom))

    2010-03-15

    The issue of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (CFRT) was last addressed by the Swedish nuclear regulators in 2001 - 2002. SKI had commissioned the Collage code with subsequent development as Collage 2. This code was employed to investigate the potential role for colloids to have been involved in the transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site and to examine the implications for CFRT in the Swedish disposal programme. It was concluded that colloids could not be ruled out as a mechanism for rapid transport and early release from the geosphere. Recently the 'bentonite erosion scenario' has become of concern. In it the generation of large quantities of bentonite colloids in fractures as a result of fresh water ingress at repository depth is possible. Potentially, these could carry radiologically significant quantities of radionuclides to an early release to the surface system. The objectives of this work are to update the knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through a fractured geosphere and to provide review capability within the SSM. Recent developments in CFRT (reviewed here) indicate that additional parameters needed to be added to the existing Collage 2 plus code in order to adequately represent colloid transport in fractures. This report looks at modifications to the model and discusses the implications of the implementation of the new processes. Authors conclude that the process of colloid filtration is an important mitigating mechanism. A new code - Collage 3 - is demonstrated and suggestions for further work are given

  7. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Historical records pertaining to the 300 North and Wye Burial Grounds at the Hanford Reservation were reviewed as a prerequisite to determining programs for land reclamation. All available historical documents, agency communications, and engineering drawings related to the study areas were located, reviewed, and analyzed. An inventory of recorded location, type, and quantity of radionuclides and associated materials in each burial ground was completed and distributed to cooperating investigators. A geophysical survey of the 300 North Burial Ground was conducted as a basis for detecting the composition, size, distribution, and depth of buried objects and characterizing the sediments in which they are buried. Acoustic, radar, magnetic, and metal detection surveys were completed and their applicability evaluated; drilling techniques and equipment for recovering and characterizing sediments and radioactive contaminated material were developed. Drilling will also determine the amount and dimensional extent of radionuclide migration; sediment-fluid interaction and fluid migration through the unsaturated zone at the 300 North Burial Ground were characterized. A study to determine biological transport of radionuclides at the Wye Burial Ground was also initiated. This study involved a preliminary survey of present flora and fauna inhabiting the Wye Burial Ground site. Plant tissue was chemically and radiochemically analyzed to determine radionuclide migration and possible dose effects and population dynamics of burrowing animals that could potentially be exposed to buried waste materials were investigated

  8. Computer prediction of subsurface radionuclide transport: an adaptive numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in the subsurface is often modeled with the aid of the advection-dispersion equation. A review of existing computer methods for the solution of this equation shows that there is need for improvement. To answer this need, a new adaptive numerical method is proposed based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation. The method is based on a decomposition of the concentration field into two parts, one advective and one dispersive, in a rigorous manner that does not leave room for ambiguity. The advective component of steep concentration fronts is tracked forward with the aid of moving particles clustered around each front. Away from such fronts the advection problem is handled by an efficient modified method of characteristics called single-step reverse particle tracking. When a front dissipates with time, its forward tracking stops automatically and the corresponding cloud of particles is eliminated. The dispersion problem is solved by an unconventional Lagrangian finite element formulation on a fixed grid which involves only symmetric and diagonal matrices. Preliminary tests against analytical solutions of ne- and two-dimensional dispersion in a uniform steady state velocity field suggest that the proposed adaptive method can handle the entire range of Peclet numbers from 0 to infinity, with Courant numbers well in excess of 1

  9. TRING: a computer program for calculating radionuclide transport in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.

    1984-12-01

    The computer program TRING is described which enables the transport of radionuclides in groundwater to be calculated for use in long term radiological assessments using methods described previously. Examples of the areas of application of the program are activity transport in groundwater associated with accidental spillage or leakage of activity, the shutdown of reactors subject to delayed decommissioning, shallow land burial of intermediate level waste and geologic disposal of high level waste. Some examples of the use of the program are given, together with full details to enable users to run the program. (author)

  10. The transport of natural radionuclides from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Conkic, Lj.; Slivka, J.; Krmar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The transport and accumulation processes of Ra-226, U-238, Th-232 and K-40 from soil to plants have been studied. Plant samples with consumable parts grown below surface have been bred in natural conditions on soil with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity (barren soil of the uranium mine Gabrovnica-Kalna). An intensive transport of heavy natural radionuclides from soil to the roots was established. The transfer factors for U-238 and Ra-226 have been much bigger than for Th-232. The most intensive uptake was registered for beet root. (author)

  11. Modelling the transport of radionuclides released in the Ilha Grande bay (Brazil) after a Large Break Loca ion the primary system of a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Soares, Abner Duarte; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin, E-mail: flamego@ien.gov.b, E-mail: asoares@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (LIMA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    It was postulated, in the cooling system of the core, a LOCA, where 431 m{sup 3} of soda almost instantaneously was lost. This inventory contained 1.87x10{sup 10} Bq/m{sup 3} of tritium, 2.22x10{sup 7} Bq/m{sup 3} of cobalt,3.48x10{sup 8} Bq/m{sup 3} of cesium and 3.44x10{sup 10} Bq/m{sup 3} of iodine and was released in liquid form near the Itaorna cove, Angra dos Reis - RJ. Applying the model in the proposed scenario (Angra 1 and 2 in operation and Angra 3 progressively reducing the capture and discharge after the accident), the simulated dilution of the specific activity of radionuclide spots, reached values much lower than report levels for seawater (1,1x10{sup 6} Bq/m{sup 3}, 1,11x10{sup 4} Bq/m{sup 3} and 1,85x10{sup 3} Bq/m{sup 3}) after 22 hours, respectively for {sup 3}H, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. From the standpoint of public exposure to radionuclide dispersion, the results of activity concentration obtained by the model suggest that the observed radiological impact is negligible. Based on these findings, we conclude that there would be no radiological impact related to a further release of controlled effluent discharges into Itaorna cove. (author)

  12. Modelling the transport of radionuclides released in the Ilha Grande bay (Brazil) after a Large Break Loca ion the primary system of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Soares, Abner Duarte; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2011-01-01

    It was postulated, in the cooling system of the core, a LOCA, where 431 m 3 of soda almost instantaneously was lost. This inventory contained 1.87x10 10 Bq/m 3 of tritium, 2.22x10 7 Bq/m 3 of cobalt,3.48x10 8 Bq/m 3 of cesium and 3.44x10 10 Bq/m 3 of iodine and was released in liquid form near the Itaorna cove, Angra dos Reis - RJ. Applying the model in the proposed scenario (Angra 1 and 2 in operation and Angra 3 progressively reducing the capture and discharge after the accident), the simulated dilution of the specific activity of radionuclide spots, reached values much lower than report levels for seawater (1,1x10 6 Bq/m 3 , 1,11x10 4 Bq/m 3 and 1,85x10 3 Bq/m 3 ) after 22 hours, respectively for 3 H, 60 Co, 131 I and 137 Cs. From the standpoint of public exposure to radionuclide dispersion, the results of activity concentration obtained by the model suggest that the observed radiological impact is negligible. Based on these findings, we conclude that there would be no radiological impact related to a further release of controlled effluent discharges into Itaorna cove. (author)

  13. Coupled Transport Phenomena in the Opalinus Clay: Implications for Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, J.M.

    1999-09-01

    performance, in agreement with the previous estimates. Finally, the results of two- and three-dimensional simple flow models incorporating advection (Darcy's law) and thermal osmosis show that, under the conditions in the vicinity of the repository at the time scales of interest, the advective component of flow will oppose and cancel the thermal-osmotic component. After evaluating the different coupled transport mechanisms, the conclusion is that coupled phenomena will only have a very minor impact on radionuclide transport in the Opalinus Clay, at least under the conditions at times equal to or greater than the expected lifetime of the waste canisters (about 1000 years). (author)

  14. Coupled Transport Phenomena in the Opalinus Clay: Implications for Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, J.M.

    1999-09-01

    performance, in agreement with the previous estimates. Finally, the results of two- and three-dimensional simple flow models incorporating advection (Darcy's law) and thermal osmosis show that, under the conditions in the vicinity of the repository at the time scales of interest, the advective component of flow will oppose and cancel the thermal-osmotic component. After evaluating the different coupled transport mechanisms, the conclusion is that coupled phenomena will only have a very minor impact on radionuclide transport in the Opalinus Clay, at least under the conditions at times equal to or greater than the expected lifetime of the waste canisters (about 1000 years). (author)

  15. Modeling of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklouti, Nada

    2010-01-01

    This work is a prediction of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide from a chronic rejection of the nuclear power generating plant that can be located in one of the Tunisian sites: Skhira or Bizerte. Also it contains a study of acute rejection 'Chernobyl accident' which was the reference for the validation of GENII the code of modeling of atmospheric dispersion.

  16. Theoretical background and user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihiko; Hatanaka, Koichiro

    2001-11-01

    In order to document a basic manual about input data, output data, execution of computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in heterogeneous porous rock, we investigated the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport which calculates water flow in three dimension, the path of moving radionuclide, and one dimensional radionuclide migration. In this report, based on above investigation we describe the geostatistical background about simulating heterogeneous permeability field. And we describe construction of files, input and output data, a example of calculating of the programs which simulates heterogeneous permeability field, and calculates groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Therefore, we can document a manual by investigating the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation. And we can model heterogeneous porous rock and analyze groundwater flow and radionuclide transport by utilizing the information from this report. (author)

  17. Mathematical and numerical modeling considerations for radionuclide ion migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treadway, A.H.

    1984-04-01

    The equations governing radionuclide transport in sorbing, porous media are presented using phenomenological coefficients. Both equilibrium controlled and simple rate controlled chemistry are summarized. Several simplified models are discussed. Finally, various numerical problems are considered. 25 references

  18. Radionuclide distribution and transport in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. A critical review of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, C.H.; Thorne, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    These volumes present the results of a study undertaken for the Commission of the European Communities. The aim was to review available data concerning the movement of radionuclides through the environment and to recommend values of parameters for use in environmental transport models. The elements reviewed all have radioactive isotopes which could contribute significantly to the radiological impact of chronic releases of radioactivity from nuclear installations within the countries of the European community, i.e. the major activation and fission products. In dividing these elements between volumes an effort has been made to take account of the method of production of their major radioisotopes, together with their chemical similarities and environmental interactions. This volume covers the radionuclide distribution of americium and curium. The main areas which are covered include the deposition of radionuclides on plants and soils, transport in soils, uptake and translocation in plants via the roots and foliage, metabolism in domestic animals and radionuclide transfers through the main physical and biotic components of the aquatic environment. In reviewing these subject areas, account has been taken not only of the literature relating to specific radionuclides, but also of the literature relating to the stable element of which they are radioisotopes. (Auth.)

  19. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The groundwater monitoring program provides information and data on groundwater quality required to evaluate the impact of waste disposal practices on the Hanford Reservation. The program includes: collection and analysis of groundwater samples on a routine basis; data processing, analysis and reporting; design, construction and maintenance of well sampling structures; and design and implementation of supporting research studies. Within the overall framework of the Groundwater Monitoring Program, the 300 Area and Wye Burial Ground Characterization Program was initiated to evaluate transport of radionuclides in the partially saturated zone above the water table and to provide site characterization at solid waste burial locations on the Reservation. Methods for collecting and analyzing program data include geophysical exploration by ground penetrating radar, refraction and reflection acoustics, magnetics, and metal detection; stratigraphic investigations by drilling and sample collection techniques; evaluation of transport phenomena by in situ psychrometric and gamma-neutron techniques; laboratory characterization of fluid and vapor transport-controlling mechanisms; and evaluation of biological radionuclide transport by organisms inhabiting contaminated areas

  20. Apparatus for the measurement of radionuclide transport rates in rock cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, H.C.; Koszykowski, R.F.; Dibley, L.L.; Murray, I.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus and procedure for the study of radionuclide transport in intact rock cores are presented in this report. This equipment more closely simulates natural conditions of radionuclide transport than do crushed rock columns. The apparatus and the procedure from rock core preparation through data analysis are described. The retardation factors measured are the ratio of the transport rate of a non-retarded radionuclide, such as 3 H, to the transport rate of a retarded radionuclide. Sample results from a study of the transport of /sup 95m/Tc and 85 Sr in brine through a sandstone core are included

  1. Modeling of radionuclide migration through porous material with meshless method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankar, L.; Turk, G.; Runovc, F.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the long term safety of a radioactive waste disposal system, mathematical models are used to describe groundwater flow, chemistry and potential radionuclide migration through geological formations. A number of processes need to be considered when predicting the movement of radionuclides through the geosphere. The most important input data are obtained from field measurements, which are not completely available for all regions of interest. For example, the hydraulic conductivity as an input parameter varies from place to place. In such cases geostatistical science offers a variety of spatial estimation procedures. Methods for solving the solute transport equation can also be classified as Eulerian, Lagrangian and mixed. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is usually obtained by finite difference methods (FDM), finite element methods (FEM), or finite volume methods (FVM). Kansa introduced the concept of solving partial differential equations using radial basis functions (RBF) for hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic PDEs. Our goal was to present a relatively new approach to the modelling of radionuclide migration through the geosphere using radial basis function methods in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates. Radionuclide concentrations will also be calculated in heterogeneous and partly heterogeneous 2D porous media. We compared the meshless method with the traditional finite difference scheme. (author)

  2. Soil Fauna Transport Versus Radionuclide Migration (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnenberg, C.; Taeschner, M.

    2000-01-01

    From a questionnaire on radioecological topics circulated in the framework of the IUR/EURADOS/EULEP Concerted Action supported by the EC it was concluded that the effect of soil fauna on the redistribution of radionuclides in soils has never been given sufficient attention. The limited data in existence suggest than faunal effects on displacement of radionuclides may be dominant over physicochemical migration. On the basis of a given dataset, an earthworm model is presented which shows that the activity decrease in the top soil layer due to bioturbation may compete with fast physicochemical migration at rates of 1 to 10 cm.y -1 . The model represents a suggestion of how to treat faunal actions and what kind of data are necessary to operate such models. (author)

  3. Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments

  4. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The

  5. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with 137 Cs, 210 Pb and 7 Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of 239,240 Pu, 241 Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The obtained findings and the

  6. Radionuclide transport and retention in natural rock formations. Ruprechtov site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noseck, U.; Brasser, T.

    2006-05-01

    Deep geological disposal is based on a multi-barrier concept in which clay materials often play an important role as geological barriers. Detailed investigations of suitable geological analogues may lead to a better understanding of the complex interrelations between transport and sorption of radionuclides in argillaceous media under natural conditions, and especially on very long-term scales relevant for Performance assessment (PA). The Ruprechtov site was chosen because its geological and geochemical conditions are similar to sedimentary sequences which cover often potential host rocks for underground waste repositories. It is situated in the north-western part of the Czech Republic in a Tertiary basin of the Eger (Ohre) rift composed of clay and organic material (coal, lignite), with places of high uranium conentrations. With a bilateral project this site has been investigated by GRS, Germany and NRI, Czech Republic in order to identify the main mobilisation/immobilisation processes for PA-relevant elements, namely uranium. The work presented here is a continuation of the previous project phase. In this last project phase the site investigation was limited to a small area of about 200 m 3 . Three exploration boreholes and two boreholes for detailed investigation were available at that time. The main intention of the new project phase was to enlarge the investigation area, in order to better understand the structure and the hydrogeochemical conditions of the overall system. On the one hand this includes the characterisation of the hydrogeological conditions in order to understand the regional groundwater flow and potential uranium transport processes on a larger spatial scale. Therefore the spatial extension of uranium-rich layers, water-bearing horizons and lithological units as well as groundwater ages and flow directions need to be determined. On that basis a conceptual model for the groundwater flow at Ruprechtov site can be developed. On the other hand it

  7. Modelling of water-flow, barrier degradation, chemistry and radionuclide transport in the near-field of a repository for L/ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    Performance assessment has been carried out for the near-field of a potential LLW/ILW repository in marl in Switzerland. The host rock is assumed to be characterised by a system with 'small fractures' and one with 'large fractures', the hydraulic conductivity ranges from 4.10 -10 -4.10 -9 [m.s -1 ] and the hydraulic gradient is 1 [m.m -1 ]. In the repository, low-and intermediate-level waste will be disposed. Waste in drums and concrete containers will be placed in concrete-lined caverns which will be filled with a porous backfill material. One option is to include an additional engineered hydraulic barrier in the repository system. Its effects on repository performance have been studied. The changes in physical and chemical properties of the barriers have been included in the assessment by calculating the leaching of mainly calcium from the concrete barriers. The hydraulic conductivities of the engineered barriers are assumed to vary between 10 -11 -10 -8 [m.s -1 ] after degradation. Radionuclide transport can be determined by both advection and diffusion, depending on the hydraulic conductivities in the near-field. The water flow rates within the barriers have been calculated. The results show that the water flow rates within the porous backfill may increase by more than one order of magnitude compared to the water flow rate in the undisturbed host rock. The water flow rate through the waste matrix is never significantly larger than that in the host rock because it has been assumed that the porous backfill always has higher hydraulic conductivity than the waste matrix. The water flow rates within the near-field have been used to calculate the fractional release rates of species with different sorption properties. (author) figs., tabs., 90 refs

  8. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. The model is based on available experimental data and describes the basic reactions between bentonite and groundwater by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. It is found that sodium bentonite will slowly be converted to calcium bentonite. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite is used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. The elements considered are: uranium, neptunium, plutonium, thorium, americium, and technetium. The redox potential in the near-field is assumed to be controlled by the corrosion products of the iron canister. Except for uranium and neptunium, radionuclide solubilities turn out to be lower under the modelled near-field conditions than in the groundwater of the surrounding granitic host rock. Uranium and neptunium solubility might be higher by orders of magnitude in the near-field than in the far-field. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. The use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  9. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test Site, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Rulison site in west-central Colorado was the location of an underground detonation of a 40-kiloton nuclear device in 1969. The test took place 2,568 m below ground surface in the Mesaverde Formation. Though located below the regional water table, none of the bedrock formations at the site yielded water during hydraulic tests, indicating extremely low permeability conditions. The scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Mesaverde Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, with transport of strontium and cesium also sensitive to the sorption coefficient

  10. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  11. Extension and validation of ARTM (atmospheric radionuclide transportation model) for the application as dispersion calculation model in AVV (general administrative provision) and SBG (incident calculation bases); Erweiterung und Validierung von ARTM fuer den Einsatz als Ausbreitungsmodell in AVV und SBG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Reinhard; Bruecher, Wenzel; Richter, Cornelia; Sentuc, Florence; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald

    2012-02-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SGB) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of nonradioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. In the context of the research project 3608S05005 possibilities for an upgrade of ARTM were investigated and implemented as far as possible to the program system. The work program comprises the validation and evaluation of ARTM, the implementation of technical-scientific extensions of the model system and the continuation of experience exchange between developers and users. In particular, the suitability of the model approach for simulations of radiological consequences according to the German SBG and the representation of the influence of buildings typical for nuclear power stations have been validated and further evaluated. Moreover, post-processing modules for calculation of dose-relevant decay products and for dose calculations have been developed and implemented. In order to continue the experience feedback and exchange, a web page has been established and maintained. Questions by users and other feedback have been dealt with and a common workshop has been held. The continued development and validation of ARTM has strengthened the basis for applications of this model system in line with the German regulations AVV and SBG. Further activity in this field can contribute to maintain and

  12. Transport of oxidants and radionuclides through a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1978-02-01

    The masstransfer rate for oxidants to, and radionuclides from a capsule in a repository has been computed. The capsule which is 0.75 m in diameter is surrounded by Montmorillonite clay. The hole is 1.5 m in diameter. For one capsule about 1220g copper will corrode due to oxygen corrosion in 10 000 years. If the fissures in the rock nearest the hole are filled with clay, the corrosion will decrease significantly. This is valid for a case where the groundwater is in equilibrium with oxygen of 0.2 bar pressure (normal air pressure). Measurements of the oxygen content in groundwater at large depths show a more than 1 000 times smaller values. The transport rate will then be correspondingly smaller. Corrosion due to sulphate/sulphide corrosion may reach some 590 g in the same time if there is 10 mg/l of the least abundant component. The radionuclides Sr 90 , Cs 137 , Am 241 and Am 243 will decay totally in the clay barriers. Pu 240 will be seriously hindered. The total dissolution of the uranium oxide in a capsule takes at least 1.8 million years. Nuclides with high solubilities decrease in about 2 000 years to half their original concentration. The sodium in the Montmorillonite clay in the fissures is exchanged for calcium in about 20 000 years. The exchange of the sodium in the clay in the hole takes millions of years

  13. Verification and improvement of a predictive model for radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Benson, L.V.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Prediction of the rates of migration of contaminant chemical species in groundwater flowing through toxic waste repositories is essential to the assessment of a repository's capability of meeting standards for release rates. A large number of chemical transport models, of varying degrees of complexity, have been devised for the purpose of providing this predictive capability. In general, the transport of dissolved chemical species through a water-saturated porous medium is influenced by convection, diffusion/dispersion, sorption, formation of complexes in the aqueous phase, and chemical precipitation. The reliability of predictions made with the models which omit certain of these processes is difficult to assess. A numerical model, CHEMTRN, has been developed to determine which chemical processes govern radionuclide migration. CHEMTRN builds on a model called MCCTM developed previously by Lichtner and Benson

  14. Analysis of NSPP experiment with ART code for analyzing transport behavior of Aerosol and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The ART code calculates transport behavior of aerosols and radionuclides during core meltdown accidents in the light water reactors. Since aerosols play an important role in carrying fission products from the core region to the environment, the ART code includes detailed models of aerosol behavior. Aerosols including several radionuclides are classified into many groups according to the aerosol mass. The models of aerosol behavior include agglomeration processes caused by Brownian motion, aerosol settling velocity difference and turbulent flow, and natural deposition processes due to diffusion, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, gravitational settling and forced convection. In order to examine validity of the ART models, the NSPP aerosol experiment was analyzed. The ART calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was ascertained that aerosol growth due to agglomeration, gravitational settling, thermophoresis in an air atmosphere, and diffusiophoresis in an air-steam atmosphere were important physical phenomena in the aerosol behavior. (author)

  15. Determination of the potential radiation exposure of the population close to the Asse II mine caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation using the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, D.; Wittwer, C.

    2014-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1978 125.787 packages filled with low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste were emplaced in the mining plant Asse II. Volatile radioactive substances like H-3, C-14 and Rn-222 are released from the emplaced waste. These substances reach the ventilated parts of the mine and are released with the discharge air. The potential radiation exposure of the population caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation is determined by the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM). As result the maximal deductions of volatile radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation of the Asse II mine lead to radiation exposure of the population, which is considerably lower than the permissible values of application rate.

  16. Radionuclide transport in the repository near-field and far-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Smith, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a background report of the TURVA-2012 safety case report 'Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System'. This report gives a comprehensive account of the modelling of radionuclide release from a defective canister and the subsequent migration to the surface groundwater system. The focus of this report is in the radionuclide migration both in the repository near-field and in the repository far-field. Radionuclide releases from the canister and migration through the repository near-field and far-field have also been analysed in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. Those simulations are discussed in a separate report by Cormenzana. Calculation cases are derived from three different types of scenarios: (i) The base scenario that assumes a single initially defective canister located in a cautiously selected canister position, i.e. selecting the failed canister location such that radionuclide release and transport properties are conservative compared to the statistics over all canister locations. Migration processes and parameter values follow the most likely lines of evolution. Repository safety functions are assumed to perform according to the design basis. Calculation cases defined in the Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios report are also supplemented by additional calculation cases that are aimed to study variability between different DFN realisations (additional BS-ALL cases), longitudinal dispersion (BS-RC-ld cases) and alternative realisations of the transport classes along the release paths (BS-RC-tc cases), (ii) Variant scenarios that study declined performance of the repository safety functions. These include enhanced corrosion failure and degradation of the buffer under variant geochemical conditions (iii) Disturbance scenarios that analyse influences of unlikely events on the radionuclide release and migration. Analysis of the variant and disturbance scenarios

  17. Development of TIGER code for radionuclide transport in a geochemically evolving region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    In a transuranic (TRU) waste geological disposal facility, using cementitious materials is being considered. Cementitious materials will gradually dissolve in groundwater over the long-term. In the performance assessment report of a TRU waste repository in Japan already published, the most conservative radionuclide migration parameter set was selected considering the evolving cementitious material. Therefore, a tool to perform the calculation of radionuclide transport considering long-term geochemically evolving cementitious materials, named the TIGER code, Transport In Geochemically Evolving Region was developed to calculate a more realistic performance assessment. It can calculate radionuclide transport in engineered and natural barrier systems. In this report, mathematical equations of this code are described and validated with analytical solutions and results of other codes for radionuclide transport. The more realistic calculation of radionuclide transport for a TRU waste geological disposal system using the TIGER code could be performed. (author)

  18. Summary of the data which is used for radionuclide transport analysis in the groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Osamu; Nagara, Shuichi; Matsumura, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Akira; Takeda, Shinji; Sato, Kazuhiko; Tokizawa, Takayuki

    2004-03-01

    To analyze high precision in groundwater flow and radionuclide transport around Yotsugi open-pit mining place site and around Yotsugi mill tailing yard, besides the topic in past analysis is extracted, following it did examination of the corresponding method and arrangement of physical properties value. It investigated concerning the 3-dimensional flow and transport analysis code which can handle the chain-radionuclide selected. The range of the analytical area examined that become the object of groundwater flow and transport analysis, the wide area, Yotsugi open-pit mining place site and Yotsugi mill tailing yard selected the analytical model area, concerning the range which is surrounded with the divide. Receiving the influence of the alteration zone and the crush zone concerning the coefficient of permeability of the granite, it re-appraised excluding the value which is supposed that water permeability is high. The weathered granite from the lithofacies divided in the high weathered granite and the low weathered granite. As for the geometrical mean of coefficient of permeability of the former 10 -6 m/s order, the later 10 -8 m/s order, there is a difference of 2 orders in both. In addition, the data which is obtained to this year concerning physical properties value for analysis, groundwater level, precipitation and radionuclide density etc. rearranged and data set drew up. (author)

  19. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite, as well as the various compositions resulting from the long-term extrapolation, are used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. Since the effect of calcium bentonite on the groundwater chemical composition will be considerably less marked than that of sodium bentonite, especially with respect to key parameters for the nuclide speciation like carbonate concentration and pH, the use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  20. Modeling of radionuclide migration and a temperature dynamics in underground disposal of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, V.K.; Zubkov, A.A.; Balakhonov, V.G.; Sukhorukov, V.A.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Noskov, M.D.; Istomin, A.D.; Kesler, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical model of radionuclide migration and temperature field dynamics during underground disposal of liquid radioactive wastes is presented. The model involves the description of filtration, convective-dispersion mass transfer, sorption and desorption of radionuclides, radioactive decay, convective heat transport and hear transfer. Software making possible to conduct prognosis calculations of changing state of stratum-collector of radioactive wastes was made. Results of the simulation of temperature field dynamics and behaviour of radionuclides on underground disposal of liquid radioactive wastes of the Siberian chemical plant are performed [ru

  1. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gasbuggy underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gasbuggy site in northwestern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 29-kiloton nuclear device in 1967. The test took place in the Lewis Shale, approximately 182 m below the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, which is the aquifer closest to the detonation horizon. The conservative assumption was made that tritium was injected from the blast-created cavity into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone by the force of the explosion, via fractures created by the shot. Model results suggest that if radionuclides produced by the shot entered the Ojo Alamo, they are most likely contained within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity, followed by the variance in hydraulic conductivity, the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, the transverse hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient, and uncertainty in the source size. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affects calculations of radionuclide transport at the Gasbuggy site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation at the site; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values

  2. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  3. Geosphere transport of radionuclides in safety assessment of spent fuel disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jussila, P

    2000-07-01

    The study is associated with a research project of Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) to utilise analytical models in safety assessment for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Geosphere constitutes a natural barrier for the possible escape of radionuclides from a geological repository of spent nuclear fuel. However, rock contains fractures in which flowing groundwater can transport material. Radionuclide transport in rock is complicated - the flow paths in the geosphere are difficult to characterise and there are various phenomena involved. In mathematical models, critical paths along which radionuclides can reach the biosphere are considered. The worst predictable cases and the effect of the essential parameters can be assessed with the help of such models although they simplify the reality considerably. Some of the main differences between the transport model used and the reality are the mathematical characterisation of the flow route in rock as a smooth and straight fracture and the modelling of the complicated chemical processes causing retardation with the help of a distribution coefficient that does not explain those phenomena. Radionuclide transport models via a heat transfer analogy and analytical solutions of them are derived in the study. The calculations are performed with a created Matlab program for a single nuclide model taking into account 1D advective transport along a fracture, 1D diffusion from the fracture into and within the porous rock matrices surrounding the fracture, retardation within the matrices, and radioactive decay. The results are compared to the results of the same calculation cases obtained by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and presented in TILA-99 safety assessment report. The model used by VTT is the same but the results have been calculated numerically in different geometry. The differences between the results of the present study and TILA-99 can to a large extent be explained by the different approaches to

  4. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Rock: Numerical Assessment for High Level Waste Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Siqueira da Silveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and stable geological formations with low permeability have been considered for high level waste definitive repository. A common problem is the modeling of radionuclide migration in a fractured medium. Initially, we considered a system consisting of a rock matrix with a single planar fracture in water saturated porous rock. Transport in the fracture is assumed to obey an advection-diffusion equation, while molecular diffusion is considered the dominant mechanism of transport in porous matrix. The partial differential equations describing the movement of radionuclides were discretized by finite difference methods, namely, fully explicit, fully implicit, and Crank-Nicolson schemes. The convective term was discretized by the following numerical schemes: backward differences, centered differences, and forward differences. The model was validated using an analytical solution found in the literature. Finally, we carried out a simulation with relevant spent fuel nuclide data with a system consisting of a horizontal fracture and a vertical fracture for assessing the performance of a hypothetical repository inserted into the host rock. We have analysed the bentonite expanded performance at the beginning of fracture, the quantified radionuclide released from a borehole, and an estimated effective dose to an adult, obtained from ingestion of well water during one year.

  5. Comparison of biospheric models of radionuclides transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Olivares, A.; Carrasco, E.

    1992-01-01

    The international BIOMOVS A4 exercise has made possible that a set of biospheric transfer models could predict the daily radionuclide concentration in soils, forage and some animal products (cow milk and beef) after the Chernobyl accident. The aim was to compare these predictions with experimental results in 13 locations around the world. The data provided were essentially the daily air contamination and precipitation and some site-dependent parameters. It was a blind test, the locations and experimental measures were not revealed in advance. Twenty-three models (quasi-steady state and time-dependent models) were involved in the study. In this paper an explicit criterion has been used in order to select the models that better fitted the experimental results. In nine selected locations a comparative analysis between these models has been carried out for obtaining the structural and parametric coincidences that could explain their relatively good performance. The first evidence obtained has been that a wide set of models were able to predict the order of magnitude of the nuclides time-integrated concentrations in several important biospheric comportments. But only a few models, all of them with a 'dynamical' structure, fitted the daily behavior with the reasonable agreement. The dynamical structure of the five most successful models at predicting for Caesium 137 (CIRCLE, ECOSYS, PATHWAY, PRYMA and RAGTIME) shows some common patterns that may be relevant for a better modelling of nuclear accident scenarios. (author)

  6. Particle and solute migration in porous media. Modeling of simultaneous transport of clay particles and radionuclides in a salinity gradient; Migration de particules et de solutes en milieu poreux. Modelisation du transport simultane de particules argileuses et de radionucleides sous l`effet d`un gradient de salinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, M H

    1994-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms which control the transient transport of particles and radionuclides in natural and artificial porous media is a key problem for the assessment of safety of radioactive waste disposals. An experimental study has been performed to characterize the clayey particle mobility in porous media: a laboratory- made column, packed with an unconsolidated sand bentonite (5% weight) sample, is flushed with a salt solution. An original method of salinity gradient allowed us to show and to quantify some typical behaviours of this system: threshold effects in the peptization of particles, creation of preferential pathways, formation of immobile water zones induce solute-transfer limitation. The mathematical modelling accounts for a phenomenological law, where the distribution of particles between the stagnant water zone and the porous medium is a function of sodium chloride concentration. This distribution function is associated with a radionuclide adsorption model, and is included in a convective dispersive transport model with stagnant water zones. It allowed us to simulate the particle and solute transport when the salt environment is modified. The complete model has been validated with experiments involving cesium, calcium and neptunium in a sodium chloride gradient. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  7. Mathematical modelling in radionuclide diagnosis of physiologic systems state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkevich, B.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the development of software for radionuclide functional diagnostics should be carried out in two directions: 1) increasing the accuracy of radiographic measurements proper; 2) increasing clinical and diagnostic informativeness in the interpretation of the results of measurements. The realization of the first problem is reduced to a mathematical model of the measurement process and the computerized selection of optimum radiography parameters and regimes. The second problem is not solved in the general form, as the interpretation of measurement results depends on the specific clinical and diagnostic aim of investigation, indicator type and the way of its administration in the organism, etc. The lecture gives the classification of the mathematical models of indicator transport, techniques of identification of model parameters. Methods promoting the increase in the accuracy of model identification are presented [ru

  8. Being prepared to verify the CTBT-Atmospheric Transport modeling and radionuclide analysis at the Austrian National Data Centre during the NDC Preparedness Exercise 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Schraick, Irene

    2010-05-01

    An explosion in the Kara-Zhyra mine in Eastern Kazakhstan on 28 November 2009 around 07:20 UTC was recorded by both the CTBTO seismic and infrasound networks. This event triggered a world-wide preparedness exercise among the CTBTO National Data Centres. Within an hour after the event was selected by the German NDC, a computer program developed by NDC Austria based on weather forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and from the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) was started to analyse what Radionuclide Stations of the CTBTO International Monitoring System (IMS) would be potentially affected by the release from a nuclear explosion at this place in the course of the following 3-10 days. These calculations were daily updated to consider the observed state of the atmosphere instead of the predicted one. Based on these calculations, automated and reviewed radionuclide reports from the potentially affected stations as produced by the CTBTO International Data Centre (IDC) were looked at. An additional analysis of interesting spectra was provided by the Seibersdorf Laboratories. Based on all the results coming in, no evidence whatsoever was found that the explosion in Kazakhstan was nuclear. This is in accordance with ground truth information saying that the event was caused by the detonation of more than 53 Tons of explosives as part of mining operations. A number of conclusions can be drawn from this exercise. First, the international, bilateral as well as national mechanisms and procedures in place for such an event worked smoothly. Second, the products and services from the CTBTO IDC proved to be very useful to assist the member states in their verification efforts. Last but not least, issues with the availability of data from IMS radionuclide stations do remain.

  9. MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) code description and User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avci, H.I.; Raghuram, S.; Baybutt, P.

    1985-04-01

    A new computer code called MATADOR (Methods for the Analysis of Transport And Deposition Of Radionuclides) has been developed to replace the CORRAL-2 computer code which was written for the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). This report is a User's Manual for MATADOR. MATADOR is intended for use in system risk studies to analyze radionuclide transport and deposition in reactor containments. The principal output of the code is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containment and their removal by natural deposition and by engineered safety systems such as sprays. It is capable of analyzing the behavior of radionuclides existing either as vapors or aerosols in the containment. The code requires input data on the source terms into the containment, the geometry of the containment, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the containment

  10. The role of colloids in the transport of radionuclides in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this programme is to understand how colloids could influence the migration behaviour of radionuclides in geological formations. This is being achieved firstly, by identifying the retention mechanisms of colloids and pseudocolloids (association of radionuclides with colloids) on mineral surfaces by static and dynamic experiments, and secondly by investigating the formation of pseudocolloids. Moreover, these studies will be focused on model systems (surfaces, colloids) selected from studies carried out on the El Berrocal site (characterization of the granite, of the colloids). Two types of experiments are planned: for the study of pseudocolloid formation, sorption experiments (batch tests) with radionuclides will be conducted either with model inorganic colloidal suspensions or with mineral monoliths as macroscopic surfaces of colloids. Dynamic experiments will be performed using well-defined packings of both synthetic and natural minerals (major constituents of granite). Moreover, a particular attention will be devoted to the organic coatings (in static and dynamic conditions). These studies will provide data directly usable by migration models to predict colloid transport under conditions relevant to geological disposals. This programme will be carried out in collaboration with the different partners of this contract: CEA (Fontenay-aux-Roses/F), CIEMAT (Madrid/S), CNRS (Orsay/F), GERMETRAD (Nantes/F), GSF (Munich/G), INFM (Padua/I), INTERA (London/UK) with Dr V. Moulin, Dr P. Rivas, Dr J.C. Dran, Pr Pieri, Dr C. Wolfrum, Pr G. Della Mea and Dr P. Grindrod as project leaders respectively. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test

  12. Study of the hydrodynamic circulation and transport of radionuclides in the Ilha Grande Bay -RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, Mariza Ramalho

    2001-01-01

    The Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Center (CNAAA), located at the city of Rio de Janeiro and the liquid effluents are released into the Ilha Grande Bay (BIG). The objective of this work was to simulate mathematically the dispersion of 3 H and 137 Cs present in the liquid effluents that are routinely released into the environment, and in this way contribute to the improvement of the radiological impact assessment associated to these releases. The hydrodynamic circulation pattern of the bay and the transport of radionuclides were simulated by means of numerical modeling techniques by the computational system SisBAHIA (Sistema Base Hidrodinâmica e Ambiental). The results indicate that the local circulation pattern is mainly driven by the propagation of the tidal wave, and is characterized by low current velocities of about 0.1 m.s -1 . The wind stress (normal or extreme ones ) over the free surface does not alter the local circulation pattern significantly. The effluents are released in a rate of about 120 m 3 .s. -1 . As a result, the local hydrodynamics is markedly altered by means of the formation of a huge vortices close to the release area. According to the annual amount of the released radionuclides predicted in the Nuclear Licensing Document, and considering a continuous release it could be predicted that the radionuclide plume would present a low mobility, with most of the activity concentration amount being restricted close to the source. The activity concentration distribution reach the transportation steady state by the end of the 51 st day of simulation. A conservative behavior of both radionuclides in the water column was assumed in the performed simulation. (author)

  13. Transport of radionuclides in urban environs: working draft assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Akins, R.E.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Finley, B.H.; Kaestner, P.C.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.; Tierney, M.S.; Finley, N.N.

    1978-05-01

    Purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impacts from transportation of radioactive materials in urban environs. The impacts from accident-free transport, vehicular accidents during transport, and from other abnormal situations are analyzed. The approach is outlined including description of the models developed and the data bases employed to account for the special features of the urban environment. The operations and contributions of the task group formed to assist in this study are also discussed. The results obtained for the New York City study area are presented and explained

  14. Transport of radionuclides in urban environs: working draft assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Akins, R.E.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Finley, B.H.; Kaestner, P.C.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.; Tierney, M.S.; Finley, N.N.

    1978-05-01

    Purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impacts from transportation of radioactive materials in urban environs. The impacts from accident-free transport, vehicular accidents during transport, and from other abnormal situations are analyzed. The approach is outlined including description of the models developed and the data bases employed to account for the special features of the urban environment. The operations and contributions of the task group formed to assist in this study are also discussed. The results obtained for the New York City study area are presented and explained.

  15. Radionuclide transport through perforations in nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aidun, C.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-11-01

    Previous analytical models for the steady-state radionuclide release rate through perforations in nuclear waste containers into the surrounding medium are based on a zero wall thickness assumption. In this paper we investigate the effect of the wall thickness on the mass transfer rate through isolated cylindrical holes. We solve the steady-state diffusion equation for the concentration field and derive a model based on the analytical solution. By direct comparison, we show that the zero wall thickness model overpredicts the mass transfer rate by about 1300 percent for a circular hole with 1-cm radius and a wall thickness of 10 cm. As expected, the zero-thickness model becomes even less accurate as the hole radius decreases; it predicts a greater release rate from a large number of small holes than the mass transfer rate from an uncontained waste form cylinder. In contrast, the results predicted by our model remain bounded for isolated holes and never exceed the mass transfer from an uncontained waste form. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  16. The role of nuclear techniques in the long-term prediction of radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Duerden, P.

    1985-01-01

    Problems associated with the long-term prediction of the migration of radionuclides, and the role of natural analogues in reducing the inherent uncertainties are discussed. Particular reference is made to the evaluation of uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory, as analogues of high-level radioactive waste repositories. A range of nuclear techniques has been used to identify the role of colloids, of alpha recoil and of mineralogy in transport. Specific mention is made of a method being developed which enables models of the migration of solute through fractured rock to be assessed via a combination of alpha track, fission track and PIXE/PIGME techniques

  17. Radionuclide transport from near-surface repository for radioactive waste - The unsaturated zone approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakimaviciute-Maseliene, V. [Vilnius University (Lithuania); Mazeika, J. [Nature Research Centre (Lithuania); Motiejunas, S. [Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Lithuania)

    2014-07-01

    About 100 000 m{sup 3} of solid conditioned Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW), generated during operation and decommissioning of the Ignalina nuclear power plant (INPP), are to be disposed of in a near-surface repository (NSR) - a 'hill'-type repository with reinforced concrete vaults and with engineered and natural barriers. The northeastern Lithuania and the environment of the INPP in particular were recognized as the areas most suitable for a near-surface repository (Stabatiske Site). The engineered barriers of the repository consist of concrete cells surrounded by clay-based material of low permeability with about the same isolating capacity in all directions. The clay materials must be effectively compactable so that required hydraulic conductivity is reached. The Lithuanian Triassic clay turned out to be sufficiently rich in smectites and was proposed as main candidate for sealing of the repository. When the concrete vaults are filled, the repository cover will be constructed. The surface of the mound will be planted with grass. In this study a computer code FEFLOW 5.0 was applied for simulating the transport of the most mobile radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 94}Nb) with moisture through an unsaturated vault of the near-surface repository in Stabatiske Site. The HYDRUS-1D analysis was used to assess the radionuclide transport in the repository and to estimate initial activity concentrations of radionuclides transported from the cemented waste matrix. Radionuclide release from the vault in the unsaturated conditions after closure of the repository and consequent contaminant plume transport has been assessed taking into account site-specific natural and engineering conditions and based on a normal evolution scenario. The highest peak radionuclide activity concentrations were estimated applying the FEFLOW code. The highest value of {sup 14}C activity concentration(about 1.3x10{sup 8} Bq/m{sup 3}) at the groundwater table

  18. Three-Dimensional Radionuclide Transport Through the Unsaturated Zone of the Yucca Mountain Site 3 Colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. J. Moridis; Y. Seol

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated colloid transport in the unsaturated fractured zone by means of three-dimensional site-scale numerical model under present-day climate infiltration, considering varying colloid diameters, kinetic declogging, and filtration. The radionuclide transport model was used to simulate continuous release of colloids into fractures throughout the proposed repository, in which any components of engineered barrier system such as waste package or drip shield were not considered. the results of the study indicate the importance of subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The simulations indicate that (1) colloid transport is not significantly affected by varying the filtration parameters, (2) travel time to the water table decreases with the colloid size, (3) larger colloids show little retardation whereas very small ones are retarded significantly, and (4) fracture filtration can have an impact on transport. Because of uncertainties in the fundamentals of colloid transport and an extremely conservative approach (based on an improbably adverse worst-case scenario), caution should be exercised in the analysis and interpretation of the 3-D simulation results. The results discussed here should be viewed as an attempt to identify and evaluate the mechanisms, processes, and geological features that control colloidal transport

  19. The impacts of pore-scale physical and chemical heterogeneities on the transport of radionuclide-carrying colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WU, Ning

    2018-04-24

    Independent of the methods of nuclear waste disposal, the degradation of packaging materials could lead to mobilization and transport of radionuclides into the geosphere. This process can be significantly accelerated due to the association of radionuclides with the backfill materials or mobile colloids in groundwater. The transport of these colloids is complicated by the inherent coupling of physical and chemical heterogeneities (e.g., pore space geometry, grain size, charge heterogeneity, and surface hydrophobicity) in natural porous media that can exist on the length scale of a few grains. In addition, natural colloids themselves are often heterogeneous in their surface properties (e.g., clay platelets possess opposite charges on the surface and along the rim). Both physical and chemical heterogeneities influence the transport and retention of radionuclides under various groundwater conditions. However, the precise mechanisms how these coupled heterogeneities influence colloidal transport are largely elusive. This knowledge gap is a major source of uncertainty in developing accurate models to represent the transport process and to predict distribution of radionuclides in the geosphere.

  20. Artificial neural networks application for horizontal and vertical forecasting radionuclides transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khil'ko, O.S.; Kovalenko, V.I.; Kundas, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Artificial neural networks approach for horizontal and vertical radionuclide transport forecasting was proposed. Runoff factors analysis was considered. Additional artificial neural network structures for physical-chemical properties recognition were used. (authors)

  1. TERRA: a computer code for simulating the transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1984-11-01

    TERRA is a computer code which calculates concentrations of radionuclides and ingrowing daughters in surface and root-zone soil, produce and feed, beef, and milk from a given deposition rate at any location in the conterminous United States. The code is fully integrated with seven other computer codes which together comprise a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System, CRRIS. Output from either the long range (> 100 km) atmospheric dispersion code RETADD-II or the short range (<80 km) atmospheric dispersion code ANEMOS, in the form of radionuclide air concentrations and ground deposition rates by downwind location, serves as input to TERRA. User-defined deposition rates and air concentrations may also be provided as input to TERRA through use of the PRIMUS computer code. The environmental concentrations of radionuclides predicted by TERRA serve as input to the ANDROS computer code which calculates population and individual intakes, exposures, doses, and risks. TERRA incorporates models to calculate uptake from soil and atmospheric deposition on four groups of produce for human consumption and four groups of livestock feeds. During the environmental transport simulation, intermediate calculations of interception fraction for leafy vegetables, produce directly exposed to atmospherically depositing material, pasture, hay, and silage are made based on location-specific estimates of standing crop biomass. Pasture productivity is estimated by a model which considers the number and types of cattle and sheep, pasture area, and annual production of other forages (hay and silage) at a given location. Calculations are made of the fraction of grain imported from outside the assessment area. TERRA output includes the above calculations and estimated radionuclide concentrations in plant produce, milk, and a beef composite by location

  2. TERRA: a computer code for simulating the transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1984-11-01

    TERRA is a computer code which calculates concentrations of radionuclides and ingrowing daughters in surface and root-zone soil, produce and feed, beef, and milk from a given deposition rate at any location in the conterminous United States. The code is fully integrated with seven other computer codes which together comprise a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System, CRRIS. Output from either the long range (> 100 km) atmospheric dispersion code RETADD-II or the short range (<80 km) atmospheric dispersion code ANEMOS, in the form of radionuclide air concentrations and ground deposition rates by downwind location, serves as input to TERRA. User-defined deposition rates and air concentrations may also be provided as input to TERRA through use of the PRIMUS computer code. The environmental concentrations of radionuclides predicted by TERRA serve as input to the ANDROS computer code which calculates population and individual intakes, exposures, doses, and risks. TERRA incorporates models to calculate uptake from soil and atmospheric deposition on four groups of produce for human consumption and four groups of livestock feeds. During the environmental transport simulation, intermediate calculations of interception fraction for leafy vegetables, produce directly exposed to atmospherically depositing material, pasture, hay, and silage are made based on location-specific estimates of standing crop biomass. Pasture productivity is estimated by a model which considers the number and types of cattle and sheep, pasture area, and annual production of other forages (hay and silage) at a given location. Calculations are made of the fraction of grain imported from outside the assessment area. TERRA output includes the above calculations and estimated radionuclide concentrations in plant produce, milk, and a beef composite by location.

  3. Radionuclide transport along a boreal hill slope - elevated soil water concentrations in riparian forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Boily, Aasa; Laudon, Hjalmar [Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeaa (Sweden); Koehler, Stephan J. [Dept. of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. 7050, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    behind the enrichment in the riparian zone was most likely the higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in these soils, which significantly enhances the solubility of many elements. This was also supported by measurements of the speciation of the elements, many of which were bound to organic colloids to a high degree. On the other hand, elements with a low affinity for organic matter, e.g. Cl, Cs and Sr, appeared to be transported more conservatively through the riparian zone. Using thermodynamic modelling it was possible to quantitatively predict the enrichment of various elements in the riparian zone based on their chemical properties. The strong enrichment of many elements in the soil water of the riparian zone may also make it hotspot for uptake of radionuclides in biota. However, analyses of bilberry leaves and spruce shoots did not generally indicate higher concentrations in the riparian zone, clearly showing that there is no linear relationship between soil water concentrations and the biological uptake in plants. We presume that there is a general decrease in the bioavailability of radionuclides that are bound to dissolved organic matter. (authors)

  4. Analysis of radionuclide transport through fissured porous media with a perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banat, M [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents a specific procedure for obtaining solutions for the transport of radionuclides in a fissured porous media. The concentration profiles are deduced for a wide range of Peclet numbers using a perturbation method with a multiscale of time. Results show clearly that because of an increase of longitudinal dispersion, the radionuclide moves faster with respect to the case of zero dispersion (i.e. an infinite Peclet number). The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the practical advantage of the present calculation method with respect to the classical numerical and analytical methods used for radionuclide transport. (author).

  5. Analysis of radionuclide transport through fracture networks by percolation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joonhong; Furuhama, Yutaka; Li, Yadong; Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Presented are results of numerical simulations for radionuclide diffusion through fracture networks in geologic layers. Actual fracture networks are expressed as two-dimensional honeycomb percolation lattices. Random-walk simulations of diffusion on percolation lattices are made by the exact-enumeration method, and compared with those from Fickian diffusion with constant and decreasing diffusion coefficients. Mean-square displacement of a random-walker on percolation lattices increases more slowly with time than that for Fickian diffusion with the constant diffusion coefficient. Though the same relation of mean-square displacement vs. time as for the percolation lattices can be obtained for a continuum with decreasing diffusion coefficients, spatial distribution of probability densities of finding the random-walker on the percolation lattice differs from that on a continuum with the decreasing diffusion coefficient. The percolation model results in slow spreading near the origin and fast spreading in the outer region, whereas the decreasing-diffusion coefficient model shows the reverse because of smaller diffusion coefficient in the outer region. We could derive a general formula that can include both Fickian and anomalous diffusion in terms of fractal and fracton dimensionalities and the anomalous diffusion exponent. (author)

  6. Integrated performance assessment model for waste policy package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  7. Integrated performance assessment model for waste package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  8. Simplified analytical model to simulate radionuclide release from radioactive waste trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Bernardete Lemes Vieira de

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, a computer code was developed to simulate the radionuclide released from waste form, transport through vadose zone and transport in the saturated zone. This paper describes the methodology used to model these process. The radionuclide released from the waste is calculated using a model based on first order kinetics and the transport through porous media was determined using semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation, considering the limiting case of unidirectional convective transport with three-dimensional dispersion in an isotropic medium. The results obtained in this work were compared with other codes, showing good agreement. (author)

  9. Radionuclide transport in the Neogene aquifer system located in the environment of the Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedeon, M.; Marivoet, J.; Vandersteen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework the Belgian research program on the long term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste coordinated by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Boom Clay is considered as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in NE-Belgium (Campine area). In the frame of the performance assessments of a disposal system located in the Boom Clay Formation, the transport of radionuclides diffusing through the clay barrier into the aquifers located above is modelled. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer is based on a series of groundwater flow models simulating the aquifer systems in the surroundings of the Boom Clay. This series of groundwater models include the regional north-eastern Belgium model simulating flow both above and below the Boom Clay, the recently updated deep-aquifer pumping model, simulating transient flow in the over-exploited aquifers below the Boom Clay and finally the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model, simulating flow in the aquifer system above the Boom Clay. The Neogene aquifer system consists of two main aquifers. The Pliocene aquifer is located at the top, separated from the underlying Miocene aquifer by the Kasterlee Clay aquitard. The Miocene aquifer consists of three hydrostratigraphic units: the Diest, Berchem and Voort Formations; with the last two having a lower hydraulic conductivity than the Diest unit. The transport model for the Neogene aquifer represents a fraction of the catchment-scale Neogene aquifer model. It stretches from the local divide between the Grote and Kleine Nete Rivers up to the Kleine Nete River, representing the main model sink. The boundary conditions and the sources/sinks in the Pliocene aquifer are defined mostly by the surface water features, such as the rivers, brooks, lakes and canals. In the partially confined Miocene aquifer, the effect of the surface water features is dampened and the heads at the model

  10. Investigating radionuclide bearing suspended sediment transport mechanisms in the Ribble estuary using airborne remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkin, P.A.

    2000-10-01

    assumes that a series of images over a flood tide can be animated to provide information on the hydrodynamic regime, erosion, and deposition. Spatial and temporal data demonstrated the complex controls on sediment transport. The data also showed the importance of microphytobenthos in the stabilisation of intertidal sediments, highlighting their importance in defining sources and sinks of radionuclides in intertidal areas. Water volume data from the VERSE model were combined with SSC from the imagery to calculate the total sediment in suspension for each flight line. This provided the figures used to determine total erosion and deposition, which were then used to derive net suspended sediment and 137 Cs influxes of 2.01x10 6 kg and 604MBq per flood tide. (author)

  11. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Susanna

    2010-04-01

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 μg/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K d -values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb, Ni

  12. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wold, Susanna (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry)

    2010-04-15

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 mug/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K{sub d}-values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb

  13. Transport of radionuclides in stochastic media. Pt. 1: The quasi-asymptotic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.; Smidts, O.F.

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional quasi-asymptotic approximate equation is developed for the transport of radionuclides in a stochastic velocity field. This approximation is derived from an integro-differential equation of transport in stochastic media, commonly encountered in hydrogeology. The quasi-asymptotic equation turns out to be a generalised Telegrapher's equation as found by Williams in the particular context of fractured media. We obtain the Telegrapher's equation without specifying the causes responsible for the random velocity field. Our model may thus be applied in porous media as well as in fractured media. We give the developments leading to the analytical solution of the three-dimensional Telegrapher's equation for constant parameters. This solution is then visualised for a source in the form of a square wave. (Author)

  14. Simulation of radionuclide retardation at Yucca Mountain using a stochastic mineralogical/geochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsell, K.H.; Campbell, K.; Eggert, K.; Travis, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary transport calculations for radionuclide movement at Yucca Mountain. Several different realizations of spatially distributed sorption coefficients are used to study the sensitivity of radionuclide migration. These sorption coefficients are assumed to be functions of the mineralogic assemblages of the underlying rock. The simulations were run with TRACRN 1 , a finite-difference porous flow and radionuclide transport code developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. Approximately 30,000 nodes are used to represent the unsaturated and saturated zones underlying the repository in three dimensions. Transport calculations for a representative radionuclide cation, 135 Cs, and anion, 99 Tc, are presented. Calculations such as these will be used to study the effectiveness of the site's geochemical barriers at a mechanistic level and to help guide the geochemical site characterization program. The preliminary calculations should be viewed as a demonstration of the modeling methodology rather than as a study of the effectiveness of the geochemical barriers. The model provides a method for examining the integration of flow scenarios with transport and retardation processes as currently understood for the site. The effects on transport of many of the processes thought to be active at Yucca Mountain may be examined using this approach. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  15. Proposed development of a radionuclide washoff model for the German Reactor Safety Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, J.C.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents a brief overview of the possible development of a model for the attenuation of radionuclide concentrations in urban environments due to rainfall/runoff relationships. The following sequence of actions is suggested: (1) preliminary review, (2) exploratory modeling, (3) detailed literature review, (4) development of mathematical model, (5) development of computer model, and (6) model review including verification and sensitivity analysis. To facilitate the initiation of the indicated efforts, an introduction to the relevant literature is provided. Further, the following topics are also briefly discussed: (1) radionuclide transport and removal in the terrestrial environment, (2) need for a description of the chemical and physical forms of the radionuclides released in a reactor accident, and (3) potential importance of surface-water contamination. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Radionuclide transport in fractured rock: quantifying releases from final disposal of high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Claudia S. da; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline rock has been considered as a potentially suitable matrix for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository because it is found in very stable geological formations and may have very low permeability. In this study the adopted physical system consists of the rock matrix containing a discrete horizontal fracture in a water saturated porous rock and a system of vertical fractures as a lineament. The transport in the fractures - horizontal and vertical, is assumed to obey a relation convection-diffusion, while the molecular diffusion is considered dominant mechanism of transport in porous rock. In this model the decay chain is considered. We use a code in Fortran 90, where the partial differential equations that describe the movement of radionuclides were discretized by finite differences methods. We use the fully implicit method for temporal discretization schemes. The simulation was performed with relevant data of nuclides in spent fuel for performance assessment in a hypothetical repository, thus quantifying the radionuclides released into the host rock. (author)

  17. Near-field geologic environment as an effective barrier against radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.; Sakuma, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Naito, M.

    1993-01-01

    A generic performance assessment of the geologic disposal system of HLW in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission. A massive engineered barrier system, consisting of vitrified waste, carbon-steel overpack and thick bentonite buffer, is introduced to ensure a long-term performance of the disposal system considering a wide range of geologic environment. A major part of the total performance of the disposal system is borne by the engineered barrier system given a geologic environment that assures and complements the performance of such engineered barrier system. The performance of the natural barrier system coupled with the strong engineered barrier system was investigated by sensitivity analyses. Two types of conceptual model were considered for the analysis to describe radionuclide transport in geologic media and the range of relevant parameters was given by taking the variation of the geologic environment in Japan into account. The results show that the degree of retardation of radionuclide transport chosen in the geologic media varies significantly depending on the parameter values chosen. However, it is indicated that there are realistic combinations of those geologic parameter values which could provide a sufficient degree of retardation within a range of only a few tens of meters from the engineered barrier system. The relative importance of the near-field geologic environment is also discussed

  18. Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

    1980-07-01

    This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

  19. Fully coupled modeling of radionuclide migration in a clayey rock disturbed by alkaline plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrni, D.; Windt, L. de; Lee, J.V.D.

    2002-03-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in clayey formations may require the use of large amounts of concrete and cement as a barrier to minimize corrosion of steel containers and radionuclide migration and for supporting drifts and disposal vaults. In this context, reactive transport modeling of the interactions between cement or concrete and the argillaceous host rock aims at estimating the evolution in time of the containment properties of the multi-barriers system. The objectives of the paper are to demonstrate that integrating radionuclides migration in the modeling of strongly coupled geochemical processes of cement-clay stone interactions is feasible and that it represents an efficient way to assess the sensitivity and modification of the classical Kd and solubility parameters with respect to the chemical evolutions. Two types of modeling are considered in the paper: i): calculation of intrinsic solubility limits and Kd values backing up on the results of modeling of cement/clay stone interactions (radionuclides are assumed to be present over the whole domain at any time whatever the scenario), ii) full mechanistic modeling which explicitly introduces radionuclides in the calculation with ad hoc assumptions on radionuclide inventory, canister failure, migration pathway, etc. The reactive transport code HYTEC, based on the geochemical code CHESS, is used to simulate both the cement-clay stone interaction processes and the radionuclide migration in 1-D and 2-D configurations. Convective/dispersive and diffuse transport can be simulated for solutes and colloids. A wide range of processes such as aqueous chemistry, redox, dissolution/precipitation, surface complexation and ion exchange can be modeled at equilibrium or with kinetic control. In addition, HYTEC is strongly coupled, i.e. the hydrology (flow and diffusion) may change when mineral precipitation or dissolution changes the local porosity. (authors)

  20. Organic matter linked radionuclide transport in Boom clay - Phenomenological understanding and abstraction to PA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, N.; Bruggeman, C.; Liu, D.J.; Salah, S.; Van Laer, L.; Wang, L.; Weetjens, E.; Govaerts, J.; Marivoet, J.; Brassinnes, S.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the frame of the Belgian research program on long term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive wastes coordinated by ONDRAF/NIRAS, plastic clays (i.e., Boom Clay and Ypresian clays) are investigated for their potential to host a deep geological disposal repository for radioactive waste because of, among others, their ability to significantly retard radionuclide releases to the biosphere. The Boom Clay is characterised by the presence of a relatively high amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM, humic substances) which show a strong interaction with a suite of radionuclides (RN) like lanthanides, actinides and transition metals. This interaction with DOM leads in general to an increased mobility of the radionuclide as the OM can act as a colloidal carrier for the radionuclide. Therefore, the quantification and the understanding of the underlying processes are needed for the demonstration of confidence in the host formation to act as a suitable barrier. However, this is not an easy task, given the multitude of processes involved: complexation/colloid formation, sorption, kinetics, filtration, -. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the research work that leads to a straightforward reactive transport model capturing fairly well the experimental observations. The model can be considered as an intermediate model providing a good basis for further safety abstraction on the one hand and the way to a more detailed phenomenological understanding on the other hand. The research is focussed on the underlying processes that govern speciation, sorption and transport. These underlying processes are investigated in a bottom-up approach, from simple systems to more complex systems. Interpretation is done using thermodynamic based models. Whereas the contribution of Bruggeman et al. focusses mainly on (batch) sorption studies (of trivalent RN), this presentation will provide more details on the

  1. Food web transport of trace metals and radionuclides from the deep sea: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.S.

    1979-06-01

    This report summarizes aspects of the potential distribution pathways of metals and radionuclides, particularly Co and Ni, through a biological trophic framework after their deposition at 4000 to 5000 meters in the North Atlantic or North Pacific. It discusses (a) the basic, deep-sea trophic structure of eutrophic and oligotrophic regions; (b) the transport pathways of biologically available energy to and from the deep sea, pathways that may act as accumulators and vectors of radionuclide distribution, and (c) distribution routes that have come into question as potential carriers of radionuclides from the deep-sea bed to man

  2. Emission, transport, deposition, and re-suspension of radionuclides from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in the atmosphere - Overview of 2-year investigations in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2013-04-01

    Following a huge earthquake and tsunami in Eastern Japan on 11 March, 2011, the accident in Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) occurred to emit a large amount of artificial radionuclides to the environment. Soon after the FDNPP accident, many Japanese researchers, as well as researchers in other countries, started monitoring radionuclides in various environmental fields and/or model calculations to understand extent and magnitude of radioactive pollution. In this presentation, we overview these activities for the atmospheric radionuclides in Japan as followings: 1. Investigations to evaluate radionuclide emissions by explosions at FNDPP in March 2011 and to estimate the respiration dose of the radiation at this stage. 2. Investigations to evaluate atmospheric transport and deposition processes of atmospheric radionuclide to determine the extent of radionuclide pollution. -- Based on results of the regular and urgent monitoring results, as well as the mapping of the distribution of radionuclide s accumulated by the deposition to the ground, restoration of their time-dependent emission rates has been tried, and processes determining atmospheric concentration and deposition to the ground have been investigated by using the model calculations. 3. Monitoring of the atmospheric concentrations of radionuclide after the initial, surge phase of FNDPP accident. 4. Investigations to evaluate re-suspension of radionuclide from the ground, including the soil and the vegetation. -- Intensive monitoring of the atmospheric concentrations and deposition amount of radionuclide after the initial, surge phase of the accident enable us to evaluate emission history from FNDPP, atmospheric transport and deposition processes, chemical and physical characteristics of atmospheric radionuclide especially of radio cesium, and re-suspension processes which has become dominant process to supply radio cesium to the atmosphere recently.

  3. Modelling freight transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.A.; Jong, G. de

    2014-01-01

    Freight Transport Modelling is a unique new reference book that provides insight into the state-of-the-art of freight modelling. Focusing on models used to support public transport policy analysis, Freight Transport Modelling systematically introduces the latest freight transport modelling

  4. Review of biokinetic and biological transport of transuranic radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, T.M.; Cross, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    Present understanding of the uptake, retention, and loss of transuranic radionuclides by marine biota is limited. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that for certain species assimilation of plutonium and americium from labeled food is an efficient process and that direct uptake from seawater is important in the bioaccumulation of all transuranic radionuclides studied to date. Organisms appear to play an important role in the vertical transport of these radioelements from the surface layers of the ocean to greater depths

  5. Transport and redistribution of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides by fluvial processes: some preliminary evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, D.E.; Bradley, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    Several measurements of 137 Cs concentrations in suspended sediment transported by the River Severn during the post-Chernobyl period and in recent channel and floodplain deposits along the river emphasise the potential significance of fluvial processes in the transport and concentration of fallout radionuclides. (author)

  6. RADAL: a dynamic model for the transfer of radionuclides through agricultural food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez Vegueria, S.F.; Frometa Suarez, I.; Jerez Vegueria, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural products by radionuclides is a mechanism which results in radiation dose commitment to the population, following fallout deposits from the atmosphere to the landscape. This paper describes the structure of the dynamic food chain model RADAL. This model simulates an acute environmental transport of fallout radionuclides through agricultural food chains to man and estimates the levels of radiation doses resulting from consumption of contaminated food. The development of RADAL was based on different existing models. For mathematical representation the transport of radionuclides was modeled through compartments representing environmental elements and/or food products. The model solves a set of linear, first-order, differential equations to estimate the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, vegetation, animal tissues and animal products as a function of time following their deposition. Dynamic physico-chemical processes of the model include the following: deposition and foliar interception, weathering, foliar absorption, soil resuspension, transfer from soil surface to the root zone, absorption by plant roots, transfer to deep soil, transfer to animal products, and human consumption of agricultural products. A parameter sensitivity analyses, performed for the main parameters of the model, showed that the foliar interception constant and resuspension factor are the most influential parameters over the radiation doses / model output. (author)

  7. Radionuclide transport paths in the nearfield - a KBS-3 concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1990-07-01

    The general scope of the study has been to identify and define major paths for radionuclide transport from KBS3 canisters, focusing on the nearfield rock. A primary purpose was to document the hydraulic properties of the 'disturbed zones' around blasted tunnels and it is concluded from compilation of theoretical data and field experiment recording that stress relief and blasting effects combine to form a previous zone that extends to about 1 m from the tunnel periphery. It has an average, isotropic hydraulic conductivity of no less than 10 -8 m/s. A second major purpose of the study was to generalize the structure of granitic rock with respect to water-bearing fractures. Forsmark, Finnsjoen, and Stripa data have been considered and found to support the idea of rather regular 'orthogonal' fracture systems with relatively large spacings. The hydraulically active part of the fractures, which can be characterized by simple statistical distributions of persistence, spacing, and aperture, is formed by channels, which can be taken as plane, straight stripes with constant width and aperture. The width can be assumed on the basis of field observations while the aperture is estimated from the bulk conductivity and the geometry of the fracture network. The major transport paths of the rock have been concretized and combined to form a general simplified model intended for calculation of radionuclide transport through water flow and through diffusion through continuous water passages. This model comprises of a circumscribing pervious zone of 'wall disturbance' around the deposition holes in addition to the fracture channels. (author)

  8. Database for radionuclide transport in the biosphere: nuclide specific and geographic data for northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiskra, J.

    1985-01-01

    The biosphere model is the final link in the chain of radionuclide transport models, used for radiation dose calculations from high-level waste repositories. This report presents the data needed for biosphere calculations and discusses them where necessary. The first part is dedicated to the nuclide specific parameters like distribution coefficients (water -soil), concentration ratios (soil - plant) and distribution factors (for milk, meat, etc.) which are reported in the literature. The second part contains the choice of regions, their division into compartments and the discussion of nutritional habits for man and animals. At the end a theoretical human population for each region is estimated based on the consumption rates and on the yield of agricultural products, assuming an autonomous nutrition. (author)

  9. The role of colloids and suspended particles in radionuclide transport in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.

    1994-02-01

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a deep engineered vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield and is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to document its case for the acceptability of the disposal concept. This report, one in a series of supporting documents for the EIS, addresses the role of particles in radionuclide transport. It summarizes our studies of natural particles in groundwater and presents the arguments used to justify the omission of particle-facilitated transport in the geosphere model that is based on the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) and used in the postclosure assessment study case. Because radiocolloids formed in the vault will not be able to migrate through the clay buffer, radiocolloid formation in the geosphere will be determined by the sorption of radionuclides onto particles in groundwater. These particles consist of typical fracture-lining minerals, such as clays, micas and quartz; precipitated particles, such as colloidal silica and Fe-Si oxyhydroxides; and organic particles. In groundwater from the WRA, the average concentrations of colloids and suspended particles are 0.34 and 1.4 mg/L respectively. Particle-facilitated transport is not included in the geosphere model because the concentrations of particles in groundwater from the WRA are too low to have a significant impact on radionuclide transport. (author). 92 refs., 11 tabs., 13 figs

  10. Models and data to predict radionuclide concentrations in river basin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, G.; Rufai, G.G.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of land may result from the detonation of nuclear weapons or nuclear accidents, such as Chernobyl. The deposition of fallout on soil and/or plants, and subsequent erosion by rainsplash and overland flow, could introduce radioactive isotopes into the water and soil resources of the environment. A model to simulate the transport and deposition of concentrated pollutants and radionuclides within the river basin is proposed. The proposed model is built on an existing Strathclyde River Basin Model, (SRBM), which has the potential to simulate runoff and erosion and the distribution of eroded soil particle sizes. An algorithm of the processes of concentration of pollutants and radionuclides can be developed based on the current understanding of the process of radionuclide attachment to soil particles. (author)

  11. Relative contributions of natural and waste-derived organics to the subsurface transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toste, A.P.; Myers, R.B.

    1985-06-01

    Our laboratory is studying the role of organic compounds in the subsurface transport of radionuclides at shallow-land burial sites of low-level nuclear waste, including a commercial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and an aqueous waste disposal site. At the Maxey Flats site, several radionuclides, notably Pu and 60 Co, appear to exist as anionic, organic complexes. Waste-derived organics, particularly chelating agents such as EDTA, HEDTA and associated degradation products (e.g., ED3A), are abundant in aqueous waste leachates and appear to account for the complexation. EDTA, and probably other waste-derived chelating agents as well, are chelated to the Pu and 60 Co in the leachates, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. In contrast, at the low-level aqueous waste disposal site, naturally-occurring organics, ranging from low molecular weight (MW) acids to high MW humic acids, account for the bulk of the groundwater's organic content. Certain radionuclides, notably 60 Co, 103 Ru and 125 Sb, are mobile as anionic complexes. These radionuclides are clearly associated with higher MW organics, presumably humic and fulvic acids with nominal MW's > 1000. It is clear, therefore, that naturally-occurring organics may play an important role in radionuclide transport, particularly at nuclear waste burial sites containing little in the way of waste-derived organics

  12. Transportation of natural radionuclides and rare earth light elements in the lagoon system of Buena, RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, Dejanira da Costa

    1999-03-01

    it was investigated the transport of the series natural radionuclides and the earth rare light elements in a coastal lagoon system, located in a monazite rich region, in the coast north region of Rio de Janeiro state. The lagoon water showed off abnormal concentrations of radium isotopes and of the earth rare light elements (ERLEs). The longitudinal gradient of the Ra, of the ERLEs and of the major ion concentration's, whose data were obtained during two and half years of the research at the place, and the statistical analysis pointed to two mainly source as responsible for the water lagoon composition - the marine and the underground waters. The underground water supplies the radionuclides and ERLEs, possibly originated by monazite lixiviation. Based on the water speciation modeling, the results of laboratory adsorption on sediment experiments and the sediment characterization, the behavior of the radio isotopes, the ERLEs, U, Th e Pb-210, along of the lagoon, are discussed. It is also discussed the role of the aquatic macrophyte Typha dominguesis Pers in the nuclide uptake and the following liberation. (author)

  13. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    while yielding greater numbers of viruses capable of transporting contaminats. Additional studies will be necessary to further establish the potential relationship(s) between viruses, cells, carbon, and metals/radionuclides to provide sufficient scientific understanding to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into agent based and reactive transport models.

  14. Mathematical model and simulations of radiation fluxes from buried radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Saat

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model and a simple Monte Carlo simulations were developed to predict radiation fluxes from buried radionuclides. The model and simulations were applied to measured (experimental) data. The results of the mathematical model showed good acceptable order of magnitude agreement. A good agreement was also obtained between the simple simulations and the experimental results. Thus, knowing the radionuclide distribution profiles in soil from a core sample, it can be applied to the model or simulations to estimate the radiation fluxes emerging from the soil surface. (author)

  15. Materials to be used for radionuclide transport experiments (milestones SPL3A1M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.

    1998-02-01

    Experiments to determine the effect of canister corrosion products on the transport of radionuclides will be undertaken using the FE(III) oxides goethite and hematite as proxies for the expected corrosion envelope that will form as a result of alteration of the corrosion allowance overpack prior to the breaching of the waste container. Samples of ESF invert concrete that have been crushed, or left intact but fractured, and that have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration will be used to determine the effect of cementitious materials on transport of radionuclides. A mixture of CaCO 3 , Si0 2 , and aggregate will be used as a proxy for completely carbonated concrete

  16. Ecological vectors of radionuclide transport at a solid radioactive waste disposal facility in southeastern Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, W.J.; Markham, O.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radioecological research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) has estimated the quantity of radionuclides transported by various ecosystem components and evaluated the impact of subsurface disposal of radioactive waste on biotic species inhabiting the area. Radiation dose rates received by small mammals ranged from 0.4 to 41790 mrad/day. Small mammal soil burrowing was an upward transport mechanism for transuranic radionuclides. Seventy-seven uCi of radioactivity occurred in SDA vegetation annually. None of these ecological vectors contributed appreciable quantities of radioactive contamination to the environment surrounding the SDA

  17. FARMLAND: model for transfer of radionuclides through terrestrial foodchains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, John

    1995-01-01

    Models to stimulate the transfer of radionuclides through terrestrial foodchains have been developed at the Board and regularly used over the last 20 years. The foodchain model is named FARMLAND (Food Activity from Radionuclide Movement on LAND) and it contains a suite of submodels, each of which simulates radionuclide transfer through a different part of the foodchain. These models can be combined in various orders so that they can be used for different situations of radiological interest. The main foods considered are: green vegetables; grain products; root vegetables; fruit; milk, meat and offal from cattle; meat and offal from sheep. A large variety of elements can be considered, although the degree of complexity with which some are modelled is greater than that for others; isotopes of caesium, strontium and iodine are treated in greatest detail. (Author)

  18. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms (open-quotes biocolloidsclose quotes) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories

  19. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  20. Transport of a Two-Member Decay Chain of Radionuclides Through a Discrete Fracture in a Porous Rock Matrix in the Presence of Colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, N.-C.; Li Shihhai

    2002-01-01

    Many physical and chemical processes dominate the transport of radionuclides in groundwater. Among these processes, the decay chain process of radionuclides was frequently disregarded in previous research. However, the daughter products may travel much farther than their parents along the fracture. Therefore, some models neglecting the effect of the decay chain may underestimate the transport radionuclide concentration in geological media. The transport of radionuclides in groundwater is also controlled by colloidal particles. The radionuclides may be enhanced or retarded by the colloids, according to the mobility of these colloidal particles. This work describes a novel model of the transport of a two-member decay chain of radionuclides through a discrete fracture in a porous rock matrix in the presence of colloids. The model addresses the following processes: (a) advective transport in the fracture, (b) mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion along the fracture, (c) molecular diffusion from the fracture to the rock matrix, (d) adsorption onto the fracture wall, (e) adsorption in the rock matrix, and (f) radioactive decay. Furthermore, colloids are assumed to be excluded from the matrix pores because of their size. A fully developed concentration profile system with nonreactive colloids is used to understand the effect of colloidal sizes by using hydrodynamic chromatography. The external forces acting on the colloid surface, such as the inertial, the van der Waals attractive force, the double layer force, and the gravitational force are accounted for. The parameters, the average velocity of the colloid, the dispersion coefficient of the colloid, and the distribution coefficient of radionuclides with colloids are modified according to the colloidal size. The transport equations for the parent radionuclides are solved analytically using the Laplace transformation and inversion method. However, for the transformed solution of the daughter products along the

  1. Sorption-capacity limited retardation of radionuclides transport in water-saturated packing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclides breakthrough times as calculated through constant retardation factors obtained in dilute solutions are non-conservative. The constant retardation approach regards the solid as having infinite sorption capacity throughout the solid. However, as the solid become locally saturated, such as in the proximity of the waste form-packing materials interface, it will exhibit no retardation properties, and transport will take place as if the radionuclides were locally non-reactive. The magnitude of the effect of finite sorption capacity of the packing materials on radionuclide transport is discussed with reference to high-level waste package performance. An example based on literature sorption data indicated that the breakthrough time may be overpredicted by orders of magnitude using a constant retardation factor as compared to using the entire sorption isotherm to obtain a concentration-dependent retardation factor. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Sorption-capacity limited retardation of radionuclides transport in water-saturated packing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclides breakthrough times as calculated through constant retardation factors obtained in dilute solutions are non-conservative. The constant retardation approach regards the solid as having infinite sorption capacity throughout the solid. However, as the solid becomes locally saturated, such as in the proximity of the waste form-packing materials interface, it will exhibit no retardation properties, and transport will take place as if the radionuclides were locally non-reactive. The magnitude of the effect of finite sorption capacity of the packing materials on radionuclide transport is discussed with reference to high-level waste package performance. An example based on literature sorption data indicates that the breakthrough time may be overpredicted by orders of magnitude using a constant retardation factor as compared to using the entire sorption isotherm to obtain a concentration-dependent retardation factor. 8 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  3. Recent developments in the integrated approach toward characterization of radionuclide transport, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.M.; Canepa, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The radionuclide migration program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) includes studies of radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusion, and transport. The study plans incorporate all possible parameters of investigation; decision-making strategies for prioritizing the parameters and evaluating their significance were developed in conjunction with the study plans. After definition of explicit research goals for each study, YMP evaluated the applicability of existing data and formulated experimental approaches for obtaining additional data. This resulted in development of individual testing strategies that were integrated into an overall strategy for the radionuclide migration program designed to provide input to credible performance assessments. The strategies allow for decision points at various steps of data collection and testing. They provide a streamlined process toward a defensible level of understanding of chemical retardation and transport processes that will be used to predict the mountain's ability to isolate waste. (author)

  4. Models of sorption and migration of radionuclides in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami

    1987-01-01

    Full understanding of the transportation of nuclides by groundwater is essential in designing an underground radioactive waste disposal site. What is the most important is to clarify in detail the process of sorption of nuclides by rock and soil. This report outlines various theories and experimental data that are currently available. In addition, studies made in various countries are reviewed and some problems are pointed out. First, a review is made of studies that deal with adsorption and behaviors of contaminants in natural barriers (rock, soil). Next, migration models that have been developed in studying migration processes in the field of chemical engineering or behaviors of agricultural chemicals in the field of soil physics are examined to see if they can be applied to investigations of the migration of radioactive contaminants in a porous medium. Finally, a review is made of basic underground migration models that are used in various countries in studying deep underground disposal of long-life radionuclides. Some laboratory experiments on TRU nuclides in rock are also outlined. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Modelling and prediction of radionuclide migration from shallow, subgrade nuclear waste facilities in arid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Ward, A.; Geldenhuis, S.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, prodigious efforts and significant advances have been made in methods of prediction of the migration rate of dissolved species in aqueous systems. Despite such work, there remain formidable obstacles in prediction of solute transport in the unsaturated zone over the long time periods necessarily related to the radionuclide bearing wastes. The objective of this paper is to consider the methods, issues and problems with the use of predictive solute transport models for radionuclide migration from nuclear waste disposal in arid environments, if and when engineering containment of the waste fails. Having considered the ability for long term solute prediction for a number of geological environments, the advantages of a disposal environment in which the solute transport process is diffusion controlled will be described

  6. IN-SITU RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT NEAR THE NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO: CONSTRAINTS FROM SHORT-LIVED DECAY-SERIES RADIONUCLIDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Ku, T.L.; Todd, V.; Murrell, M.; Pineda, J. Alfredo Rodriguez; Dinsmoor, J.; Mitchell, A.

    2005-01-01

    For nuclear waste management, an important mechanism by which radioactive waste components are isolated from returning to the human environment, the biosphere, is by the geological barrier in which the effectiveness of the barrier is characterized by in-situ retardation factor, i.e., the transport rate of a radionuclide relative to that of groundwater. As part of natural analog studies of the Yucca Mountain Project of the U. S. Department of Energy, we propose such characterization by using naturally-occurring decay-series radioisotopes as an analog. We collected large-volume (>1000 liters) groundwater samples from three wells (PB, Pozos, and PB4, respectively) near the Nopal I Uranium Ore site at Pena Blanca, Mexico, by using an in-situ Mn-cartridge filtration technique for analysis of short-lived decay-series radionuclides. Results show that the activities of short-lived radioisotopes ( 228 Ra, 224 Ra and 223 Ra) and activity ratios of 224 Ra/ 228 Ra and 224 Ra/ 223 Ra are higher at PB and Pozos than at PB4. In contrast, the 210 Po activity is much lower at PB and Pozos than at PB4. The high Ra activities and activities ratios at PB and Pozos are attributable to the high alpha-recoil input from the aquifer rocks, while the high 210 Po activity at PB4 is due to the enhanced colloidal transport. Based on a uranium-series transport model, we estimate that the in-situ retardation factor of Ra is (0.43 ± 0.02) x 10 3 at PB, (1.68 ± 0.08) x 10 3 at Pozos, and (1.19 ± 0.08) x 10 3 at PB4 and that the mean fracture width in the aquifer rocks is about 0.23 (micro)m at PB, 0.37 (micro)m at Posos, and 4.0 (micro)m at PB4, respectively. The large fracture width at PB4 as derived from the model provides an additional evidence to the inference from the Po measurements that particle-reactive radionuclides are transported mainly as colloidal forms through the large fractures in rocks. Our model also suggests that in addition to alpha recoil, decay of 226 Ra from the adsorbed

  7. IN-SITU RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT NEAR THE NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO: CONSTRAINTS FROM SHORT-LIVED DECAY-SERIES RADIONUCLIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Luo; T.L. Ku; V. Todd; M. Murrell; J. Alfredo Rodriguez Pineda; J. Dinsmoor; A. Mitchell

    2005-07-11

    For nuclear waste management, an important mechanism by which radioactive waste components are isolated from returning to the human environment, the biosphere, is by the geological barrier in which the effectiveness of the barrier is characterized by in-situ retardation factor, i.e., the transport rate of a radionuclide relative to that of groundwater. As part of natural analog studies of the Yucca Mountain Project of the U. S. Department of Energy, we propose such characterization by using naturally-occurring decay-series radioisotopes as an analog. We collected large-volume (>1000 liters) groundwater samples from three wells (PB, Pozos, and PB4, respectively) near the Nopal I Uranium Ore site at Pena Blanca, Mexico, by using an in-situ Mn-cartridge filtration technique for analysis of short-lived decay-series radionuclides. Results show that the activities of short-lived radioisotopes ({sup 228}Ra, {sup 224}Ra and {sup 223}Ra) and activity ratios of {sup 224}Ra/{sup 228}Ra and {sup 224}Ra/{sup 223}Ra are higher at PB and Pozos than at PB4. In contrast, the {sup 210}Po activity is much lower at PB and Pozos than at PB4. The high Ra activities and activities ratios at PB and Pozos are attributable to the high alpha-recoil input from the aquifer rocks, while the high {sup 210}Po activity at PB4 is due to the enhanced colloidal transport. Based on a uranium-series transport model, we estimate that the in-situ retardation factor of Ra is (0.43 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup 3} at PB, (1.68 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at Pozos, and (1.19 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at PB4 and that the mean fracture width in the aquifer rocks is about 0.23 {micro}m at PB, 0.37 {micro}m at Posos, and 4.0 {micro}m at PB4, respectively. The large fracture width at PB4 as derived from the model provides an additional evidence to the inference from the Po measurements that particle-reactive radionuclides are transported mainly as colloidal forms through the large fractures in rocks. Our model also suggests that

  8. PATHWAY: a dynamic foodchain model to predict radionuclide ingestion after fallout deposition. Final report, September 17, 1979-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and basis for parameter values of a computerized foodchain transport model for radionuclides. The model, called ''PATHWAY,'' estimates the time-integrated intake by humans of twenty radionuclides after a single deposition of radioactive material from the atmosphere to the landscape. The model solves a set of differential equations to estimate the inventories and concentrations of radionuclides in three soil layers and numerous types of vegetation, animal tissues and animal products as a function of time following a deposition event. Dynamic processes considered in the model include foliar interception, weathering and absorption; plant growth, uptake, harvest and senescence; soil resuspension, percolation, leaching and tillage; radioactive decay; livestock ingestion, absorption, excretion; and etc. An age- and sex-specific human diet is embodied in the model to permit calculation of time-dependent radionuclide ingestion rates, which are then numerically integrated. 3 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The transport and fate of Strontium 90, Cesium 137 and Plutonium 239, 240 in the Hudson River Estuary is discussed. Rates of radionuclide deposition and accumulation over time and space are calculated for the Hudson River watershed, estuary, and continental shelf offshore. 37 references, 7 figures, 15 tables

  10. Mathematical modeling of radionuclide release through a borehole in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo

    1996-02-01

    The effects of inadvertent human intrusion as a form of direct drilling into a radioactive waste repository are discussed in this thesis. It has been mentioned that the inadvertent direct drilling into the repository could provide a release pathway for radionuclides even with its low occurrence probability. The following analyses are carried out regarding the problem. The maximum concentration in a water-filled borehole penetrating a repository is computed with a simple geometry. The modeling is based upon the assumption of the diffusive mass transfer in the waste forms and the complete mixing in the borehole. It is shown that the maximum concentrations of six radionuclides in the borehole could exceed the Maximum Permissible Concentration. Also, the diffusive mass transport in a water-filled borehole is investigated with a solubility-limited boundary condition. An analytic solution is derived for this case. Results show that the diffusive mass transport is fast enough to justify the assumption of the complete mixing compared with the considered time span. The axial diffusive mass transport along a water-filled borehole is modeled to compute the release rate taking account of the rock matrix diffusion. The results show that the release of short-lived radionuclides are negligible due to the low concentration gradient in early time and the rock matrix diffusion. The release rates of four long-lived radionuclides are computed. It is also shown that the model developed could be applied to a borehole at a non-cylindrically shaped repository and the off-center drilling of a cylindrical repository. The release rates of long-lived nuclides through a porous material-filled borehole are computed. The results show that the release of all the long-lived nuclides is negligible up to half million years in the case that the borehole is filled with the porous material. The radiological effects of the nuclides released through the borehole penetrating the repository are computed

  11. Radionuclide transfer from soil to agricultural plants: measurements and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbarese, C; Terrasi, F.; D'Onofrio, A.D.; Stellato, L.; Lubritto, C.; Ermice, A.; Cotrufo, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the internal doses to humans from ingestion of radionuclides present in agricultural products it is necessary to know the main processes which determine the transport of radionuclides in the environment (Russel, 1966; Peterson, 1983; IAEA, 1995). The available data, generally, do not reflect natural conditions, and the mechanisms of translocation and mobility of radionuclides within the soil-plant system are still not fully understood (Coughtrey and Thorne, 1983; Fresquez et a., 1998; Krouglov et al., 1997; Frissel, 1992; Roca and Vallejo, 1995; Desmet et al., 1990). The knowledge of the contributions of direct contamination of plant fruits and of the process of root to fruit transfer can improve the understanding of exposure through ingestion and of the mechanisms determining sorption and translocation. Several studies on the relations among specific activities of various radionuclides in different environmental compartments have been performed in the last decades (Coughtrey and Thorne, 1983; Fresquez et al., 1998; Krouglov et al., 1997; Howard et al., 1995; Strand et al., 1994; Konshin, 1992; Frissel, 1992; Alexakhin and Korneev, 1992; Desmet et al., 1990)

  12. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments

  13. An Updated Site Scale Saturated Zone Ground Water Transport Model For Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Kelkar; H. Viswanathan; A. Eddebbarrh; M. Ding; P. Reimus; B. Robinson; B. Arnold; A. Meijer

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site scale saturated zone transport model has been revised to incorporate the updated flow model based on a hydrogeologic framework model using the latest lithology data, increased grid resolution that better resolves the geology within the model domain, updated Kd distributions for radionuclides of interest, and updated retardation factor distributions for colloid filtration. The resulting numerical transport model is used for performance assessment predictions of radionuclide transport and to guide future data collection and modeling activities. The transport model results are validated by comparing the model transport pathways with those derived from geochemical data, and by comparing the transit times from the repository footprint to the compliance boundary at the accessible environment with those derived from 14 C-based age estimates. The transport model includes the processes of advection, dispersion, fracture flow, matrix diffusion, sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport. The transport of sorbing radionuclides in the aqueous phase is modeled as a linear, equilibrium process using the Kd model. The colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides is modeled using two approaches: the colloids with irreversibly embedded radionuclides undergo reversible filtration only, while the migration of radionuclides that reversibly sorb to colloids is modeled with modified values for sorption coefficient and matrix diffusion coefficients. Model breakthrough curves for various radionuclides at the compliance boundary are presented along with their sensitivity to various parameters

  14. Radionuclide transfer in marine coastal ecosystems, a modelling study using metabolic processes and site data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, L; Bradshaw, C; Kumblad, L; Kautsky, U

    2014-07-01

    This study implements new site-specific data and improved process-based transport model for 26 elements (Ac, Ag, Am, Ca, Cl, Cm, Cs, Ho, I, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pd, Po, Pu, Ra, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, U, Zr), and validates model predictions with site measurements and literature data. The model was applied in the safety assessment of a planned nuclear waste repository in Forsmark, Öregrundsgrepen (Baltic Sea). Radionuclide transport models are central in radiological risk assessments to predict radionuclide concentrations in biota and doses to humans. Usually concentration ratios (CRs), the ratio of the measured radionuclide concentration in an organism to the concentration in water, drive such models. However, CRs vary with space and time and CR estimates for many organisms are lacking. In the model used in this study, radionuclides were assumed to follow the circulation of organic matter in the ecosystem and regulated by radionuclide-specific mechanisms and metabolic rates of the organisms. Most input parameters were represented by log-normally distributed probability density functions (PDFs) to account for parameter uncertainty. Generally, modelled CRs for grazers, benthos, zooplankton and fish for the 26 elements were in good agreement with site-specific measurements. The uncertainty was reduced when the model was parameterized with site data, and modelled CRs were most similar to measured values for particle reactive elements and for primary consumers. This study clearly demonstrated that it is necessary to validate models with more than just a few elements (e.g. Cs, Sr) in order to make them robust. The use of PDFs as input parameters, rather than averages or best estimates, enabled the estimation of the probable range of modelled CR values for the organism groups, an improvement over models that only estimate means. Using a mechanistic model that is constrained by ecological processes enables (i) the evaluation of the relative importance of food and water

  15. Radionuclide transfer in marine coastal ecosystems, a modelling study using metabolic processes and site data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalenko, L.; Bradshaw, C.; Kumblad, L.; Kautsky, U.

    2014-01-01

    This study implements new site-specific data and improved process-based transport model for 26 elements (Ac, Ag, Am, Ca, Cl, Cm, Cs, Ho, I, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pd, Po, Pu, Ra, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, U, Zr), and validates model predictions with site measurements and literature data. The model was applied in the safety assessment of a planned nuclear waste repository in Forsmark, Öregrundsgrepen (Baltic Sea). Radionuclide transport models are central in radiological risk assessments to predict radionuclide concentrations in biota and doses to humans. Usually concentration ratios (CRs), the ratio of the measured radionuclide concentration in an organism to the concentration in water, drive such models. However, CRs vary with space and time and CR estimates for many organisms are lacking. In the model used in this study, radionuclides were assumed to follow the circulation of organic matter in the ecosystem and regulated by radionuclide-specific mechanisms and metabolic rates of the organisms. Most input parameters were represented by log-normally distributed probability density functions (PDFs) to account for parameter uncertainty. Generally, modelled CRs for grazers, benthos, zooplankton and fish for the 26 elements were in good agreement with site-specific measurements. The uncertainty was reduced when the model was parameterized with site data, and modelled CRs were most similar to measured values for particle reactive elements and for primary consumers. This study clearly demonstrated that it is necessary to validate models with more than just a few elements (e.g. Cs, Sr) in order to make them robust. The use of PDFs as input parameters, rather than averages or best estimates, enabled the estimation of the probable range of modelled CR values for the organism groups, an improvement over models that only estimate means. Using a mechanistic model that is constrained by ecological processes enables (i) the evaluation of the relative importance of food and water

  16. Importance of biota in radionuclide transport at the SL-1 radioactive waste disposal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, W.J.; Grant, J.C.; Markham, O.D.

    1983-01-01

    During summer 1981 and 1982, radioecological research was conducted at the Stationary Low Power Reactor-1 radioactive waste disposal area to: (1) identify vegetation, wildlife, and invertebrate species occurring at or using the area; (2) determine radionuclide concentrations in these various ecosystem components; and (3) to evaluate their respective roles in radionuclide uptake and transport through the surrounding environment. Cesium-137 concentrations detected in surface soils, small mammal excavated soils and small mammal tissues collected at the waste disposal site were significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) greater than control area samples. Strontium-90 and 235 U analyses of SL-1 and control area samples and projections of total mass of ecosystem components in SL-1 area will be completed in summer of 1983 at which time estimates will be made on the total quantity of fission and activation radionuclides occurring in ecological media at the SL-1 waste disposal area

  17. The role of organic complexants and microparticulates in the facilitated transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Abel, K.H.; Thomas, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    This progress report describes the results of ongoing radiological and geochemical investigations of the mechanisms of radionuclide transport in groundwater at two low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites within the waste management area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), Ontario, Canada. These sites, the Chemical Pit liquid disposal facility and the Waste Management Area C solid LLW disposal site, have provided valuable 30- to 40-year-old field locations for characterizing the migration of radionuclides and evaluating a number of recent site performance objectives for LLW disposal facilities. This information will aid the NRC and other federal, state, and local regulators, as well as LLW disposal site developers and waste generators, in maximizing the effectiveness of existing or projected LLW disposal facilities for isolating radionuclides from the general public and thereby improving the health and safety aspects of LLW disposal

  18. Approaches to modelling radionuclide transfer in agricultural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological dose assessment requires information describing the concentration and distribution of radionuclides in the environment. This information can be obtained from monitoring but is also evaluated with the aid of mathematical models. In such models the pathways of radionuclides from the release point to man are described in terms of transfer between compartments. The main pathways to be considered include: deposition to vegetation and soils; transfer from soil-to-plant; uptake and turnover in domestic animals; and, intake by man. The development of mathematical models for simulating transfer via these pathways depends on: an understanding of the system under study, in particular for those processes that are most important in the overall transfer to man; the availability of data to determine the structure and parameters for the model; the computing systems available; the knowledge of the user of the model; and, the application of the model. (author)

  19. Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bioimmobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostka, Joel E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Prakash, Om [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Green, Stefan J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Akob, Denise [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chin, Kuk-Jeong [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sheth, Mili [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Keller, Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Venkateswaran, Amudhan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elkins, James G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stucki, Joseph W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Our objectives were to: 1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), 2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and 3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations. Field sampling was conducted at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ORFRC subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. In short, we effectively addressed all 3 stated objectives of the project. In particular, we isolated and characterized a large number of novel anaerobes with a high bioremediation potential that can be used as model organisms, and we are now able to quantify the function of subsurface sedimentary microbial communities in situ using state-of-the-art gene expression methods (molecular proxies).

  20. Fate and transport of radionuclides in soil-water environment. Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Aleksei

    2017-04-01

    is up to one order of magnitude higher than in Chernobyl. Long-term dynamics of radionuclide concentrations in rivers is approached from the standpoint of basic mechanisms of radionuclide sorption-desorption, fixation, vertical migration in catchment soils. Corresponding semi-empirical models are presented and discussed. For the Chernobyl case, radiostrontium (r-Sr) was shown to be more mobile and moving faster in dissolved state with surface runoff and river water in comparison with r-Cs. Similar pattern was observed for Mayak area in South Ural (Russia), where r-Sr was traced up to 1500 km away from the release point migrating through Techa-Iset'-Tobol-Irtysh-Ob' river system. On the other hand, r-Cs bound to clay particles settles down in Techa river reservoirs and is transported with river water only insignificantly. For the first 3 years after the accident vertical migration of r-Cs in soils of Fukushima catchments was found to be faster than in Chernobyl due to higher air temperature, higher precipitation and higher biological activity in top soil. However, with time this process slows down because of higher r-Cs retardation in Fukushima soils. In Fukushima case, extreme floods during typhoons lead to substantial reduction in dose rate on floodplain areas due to sedimentation of relatively clean material and burial of contaminated top soil layer. In general, due to higher precipitation, higher temperatures and higher biological activities in soils, self-purification of the environment and natural attenuation in Fukushima is essentially faster than in Chernobyl area.

  1. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Summary report, field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.H.; Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-11-01

    A three-phase field sampling program was conducted on the Buttermilk-Cattaraugus Creek system to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Phase 1 of the sampling program was conducted during November and December 1977; Phase 2 during September 1978; and Phase 3 during April 1979. Bed sediment, suspended sediment, and water samples were collected over a 45-mile reach of the creek system. Bed sediment samples were also collected at the mouth of Cattaraugus Creek in Lake Erie. A fourth sampling trip was conducted during May 1980 to obtain supplementary channel geometry data and flood plain sediment samples. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, CS-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239,240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks

  2. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 3. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-08-01

    A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during April 1979 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Bed sediment, suspended sediment and water samples were collected during unsteady flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, Cs-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. This field sampling effort was the last of a three phase program to collect hydrologic and radiologic data at different flow conditions

  3. Transport and accumulation of radionuclides and stable elements in a Missouri River reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callender, E.; Robbins, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Several long sediment cores from the Cheyenne River Embayment of Lake Oahe, a 250-km-long Missouri River reservoir in South Dakota, have been analyzed for radionuclides and stable elements. The combination of fine-scale sampling and rapid sedimentation produces radionuclide distributions that can be used to estimate the detailed chronology of particle transport processes in the Oahe reservoir system. A self-consistent and quantitative treatment of the Cesium 137 data suggests processes to which characteristic times may be associated. Times that characterize system-wide processes include (1) an integration time of several years reflecting retention of the sediment-bound tracer in regions within or external to the reservoir, (2) a relaxation time of approximately 15 years reflecting a decreasing rate of sediment accumulation ascribed to shoreline stabilization, (3) a time of a few months characterizing the breadth of riverine signatures in cores due to integration effects in the Cheyenne River system and deltaic deposits, and (4) times of a few years associated with propagation of riverine load signatures along the embayment. The distribution of total sedimentary arsenic confirms the validity of the variable sedimentation model. In 1977, a tailings retention facility was built at the Homestake Mine site, and the unrestricted input of As ceased. As a result of this remedial action, the concentration of sedimentary As decreased dramatically. Because there is minimal diagenesis of chemical constituents in the rapidly accumulating sediments, stable element signatures, in addition to radiotracers, may be used to reconstruct hydrologic events in drainage basins that contribute sediment to lakes and reservoirs

  4. Transport and accumulation of radionuclides and stable elements in a Missouri River Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callendar, Edward; Robbins, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Several long sediment cores from the Cheyenne River Embayment of Lake Oahe, a 250-km-long Missouri River reservoir in South Dakota, have been analyzed for radionuclides and stable elements. The combination of fine-scale sampling and rapid sedimentation produces radionuclide distributions that can be used to estimate the detailed chronology of particle transport processes in the Oahe reservoir system. A self-consistent and quantitative treatment of the 137Cs data suggests processes to which characteristic times may be associated. Times that characterize system-wide processes include (1) an integration time of several years reflecting retention of the sediment-bound tracer in regions within or external to the reservoir, (2) a relaxation time of approximately 15 years reflecting a decreasing rate of sediment accumulation ascribed to shoreline stabilization, (3) a time of a few months characterizing the breadth of riverine signatures in cores due to integration effects in the Cheyenne River system and deltaic deposits, and (4) times of a few years associated with propagation of riverine load signatures along the embayment. The distribution of total sedimentary arsenic confirms the validity of the variable sedimentation model. In 1977, a tailings retention facility was built at the Homestake Mine site, and the unrestricted input of As ceased. As a result of this remedial action, the concentration of sedimentary As decreased dramatically. In the upper section of the core, above the depth represented by the year 1976, the concentration of As decreases tenfold. In this same core the distribution of lithologically discriminating chemical elements, calcium and vanadium, relate to major flow events in the Cheyenne River basin. Because there is minimal diagenesis of chemical constituents in these rapidly accumulating sediments, stable element signatures, in addition to radiotracers, may be used to reconstruct hydrologic events in drainage basins that contribute sediment to

  5. Transport of Gas Phase Radionuclides in a Fractured, Low-Permeability Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. A.; Chapman, J.

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the Department of Energy, DOE) oversaw a joint program between industry and government in the 1960s and 1970s to develop technology to enhance production from low-permeability gas reservoirs using nuclear stimulation rather than conventional means (e.g., hydraulic and/or acid fracturing). Project Rio Blanco, located in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, was the third experiment under the program. Three 30-kiloton nuclear explosives were placed in a 2134 m deep well at 1780, 1899, and 2039 m below the land surface and detonated in May 1973. Although the reservoir was extensively fractured, complications such as radionuclide contamination of the gas prevented production and subsequent development of the technology. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to identify the main transport processes that have occurred and are currently occurring in relation to the detonations, and to estimate the extent of contamination in the reservoir. Minor modifications were made to TOUGH2, the multiphase, multicomponent reservoir simulator developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The simulator allows the explicit incorporation of fractures, as well as heat transport, phase change, and first order radionuclide decay. For a fractured two-phase (liquid and gas) reservoir, the largest velocities are of gases through the fractures. In the gas phase, tritium and one isotope of krypton are the principle radionuclides of concern. However, in addition to existing as a fast pathway, fractures also permit matrix diffusion as a retardation mechanism. Another retardation mechanism is radionuclide decay. Simulations show that incorporation of fractures can significantly alter transport rates, and that radionuclides in the gas phase can preferentially migrate upward due to the downward gravity drainage of liquid water in the pores. This project was funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office

  6. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  7. Quantitative analysis of soil chromatography. I. Water and radionuclide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, M.; Francis, C.W.; Duguid, J.O.

    1977-12-01

    Soil chromatography has been used successfully to evaluate relative mobilities of pesticides and nuclides in soils. Its major advantage over the commonly used suspension technique is that it more accurately simulates field conditions. Under such conditions the number of potential exchange sites is limited both by the structure of the soil matrix and by the manner in which the carrier fluid moves through this structure. The major limitation of the chromatographic method, however, has been its qualitative nature. This document represents an effort to counter this objection. A theoretical basis is specified for the transport both of the carrier eluting fluid and of the dissolved constituent. A computer program based on this theory is developed which optimizes the fit of theoretical data to experimental data by automatically adjusting the transport parameters, one of which is the distribution coefficient k/sub d/. This analysis procedure thus constitutes an integral part of the soil chromatographic method, by means of which mobilities of nuclides and other dissolved constituents in soils may be quantified.

  8. Quantitative analysis of soil chromatography. I. Water and radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, M.; Francis, C.W.; Duguid, J.O.

    1977-12-01

    Soil chromatography has been used successfully to evaluate relative mobilities of pesticides and nuclides in soils. Its major advantage over the commonly used suspension technique is that it more accurately simulates field conditions. Under such conditions the number of potential exchange sites is limited both by the structure of the soil matrix and by the manner in which the carrier fluid moves through this structure. The major limitation of the chromatographic method, however, has been its qualitative nature. This document represents an effort to counter this objection. A theoretical basis is specified for the transport both of the carrier eluting fluid and of the dissolved constituent. A computer program based on this theory is developed which optimizes the fit of theoretical data to experimental data by automatically adjusting the transport parameters, one of which is the distribution coefficient k/sub d/. This analysis procedure thus constitutes an integral part of the soil chromatographic method, by means of which mobilities of nuclides and other dissolved constituents in soils may be quantified

  9. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone

  10. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: Characterization of Radionuclide Transport and Retention in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, Acacia J.; Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    A vital component of the U.S. reactor licensing process is an integrated safety analysis in which a source term representing the release of radionuclides during normal operation and accident sequences is analyzed. Historically, source term analyses have utilized bounding, deterministic assumptions regarding radionuclide release. However, advancements in technical capabilities and the knowledge state have enabled the development of more realistic and best-estimate retention and release models such that a mechanistic source term assessment can be expected to be a required component of future licensing of advanced reactors. Recently, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan effort for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory has investigated the current state of knowledge of potential source terms in an SFR via an extensive review of previous domestic experiments, accidents, and operation. As part of this work, the significant sources and transport processes of radionuclides in an SFR have been identified and characterized. This effort examines all stages of release and source term evolution, beginning with release from the fuel pin and ending with retention in containment. Radionuclide sources considered in this effort include releases originating both in-vessel (e.g. in-core fuel, primary sodium, cover gas cleanup system, etc.) and ex-vessel (e.g. spent fuel storage, handling, and movement). Releases resulting from a primary sodium fire are also considered as a potential source. For each release group, dominant transport phenomena are identified and qualitatively discussed. The key product of this effort was the development of concise, inclusive diagrams that illustrate the release and retention mechanisms at a high level, where unique schematics have been developed for in-vessel, ex-vessel and sodium fire releases. This review effort has also found that despite the substantial range of phenomena affecting radionuclide release, the

  11. Modelling of radionuclide migration in forest ecosystems. A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.; Moberg, L.; Hubbard, L.

    1998-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident has clearly shown the long-term effects of a radioactive contamination of forest ecosystems. This report is based on a literature review of models which describe the migration of radionuclides, radioactive caesium in particular, in forest ecosystems. The report describes the particularities of the forest ecosystem, the time dynamics of the contamination, the transfer processes and factors influencing caesium migration. This provides a basis for a discussion of different approaches for modelling caesium migration in the forest. It is concluded that the studied dynamic models include the most relevant transfer processes both for the acute and the long-term phase after a radioactive deposition. However, most models are site specific and do not consider some of the factors responsible for the differences in radionuclide behaviour and distribution in different types of forests. Although model improvements are constrained by the availability of experimental data and by the lack of knowledge of the migration mechanisms some possible improvements are discussed. This report is part of the LANDSCAPE project. -An integrated approach to radionuclide flow in the semi-natural ecosystems underlying exposure pathways to man. 42 refs, 3 tabs, 9 figs.

  12. Modelling of radionuclide migration in forest ecosystems. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, R.; Moberg, L.; Hubbard, L.

    1998-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident has clearly shown the long-term effects of a radioactive contamination of forest ecosystems. This report is based on a literature review of models which describe the migration of radionuclides, radioactive caesium in particular, in forest ecosystems. The report describes the particularities of the forest ecosystem, the time dynamics of the contamination, the transfer processes and factors influencing caesium migration. This provides a basis for a discussion of different approaches for modelling caesium migration in the forest. It is concluded that the studied dynamic models include the most relevant transfer processes both for the acute and the long-term phase after a radioactive deposition. However, most models are site specific and do not consider some of the factors responsible for the differences in radionuclide behaviour and distribution in different types of forests. Although model improvements are constrained by the availability of experimental data and by the lack of knowledge of the migration mechanisms some possible improvements are discussed. This report is part of the LANDSCAPE project. -An integrated approach to radionuclide flow in the semi-natural ecosystems underlying exposure pathways to man

  13. Radionuclides deposition and fine sediment transport in a forested watershed, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S.; Gomi, T.; Kato, H.; Tesfaye, T.; Onda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated radionuclides deposition and fine sediment transport in a 13 ha headwater watershed, Tochigi prefecture, located in 98.94 km north of Tokyo. The study site was within Karasawa experimental forest, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. We conducted fingerprinting approach, based on the activities of fallout radionuclides, including caesium-134 (Cs-134) caesium-137 (Cs-137) and excess lead-210 (Pb-210ex). For indentifying specific sources of fine sediment, we sampled tree, soil on forested floor, soil on logging road surface, stream bed and stream banks. We investigated the radionuclides (i.e., as Cs-134, Cs-137 and Pb-210ex) deposition on tree after accident of nuclear power plants on March 11, 2011. We sampled fruits, leaves, branches, stems, barks on Japanese cedar (Sugi) and Japanese cypress (Hinoki). To analyze the samples, gammaray spectrometry was performed at a laboratory at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba City, Japan) using n-type coaxial low-energy HPGe gamma detectors (EGC-200-R and EGC25-195-R of EURYSIS Co., Lingolsheim, France) coupled with a multichannel analyzer. We also collected soil samples under the forest canopy in various soil depths from 2, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm along transect of hillslopes. Samples at forest road were collected road segments crossing on the middle section of monitoring watersheds. Fine sediment transport in the streams were collected at the outlet of 13 ha watersheds using integrated suspended sediment samplers. This study indicates the some portion of radio nuclide potentially remained on the tree surface. Part of the deposited radionuclides attached to soil particles and transported to the streams. Most of the fine sediment can be transported on road surface and/or near stream side (riparian zones).

  14. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  15. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides emitted due to wildfires near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Zibtsev, Sergey; Myroniuk, Viktor; Zhurba, Marina; Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Paugam, Ronan; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Kireev, Sergey I.

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, two major fires in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) have caused concerns about the secondary radioactive contamination that might have spread over Europe. The total active burned area was estimated to be about 15,000 hectares, of which 9000 hectares burned in April and 6000 hectares in August. The present paper aims to assess, for the first time, the transport and impact of these fires over Europe. For this reason, direct observations of the prevailing deposition levels of 137Cs and 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am in the CEZ were processed together with burned area estimates. Based on literature reports, we made the conservative assumption that 20% of the deposited labile radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr, and 10% of the more refractory 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am, were resuspended by the fires. We estimate that about 10.9 TBq of 137Cs, 1.5 TBq of 90Sr, 7.8 GBq of 238Pu, 6.3 GBq of 239Pu, 9.4 GBq of 240Pu and 29.7 GBq of 241Am were released from both fire events. These releases could be classified as of "Level 3" on the relative INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) scale, which corresponds to a serious incident, in which non-lethal deterministic effects are expected from radiation. To simulate the dispersion of the resuspended radionuclides in the atmosphere and their deposition onto the terrestrial environment, we used a Lagrangian dispersion model. Spring fires redistributed radionuclides over the northern and eastern parts of Europe, while the summer fires also affected Central and Southern Europe. The more labile elements escaped more easily from the CEZ and then reached and deposited in areas far from the source, whereas the larger refractory particles were removed more efficiently from the atmosphere and thus did mainly affect the CEZ and its vicinity. For the spring 2015 fires, we estimate that about 80% of 137Cs and 90Sr and about 69% of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am were deposited over areas outside the CEZ. 93% of the labile and 97% of

  16. Environmental radionuclide concentrations: statistical model to determine uniformity of distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawley, C.N.; Fenyves, E.J.; Spitzberg, D.B.; Wiorkowski, J.; Chehroudi, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    In the evaluation of data from environmental sampling and measurement, a basic question is whether the radionuclide (or pollutant) is distributed uniformly. Since physical measurements have associated errors, it is inappropriate to consider the measurements alone in this determination. Hence, a statistical model has been developed. It consists of a weighted analysis of variance with subsequent t-tests between weighted and independent means. A computer program to perform the calculations is included

  17. A model of accumulation of radionuclides in biosphere originating from groundwater contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil Sciences; Jansson, Per-Erik; Karlberg, Louise [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. Land and Water Resources

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study is to introduce a module in CoupModel describing the transport and accumulation in the biosphere of a radionuclide originating from a ground water contamination. Two model approaches describing the plant uptake of a radionuclide were included, namely passive and active uptake. Passive uptake means in this study that the root uptake rate of a radionuclide is governed by water uptake. Normal mechanism for the passive water uptake is the convective flux of water from the soil to the plant. An example of element taken up passively is Ca. Active plant uptake is in this model defined as the root uptake rate of a radionuclide that is governed by carbon assimilation i.e. photosynthesis and plant growth. The actively taken up element can for example be an element essential to plant, but not available in high enough concentration by passive uptake alone, like the major nutrients N and P or an element that very well resembles a plant nutrient, like Cs resembles K. Active uptake of trace element may occur alone or in addition to passive uptake. Normal mechanism for the active uptake is molecular diffusion from the soil solution to the roots or via any other organism living in symbiosis with the roots like the mycorrhiza. Also a model approach describing adsorption was introduced. CoupModel dynamically couples and simulates the flows of water, heat, carbon and nitrogen in the soil/plant/atmosphere system. Any number of plants may be defined and are divided into roots, leaves, stem and grain. The soil is considered in one vertical profile that may be represented into a maximum of 100 layers. The model is the windows-successor and integrated version of the DOS-models SOIL and SOILN, which have been widely used on different ecosystems and climate regions during 25 years time period. To this soil/plant/atmosphere model were introduced a module describing accumulation of a radionuclide in the biosphere originating from groundwater contamination. The

  18. A model of accumulation of radionuclides in biosphere originating from groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke; Jansson, Per-Erik; Karlberg, Louise

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to introduce a module in CoupModel describing the transport and accumulation in the biosphere of a radionuclide originating from a ground water contamination. Two model approaches describing the plant uptake of a radionuclide were included, namely passive and active uptake. Passive uptake means in this study that the root uptake rate of a radionuclide is governed by water uptake. Normal mechanism for the passive water uptake is the convective flux of water from the soil to the plant. An example of element taken up passively is Ca. Active plant uptake is in this model defined as the root uptake rate of a radionuclide that is governed by carbon assimilation i.e. photosynthesis and plant growth. The actively taken up element can for example be an element essential to plant, but not available in high enough concentration by passive uptake alone, like the major nutrients N and P or an element that very well resembles a plant nutrient, like Cs resembles K. Active uptake of trace element may occur alone or in addition to passive uptake. Normal mechanism for the active uptake is molecular diffusion from the soil solution to the roots or via any other organism living in symbiosis with the roots like the mycorrhiza. Also a model approach describing adsorption was introduced. CoupModel dynamically couples and simulates the flows of water, heat, carbon and nitrogen in the soil/plant/atmosphere system. Any number of plants may be defined and are divided into roots, leaves, stem and grain. The soil is considered in one vertical profile that may be represented into a maximum of 100 layers. The model is the windows-successor and integrated version of the DOS-models SOIL and SOILN, which have been widely used on different ecosystems and climate regions during 25 years time period. To this soil/plant/atmosphere model were introduced a module describing accumulation of a radionuclide in the biosphere originating from groundwater contamination. The

  19. Complementary programs for stochastic analysis of radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Hernandez, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The present programs will permit to analyze the risks using parametric and non parametric technic. The programs are presented in two groups: 1) variable estimation through indicator krigeaje and variable estimation by Cokrigeaje 2) variable simulation with multi gassiness stochastic model and non gassiness. This report includes new programs for the non parametric geostatistics

  20. Sensitivity analysis on retardation effect of natural barriers against radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, K.

    1994-01-01

    The generic performance assessment of the geological disposal system for high level waste (HLW) in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. The Japanese concept of the geological disposal system is based on a multi-barrier system which is composed of vitrified waste, carbon steel overpack, thick bentonite buffer and a variety of realistic geological conditions. The main objectives of the study are the detailed analysis of the performance of engineered barrier system (EBS) and the analysis of the performance of natural barrier system (NBS) and the evaluation of its compliance with the required overall system performance. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the objectives to investigate the way and extent of the retardation in the release to biosphere by the effect of NBS, and to clarify the conditions which is sufficient to ensure that the overall system meets safety requirement. The radionuclide transport model in geological media, the sensitivity analysis, and the calculated results of the retardation effect of NBS in terms of the sensitivity parameters are reported. (K.I.)

  1. Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.; Piepkho, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner

  2. Fracture hydrology relevant to radionuclide transport. Field work in a granite formation in Cornwall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Durrance, E.M.; Heath, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Separation, orientation, apertures and intersections of water-bearing fractures are the variables which control water flow and affect radionuclide transport through fractured rocks. The need is discussed for information on the distribution of these variables in statistical treatments of flow and transport, because of the inadequacy of permeability and porosity data in continuum treatments. Satisfactory methods of measuring distributions of separation, orientation and apetures have been developed and data for Cornish granite are presented. An estimate of the average distance between fracture intersections is made

  3. Modelling for radiological and radioecological consequences of an accidental radionuclide release at Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Scenarios concerning accidental releases of radionuclides into water bodies can be found in the open literature, mostly in connection with nuclear power plants located either onshore or inland. However, meager attention has been given to nuclear reactors used as energy sources for propulsion at sea, which are also subject to accidents. Such potential accidents may involve the loss of part of the reactor core to the surrounding water body. In addition of the initial instantaneous releases, one can estimate delayed source terms based on the rate at which radionuclides are dissolved or leached from the solidified material, like part of the core or structural materials in contact with water. Most of such solidified material might be a mixture of uranium, zirconium, iron, calcium, silica, fission and activation products, and transuranium elements as oxides, forming a glassy type solid. Transport models were used to calculate radionuclide concentrations in water resulting from short and delayed source terms. Oceanographic data used in the calculations were taken either from the open literature or from unclassified reports of the Brazilian Navy, being, however, as generic as possible. Time-dependent concentration functions for radionuclides in aquatic food following an accidental release reflect the net result of intake and elimination processes. However, to avoid the complexities of multiple parameters involved in such processes, the model accounts only for trophic transfer of radionuclides, and yet avoids the necessity of analyzing the details of each transfer step used to determine fish, crustacea, molluscs and seaweed accumulation. Swimming and other aquatic sports are not included in the model used for dose calculations because of theirs relatively low importance in comparison with the pathways concerning ingestion of aquatic food

  4. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  5. In-situ radionuclide transport and preferential groundwater flows at INEEL (Idaho): Decay-series disequilibrium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Ku, T.L.; Roback, R.; Murrell, M.; McLing, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium and thorium-decay series disequilibria in groundwater occur as a result of water-rock interactions, and they provide site-specific, natural analog information for assessment of in-situ, long-term migration of radionuclides in the far field of a nuclear waste disposal site. In this study, a mass balance model was used to relate the decay-series radionuclide distributions among solution, sorbed and solid phases in an aquifer system to processes of water transport, sorption-desorption, dissolution-precipitation, radioactive ingrowth-decay, and α recoil. Isotopes of U and Rn were measured in 23 groundwater samples collected from a basaltic aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Idaho. The results show that groundwater activities of Th and Ra isotopes are 2--4 orders lower than those of their U progenitors. Modeling of the observed disequilibria places the following constraints on the time scale of radionuclide migration and water-rock interaction at INEEL: (1) Time for sorption is minutes for Ra and Th; time for desorption is days for Ra and years for Th; and time for precipitation is days for Th, years for Ra, and centuries for U. (2) Retardation factors due to sorption average > 10 6 for 232 Th, approximately10 4 for 226 Ra, and approximately10 3 for 238 U. (3) Dissolution rates of rocks are approximately70 to 800 mg/L/y. (4) Ages of groundwater range from 222 Rn occur near the groundwater recharging sites as well as in the major flow pathways. Decay of the sorbed parent radionuclides (e.g., 226 Ra and 228 Ra) on micro-fracture surfaces constitutes an important source of their daughter ( 222 Rn and 228 Th) activities in groundwater

  6. Organic material in clay-based buffer materials and its potential impact on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Goulard, M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Haveman, S.A.; Bachinski, D.B.; Hamon, C.J.; Comba, R.

    1997-03-01

    AECL has submitted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel disposal at depth in crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. In this disposal concept used fuel would be emplaced in corrosion-resistant containers which would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials. Once groundwater is able to penetrate the buffer and corrosion-resistant container, radionuclides could be transported from the waste form to the surrounding geosphere, and eventually to the biosphere. The release of radionuclides from the waste form and their subsequent transport would be determined by the geochemistry of the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere. Organic substances affect the geochemistry of radionuclides through complexation reactions that increase solubility and alter mobility, by affecting the redox of certain radionuclides and by providing food for microbes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the buffer and backfill materials proposed for use in a disposal vault contain organics that could be leached by groundwater in large enough quantities to complex with radionuclides and affect their mobility within the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere. Buffer material, made from a mixture of 50 wt.% Avonlea sodium bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand, was extracted with deionized water to determine the release of dissolved organic carbon, humic acid and fulvic acid. The effect of radiation and heat from the used fuel was simulated by treating samples of buffer before leaching to various amounts of heat (60 deg C and 90 deg C) for periods of 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and to ionizing radiation with doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy. Humic substances were isolated from the leachates to determine the concentrations of humic and fulvic acids and to determine their functional group content by acid-base titrations. The results showed that groundwater would leach significant amounts of organics that would complex with radionuclides such as

  7. Evaluating biological transport of radionuclides at low-level waste burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Kennedy, W.E.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of the work reported here is to develop and demonstrate methods for evaluating the long-term impact of biological processes at low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. As part of this effort, we developed order-of-magnitude estimates of dose-to-man resulting from animal burrowing activity and plant translocation of radionuclides. Reference low-level waste sites in both arid and humid areas of the United States were examined. The results of our evaluation for generalized arid LLW burial site are presented here. Dose-to-man estimates resulting from biotic transport are compared with doses calculated from human intrusion exposure scenarios. Dose-to-man estimates, as a result of biotic transport, are of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from a more commonly evaluated human intrusion scenario. The reported lack of potential importance of biotic transport at LLW sites in earlier assessment studies is not confirmed by our findings. These results indicate that biotic transport has the long-term potential to mobilize radionuclides. Therefore, biotic transport should be carefully evaluated during burial site assessment

  8. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants; Transport radionuklida i doze u okolini nekih termoelektrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Telenta, B [Savezni hidrometeoroloski zavod, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sokcic-Kostic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1994-07-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  9. Radionuclide migration experiments related to an underground nuclear test: II. modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompson, A.; Carle, S.F.; Smith, D.K.; Hudson, G.B.; Bruton, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    that correspond to these infiltration processes will be presented. These are generally determined in terms of a multiphase flow model of liquid and gas phase movement in an unsaturated porous medium, coupled with a corresponding model of radionuclide transport. Predictions of tritium migration to a nearby water table well will be compared with a 10-year record of increasing tritium concentration measurements. The use of tritium/helium age dating will be described as a method to calibrate the models and as a way to further understand the intricacies of tritium and moisture migration in the system. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48

  10. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Bodvarsson

    2004-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site has a dry climate and deep water table, with the repository located in the middle of an unsaturated zone approximately 600 m thick. Radionuclide transport processes from the repository to the water table are sensitive to the unsaturated zone flow field, as well as to sorption, matrix diffusion, radioactive decay, and colloid transport mechanisms. The unsaturated zone flow and transport models are calibrated against both physical and chemical data, including pneumatic pressure, liquid saturation, water potential, temperature, chloride, and calcite. The transport model predictions are further compared with testing specific to unsaturated zone transport: at Alcove 1 in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), at Alcove 8 and Niche 3 of the ESF, and at the Busted Butte site. The models are applied to predict the breakthroughs at the water table for nonsorbing and sorbing radionuclides, with faults shown as the important paths for radionuclide transport. Daughter products of some important radionuclides, such as 239 Pu and 241 Am, have faster transport than the parents and must be considered in the unsaturated zone transport model. Colloid transport is significantly affected by colloid size, but only negligibly affected by lunetic declogging (reverse filtering) mechanisms. Unsaturated zone model uncertainties are discussed, including the sensitivity of breakthrough to the active fracture model parameter, as an example of uncertainties related to detailed flow characteristics and fracture-matrix interaction. It is expected that additional benefits from the unsaturated zone barrier for transport can be achieved by full implementation of the shadow zone concept immediately below the radionuclide release points in the waste emplacement drifts

  11. Modelling and analysis of radionuclide dispersion from PWR on abnormal condition in Bojanegara Serang site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro

    2010-01-01

    Additional of electrical power especially Nuclear Power Plant will give radiological consequence sto population and environment due to radioactive release in normal and abnormal condition. In consequence the management of nuclear power plant must supply data and strong argumentation to clarify the safety of nuclear power plant to environment. For that purpose it needs to be carried out an analysis of abnormal condition in nuclear power plant and its radiological consequences to the environment. That analysis is done using abnormal condition simulation model postulated on 1000 MWe nuclear power plant.That simulation model is used also to evaluate environmental potential as site capability in supporting the radiological consequences. Radionuclide transport modeling from reactor core to containment uses EMERALD computer code. Other computer codes are Wind rose, PC-COSYMA and Arc View are used to simulate meteorology condition, radionuclide release to population distribution of food production and consumption and distribution of radiation dose received to population around nuclear power plant. Application of that simulation is carried out to NPP candidate site in Bojanegara-Kramatwatu, Serang Banten peninsula. Using source term data, meteorology data, dispersion data and pathways modeling are resulting radionuclide dispersion model and radiation pathway acceptance at the surrounding nuclear power plant site (Bojanegara-Serang peninsula). The result shows that maximum radiation dose received is lower than dose permitted in accordance with regulatory body (BAPETEN). (author)

  12. Modelling of transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi.

    1993-09-01

    In this review article, we discuss key features of the transport phenomena and theoretical modelling to understand them. Experimental observations have revealed the nature of anomalous transport, i.e., the enhancement of the transport coefficients by the gradients of the plasma profiles, the pinch phenomena, the radial profile of the anomalous transport coefficients, the variation of the transport among the Bohm diffusion, Pseudo-classical confinement, L-mode and variety of improved confinement modes, and the sudden jumps such as L-H transition. Starting from the formalism of the transport matrix, the modelling based on the low frequency instabilities are reviewed. Theoretical results in the range of drift wave frequency are examined. Problems in theories based on the quasilinear and mixing-length estimates lead to the renewal of the turbulence theory, and the physics picture of the self-sustained turbulence is discussed. The theory of transport using the fluid equation of plasma is developed, showing that the new approach is very promising in explaining abovementioned characteristics of anomalous transport in both L-mode and improved confinement plasmas. The interference of the fluxes is the key to construct the physics basis of the bifurcation theory for the L-H transition. The present status of theories on the mechanisms of improved confinement is discussed. Modelling on the nonlocal nature of transport is briefly discussed. Finally, the impact of the anomalous transport on disruptive phenomena is also described. (author) 95 refs

  13. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, D.; Telenta, B.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  14. Determination of the potential radiation exposure of the population close to the Asse II mine caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation using the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM); Ermittlung der potenziellen Strahlenexposition der Bevoelkerung in der Umgebung der Schachtanlage Asse II infolge Ableitung radioaktiver Stoffe mit den abwettern im bestimmungsgemaessen Betrieb mittels des ''atmospaerischen Radionuklid-Transport-Modells'' ARTM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, D.; Wittwer, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    Between 1967 and 1978 125.787 packages filled with low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste were emplaced in the mining plant Asse II. Volatile radioactive substances like H-3, C-14 and Rn-222 are released from the emplaced waste. These substances reach the ventilated parts of the mine and are released with the discharge air. The potential radiation exposure of the population caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation is determined by the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM). As result the maximal deductions of volatile radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation of the Asse II mine lead to radiation exposure of the population, which is considerably lower than the permissible values of application rate.

  15. Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport

  16. MASCOT user's guide--Version 2.0: Analytical solutions for multidimensional transport of a four-member radionuclide decay chain in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gureghian, A.B.

    1988-07-01

    The MASCOT code computes the two- and three-dimensional space-time dependent convective-dispersive transport of a four-member radionuclide decay chain in unbounded homogeneous porous media, for constant and radionuclide-dependent release, and assuming steady- state isothermal ground-water flow and parallel streamlines. The model can handle a single or multiple finite line source or a Gaussian distributed source in the two-dimensional case, and a single or multiple patch source or bivariate-normal distributed source in the three-dimensional case. The differential equations are solved by Laplace and Fourier transforms and a Gauss-Legendre integration scheme. 33 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Human radiation dose resulting from forests contaminated by radionuclides: generic model and applications to the Chernobyl ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkov, I.; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA; Schell, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    Forest ecosystems have been found to contribute significantly to the human radiation dose in the intermediate and long teens following radionuclide releases. Evaluation of the internal and external radiation dose for these critical population groups requires knowledge of radionuclide transport processes in forest ecosystems, as well as the extent of forest utilization by these populations. The high complexity of the problem requires the use of models to define and analyze the properties of the forest as well as to evaluate the ecosystem response to possible human intervention. A generic FORESTPATH model is used to calculate the internal and external radiation doses for different critical groups of consumers at different times following radionuclide release. The model is tested using the information available for contaminated forests in Belarus. Uncertainty of the model predictions are estimated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. (author)

  18. Dispersion of radionuclides in the European north-western seas: observations and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In this report for an Accreditation to supervise research (HDR), the author reports the use over 30 years by the Cherbourg-Octeville IRSN Laboratory of artificial radionuclides in solution in sea water as oceanographic markers. Such measurements on radio-markers which are soluble in sea water, enabled a better knowledge of dissolved substance displacements in north-western seas of Europe, notably the Channel, the North Sea, the Celtic Sea, and the Irish Sea. The author reports researches which aimed at studying the dispersion of radionuclides in seawater and their use as water mass markers, at validating hydrodynamic models of dispersion at different time-space scales, at the understanding and simulation of the sedimentary transport, and at studying the transfer to living species. These different topics give the document its structure [fr

  19. Fukushima Daiichi-Derived Radionuclides in the Ocean: Transport, Fate, and Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesseler, Ken; Dai, Minhan; Aoyama, Michio; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Charmasson, Sabine; Higley, Kathryn; Maderich, Vladimir; Masqué, Pere; Morris, Paul J; Oughton, Deborah; Smith, John N

    2017-01-03

    The events that followed the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, included the loss of power and overheating at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants, which led to extensive releases of radioactive gases, volatiles, and liquids, particularly to the coastal ocean. The fate of these radionuclides depends in large part on their oceanic geochemistry, physical processes, and biological uptake. Whereas radioactivity on land can be resampled and its distribution mapped, releases to the marine environment are harder to characterize owing to variability in ocean currents and the general challenges of sampling at sea. Five years later, it is appropriate to review what happened in terms of the sources, transport, and fate of these radionuclides in the ocean. In addition to the oceanic behavior of these contaminants, this review considers the potential health effects and societal impacts.

  20. Study on radionuclides transport from natural evaporating ponds to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Keqiang; Zou Changgui

    1997-08-01

    The results of simulated experiments, field monitoring and radiation health risk evaluation of radionuclides transport to the atmosphere from the natural evaporating ponds of a certain nuclear factory, and the estimating method of releasing source strength are presented. The estimated results of radiation health risk show that the maximum individual annual risk is 6.5 x 10 -9 and the total collective annual risk within a radius of 20 km is 3.2 x 10 -5 person, which are caused by operation of the evaporating ponds. It should be pointed out that the above estimated results only refer to one operating year (1990). If the cumulative effect of radionuclides deposition in ground is considered, the risk will increase a little with time until the dynamic balance is achieved. (5 ref., 8 tabs.)

  1. Comparison of models of radionuclide migration in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanusik, V.; Mitro, A.; Chorvat, D.

    1985-01-01

    Two models are compared used for describing the transfer of radioactive substances to man through food chains: the model used in US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 and that used in Interatomehnergo NTD No. 38.220.56-81. The models are compared with regard to the approach to model construction, with regard to mathematical expressions and recommended values of parameters. The comparative calculations show that with the use of the recommended values the contribution of direct contamination is prevalent in both models. The concentration of radioactive substances in selected products calculated for indirect contamination using the NRC method is more conservative. For direct and total contamination the NRC method provides higher values of concentrations in the leaf and non-leaf vegetables (cabbage, potatoes, cucumbers) than the NTD method. Concentrations in non-leaf vegetables are higher than in wheat for 4 nuclides only and in meat and milk for 13 radionuclides of the considered set of 22 radionuclides. Substitution of the recommended values of the parameters of the NRC model with recommended values of the corresponding parameters of the NTD model will reduce total concentrations in products as against initial results of the two studied models. (author)

  2. CIEMAT results in the frame of the european project Mechanisms governing the behaviour and transport of transuranics (analogues) and other radionuclides in marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarises the objectives and more relevant conclusions obtained by CIEMAT in the frame of the project Mechanisms governing the behaviour and transport of transuranics (analogues) and other radionuclides in marine ecosystems. The overall objective of this project was to identify the basic mechanisms and define the key parameters governing the physico-chemical speciation, vertical and horizontal mobility, biological magnification, incorporation to seabed sediments and ultimate fate of transuranium and other long-lived radionuclides in the marine environment, with a view to providing high-quality data of a universal character for use in the development and validation of predictive models based on fundamental mechanisms rather than the simpler box-model approach. This research was carried out in different European marine ecosystems: those directly affected by controlled releases from Nuclear Industries and/or accidents and those characterized by being preferent radionuclides accumulation sites (submarine canyons, estuaries, etc.). (Author)

  3. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, John

    2004-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102.

  4. Using ecosystem modelling techniques in exposure assessments of radionuclides - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumblad, L.

    2005-01-01

    The risk to humans from potential releases from nuclear facilities is evaluated in safety assessments. Essential components of these assessments are exposure models, which estimate the transport of radionuclides in the environment, the uptake in biota, and transfer to humans. Recently, there has been a growing concern for radiological protection of the whole environment, not only humans, and a first attempt has been to employ model approaches based on stylized environments and transfer functions to biota based exclusively on bioconcentration factors (BCF). They are generally of a non-mechanistic nature and involve no knowledge of the actual processes involved, which is a severe limitation when assessing real ecosystems. in this paper, the possibility of using an ecological modelling approach as a complement or an alternative to the use of BCF-based models is discussed. The paper gives an overview of ecological and ecosystem modelling and examples of studies where ecosystem models have been used in association to ecological risk assessment studies for other pollutants than radionuclides. It also discusses the potential to use this technique in exposure assessments of radionuclides with a few examples from the safety assessment work performed by the Swedish nuclear fuel and waste management company (SKB). Finally there is a comparison of the characteristics of ecosystem models and traditionally exposure models for radionuclides used to estimate the radionuclide exposure of biota. The evaluation of ecosystem models already applied in safety assessments has shown that the ecosystem approach is possible to use to assess exposure to biota, and that it can handle many of the modelling problems identified related to BCF-models. The findings in this paper suggest that both national and international assessment frameworks for protection of the environment from ionising radiation would benefit from striving to adopt methodologies based on ecologically sound principles and

  5. Measurements for modeling radionuclide transfer in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, B.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical methods for measuring radionuclides in the aquatic environment are discussed for samples of fresh water and seawater, fish and shellfish, biota such as algae, plankton, seaweed, and aquatic plants, and sediment. Consideration is given to radionuclide collection and concentration, sample preservation, radiochemical and instrumental analysis, and quality assurance. Major problems are the very low environmental levels of the radionuclides of interest, simultaneous occurrence of radionuclides in several chemical and physical forms and the numerous factors that affect radionuclide levels in and transfers among media. Some radionuclides of importance in liquid effluents from nuclear power stations are listed, and sources of radiochemical analytical methods are recommended

  6. Reconstructing historical radionuclide concentrations along the east coast of Ireland using a compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.N.; Clarke, S.; McDonald, P.; Goshawk, J.A.; Jones, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented that simulates the annually averaged transport of radionuclides, originating from the BNFL reprocessing plant at Sellafield, throughout the Irish Sea. The model, CUMBRIA77, represents the processes of radionuclide transport and dispersion in the marine environment and allows predictions of radionuclide concentration in various environmental media, including biota, to be made throughout the whole of the Irish Sea. In this paper we describe the use of the model to reconstruct the historical activity concentrations of 137Cs and 239+240Pu in a variety of environmental media in the western Irish Sea and along the Irish east coast back to 1950. This reconstruction exercise is of interest because only limited measurements of 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity are available prior to the 1980s. The predictions were compared to the available measured data to validate their accuracy. The results of the reconstruction indicate that activity concentrations of 137Cs in the western Irish Sea follow a similar, though slightly delayed and smoothed, profile to the discharges from the Sellafield site, with concentrations at the time of peak discharge (the mid-1970s) being around an order of magnitude higher than those measured in the 1980s and 1990s. By contrast, the concentrations of 239+240Pu at the time of peak discharges were similar to those presently measured. These differences reflect the distinct marine chemistries of the two nuclides, in particular the higher propensity of plutonium to bind to sediments leading to extended transport times. Despite these differences in behaviour the doses to Irish seafood consumers from 137Cs remain significantly higher than those from 239+240Pu

  7. Limitations of sorption isotherms on modeling groundwater contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eduardo Figueira da

    2007-01-01

    Design and safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories, as well as remediation of radionuclide contaminated groundwater require the development of models capable of accurately predicting trace element fate and transport. Adsorption of trace radionuclides onto soils and groundwater is an important mechanism controlling near- and far- field transport. Although surface complexation models (SCMs) can better describe the adsorption mechanisms of most radionuclides onto mineral surfaces by directly accounting for variability of system properties and mineral surface properties, isotherms are still used to model contaminant transport in groundwater, despite the much higher system dependence. The present work investigates differences between transport model results based on these two approaches for adsorption modeling. A finite element transport model is used for the isotherm model, whereas the computer program PHREEQC is used for the SCM approach. Both models are calibrated for a batch experiment, and one-dimensional transport is simulated using the calibrated parameters. At the lower injected concentrations there are large discrepancies between SCM and isotherm transport predictions, with the SCM presenting much longer tails on the breakthrough curves. Isotherms may also provide non-conservative results for time to breakthrough and for maximum concentration in a contamination plume. Isotherm models are shown not to be robust enough to predict transport behavior of some trace elements, thus discouraging their use. The results also illustrate the promise of the SCM modeling approach in safety assessment and environmental remediation applications, also suggesting that independent batch sorption measurements can be used, within the framework of the SCM, to produce a more versatile and realistic groundwater transport model for radionuclides which is capable of accounting more accurately for temporal and spatial variations in geochemical conditions. (author)

  8. Wind Transport of Radionuclide- Bearing Dust, Peña Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, R.; Goodell, P. C.; Gill, T. E.; Arimoto, R.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation evaluates radionuclide fractionation during wind erosion of high-grade uranium ore storage piles at Peña Blanca (50km north of Chihuahua City), Chihuahua, Mexico. The aridity of the local environment promotes dust resuspension by high winds. Although active operations ceased in 1983, the Peña Blanca mining district is one of Mexico`s most important uranium ore reserves. The study site contains piles of high grade ore, left loose on the surface, and separated by the specific deposits from which they were derived (Margaritas, Nopal I, and Puerto I). Similar locations do not exist in the United States, since uranium mining sites in the USA have been reclaimed. The Peña Blanca site serves as an analog for the Yucca Mountain project. Dust deposition is collected at Peña Blanca with BSNE sediment catchers (Fryrear, 1986) and marble dust traps (Reheis, 1999). These devices capture windblown sediment; subsequently, the sample data will help quantify potentially radioactive short term field sediment loss from the repository surface and determine sediment flux. Aerosols and surface materials will be analyzed and radioactivity levels established utilizing techniques such as gamma spectroscopy. As a result, we will be able to estimate how much radionuclide contaminated dust is being transported or attached geochemically to fine grain soils or minerals (e.g., clays or iron oxides). The high-grade uranium-bearing material is at secular equilibrium, thus the entire decay series is present. Of resulting interest is not only the aeolian transport of uranium, but also of the other daughter products. These studies will improve our understanding of geochemical cycling of radionuclides with respect to sources, transport, and deposition. The results may also have important implications for the geosciences and homeland security, and potential applications to public health. Funding for this project is provided in part via a NSF grant to Arimoto.

  9. Bentonite erosion: effects on the long term performance of the engineered barrier and radionuclide transport - The BELBAR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, P.; Sundman, D.; Bailey, L.; Missana, T.; Schaefer, T.; Cervinka, R.; Koskinen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. BELBaR is a Collaborative Project within the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) for nuclear research and training activities. The main aim of BELBaR is to increase knowledge of the processes that control clay colloid stability, generation and its ability to transport radionuclides. The overall purpose of the project is to come up with a new way of treating issues in long-term safety/performance assessment. The project started March 1, 2012 and has a duration of 48 months. The project has 14 partners from seven European countries. The main aim of BELBaR is to reduce the uncertainties in the description of the effect of clay colloids on the long term performance of the engineered barrier and on radionuclide transport as illustrated in Figure 1. This is done by: - Improving the understanding on when bentonite colloids are unstable. For a given site/site evolution, this is critical information, since it determines whether or not clay colloids need to be included in the long-term assessment. - Improving the quantitative models for erosion on the bentonite barrier for the cases when the colloids are stable - Improving the understanding of how radionuclides attach to clay colloids. This information will be used to formulate improved transport models for the assessment of radionuclide transport in the geosphere. To meet the main aim a number of experimental and modelling activities will be undertaken within the project. BELBaR consists of six RTD (research and technical development) work packages and one project management work package. WP1 will have the responsibility to ensure that that the type and values of the parameters selected for experimental and modelling work are those that represent as much as possible the full range of conditions and situations that can be expected in a repository. Drawing on the work undertaken in WP 2 to 5, the general objective of this work package

  10. Modelling the effects of spatial variability on radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The NEA workshop reflect the present status in national waste management program, specifically in spatial variability and performance assessment of geologic disposal sites for deed repository system the four sessions were: Spatial Variability: Its Definition and Significance to Performance Assessment and Site Characterisation; Experience with the Modelling of Radionuclide Migration in the Presence of Spatial Variability in Various Geological Environments; New Areas for Investigation: Two Personal Views; What is Wanted and What is Feasible: Views and Future Plans in Selected Waste Management Organisations. The 26 papers presented on the four oral sessions and on the poster session have been abstracted and indexed individually for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  11. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock: effects of decay chain and limited matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. B.; Park, J. W.; Lee, E. Y.; Kim, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock is studies by considering radioactive decay chain and limited matrix diffusion into surrounding porous media. Semi-analytical solution in the Laplace domain is obtained from the mass balance equation of radionuclides and colloid particles. Numerical inversion of the Laplace solution is used to get the concentration profiles both in a fracture and in rock matrix. There issues are analyzed for the radionuclide concentration in a fracture by 1) formation constant of pseudo-colloid, 2) filtration coefficient of radio-colloid and 3) effective diffusion depth into the surrounding porous rock media

  12. Modelling the combined impact of radionuclide discharges reaching rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, J.; Small, S.; Hornby, D.; Scarlett, P.; Harvey, M.; Simmonds, J.; Bexon, A.; Jones, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Agency currently authorises direct and indirect (via sewerage systems) discharges of liquid radioactive wastes to rivers from nuclear sites and other registered users of radioactivity. Discharges are normally authorised on a site-by-site basis, taking into account the radiological assessment. Radiological assessments are normally made using dilution models to estimate radionuclide activities in the effluents themselves and in the receiving rivers. These data are then combined with information on habits and dose factor information to give a dose assessment for individuals exposed to the discharge. For each site the highest radiological impact is expected immediately downstream of the disposal point where concentrations of radionuclides and resulting doses are highest. The concentration and doses are expected to decline with increasing distance downstream of the disposal point. However, if discharges are made into the river from other establishments higher up the catchment, the total dose may be higher. Recent Environment Agency research projects provided evidence of the potential radiological significance of multiple discharges to a single river. In the light of these studies, the Agency require a robust modelling tool to assist in the assessment of the effects of combined discharges to river systems. The aim of this R and D project was to develop and test modelling tools that could be used to make assessments of the impact of multiple radiological discharge into river systems and to trial them on the upper Thames river system

  13. A strategy for validation a concept model for radionuclide migration in the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual model for radionuclide migration in the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain is presented. The available hydrologic data from the site is compiled to present a qualitative picture of transport of radionuclides horizontally within the first 100-200 m of the saturated zone. The transport model consists of flow within fractures and interchange of dissolved species between the fractures and surrounding matrix blocks via molecular diffusion. A parametric study illustrates that at the groundwater conditions expected to exist in the saturated zone, radionuclide will have ample time to diffuse fully within the matrix blocks. The result is a predicted solute transport time several orders of magnitude greater than the groundwater travel time (GWTT). To validate this model, a suite of interwell tracer tests are proposed at various flow rates and with conservative and sorbing species. Numerical simulations show that these tests will allow us to discriminate between a matrix diffusion model and a more conventional continuum transport model. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 35 refs

  14. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models

  15. Modeling of container failure and radionuclide release from a geologic nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Lak; Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Kwang Sub; Cho, Chan Hee

    1989-02-01

    Generally, two processes are involved in leaching and dissolution; (1) chemical reactions and (2) mass transfer by diffusion. The chemical reaction controls the dissolution rates only during the early stage of exposure to groundwater. The exterior-field mass transfer may control the long-term dissolution rates from the waste solid in a geologic repository. Masstransfer analyses rely on detailed and careful application of the governing equations that describe the mechanistic processes of transport of material between and within phases. We develop analytical models to predict the radionuclide release rate into the groundwater with five different approaches: a measurement-based model, a diffusion model, a kinetics model, a diffusion-and-kinetics model, and a modified diffusion model. We also collected experimental leaching data for a partial validation of the radionuclide release model based on the mass transfer theory. Among various types of corrosions, pitting is the most significant because of its rapid growth. The failure time of the waste container, which also can be interpreted as the containment time, is a milestone of the performance of a repository. We develop analytical models to predict the pit growth rate on the container surface with three different approaches: an experimental method, a statistical method, and a mathematical method based on the diffusion theory. (Author)

  16. Modeling of radiocesium transport kinetics in system water-aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svadlenkova, M.

    1988-01-01

    Compartment models were used to describe the kinetics of the transport of radionuclides in the system water-biomass of aquatic plants. Briefly described are linear models and models with time variable parameters. The model was tested using data from a locality in the environs of the Bohunice nuclear power plant. Cladophora glomerata algae were the monitored plants, 137 Cs the monitored radionuclide. The models may be used when aquatic plants serve as bioindicators of the radioactive contamination of surface waters, for monitoring the transport of radionuclides in food chains. (M.D.). 10 refs

  17. Stochastic analysis of contaminant transport in porous media: analysis of a two-member radionuclide chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonano, E.J.; Shipers, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the authors extend previous stochastic analyses of contaminant transport in geologic media for a single species to a chain of two species. The authors particular application is the quantification of uncertainties due to lack of characterization of the spatial variability of hydrologic parameters on transport of radionuclides from a high-level waste repository to the biosphere. Radionuclide chains can have a significant impact on demonstrating compliance (or violation) of standards regulating the release to the environment accessible to humans. Two approaches for determining the cross-covariance terms in the mean concentration equations are presented. One uses a Taylor expansion to obtain the cross-covariance between the velocity and concentration fluctuations, while the other is based on a Fourier-Laplace double transform method. For the conditions of interest here, the difference between these two approaches are expected to be small. In addition, the variances are calculated in a unique way by solving another associated partial differential equation. A parametric study is carried out to examine the sensitivity of the mean concentration of the two species and their corresponding variances and cross-covariance on the parameters associated with the structure of the stochastic velocity field. It is found that the dependent variables are most sensitive to the intensity and correlation length of the velocity fluctuations. The magnitude of the variances and cross-covariance of the concentrations are proportional to the magnitude of the mean concentrations which depend on inlet concentration boundary conditions

  18. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Baumgartner, A.; Rechberger, F.; Seidel, C.; Stietka, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. - Highlights: • Dose models for indoor radiation exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials. • Strategies and methods in radionuclide metrology, activity measurement and dose modelling. • Selection of appropriate parameters in radiation protection standards for building materials. • Scientific-based limitations of indoor exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials

  19. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. Observations and dispersion modelling of the released radionuclides help to assess the regional impact of such nuclear accidents. Modelling the increase of regional radionuclide activity concentrations, which results from nuclear accidents, underlies a multiplicity of uncertainties. One of the most significant uncertainties is the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source term may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on estimates given by the operators of the nuclear power plant. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site can be estimated using inverse modelling (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). The accuracy of the method depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the used observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a relatively sparse grid and the temporal resolution of available data may be low within the order of hours or a day. Gamma dose rates, on the other hand, are observed routinely on a much denser grid and higher temporal resolution and provide therefore a wider basis for inverse modelling (Saunier et al., 2013). We present a new inversion approach, which combines an atmospheric dispersion model and observations of radionuclide activity concentrations and gamma dose rates to obtain the source term of radionuclides. We use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; Stohl et al., 2005) to model the atmospheric transport of the released radionuclides. The

  20. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The basic reactions between sodium bentonite and groundwater are described by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. It is calculated that the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite saturated with Swiss Reference Groundwater will have a pH value of 9.7 and a free carbonate activity of 8x10 -4 M. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. In this way, an attempt is made to account for the continuous water exchange between the near-field and the host rock. It is found that sodium bentonite will be slowly converted to calcium bentonite. This conversion is roughly estimated to be completed after 2 million years

  1. Modelling the behaviour of uranium-series radionuclides in soils and plants taking into account seasonal variations in soil hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Sánchez, D.; Thorne, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper, a mathematical model for the behaviour of 79 Se in soils and plants was described. Subsequently, a review has been published relating to the behaviour of 238 U-series radionuclides in soils and plants. Here, we bring together those two strands of work to describe a new mathematical model of the behaviour of 238 U-series radionuclides entering soils in solution and their uptake by plants. Initial studies with the model that are reported here demonstrate that it is a powerful tool for exploring the behaviour of this decay chain or subcomponents of it in soil-plant systems under different hydrological regimes. In particular, it permits studies of the degree to which secular equilibrium assumptions are appropriate when modelling this decay chain. Further studies will be undertaken and reported separately examining sensitivities of model results to input parameter values and also applying the model to sites contaminated with 238 U-series radionuclides. - Highlights: • Kinetic model of radionuclide transport in soils and uptake by plants. • Takes soil hydrology and redox conditions into account. • Applicable to the whole U-238 chain, including Rn-222, Pb-210 and Po-210. • Demonstrates intra-season and inter-season variability on timescales up to thousands of years

  2. Obtaining and testing of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungies inocula for the modification of radionuclides transport into the plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryipka, A.V.; Sorochins'kij, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    Spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungies have been isolaten from the plants collected at the Chernobyl zone. Selection of the plants were done due to their high radionuclides' accumulation ability and AM colonization level as well. These spores were used to start the inocula production for the plant treatment aimed to affect radionuclides transport. Spores identification was done based on their morphological and molecular features. Three different AM inocula with high potential to modify 90 Sr and 137 Cs transport at the phytoremediation experiments were obtained

  3. Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Meck, Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot study of the reliability of the biokinetic and dosimetric models currently used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as predictors of dose per unit internal or external exposure to radionuclides. The study examines the feasibility of critically evaluating the accuracy of these models for a comprehensive set of radionuclides of concern to the NRC. Each critical evaluation would include: identification of discrepancies between the models and current databases; characterization of uncertainties in model predictions of dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; characterization of variability in dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; and evaluation of prospects for development of more accurate models. Uncertainty refers here to the level of knowledge of a central value for a population, and variability refers to quantitative differences between different members of a population. This pilot study provides a critical assessment of models for selected radionuclides representing different levels of knowledge of dose per unit exposure. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) To optimize the use of available NRC resources, the full study should focus on radionuclides most frequently encountered in the workplace or environment. A list of 50 radionuclides is proposed. (2) The reliability of a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide (i.e., an estimate of dose per unit intake) may depend strongly on the specific application. Multiple characterizations of the uncertainty in a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide may be needed for different forms of the radionuclide and different levels of information of that form available to the dose analyst. (3) A meaningful characterization of variability in dose per unit intake of a radionuclide requires detailed information on the biokinetics of the radionuclide and hence is not feasible for many infrequently

  4. Effect on localized waste-container failure on radionuclide transport from an underground nuclear waste vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, S.C.H.; Chan, T.

    1983-07-01

    In the geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste, one option is to emplace the waste container in a borehole drilled into the floor of the underground vault. In the borehole, the waste container is surrounded by a compacted soil material known as the buffer. A finite-element simulation has been performed to study the effect of localized partial failure of the waste container on the steady-state radionuclide transport by diffusion from the container through the buffer to the surrounding rock and/or backfill. In this study, the radionuclide concentration at the buffer-backfill interface is assumed to be zero. Two cases are considered at the interface between the buffer and the rock. In case 1, a no-flux boundary condition is used to simulate intact rock. In case 2, a constant radionuclide concentration condition is used to simulate fractured rock with groundwater flow. The results show that the effect of localized partial failure of the waste container on the total flux is dependent on the boundary condition at the buffer-rock interface. For the intact rock condition, the total flux is mainly dependent on the location of the failure. The total flux increases as the location changes from the bottom to the top of the emplaced waste container. For a given localized failure of the waste container, the total flux remains unaffected by the area of failed surface below the top of the failure. For fractured rock, the total flux is directly proportional to the failed surface area of the waste container regardless of the failure location

  5. Comprehensive cooling water study annual report. Volume IV: radionuclide and heavy metal transport, Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladden, J.B.; Lower, M.W.; Mackey, H.E.; Specht, W.L.; Wilde, E.W.

    1985-07-01

    The principal sources of tritium, radiocesium, and radiocobalt in the environment at the Savannah River Plant have been reactor area effluent discharges to onsite streams. Radioactive releases began in 1955, with the period of major reactor releases occurring between 1955 and 1968. Since the early 1970s, releases, except for tritium releases, have been substantially reduced. Radioisotope liquid releases resulted specifically from leaching of reactor fuel elements with cladding failures which exposed the underlying fuel to water. The direct sources of these releases were heat exchanger cooling water, spent fuel storage and disassembly basin effluents, and process water from each of the reactor areas. Offsite radiochemical monitoring of water and sediment at upriver and downriver water treatment facilities indicates that SRP contributions of gamma-emitting radionuclide levels present at these facilities are minute. Tritium in water attributable to SRP operations is routinely detected at the downriver facilities; however, total alpha and nonvolatile beta concentrations attributable to SRP liquid releases are not detected at the downriver facilities. The historic material balance calculated for onsite releases of tritium transported to the Savannah River exhibits a high accounting of tritium released. Other radionuclides released to onsite streams have primarily remained in onsite floodplains. Radionuclide releases associated with reactor operations are derived primarily from disassembly basin water releases in the reactor areas and historically have been the major source of radioactivity released to onsite streams. The movement and interaction of these releases have been governed by cooling water discharges. Liquid releases continue to meet DOE concentration guides for the various radioisotopes in onsite streams and in the Savannah River

  6. A basis for modelling of radionuclide flow in the Forsmark biotest basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notter, M.; Snoeijs, P.; Argaerde, L.; Elert, M.

    1987-01-01

    Certain radionuclides are discharged together with the cooling water of Forsmark power station. Of these, Mn-54, Co-60, Zn-65 and Ag-110 m are easily detectable in the environment. This report gives a conceptual five-compartment model for the flows of radionuclides within the basin ecosystem. The available data from biological and radio-ecological investigations in the biotest basin were used to quantify the amounts of radionuclides in each of the reservoirs. The subsystem water-sediment-primary producers was pointed out to be the most interesting part of the ecosystem for studying radionuclides with mathematical modelling in the future. (orig./DG)

  7. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides. Model testing using Chernobyl data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garger, E.; Lev, T.; Talerko, N.; Galeriu, D.; Garland, J.; Hoffman, O.; Nair, S.; Thiessen, K.; Miller, C.; Mueller, H.; Kryshev, A.

    1996-10-01

    Resuspension can be an important secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The inhalation of resuspended radionuclides contributes to the overall dose received by exposed individuals. Based on measurements collected after the Chernobyl accident, Scenario R was developed to provide an opportunity to test existing mathematical models of contamination resuspension. In particular, this scenario provided the opportunity to examine data and test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides at several different locations from the release, to investigate resuspension processes on both local and regional scales, and to investigate the importance of seasonal variations of these processes. Participants in the test exercise were provided with information for three different types of locations: (1) within the 30-km zone, where local resuspension processes are expected to dominate; (2) a large urban location (Kiev) 120 km from the release site, where vehicular traffic is expected to be the dominant mechanism for resuspension; and (3) an agricultural area 40-60 km from the release site, where highly contaminated upwind 'hot spots' are expected to be important. Input information included characteristics of the ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Participants were requested to predict the average (quarterly and yearly) concentrations of 137 Cs in air at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout; predictions for 90 Sr and 239 + 240 Pu were also requested for one location and time point. Predictions for specified resuspension factors and rates were also requested. Most participants used empirical models for the resuspension factor as a function of time K(t), as opposed to process-based models. While many of these

  8. The reactor accident at Chernobyl: A possibility to test colloid-controlled transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Gunten, H.R.; Waber, U.; Krahenbuhl, U.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive fall-out from the damaged nuclear power plant at Chernobyl (USSR) has been measured between May 2 and May 20, 1986 in the River Glatt (Zurich, Switzerland) and in a shallow groundwater stream which is hydraulically connected to the river. Water infiltrating from the river into the groundwater was sampled at different distances and depths by means of a system of piezometer tubes which are part of an experimental installation for the investigation of groundwater quality and migration processes. The aquifer is a quarternary glaciofluvial deposit consisting of stones, gravel, sand, silt and clays. It is typical for large parts of alpine and peri-alpine regions and contains in Switzerlamd about 80% of the drinking water supplies. The radionuclides Tc-99m, Ru-103, I-131, Te-132, Cs-134 and Cs-137 were measured several times in the river water and in the groundwater using calibrated Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometers. Based on the present state of data evaluation the authors conclude that anionic species like iodides, ruthenates or tellurates are not or only slightly sorbed, whereas cesium is completely retained during infiltration from the river into the groundwater. Colloid (>0.05 μm) controlled migration of radionuclides in this heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposits is a transport mechanism of minor importance. However, with the present data it cannot be excluded completely

  9. Development of dynamic compartment models for prediction of radionuclide behaviors in rice paddy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Tomita, Ken'ichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Uchida, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    We are developing dynamic compartment models for prediction of behaviors of some important radionuclides in rice paddy fields for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. For a verification of these models, we report calculations for several different deposition patterns of radionuclides. (author)

  10. Simplified semi-analytical model for mass transport simulation in unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Bernadete L. Vieira de; Hiromoto, Goro

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a simple model to determine the flux of radionuclides released from a concrete vault repository and its implementation through the development of a computer program. The radionuclide leach rate from waste is calculated using a model based on simple first order kinetics and the transport through porous media bellow the waste is determined using a semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation. Results obtained in the IAEA intercomparison program are also related in this communication. (author)

  11. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected

  12. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  13. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data

  14. Application of the linear-quadratic model with incomplete repair to radionuclide directed therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, W.T.; Glasgow Univ.

    1991-01-01

    The LQ model has now been extended to include a general time varying dose rate profile, and the equations can be readily evaluated if an exponential radiation damage repair process is assumed. These equations are applicable to radionuclide directed therapy, including brachytherapy. Kinetic uptake data obtained during radionuclide directed therapy may therefore be used to determine the radiobiological dosimetry of the target and non-target tissues. Also, preliminary tracer studies may be used to pre-plan the radionuclide directed therapy, provided that tracer and therapeutic amounts of the radionuclide carrier are identically processed by the tissues. It is also shown that continuous radionuclide therapy will induce less damage in late-responding tissues than 2 Gy/fraction external beam therapy if the ratio of the maximum dose rate and the sublethal damage repair half-life in the tissue is less than 1.0 Gy. Similar inequalities may be derived for β-particle radionuclide directed therapy. (author)

  15. The MIRAGE project: large scale radionuclide transport investigations and integral migration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Bidoglio, G.; Chapman, N.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of radionuclide migration through the geosphere must be supported by large-scale, long-term investigations. Several research areas of the MIRAGE Project are devoted to acquiring reliable data for developing and validating models. Apart from man-made migration experiments in boreholes and/or underground galleries, attention is paid to natural geological migration systems which have been active for very long time spans. The potential role of microbial activity, either resident or introduced into the host media, is also considered. In order to clarify basic mechanisms, smaller scale ''integral'' migration experiments under fully controlled laboratory conditions are also carried out using real waste forms and representative geological media. (author)

  16. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  18. Age-dependent metabolic model of radionuclides in Human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Changqing

    1986-01-01

    Age-dependent metabolic model of radionuclides in human body was introduced briefly. These data are necessary in setting up the secondary dose limit of internal exposure of the general public. For the gastro-intestinal tract model, it was shown that the dose of various sections of GI tract caused by unsoluble radioactive materials were influenced by the mass of section and mean residence time, both of which are age-dependent, but the absorption fraction f 1 through gastro-intestinal tract should be corrected only for the infant less than 1 year of age. For the lung model, it was indicated that the fraction of deposition or clearance of particles in the different compartments of lung were related to age. The doses of tracheobronchial and pulmonary compartment of adult for 222 Rn or 220 Rn with their decay products were one third of that of 6-years old child who received the maximum dose in comparison with other ages. The age-dependent metabolic models in organ and/or body of Tritium, Iodine-131, Caesium-137, radioactive Strontium, Radium and Plutonium were reported. A generalized approach for estimating the effect of age on deposition fractions and retention half-time were presented. Calculated results indicated that younger ages were characterized by increased deposition fraction and decreased half-time for retention. Representative examples were provided for 21 elements of current interest in health physics

  19. Numerical modeling of the radionuclide water pathway with HYDRUS and comparison with the IAEA model of SR 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Rainer

    2012-02-01

    This study depicts a theoretical experiment in which the radionuclide transport through the porous material of a landfill consisting of concrete rubble (e.g., from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants) and the subsequent migration through the vadose zone and aquifer to a model well is calculated by means of the software HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2008). The radionuclides originally contained within the rubble become dissolved due to leaching caused by infiltrated rainwater. The resulting well-water contamination (in Bq/L) is calculated numerically as a function of time and location and compared with the outcome of a simplified analytic model for the groundwater pathway published by the IAEA (2005). Identical model parameters are considered. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the predictive capacity of the more simple IAEA model using HYDRUS-1D as a reference. For most of the radionuclides considered (e.g., ¹²⁹I, and ²³⁹Pu), results from applying the IAEA model were found to be comparable to results from the more elaborate HYDRUS modeling, provided the underlying parameter values are comparable. However, the IAEA model appears to underestimate the effects resulting from, for example, high nuclide mobility, short half-life, or short-term variations in the water infiltration. The present results indicate that the IAEA model is suited for screening calculations and general recommendation purposes. However, the analysis of a specific site should be accompanied by detailed HYDRUS computer simulations. In all models considered, the calculation outcome largely depends on the choice of the sorption parameter K(d). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The fast multiple-path NUCTRAN model -- Calculating the radionuclide release from a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1995-01-01

    The NUCTRAN model has been applied to the Swedish KBS-3 nuclear waste repository concept, where the migration of radionuclides is through various barriers and pathways. The escape of the nuclides from the canister occurs through a small hole. This hole controls the release of nuclides from the repository. NUCTRAN is a useful tool to calculate the nonstationary transport in a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The advantage of this model is the use of a coarse compartmentalization of the repository, which makes it flexible and easy to adapt to different geometries. The several radionuclide release calculations made with NUCTRAN have shown the capability of this to handle different situations rapidly and easily. The particularity of these calculations is the high accuracy obtained by using a coarse compartmentalization of the Swedish KBS-3 repository and the small requirements of computing time. At short times for short-lived nuclides, the calculated releases are exaggerated. The error can be considerably reduced by an additional subdivision of large compartments into a few compartments

  1. A fuzzy approach for modelling radionuclide in lake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, H.K.; Christian, R.A.; Banerjee, J.; Patra, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive liquid waste is generated during operation and maintenance of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Generally low level liquid waste is diluted and then discharged into the near by water-body through blowdown water discharge line as per the standard waste management practice. The effluents from nuclear installations are treated adequately and then released in a controlled manner under strict compliance of discharge criteria. An attempt was made to predict the concentration of 3 H released from Kakrapar Atomic Power Station at Ratania Regulator, about 2.5 km away from the discharge point, where human exposure is expected. Scarcity of data and complex geometry of the lake prompted the use of Heuristic approach. Under this condition, Fuzzy rule based approach was adopted to develop a model, which could predict 3 H concentration at Ratania Regulator. Three hundred data were generated for developing the fuzzy rules, in which input parameters were water flow from lake and 3 H concentration at discharge point. The Output was 3 H concentration at Ratania Regulator. These data points were generated by multiple regression analysis of the original data. Again by using same methodology hundred data were generated for the validation of the model, which were compared against the predicted output generated by using Fuzzy Rule based approach. Root Mean Square Error of the model came out to be 1.95, which showed good agreement by Fuzzy model of natural ecosystem. -- Highlights: • Uncommon approach (Fuzzy Rule Base) of modelling radionuclide dispersion in Lake. • Predicts 3 H released from Kakrapar Atomic Power Station at a point of human exposure. • RMSE of fuzzy model is 1.95, which means, it has well imitated natural ecosystem

  2. A new simulation model for calculating the internal exposure of some radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrous Ayman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new model based on a series of mathematical functions for estimating excretion rates following the intake of nine different radionuclides is presented in this work. The radionuclides under investigation are: cobalt, iodine, cesium, strontium, ruthenium, radium, thorium, plutonium, and uranium. The committed effective dose has been calculated by our model so as to obtain the urinary and faecal excretion rates for each radionuclide. The said model is further validated by a comparison with the widely spread Mondal software and a simulation program. The results obtained show a harmony between the Mondal package and the model we have constructed.

  3. Behaviour and fate radionuclides in soils. Mathematical modelling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovdan, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides as result of Chernobyl accident has led to contamination of 23% of territory of Republic of Belarus. Soil has high capacity to adsorb radionuclides and their intensive sorption provides the creation of a long-lived radionuclide source in a terrestrial environment. In the management of the contaminated areas and application of a countermeasure strategy it is extremely important to know the environmental mechanisms governing the behaviour of radionuclides in soils. Basic attention in the work is paid to the study of 137 Cs and 90 Sr because they are the main radionuclides from the view point of radioactive danger in polluted areas. The main features and processes that control radionuclide behaviour in soil have been analysed. On the basis of natural researches, lab test and mathematical modelling the impact of physical-chemical factors and the soil component composition changes upon the radionuclides migration and sorption in natural dispersed systems (peat, sand, bentonite, kaolin, sapropel) has been investigated. The investigations done allowed to substantiate the mathematical models of the radionuclides migration in the regions of positive and negative temperatures, to develop methods of experimental identification of main transfer characteristics and to compile a data base for these models. (orig.)

  4. Transport and deposition of particles and radionuclides at the Puy de Dome, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol particles play a key role both on air quality and on the radiative balance of the Earth. Their sources, as well as their deposition are key stages in their life cycle. This work is a contribution in a better knowledge of the chemical composition of particles, cloud droplets and rain droplets. The specificity of our study is to couple, on three sampling sites (Puy de Dome (1465 m a.s.l.), Opme (660 m a.s.l.) and Cezeaux (400 m a.s.l.)), observations on the chemical composition and the radionuclides activity in cloud/rain/aerosol phases. We observed, in aerosol phase, ionic and carbonaceous concentrations and radionuclides activity higher in summer than in winter at the Puy de Dome, inverse of the seasonal variation observed at the Cezeaux for chemical compounds. From these observations, we offer a representative composition de each mass air type. This work is supplemented by a study of cloud and rain liquid, which allow us to study the scavenging of the pollutants by the rain. The chemical composition of the rain reveals a similar behaviour to that of the particles at the Puy de Dome, indicating that the role of activation and scavenging of particles is preponderant in the composition of the rain. This is confirmed by a study of the environmental and structural factors of the rain which do not seem to influence the washout ratio in a significant manner. Our work highlights the role of long range transport of pollutants in the composition of atmospheric liquid phase. (author)

  5. Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.; Cohen, N.; Trier, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Fallout plutonium and radiocesium derived from both weapons testing and local reactor releases are found in the water column and sediments of the Hudson River in readily measurable amounts. The history of fallout delivery and dissolved phase runoff from the drainage basin of 80 Sr, 137 Cs, and /sup 239,240/Pu have been extensively documented since the mid-1950s. Sediment and water column concentrations of 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and /sup 239,240/Pu in the Hudson have also been documented since the mid-1960's and are summarized. Since the peak fallout years, substantial portions of the fallout radionuclides in the drainage basin have become unavailable to normal weathering processes as reflected by a measured decrease in the fallout nuclide transport to the waters of the tidal Hudson. Budget calculations indicate that plutonium may be transported into the estuary from the coastal ocean, and that desorption of radiocesium from particles has allowed a substantial fraction of radiocesium to be exported from the Hudson to marine waters. 29 references, 6 figures, 8 tables

  6. A review of radionuclide release and transport in recent in-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, N.F.; Clough, P.N.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental series, reviewed in this work, are LOFT-LP-FP-2, PBF SFD ST to 1-4, Treat/STEP I to 4, and ACRR ST-1 and ST-2. These have the common features of in-core heating of a test fuel bundle to high temperatures (usually with some fuel melting) in an experimental reactor core, and of collecting and analysing the released fission products. They were designed to provide detailed information on the release from fuel of fission products and other radionuclides under LWR severe accident conditions, and on the chemical and physical forms and transport of the fission products. The main aim of this review is to bring together, in a systematic way, information on the conduct of the tests, on their successes and failures, and particularly on the information they generated on the chemical and physical behaviour of released fission products. By examining and analysing the data from all of the tests together, patterns of fission product behaviour may become apparent and insights may be gained, which would not be arrived at from individual test results. Moreover, important lessons may be learned, and useful guidance obtained, relating to the aims and conduct of future experimental programmes of fission product release from fuel and transport behaviour. The conclusions should be particularly relevant to the imminent Phebus-FP in-pile test series at Cadarache

  7. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides. Model testing using Chernobyl data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garger, E.; Lev, T.; Talerko, N. [Inst. of Radioecology UAAS, Kiev (Ukraine); Galeriu, D. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Garland, J. [Consultant (United Kingdom); Hoffman, O.; Nair, S.; Thiessen, K. [SENES, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, C. [Centre for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (United States); Mueller, H. [GSF - Inst. fuer Strahlenschultz, Neuherberg (Germany); Kryshev, A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Resuspension can be an important secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The inhalation of resuspended radionuclides contributes to the overall dose received by exposed individuals. Based on measurements collected after the Chernobyl accident, Scenario R was developed to provide an opportunity to test existing mathematical models of contamination resuspension. In particular, this scenario provided the opportunity to examine data and test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides at several different locations from the release, to investigate resuspension processes on both local and regional scales, and to investigate the importance of seasonal variations of these processes. Participants in the test exercise were provided with information for three different types of locations: (1) within the 30-km zone, where local resuspension processes are expected to dominate; (2) a large urban location (Kiev) 120 km from the release site, where vehicular traffic is expected to be the dominant mechanism for resuspension; and (3) an agricultural area 40-60 km from the release site, where highly contaminated upwind 'hot spots' are expected to be important. Input information included characteristics of the ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Participants were requested to predict the average (quarterly and yearly) concentrations of 137 Cs in air at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout; predictions for 90 Sr and 239 + 240 Pu were also requested for one location and time point. Predictions for specified resuspension factors and rates were also requested. Most participants used empirical models for the resuspension factor as a function of time K(t), as opposed to process-based models. While many of

  8. Development of uncertainty analyses for the transport of radionuclides from a repository for high-level radioactive waste. Stage one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstroem, B.

    1986-10-01

    The escape of radionuclides from a repository for high level waste is described by the near field model LCHCAL and the geosphere models GEO1/SU and NUCDIF. These models are used to calculate the radionuclide outflow to the biosphere. The uncertainties in the input parameters to the near field and geosphere models are handled by the uncertainty analysis models PARVAR and SYVAC/SU. The uncertainty analysis models have been tested on two nuclides, 14 C and 135 Cs, for cases with pure surface sorption and matrix diffusion. In the case of surface sorption five input parameters and for matrix diffusion six input parameters were varied. The results of the uncertainty analyses are presented in the form of histograms, scatter plots, isocontour plots and 3-dimensional plots of the radionuclide release to the biosphere. Also the ten highest maximum release rates and correlation coefficients are presented. (orig.)

  9. Sediment and toxic contaminant transport modeling in coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Mayer, D.W.; Argo, R.S.

    1982-02-01

    A hydrodynamic model, CAFE-I, a wave refraction model, LO3D, and a sediment and contaminant transport model, FETRA, were selected as tools for evaluating exposure levels of radionuclides, heavy metals, and other toxic chemicals in coastal waters. Prior to the application of these models to the Irish Sea and other coastal waters, the finite element model, FETRA, was tested to demonstrate its ability to simulate sediment and contaminant interactions (e.g., adsorption and desorption), and the mechanisms governing the transport, deposition, and resuspension of contaminated sediments

  10. Simplified analytical model to simulate radionuclide release from radioactive waste trenches; Modelo simplificado para simulacao da liberacao de radionuclideos de repositorios de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Bernardete Lemes Vieira de

    2001-07-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, a computer code was developed to simulate the radionuclide released from waste form, transport through vadose zone and transport in the saturated zone. This paper describes the methodology used to model these process. The radionuclide released from the waste is calculated using a model based on first order kinetics and the transport through porous media was determined using semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation, considering the limiting case of unidirectional convective transport with three-dimensional dispersion in an isotropic medium. The results obtained in this work were compared with other codes, showing good agreement. (author)

  11. Dispersive processes in models of regional radionuclide migration. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, D.E.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    Three broad areas of concern in the development of aquifer scale transport models will be local scale diffusion and dispersion processes, regional scale dispersion processes, and numerical problems associated with the advection-dispersion equation. Local scale dispersion processes are fairly well understood and accessible to observation. These processes will generally be dominated in large scale systems by regional processes, or macro-dispersion. Macro-dispersion is primarily the result of large scale heterogeneities in aquifer properties. In addition, the effects of many modeling approximations are often included in the process. Because difficulties arise in parameterization of this large scale phenomenon, parameterization should be based on field measurements made at the same scale as the transport process of interest or else partially circumvented through the application of a probabilistic advection model. Other problems associated with numerical transport models include difficulties with conservation of mass, stability, numerical dissipation, overshoot, flexibility, and efficiency. We recommend the random-walk model formulation for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's purposes as the most flexible, accurate and relatively efficient modeling approach that overcomes these difficulties

  12. Benchmark studies of computer prediction techniques for equilibrium chemistry and radionuclide transport in groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of two recent benchmark exercises is presented. These were separately concerned with the equilibrium chemistry of groundwater and the geosphere migration of radionuclides, and involved the use of a total of 19 computer codes by 11 organisations in Europe and Canada. A similar methodology was followed for each exercise, in that series of hypothetical test cases were used to explore the limits of each code's application, and so provide an overview of current modelling potential. Aspects of the user-friendliness of individual codes were also considered. The benchmark studies have benefited participating organisations by providing a means of verifying current codes, and have provided problem data sets by which future models may be compared. (author)

  13. Radionuclide-migration model for buried waste at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.M.; Root, R.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Solid waste has been buried at the Savannah River Plant burial ground since 1953. The solid waste is contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium (TRU) nuclides, with beta-gamma-emitting activation and fission products, and with tritium. To provide guidance for the current use and eventual permanent retirement of the burial site from active service, a radionuclide environmental transport model has been used to project the potential influence on man if the burial site were occupied after decommissioning. The model used to simulate nuclide migration includes the various hydrological, animal, vegetative, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways in estimating dose to man as a function of time. Specific scenarios include a four-person home farm on the 195-acre burial ground. Key input to the model includes site-specific nuclide migration rates through soil, nuclide distribution coefficients, and site topography. Coupled with literature data on plant and animal concentration factors, transfer coefficients reflecting migration routes are input to a set of linear differential equations for subsequent matrix solution. Output from the model is the nuclide-specific decayed curie intake by man. To discern principal migration routes, model-compartment inventories with time can also be displayed. Dose projections subsequently account for organ concentrations in man for the nuclide of interest. Radionuclide migration has been examined in depth with the dose-to-man model. Movement by vegetative pathways is the primary route for potential dose to man for short-lived isotopes. Hydrological routes provide a secondary scheme for long-lived nuclides. Details of model methodology are reviewed

  14. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, Nathalie A.; Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Assessments of waste form and disposal options start with the degradation of the waste forms and consequent mobilization of radionuclides. Long-term static tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and the pressurized unsaturated flow test are often employed to study the durability of potential waste forms and to help create models that predict their durability throughout the lifespan of the disposal site. These tests involve the corrosion of the material in the presence of various leachants, with different experimental designs yielding desired information about the behavior of the material. Though these tests have proved instrumental in elucidating various mechanisms responsible for material corrosion, the chemical environment to which the material is subject is often not representative of a potential radioactive waste repository where factors such as pH and leachant composition will be controlled by the near-field environment. Near-field materials include, but are not limited to, the original engineered barriers, their resulting corrosion products, backfill materials, and the natural host rock. For an accurate performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository, realistic waste corrosion experimental data ought to be modeled to allow for a better understanding of waste form corrosion mechanisms and the effect of immediate geochemical environment on these mechanisms. Additionally, the migration of radionuclides in the resulting chemical environment during and after waste form corrosion must be quantified and mechanisms responsible for migrations understood. The goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms responsible for waste form corrosion in the presence of relevant repository sediments to allow for accurate radionuclide migration quantifications. The rationale for this work is that a better understanding of waste form corrosion in relevant systems will enable increased reliance on waste form performance in repository environments and potentially

  15. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Assessments of waste form and disposal options start with the degradation of the waste forms and consequent mobilization of radionuclides. Long-term static tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and the pressurized unsaturated flow test are often employed to study the durability of potential waste forms and to help create models that predict their durability throughout the lifespan of the disposal site. These tests involve the corrosion of the material in the presence of various leachants, with different experimental designs yielding desired information about the behavior of the material. Though these tests have proved instrumental in elucidating various mechanisms responsible for material corrosion, the chemical environment to which the material is subject is often not representative of a potential radioactive waste repository where factors such as pH and leachant composition will be controlled by the near-field environment. Near-field materials include, but are not limited to, the original engineered barriers, their resulting corrosion products, backfill materials, and the natural host rock. For an accurate performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository, realistic waste corrosion experimental data ought to be modeled to allow for a better understanding of waste form corrosion mechanisms and the effect of immediate geochemical environment on these mechanisms. Additionally, the migration of radionuclides in the resulting chemical environment during and after waste form corrosion must be quantified and mechanisms responsible for migrations understood. The goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms responsible for waste form corrosion in the presence of relevant repository sediments to a