WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling individuals employing

  1. Video Self-Modeling: A Job Skills Intervention with Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Employment Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ailsa E.; Bambara, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of video self-modeling (VSM) to teach chained job tasks to individuals with intellectual disability in community-based employment settings. Initial empirical evaluations have demonstrated that VSM when used in combination with other instructional strategies, are effective methods to teach…

  2. Video Self-Modeling: A Job Skills Intervention with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in Employment Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ailsa E.

    2010-01-01

    A large majority of adults with intellectual disabilities are unemployed. Unemployment of adults with intellectual disabilities is a complex multidimensional issue. Some barriers to employment of individuals with intellectual disabilities are the lack of job experience and skills training. In recent years, video-based interventions, such as video…

  3. EMPLOYER BRAND AND ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Stošić Mihajlović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As companies and individuals to live their best release? What should companies and individuals were the most successful? What job would bring the most satisfaction and opportunities for further development? What would be the fastest way led to the realization of corporate goals and their own? Answers to these questions can be obtained through analysis of employer brand and Analysis of individual potential (AIP. Employer brand analysis and analysis of individual potential is the process of identifying the strengths and potential of the company as well as a person. In this way, determining what it is that a company or person works best, how to motivate people and to the field of application of discovered talent. The main objective of this procedure is the development of an overall as well as personal and professional development of individuals in the direction of those activities and areas that will bring long-term satisfaction

  4. 75 FR 45039 - Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals With Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... living with a disability, in eliminating the stigma associated with disability, and in encouraging... 13548 of July 26, 2010 Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals With Disabilities By the authority... to establish the Federal Government as a model employer of individuals with disabilities, it is...

  5. 20 CFR 345.201 - Individual employer record defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subpart, “Individual Employer Record” means a record of each employer's benefit ratio; reserve ratio; 1-year compensation base; 3-year compensation base; unallocated charge; reserve balance; net...

  6. Using the Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to improve employment and clinical outcomes of homeless youth with mental illness1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research reveals high unemployment rates among homeless youth. The literature offers many examples of using evidence-informed and evidence-based supported employment models with vulnerable populations to assist them in obtaining and maintaining employment and concurrently addressing mental health challenges. However, there are few examples to date of these models with homeless youth with mental illness. The purpose of this article was thus to describe a methodology for establishing a university-agency research partnership to design, implement, evaluate, and replicate evidence-informed and evidence-based interventions with homeless youth with mental illness to enhance their employment, mental health, and functional outcomes. Data from two studies are used to illustrate the relationship between vocational skill-building/employment and mental health among homeless youth. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of conducting community-based participatory employment and clinical intervention research. The author highlights the opportunities and tensions associated with this approach. PMID:24294127

  7. Using the Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to improve employment and clinical outcomes of homeless youth with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M

    2013-09-01

    Prior research reveals high unemployment rates among homeless youth. The literature offers many examples of using evidence-informed and evidence-based supported employment models with vulnerable populations to assist them in obtaining and maintaining employment and concurrently addressing mental health challenges. However, there are few examples to date of these models with homeless youth with mental illness. The purpose of this article was thus to describe a methodology for establishing a university-agency research partnership to design, implement, evaluate, and replicate evidence-informed and evidence-based interventions with homeless youth with mental illness to enhance their employment, mental health, and functional outcomes. Data from two studies are used to illustrate the relationship between vocational skill-building/employment and mental health among homeless youth. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of conducting community-based participatory employment and clinical intervention research. The author highlights the opportunities and tensions associated with this approach.

  8. Ten-Year Employment Patterns of Working Age Individuals After Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Pretz, Christopher R; Bushnik, Tamara; Fraser, Robert T; Hart, Tessa; Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie A; Malec, James F; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Sherer, Mark

    2015-12-01

    To describe the 10-year patterns of employment for individuals of working age discharged from a Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) center between 1989 and 2009. Secondary data analysis. Inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients aged 16 to 55 years (N=3618) who were not retired at injury, received inpatient rehabilitation at a TBIMS center, were discharged alive between 1989 and 2009, and had at least 3 completed follow-up interviews at postinjury years 1, 2, 5, and 10. Not applicable. Employment. Patterns of employment were generated using a generalized linear mixed model, where these patterns were transformed into temporal trajectories of probability of employment via random effects modeling. Covariates demonstrating significant relations to growth parameters that govern the trajectory patterns were similar to those noted in previous cross-sectional research and included age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, preinjury substance misuse, preinjury vocational status, and days of posttraumatic amnesia. The calendar year in which the injury occurred also greatly influenced trajectories. An interactive tool was developed to provide visualization of all postemployment trajectories, with many showing decreasing probabilities of employment between 5 and 10 years postinjury. These results highlight that postinjury employment after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a dynamic process, with varied patterns of employment for individuals with specific characteristics. The overall decline in trajectories of probability of employment between 5 and 10 years postinjury suggests that moderate to severe TBI may have unfavorable chronic effects and that employment outcome is highly influenced by national labor market forces. Additional research targeting the underlying drivers of the decline between 5 and 10 years postinjury is recommended, as are interventions that target influencing factors. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  9. Negotiating Individual Employment Relations, Evidence from four Dutch Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Goudswaard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose is to assess the actual experiences of companies in the context of individualised employment relationships. We have three questions: (1 what issues of the employment relationship can be individually negotiated in organizations? (scope; (2 what issues of the employment relationship are individually negotiated in organizations? (actual use; (3 what are the advantages and disadvantages of negotiations according to employees and managers?; We conducted four case studies in Dutch companies in different sectors (telecom, insurance, manufacturing and consultancy. The data were collected in a total of 69 semi-structured interviews with line managers, HR managers and shop floor employees. We focused on five topics of the employment relation: contract, working hours, wages, development and performance. We found that the scope for negotiation differs according to topic: there is considerable scope with regard to working hours, development and contract and little scope with regard to wages and performance goals. However, employees and supervisors use the scope for negotiating only for working hours and to a lesser extent development. On other topics negotiations hardly take place (e.g. contract or only under specific conditions (e.g. performance goals in non-routine processes. Furthermore, we found that employees and managers perceive both advantages and disadvantages of negotiations. Considering the (dis advantages our conclusion is that there must be an optimum in the scope and use of negotiating the employment relationship in order to serve conditions as fairness, fit, cost effectiveness and extra-role behaviour.Our paper provides empirical data on how individualised employment relations take place in practice. It offers insight in different companies on the scope for, the actual use of and the effects of individual negotiations on different aspects of the employment relationship.

  10. Five-Factor Model of Personality, Work Behavior Self-Efficacy, and Length of Prior Employment for Individuals with Disabilities: An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    With the continued lower employment rate for persons with disabilities, researchers are focusing more on barriers to employment that reach beyond functional impairment. Personality and self-efficacy have consistently been important factors when considering employment outcomes for persons without disability; less is known about these factors as…

  11. Five-Factor Model of Personality, Work Behavior Self-Efficacy, and Length of Prior Employment for Individuals with Disabilities: An Exploratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    With the continued lower employment rate for persons with disabilities, researchers are focusing more on barriers to employment that reach beyond functional impairment. Personality and self-efficacy have consistently been important factors when considering employment outcomes for persons without disability; less is known about these factors as…

  12. Individual employment, household employment and risk of poverty in the EU: a decomposition analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corluy, V.; Vandenbroucke, F.

    2013-01-01

    This Working Paper explores the missing links between employment policy success and social inclusion policy failure. The focus is on individuals in the 20 to 59 age cohort and empirical analyses are relying on the EU Labour Force Survey (EU LFS) and the EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions

  13. Virtual Reality Job Interview Training and 6-Month Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Schizophrenia Seeking Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Fleming, Michael F.; Wright, Michael A.; Roberts, Andrea G.; Humm, Laura Boteler; Olsen, Dale; Bell, Morris D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Individuals with schizophrenia have low employment rates and the job interview presents a critical barrier for them to obtain employment. Virtual reality training has demonstrated efficacy at improving interview skills and employment outcomes among multiple clinical populations. However, the effects of this training on individuals with schizophrenia are unknown. This study evaluated the efficacy of virtual reality job interview training (VR-JIT) at improving job interview skills and employment outcomes among individuals with schizophrenia in a small randomized controlled trial (n=21 VR-JIT trainees, n=11 waitlist controls). METHODS Trainees completed up to 10 hours of virtual interviews using VR-JIT, while controls received services as usual. Primary outcome measures included two pre-test and two post-test video-recorded role-play interviews scored by blinded human resource experts and self-reported interviewing self-confidence. Six-month follow-up data on employment outcomes were collected. RESULTS Trainees reported the intervention was easy-to-use, helpful, and prepared them for future interviews. Trainees demonstrated increased role-play scores between pre-test and post-test while controls did not (p=0.001). After accounting for neurocognition and months since prior employment, trainees had greater odds of receiving a job offer by 6 month follow-up compared to controls (OR: 8.73, p=0.04) and more training was associated with fewer weeks until receiving a job offer (r=−0.63, pskills in individuals with schizophrenia. Moreover, trainees had greater odds of receiving a job offer by 6-month follow-up. Future studies could evaluate the effectiveness of VR-JIT within community-based services. PMID:26032567

  14. Enhancing Individual Employability: The Perspective of Engineering Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Employability includes the ability to find employment and remain employed. Employability includes both hard and soft skills, including formal and actual competence, interpersonal skills, and personal characteristics. This paper aims to focus on illuminating perceptions engineering graduates have regarding employability. More specifically,…

  15. Effects of non-employment in early work-life on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, A.R.C.M.; Wolbers, M.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the effects of non-employment in early work-life on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the Netherlands are examined. A main concern is whether the experience of non-employment in the beginning of the career (permanently) damages a workers later employment opportunities

  16. Individual Colorimetric Observer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Asano

    Full Text Available This study proposes a vision model for individual colorimetric observers. The proposed model can be beneficial in many color-critical applications such as color grading and soft proofing to assess ranges of color matches instead of a single average match. We extended the CIE 2006 physiological observer by adding eight additional physiological parameters to model individual color-normal observers. These eight parameters control lens pigment density, macular pigment density, optical densities of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments, and λmax shifts of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments. By identifying the variability of each physiological parameter, the model can simulate color matching functions among color-normal populations using Monte Carlo simulation. The variabilities of the eight parameters were identified through two steps. In the first step, extensive reviews of past studies were performed for each of the eight physiological parameters. In the second step, the obtained variabilities were scaled to fit a color matching dataset. The model was validated using three different datasets: traditional color matching, applied color matching, and Rayleigh matches.

  17. Employment Rights of Handicapped Individuals: Statutory and Judicial Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Toni M.

    1978-01-01

    Analyzes existing legislation, regulations, and case law interpreting statutory mandates to provide a survey of the current status of employment rights for the handicapped. Suggests an administrative framework to alleviate weaknesses in existing governmental programs. Available from Marshall-Wythe School of Law of the College of William and Mary,…

  18. Individual and organisational predictors influencing ageing workers’ employability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wognum, A.A.M.; Breukers, A.; Wittpoth, M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    An important way to improve ageing workersʼ employability is through participation in formal and informal human resource development (HRD) activities. However, older workers remain underrepresented in most forms of training and development, and company policies are hardly directed at improving older

  19. Globalisation, the development of constitutionalism and the individual employer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Calitz

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available To establish which legal system will govern the relationship between parties involved in an international employment contract, the rules of private international law (or conflict of laws must be applied. Each country has its own rules of private international law and each country’s courts will apply its own rules if the court is seized with a matter that involves foreign elements. There may be conflict between the potentially applicable legal systems of countries in terms of the level of protection afforded to employees who are parties to international employment contracts. South Africa has constitutionalised the right to fair labour practices and the question is whether this right is applicable to South African employees working in other countries, or to foreigners working in South Africa who originate from countries where this right is not protected. The answer to this question is to be found in the influence of the Constitution on the rules of private international law as applied by South African courts. It is evident from recent judgments of the Labour Court that the Court will readily assume jurisdiction and will furthermore readily hold that the proper law of the contract is South African law in order to protect the constitutional rights of employees involved in international employment contracts. Had the Labour Court held that the place of performance was still the decisive connecting factor, (as previously decided in most South African cases on this aspect the law of the other countries involved in the international employment relationship could have left employees in a worse position than under South African law. This possibility seems to be one of the important underlying reasons for the Labour Court’s willingness to assume jurisdiction and to hold that the proper law was in fact South African law. In the globalisation context the Labour Court has contributed to the advancement of constitutionalism by developing South Africa

  20. JobTIPS: A Transition to Employment Program for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Strickland, Dorothy C.; Coles, Claire D.; Southern, Louise B.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an Internet accessed training program that included Theory of Mind-based guidance, video models, visual supports, and virtual reality practice sessions in teaching appropriate job interview skills to individuals with high functioning ASD. In a randomized study, twenty two youth, ages 16 to 19, were evaluated during two employment interviews. Half received a training intervention following the initial interview and the half who served as a contrast gro...

  1. Unrealized Potential: Differing Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Other Disability Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Temelini, David; Graham, Audrey

    This brief discusses outcomes of a study that investigated the employment and job search practices used with individuals with mental retardation to those used with individuals with mental illness, sensory impairments, and physical impairments. Survey participants included 568 employment staff and 303 individuals with disabilities from community…

  2. 76 FR 42131 - Agency Information Collection Activities: DHS Individual Complaint of Employment Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: DHS Individual Complaint of Employment Discrimination... prohibit discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age.... Persons who claim to have been subjected to these types of discrimination, or to retaliation for...

  3. Individual Differences in Equity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmans, Joeri

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we (1) study whether people differ in the equity models they use, and (2) test whether individual differences in equity models relate to individual differences in equity sensitivity. To achieve this goal, an Information Integration experiment was performed in which participants were given information on the performance of two…

  4. Employment Interventions for Individuals with ASD: The Relative Efficacy of Supported Employment With or Without Prior Project SEARCH Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Carol M; Wehman, Paul; Brooke, Valerie; Graham, Carolyn; McDonough, Jennifer; Brooke, Alissa; Ham, Whitney; Rounds, Rachael; Lau, Stephanie; Allen, Jaclyn

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents findings from a retrospective observational records review study that compares the outcomes associated with implementation of supported employment (SE) with and without prior Project SEARCH with ASD Supports (PS-ASD) on wages earned, time spent in intervention, and job retention. Results suggest that SE resulted in competitive employment for 45 adults with ASD. Twenty-five individuals received prior intervention through PS-ASD while the other 20 individuals received SE only. Individuals in this sample who received PS-ASD required fewer hours of intervention. Additionally, individuals in the PS-ASD group achieved a mean higher wage and had higher retention rates than their peers who received SE only. Further research with a larger sample is needed to confirm these findings.

  5. The role of developmental work personality in the employment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R; O'Sullivan, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Due to the current demands of today's competitive and team-oriented workplaces, organizations are becoming increasingly dependent on assessing potential and current employee traits that go beyond skills and education. Contextual work behaviors, such as getting along with others, accepting supervision, and ability to adapt to changes, are proving to be salient factors in predicting overall successful employment outcomes. These contextual behaviors are often learned in childhood during the school years and by watching parents and role models demonstrate behaviors related to work. Individuals with psychiatric disabilities often have a harder time than individuals who do not experience symptoms of psychiatric disabilities demonstrating positive contextual work behaviors. This paper will outline the importance of evaluating work personality using the Developmental Work Personality Scale for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

  6. Markowitz portfolio optimization model employing fuzzy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Suhailywati; Jaaman, Saiful Hafizah

    2017-04-01

    Markowitz in 1952 introduced the mean-variance methodology for the portfolio selection problems. His pioneering research has shaped the portfolio risk-return model and become one of the most important research fields in modern finance. This paper extends the classical Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio selection model applying the fuzzy measure to determine the risk and return. In this paper, we apply the original mean-variance model as a benchmark, fuzzy mean-variance model with fuzzy return and the model with return are modeled by specific types of fuzzy number for comparison. The model with fuzzy approach gives better performance as compared to the mean-variance approach. The numerical examples are included to illustrate these models by employing Malaysian share market data.

  7. The Effect of Postsecondary Education on Employment and Income for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannicandro, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The low employment rates of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are a major concern. In 2011 only 34% of adults with ID were employed compared to 76% of adults without disabilities (Siperstein, Parker, & Drascher, 2013). Higher educational attainment is associated with higher employment rates for students with ID (Smith, Grigal,…

  8. Explaining the Muslim employment gap in Western Europe: individual-level effects and ethno-religious penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Phillip; Koenig, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    It is well-documented that Muslims experience economic disadvantages in Western European labor markets. However, few studies comprehensively test individual-level explanations for the Muslim employment gap. Using data from the European Social Survey, this research note briefly examines the role of individual-level differences between Muslims and non-Muslims in mediating employment differences. Results reveal that human capital, migration background, religiosity, cultural values, and perceptions of discrimination jointly account for about 40% of the employment variance between Muslims and non-Muslims. Model specifications for first- and second-generation Muslim immigrants reveal a similar pattern, with migration background and perceived discrimination being of key relevance in mediating employment difference. While individual-level effects are indeed relevant, unexplained variance suggests that symbolic boundaries against Islam may still translate into tangible ethno-religious penalties.

  9. Toward the Employability-Link Model: Current Employment Transition to Future Employment Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, Johannes G.L.; Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2008-01-01

    This article goes into a critical analysis of the concept of employability, its development across historical periods, its components, and different strategic approaches to enhance workers' employability throughout their career. Given the need for a systematic analysis and more empirical research in

  10. 76 FR 24503 - Agency Information Collection Activities: DHS Individual Complaint of Employment Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: DHS Individual Complaint of Employment Discrimination... form is used for original allegations of discrimination but also for amendments to underlying complaints of discrimination. The form also determines whether the person is willing to participate...

  11. Individuals' perceptions of employment accommodation decisions and solutions: lessons for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Helen P; Thurman, Hanna; Cordingly, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Disability rights advocates in social work have claimed that employment opportunities for people with disabilities are an important part of personal empowerment and social inclusion. Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act is aimed at ensuring meaningful employment opportunities are available. Hahn and Raske (2005) state that social work needs to develop a research paradigm that values the inclusion of people with disabilities. This article examines these efforts by incorporating the voices of individuals with disabilities who accessed services at the Job Accommodation Network. Understanding individuals' perspectives could contribute to better accommodation outcomes for people with disabilities, employers, and advocacy professionals alike.

  12. INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT SPECIAL STIPULATIONS OTHER THAN THOSE PROVIDED BY THE LABOUR CODE

    OpenAIRE

    ADA HURBEAN

    2011-01-01

    The individual employment contract parties can negotiate and provide stipulations that govern their juridical labour relations, other than those stipulated by Labour Code, according with the paraghraph1 article 20 of the bill in discussion. In principle, this legal liberty is the expression of the will’s autonomy of the parties to conclude any legal act. We have to say that these stipulations transform the employment contract of an act imposed, an adhesion act in one governed by the principle...

  13. Motion Model Employment using interacting Motion Model Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

    model being correct is computed through a likelihood function for each model.  The study presented a simple technique to introduce additional models into the system using deterministic acceleration which basically defines the dynamics of the system.  Therefore, based on this value more motion models can...... be employed to increase the coverage.  Finally, the combined estimate is obtained using posteriori probabilities from different filter models.   The implemented approach provides an adaptive scheme for selecting various number of motion models.  Motion model description is important as it defines the kind...

  14. Postsecondary inclusion for individuals with an intellectual disability and its effects on employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eric J; Schelling, Amy

    2015-06-01

    Postsecondary education (PSE) programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have emerged exponentially in the United States over the last decade. Research regarding these postsecondary programs has largely been descriptive, and thus, there exists a need for qualitative, outcome-based research. In this comparative case report, graduates from two types of PSE programs for individuals with IDs are surveyed regarding employment outcomes and other personal developments. The results from each postsecondary program are compared with one another and also with a comparison group of individuals with IDs who did not attend a postsecondary program (utilizing the 2009 National Longitudinal Transition Study 2). This case demonstrates significant positive employment outcomes for individuals with IDs who attend postsecondary programs compared to those who do not attend such programs and highlights similarities and differences regarding outcomes of the two program types under consideration.

  15. A longitudinal study of employment and skill acquisition among individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dawn L; Collins, Michael D; Dodder, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Recent legislation, especially the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, generated the closure of institutions for people with disabilities and inclusion into community residences and employment. It has been well documented that individuals with developmental disabilities often experience difficulties with employment including both obtaining and maintaining jobs, and many researchers have looked for ways to make employment more successful [McConkey, R. & Mezza F. (2001). Employment aspirations of people with learning disabilities attending day centers. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 5(4), 309-318; Stevens, G. (2002). Employers' perceptions and practice in the employability of disabled people: a survey of companies in south east UK. Disability and Society, 17(7), 779-796; Capella, M., Roessler, R., & Hemmeria, K. (2002). Work-related skills awareness in high-school students with disabilities. Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 33(2), 17-23; Ingraham, K., Rahimi, M., Tsang, H., Chan, F., & Oulvey, E. (2001). Work support groups in state vocational rehabilitation agency settings: a case study. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Skills, 5(1), 6-21; Gosling, V. & Cotterill, L. (2000). An employment project as a route to social inclusion for people with learning difficulties? Disability and Society, 15(7), 1001-1018; Neitupski, J. & Hamre-Nietupski, S. (2000). A systematic process for carving supported employment positions for people with severe disabilities. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 12(2), 103-119]. While research has accumulated that has examined predictors of successful employment, this research assessed longitudinal outcomes of employment. Data were obtained from an existing data set of all known persons receiving services from the Developmental Disabilities Division of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (N=2760). Results indicated that as people moved to employment, scores on adaptive skills increased, that as people moved

  16. Intervention Practices in the Retention of Competitive Employment among Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Anjoo; Stephens, Barry C.

    This report discusses the results of a national study of 89 rehabilitation counselors that investigated the methods by which an individual could retain competitive employment after the onset of a significant vision loss. The purpose of the study was to identify and describe strategies that contribute to successful job retention and identify best…

  17. 26 CFR 1.401(e)-1 - Definitions relating to plans covering self-employed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-employed individuals may be covered by a qualified pension, annuity, or profit-sharing plan. This section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus... owner-employees for premiums on annuity, etc., contracts and a transitional rule for certain...

  18. Partnering with Employers to Promote Job Advancement for Low-Skill Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Karin

    2010-01-01

    The current economic climate in the United States and the difficulty employers face in hiring and maintaining a skilled workforce in an increasingly competitive and global economy have generated interest in developing and promoting policies and programs that can most effectively help low-skill individuals gain job skills and move up the economic…

  19. Motion Model Employment using interacting Motion Model Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a simulation study to track a maneuvering target using a selective approach in choosing Interacting Multiple Models (IMM) algorithm to provide a wider coverage to track such targets.  Initially, there are two motion models in the system to track a target.  Probability of each...... model being correct is computed through a likelihood function for each model.  The study presented a simple technique to introduce additional models into the system using deterministic acceleration which basically defines the dynamics of the system.  Therefore, based on this value more motion models can...... be employed to increase the coverage.  Finally, the combined estimate is obtained using posteriori probabilities from different filter models.   The implemented approach provides an adaptive scheme for selecting various number of motion models.  Motion model description is important as it defines the kind...

  20. Does pain in individuals with multiple sclerosis affect employment? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrbanian, Shahnaz; Auais, Mohammad; Duquette, Pierre; Anderson, Katie; Mayo, Nancy E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience some of the highest unemployment rates among all groups of chronic illnesses. Pain has been found to be a common reason for sick leave or early retirement in healthy populations or other groups with chronic illness; however, there is little awareness regarding the effect of pain on the work status of individuals with MS. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the extent to which individuals with pain differ in employment status compared with those without pain among MS patients. METHODS: An extensive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration to identify studies focusing on the effect of pain on employment in individuals with MS. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, PsychInfo, Web of Science, MD Consult and Elsevier, and Science Direct. The methodological quality of studies was assessed using the McMaster Critical Review Form. RESULTS: Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Of these studies, five that exhibited clinical, methodological and statistical homogeneity were included in the meta-analysis. The between-groups (pain + versus pain −) pooled random OR of being employed was 0.7 (strong), and was significantly different from unity (95% CI 0.5 to 0.9; P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study indicated that individuals with MS who experience pain were significantly more likely to report a decreased employment rate than individuals with MS who were pain free. PMID:24093124

  1. Effective Employer Engagement: The Year Up Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workforce Strategy Center, 2009

    2009-01-01

    It is hard to imagine a more critical time for helping the low-skilled and disenfranchised youth in our communities to become gainfully employed. Even as the nation suffers through its worst economic downturn in decades, America's business and industry leaders are predicting an unprecedented shortage of educated and skilled workers to meet the…

  2. 25 CFR 63.22 - Can an employer certify an individual with a prior conviction or substantiated misconduct as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can an employer certify an individual with a prior conviction or substantiated misconduct as suitable for employment? 63.22 Section 63.22 Indians BUREAU OF... individual with a prior conviction or substantiated misconduct as suitable for employment? (a) The Bureau...

  3. Rehabilitation-Related Research on Disability and Employer Practices Using Individual-Based National and Administrative Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Zafar E.; Erickson, William A.; Bruyère, Susanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: It is useful to examine workplace factors influencing employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities and the interplay of disability, employment-related, and employer characteristics to inform rehabilitation practice. Design: A number of large national survey and administrative data sets provide information on employers and can…

  4. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eRay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A spindle detection method was developed that: 1 extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma relative to ongoing background sigma activity using complex demodulation, 2 accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and 3 employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile. Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11-16 Hz filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles.

  5. Individual Influence on Model Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Sonya K.; Pek, Jolynn

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in psychology are increasingly using model selection strategies to decide among competing models, rather than evaluating the fit of a given model in isolation. However, such interest in model selection outpaces an awareness that one or a few cases can have disproportionate impact on the model ranking. Though case influence on the fit…

  6. Individual, employment and psychosocial factors influencing walking to work: Implications for intervention design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Emma J; Esliger, Dale W; Taylor, Ian M; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-01-01

    Promoting walking for the journey to and from work (commuter walking) is a potential strategy for increasing physical activity. Understanding the factors influencing commuter walking is important for identifying target groups and designing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors associated with commuter walking and to discuss the implications for targeting and future design of interventions. 1,544 employees completed a baseline survey as part of the 'Walking Works' intervention project (33.4% male; 36.3% aged logistic regression was used to examine the associations of individual (age, ethnic group, educational qualifications, number of children <16 and car ownership), employment-related (distance lived from work, free car parking at work, working hours, working pattern and occupation) and psychosocial factors (perceived behavioural control, intention, social norms and social support from work colleagues) with commuter walking. Almost half of respondents (n = 587, 49%) were classified as commuter walkers. Those who were aged <30 years, did not have a car, had no free car parking at work, were confident of including some walking or intended to walk to or from work on a regular basis, and had support from colleagues for walking were more likely to be commuter walkers. Those who perceived they lived too far away from work to walk, thought walking was less convenient than using a car for commuting, did not have time to walk, needed a car for work or had always travelled the same way were less likely to be commuter walkers. A number of individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors were associated with commuter walking. Target groups for interventions to promote walking to and from work may include those in older age groups and those who own or have access to a car. Multi-level interventions targeting individual level behaviour change, social support within the workplace and organisational

  7. A qualitative study of stress in individuals self-employed in solo businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Mazzola, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    This qualitative study involved 54 individuals who were self-employed in a variety of solo businesses. All participants were administered a semistructured interview that inquired into various aspects of their work experience with the data subject to reliability and validity checks. The study identified stressful incidents, coping strategies, and emotional strains arising from those stressful incidents. Uncertainty about income was a common background stressor. Recent specific stressors included dramatic slowdowns in business, reputational threat, betrayal, unreasonable customers, and medical problems. Commonly occurring strains included apprehension/anxiety, frustration, anger, and sadness/depression. The self-employed used problem-focused coping much more often than emotion-focused coping. We also identified a third kind of coping that we labeled humanitarian coping. A number of questions/hypotheses for future research emerged, including identifying (a) a tipping point bearing on when the psychological benefits of self-employment (e.g., autonomy) are overtaken by business losses outside the individual's control and (b) the coping strategies that are most useful in managing work-related stressors.

  8. An employer brand predictive model for talent attraction and retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelize Botha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In an ever shrinking global talent pool organisations use employer brand to attract and retain talent, however, in the absence of theoretical pointers, many organisations are losing out on a powerful business tool by not developing or maintaining their employer brand correctly. Research purpose: This study explores the current state of knowledge about employer brand and identifies the various employer brand building blocks which are conceptually integrated in a predictive model.Motivation for the study: The need for scientific progress though the accurate representation of a set of employer brand phenomena and propositions, which can be empirically tested, motivated this study.Research design, approach and method: This study was nonempirical in approach and searched for linkages between theoretical concepts by making use of relevant contextual data. Theoretical propositions which explain the identified linkages were developed for purpose of further empirical research.Main findings: Key findings suggested that employer brand is influenced by target group needs, a differentiated Employer Value Proposition (EVP, the people strategy, brand consistency, communication of the employer brand and measurement of Human Resources (HR employer branding efforts.Practical/managerial implications: The predictive model provides corporate leaders and their human resource functionaries a theoretical pointer relative to employer brand which could guide more effective talent attraction and retention decisions.Contribution/value add: This study adds to the small base of research available on employer brand and contributes to both scientific progress as well as an improved practical understanding of factors which influence employer brand.

  9. Employment consequences of depressive symptoms and work demands individually and combined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielen, Karsten; Nygaard, Else; Andersen, Ingelise

    2013-01-01

    . In total, 5785 employed persons, aged 40 and 50 years, were included. Information about employment status, sick leave and work disability was obtained from registers. Logistic regression models were used to measure separate and combined effects of depressive symptoms and work demands on job change......BACKGROUND: Denmark, like other Western countries, is recently burdened by increasingly high social spending on employment consequences caused by ill mental health. This might be the result of high work demands affecting persons with ill mental health. Therefore, this study assesses to what extent......, unemployment and sick leave during 2001-02 and work disability during 2003-07. RESULTS: After adjustment for covariates, high physical work demands and depressive symptoms had a graded effect on subsequent unemployment, sick leave and permanent work disability. Persons with both depressive symptoms and high...

  10. 34 CFR 361.55 - Annual review of individuals in extended employment and other employment under special...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other employment under special certificate provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 361.55 Section... under special certificate provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. (a) The State plan must assure... section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act; or (2) Whose record of services is closed while the...

  11. INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT SPECIAL STIPULATIONS OTHER THAN THOSE PROVIDED BY THE LABOUR CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADA HURBEAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The individual employment contract parties can negotiate and provide stipulations that govern their juridical labour relations, other than those stipulated by Labour Code, according with the paraghraph1 article 20 of the bill in discussion. In principle, this legal liberty is the expression of the will’s autonomy of the parties to conclude any legal act. We have to say that these stipulations transform the employment contract of an act imposed, an adhesion act in one governed by the principle of contractual freedom, even if the juridical literature calls these nonessential and optional clauses.In concreto, the employee and employer may agree to any provision not contrary to imperative stipulation of law, public order or morality. Thus, in this study we aimed to analyze those terms often encounter in labour relations: terms of intellectual propriety rights, conscience, stability, risk, delegation of responsibilities, objective, restriction of free time, index clause, without claiming exhaustive treatment of this topic, considering the development and adaptation of labor relations in Romania in the European context and beyond.

  12. An Econometric Model for Forecasting Income and Employment in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Laurence C.

    This report presents the methodology for short-run forecasting of personal income and employment in Hawaii. The econometric model developed in the study is used to make actual forecasts through 1973 of income and employment, with major components forecasted separately. Several sets of forecasts are made, under different assumptions on external…

  13. JobTIPS: A Transition to Employment Program for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Dorothy C.; Coles, Claire D.; Southern, Louise B.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an internet accessed training program that included Theory of Mind-based guidance, video models, visual supports, and virtual reality practice sessions in teaching appropriate job interview skills to individuals with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders. In a randomized study, twenty-two youth, ages…

  14. Hierarchical mixture models for assessing fingerprint individuality

    OpenAIRE

    Dass, Sarat C.; Li, Mingfei

    2009-01-01

    The study of fingerprint individuality aims to determine to what extent a fingerprint uniquely identifies an individual. Recent court cases have highlighted the need for measures of fingerprint individuality when a person is identified based on fingerprint evidence. The main challenge in studies of fingerprint individuality is to adequately capture the variability of fingerprint features in a population. In this paper hierarchical mixture models are introduced to infer the extent of individua...

  15. Employer-driven consumerism: integrating health into the business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Checkley, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Consumer-driven health care is a misnomer. Notwithstanding the enormous role the individual consumer has to play in reshaping the U.S. health care delivery system, this article will focus on the employer as the key driver of change and innovation in the consumerism revolution. American Standard provides a case study of how one major employer has evaluated health care in the context of its business and aggressively integrated consumerism and health into the core of its business. Other companies will appropriately execute consumerism strategies in a fashion consistent with their own needs, culture, resources and populations. However, the principles supporting those strategies will be very much consistent.

  16. Project Career: An individualized postsecondary approach to promoting independence, functioning, and employment success among students with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Deborah; Elias, Eileen; Rumrill, Phillip; Hendricks, Deborah J; Jacobs, Karen; Leopold, Anne; Nardone, Amanda; Sampson, Elaine; Scherer, Marcia; Gee Cormier, Aundrea; Taylor, Aiyana; DeLatte, Caitlin

    2017-09-14

    Project Career is a five-year interdisciplinary demonstration project funded by NIDILRR. It provides technology-driven supports, merging Cognitive Support Technology (CST) evidence-based practices and rehabilitation counseling, to improve postsecondary and employment outcomes for veteran and civilian undergraduate students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Provide a technology-driven individualized support program to improve career and employment outcomes for students with TBI. Project staff provide assessments of students' needs relative to assistive technology, academic achievement, and career preparation; provide CST training to 150 students; match students with mentors; provide vocational case management; deliver job development and placement assistance; and maintain an electronic portal regarding accommodation and career resources. Participating students receive cognitive support technology training, academic enrichment, and career preparatory assistance from trained professionals at three implementation sites. Staff address cognitive challenges using the 'Matching Person with Technology' assessment to accommodate CST use (iPad and selected applications (apps)). JBS International (JBS) provides the project's evaluation. To date, 117 students participate with 63% report improved life quality and 75% report improved academic performance. Project Career provides a national model based on best practices for enabling postsecondary students with TBI to attain academic, employment, and career goals.

  17. The Impact of Intensive Vocation-Related Course Taking on Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Are Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Wendel, Erica M.; Bond, Mark P.; Garberoglio, Carrie Lou

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who are deaf have historically faced significant obstacles to equity in employment. This secondary analysis of data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS2) examined (a) intensive vocation-related courses taken by students who are deaf and (b) their impact on long-term employment outcomes. Deaf students in general…

  18. 34 CFR 363.55 - What are the requirements for successfully rehabilitating an individual in supported employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for successfully rehabilitating an individual in supported employment? 363.55 Section 363.55 Education Regulations of the Offices..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE STATE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROGRAM What Post-Award Conditions Must...

  19. Model-based estimation of individual fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W.A.; Cooch, E.G.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Fitness is the currency of natural selection, a measure of the propagation rate of genotypes into future generations. Its various definitions have the common feature that they are functions of survival and fertility rates. At the individual level, the operative level for natural selection, these rates must be understood as latent features, genetically determined propensities existing at birth. This conception of rates requires that individual fitness be defined and estimated by consideration of the individual in a modelled relation to a group of similar individuals; the only alternative is to consider a sample of size one, unless a clone of identical individuals is available. We present hierarchical models describing individual heterogeneity in survival and fertility rates and allowing for associations between these rates at the individual level. We apply these models to an analysis of life histories of Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla ) observed at several colonies on the Brittany coast of France. We compare Bayesian estimation of the population distribution of individual fitness with estimation based on treating individual life histories in isolation, as samples of size one (e.g. McGraw & Caswell, 1996).

  20. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  1. Employment, Production and Consumption model: Patterns of phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavička, H.; Lin, L.; Novotný, J.

    2010-04-01

    We have simulated the model of Employment, Production and Consumption (EPC) using Monte Carlo. The EPC model is an agent based model that mimics very basic rules of industrial economy. From the perspective of physics, the nature of the interactions in the EPC model represents multi-agent interactions where the relations among agents follow the key laws for circulation of capital and money. Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic model reveal phase transition in the model economy. The two phases are the phase with full unemployment and the phase with nearly full employment. The economy switches between these two states suddenly as a reaction to a slight variation in the exogenous parameter, thus the system exhibits strong non-linear behavior as a response to the change of the exogenous parameters.

  2. Supporting Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Quality Employment Practices. The Institute Brief. Issue Number 25. ICI Professional Development Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Alan; Jordan, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    It has been known for decades that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including those with significant impairment or who have behaviors that others find challenging, can work when they are given appropriate supports (Smith, Belcher, & Juhrs, 1995). It is also clear that individuals with ASD can benefit from employment. Benefits…

  3. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully...... account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  4. Consumer Satisfaction: A Survey of Individuals with Severe Disabilities Who Receive Supported Employment Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Wendy; Kregel, John; Johnson, Angela

    1996-01-01

    A Consumer Satisfaction Survey was administered to 110 persons with severe disabilities involved in a supported employment program. Results indicated most consumers liked their jobs, were happy with supported employment services, and would use them again. However, most also felt their current job was not the career they would like to have…

  5. The Role of Perceived Workplace Development Opportunities in Enhancing Individual Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mattia; Cavenago, Dario

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the effects on workers' employability of workplace development opportunities during employment as perceived by the workers themselves. Data was collected through a survey conducted in 2012 in Italy using a sample of 558 workers. The aim was to test the effects of participation in training courses, workplace learning…

  6. Individual Placement And Support Services Boost Employment For People With Serious Mental Illnesses, But Funding Is Lacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robert E; Bond, Gary R; Goldman, Howard H; Hogan, Michael F; Karakus, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    The majority of people with serious mental illnesses want to work. Individual placement and support services, an evidence-based supported employment intervention, enables about 60 percent of people with serious mental illnesses who receive the services to gain competitive employment and improve their lives, but the approach does not lead to fewer people on government-funded disability rolls. Yet individual placement and support employment services are still unavailable to a large majority of people with serious mental illnesses in the United States. Disability policies and lack of a simple funding mechanism remain the chief barriers. A recent federal emphasis on early-intervention programs may increase access to employment services for people with early psychosis, but whether these interventions will prevent disability over time is unknown.

  7. Individual eye model based on wavefront aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huanqing; Wang, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Qiuling; Quan, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2005-03-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore, the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There are four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high-order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software-ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  8. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.; Ruardij, P.

    2014-11-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg mortality, background mortality, food competition, and predation (including cannibalism) were additional population processes. Model properties were studied through the analysis of theoretical scenarios and by simulation of different mortality parameter combinations in a realistic setup, imposing environmental measurements. Realistic criteria were applied to narrow down the possible combination of parameter values. Field observations obtained in the long-term and multi-station monitoring program were compared with the model scenarios. The realistically selected modeling scenarios were able to reproduce reasonably the timing of some peaks in the individual abundances in the mussel bed and its size distribution but the number of individuals was not well predicted. The results suggest that the mortality in the early life stages (egg and larvae) plays an important role in population dynamics, either by initial egg mortality, larvae dispersion, settlement failure or shrimp predation. Future steps include the coupling of the population model with a hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to improve the simulation of egg/larvae dispersion, settlement probability, food transport and also to simulate the feedback of the organisms' activity on the water column properties, which will result in an improvement of the food quantity and quality characterization.

  9. Exploring Perceived Discrimination Among LGBT Individuals in Turkey in Education, Employment, and Health Care: Results of an Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göçmen, İpek; Yılmaz, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the discrimination practices encountered by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in education, income, employment, and health care in Turkey. Limited quantitative data on LGBT individuals are available in Turkey. This study collected data from 2,875 LGBT individuals through a Web-based survey. The findings suggest that LGBT individuals report perceived direct and indirect discrimination in accessing education, employment, and health care. In a country where LGBT rights are not yet recognized and antidiscrimination legislation covering sexual orientation and gender identity is still nonexistent, findings demonstrate perceived discrimination of LGBTs rarely turns into a legal complaint. Even when they do, most LGBTs in our sample report that they did not feel that the justice system addressed their grievances.

  10. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly.

  11. Gender Differences in Vocational Rehabilitation Service Predictors of Successful Competitive Employment for Transition-Aged Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Connie; Sánchez, Jennifer; Kuo, Hung-Jen; Wang, Chia-Chiang; Leahy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    As males and females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience different symptomology, their needs for vocational rehabilitation (VR) are unique as they transition into adulthood. This study examined the effects of gender differences in VR service predictors on employment outcomes for transition-aged individuals with ASD. A total of 1696…

  12. 34 CFR 300.177 - States' sovereign immunity and positive efforts to employ and advance qualified individuals with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false States' sovereign immunity and positive efforts to employ and advance qualified individuals with disabilities. 300.177 Section 300.177 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION...

  13. Using Assistive Technology Outcomes Research to Inform Policy Related to the Employment of Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Steven; Edyburn, Dave L.; Rust, Kathy L.; Schwanke, Todd D.; Smith, Roger O.

    2008-01-01

    We know that work is recognized as a central component of life for individuals with and without disabilities. It yields many physical and psychological benefits to the individual while simultaneously contributing numerous benefits to society. Lawmakers have enacted a plethora of laws designed to prevent discrimination, provide incentives for…

  14. Does Pain in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis Affect Employment? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Shahrbanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS experience some of the highest unemployment rates among all groups of chronic illnesses. Pain has been found to be a common reason for sick leave or early retirement in healthy populations or other groups with chronic illness; however, there is little awareness regarding the effect of pain on the work status of individuals with MS.

  15. Disability-Inclusive Employer Practices and Hiring of Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, William A.; von Schrader, Sarah; Bruyère, M.; VanLooy, Sara A.; Matteson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what disability-inclusive policies and practices employers have in place and examine the relationship between these practices and the actual recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities. Method: A survey 675 of human resources professionals who were members of the Society for Human Resource Management. Results: After…

  16. Disability-Inclusive Employer Practices and Hiring of Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, William A.; von Schrader, Sarah; Bruyère, M.; VanLooy, Sara A.; Matteson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what disability-inclusive policies and practices employers have in place and examine the relationship between these practices and the actual recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities. Method: A survey 675 of human resources professionals who were members of the Society for Human Resource Management. Results: After…

  17. Family, employment, and individual resource-based antecedents of maternal work-family enrichment from infancy through middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Buehler, Cheryl

    2016-07-01

    This study used data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,019) to examine family, employment, and individual antecedents of maternal work-family enrichment from infancy through middle childhood. Work-family conflict and important confounding factors were controlled. From the family domain, higher income-to-needs ratio and social support were associated with higher work-family enrichment. From the employment domain, greater job rewards, benefits of employment for children, and work commitment were associated with higher work-family enrichment. From the individual domain, higher maternal education and extroversion were associated with higher work-family enrichment. No family, employment, and individual characteristics were associated with work-family conflict across time except for partner intimacy. In general, the results supported antecedents of work-family enrichment that supply needed resources. The present study contributed to the literature by identifying antecedents of maternal work-family enrichment across early child developmental stages, which goes beyond examinations of particular life stages and a work-family conflict perspective. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Long-Term Effects of Evidence-Based Supported Employment on Earnings and on SSI and SSDI Participation Among Individuals With Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A; Burke-Miller, Jane K; Roessel, Emily

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the long-term effects of evidence-based supported employment services on three vocational outcomes: labor force participation, earnings, and attainment of Social Security Administration (SSA) nonbeneficiary status through suspension or termination of disability cash payments due to work (NSTW). Data from 449 individuals with psychiatric disabilities who participated in a multisite controlled trial of supported employment were matched to SSA data over a 13-year period (2000-2012) following supported employment services. Long-term outcomes were analyzed using random effects regression models comparing participants in the experimental and control conditions on measures of employment, earnings, and attainment of NSTW. The authors adjusted for time, age, race/ethnicity, gender, education, schizophrenia diagnosis, substance abuse history, and geographic region. Overall outcomes were modest across the 13-year follow-up, with 32.9% of participants having any earned income and 13.1% ever attaining NSTW. Supported employment recipients were almost three times as likely as control subjects to be employed over 13 years (odds ratio=2.89). Although earnings were low, supported employment participants had significantly higher earnings per month than control subjects over time (parameter estimate=$23.82) and were more likely than control subjects to attain NSTW (odds ratio=12.99). The supported employment effect diminished and was completely attenuated over time. The study's findings indicate a small but significant vocational advantage accruing to recipients of evidence-based supported employment in the decade following service delivery, adding to the evidence on the durability of supported employment effects. Results can inform policies designed to help workers enhance economic security and reduce dependence on Social Security disability benefits.

  19. Employment of CB models for non-linear dynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. R. M.; Deloo, P.; Fournier-Sicre, A.

    1990-01-01

    The non-linear dynamic analysis of large structures is always very time, effort and CPU consuming. Whenever possible the reduction of the size of the mathematical model involved is of main importance to speed up the computational procedures. Such reduction can be performed for the part of the structure which perform linearly. Most of the time, the classical Guyan reduction process is used. For non-linear dynamic process where the non-linearity is present at interfaces between different structures, Craig-Bampton models can provide a very rich information, and allow easy selection of the relevant modes with respect to the phenomenon driving the non-linearity. The paper presents the employment of Craig-Bampton models combined with Newmark direct integration for solving non-linear friction problems appearing at the interface between the Hubble Space Telescope and its solar arrays during in-orbit maneuvers. Theory, implementation in the FEM code ASKA, and practical results are shown.

  20. Effective Transitional Plan from Secondary Education to Employment for Individuals with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Loh Sau; Yahya, Sharifah Zainiyah Syed

    2013-01-01

    One of the major goals in the education and training of individuals with special needs is to prepare them for independence. However, in the Malaysian context, parents who have special adolescents are in doubt as to what would be the future of their children soon after they have finished the vocational training. This case study explores the…

  1. Ex-Post-Facto Analysis of Competitive Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Mental Retardation: National Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Corey L.; Harley, Debra A.; Gamble, David

    2004-01-01

    Disparities in proportions of competitive job placements and provision of vocational rehabilitation services by level of mental retardation were identified for 28,565 individuals. Chi-square results reveal that consumers with mild mental retardation are significantly more likely to achieve competitive jobs compared to those with more severe…

  2. 38 CFR 21.6080 - Requirement for an individualized written rehabilitation or employment assistance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... veteran agrees that such training will meet his or her needs. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1524(b)) (c) Changes... § 21.80(d) of this part, in identifying other resources through which the training desired may be... EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational Training for Certain New Pension Recipients Individualized...

  3. An Empirical Model of Employed Search, Unemployed Search, and Nonsearch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Lawrence M.; Low, Stuart A.

    1984-01-01

    The 1969-1971 National Longitudinal Surveys data on young men were used to study the employed worker's choice among employed search, unemployed search, and not searching for a new job. The principal results are that current wages, seniority, collective bargaining coverage, employment outside construction, and employment by government are each…

  4. The Parties’ Consent– A Distinct Reason for the Termination of the Individual Employment Contract. A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PĂDUCEL

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This thesis deals with the problematic of the termination of the individual employment contract by means of the parties’ consent as per Article 55 b of the Labor Code and Article 74 (1 b of the Sole Collective Labor Agreement at a national level for the years 2007-2010, no. 2895/2006. A distinction has been made between the initiative regarding the termination of the legal labor relationship by means of the parties’ consent (employee or employer and the fulfilment of the parties’ agreement. It has been argued that the reasons which may lead to the agreement fulfillment for the termination of the employment contract may be reasons which relate to the employee as a person or reasons which have nothing to do with the employee as a person.

  5. 26 CFR 1.404(e)-1 - Contributions on behalf of a self-employed individual to or under a pension, annuity, or profit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... individual to or under a pension, annuity, or profit-sharing plan meeting the requirements of section 401... self-employed individual to or under a pension, annuity, or profit-sharing plan meeting the... certain self-employed individuals to be treated as employees for purposes of pension, annuity, and...

  6. Barriers and facilitators of return to work for individuals with strokes: perspectives of the stroke survivor, vocational specialist, and employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Kathleen H; Wang, Ying-Chih; Byers, Katherine; Trierweiler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that facilitated or acted as a barrier to return to work (RTW) for stroke survivors. We applied 3 approaches to identify the factors. First, we conducted qualitative interviews with 10 stroke survivors about their RTW experience post stroke. Second, we surveyed 21 vocational specialists about barriers and facilitators of RTW based on their clinical practice. Last, we interviewed 7 employers who had experience in interviewing individuals with disabilities or had the authority to make hiring decisions. Descriptions of barriers and facilitators to RTW from these 3 perspectives were illustrated. Identified components were mapped based on the ICF framework. From stroke survivors' perspectives, factors affecting employment after stroke include neurological (motor, cognition, communication), social, personal, and environmental factors. Vocational specialists described similar barriers and facilitators of RTW as the stroke survivors but emphasized personal factors such as flexibility and being realistic in vocational goals. The employers explained that the candidate's disability plays no role in the hiring process and indicated that all applicants must meet the essential job requirements. Some employers described the benefits of having the support of vocational rehabilitation staff and being able to interact with the vocational rehabilitation specialists during the hiring process. The interaction allows the employer to gather initial information (consented to by the job applicant) about the applicants from the vocational rehabilitation service and to be educated about any specific needs related to the applicant's medical issues.

  7. Factors contributing to occupational stress experienced by individuals employed in the fast food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailids, Maria P; Elwkai, Mouafak E-ali

    2003-01-01

    The present study, examined through survey research methodology, the factors or combination of factors which appear to contribute to the experience of occupational stress of individuals working in the fast-food industry. The Occupational Stress Indicator was used. Preliminary findings showed that there exists, several compound factors, which appear to be the most frequently encountered factors by the sample tested, such as the way they feel about their job; the way they behave generally; the way they interpret events around them; the sources of pressure in their job; and the way they cope with stress they experience. It appears that there are statistically significant differences between males and females as regards to the way they respond to stress, the sources of pressure in their job and the way they cope with stress they experience. Also, statistically significant differences exist between individuals in managerial and non-managerial positions, as regards to their personality type, the degree of ambition, and work dedication they possess.

  8. Beyond labelling: what strategies do nut allergic individuals employ to make food choices? A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Barnett

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Food labelling is an important tool that assists people with peanut and tree nut allergies to avoid allergens. Nonetheless, other strategies are also developed and used in food choice decision making. In this paper, we examined the strategies that nut allergic individuals deploy to make safe food choices in addition to a reliance on food labelling. METHODS: THREE QUALITATIVE METHODS: an accompanied shop, in-depth semi-structured interviews, and the product choice reasoning task - were used with 32 patients that had a clinical history of reactions to peanuts and/or tree nuts consistent with IgE-mediated food allergy. Thematic analysis was applied to the transcribed data. RESULTS: Three main strategies were identified that informed the risk assessments and food choice practices of nut allergic individuals. These pertained to: (1 qualities of product such as the product category or the country of origin, (2 past experience of consuming a food product, and (3 sensory appreciation of risk. Risk reasoning and risk management behaviours were often contingent on the context and other physiological and socio-psychological needs which often competed with risk considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding and taking into account the complexity of strategies and the influences of contextual factors will allow healthcare practitioners, allergy nutritionists, and caregivers to advise and educate patients more effectively in choosing foods safely. Governmental bodies and policy makers could also benefit from an understanding of these food choice strategies when risk management policies are designed and developed.

  9. Toward the development of a supported employment program for individuals with high-functioning autism in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeley, K; Kirchner, J C; Gawronski, A; Tebartz van Elst, L; Dziobek, I

    2013-11-01

    Human-human interactions are of central relevance for the success in professional and occupational environments, which also substantially influence quality of life. This is especially true in the case of individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA), who experience deficits in social cognition that often lead to social exclusion and unemployment. Despite good education and high motivation, individuals with HFA do not reach employment rates that are substantially higher than 50 %. This is an alarmingly high rate of unemployment considering that the United Nations have recently emphasized the inclusion of handicapped persons as a mandatory human right. To date, the specific needs of autistic persons with respect to their working environment are largely unexplored. It remains moreover an open question how support systems and activities, including newly developed communication devices for professional environments of individuals with HFA, should look like. The German health and social care systems are not adequately prepared for the proper support of this population. This leads us to suggest that supported employment programs should be developed for adults with HFA that specifically address their needs and requirements. Such programs should comprise (1) the adequate assessment of HFA, including a neuropsychological profile and an individual matching of persons' preferences with requirements of the working place, (2) on-the-job coaching activities that include systematic communication and interaction training, and (3) instruction of non-autistic peers, including colleagues and supervisors, about weaknesses and strengths of HFA.

  10. The role of political affiliation in employment decisions: A model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Philip L; Goldberg, Caren B; Thatcher, Jason B

    2017-09-01

    Organizational researchers have studied how individuals identify with groups and organizations and how this affiliation influences behavior for decades (e.g., Tajfel, 1982). Interestingly, investigation into political affiliation and political affiliation similarity in the organizational sciences is extremely rare. This is striking, given the deep political divides that exist between groups of individuals described in the political science literature. We draw from theories based on similarity, organizational identification, and person-environment fit, as well as theoretical notions related to individuating information, to develop a model, the political affiliation model (PAM), which describes the implications of political affiliation and political similarity for employment decisions. We set forth a number of propositions based on PAM, to spur future research in the organizational sciences for a timely topic which has received little attention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Cognitive-behavioural therapy effects on employment-related outcomes for individuals with mental illness: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Minjoo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: To identify the effects of interventions in cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT on employment-related outcomes world-wide for individuals with mental illness.Research purpose: A search of the relevant literature was conducted through PsychInfo, Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar™, covering the period between 1995 and August 2011. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the criteria from Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.Motivation for the study: Evidence is needed on best practices to support work participation by people with mental illness. Effective cognitive-behavioural intervention might enhance their personal control over participation in employment aside from systemic or policy-oriented interventions.Research approach, design and method: A scoping review was done to map trends in the evidence for CBT as an intervention to support employment participation by people with mental illness. A scoping review is exploratory, the evidence of which lays the basis for subsequent studies. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the EBLIP Critical Appraisal Checklist.Main findings: Cognitive-behaviour therapy was an effective intervention approach for better work productivity, longer work hours, higher re-employment rate and enhanced mental health for individuals with mental illness.Practical/managerial implications: Cognitive-behaviour therapy is a promising strategy for industrial and organisational psychologists dealing with people who have a mental illness. It enhances employment and maintains work adjustment. Additional clinical trials in diverse populations and contexts will further establish its efficacy.Contribution/value-add: This scoping review aggregated the preliminary evidence for the efficacy of cognitive-behaviour therapy as a work-participation intervention for people with mental illness.

  12. Individual skills based volunteerism and life satisfaction among healthcare volunteers in Malaysia: role of employer encouragement, self-esteem and job performance, a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanthiran Veerasamy

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze two important outcomes of individual skills-based volunteerism (ISB-V among healthcare volunteers in Malaysia. The outcomes are: job performance and life satisfaction. This study has empirically tested the impact of individual dimensions of ISB-V along with their inter-relationships in explaining the life satisfaction and job performance. Besides, the effects of employer encouragement to the volunteers, demographic characteristics of volunteers, and self-esteem of volunteers on job performance and life satisfaction have been studied. The data were collected through a questionnaire distributed to 1000 volunteers of St. John Ambulance in Malaysia. Three hundred and sixty six volunteers responded by giving their feedback. The model was tested using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The main results of this study are: (1 Volunteer duration and nature of contact affects life satisfaction, (2 volunteer frequency has impact on volunteer duration, (3 self-esteem of volunteers has significant relationships with volunteer frequency, job performance and life satisfaction, (4 job performance of volunteers affect their life satisfaction and (5 current employment level has significant relationships with duration of volunteering, self esteem, employer encouragement and job performance of volunteers. The model in this study has been able to explain 39% of the variance in life satisfaction and 45% of the variance in job performance. The current study adds significantly to the body of knowledge on healthcare volunteerism.

  13. Individual skills based volunteerism and life satisfaction among healthcare volunteers in Malaysia: role of employer encouragement, self-esteem and job performance, a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasamy, Chanthiran; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze two important outcomes of individual skills-based volunteerism (ISB-V) among healthcare volunteers in Malaysia. The outcomes are: job performance and life satisfaction. This study has empirically tested the impact of individual dimensions of ISB-V along with their inter-relationships in explaining the life satisfaction and job performance. Besides, the effects of employer encouragement to the volunteers, demographic characteristics of volunteers, and self-esteem of volunteers on job performance and life satisfaction have been studied. The data were collected through a questionnaire distributed to 1000 volunteers of St. John Ambulance in Malaysia. Three hundred and sixty six volunteers responded by giving their feedback. The model was tested using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). The main results of this study are: (1) Volunteer duration and nature of contact affects life satisfaction, (2) volunteer frequency has impact on volunteer duration, (3) self-esteem of volunteers has significant relationships with volunteer frequency, job performance and life satisfaction, (4) job performance of volunteers affect their life satisfaction and (5) current employment level has significant relationships with duration of volunteering, self esteem, employer encouragement and job performance of volunteers. The model in this study has been able to explain 39% of the variance in life satisfaction and 45% of the variance in job performance. The current study adds significantly to the body of knowledge on healthcare volunteerism.

  14. [Effectiveness of individual supported employment for people with severe mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pulido, Francisco; Caballero Estebaranz, Nayra; Tallo Aldana, Elena; Méndez Abad, Manuel E; Hernández Álvarez-Sotomayor, M Carmen; López Reig, Susana; Vílchez de León, Patricia Inés; González-Dávila, Enrique

    2017-07-13

    To assess the effectiveness of an individual placement and support (IPS) strategy in people with severe mental disorders in Tenerife Island (Spain). Patients of Community Mental Health Services with severe mental disorders were randomly assigned to two groups. One of them received IPS (n=124), and the control group (n=75) was advised in the usual job search. Patients were followed up for an average of 3.4 years and an analysis was made of how many patients worked at least one day, working hours, wages, the number of contracts and the number of hospital admissions. Non-parametric methods were used to compare the results (Mann-Whitney U test). The percentage of patients who worked at least one day was 99% in the IPS group compared with 75% in the control group; they worked on average 30.1 weeks per year vs 7.4; the monthly salary was € 777.9 vs € 599.9; the number of contracts per person was 3.89 vs 4.85, and hospital admissions were 0.19 vs 2.1. The IPS strategy is effective for the labour integration of people with severe mental illness getting them to work longer, have higher wages and fewer hospital admissions. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Trajectories and models of individual growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseniy Karkach

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that the patterns of growth play an important role in the evolution of age trajectories of fertility and mortality (Williams, 1957. Life history studies would benefit from a better understanding of strategies and mechanisms of growth, but still no comparative research on individual growth strategies has been conducted. Growth patterns and methods have been shaped by evolution and a great variety of them are observed. Two distinct patterns - determinate and indeterminate growth - are of a special interest for these studies since they present qualitatively different outcomes of evolution. We attempt to draw together studies covering growth in plant and animal species across a wide range of phyla focusing primarily on the noted qualitative features. We also review mathematical descriptions of growth, namely empirical growth curves and growth models, and discuss the directions of future research.

  16. Employing Augmented-Reality-Embedded Instruction to Disperse the Imparities of Individual Differences in Earth Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-ping; Wang, Chang-Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Studies have proven that merging hands-on and online learning can result in an enhanced experience in learning science. In contrast to traditional online learning, multiple in-classroom activities may be involved in an augmented-reality (AR)-embedded e-learning process and thus could reduce the effects of individual differences. Using a three-stage AR-embedded instructional process, we conducted an experiment to investigate the influences of individual differences on learning earth science phenomena of "day, night, and seasons" for junior highs. The mixed-methods sequential explanatory design was employed. In the quantitative phase, factors of learning styles and ICT competences were examined alongside with the overall learning achievement. Independent t tests and ANCOVAs were employed to achieve inferential statistics. The results showed that overall learning achievement was significant for the AR-embedded instruction. Nevertheless, neither of the two learner factors exhibited significant effect on learning achievement. In the qualitative phase, we analyzed student interview records, and a wide variation on student's preferred instructional stages were revealed. These findings could provide an alternative rationale for developing ICT-supported instruction, as our three-stage AR-embedded comprehensive e-learning scheme could enhance instruction adaptiveness to disperse the imparities of individual differences between learners.

  17. Storage Capacity Modeling of Reservoir Systems Employing Performance Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Saket Oskoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing a prediction relationship for total (i.e. within-year plus over-year storage capacity of reservoir systems is beneficial because it can be used as an alternative to the analysis of reservoirs during designing stage and gives an opportunity to planner to examine and compare different cases in a fraction of time required for complete analysis where detailed analysis is not necessary. Existing relationships for storage capacity are mostly capable of estimating over-year storage capacity and total storage capacity can be obtained through relationships for adjusting over-year capacity and there is no independent relationship to estimate total storage capacity. Moreover these relationships do not involve vulnerability performance criterion and are not verified for Malaysia Rivers. In this study two different reservoirs in Southern part of Peninsular Malaysia, Melaka and Muar, are analyzed through a Monte Carlo simulation approach involving performance metrics. Subsequently the storage capacity results of the simulation are compared with those of the well-known existing equations. It is observed that existing models may not predict total capacity appropriately for Malaysian reservoirs. Consequently, applying the simulation results, two separate regression equations are developed to model total storage capacity of study reservoirs employing time based reliability and vulnerability performance measures.

  18. Cognitive and clinical indicators of employment assistance needs from a national survey of individuals living with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Geoffrey; Hielscher, Emily; Saha, Sukanta; McGrath, John J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this secondary analysis was to explore global functioning, course of illness (the number of episodes since onset and the degree of recovery between episodes), duration of illness, and cognitive ability as potential indicators of the extent of employment assistance needs. A secondary analysis of Australia's second national survey of psychosis was undertaken. Screening for psychosis took place during March, 2010 at 7 national locations, within public mental health services and nongovernment organizations. Next, 1,825 of the 7,955 who screened positive for psychosis were randomly selected and completed face-to-face interviews. Of those, 1,619 also completed the Digit Symbol Coding Test (DSCT), a measure of current general cognitive ability. In epidemiological surveys, employment status is an important proxy indicator of employment assistance needs. The strongest correlates of any versus no employment in the current survey were: global functioning as represented by Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) total score, age, general cognitive ability as represented by DSCT scores, course of illness, and educational attainment. These correlates persisted following adjustment in a multivariate model. Subject to the limitations identified, global functioning, cognitive ability, and course of illness were the most promising clinical and cognitive indicators of more intensive employment assistance needs. The demographic variables age and educational attainment indicated additional labor market disadvantage, which could also help to identify those more likely to need intensive employment assistance. These results inform further investigations aimed at developing a practical measure of employment-related psychiatric disability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. 20 CFR 1002.23 - What must the individual show to carry the burden of proving that the employer discriminated or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must the individual show to carry the....23 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... retaliated against the individual, he or she must first show that the employer's action was motivated by...

  20. Do inclusive work environments matter? Effects of community-integrated employment on quality of life for individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Rachel N; Litz, Katherine S; Thornhill, Monica G; Goreczny, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    More individuals with an intellectual disability now possess prerequisite skills and supports necessary for successful work force integration than did previous generations. The current study compared quality of life of community-integrated workers with those participating in sheltered vocational workshops and adult day care programs. We considered numerous indices of quality of life, including inclusion and community participation; satisfaction within professional services, home life, and day activities; dignity, rights, and respect received from others; fear; choice and control; and family satisfaction. Our data revealed several important differences in quality of life across daytime activities; participants involved in community-integrated employment tended to be younger, indicated a greater sense of community integration, and reported more financial autonomy than did those who participated in adult day care programs and sheltered workshops. However, individuals reported no differences in overall satisfaction across daytime activities. We discuss generational differences across employment status as well as possible explanations to account for high levels of satisfaction across daytime activities.

  1. A Mathematical Model on Employment versus Several Factors in Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpresa Syla

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study is made an attempt to analyze the conjunction of several indicators on the employment of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. In this regard the logistic regression and odds ratios were used in order to see how certain factors such as gender, age, ethnicity, education, area of residence and the number of family members affect employment at citizens. This study is based on data from a survey organized by the Center for Economic Analyses in December 2011, by 400 citizens of the Republic of Macedonia. Results show that young males of Macedonian nationality, those with higher education, ones that live on urban areas and the families that have greater number of members are more likely to be employed. For data processing is used software Med Calc.

  2. Modelling regional labour market dynamics: Participation, employment and migration decisions in a spatial CGE model for the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiaan Persyn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines how regional labour market adjustments to macroeconomic and policy shocks are modelled in RHOMOLO through participation, employment and migration decisions of workers. RHOMOLO, being a multisectoral, inter-regional general equilibrium model, is complex both in terms of its dimensionality and the modelling of spatial interactions through trade flows and factor mobility. The modelling of the labour market is therefore constrained by the tractability and computational solvability of the model. The labour market module consists of individual labour participation decisions, including the extensive margin (to participate or not and the intensive margin (hours of work. Unemployment is determined through a wage curve and inter-regional labour migration decisions are modelled in a discrete-choice framework, with backward-looking expectations.

  3. A Mathematical Model on Employment versus Several Factors in Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Shpresa Syla; Sadri Alija

    2013-01-01

    In this study is made an attempt to analyze the conjunction of several indicators on the employment of citizens in the Republic of Macedonia. In this regard the logistic regression and odds ratios were used in order to see how certain factors such as gender, age, ethnicity, education, area of residence and the number of family members affect employment at citizens. This study is based on data from a survey organized by the Center for Economic Analyses in December 2011, by 400 citizens of the ...

  4. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  5. Supported Employment: Report of a Successful Enclave Model: Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Sue

    1990-01-01

    Three men and three women with moderate intellectual handicaps but no work experience outside sheltered workshops were employed by the Royal Australian Mint in the first enclave project in the Australian Capital Territory. Significant worker wages and improved independence and self-esteem were noted, and social security savings of over $7000…

  6. Stress Process Model for Individuals with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Katherine S.; Menne, Heather L.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with dementia (IWDs) face particular challenges in managing and coping with their illness. The experience of dementia may be affected by the etiology, stage, and severity of symptoms, preexisting and related chronic conditions, and available informal and formal supportive services. Although several studies have examined…

  7. Model and Analysis of Individual Rehearsals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Frimodt-Møller, Søren

    2013-01-01

    of this attention over time, and discusses how this attention is dependent on the musician’s ability to memorize. A selection of musicians (playing guitar, bass clarinet, or violin) was made to individually rehearse short pieces (by Beethoven and Bach) up to and exceeding 20 times. The musicians were instructed...

  8. Risk of latent TB infection in individuals employed in the healthcare sector in Germany: a multicentre prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harling Melanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare workers are still recognised as a high-risk group for latent TB infection (LTBI. Therefore, the screening of people employed in the healthcare sector for active and LTBI is fundamental to infection control programmes in German hospitals. It was the aim of the study to determine the prevalence and putative risk factors of LTBI. Methods We tested 2028 employees in the healthcare sector with the QuantiFERON-Gold In-tube (QFT-IT test between December 2005 and May 2009, either in the course of contact tracing or in serial testing of TB high-risk groups following German OSH legislation. Results A positive IGRA was found in 9.9% of the healthcare workers (HCWs. Nurses and physicians showed similar prevalence rates (9.7% to 9.6%. Analysed by occupational group, the highest prevalence was found in administration staff and ancillary nursing staff (17.4% and 16.7%. None of the individuals in the trainee group showed a positive IGRA result. In the different workplaces the observed prevalence was 14.7% in administration, 12.0% in geriatric care, 14.2% in technicians (radiology, laboratory and pathology, 6.5% in admission ward staff and 8.3% in the staff of pulmonary/infectious disease wards. Putative risk factors for LTBI were age (>55 years: OR14.7, 95% CI 5.1-42.1, being foreign-born (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.4-2.8, TB in the individual's own history (OR 4.96, 95% CI 1.99-12.3 and previous positive TST results (OR 3.5, 95% CI 2.4-4.98. We observed no statistically significant association with gender, BCG vaccination, workplace or profession. Conclusion The prevalence of LTBI in low-incidence countries depends on age. We found no positive IGRA results among trainees in the healthcare sector. Incidence studies are needed to assess the infection risk. Pre-employment screening might be helpful in this endeavour.

  9. Employing Power Graph Analysis to Facilitate Modeling Molecular Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momchil Nenov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling is used to explore and understand complex systems ranging from weather patterns to social networks to gene-expression regulatory mechanisms. There is an upper limit to the amount of details that can be reflected in a model imposed by finite computational resources. Thus, there are methods to reduce the complexity of the modeled system to its most significant parameters. We discuss the suitability of clustering techniques, in particular Power Graph Analysis as an intermediate step of modeling.

  10. Predictors of job satisfaction among individuals with disabilities: An analysis of South Korea's National Survey of employment for the disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujeong; Seo, Dong Gi; Park, Jaekook; Bettini, Elizabeth; Smith, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the influences of personal, vocational, and job environment related factors that are associated with job satisfaction of individuals with disabilities in South Korea. Data for wage-based working employees from a nationwide survey were obtained, which resulted in a total number of 417 participants. The six hypotheses and mediation effects of personal and work related environmental factors were tested using the structural equation modeling drawn from existing research evidence. Results revealed that (a) life satisfaction and job related environments directly influenced job satisfaction; (b) the relationship between personal experience and job satisfaction was mediated by life satisfaction for both mild/moderate and severe/profound disabilities group; and (c) the mediating role of job environment between vocational preparedness and job satisfaction was only observed for individuals with mild/moderate disabilities. Summary of findings and implications for future research and practices are discussed.

  11. An integrative model for measuring graduates’ employability skills—A study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Su

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Employability is a key issue in graduates’ job-hunting, but little research has been done on that of the graduates in Chinese universities. These universities have been experiencing a decline in their graduate employment since the past decade. This paper attempts to tackle this issue. It reviews the relevant research on employability and develops a research-based theoretical framework to evaluate and analyze the graduates’ employability in China. It adopts multiple approaches to establish the skills that will enhance university students’ employability. Investigating around 100 employers and 200 undergraduates from the universities in Beijing, the paper explores the characteristics of and factors influencing the graduates’ employability. Subsequently, it proposes a qualitative model to measure graduates’ employability. Based on the findings, it discusses the theoretical and practical implications and provides advice for Chinese graduates to improve their employability.

  12. Individualized Cognitive Modeling for Close-Loop Task Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiang; Schnell, Tom; Keller, Mike

    2010-01-01

    An accurate real-time operator functional state assessment makes it possible to perform task management, minimize risks, and improve mission performance. In this paper, we discuss the development of an individualized operator functional state assessment model that identifies states likely leading to operational errors. To address large individual variations, we use two different approaches to build a model for each individual using its data as well as data from subjects with similar responses. If a subject's response is similar to that of the individual of interest in a specific functional state, all the training data from this subject will be used to build the individual model. The individualization methods have been successfully verified and validated with a driving test data set provided by University of Iowa. With the individualized models, the mean squared error can be significantly decreased (by around 20%).

  13. The Employer's Obligation to Inform the Successful Candidate, Namely the Employee, on the Essential Terms of the Individual Employment Contract. National and European Normative Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Constantina Nenu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a labor market with normative dimensions in constant evolution, the employee status is quite difficult. In consistence with the principle of protecting employee rights, labor law has imposed new measures that counterbalance the employer‟s position of authority within the employment relationship, both at European and national levels. These include the obligation to inform the employee about the essential elements of his working relationship, obligation established at European level by Council Directive 91/533/EEC of 14 October 1991, and at national level by the Labor Code.

  14. Mental Models, Magical Thinking, And Individual Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Turner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly, there are two mutually exclusive accounts of how people (non-specialist users reason about and conceptualize interactive technology. The first is based on classical cognitive psychology and is characterized by the term mental model. The second, drawing on concepts from social cognition, observes that people often anthropomorphize technology. We argue that people are able to exhibit both of these quite different styles of cognition, which Baron-Cohen has described as systemizing and empathizing. The former is associated with the drive to analyze, explore, and construct a system, whereas the latter is the ability to spontaneously tune into another’s thoughts and feelings. The propensity to systemize might give rise to a mental model, while the empathizing tendency might tend to anthropomorphize technology. We present an empirical study that lends support for the above position.

  15. The Croton-Yorktown Model of Individualized Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, George F.; Snyder, Edward B.

    1980-01-01

    The individualized learning model, discussed in this article, uses an efficient feedback mechanism which incorporates an innovative student evaluation program and a unique system of classroom management. The design provides a model for monitoring student progress. (Author/SA)

  16. Heterogeneous individuals' behavioral biases model and numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-yong; LIANG Guo-wei

    2010-01-01

    A model of the relationships between individual cognitive biases and individual decision-making based on the analysis of cognitive biases of bonded rationality individual,has been established in this paper by introducing a set of new variables callod overconfidence coefficient and attribution bias coefficient to the sentiment model.The irrational expectation and irrational risk aversion as two inseparable aspects of bonded rationality are expressed in an unified model,and a method of measuring individual cognitive biases is proposed,which overcomes the shortcomings of traditional normative models that can not describe the differences of behaviors among heterogeneous individuals.As a result,numerical simulations show that individual cognitive risk is a positive interaction with overconfidence coefficient,and a negative interaction with attribution bias coefficient.

  17. A neural network evaluation model for individual thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lian, Zhiwei; Zhao, Bo [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2007-10-15

    An evaluation model for individual thermal comfort is presented based on the BP neural network. The train data came from a thermal comfort survey. The evaluation results of the model showed a good match with the subject's real thermal sensation, which indicated that the model can be used to evaluate individual thermal comfort rightly. Taken a room air conditioner as an example, the application of the NNEM in creating a microenvironment for individual was discussed. The result showed that the NNEM can play an important role of connecting individual thermal comfort with the control on the air conditioner. (author)

  18. Stochastic wind turbine modeling for individual pitch control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Sven Creutz; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    By pitching the blades of a wind turbine individually it is possible to attenuate the asymmetric loads caused by a non-uniform wind field - this is denoted individual pitch control. In this work we investigate how to set up a simplified stochastic and deterministic description of the wind...... and a simplified description of the aerodynamics with sufficient detail to design model-based individual pitch controllers. Combined with a simplified model of the wind turbine, we exemplify how to use the model elements to systematically design an individual pitch controller. The design is investigated...

  19. The PIC [Process Individualization Curriculum] Model: Structure with Humanistic Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Doris T.

    This paper describes a curriculum design model to train research and development personnel under USOE-NIE funding. This design model, called PIC (Process Individualization Curriculum), was chosen for coverting on-campus courses to extra-mural self-instructional courses. The curriculum specialists who work with professors to individualize their…

  20. Interagency Coordination and Effectiveness: Employing the JIATF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    34Nangarhar Inc." 27 Ibid. 41 interagency has the opportunity to establish early stages of critical infrastructure’ to attract investors. The interagency...entail frightful risks" .4 Applying the JIA TF Model JIA TF -South senior representatives can routinely meet to revise mission sets, review strategy

  1. 75 FR 16840 - Proposed Extension of Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment; Model Employer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Comment; Model Employer CHIP Notice AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Department of Labor... ] Administration is soliciting comments on the Model CHIP Employer Notice. A copy of the information collection...(f)(3)(B)(i)(I), and section 9801(f)(3)(B)(i)(I) of the Internal Revenue Code, as added by CHIPRA,...

  2. A Simple Forecasting Model Linking Macroeconomic Policy to Industrial Employment Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, James R.; Hady, Thomas F.

    A study detailed further a model linking monetary and fiscal policy to industrial employment in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas of four United States regions. The model was used to simulate the impacts on area and regional employment of three events in the economy: changing real gross national product (GNP) via monetary policy, holding the…

  3. An Evaluation of High School Curricula Employing Using the Element-Based Curriculum Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Dolgun; Günay, Rafet

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the curricula that constitute the basis of education provision at high schools in Turkey from the perspective of the teachers involved. A descriptive survey model, a quantitative research method was employed in this study. An item-based curriculum evaluation model was employed as part of the…

  4. Effect of a vocationally-focused brief cognitive behavioural intervention on employment-related outcomes for individuals with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A; Boyd, Geoffrey M; Bieling, Peter; Pike, Shannon; Kazarian-Keith, Dawnna

    2008-01-01

    Despite an increasing emphasis on the importance of vocational success to the quality of life of individuals with mental illness (Bond, Drake, & Becker, 2008), minimal work has examined the impact of cognitive behavioural interventions that focus on vocational stressors. Vocational stressors commonly faced by persons with mental illness include difficulties with work task completion, obtaining employment, and coping with interpersonal stressors (Becker et al., 1998). The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy group intervention that targets vocational stressors for individuals whose vocational functioning had been significantly impacted by mental illness. Participants included 16 individuals with mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses. After this intervention, it was found that employed persons reported an improved sense of mastery in the completion of work tasks, improved satisfaction with work supervision, and decreased satisfaction with advancement and job security. Unemployed participants reported improved expectancy for employment success.

  5. Individualism in plant populations: using stochastic differential equations to model individual neighbourhood-dependent plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiming; Schneider, Manuel K; Pitchford, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    We study individual plant growth and size hierarchy formation in an experimental population of Arabidopsis thaliana, within an integrated analysis that explicitly accounts for size-dependent growth, size- and space-dependent competition, and environmental stochasticity. It is shown that a Gompertz-type stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, involving asymmetric competition kernels and a stochastic term which decreases with the logarithm of plant weight, efficiently describes individual plant growth, competition, and variability in the studied population. The model is evaluated within a Bayesian framework and compared to its deterministic counterpart, and to several simplified stochastic models, using distributional validation. We show that stochasticity is an important determinant of size hierarchy and that SDE models outperform the deterministic model if and only if structural components of competition (asymmetry; size- and space-dependence) are accounted for. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of plant ecology and in more general modelling situations.

  6. Developing a workplace breast feeding support model for employed lactating mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimyam, Susanha; Hanpa, Wasana

    2014-06-01

    Resuming work is often considered an obstacle for continued breast feeding. The objectives of this participatory action research study were to develop a breast feeding support model in the workplace and to compare breast feeding rates before and after implementation of the breast feeding support campaign. Twenty-four women participated before the implementation of the breast feeding support campaign, whereas 31 women participated after the campaign. Data were collected by interviewing employed women about their breast feeding practices within six months post partum. Additional data were collected through interviews with the workplace administrator and head of work sections as well as observation of the breast feeding support campaigns. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis, whereas quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and χ(2) test. The workplace breast feeding support model was developed based on the concept of Mother-Friendly Workplace Initiatives by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and the Thai government׳s promotion of a workplace breast feeding corner. Within this model, a committee for breast feeding support was created for working with the research team to develop breast feeding activities and media for breast feeding education and breast feeding support campaigns in the workplace. Breast feeding rates at six months after implementation of the breast feeding support campaign were significantly higher than rates before, both for exclusive breast feeding and any breast feeding at levels .004 and .033, respectively. These results suggest that breast feeding should be encouraged in every workplace depending on context. Individual advice and help for employed mothers should be provided from pregnancy through weaning in the postpartum period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Model-Based Systems Engineering Methodology for Employing Architecture In System Analysis: Developing Simulation Models Using Systems Modeling Language Products to Link Architecture and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY FOR EMPLOYING ARCHITECTURE IN SYSTEM ANALYSIS: DEVELOPING SIMULATION MODELS USING SYSTEMS MODELING LANGUAGE PRODUCTS TO LINK... ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY FOR EMPLOYING ARCHITECTURE IN SYSTEM ANALYSIS: DEVELOPING SIMULATION MODELS USING SYSTEMS MODELING LANGUAGE PRODUCTS TO LINK...to model-based systems engineering (MBSE) by formally defining an MBSE methodology for employing architecture in system analysis (MEASA) that presents

  8. A model for individual egg production in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.; Koops, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our primary objective was to improve on an existing model for the individual weekly egg production curve by modeling the curve as a sum of logistic functions: one for the increasing phase of production and a sum for the decreasing phases. To illustrate the model, we used four data sets from two

  9. A paradox in individual-based models of populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The standard dynamic energy budget model is widely used to describe the physiology of individual animals. It assumes thatassimilation rate scales with body surface area, whereas maintenance rate scales with body volume. When the model is usedas the building block of a population model, only limited

  10. 26 CFR 1.404(e)-1A - Contributions on behalf of a self-employed individual to or under a qualified pension, annuity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... individual to or under a qualified pension, annuity, or profit-sharing plan. 1.404(e)-1A Section 1.404(e)-1A...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(e)-1A Contributions on behalf of a self-employed individual to or under a qualified pension, annuity, or profit-sharing plan. (a) In...

  11. Developing a Sustainable Practical Model of Graduate Employability for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Umar Rufai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evolve a sustainable practical model of employability skills that is sure to capture relevant learning aspects of a particular occupational discipline to be used as framework for Undergraduate students to develop their employability potentials. The study was conducted in three Universities and Polytechnics each with three multi-national companies. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using purposeful sampling 18 academic staff and 3 professionals representing company employers were selected as the study participants. The study evolved a model that is work-based, explicit in its outcome, fully articulated and realistic in terms of employability skill experiences. The proposed model can be used to establish a common higher education programme or curricula that is work-based and skill experience oriented, that can encourage students in higher education to think about work place learning more explicitly and reflectively, that will in turn help them to develop a broad range of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values, each of which ultimately contribute in some manner to graduate employability.  The paper is considered a contribution to the evolution and growth of knowledge on the linkage between higher education and workplace, through which the ‘skill gap’ occurring between the demand of employment and the level of educational preparation of graduates can be bridged. Keywords: Employability, Higher Education, Graduates, Model/Framework,   academic staff, Employers/Professionals

  12. Role Modeling and Role Playing: A Manual for Vocational Development and Employment Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertcher, Harvey; And Others

    This project investigated two major areas: (1) ways in which social science research and employment agency experience could be melded so as to make practical knowledge available to these agencies, and (2) ways of convincing employment agencies to use this knowledge. The manual resulting from the investigation focuses on role modeling and role…

  13. Developing a Sustainable Practical Model of Graduate Employability for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufai, Ahmed Umar; Bakar, Ab Rahim Bin; Rashi, Abdullah Bin Mat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evolve a sustainable practical model of employability skills that is sure to capture relevant learning aspects of a particular occupational discipline to be used as framework for Undergraduate students to develop their employability potentials. The study was conducted in three Universities and Polytechnics each with…

  14. Testing a Model of Undergraduate Competence in Employability Skills and Its Implications for Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the development of employability skills being firmly entrenched in higher education's strategic agenda worldwide; recent graduates' standards in certain skills are not meeting industry expectations. This paper presents and tests a model of undergraduate competence in employability skills. It highlights those factors which impact on…

  15. Testing a Model of Undergraduate Competence in Employability Skills and Its Implications for Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the development of employability skills being firmly entrenched in higher education's strategic agenda worldwide; recent graduates' standards in certain skills are not meeting industry expectations. This paper presents and tests a model of undergraduate competence in employability skills. It highlights those factors which impact…

  16. Employing individual measures of baseline glucocorticoids as population-level conservation biomarkers: considering within-individual variation in a breeding passerine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L.; Love, Oliver P.

    2016-01-01

    Labile physiological variables, such as stress hormones [i.e. glucocorticoids (GCs)], allow individuals to react to perturbations in their environment and may therefore reflect the effect of disturbances or positive conservation initiatives in advance of population-level demographic measures. Although the application of GCs as conservation biomarkers has been of extensive interest, few studies have explicitly investigated whether baseline GC concentrations respond to disturbances consistently across individuals. However, confirmation of consistent responses is of paramount importance to assessing the ease of use of GCs in natural systems and to making valid interpretations regarding population-level change (or lack of change) in GC concentrations. We investigated whether free-ranging female tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) display individually specific changes in baseline glucocorticoid concentrations naturally over the breeding season (from incubation to offspring provisioning) and in response to a manipulation of foraging profitability (representing a decrease in access to food resources). We show that baseline GC concentrations are repeatable within individuals over reproduction in natural conditions. However, in response to a reduction in foraging ability, baseline GC concentrations increase at the population level but are not repeatable within individuals, indicating a high level of within-individual variation. Overall, we suggest that baseline GCs measured on a subset of individuals may not provide a representative indication of responses to environmental change at the population level, and multiple within-individual measures may be necessary to determine the fitness correlates of GC concentrations. Further validation should be completed across a variety of taxa and life-history stages. Moving beyond a traditional cross-sectional approach by incorporating repeated-measures methods will be necessary to assess the suitability of baseline GCs as biomarkers of

  17. Uber die Vereinbarkeit individueller Bildungsbedurfnisse und betrieblicher Qualifikationsanforderungen (On the Compatibility of Individual Needs for Education and Employment-Related Qualification Requirements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    States that a tendency has developed to orientate educational-practical acting using learners' educational needs, while representatives of the employment system deduce political and practical educational maxims from requirements that result from economic structural changes. Defines the instructional importance of individual educational needs and…

  18. Uber die Vereinbarkeit individueller Bildungsbedurfnisse und betrieblicher Qualifikationsanforderungen (On the Compatibility of Individual Needs for Education and Employment-Related Qualification Requirements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    States that a tendency has developed to orientate educational-practical acting using learners' educational needs, while representatives of the employment system deduce political and practical educational maxims from requirements that result from economic structural changes. Defines the instructional importance of individual educational needs and…

  19. A microcosmic discrete occupant evacuation model based on individual characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lizhong; LI Jian; ZHAO Daoliang; FANG Weifeng; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The research of occupant evacuation in an emergency is of great benefit to building design and evacuation guidance. In this paper a microcosmic discrete evacuation model based on Cellular Automata (CA) is presented, in which the occupants' individual characteristics are considered. Thus, our model has given a description of evacuation route choice with influencing factors, including: individual knowledge of the building,individual realization of the emergency development, and the attractive and repulsive force between occupants. This model differs somewhat from other models in the attention to the associative and separate effect of influencing factors, based on occupant's behaviors. In addition, the model could reveal the phenomenon of escape in fire, as those simulations involving a fire condition have shown.

  20. Individual based and mean-field modeling of direct aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We introduce two models of biological aggregation, based on randomly moving particles with individual stochasticity depending on the perceived average population density in their neighborhood. In the firstorder model the location of each individual is subject to a density-dependent random walk, while in the second-order model the density-dependent random walk acts on the velocity variable, together with a density-dependent damping term. The main novelty of our models is that we do not assume any explicit aggregative force acting on the individuals; instead, aggregation is obtained exclusively by reducing the individual stochasticity in response to higher perceived density. We formally derive the corresponding mean-field limits, leading to nonlocal degenerate diffusions. Then, we carry out the mathematical analysis of the first-order model, in particular, we prove the existence of weak solutions and show that it allows for measure-valued steady states. We also perform linear stability analysis and identify conditions for pattern formation. Moreover, we discuss the role of the nonlocality for well-posedness of the first-order model. Finally, we present results of numerical simulations for both the first- and second-order model on the individual-based and continuum levels of description. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Markovian Building Blocks for Individual-Based Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Lars Anders Fredrik; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Beyer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis consists of a summary report, four research articles, one technical report and one manuscript. The subject of the thesis is individual-based stochastic models. The summary report is composed of three parts and a brief history of some basic models in population biology. This history is included in order to provide a reader that has no previous exposure to models in population biology with a sufficient background to understand some of the biological models that are mentioned ...

  2. Establishment of Comprehensive Evaluation Model of the New Generation Migrant Workers' Employability

    OpenAIRE

    GAO, Jianli; ZHANG, Tongquan

    2013-01-01

    Through literature research and expert interviews, we extract 10 variables influencing the new generation migrant workers' employability, and establish the comprehensive evaluation model of the new generation migrant workers' employability. Using factor analysis, we derive that the model includes three factors: skill literacy, relationship literacy and basic literacy. The weights of each factor are 0.580, 0.244 and 0.174 8, respectively. Skill literacy is affected by skill level, learning abi...

  3. Hybrid Modelling of Individual Movement and Collective Behaviour

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of dispersal in biological systems are often written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) which describe the time evolution of population-level variables (concentrations, densities). A more detailed modelling approach is given by individual-based (agent-based) models which describe the behaviour of each organism. In recent years, an intermediate modelling methodology - hybrid modelling - has been applied to a number of biological systems. These hybrid models couple an individual-based description of cells/animals with a PDE-model of their environment. In this chapter, we overview hybrid models in the literature with the focus on the mathematical challenges of this modelling approach. The detailed analysis is presented using the example of chemotaxis, where cells move according to extracellular chemicals that can be altered by the cells themselves. In this case, individual-based models of cells are coupled with PDEs for extracellular chemical signals. Travelling waves in these hybrid models are investigated. In particular, we show that in contrary to the PDEs, hybrid chemotaxis models only develop a transient travelling wave. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  4. MODEL AUTHENTIC SELF-ASSESSMENT DALAM PENGEMBANGAN EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS MAHASISWA PENDIDIKAN TINGGI VOKASI

    OpenAIRE

    I Made Suarta; Nyoman Sentosa Hardika; I Gusti Ngurah Sanjaya; I Wayan Basi Arjana

    2015-01-01

    Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengembangkan perangkat penilaian guna mengevaluasi capaian employability skills yang diintegrasikan dalam pembelajaran aplikasi basis data. Model penilaian yang dikembangkan merupakan kombinasi dari penilaian diri sendiri dan penilaian otentik, diusulkan dengan sebutan model authentic self-assessment. Langkah-langkah pengembangan model authentic self-assessment meliputi penentuan standar, penentuan tugas otentik, pembuatan kriteria, dan pembuatan rubrik. Hasil pe...

  5. A Multi-Objective Model for Planning Equal Employment Opportunities. Research Report No. 23. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnes, A.; And Others

    The document suggests some new modeling approcaches for equal employment opportunity (EEO) planning. Previous manpower planning models of the Office of Civilian Manpower Management have utilized multi-period Markoff processes embedded in goal programing (multiple objective) models. These are here extended to EEO plans directed to changing the mix…

  6. Hearing dummies: individualized computer models of hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manasa R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Tan, Christine M; Jürgens, Tim; Meddis, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Our aim was to explore the usage of individualized computer models to simulate hearing loss based on detailed psychophysical assessment and to offer hypothetical diagnoses of the underlying pathology. Individualized computer models of normal and impaired hearing were constructed and evaluated using the psychophysical data obtained from human listeners. Computer models of impaired hearing were generated to reflect the hypothesized underlying pathology (e.g. dead regions, outer hair cell dysfunction, or reductions in endocochlear potential). These models were evaluated in terms of their ability to replicate the original patient data. Auditory profiles were measured for two normal and five hearing-impaired listeners using a battery of three psychophysical tests (absolute thresholds, frequency selectivity, and compression). The individualized computer models were found to match the data. Useful fits to the impaired profiles could be obtained by changing only a single parameter in the model of normal hearing. Sometimes, however, it was necessary to include an additional dead region. The creation of individualized computer models of hearing loss can be used to simulate auditory profiles of impaired listeners and suggest hypotheses concerning the underlying peripheral pathology.

  7. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Bin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society.

  8. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach...Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly and quantification by...tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However, it has not been

  9. A review of existing models and methods to estimate employment effects of pollution control policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwin, R.F.; Nesse, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about existing models and methods used to estimate coal mining employment impacts of pollution control policies. The EPA is currently assessing the consequences of various alternative policies to reduce air pollution. One important potential consequence of these policies is that coal mining employment may decline or shift from low-sulfur to high-sulfur coal producing regions. The EPA requires models that can estimate the magnitude and cost of these employment changes at the local level. This paper contains descriptions and evaluations of three models and methods currently used to estimate the size and cost of coal mining employment changes. The first model reviewed is the Coal and Electric Utilities Model (CEUM), a well established, general purpose model that has been used by the EPA and other groups to simulate air pollution control policies. The second model reviewed is the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), which was developed for the EPA specifically to analyze the impacts of air pollution control policies. Finally, the methodology used by Arthur D. Little, Inc. to estimate the costs of alternative air pollution control policies for the Consolidated Coal Company is discussed. These descriptions and evaluations are based on information obtained from published reports and from draft documentation of the models provided by the EPA. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Measuring attitudes in the self-employment intention model: methodological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josipa Mijoč

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a statistical model, the construction of which requires determining the independent variables. To determine the predictive ability of different approaches to measuring independent variables, the paper provides an overview of theoretical and research approaches to the research problem. The purpose of the study is to analyze the predictive power of instruments measuring attitudes toward self-employment as one of the most significant predictors of a career choice according to the theory of planned behavior. The paper juxtaposes two various measurement approaches in assessing attitudes toward self-employment. The first approach is based on behavioral beliefs that produce favorable or unfavorable attitudes toward a self-employed career and considers two opposing options: pursuing a self-employed career or accepting a job position (working for an employer. In this context, developing a measurement construct is a multistep process that requires testing psychometric characteristics of proposed measures based on predefined theoretical and empirical dimensions. The second approach incorporates aggregate measures of attitude toward self-employment in which the predictor variable is assessed from only one perspective, without taking into account other career options. Through the means of multiple regression analysis, the paper details a comparison of both measurement approaches and their performance in explaining the dependent variable (self-employment intention. The predictive power of the model is defined as a criterion for selecting a measurement approach that can serve as a methodological framework for prospective studies focused on investigating attitudes toward certain behavior.

  11. Employing Augmented-Reality-Embedded Instruction to Disperse the Imparities of Individual Differences in Earth Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-ping; Wang, Chang-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Studies have proven that merging hands-on and online learning can result in an enhanced experience in learning science. In contrast to traditional online learning, multiple in-classroom activities may be involved in an augmented-reality (AR)-embedded e-learning process and thus could reduce the effects of individual differences. Using a…

  12. 26 CFR 31.3121(k)-3 - Request for coverage of individual employed by exempt organization before August 1, 1956.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1954, see 26 CFR (1939) 408.216(c) and (d) (Regulations 128).) (b) Organization which did not have... knowledge and belief. If the statement of the organization is not submitted with the individual's request... organization who shall certify that the statement is correct to the best of his knowledge and belief. If...

  13. Employing Augmented-Reality-Embedded Instruction to Disperse the Imparities of Individual Differences in Earth Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-ping; Wang, Chang-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Studies have proven that merging hands-on and online learning can result in an enhanced experience in learning science. In contrast to traditional online learning, multiple in-classroom activities may be involved in an augmented-reality (AR)-embedded e-learning process and thus could reduce the effects of individual differences. Using a…

  14. 75 FR 5808 - Publication of Model Notice for Employers to Use Regarding Eligibility for Premium Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Insurance Program (CHIP). The Department of Labor (Department) is required to provide the model notice to... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notice for Employers to Use Regarding Eligibility for Premium Assistance Under Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program, Notice AGENCY:...

  15. A model of competition between employed, short-term and long-term unemployed job searchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Lourens

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a model in which not only employed job search is endogenized, but also the phenomenon that long-term unemployed may becomediscouraged and stop searching for a job. When this model is applied to Dutch flow data, we find that this discouragement particularly took place in the early

  16. An Improved Methodology for Individualized Performance Prediction of Sleep-Deprived Individuals with the Two-Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    process model of sleep regulation for developing individualized biomathematical models that predict performance impairment for individuals subjected to total sleep loss. This new method advances our previous work in two important ways. First, it enables model customization to start as soon as the first performance measurement from an individual becomes available. This was achieved by optimally combining the performance information obtained from the individual’s performance measurements with a priori performance information using a Bayesian framework, while retaining

  17. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; van Loveren, C.; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) sco

  18. An individuality model for online signatures using global Fourier descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmatov, Alisher; Yanikoglu, Berrin

    2008-03-01

    The discriminative capability of a biometric is based on its individuality/uniqueness and is an important factor in choosing a biometric for a large-scale deployment. Individuality studies have been carried out rigorously for only certain biometrics, in particular fingerprint and iris, while work on establishing handwriting and signature individuality has been mainly on feature level. In this study, we present a preliminary individuality model for online signatures using the Fourier domain representation of the signature. Using the normalized Fourier coefficients as global features describing the signature, we derive a formula for the probability of coincidentally matching a given signature. Estimating model parameters from a large database and making certain simplifying assumptions, the probability of two arbitrary signatures to match in 13 of the coefficients is calculated as 4.7x10 -4. When compared with the results of a verification algorithm that parallels the theoretical model, the results show that the theoretical model fits the random forgery test results fairly well. While online signatures are sometimes dismissed as not very secure, our results show that the probability of successfully guessing an online signature is very low. Combined with the fact that signature is a behavioral biometric with adjustable complexity, these results support the use of online signatures for biometric authentication.

  19. Knowledge Growth: Applied Models of General and Individual Knowledge Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkina, Galina Iu.; Bakanova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the mathematical models of the growth and accumulation of scientific and applied knowledge since it is seen as the main potential and key competence of modern companies. The problem is examined on two levels--the growth and evolution of objective knowledge and knowledge evolution of a particular individual. Both processes are…

  20. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; Loveren, C. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft)

  1. An Individual-based Probabilistic Model for Fish Stock Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Buti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We define an individual-based probabilistic model of a sole (Solea solea behaviour. The individual model is given in terms of an Extended Probabilistic Discrete Timed Automaton (EPDTA, a new formalism that is introduced in the paper and that is shown to be interpretable as a Markov decision process. A given EPDTA model can be probabilistically model-checked by giving a suitable translation into syntax accepted by existing model-checkers. In order to simulate the dynamics of a given population of soles in different environmental scenarios, an agent-based simulation environment is defined in which each agent implements the behaviour of the given EPDTA model. By varying the probabilities and the characteristic functions embedded in the EPDTA model it is possible to represent different scenarios and to tune the model itself by comparing the results of the simulations with real data about the sole stock in the North Adriatic sea, available from the recent project SoleMon. The simulator is presented and made available for its adaptation to other species.

  2. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Employment status and the prevalence of poor self-rated health. Findings from UK individual-level repeated cross-sectional data from 1978 to 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, Frank; Gray, Linsay; Bambra, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess, using individual level data, how the proportion of people in different employment statuses may have played a role in the prevalence of poor self-rated health from 1978 to 2004 as there have been major changes in employment patterns in advanced market democracies and employment is an important correlate of health. Design Individual-level analysis of repeated cross-sectional surveys. Setting UK. Participants 125 125 men and 139 535 women of working age (25–59). Outcome measure Self-rated general health. Results Compared to 1978 there was evidence of higher levels of poor health in the subsequent years. For example, in 2004, the prevalence of poor health was 2.8 (95% CI 1.7 to 3.9) and 1.3 (0.1 to 2.5) percentage points higher than 1978 for men and women, respectively, after adjusting for age. After additional adjustment for socio-economic characteristics, annual differences compared to 1978 increased (5.4 (4.2 to 6.5) and 4.4 (3.2 to 5.6) for men and women in 2004). Further adjustment for employment status, however, attenuated the annual differences in poor health (0.7 (−0.3 to 1.7) for men and 1.5 (0.3 to 2.6) for women in 2004). Conclusions These results suggest that the proportion of people in different employment statuses, particularly the proportion in sickness- or disability-related economic inactivity, could play an important role in the prevalence of poor self-rated health in the UK. Whether decreasing economic inactivity would enhance population health is an open question that needs further investigation. Trial registration This observational study was not registered. PMID:23212993

  4. 高校差别化就业指导模式研究%A Study on the Mode of Individualized Employment Guidance of Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许根良

    2015-01-01

    Without c lose interaction with the employment market, along with the fact that the design of teaching process tends to be oversimplified, careers guidance in high schools can barely really satisfy the requirement of students. Therefore the concept of individualized careers guidance was introduced to solve this problem. The article analyzed the influential factors and laid down principles on giving individualized guidance to the target audience. According to students' specialties, four modules were designed, namely guidance on general needs, guidance on business starting, guidance on employment in the specialized fields and guidance on cross-profession empl-oyment, to form a basic frame for the teaching of individualized employment guidance.%针对当前高校就业指导教学模式设计简单,教学内容单一,不能充分满足学生个体差异性需求,没有与就业市场充分对接等现状,为了提高就业指导效率、促进大学生优质就业,提出高校差别化就业指导模式。通过对就业指导受众群体差别化原则和因素的分析,针对高校教育按专业划分的特点,设计了四个对应教学模块,包括普适性职业生涯规划教育、创业指导、对口专业行业内就业指导、非对口专业行业内就业指导,并以此为基础构建了高校差别化就业指导模式框架。

  5. Establishment of Comprehensive Evaluation Model of the New Generation Migrant Workers’ Employability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianli; GAO; Tongquan; ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Through literature research and expert interviews,we extract 10 variables influencing the new generation migrant workers’ employability,and establish the comprehensive evaluation model of the new generation migrant workers’ employability. Using factor analysis,we derive that the model includes three factors: skill literacy,relationship literacy and basic literacy. The weights of each factor are 0. 580,0. 244 and 0. 174 8,respectively. Skill literacy is affected by skill level,learning ability,career aspiration,ability to analyze problems,physical health status and other factors. Relationship literacy is affected by the sense of teamwork,interpersonal skills,social support and other factors. Basic literacy is affected by educational level,hardworking spirit and other factors. According to the results,we put forth the following recommendations to improve the new generation migrant workers’ employability: strengthening the vocational skill training; coordinating the vocational education resources.

  6. Analysis of the Individual Competitiveness:Employability%就业能力在人力资源竞争当中的价值与意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢馨; 郭广忠

    2013-01-01

    The employability of employees becomes an important foundation for the survival and growth of individuals and com-panies in the competitive circumstance. The employability even has influence in countries, which makes the countries have advan-tages in national business competitiveness. The traditional method of employment has been changed by the knowledge and internet e-conomy. In the whole developing process of employability, different perceptions and frameworks are recommended. Two theories about the relationship between education and employability will be provided and the disadvantages of the relationship will be ana-lyzed. Education also is meaningful to develop the employability.%就业能力对于个人、企业和国家都非常重要,是个人和组织在激烈的竞争环境中生存、发展的重要基础,也是国家经济发展的前提。随着知识经济和互联网的发展,传统的就业方法已不适应新形势的需要。而就业能力的发展历程和不同的就业能力理论也随着时代的发展而变更,目前主要有人力资本说和就业市场信号说两种观点,两种理论分别有它们的优势和劣势,教育对就业能力也有深远的影响。

  7. IBSEM: An Individual-Based Atlantic Salmon Population Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Castellani

    Full Text Available Ecology and genetics can influence the fate of individuals and populations in multiple ways. However, to date, few studies consider them when modelling the evolutionary trajectory of populations faced with admixture with non-local populations. For the Atlantic salmon, a model incorporating these elements is urgently needed because many populations are challenged with gene-flow from non-local and domesticated conspecifics. We developed an Individual-Based Salmon Eco-genetic Model (IBSEM to simulate the demographic and population genetic change of an Atlantic salmon population through its entire life-cycle. Processes such as growth, mortality, and maturation are simulated through stochastic procedures, which take into account environmental variables as well as the genotype of the individuals. IBSEM is based upon detailed empirical data from salmon biology, and parameterized to reproduce the environmental conditions and the characteristics of a wild population inhabiting a Norwegian river. Simulations demonstrated that the model consistently and reliably reproduces the characteristics of the population. Moreover, in absence of farmed escapees, the modelled populations reach an evolutionary equilibrium that is similar to our definition of a 'wild' genotype. We assessed the sensitivity of the model in the face of assumptions made on the fitness differences between farm and wild salmon, and evaluated the role of straying as a buffering mechanism against the intrusion of farm genes into wild populations. These results demonstrate that IBSEM is able to capture the evolutionary forces shaping the life history of wild salmon and is therefore able to model the response of populations under environmental and genetic stressors.

  8. Markovian Building Blocks for Individual-Based Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lars Anders Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis consists of a summary report, four research articles, one technical report and one manuscript. The subject of the thesis is individual-based stochastic models. The summary report is composed of three parts and a brief history of some basic models in population biology....... This history is included in order to provide a reader that has no previous exposure to models in population biology with a sufficient background to understand some of the biological models that are mentioned in the thesis. The first part of the rest of the summary is a description of the dramatic changes...... in the degree of aggregation of sprat or herring in the Baltic during the day, with special focus on the dispersion of the fish from schools at dusk. The next part is a brief introduction to Markovian arrival processes, a type of stochastic processes with potential applications as sub-models in population...

  9. Individual Subjective Initiative Merge Model Based on Cellular Automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Jie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The merge control models proposed for work zones are classified into two types (Hard Control Merge (HCM model and Soft Control Merge (SCM model according to their own control intensity and are compared with a new model, called Individual Subjective Initiative Merge (ISIM model, which is based on the linear lane-changing probability strategy in the merging area. The attention of this paper is paid to the positive impact of the individual subjective initiative for the whole traffic system. Three models (ISIM, HCM, and SCM are established and compared with each other by two order parameters, that is, system output and average vehicle travel time. Finally, numerical results show that both ISIM and SCM perform better than HCM. Compared with SCM, the output of ISIM is 20 vehicles per hour higher under the symmetric input condition and is more stable under the asymmetric input condition. Meanwhile, the average travel time of ISIM is 2000 time steps less under the oversaturated input condition.

  10. Toward an Integrated Competence-based System Supporting Lifelong Learning and Employability: Concepts, Model, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boon, Jo; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Van der Klink, M., Boon, J., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2009). Toward an Integrated Competence-based System Supporting Lifelong Learning and Employability: Concepts, Model, and Challenges. In M. Spaniol, Q. Li, R. Klamma & R. W. H. Lau (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th International Conferenc

  11. Modelling the Dynamics of the Work-Employment System by Predator-Prey Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Serpa, Nilo

    2011-01-01

    The broad application range of the predator-prey modelling enabled us to apply it to represent the dynamics of the work-employment system. For the adopted period, we conclude that this dynamics is chaotic in the beginning of the time series and tends to less perturbed states, as time goes by, due to public policies and hidden intrinsic system features. Basic Lotka-Volterra approach was revised and adapted to the reality of the study. The final aim is to provide managers with generalized theoretical elements that allow to a more accurate understanding of the behavior of the work-employment system.

  12. A NOTE ON THE EMPLOYMENT OF THE DEDICATION FORMULA IR.N.F M MNW.F FOR NON-ROYAL INDIVIDUALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EdmundS.Meltzer

    1994-01-01

    In two recent studies of the dedication formulai(?)n.f m mnw.f, Sayed Tawfik and Günther Vittmann mention very few examples in which it is employed by private individuals. Tawfik states that the rare instances of that kind are those in which the dedication is made to one’s ancestors, though the passage he cites from the autobiography of Chnumhotpe II does not conform to that pattern. Vittmann adds Cairo CG 23019, an offering table with two parallel formulae recording a dedication at the staircases of Osiris and Wepwawet at Abydos in exchange for funerary wishes and offerings, and he also includes an example from Meir.

  13. Rational inattention and employer learning

    OpenAIRE

    Habermalz, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Research on employer learning has provided important insights into the dynamic process that determines individual wages, especially during the early part of a worker's career. However, the recent evidence on the absence of employer learning for college graduates by Arcidiacono et al. (2008) and results that economic conditions at labor market entry have persistent effects on wages (for example Oreopoulos et al. (2008)) cast doubt on the model's validity. This paper extends the employer learni...

  14. Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Individual Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a generalized method of moments (GMM based estimation for dynamic panel data models with individual specific fixed effects and threshold effects simultaneously. We extend Hansen’s (Hansen, 1999 original setup to models including endogenous regressors, specifically, lagged dependent variables. To address the problem of endogeneity of these nonlinear dynamic panel data models, we prove that the orthogonality conditions proposed by Arellano and Bond (1991 are valid. The threshold and slope parameters are estimated by GMM, and asymptotic distribution of the slope parameters is derived. Finite sample performance of the estimation is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. It shows that the threshold and slope parameter can be estimated accurately and also the finite sample distribution of slope parameters is well approximated by the asymptotic distribution.

  15. A partnership-based model for embedding employability in urban planning education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neale Blair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a partnership-based model for embedding employability in urban planning education. The model is based on the author’s experiences of implementing an international project which supported the development of employability skills in urban and regional planning education in Malawi. Since independence, urban planners have typically trained outside the country, attending university in the UK and other Commonwealth countries. More recently, the paradigm has shifted towards in-country education delivered by academic staff cognisant with the opportunities and challenges of development in Malawi. There remains, though, a gap between graduate knowledge of the subject and the skills necessary to pursue a professional career in the sector. Although there is no consensus yet on the meaning of employability in the literature, lessons from the project indicate that academic–public–private collaboration helps incorporate in curriculum skills that employers anticipate. Applicability of these principles is however context dependent, particularly in the emerging economy context where institutional capacity may be less developed compared to elsewhere.

  16. Individual brain structure and modelling predict seizure propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proix, Timothée; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2017-03-01

    See Lytton (doi:10.1093/awx018) for a scientific commentary on this article.Neural network oscillations are a fundamental mechanism for cognition, perception and consciousness. Consequently, perturbations of network activity play an important role in the pathophysiology of brain disorders. When structural information from non-invasive brain imaging is merged with mathematical modelling, then generative brain network models constitute personalized in silico platforms for the exploration of causal mechanisms of brain function and clinical hypothesis testing. We here demonstrate with the example of drug-resistant epilepsy that patient-specific virtual brain models derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging have sufficient predictive power to improve diagnosis and surgery outcome. In partial epilepsy, seizures originate in a local network, the so-called epileptogenic zone, before recruiting other close or distant brain regions. We create personalized large-scale brain networks for 15 patients and simulate the individual seizure propagation patterns. Model validation is performed against the presurgical stereotactic electroencephalography data and the standard-of-care clinical evaluation. We demonstrate that the individual brain models account for the patient seizure propagation patterns, explain the variability in postsurgical success, but do not reliably augment with the use of patient-specific connectivity. Our results show that connectome-based brain network models have the capacity to explain changes in the organization of brain activity as observed in some brain disorders, thus opening up avenues towards discovery of novel clinical interventions. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  17. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  18. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  19. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Denise; van Loveren, Cor; Dusseldorp, Elise; Verrips, Gijsbert H W

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) scores were extracted from dental records. A validated parental questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and oral hygiene behaviours. Data on neighbourhood quality were obtained from the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics. Structural equation modelling indicated that the model was valid after applying a few modifications. In the revised model, lower maternal education level was related to poorer family organization, lower levels of social support, lower dental self-efficacy, and an external dental health locus of control. These, in turn, were associated with poorer oral hygiene behaviours, which were linked to higher levels of childhood dental caries. In addition, lower maternal education level and poorer neighbourhood quality were directly associated with higher caries levels in children. This model advances our understanding of determinants of childhood dental caries and the pathways in which they operate. Conception of these pathways is essential for guiding the development of caries-preventive programmes for children. Clues for further development of the model are suggested.

  20. Employing Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities to simulate turbulent statistics in LES models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrazia, G. A.; Rizza, U.; Puhales, F. S.; Welter, G. S.; Acevedo, O. C.; Maldaner, S.

    2012-02-01

    A turbulent subfilter viscosity for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based on the Taylor statistical diffusion theory is proposed. This viscosity is described in terms of a velocity variance and a time scale, both associated to the inertial subrange. This new subfilter viscosity contains a cutoff wavenumber kc, presenting an identical form (differing by a constant) to the Heisenberg subfilter viscosity. Therefore, both subfilter viscosities are described in terms of a sharp division between large and small wavenumbers of a turbulent flow and, henceforth, Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities are in agreement with the sharp Fourier filtering operation, frequently employed in LES models. Turbulent statistics of different orders, generated from atmospheric boundary layer simulations employing both Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities have been compared with observations and results provided by other simulations. The comparison shows that the LES model utilizing the approaches of Taylor and Heisenberg reproduces these turbulent statistics correctly in different vertical regions of a planetary convective boundary layer (CBL).

  1. Predictive models for the assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals: A new challenge for employers

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Piotr Gromiec; Małgorzata Kupczewska-Dobecka; Agnieszka Jankowska; Sławomir Czerczak

    2013-01-01

    Employers are obliged to carry out and document the risk associated with the use of chemical substances. The best but the most expensive method is to measure workplace concentrations of chemicals. At present no "measureless" method for risk assessment is available in Poland, but predictive models for such assessments have been developed in some countries. The purpose of this work is to review and evaluate the applicability of selected predictive methods for assessing occupational inhalation e...

  2. Predictive Models to Determine Imagery Strategies Employed by Children to Judge Hand Laterality

    OpenAIRE

    Steffie Spruijt; Marijtje L A Jongsma; John van der Kamp; Bert Steenbergen

    2015-01-01

    A commonly used paradigm to study motor imagery is the hand laterality judgment task. The present study aimed to determine which strategies young children employ to successfully perform this task. Children of 5 to 8 years old (N = 92) judged laterality of back and palm view hand pictures in different rotation angles. Response accuracy and response duration were registered. Response durations of the trials with a correct judgment were fitted to a-priori defined predictive sinusoid models, repr...

  3. Modeling individual effects in the Cormack-Jolly-Seber Model: A state-space formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    In population and evolutionary biology, there exists considerable interest in individual heterogeneity in parameters of demographic models for open populations. However, flexible and practical solutions to the development of such models have proven to be elusive. In this article, I provide a state-space formulation of open population capture-recapture models with individual effects. The state-space formulation provides a generic and flexible framework for modeling and inference in models with individual effects, and it yields a practical means of estimation in these complex problems via contemporary methods of Markov chain Monte Carlo. A straightforward implementation can be achieved in the software package WinBUGS. I provide an analysis of a simple model with constant parameter detection and survival probability parameters. A second example is based on data from a 7-year study of European dippers, in which a model with year and individual effects is fitted.

  4. Modeling Employment on Regional Labor Markets(Through the Example of the Khabarovsk Territory of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Valerievna Zikunova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The disbalance of demand and supply on the labor market acquires special sense for remote and underpopulated settled lands. The lack of perspective estimations of the regional labor markets development leads to the outflow of human capital assets from regions, and their high concentration in central regions of the country. It results in the loss of competition effects on the labor market, aggravation of the mismatch of the demand and supply for labor resources according to the types of economic activity. Ultimately, the inertia policy in the area of planning regional employment can lead to the loss of skilled personnel and loss of effects related to regional specialization. The aim of this article is to substantiate the model to predict the number of the employed in the region. Firstly, the article generalizes regional and national tendencies of the labor market development. Secondly, based on the analysis of demographic and economic characteristics of the region, the model related to predicting the employment in the region is offered. Its quality is proved by subsequent approbation on the basis of real statistic data. The article displays the perspectives of applying such models in other regional economic systems taking into account their industry specialization.

  5. Attractor-based models for individual and groups’ forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, N. N.; Demidova, L. A.; Kuzovnikov, A. V.; Tishkin, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the questions of the attractors’ application in case of the development of the forecasting models on the base of the strictly binary trees have been considered. Usually, these models use the short time series as the training data sequence. The application of the principles of the attractors’ forming on the base of the long time series will allow creating the training data sequence more reasonably. The offered approach to creation of the training data sequence for the forecasting models on the base of the strictly binary trees was applied for the individual and groups’ forecasting of time series. At the same time the problems of one-objective and multiobjective optimization on the base of the modified clonal selection algorithm have been considered. The reviewed examples confirm the efficiency of the attractors’ application in sense of minimization of the used quality indicators of the forecasting models, and also the forecasting errors on 1 – 5 steps forward. Besides, the minimization of time expenditures for the development of the forecasting models is provided.

  6. The psychological contract: is the UK National Health Service a model employer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Sandra; Whiting, Fiona

    2007-05-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is facing recruitment challenges that mean it will need to become an 'employer of choice' if it is to continue to attract high-quality employees. This paper reports the findings from a study focusing on allied health professional staff (n = 67), aimed at establishing the expectations of the NHS inherent in their current psychological contract and to consider whether the government's drive to make the NHS a model employer meets those expectations. The findings show that the most important aspects of the psychological contract were relational and based on the investment made in the employment relationship by both parties. The employment relationship was one of high involvement but also one where transactional contract items, such as pay, were still of some importance. Although the degree of employee satisfaction with the relational content of the psychological contract was relatively positive, there was, nevertheless, a mismatch between levels of importance placed on such aspects of the contract and levels of satisfaction, with employees increasingly placing greater emphasis on those items the NHS is having the greatest difficulty providing. Despite this apparent disparity between employee expectation and the fulfilment of those expectations, the overall health of the psychological contract was still high.

  7. A Case Study of Employing A Single Server Nonpreemptive Priority Queuing Model at ATM Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Furquan; Abdullah Imran

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study of employing a single server nonpreemptivepriorityqueuing model [1]at ATM machine which originally operates on M/M/1 model. In this study we have taken two priority classes of people in following order:- .Priority class 1- woman .Priority class 2- man Sometimea long queue is formed at ATMmachine (single server)but the bank management don’t have enough money to invest on installing new ATM machine.In this situation we want to apply single ser...

  8. Fraud, individuals, and networks: A biopsychosocial model of scientific frauds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J; Linkowski, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The problem of fraud, especially scientific fraud, is global and its identification risk is still in its infancy. Based on an in-depth analysis of several financial and scientific fraud trials, the authors propose a new and integrative model of scientific fraud. This model identifies two major levels for committing fraud: (i) at the personal skills level (micro-level) and (ii) at the network skills level (macro-level). Interacting continuously with each other, they form a dynamic, efficient, and integrative system: an integrative model of fraud. The micro-level refers to three factors: (i) personality organization, (ii) social competence, and (iii) the so-called triangle of fraud. The macro-level refers essentially to social network organization and social engineering. Then, the key to understanding and mostly controlling fraud is to consider both the individual and the environment in which they operate. Based on our model, several steps at the micro- and macro-levels can be proposed. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  10. Tension at the borders: perceptions of role overload, conflict, strain and facilitation in work, family and health roles among employed individuals with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Backman, Catherine L; Kaptein, Simone; Lacaille, Diane; Beaton, Dorcas E; Hofstetter, Catherine; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    To examine inter-relationships among arthritis (A), work (W) and personal life (P) roles and their reciprocal influences, especially experiences of role balance/imbalance among individuals with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and OA. Eight focus groups were conducted with 24 women and 16 men (aged 29-72 years). A purposive sample was recruited from community advertising. Eligibility included current employment or having been employed within the previous year. Participants were asked about ways arthritis, work and personal life roles intersected and their impact. A standardized questionnaire collected demographic, symptom and employment data for descriptive purposes. Participants noted that having arthritis affected their identity and intersected with work and personal roles, creating role overload, role conflict, role strain and role facilitation. Role overload highlighted that arthritis both affected and was impacted by work and personal life (A → W; A → P; W → A; P → A). Role conflict focused on A → W and A → P difficulties, whereas role facilitation emphasized the positive impact of work and personal life roles on arthritis (W → A; P → A). Role strain was pervasive and arose from numerous sources. Personal strategies (e.g. positive framing) and contextual factors (e.g. support) were important in contributing to or ameliorating role balance/imbalance. By comprehensively examining multiple types of role balance/imbalance and the context within which it occurs, this study identifies gaps in patient-oriented measurement of the impact of arthritis and areas of need in the development of arthritis intervention.

  11. Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Petra

    2016-01-01

    A challenge for most theoretical and computational accounts of linguistic reference is the observation that language users vary considerably in their referential choices. Part of the variation observed among and within language users and across tasks may be explained from variation in the cognitive resources available to speakers and listeners. This paper presents a computational model of reference production and comprehension developed within the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Through simulations with this ACT-R model, it is investigated how cognitive constraints interact with linguistic constraints and features of the linguistic discourse in speakers' production and listeners' comprehension of referring expressions in specific tasks, and how this interaction may give rise to variation in referential choice. The ACT-R model of reference explains and predicts variation among language users in their referential choices as a result of individual and task-related differences in processing speed and working memory capacity. Because of limitations in their cognitive capacities, speakers sometimes underspecify or overspecify their referring expressions, and listeners sometimes choose incorrect referents or are overly liberal in their interpretation of referring expressions.

  12. Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eHendriks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for most theoretical and computational accounts of linguistic reference is the observation that language users vary considerably in their referential choices. Part of the variation observed among and within language users and across tasks may be explained from variation in the cognitive resources available to speakers and listeners. This paper presents a computational model of reference production and comprehension developed within the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Through simulations with this ACT-R model, it is investigated how cognitive constraints interact with linguistic constraints and features of the linguistic discourse in speakers’ production and listeners’ comprehension of referring expressions in specific tasks, and how this interaction may give rise to variation in referential choice. The ACT-R model of reference explains and predicts variation among language users in their referential choices as a result of individual and task-related differences in processing speed and working memory capacity. Because of limitations in their cognitive capacities, speakers sometimes underspecify or overspecify their referring expressions, and listeners sometimes choose incorrect referents or are overly liberal in their interpretation of referring expressions.

  13. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; LIU Dan; HE Min-Hua; YU Xiao-Ling; PAN Gui-Jun; SUN Hong-Zhang; SU Xiang-Ying; SUN Fan; YIN Yan-Ping; LI Rui

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady statesof epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  14. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan-Ming; He, Min-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Pan, Gui-Jun; Sun, Hong-Zhang; Su, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Fan; Yin, Yan-Ping; Li, Rui; Liu, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady states of epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  15. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  16. Where do inmmigrants fare worse? Modeling workplace wage gap variation with longitudinal employer-employee data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald; Hällsten, Martin; Avent-Holt, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    The authors propose a strategy for observing and explaining workplace variance in categorically linked inequalities. Using Swedish economy-wide linked employer-employee panel data, the authors examine variation in workplace wage inequalities between native Swedes and non-Western immigrants. Consistent with relational inequality theory, the authors' findings are that immigrant-native wage gaps vary dramatically across workplaces, even net of strong human capital controls. The authors also find that, net of observed and fixed-effect controls for individual traits, workplace immigrant-native wage gaps decline with increased workplace immigrant employment and managerial representation and increase when job segregation rises. These results are stronger in high-inequality workplaces and for white-collar employees: contexts in which one expects status-based claims on organizational resources, the central causal mechanism identified by relational inequality theory, to be stronger. The authors conclude that workplace variation in the non-Western immigrant-native wage gaps is contingent on organizational variationin the relative power of groups and the institutional context in which that power is exercised.

  17. Symptom Effects on Employment in a Structural Model of Mental Illness and Treatment: Analysis of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Eric; Salkever, David

    2001-03-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a long tradition in the health and mental health economics literatures of estimating the impacts of disorders on employment and earnings. Several analyses have associated mental illness with poorer labor market outcomes, often using indicators of disorders to measure mental illness, but it is unclear to what extent unobserved medical treatment biases the estimated impacts of disorders on labor market outcomes. In this study we argue that in order to judge the true employment costs of mental illness and the potential benefits of treatment it is necessary to account for the structural relationship between treatment, symptoms, and employment outcomes. AIMS OF THE STUDY: The study proposes a structural model for understanding mental illness impacts on employment and empirically estimates one element of this structural model that links symptoms of schizophrenia to patients' employment status. In addition, we use our empirical estimates to simulate employment consequences of more effective treatment and reductions in symptom levels. EMPIRICAL METHODS: Our empirical analyses use a sample of 1,643 adults with a schizophrenia diagnosis. We predict the likelihood of three outcomes - not employed, employed in a sheltered or supported job, and employed in a non-supported job. Analyses include measures of demographic characteristics, illness history, location differences, and detailed symptom measures. RESULTS: We find that negative symptoms have a substantial adverse impact on participation in both non-supported jobs and in sheltered or supported jobs. The impacts on employment of other symptoms of schizophrenia are not as large, but significant effects are also found for symptoms of depression. Simulations suggest, however, that only one-third of consumers would be employed in any type of job even given a large reduction in symptom levels. DISCUSSION: Negative symptoms are particularly important for role functioning and employment. The marginal effect on

  18. A Multifactorial Personnel Distribution Model in the Human Resources Employment for the District Police Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Baycan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human resources employment is a very essential management process for effectiveness and efficiency of organizations. Determining the optimal number of staff represents a very essential management and decision-making process to provide effective and efficient policing services. In this study, the personnel allocation of Turkish National Police (TNP to 256 districts in respect to their organizational structure, special situations, and risk factors was simulated with developed Multifactorial Personnel Distribution Model. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods was used in this study. In Multifactorial Personnel Distribution Model, basically four elements were found to be useful for the planning. Those are; (1 minimum number of staff for units, (2 the number of staff based on population and other risk factors, (3 the number of staff based on special situation of province, and (4 benchmarking with other units that have similar characteristics.

  19. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  20. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  1. Developments in convective heat transfer models featuring seamless and selected detail surfaces, employing electroless plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Several model/instrument concepts employing electroless metallic skin were considered for improvement of surface condition, accuracy, and cost of contoured-geometry convective heat transfer models. A plated semi-infinite slab approach was chosen for development and evaluation in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The plated slab model consists of an epoxy casting containing fine constantan wires accurately placed at specified surface locations. An electroless alloy was deposited on the plastic surface that provides a hard, uniformly thick, seamless skin. The chosen alloy forms a high-output thermocouple junction with each exposed constantan wire, providing means of determining heat transfer during tunnel testing of the model. A selective electroless plating procedure was used to deposit scaled heatshield tiles on the lower surface of a 0.0175-scale shuttle orbiter model. Twenty-five percent of the tiles were randomly selected and plated to a height of 0.001-inch. The purpose was to assess the heating effects of surface roughness simulating misalignment of tiles that may occur during manufacture of the spacecraft.

  2. STELLA software as a tool for modelling phosphorus removal in a constructed wetland employing dewatered alum sludge as main substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J L G; Wang, Z Y; Zhao, Y Q; Babatunde, A O; Zhao, X H; Jørgensen, S E

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic simulation model was developed for the removal of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from the vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCW) using a dynamic software program called STELLA (structural thinking, experiential learning laboratory with animation) 9.1.3 to aid in simulating the environmental nature and succession of relationship between interdependent components and processes in the VFCW system. In particular, the VFCW employed dewatered alum sludge as its main substrate to enhance phosphorus (P) immobilization. Although computer modelling of P in treatment wetland has been well studied especially in recent years, there is still a need to develop simple and realistic models that can be used for investigating the dynamics of SRP in VFCWs. The state variables included in the model are dissolved phosphorus (DISP), plant phosphorus (PLAP), detritus phosphorus (DETP), plant biomass (PLBI) and adsorbed phosphorus (ADSP). The major P transformation processes considered in this study were adsorption, plant and microbial uptake and decomposition. The forcing functions which were considered in the model are temperature, radiation, volume of wastewater, P concentration, contact time, flow rate and the adsorbent (i.e., alum sludge). The model results revealed that up to 72% of the SRP can be removed through adsorption process whereas the uptake by plants is about 20% and the remaining processes such as microbial P utilization and decomposition, accounted for 7% SRP removal based on the mass balance calculations. The results obtained indicate that the model can be used to simulate outflow SRP concentration, and it can also be used to estimate the amount of P removed by individual processes in the VFCW using alum-sludge as a substrate.

  3. Patient-specific modeling of individual sickle cell behavior under transient hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a highly complex genetic blood disorder in which red blood cells (RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphology changes and decreased deformability. We employ a kinetic model for cell morphological sickling that invokes parameters derived from patient-specific data. This model is used to investigate the dynamics of individual sickle cells in a capillary-like microenvironment in order to address various mechanisms associated with SCD. We show that all RBCs, both hypoxia-unaffected and hypoxia-affected ones, regularly pass through microgates under oxygenated state. However, the hypoxia-affected cells undergo sickling which significantly alters cell dynamics. In particular, the dense and rigid sickle RBCs are obstructed thereby clogging blood flow while the less dense and deformable ones are capable of circumnavigating dead (trapped) cells ahead of them by choosing a serpentine path. Informed by recent experiments involving microfluidics that provide in vitro quantitative information on cell dynamics under transient hypoxia conditions, we have performed detailed computational simulations of alterations to cell behavior in response to morphological changes and membrane stiffening. Our model reveals that SCD exhibits substantial heterogeneity even within a particular density-fractionated subpopulation. These findings provide unique insights into how individual sickle cells move through capillaries under transient hypoxic conditions, and offer novel possibilities for designing effective therapeutic interventions for SCD. PMID:28288152

  4. Video Modeling for Individuals with Autism: A Review of Model Types and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kathleen; Hermansen, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy research on video modeling as an instructional approach for individuals with autism has been found to be a promising area for teachers and researchers. Over the last three decades the literature has shown successful use of video modeling for teaching a variety of social, academic, and functional skills. The purpose of this literature…

  5. Getting unemployed job seekers back to work: the development of a process model of employment counseling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, G.; van Hooft, E.A.J.; van Mierlo, H.; van Dam, A.; Born, M.Ph.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a tentative model of employment counseling based on 31 critical incident interviews with supervisors, employment counselors, and unemployed job seekers. The incidents (N= 599) mentioned in the interviews were inductively used to develop a category framework

  6. Re-engineering pre-employment check-up systems: a model for improving health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rateb, Said Abdel Hakim; El Nouman, Azza Abdel Razek; Rateb, Moshira Abdel Hakim; Asar, Mohamed Naguib; El Amin, Ayman Mohammed; Gad, Saad abdel Aziz; Mohamed, Mohamed Salah Eldin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for improving health services provided by the pre-employment medical fitness check-up system affiliated to Egypt's Health Insurance Organization (HIO). Operations research, notably system re-engineering, is used in six randomly selected centers and findings before and after re-engineering are compared. The re-engineering model follows a systems approach, focusing on three areas: structure, process and outcome. The model is based on six main components: electronic booking, standardized check-up processes, protected medical documents, advanced archiving through an electronic content management (ECM) system, infrastructure development, and capacity building. The model originates mainly from customer needs and expectations. The centers' monthly customer flow increased significantly after re-engineering. The mean time spent per customer cycle improved after re-engineering--18.3 +/- 5.5 minutes as compared to 48.8 +/- 14.5 minutes before. Appointment delay was also significantly decreased from an average 18 to 6.2 days. Both beneficiaries and service providers were significantly more satisfied with the services after re-engineering. The model proves that re-engineering program costs are exceeded by increased revenue. Re-engineering in this study involved multiple structure and process elements. The literature review did not reveal similar re-engineering healthcare packages. Therefore, each element was compared separately. This model is highly recommended for improving service effectiveness and efficiency. This research is the first in Egypt to apply the re-engineering approach to public health systems. Developing user-friendly models for service improvement is an added value.

  7. [Predictive models for the assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals: a new challenge for employers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiec, Jan Piotr; Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    Employers are obliged to carry out and document the risk associated with the use of chemical substances. The best but the most expensive method is to measure workplace concentrations of chemicals. At present no "measureless" method for risk assessment is available in Poland, but predictive models for such assessments have been developed in some countries. The purpose of this work is to review and evaluate the applicability of selected predictive methods for assessing occupational inhalation exposure and related risk to check the compliance with Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs), as well as the compliance with REACH obligations. Based on the literature data HSE COSHH Essentials, EASE, ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager, and EMKG-Expo-Tool were evaluated. The data on validation of predictive models were also examined. It seems that predictive models may be used as a useful method for Tier 1 assessment of occupational exposure by inhalation. Since the levels of exposure are frequently overestimated, they should be considered as "rational worst cases" for selection of proper control measures. Bearing in mind that the number of available exposure scenarios and PROC categories is limited, further validation by field surveys is highly recommended. Predictive models may serve as a good tool for preliminary risk assessment and selection of the most appropriate risk control measures in Polish small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) providing that they are available in the Polish language. This also requires an extensive training of their future users.

  8. Predictive models for the assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals: A new challenge for employers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Piotr Gromiec

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Employers are obliged to carry out and document the risk associated with the use of chemical substances. The best but the most expensive method is to measure workplace concentrations of chemicals. At present no "measureless" method for risk assessment is available in Poland, but predictive models for such assessments have been developed in some countries. The purpose of this work is to review and evaluate the applicability of selected predictive methods for assessing occupational inhalation exposure and related risk to check the compliance with Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs, as well as the compliance with REACH obligations. Based on the literature data HSE COSHH Essentials, EASE, ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager, and EMKG-Expo-Tool were evaluated. The data on validation of predictive models were also examined. It seems that predictive models may be used as a useful method for Tier 1 assessment of occupational exposure by inhalation. Since the levels of exposure are frequently overestimated, they should be considered as "rational worst cases" for selection of proper control measures. Bearing in mind that the number of available exposure scenarios and PROC categories is limited, further validation by field surveys is highly recommended. Predictive models may serve as a good tool for preliminary risk assessment and selection of the most appropriate risk control measures in Polish small and medium size enterprises (SMEs providing that they are available in the Polish language. This also requires an extensive training of their future users. Med Pr 2013;64(5:699–716

  9. Influence of aquifer heterogeneity on karst hydraulics and catchment delineation employing distributive modeling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oehlmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to their heterogeneous nature, karst aquifers pose a major challenge for hydrogeological investigations. Important procedures like the delineation of catchment areas for springs are hindered by the unknown locations and hydraulic properties of highly conductive karstic zones. In this work numerical modeling was employed as a tool in delineating catchment areas of several springs within a karst area in southwestern Germany. For this purpose, different distributive modeling approaches were implemented in the Finite Element simulation software Comsol Multiphysics®. The investigation focuses on the question to which degree the effect of karstification has to be taken into account for accurately simulating the hydraulic head distribution and the observed spring discharges. The results reveal that the representation of heterogeneities has a large influence on the delineation of the catchment areas. Not only the location of highly conductive elements but also their geometries play a major role for the resulting hydraulic head distribution and thus for catchment area delineation. The size distribution of the karst conduits derived from the numerical models agrees with knowledge from karst genesis. It was thus shown that numerical modeling is a useful tool for catchment delineation in karst aquifers based on results from different field observations.

  10. A background error covariance model of significant wave height employing Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanyou; HOU Yijun; ZHANG Chunmei; YANG Jie

    2012-01-01

    The quality of background error statistics is one of the key components for successful assimilation of observations in a numerical model.The background error covariance(BEC)of ocean waves is generally estimated under an assumption that it is stationary over a period of time and uniform over a domain.However,error statistics are in fact functions of the physical processes governing the meteorological situation and vary with the wave condition.In this paper,we simulated the BEC of the significant wave height(SWH)employing Monte Carlo methods.An interesting result is that the BEC varies consistently with the mean wave direction(MWD).In the model domain,the BEC of the SWH decreases significantly when the MWD changes abruptly.A new BEC model of the SWH based on the correlation between the BEC and MWD was then developed.A case study of regional data assimilation was performed,where the SWH observations of buoy 22001 were used to assess the SWH hindcast.The results show that the new BEC model benefits wave prediction and allows reasonable approximations of anisotropy and inhomogeneous errors.

  11. A Case Study of Employing A Single Server Nonpreemptive Priority Queuing Model at ATM Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Furquan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a case study of employing a single server nonpreemptivepriorityqueuing model [1]at ATM machine which originally operates on M/M/1 model. In this study we have taken two priority classes of people in following order:- .Priority class 1- woman .Priority class 2- man Sometimea long queue is formed at ATMmachine (single serverbut the bank management don’t have enough money to invest on installing new ATM machine.In this situation we want to apply single server nonpreemptive priority queuing model.The security guard at the ATM will divide the customers in two category and arrange the customers in the above said priority order Thuspriority class 1 people willreceive theatm service ahead of priority class 2 people.This will reduce the waiting time of priority class 1 people. Of course by doing this the waiting time of priority class 2will increase. This is ok as long as the increment in waiting time of priority class2 people is reasonable and within the tolerable limitof priority class 2people.This will be true when percentage of priority class 1 people is relatively less as compared to priority class 2 people To know the attitude and tolerable limit of priority class 2 people towards the single server non preemtive priority model a sample survey has been done on the incomingpriority class 2 population at the atm machine.Against this background, the queuing process is employed with emphasis to Poisson distribution to assess the waiting time. The data for this study was collected from primary source and is limited to ATM service point of state bank of India located at Ramesh chowk, Aurangabad, bihar, India.. The assistance of three colleague was sought in collecting the data. The Interarrival time and service time data was collected during busy working hours (i.e. 10.30am to 4:00pm during the first 60 days. A sample survey was done to know the attitude and tolerable limit of priority class 2people towards the single server

  12. Individual balanced scorecard based on innovative models of personality structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Polozov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Article focuses on integration of different views on personality structure, which comprises the type of person, the type of character and several types of intelligence. The paper shows practical application of the concept. Graduates who seek to realize their career must comply with the activities of his personality type, the type of character and the dominant type of intelligence.The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to offer the variant of integrating various psychological doctrines. This variant must have higher convergence of expected and actual behavior of selected groups than any of the local concepts. Personal balanced scorecard based on the innovative model of personality structure is building in the article.Practical work was carried out by the authors on the two groups of students. The main condition for the practical work was the fact that students do not impose something.The results of the analysis. We defined that personality structure is a complex concept. It is important to combine different views on the structure of individual and to include various aspects. From the analysis of other authors works we found out that BSC idea is to balance system performance in four groups. The first group includes traditional financial performance. The second group describes external environment of the company and its relationship with customers. The third group describes internal processes of the enterprise. The fourth group allows us to describe the company's ability to learn and grow.Conclusions and directions of further researches. The focus of interest is mainly determined by the type of personality. However, the selection should be such that:consistent hierarchy of motives at this age;trends of economy in general and in the chosen industry in particular;supported by appropriate kind of intelligence;absorbed all of the recommended activity profiles as private.

  13. Measurements of AIM for Visible Wavelength Based on Individual Eye Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Zhao-Qi; WANG Yan; ZUO Tong; ZHAO Kan-Xing

    2006-01-01

    We measure and calculate the aerial image modulation (AIM) of human retina for visible wavelengths based on the individual eye model. By employing the optical design software ZEMAX, we obtain the modulation transfer function (MTF) of human eye in visible wavelengths. Using CSV-1000 and VAF-1000, the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and the visual acuity (VA) for the same eye are measured. Then the AIM of human retina could be acquired by the relations between MTF and CSF and between MTF and VA. The AIM of human retina is independent of MTF, and the values of AIM for normal eyes (without retina disease) are similar, so the assembly average for large numbers of normal eyes can be a standard AIM curve, which is helpful for the diagnosis of diseases in the retina system.

  14. Partially mixed household epidemiological model with clustered resistant individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Criner, Amanda Keck

    2007-02-01

    We study the dynamics of the spread of an infectious disease within a population partitioned into households, and stratified into resistant and nonresistant individuals. Variability in the level of resistance between households increases the initial rate of spread of the infection, as well as the infection level at the endemic equilibrium. This phenomenon is seen even when all individuals in the population are equally likely to be resistant, and can also be predicted by including spatial clustering of resistant individuals within an improved mean-field approximation.

  15. Employing satellite retrieved soil moisture for parameter estimation of the hydrologic model mHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias; Mai, Juliane; Rakovec, Oldrich; Schrön, Martin; Kumar, Rohini; Schäfer, David; Samaniego, Luis

    2016-04-01

    function is based on the parameter distance (3). Thus, the temporal correlation and the sum of squared distances from soil moisture anomalies of reference and estimated soil moisture revealed best performances. Employing satellite retrieved SM for calibrating the hydrological model leads to model parameters which are able to catch soil moisture dynamics but deteriorates the skill on streamflow prediction. Discharge estimates are ranging between 0.1-0.3 Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency, whereas the coefficient of correlation between modeled and satellite retrieved soil moisture exceeds 0.7.

  16. Fuzzy clustering: critical analysis of the contextual mechanisms employed by three neural network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Andrea; Parmiggiani, Flavio

    1996-06-01

    According to the following definition, taken from the literature, a fuzzy clustering mechanism allows the same input pattern to belong to multiple categories to different degrees. Many clustering neural network (NN) models claim to feature fuzzy properties, but several of them (like the Fuzzy ART model) do not satisfy this definition. Vice versa, we believe that Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map, SOM, satisfies the definition provided above, even though this NN model is well-known to (robustly) perform topologically ordered mapping rather than fuzzy clustering. This may sound as a paradox if we consider that several fuzzy NN models (such as the Fuzzy Learning Vector Quantization, FLVQ, which was first called Fuzzy Kohonen Clustering Network, FKCN) were originally developed to enhance Kohonen's models (such as SOM and the vector quantization model, VQ). The fuzziness of SOM indicates that a network of processing elements (PEs) can verify the fuzzy clustering definition when it exploits local rules which are biologically plausible (such as the Kohonen bubble strategy). This is equivalent to state that the exploitation of the fuzzy set theory in the development of complex systems (e.g., clustering NNs) may provide new mathematical tools (e.g., the definition of membership function) to simulate the behavior of those cooperative/competitive mechanisms already identified by neurophysiological studies. When a biologically plausible cooperative/competitive strategy is pursued effectively, neighboring PEs become mutually coupled to gain sensitivity to contextual effects. PEs which are mutually coupled are affected by vertical (inter-layer) as well as horizontal (intra-layer) connections. To summarize, we suggest to relate the study of fuzzy clustering mechanisms to the multi-disciplinary science of complex systems, with special regard to the investigation of the cooperative/competitive local rules employed by complex systems to gain sensitivity to contextual effects in

  17. Modeling stem increment in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, S.; Bevilacqua, E.

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common and important tree characteristics used in forest management decision-making is tree diameter-at-breast height (DBH). This paper presents results on an evaluation of two growth functions developed to model stem diameter increases in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic. The first model was developed in order to predict future DBH (FDM) at different intervals of time and the other for predicting growth, that is, periodic annual diameter increment (PADIM). Each model employed two statistical techniques for fitting model parameters: stepwise ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, and mixed models. The two statistical approaches varied in how they accounted for the repeated measurements on individual trees over time, affecting standard error estimates and statistical inference of model parameters. Each approach was evaluated based on six goodness of- fit statistics, using both calibration and validation data sets. The objectives were 1) to determine the best model for predicting future tree DBH; 2) to determine the best model for predicting periodic annual diameter increment, both models using tree size, age, site index and different indices of competitive status; and 3) compare which of these two modeling approaches predicts better the future DBH. OLS provided a better fit for both of the growth functions, especially in regards to bias. Both models showed advantages and disadvantages when they were used to predict growth and future diameter. For the prediction of future diameter with FDM, accuracy of predictions were within one centimeter for a five-year projection interval. The PADIM presented negligible bias in estimating future diameter, although there was a small increase in bias as time of prediction increased. As expected, each model was the best in estimating the response variable it was developed for.. However, a closer examination of the distribution of errors showed a slight advantage of the FDM

  18. Considerations in representing human individuals in social ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredo, Michael J.; Teel, Tara L.; Gavin, Michael C.; Fulton, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on how to integrate the human individual into social-ecological systems analysis, and how to improve research on individual thought and action regarding the environment by locating it within the broader social-ecological context. We discuss three key questions as considerations for future research: (1) is human thought conceptualized as a dynamic and adaptive process, (2) is the individual placed in a multi-level context (including within-person levels, person-group interactions, and institutional and structural factors), and (3) is human thought seen as mutually constructed with the social and natural environment. Increased emphasis on the individual will be essential if we are to understand agency, innovation, and adaptation in social-ecological systems.

  19. A model of individual differences in learning air traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, NA; Altmann, EM; Cleeremans, A; Schunn, CD; Gray, WD

    2001-01-01

    Individual differences in skill acquisition are influenced by several architectural factors. According to Ackerman's theory, general intelligence, speed of proceduralization and psychomotor speed influence different stages of skill acquisition. Ackerman tested this theory by correlating performance

  20. THE WORLD-MODELLING POTENCY OF THE INDIVIDUAL METAPHOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova, M.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes individual metaphors as a fundamental component of the artistic worldview. The research discusses the correlation between the individual metaphor and interdiscourse markedness that allows identifying some peculiarities of cultural identity of the English-language literary text. The central place belongs to the propositions connected with the ways of reality conceptualization in the minds of the English-speaking mentality, which are necessary for correct interpretation of the cultural-specific information.

  1. Significantly improved HIV inhibitor efficacy prediction employing proteochemometric models generated from antivirogram data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J P van Westen

    Full Text Available Infection with HIV cannot currently be cured; however it can be controlled by combination treatment with multiple anti-retroviral drugs. Given different viral genotypes for virtually each individual patient, the question now arises which drug combination to use to achieve effective treatment. With the availability of viral genotypic data and clinical phenotypic data, it has become possible to create computational models able to predict an optimal treatment regimen for an individual patient. Current models are based only on sequence data derived from viral genotyping; chemical similarity of drugs is not considered. To explore the added value of chemical similarity inclusion we applied proteochemometric models, combining chemical and protein target properties in a single bioactivity model. Our dataset was a large scale clinical database of genotypic and phenotypic information (in total ca. 300,000 drug-mutant bioactivity data points, 4 (NNRTI, 8 (NRTI or 9 (PI drugs, and 10,700 (NNRTI 10,500 (NRTI or 27,000 (PI mutants. Our models achieved a prediction error below 0.5 Log Fold Change. Moreover, when directly compared with previously published sequence data, derived models PCM performed better in resistance classification and prediction of Log Fold Change (0.76 log units versus 0.91. Furthermore, we were able to successfully confirm both known and identify previously unpublished, resistance-conferring mutations of HIV Reverse Transcriptase (e.g. K102Y, T216M and HIV Protease (e.g. Q18N, N88G from our dataset. Finally, we applied our models prospectively to the public HIV resistance database from Stanford University obtaining a correct resistance prediction rate of 84% on the full set (compared to 80% in previous work on a high quality subset. We conclude that proteochemometric models are able to accurately predict the phenotypic resistance based on genotypic data even for novel mutants and mixtures. Furthermore, we add an applicability domain to

  2. Conceptual Models of the Individual Public Service Provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Bhatti, Yosef; Petersen, Ole Helby

    Individual public service providers’ motivation can be conceptualized as either extrinsic, autonomous or prosocial, and the question is how we can best theoretically understand this complexity without losing too much coherence and parsimony. Drawing on Allison’s approach (1969), three perspectives...

  3. Individual Tree Biomass Models for Plantation Grown American Sycamore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan B. Willson; Bryce E. Schlaegel; Harvey E. Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Individual tree volume and green and dry weight equations are derived for American sycamore from a 5-year-old plantation in southeast Arkansas. Two trees have been destructively sampled each year from each of 20 plots. Observations from 168 trees are used to predict tree weight and volume as a function of dbh, total height, age, and initial number of trees. Separate...

  4. Holland's RIASEC Model as an Integrative Framework for Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Day, Susan X.; McVay, Jason P.; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    Using data from published sources, the authors investigated J. L. Holland's (1959, 1997) theory of interest types as an integrative framework for organizing individual differences variables that are used in counseling psychology. Holland's interest types were used to specify 2- and 3-dimensional interest structures. In Study 1, measures of…

  5. Holland's RIASEC Model as an Integrative Framework for Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Day, Susan X.; McVay, Jason P.; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    Using data from published sources, the authors investigated J. L. Holland's (1959, 1997) theory of interest types as an integrative framework for organizing individual differences variables that are used in counseling psychology. Holland's interest types were used to specify 2- and 3-dimensional interest structures. In Study 1, measures of…

  6. St. Louis Model for Macroeconomic Policy Determination in Relation to Employment Generation in a Developing Economy: Some Simulation Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Umoru

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study uses St. Louis model to econometrically answer the question of whether the Keynesian policy or the Monetarist’s policy was more efficacious on employment generation in Nigerian with quarterly data for sample period of 1992 to 2016. The empirical finding is that cumulative effects of Keynesian of increasing aggregate government spending on the growth rate of employment in Nigeria is dominant in contrast to Monetarist’s policy. The policy simulation results reported negative dynamic multiplier of -0.01 of monetary policy on employment; fiscal policy gave a dynamic employment multiplier of 0.12 respectively. The study thus bears out fiscal policy as more effectual in inducing employment in Nigeria by imposing positive feedbacks. The study remarks on feasible implementation of empirical finding.

  7. Diffraction and reflection of irregular waves in a harbor employing a spectral model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Violante-Carvalho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWAN wave model is widely used in coastal waters and the main focus of this work is on its application in a harbor. Its last released version - SWAN 40.51 - includes an approximation to compute diffraction, however, so far there are few published works that discuss this matter. The performance of the model is therefore investigated in a harbor where reflection and diffraction play a relevant role. To assess its estimates, a phase-resolving Boussinesq wave model is employed as well, together with measurements carried out at a small-scale model of the area behind the breakwater. For irregular, short-crested waves with broad directional spreading, the importance of diffraction is relatively small. On the other hand, reflection of the incident waves is significant, increasing the energy inside the harbor. Nevertheless, the SWAN model does not achieve convergence when it is set to compute diffraction and reflection simultaneously. It is concluded that, for situations typically encountered in harbors, with irregular waves near reflective obstacles, the model should be set without the diffraction option.O modelo de ondas SWAN é amplamente empregado em simulações na região costeira e o presente trabalho investiga sua aplicação dentro de um porto. A última versão disponibilizada para a comunidade - SWAN 40.51 - inclui uma aproximação para computar a difração, embora, até o momento, poucos trabalhos abordando este tema foram publicados. O desempenho do modelo é estudado em um porto onde os fenômenos de reflexão e difração são importantes. Para avaliar suas estimativas, um modelo do tipo Boussinesq também é empregado, juntamente com medições realizadas em um modelo em escala reduzida da área atrás do quebramar. Para ondas irregulares, com cristas curtas e espalhamento direcional mais amplo, a importância da difração é relativamente menor. Contudo, o modelo SWAN não alcança convergência quando programado para estimar

  8. A model for the multiplex dynamics of two-mode and one-mode networks, with an application to employment preference, friendship, and advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tom A B; Lomi, Alessandro; Torló, Vanina Jasmine

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new stochastic actor-oriented model for the co-evolution of two-mode and one-mode networks. The model posits that activities of a set of actors, represented in the two-mode network, co-evolve with exchanges and interactions between the actors, as represented in the one-mode network. The model assumes that the actors, not the activities, have agency. The empirical value of the model is demonstrated by examining how employment preferences co-evolve with friendship and advice relations in a group of seventy-five MBA students. The analysis shows that activity in the two-mode network, as expressed by number of employment preferences, is related to activity in the friendship network, as expressed by outdegrees. Further, advice ties between students lead to agreement with respect to employment preferences. In addition, considering the multiplexity of advice and friendship ties yields a better understanding of the dynamics of the advice relation: tendencies to reciprocation and homophily in advice relations are mediated to an important extent by friendship relations. The discussion pays attention to the implications of this study in the broader context of current efforts to model the co-evolutionary dynamics of social networks and individual behavior.

  9. 20 CFR 669.400 - What are the elements of the Individual Employment Plan that is authorized as an intensive service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... type and duration of intensive or training services must be based upon: (1) The employment/career goal... Employment Plan that is authorized as an intensive service? 669.400 Section 669.400 Employees' Benefits... THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT The National Farmworker Jobs Program Customers and Available Program...

  10. Therapeutic Enactment: Integrating Individual and Group Counseling Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marvin J.; Keats, Patrice A.; Wilensky, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to a group-based therapy model known as therapeutic enactment. A description of this multimodal change model is provided by outlining the relevant background information, key concepts related to specific change processes, and the differences in this model compared to earlier psychodrama…

  11. Individual-based lattice model for spatial spread of epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Fuks

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a lattice gas cellular automaton (LGCA to study spatial and temporal dynamics of an epidemic of SIR (susceptible-infected-removed type. The automaton is fully discrete, i.e., space, time and number of individuals are discrete variables. The automaton can be applied to study spread of epidemics in both human and animal populations. We investigate effects of spatial inhomogeneities in initial distribution of infected and vaccinated populations on the dynamics of epidemic of SIR type. We discuss vaccination strategies which differ only in spatial distribution of vaccinated individuals. Also, we derive an approximate, mean-field type description of the automaton, and discuss differences between the mean-field dynamics and the results ofLGCA simulation.

  12. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose......-response relationships for clinical risk factors was employed. Effect size estimates (odds ratios) for risk factors were drawn from a recently published meta-analysis. Baseline values for D50 and γ50 were found. The method was tested in an independent dataset (103 patients), comparing the predictive power of the dose......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...

  13. Job crafting: Towards a new model of individual job redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tims

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: For a long time, employees have been viewed as passive performers of their assigned job tasks. Recently, several scholars have argued that job design theory needs to address the influence of employees on their job designs.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to fit job crafting in job design theory.Motivation for the study: The study was an attempt to shed more light on the types of proactive behaviours of individual employees at work. Moreover, we explored the concept of job crafting and its antecedents and consequences.Research design, approach and method: A literature study was conducted in which the focus was first on proactive behaviour of the employee and then on job crafting.Main findings: Job crafting can be seen as a specific form of proactive behaviour in which the employee initiates changes in the level of job demands and job resources. Job crafting may be facilitated by job and individual characteristics and may enable employees to fit their jobs to their personal knowledge, skills and abilities on the one hand and to their preferences and needs on the other hand.Practical/managerial implications: Job crafting may be a good way for employees to improve their work motivation and other positive work outcomes. Employees could be encouraged to exert more influence on their job characteristics.Contribution/value-add: This article describes a relatively new perspective on active job redesign by the individual, called job crafting, which has important implications for job design theories.

  14. A review method for UML requirements analysis model employing system-side prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Shinpei; Matsuura, Saeko

    2013-12-01

    User interface prototyping is an effective method for users to validate the requirements defined by analysts at an early stage of a software development. However, a user interface prototype system offers weak support for the analysts to verify the consistency of the specifications about internal aspects of a system such as business logic. As the result, the inconsistency causes a lot of rework costs because the inconsistency often makes the developers impossible to actualize the system based on the specifications. For verifying such consistency, functional prototyping is an effective method for the analysts, but it needs a lot of costs and more detailed specifications. In this paper, we propose a review method so that analysts can verify the consistency among several different kinds of diagrams in UML efficiently by employing system-side prototyping without the detailed model. The system-side prototype system does not have any functions to achieve business logic, but visualizes the results of the integration among the diagrams in UML as Web pages. The usefulness of our proposal was evaluated by applying our proposal into a development of Library Management System (LMS) for a laboratory. This development was conducted by a group. As the result, our proposal was useful for discovering the serious inconsistency caused by the misunderstanding among the members of the group.

  15. Adapting the Individual Placement and Support Model with Homeless Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin; Glynn, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prior research reveals high unemployment rates among homeless young adults. The literature offers many examples of using evidence-based supported employment models with vulnerable populations to assist them in obtaining and maintaining competitive employment; yet few examples exist to date with homeless young adults with mental…

  16. [Relationship between two models of personality in old individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Benjamin; Bricaud, Magali; Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The relationships between the seven dimensions of the Cloninger psychobiological model and the five factors of the Costa and McCrae model were examined in 54 elderly subjects from the French general population. The dimensions of temperament (novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence) and character (determination, cooperation, transcendence) from the Cloninger's model were measured by the temperament and character inventory whereas the five factors of Costa and McCrae model (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness) were evaluated using the NEO PI-R. Multiple regression analyses show that some dimensions of the temperament and character inventory predict some dimensions of the Big five and vice versa. Therefore we suggest that the Big five model could be related to brain monoaminergic activities.

  17. Job crafting: Towards a new model of individual job redesign

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tims; Arnold B. Bakker

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: For a long time, employees have been viewed as passive performers of their assigned job tasks. Recently, several scholars have argued that job design theory needs to address the influence of employees on their job designs.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to fit job crafting in job design theory.Motivation for the study: The study was an attempt to shed more light on the types of proactive behaviours of individual employees at work. Moreover, we explored the concept ...

  18. Illustrative probabilistic biosphere model for Yucca Mountain individual risk calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilems, R.E. [Del Mar Consulting, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The proposed EPA Standards for the disposal of spent fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive waste prescribe future biosphere--one in which no sustained human activity occurs inside the controlled zone, yet sustained use of groundwater occurs just outside the controlled zone boundary. Performance assessments have generally assumed a person at this location extracts all his water needs directly from the projected contaminated plume for all of his life. Dose to this maximally-exposed individual is too conservative a measure of performance for a nuclear waste repository and does not reflect the isolation characteristics of a site. A better measure is individual risk in which uncertainties in biosphere characteristics for the longer periods of performance, for a site like Yucca Mountain only those characteristics associated with well water scenarios need be prescribed. Such a prescription of the biosphere is appropriate because the goal of the regulations is to provide indicators of future performance so the regulators can make a responsible decision regarding reasonable assurance of public health and safety.

  19. Individualized Responses of Gut Microbiota to Dietary Intervention Modeled in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Samuel A; Marcobal, Angela; Higginbottom, Steven; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Kashyap, Purna C

    2016-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in shaping the structure and function of the gut microbiota. The microbes and microbial products in turn can influence various aspects of host physiology. One promising route to affect host function and restore health is by altering the gut microbiome using dietary intervention. The individuality of the microbiome may pose a significant challenge, so we sought to determine how different microbiotas respond to the same dietary intervention in a controlled setting. We modeled gut microbiotas from three healthy donors in germfree mice and defined compositional and functional alteration following a change in dietary microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs). The three gut communities exhibited responses that differed markedly in magnitude and in the composition of microbiota-derived metabolites. Adjustments in community membership did not correspond to the magnitude of changes in the microbial metabolites, highlighting potential challenges in predicting functional responses from compositional data and the need to assess multiple microbiota parameters following dietary interventions. IMPORTANCE Dietary modification has long been used empirically to modify symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and a diverse group of diseases with gastrointestinal symptoms. There is both anecdotal and scientific evidence to suggest that individuals respond quite differently to similar dietary changes, and the highly individualized nature of the gut microbiota makes it a prime candidate for these differences. To overcome the typical confounding factors of human dietary interventions, here we employ ex-germfree mice colonized by microbiotas of three different humans to test how different microbiotas respond to a defined change in carbohydrate content of diet by measuring changes in microbiota composition and function using marker gene-based next-generation sequencing and metabolomics. Our findings suggest that the same diet has very

  20. Ignoring Individual Differences in Times of Assessment in Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Patrick; Selig, James P.; Delaney, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often collect longitudinal data to model change over time in a phenomenon of interest. Inevitably, there will be some variation across individuals in specific time intervals between assessments. In this simulation study of growth curve modeling, we investigate how ignoring individual differences in time points when modeling change over…

  1. Learning at the workplace and sustainable employability: A multi-source model moderated by age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Gorgievski, M.J.; Lange, A.H. de

    2016-01-01

    This study, among 330 pairs of employees and their supervisors, tested whether self- versus supervisor ratings of five employability dimensions (occupational expertise, corporate sense, personal flexibility, anticipation and optimization, and balance) are associated with different learning

  2. Learning at the workplace and sustainable employability: a multi-source model moderated by age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Beatrice; Gorgievski, Marjan J.; de Lange, Annet H.

    2015-01-01

    This study, among 330 pairs of employees and their supervisors, tested whether self- versus supervisor ratings of five employability dimensions (occupational expertise, corporate sense, personal flexibility, anticipation and optimization, and balance) are associated with different learning

  3. Learning at the workplace and sustainable employability: a multi-source model moderated by age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, Beatrice van der; Gorgievski, Marjan; Lange, Annet de

    2015-01-01

    This study, among 330 pairs of employees and their supervisors, tested whether self- versus supervisor ratings of five employability dimensions (occupational expertise, corporate sense, personal flexibility, anticipation and optimization, and balance) are associated with different learning character

  4. Learning at the workplace and sustainable employability: A multi-source model moderated by age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Gorgievski, M.J.; Lange, A.H. de

    2016-01-01

    This study, among 330 pairs of employees and their supervisors, tested whether self- versus supervisor ratings of five employability dimensions (occupational expertise, corporate sense, personal flexibility, anticipation and optimization, and balance) are associated with different learning character

  5. Learning at the workspace and sustainable employability: a multi source model moderated by age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, Beatrice van der; Gorgievski, Marjan; Lange, Annet de

    2015-01-01

    This study, among 330 pairs of employees and their supervisors, tested whether self- versus supervisor ratings of five employability dimensions (occupational expertise, corporate sense, personal flexibility, anticipation and optimization, and balance) are associated with different learning character

  6. Employer Role in Integrative Workplace Health Management: A New Model in Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Cordia Chu; Sophie Dwyer

    2002-01-01

    The health of the international workforce has been an increasing area of concern for the last two decades. Globalization of the world economy and rapid technological changes continue to change the nature of work and employment practices, exposing employees to new and serious health risks. These challenges are inescapable in any workplace, therefore it is important that employers examine how they can best fulfill their legal and leadership roles to protect and promote the health and well-being...

  7. Departure time choice: Modelling individual preferences, intention and constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Mikkel

    working hours) as the penalty of late arrival is very likely to be higher for individuals with constraints on arrival time. However, flexibility is not only a matter of fixed arrival time. Activities can be mandatory or discretionary (Yamamoto and Kitamura, 1999), performed alone or jointly with family......D thesis is as follows. Firstly, it provides evidence of a fully efficient stated choice design for a departure time context. Using a pivot design (Rose et al., 2008) built around a reference trip (usually from the day before), the thesis shows that the efficient design performs well in cases where good...... whether they are constrained. The thesis also provides empirical evidences of the policy implication of not accounting for other activities and their constraints. Thirdly, the thesis shows that the departure time choice can be partly explained by psychological factors, which have previously been neglected...

  8. [Bridge employment and retirees' personal well-being. A structural equation model with a European probabilistic sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa Cantisano, Gabriela; Depolo, Marco; Moriano León, Juan A; Morales Domínguez, José F

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the relationships between antecedents and consequences of bridge employment activity; second, to analyze the mediator role both of quality and quantity of bridge employment activities in the relationship between antecedents and consequences. First wave panel data from the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe) were obtained from 1190 men and women in Europe, using structured interviews and questionnaires. Structural equation modeling analyses, including the sample without missing values (N=650), showed that both quantity and quality of bridge employment participation are predictors of job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and quality of life in retirement. These results validate and expand the previous research on bridge employment activities and partial retirement.

  9. Developing population models with data from marked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hae Yeong Ryu,; Kevin T. Shoemaker,; Eva Kneip,; Anna Pidgeon,; Patricia Heglund,; Brooke Bateman,; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Reşit Akçakaya,

    2016-01-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a powerful tool for biodiversity assessments, but its use has been limited because of the requirements for fully specified population models such as demographic structure, density-dependence, environmental stochasticity, and specification of uncertainties. Developing a fully specified population model from commonly available data sources – notably, mark–recapture studies – remains complicated due to lack of practical methods for estimating fecundity, true survival (as opposed to apparent survival), natural temporal variability in both survival and fecundity, density-dependence in the demographic parameters, and uncertainty in model parameters. We present a general method that estimates all the key parameters required to specify a stochastic, matrix-based population model, constructed using a long-term mark–recapture dataset. Unlike standard mark–recapture analyses, our approach provides estimates of true survival rates and fecundities, their respective natural temporal variabilities, and density-dependence functions, making it possible to construct a population model for long-term projection of population dynamics. Furthermore, our method includes a formal quantification of parameter uncertainty for global (multivariate) sensitivity analysis. We apply this approach to 9 bird species and demonstrate the feasibility of using data from the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. Bias-correction factors for raw estimates of survival and fecundity derived from mark–recapture data (apparent survival and juvenile:adult ratio, respectively) were non-negligible, and corrected parameters were generally more biologically reasonable than their uncorrected counterparts. Our method allows the development of fully specified stochastic population models using a single, widely available data source, substantially reducing the barriers that have until now limited the widespread application of PVA. This method

  10. Individual discriminative face recognition models based on subsets of features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Gomez, David Delgado; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    of the face recognition problem. The elastic net model is able to select a subset of features with low computational effort compared to other state-of-the-art feature selection methods. Furthermore, the fact that the number of features usually is larger than the number of images in the data base makes feature...... selection techniques such as forward selection or lasso regression become inadequate. In the experimental section, the performance of the elastic net model is compared with geometrical and color based algorithms widely used in face recognition such as Procrustes nearest neighbor, Eigenfaces, or Fisher...

  11. Supported employment: randomised controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M.; Heslin, Margaret; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Rice, Christopher; Jarrett, Manuela; Spokes, Terry; Huxley, Peter; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence from North American trials that supported employment using the individual placement and support (IPS) model is effective in helping individuals with severe mental illness gain competitive employment. There have been few trials in other parts of the world. Aims To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IPS in the UK. Method Individuals with severe mental illness in South London were randomised to IPS or local traditional vocational services (treatment as usual) (ISRCTN96677673). Results Two hundred and nineteen participants were randomised, and 90% assessed 1 year later. There were no significant differences between the treatment as usual and intervention groups in obtaining competitive employment (13% in the intervention group and 7% in controls; risk ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.95–1.93, P = 0.15), nor in secondary outcomes. Conclusions There was no evidence that IPS was of significant benefit in achieving competitive employment for individuals in South London at 1-year follow-up, which may reflect suboptimal implementation. Implementation of IPS can be challenging in the UK context where IPS is not structurally integrated with mental health services, and economic disincentives may lead to lower levels of motivation in individuals with severe mental illness and psychiatric professionals. PMID:20435968

  12. Individualized Human CAD Models: Anthropmetric Morphing and Body Tissue Layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    torso sub-assembly may have more fat in the abdomen than in the chest. A study 18 that could help refine this feature is being developed by the US...responses to various ensembles being developed, taking 3 into account human characteristics (height, weight, body fat , etc.), physical activity levels...model of the human body in a CAD (Computer- Aided Design) format which includes both surface features as well as internal composition, e.g., the fat

  13. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  14. Modeling auditory perception of individual hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    showed that, in most cases, the reduced or absent cochlear compression, associated with outer hair-cell loss, quantitatively accounts for broadened auditory filters, while a combination of reduced compression and reduced inner hair-cell function accounts for decreased sensitivity and slower recovery from...... selectivity. Three groups of listeners were considered: (a) normal hearing listeners; (b) listeners with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss; and (c) listeners with a severe sensorineural hearing loss. A fixed set of model parameters were derived for each hearing-impaired listener. The simulations...

  15. Three-Mode Models and Individual Differences in Semantic Differential Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kroonenberg, Pieter M.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrated how individual differences in semantic differential data can be modeled and assessed using three-mode models by studying the characterization of Chopin's "Preludes" by 38 Japanese college students. (SLD)

  16. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaraj Jayachandran

    Full Text Available 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT. Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach.

  17. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Devaraj; Laínez-Aguirre, José; Rundell, Ann; Vik, Terry; Hannemann, Robert; Reklaitis, Gintaras; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2015-01-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype) plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach.

  18. Individual Decision-Making to Commit a Crime: A Survey of Early Models

    OpenAIRE

    Roman Horváth; Eva Kolomazníková

    2003-01-01

    The authors provide a survey of the most important findings of the early models of the economics of crime, namely the models of Becker, Ehrlich and Heineke. These models study rational individual decision-making about entering into illegal activities. Probability and size of punishment, attitudes towards risk, gains from crime and income are the main variables influencing the results of individual behavior. The authors also discuss weaknesses of these models such as their static nature or the...

  19. Modeling the Individual Within the Group: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Constructing knowledge with others is fundamental for all human activity, and many disciplines have sought to understand how the individual, other people, and the context, all influence collaborative knowledge construction, be it individual or group knowledge. The goal of this Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches is to present an analytical model of the relations of the individual to the group in situations of collaborative knowledge construction. The model is inspired by the work of Levinso...

  20. Do Labour Market Programmes Necessarily Crowd out Regular Employment? A Matching Model Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    It is often claimed that the usage of labour market programmes will necessarily crowd out regular employment (see, for example, Holmlund & Lindén (1993)). As a result, it could be argued that, despite their probable negative impact on unemployment, the overall benefits of using labour market program

  1. A Peer-to-Peer Support Model for Developing Graduate Students' Career and Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Narelle; Torezani, Silvia; Luca, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Career opportunities for Australian research graduates have expanded in recent years into areas outside academia. However, the employment market is highly competitive, and Australian universities have recognised the need to produce graduates with transferable skills across all sectors, not just academia. The need to provide an infrastructure to…

  2. A Peer-to-Peer Support Model for Developing Graduate Students' Career and Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Narelle; Torezani, Silvia; Luca, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Career opportunities for Australian research graduates have expanded in recent years into areas outside academia. However, the employment market is highly competitive, and Australian universities have recognised the need to produce graduates with transferable skills across all sectors, not just academia. The need to provide an infrastructure to…

  3. An individual-based simulation model for mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi) in a southern Appalachian stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda Rashleigh; Gary D. Grossman

    2005-01-01

    We describe and analyze a spatially explicit, individual-based model for the local population dynamics of mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi). The model simulated daily growth, mortality, movement and spawning of individuals within a reach of stream. Juvenile and adult growth was based on consumption bioenergetics of benthic macroinvertebrate prey;...

  4. Beyond Dyadic Interdependence: Actor-Oriented Models for Co-Evolving Social Networks and Individual Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, William J.; Steglich, Christian E. G.; Snijders, Tom A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Actor-oriented models are described as a longitudinal strategy for examining the co-evolution of social networks and individual behaviors. We argue that these models provide advantages over conventional approaches due to their ability to account for inherent dependencies between individuals embedded in a social network (i.e., reciprocity,…

  5. Video Self-Modeling as an Intervention Strategy for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Anderson, Candace; McCarthy, Scott; Buggey, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Video self-modeling demonstrates promise as an intervention strategy to improve outcomes in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This article summarizes the empirical evidence supporting the use of video self-modeling with individuals with autism spectrum disorders to increase language and communication, increase social skills, modify…

  6. Maximum likelihood estimators for extended growth curve model with orthogonal between-individual design matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Daniel; Zezula, Ivan

    The extended growth curve model is discussed in this paper. There are two versions of the model studied in the literature, which differ in the way how the column spaces of the design matrices are nested. The nesting is applied either to the between-individual or to the within-individual design

  7. 42 CFR Appendix to Part 54a - Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., ET SEQ., FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT SERVICES Pt. 54a, App. Appendix to Part 54a—Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services Model Notice to Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services No provider of substance abuse services receiving Federal funds from the...

  8. Predictor Relationships between Values Held by Married Individuals, Resilience and Conflict Resolution Styles: A Model Suggestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Fatma; Dilmac, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to reveal the predictor relationships between the values held by married individuals, resilience and conflict resolution styles. The research adopts a relational screening model that is a sub-type of the general screening model. The sample of the research consists of 375 married individuals, of which 173 are…

  9. Model for multi-stand management based on structural attributes of individual stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.W. Miller; J. Sullivan

    1997-01-01

    A growing interest in managing forest ecosystems calls for decision models that take into account attribute goals for large forest areas while continuing to recognize the individual stand as a basic unit of forest management. A dynamic, nonlinear forest management model is described that schedules silvicultural treatments for individual stands that are linked by multi-...

  10. Examining individual and school characteristics associated with child obesity using a multilevel growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuo; Stack, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic continues to be a serious concern in the U.S., disproportionately affecting low socioeconomic and minority groups. Because many interventions are based in schools, both individual and school factors contributing to obesity were examined in this study. Employing data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K), a three level hierarchical linear model was used to estimate children's body mass index (BMI) growth trajectories within their school contexts. Results indicated an inverse relationship between BMI and socioeconomic status (SES), except for black males. Additionally, results showed that low school SES and rural locality of the school were school-level risk factors of obesity. Lastly, a major portion of the between-schools variance was explained by aggregated student characteristics, indicating that students were more likely to attend schools with peers of similar BMI who had similar SES and race/ethnicity, supporting a school-level compositional effect associated with obesity.

  11. Individual biomass facility reports. Supplement to some employment and earnings implications of regional biomass energy utilization: New England and the Cornbelt States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, J. R.; Bell, S. E.; Blair, L. M.; Gove, R. M.; Stevenson, W.; Tamura, R. F.

    1981-08-01

    Research was conducted to determine the direct employment and earnings implications of regional biomass energy utilization. Details of the primary data collected during the course of the investigation are provided. A case studies approach was used to observe and analyze various biomass energy systems. Visits were made to existing biomass facilities and data on their operation and employment requirements were collected. Information on planned or potential future facilities was also obtained. When this information was analyzed, a fairly accurate picture of the current situation as well as the rate and direction of future development in biomass was attained. Separate descriptions are included for each facility visited or for each interview obtained. The facility reports are organized according to fuel cycle (wood-fuel, alcohol-fuel, municipal solid waste facilities, others).

  12. Coupling of an Individual-Based Model of Anchovy with Lower Trophic Level and Hydrodynamic Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuheng; WEI Hao; Michio J. Kishi

    2013-01-01

    Anchovy (Engraulisjaponicus),a small pelagic fish and food of other economic fishes,is a key species in the Yellow Sea ecosystem.Understanding the mechanisms of its recruitment and biomass variation is important for the prediction and management of fishery resources.Coupled with a hydrodynamic model (POM) and a lower trophic level ecosystem model (NEMURO),an individual-based model of anchovy is developed to study the influence of physical environment on anchovy's biomass variation.Seasonal variations of circulation,water temperature and mix-layer depth from POM are used as external forcing for NEMURO and the anchovy model.Biomasses of large zooplankton and predatory zooplankton which anchovy feeds on are output from NEMURO and are controlled by the consumption of anchovy on them.Survival fitness theory related to temperature and food is used to determine the swimming action of anchovy in the model.The simulation results agree well with observations and elucidate the influence of temperature in over-wintering migration and food in feeding migration.

  13. Spatial organization of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro--results from a new individual cell-based model with podia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC requires their extensive in vitro expansion. MSC in culture typically grow to confluence within a few weeks. They show spindle-shaped fibroblastoid morphology and align to each other in characteristic spatial patterns at high cell density. We present an individual cell-based model (IBM that is able to quantitatively describe the spatio-temporal organization of MSC in culture. Our model substantially improves on previous models by explicitly representing cell podia and their dynamics. It employs podia-generated forces for cell movement and adjusts cell behavior in response to cell density. At the same time, it is simple enough to simulate thousands of cells with reasonable computational effort. Experimental sheep MSC cultures were monitored under standard conditions. Automated image analysis was used to determine the location and orientation of individual cells. Our simulations quantitatively reproduced the observed growth dynamics and cell-cell alignment assuming cell density-dependent proliferation, migration, and morphology. In addition to cell growth on plain substrates our model captured cell alignment on micro-structured surfaces. We propose a specific surface micro-structure that according to our simulations can substantially enlarge cell culture harvest. The 'tool box' of cell migratory behavior newly introduced in this study significantly enhances the bandwidth of IBM. Our approach is capable of accommodating individual cell behavior and collective cell dynamics of a variety of cell types and tissues in computational systems biology.

  14. Competition and the Racial Wage Gap: Testing Becker's Model of Employer Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Guilherme; Soares, Rodrigo R.

    2016-01-01

    According to Becker's (1957) theory of taste-based employer discrimination, pure economic rents are necessary for discrimination to be observed in the labor market. Increased competition and reduced rents in the market for final goods should therefore lead to reduced labor market discrimination. We look at the natural experiment represented by the Brazilian trade liberalization from the early 1990s to study the effect of increased competition in the market for final goods on racial discrimina...

  15. An Analysis of Success Factors in the Utilization of Learning Activity Packages Employed as Vehicles for Individualizing Science Instruction at Nova High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Roy Franklin

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether "Learning Activity Packages" (LAPs) could be used as the basic instructional material of individualized instruction for certain types of students and not for others. A sample of 133 biology students was selected at random and assigned to one of three groups, low, medium or high, on the basis of…

  16. Prediction of Individual Buying Behavior: A Poisson-Bernoulli Model with Arbitrary Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, S. R.; Lee, J. C.; D. J. Sabavala

    1984-01-01

    Patterns of customer purchases are often modeled as discrete behavioral events following some probability law. These stochastic models have been applied separately to the phenomena of product class purchase incidence and brand choice (conditional on the products being purchased). Most of these models are probability mixture models where the parameters of an individual customer model vary across the population according to some distribution. This paper proposes a simple model of purchase behav...

  17. A dual change model of life satisfaction and functioning for individuals with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Melissa; Pahwa, Rohini; Lee, Karen Kyeunghae; Hoe, Maanse; Brekke, John S

    2012-08-01

    Despite the notion that increases in functioning should be associated with increases in life satisfaction in schizophrenia, research has often found no association between the two. Dual change models of global and domain-specific life satisfaction and functioning were examined in 145 individuals with schizophrenia receiving community-based services over 12 months. Functioning and satisfaction were measured using the Role Functioning Scale and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Data were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Improvement in global life satisfaction was associated with improvement in overall functioning over time. Satisfaction with living situation also improved as independent functioning improved. Work satisfaction did not improve as work functioning improved. Although social functioning improved, satisfaction with social relationships did not. The link between overall functioning and global life satisfaction provides support for a recovery-based orientation to community based psychosocial rehabilitation services. When examining sub-domains, the link between outcomes and subjective experience suggests a more complex picture than previously found. These findings are crucial to interventions and programs aimed at improving functioning and the subjective experiences of consumers recovering from mental illness. Interventions that show improvements in functional outcomes can assume that they will show concurrent improvements in global life satisfaction as well and in satisfaction with independent living. Interventions geared toward improving social functioning will need to consider the complexity of social relationships and how they affect satisfaction associated with personal relationships. Interventions geared towards improving work functioning will need to consider how the quality and level of work affect satisfaction with employment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Linking individual-tree and whole-stand models for forest growth and yield prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang V Cao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Different types of growth and yield models provide essential information for making informed decisions on how to manage forests. Whole-stand models often provide well-behaved outputs at the stand level, but lack information on stand structures. Detailed information from individual-tree models and size-class models typically suffers from accumulation of errors. The disaggregation method, in assuming that predictions from a whole-stand model are reliable, partitions these outputs to individual trees. On the other hand, the combination method seeks to improve stand-level predictions from both whole-stand and individual-tree models by combining them. Methods Data from 100 plots randomly selected from the Southwide Seed Source Study of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. were used to evaluate the unadjusted individual-tree model against the disaggregation and combination methods. Results Compared to the whole-stand model, the combination method did not show improvements in predicting stand attributes in this study. The combination method also did not perform as well as the disaggregation method in tree-level predictions. The disaggregation method provided the best predictions of tree- and stand-level survival and growth. Conclusions The disaggregation approach provides a link between individual-tree models and whole-stand models, and should be considered as a better alternative to the unadjusted tree model.

  19. Modelling Holocene peatland dynamics with an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are designed for the study of past, present and future vegetation patterns together with associated biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. However, most DGVMs do not yet have detailed representations of permafrost and non-permafrost peatlands, which are an important store of carbon, particularly at high latitudes. We demonstrate a new implementation of peatland dynamics in a customized Arctic version of the LPJ-GUESS DGVM, simulating the long-term evolution of selected northern peatland ecosystems and assessing the effect of changing climate on peatland carbon balance. Our approach employs a dynamic multi-layer soil with representation of freeze-thaw processes and litter inputs from a dynamically varying mixture of the main peatland plant functional types: mosses, shrubs and graminoids. The model was calibrated and tested for a sub-Arctic mire in Stordalen, Sweden, and validated at a temperate bog site in Mer Bleue, Canada. A regional evaluation of simulated carbon fluxes, hydrology and vegetation dynamics encompassed additional locations spread across Scandinavia. Simulated peat accumulation was found to be generally consistent with published data and the model was able to capture reported long-term vegetation dynamics, water table position and carbon fluxes. A series of sensitivity experiments were carried out to investigate the vulnerability of high-latitude peatlands to climate change. We found that the Stordalen mire may be expected to sequester more carbon in the first half of the 21st century due to milder and wetter climate conditions, a longer growing season, and the CO2 fertilization effect, turning into a carbon source after mid-century because of higher decomposition rates in response to warming soils.

  20. Modeling regional population-employment dynamics across different sectors of the economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, T. de; Oort, F.G. van; Florax, R.

    2012-01-01

    An important subset of the literature on agglomeration externalities hypothesizes that intrasectoral and intersectoral relations are endogenously determined in models of local and regional economic growth. Remarkably, structural adjustment models describing the spatio-temporal dynamics of population

  1. Assessment of training effects on employability within the institutional Spanish training model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-del-Río, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The association between quantity of training and employability was analysed through a non experimental research with two non equivalent groups. The operationalization of training quantity is considered to provide an indicator of training effort. Thus, training effort (number of courses was analysed as the independent variable and employability as dependent variable (occupation indicators, activity enhancement and job performance. The results show that training is related to activity enhancement, specially when workers belong to a small/medium enterprise (SME and/or to technical or qualified positions. A positive association between training and performance also appeared in the case of SMEs. Se analiza la asociación entre cantidad de formación y empleabilidad mediante una investigación no experimental con dos grupos no equivalentes. Se considera que la operativización de la cantidad de formación proporciona un indicador próximo al esfuerzo formativo realizado. Así, se estudió la variable independiente esfuerzo formativo (número de cursos y la dependiente, empleabilidad (indicadores de ocupación, enriquecimiento de actividad y desempeño. Los resultados muestran que la formación está asociada al enriquecimiento de la actividad, sobre todo si los trabajadores pertenecen a una PYME y/o a puestos técnicos o cualificados. También hay una asociación positiva entre formación y desempeño en PYMES.

  2. Disability and Supported Employment: Impact on Employment, Income, and Allowances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germundsson, Per; Gustafsson, Johanna; Lind, Martin; Danermark, Berth

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine supported employment and its impact on the level of employment, disposable income, and sum of allowances, targeting a group of individuals with disabilities. We have particularly focused on individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Supported employment is a vocational rehabilitation service with an empowerment approach…

  3. A structural econometric model of family valuation and choice of employer-sponsored health insurance in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanness, David J

    2003-09-01

    This paper estimates a fully structural unitary household model of employment and health insurance decisions for dual wage-earner families with children in the United States, using data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey. Families choose hours of work and the breakdown of compensation between cash wages and health insurance benefits for each wage earner in order to maximize expected utility under uncertain need for medical care. Heterogeneous demand for the employer-sponsored health insurance is thus generated directly from variations in health status and earning potential. The paper concludes by discussing the benefits of using structural models for simulating welfare effects of insurance reform relative to the costly assumptions that must be imposed for identification.

  4. A Stochastic LWR Model with Consideration of the Driver's Individual Property%A Stochastic LWR Model with Consideration of the Driver's Individual Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐铁桥; 王云鹏; 余贵珍; 黄海军

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we develop a stochastic LWR model based on the influences of the driver's individual property on his/her perceived density and speed deviation.The numerical results show that the driver's individual property has great effects on traffic flow only when the initial density is moderate,i.e.,at this time,oscillating traffic flow will occur and the oscillating phenomena in the traffic system consisting of the conservative and aggressive drivers is more serious than that in the traffic system consisting of the conservative (aggressive) drivers.

  5. The true-change model with individual method effects : Reliability issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vautier, Stephane; Steyer, Rolf; Boomsma, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The true intra-individual change model is generalized by defining individual method effects. This allows the analysis of non-congeneric test-retest variables assumed to measure a common, possibly (temporally) transient, attribute. Temporal change in the attribute between different times of measureme

  6. Additive gamma frailty models with applications to competing risks in related individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Scheike, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of related individuals are often complicated by the fact that follow-up on the event type of interest is incomplete due to the occurrence of other events. We suggest a class of frailty models with cause-specific hazards for correlated competing events in related individuals...

  7. Career Planning: Towards a More Inclusive Model for Women and Diverse Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Claretha H.

    2006-01-01

    Since the 1953 introduction of Super's model of career development, many publications regarding career development and career planning have been developed. However, career planning models for women and diverse individuals are not prevalent. This paper contains a literature review of various well-known models that have few specific applications for…

  8. Teachers’ individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: The value of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61, 203-215.

  9. Simulation of Electric Faults in Doubly-Fed Induction Generators Employing Advanced Mathematical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Sebastian; Mijatovic, Nenad; Holbøll, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Efficient fault detection in generators often require prior knowledge of fault behavior, which can be obtained from theoretical analysis, often carried out by using discrete models of a given generator. Mathematical models are commonly represented in the DQ0 reference frame, which is convenient...... in many areas of electrical machine analysis. However, for fault investigations, the phase-coordinate representation has been found more suitable. This paper presents a mathematical model in phase coordinates of the DFIG with two parallel windings per rotor phase. The model has been implemented in Matlab...... as undesired spectral components, which can be detected by applying frequency spectrum analysis....

  10. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Nedorezov

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population). For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time). Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between i...

  11. On the Charney Conjecture of Data Assimilation Employing Temperature Measurements Alone: The Paradigm of 3D Planetary Geostrophic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Aseel; Titi, Edriss S

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the validity and success of a data assimilation algorithm when some state variable observations are not available is an important problem in meteorology and engineering. We present an improved data assimilation algorithm for recovering the exact full reference solution (i.e. the velocity and temperature) of the 3D Planetary Geostrophic model, at an exponential rate in time, by employing coarse spatial mesh observations of the temperature alone. This provides, in the case of this paradigm, a rigorous justification to an earlier conjecture of Charney which states that temperature history of the atmosphere, for certain simple atmospheric models, determines all other state variables.

  12. Maintaining Vocational Skills of Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities through Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laarhoven, Toni; Winiarski, Lauren; Blood, Erika; Chan, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    A modified pre/posttest control group design was used to measure the effectiveness of video modeling on the maintenance of vocational tasks for six students with autism spectrum disorder and/or developmental disabilities. Each student was assigned two vocational tasks at their employment settings and their independence with each task was measured…

  13. Computational model, method, and system for kinetically-tailoring multi-drug chemotherapy for individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Shea Nicole

    2007-10-23

    A method and system for tailoring treatment regimens to individual patients with diseased cells exhibiting evolution of resistance to such treatments. A mathematical model is provided which models rates of population change of proliferating and quiescent diseased cells using cell kinetics and evolution of resistance of the diseased cells, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. Cell kinetic parameters are obtained from an individual patient and applied to the mathematical model to solve for a plurality of treatment regimens, each having a quantitative efficacy value associated therewith. A treatment regimen may then be selected from the plurlaity of treatment options based on the efficacy value.

  14. Indigenous Adoption of Novaco's Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Sumara; Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco's model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that individuals in the treatment group significantly (p anger management was shown to be more effective than general counseling for anger management.

  15. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Nedorezov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population. For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time. Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between individuals is analyzed.

  16. Handling a Small Dataset Problem in Prediction Model by employ Artificial Data Generation Approach: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateh, Masitah Abdul; Kamilah Muda, Azah; Yusof, Zeratul Izzah Mohd; Azilah Muda, Noor; Sanusi Azmi, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    The emerging era of big data for past few years has led to large and complex data which needed faster and better decision making. However, the small dataset problems still arise in a certain area which causes analysis and decision are hard to make. In order to build a prediction model, a large sample is required as a training sample of the model. Small dataset is insufficient to produce an accurate prediction model. This paper will review an artificial data generation approach as one of the solution to solve the small dataset problem.

  17. A model employing integral transform method to simulate pollutant dispersion in atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Martins Moreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An updated version of the semi-analytical model for describing the steady-state concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer is presented here. Two inversion methods of the Laplace transform are tested: the Gaussian Quadrature scheme and the Fixed-Talbot method. The model takes into account settling velocity, removal (wet and dry deposition, and first order chemical reactions. The capability of the model to accurately predict the ground-level concentration is demonstrated qualitative and quantitatively. The results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Compatible Models of Carbon Content of Individual Trees on a Cunninghamia lanceolata Plantation in Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lin; Tao, Hong; Wei, Hong; Chengzhen, Wu

    2016-01-01

    We tried to establish compatible carbon content models of individual trees for a Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantation from Fujian province in southeast China. In general, compatibility requires that the sum of components equal the whole tree, meaning that the sum of percentages calculated from component equations should equal 100%. Thus, we used multiple approaches to simulate carbon content in boles, branches, foliage leaves, roots and the whole individual trees. The approaches included (i) single optimal fitting (SOF), (ii) nonlinear adjustment in proportion (NAP) and (iii) nonlinear seemingly unrelated regression (NSUR). These approaches were used in combination with variables relating diameter at breast height (D) and tree height (H), such as D, D2H, DH and D&H (where D&H means two separate variables in bivariate model). Power, exponential and polynomial functions were tested as well as a new general function model was proposed by this study. Weighted least squares regression models were employed to eliminate heteroscedasticity. Model performances were evaluated by using mean residuals, residual variance, mean square error and the determination coefficient. The results indicated that models with two dimensional variables (DH, D2H and D&H) were always superior to those with a single variable (D). The D&H variable combination was found to be the most useful predictor. Of all the approaches, SOF could establish a single optimal model separately, but there were deviations in estimating results due to existing incompatibilities, while NAP and NSUR could ensure predictions compatibility. Simultaneously, we found that the new general model had better accuracy than others. In conclusion, we recommend that the new general model be used to estimate carbon content for Chinese fir and considered for other vegetation types as well.

  19. An individual-based model of zebrafish population dynamics accounting for energy dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Beaudouin

    Full Text Available Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model. Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding, it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level.

  20. Engaging Employers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

  1. Industry Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  2. Using Decision Models to Enhance Investigations of Individual Differences in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey N.; Curl, Ryan A.; Sloane, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in relating individual differences in cognitive processing to activation of neural systems. The general process involves relating measures of task performance like reaction times or accuracy to brain activity to identify individual differences in neural processing. One limitation of this approach is that measures like reaction times can be affected by multiple components of processing. For instance, some individuals might have higher accuracy in a memory task because they respond more cautiously, not because they have better memory. Computational models of decision making, like the drift–diffusion model and the linear ballistic accumulator model, provide a potential solution to this problem. They can be fitted to data from individual participants to disentangle the effects of the different processes driving behavior. In this sense the models can provide cleaner measures of the processes of interest, and enhance our understanding of how neural activity varies across individuals or populations. The advantages of this model-based approach to investigating individual differences in neural activity are discussed with recent examples of how this method can improve our understanding of the brain–behavior relationship. PMID:26903896

  3. Using decision models to enhance investigations of individual differences in cognitive neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey N White

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in relating individual differences in cognitive processing to activation of neural systems. The general process involves relating measures of task performance like reaction times or accuracy to brain activity to identify individual differences in neural processing. One limitation of this approach is that measures like reaction times can be affected by multiple components of processing. For instance, some individuals might have higher accuracy in a memory task because they respond more cautiously, not because they have better memory. Computational models of decision making, like the drift-diffusion model and the linear ballistic accumulator model, provide a potential solution to this problem. They can be fitted to data from individual participants to disentangle the effects of the different processes driving behavior. In this sense the models can provide cleaner measures of the processes of interest, and enhance our understanding of how neural activity varies across individuals or populations. The advantages of this model-based approach to investigating individual differences in neural activity are discussed with recent examples of how this method can improve our understanding of the brain-behavior relationship.

  4. Changes in speed distribution: Applying aggregated safety effect models to individual vehicle speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeby, Anna; Forsman, Åsa

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of applying two aggregated models (the Power model and the Exponential model) to individual vehicle speeds instead of mean speeds. This is of particular interest when the measure introduced affects different parts of the speed distribution differently. The aim was to examine how the estimated overall risk was affected when assuming the models are valid on an individual vehicle level. Speed data from two applications of speed measurements were used in the study: an evaluation of movable speed cameras and a national evaluation of new speed limits in Sweden. The results showed that when applied on individual vehicle speed level compared with aggregated level, there was essentially no difference between these for the Power model in the case of injury accidents. However, for fatalities the difference was greater, especially for roads with new cameras where those driving fastest reduced their speed the most. For the case with new speed limits, the individual approach estimated a somewhat smaller effect, reflecting that changes in the 15th percentile (P15) were somewhat larger than changes in P85 in this case. For the Exponential model there was also a clear, although small, difference between applying the model to mean speed changes and individual vehicle speed changes when speed cameras were used. This applied both for injury accidents and fatalities. There were also larger effects for the Exponential model than for the Power model, especially for injury accidents. In conclusion, applying the Power or Exponential model to individual vehicle speeds is an alternative that provides reasonable results in relation to the original Power and Exponential models, but more research is needed to clarify the shape of the individual risk curve. It is not surprising that the impact on severe traffic crashes was larger in situations where those driving fastest reduced their speed the most. Further investigations on use of the Power and/or the

  5. Employing incomplete complex modes for model updating and damage detection of damped structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuaJun; LIU FuShun; HU Sau-Lon James

    2008-01-01

    In the study of finite element model updating or damage detection, most papers are devoted to undamped systems. Thus, their objective has been exclusively re-stricted to the correction of the mass and stiffness matrices. In contrast, this paper performs the model updating and damage detection for damped structures. A theoretical contribution of this paper is to extend the cross-model cross-mode (CMCM) method to simultaneously update the mass, damping and stiffness matri-ces of a finite element model when only few spatially incomplete, complex-valued modes are available. Numerical studies are conducted for a 30-DOF (degree-of-freedom) cantilever beam with multiple damaged elements, as the measured modes are synthesized from finite element models. The numerical results reveal that ap-plying the CMCM method, together with an iterative Guyan reduction scheme, can yield good damage detection in general. When the measured modes utilized in the CMCM method are corrupted with irregular errors, assessing damage at the loca-tion that possesses larger modal strain energy is less sensitive to the corrupted modes.

  6. Employing incomplete complex modes for model updating and damage detection of damped structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Sau-Lon; James

    2008-01-01

    In the study of finite element model updating or damage detection,most papers are devoted to undamped systems.Thus,their objective has been exclusively restricted to the correction of the mass and stiffness matrices.In contrast,this paper performs the model updating and damage detection for damped structures.A theoretical contribution of this paper is to extend the cross-model cross-mode(CMCM) method to simultaneously update the mass,damping and stiffness matrices of a finite element model when only few spatially incomplete,complex-valued modes are available.Numerical studies are conducted for a 30-DOF(degree-of-freedom) cantilever beam with multiple damaged elements,as the measured modes are synthesized from finite element models.The numerical results reveal that applying the CMCM method,together with an iterative Guyan reduction scheme,can yield good damage detection in general.When the measured modes utilized in the CMCM method are corrupted with irregular errors,assessing damage at the location that possesses larger modal strain energy is less sensitive to the corrupted modes.

  7. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonini, Luca; Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-08-10

    Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on healthy individuals perform poorly and should not be

  8. The effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull log-normal sire frailty models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, L H; Korsgaard, I R; Simonsen, J; Dalsgaard, O; Andersen, A H

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was, by means of simulation, to quantify the effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull sire frailty models on parameter estimates and to address the consequences for genetic inferences. Three simulation studies were evaluated, which included 3 levels of individual heterogeneity combined with 4 levels of censoring (0, 25, 50, or 75%). Data were simulated according to balanced half-sib designs using Weibull log-normal animal frailty models with a normally distributed residual effect on the log-frailty scale. The 12 data sets were analyzed with 2 models: the sire model, equivalent to the animal model used to generate the data (complete sire model), and a corresponding model in which individual heterogeneity in log-frailty was neglected (incomplete sire model). Parameter estimates were obtained from a Bayesian analysis using Gibbs sampling, and also from the software Survival Kit for the incomplete sire model. For the incomplete sire model, the Monte Carlo and Survival Kit parameter estimates were similar. This study established that when unobserved individual heterogeneity was ignored, the parameter estimates that included sire effects were biased toward zero by an amount that depended in magnitude on the level of censoring and the size of the ignored individual heterogeneity. Despite the biased parameter estimates, the ranking of sires, measured by the rank correlations between true and estimated sire effects, was unaffected. In comparison, parameter estimates obtained using complete sire models were consistent with the true values used to simulate the data. Thus, in this study, several issues of concern were demonstrated for the incomplete sire model.

  9. Employment Trajectories Beyond Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Carola; Hochfellner, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Within the political and academic debate on working longer, post-retirement employment is discussed as an alternative to maintain older workers in the labor market. Our article enhances this discussion by studying determinants of transitions into post-retirement jobs within differing work environments of birth cohorts 1940-1942. We estimate proportional subhazard models accounting for competing risks using unique German social security data linked to pension accounts. Our findings suggest that individuals' preferences to take up post-retirement jobs are not mutually exclusive. Our study provides evidence that taking up post-retirement jobs is related to seeking financial security, continuity, and work ability, suggesting that public policy has to develop target-oriented support through a public policy mix of different measures aligned to the different peer groups in the labor market.

  10. Gaussian process modeling in conjunction with individual patient simulation modeling: a case study describing the calculation of cost-effectiveness ratios for the treatment of established osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, M D; Oakley, J; Chilcott, J B

    2004-01-01

    Individual patient-level models can simulate more complex disease processes than cohort-based approaches. However, large numbers of patients need to be simulated to reduce 1st-order uncertainty, increasing the computational time required and often resulting in the inability to perform extensive sensitivity analyses. A solution, employing Gaussian process techniques, is presented using a case study, evaluating the cost-effectiveness of a sample of treatments for established osteoporosis. The Gaussian process model accurately formulated a statistical relationship between the inputs to the individual patient model and its outputs. This model reduced the time required for future runs from 150 min to virtually-instantaneous, allowing probabilistic sensitivity analyses-to be undertaken. This reduction in computational time was achieved with minimal loss in accuracy. The authors believe that this case study demonstrates the value of this technique in handling 1st- and 2nd-order uncertainty in the context of health economic modeling, particularly when more widely used techniques are computationally expensive or are unable to accurately model patient histories.

  11. GIS modelling for new landfill sites: critical review of employed criteria and methods of selection criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujayyab, Sohaib K. M.; Ahamad, Mohd Sanusi S.; Shukri Yahya, Ahmad; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Policy makers and the public are increasingly concerned with the determination of landfill-siting input criteria (DLSIC) in landfill modelling procedures as an area of research. Thus, its procedures are complicated and decision makers are increasingly pressured. These procedures can be considerably develop in order to reduce the negative effect of landfill locations on the environment, economy, and society. In this review article, literature related to the developments of 64 models and their procedures in the past 18 years (from 1997 to 2014) were comprehensively survey. DLSIC are determined through a conventional method. The frequency of criterion usage reflects the limitation of Conventional method for DLSIC. Moreover, some of these studies utilize unrelated criteria that are time-consuming, costly, arduous, and fruitless. Potential improvement in Geographic information systems GIS modelling parameter for landfill sites via utilizing multivariate analysis (MVA) instead of Conventional method (CM) through for DLSIC (e.g., Input variables, Accuracy, objectivity, reliability of criteria, time consumption, cost and comprehensiveness) were emphasize. It can be conclude that expenses can be reduce by implementing MVA in DLSIC for landfill modelling using geographic information systems (GIS) based on the corresponding significant level. Moreover, the determined criteria can be accurate, satisfying, sufficient, and free of bias from experts and human error.

  12. University-Community Partnership Models: Employing Organizational Management Theories of Paradox and Strategic Contradiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Amanda M.

    2017-01-01

    University-Community (U-C) partnerships have the potential to respond to society's most pressing needs through engaged scholarship. Despite this promise, partnerships face paradoxical tensions and inherent contradictions that are often not fully addressed in U-C partnership models or frameworks, or in practice. This article seeks to explore the…

  13. Probabilistic Inference: Task Dependency and Individual Differences of Probability Weighting Revealed by Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Moritz; Seer, Caroline; Lange, Florian; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities) by two (likelihoods) design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behavior. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted) S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model's success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modeling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  14. Driving-forces model on individual behavior in scenarios considering moving threat agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Zhuang, Jun; Shen, Shifei; Wang, Jia

    2017-09-01

    The individual behavior model is a contributory factor to improve the accuracy of agent-based simulation in different scenarios. However, few studies have considered moving threat agents, which often occur in terrorist attacks caused by attackers with close-range weapons (e.g., sword, stick). At the same time, many existing behavior models lack validation from cases or experiments. This paper builds a new individual behavior model based on seven behavioral hypotheses. The driving-forces model is an extension of the classical social force model considering scenarios including moving threat agents. An experiment was conducted to validate the key components of the model. Then the model is compared with an advanced Elliptical Specification II social force model, by calculating the fitting errors between the simulated and experimental trajectories, and being applied to simulate a specific circumstance. Our results show that the driving-forces model reduced the fitting error by an average of 33.9% and the standard deviation by an average of 44.5%, which indicates the accuracy and stability of the model in the studied situation. The new driving-forces model could be used to simulate individual behavior when analyzing the risk of specific scenarios using agent-based simulation methods, such as risk analysis of close-range terrorist attacks in public places.

  15. Modeling of individual coherent structures in wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 陆昌根; 罗纪生

    1999-01-01

    Models for individual coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer are proposed. Method of numerical simulations is used to follow the evolution of the structures. It is found that the proposed model does bear many features of coherent structures found in experiments.

  16. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  17. The Limit Behavior of a Stochastic Logistic Model with Individual Time-Dependent Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a variant of the stochastic logistic model that allows individual variation and time-dependent infection and recovery rates. The model is described as a heterogeneous density dependent Markov chain. We show that the process can be approximated by a deterministic process defined by an integral equation as the population size grows.

  18. Predicting individual responses to pravastatin using a physiologically based kinetic model for plasma cholesterol concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, N.C.A. van de; Rullmann, J.A.C.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Graaf, A.A. de

    2014-01-01

    We used a previously developed physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model to analyze the effect of individual variations in metabolism and transport of cholesterol on pravastatin response. The PBK model is based on kinetic expressions for 21 reactions that interconnect eight different body

  19. Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) : explanation and elaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Karel G M; Altman, Douglas G; Reitsma, Johannes B; Ioannidis, John P A; Macaskill, Petra; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Vickers, Andrew J; Ransohoff, David F; Collins, Gary S

    2015-01-01

    The TRIPOD (Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis) Statement includes a 22-item checklist, which aims to improve the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. T

  20. The effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull log-normal sire frailty models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Lars Holm; Korsgaard, Inge Riis; Simonsen, J;

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was, by means of simulation, to quantify the effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull sire frailty models on parameter estimates and to address the consequences for genetic inferences. Three simulation studies were evaluated, which included 3 levels...... the software Survival Kit for the incomplete sire model. For the incomplete sire model, the Monte Carlo and Survival Kit parameter estimates were similar. This study established that when unobserved individual heterogeneity was ignored, the parameter estimates that included sire effects were biased toward zero...

  1. Effects of Model Formulation on Estimates of Health in Individual Right Whales (Eubalaena glacialis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Robert S; Kraus, Scott D; Rolland, Rosalind M; Knowlton, Amy R; Hamilton, Philip K; Pettis, Heather M; Thomas, Len; Harwood, John; Clark, James S

    2016-01-01

    Right whales are vulnerable to many sources of anthropogenic disturbance including ship strikes, entanglement with fishing gear, and anthropogenic noise. The effect of these factors on individual health is unclear. A statistical model using photographic evidence of health was recently built to infer the true or hidden health of individual right whales. However, two important prior assumptions about the role of missing data and unexplained variance on the estimates were not previously assessed. Here we tested these factors by varying prior assumptions and model formulation. We found sensitivity to each assumption and used the output to make guidelines on future model formulation.

  2. Agency employment

    OpenAIRE

    Tomčíková, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    - Agency Employment For my thesis topic, I have chosen "Agency Employment". It's a relatively young institute, which was incorporated into our legal system only on October 1st, 2004. I believe that Agency Employment topic can be always considered current and positive, because it allows us to flexibly react to the needs of the job market. Since the topic is very broad, the goal of this paper is not a detailed analysis of all aspects of this institute, but only a few of them that I consider to ...

  3. Modelling individual routines and spatio-temporal trajectories in human mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Pappalardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility modelling is of fundamental importance in a wide range of applications, such as the developing of protocols for mobile ad hoc networks or for what-if analysis and simulation in urban ecosystems. Current generative models generally fail in accurately reproducing the individuals' recurrent daily schedules and at the same time in accounting for the possibility that individuals may break the routine and modify their habits during periods of unpredictability of variable duration. In this article we present DITRAS (DIary-based TRAjectory Simulator), a framework to simulate the spatio-temporal patterns of human mobility in a realistic way. DITRAS operates in two steps: the generation of a mobility diary and the translation of the mobility diary into a mobility trajectory. The mobility diary is constructed by a Markov model which captures the tendency of individuals to follow or break their routine. The mobility trajectory is produced by a model based on the concept of preferential exploration and pref...

  4. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  5. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  6. Congestion Control in the Internet by Employing a Ratio dependent Plant Herbivore Carnivorous Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jamali, Shahram

    2009-01-01

    The demand for Internet based services has exploded over the last decade. Many organizations use the Internet and particularly the World Wide Web as their primary medium for communication and business. This phenomenal growth has dramatically increased the performance requirements for the Internet. To have a high performance Internet, a good congestion control system is essential for it. The current work proposes that the congestion control in the Internet can be inspired from the population control tactics of the nature. Toward this idea, each flow (W) in the network is viewed as a species whose population size is congestion window size of the flow. By this assumption, congestion control problem is redefined as population control of flow species. This paper defines a three trophic food chain analogy in congestion control area, and gives a ratio dependent model to control population size of W species within this plant herbivore carnivorous food chain. Simulation results show that this model achieves fair bandw...

  7. An older-worker employment model: Japan's Silver Human Resource Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, S A; Oka, M

    1995-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, a unique model of publicly assisted industries has developed in Japan, which contracts for services provided by retirees. Jobs for retirees are part-time and temporary in nature and, for the most part, are designed to assist in expanding community-based services. The program, known as the Silver Human Resource Centers, has expanded nationwide and reflects a novel approach to the productive engagement of retirees in society that may be replicable in other industrialized nations.

  8. Employing New Mathematical Models and Equations to Evaluate Risk-Benefit Criteria of Clinical Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Y. Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current preclinical and clinical evaluation of a drugs or therapy is at first to find out a maximum toxicity tolerance, which is overall fixed. The potential therapeutic dosage will be ranged just lower or within the periphery of these maximum tolerant data. A hidden acceptance among general researchers lies as the toxicity concentration of a drug is always the same and can be referred as a fixed data. However, practical therapeutics is not very strictly following this doctrine. Even using many strict well-formed mathematical models and toxicity evaluating systems, the disputes and lawsuits of some newly-developed drugs are increasing dramatically nowadays. In this work, a mathematical equation and a dynamic parameter  are generated to help improving this situation. This new mathematic model combines and integrates effective, toxicity and no effective data as a whole, which fits to evaluate the risk-benefits of therapeutics in dynamic and changeable states. We need no more to deduce therapeutic dosage from fixed tolerance data regardless different therapeutic modes of action and toxicity of drugs acting on different organs and physiological systems. We hypothesize and equation that risk-benefit ratios are varied with drug dosages. It is a new start to help the understanding of effects and toxicities of therapeutic same time in a single clinical practice and well compliment with previous mathematical models.

  9. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment.

  10. Anatomy of Student Models in Adaptive Learning Systems: A Systematic Literature Review of Individual Differences from 2001 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakic, Jelena; Granic, Andrina; Glavinic, Vlado

    2015-01-01

    This study brings an evidence-based review of user individual characteristics employed as sources of adaptation in recent adaptive learning systems. Twenty-two user individual characteristics were explored in a systematically designed search procedure, while 17 of them were identified as sources of adaptation in final selection. The content…

  11. Probabilistic inference: Task dependency and individual differences of probability weighting revealed by hierarchical Bayesian modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eBoos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities by two (likelihoods design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behaviour. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model’s success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modelling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  12. Animal models of human psychopathology based on individual differences in novelty-seeking and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Cornelius R; Ho, Ying-Jui; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2008-10-01

    The role of individual factors in behavioural neuroscience is an important, but still neglected area of research. The present review aims to give, first, an outline of the most elaborated theory on animal behaviour, and second, an overview of systematic approaches of historic and present animal models of human psychopathology based on individual differences. This overview will be focused on animal models of unselected subjects (i.e. natural variance of a specific behaviour within a given population) and selected breeding for a specific behaviour. Accordingly, an outline of the personality model from Gray and McNaughton of individual behaviour in animals is given first. Then, a comprehensive overview of past and current animal models in novelty-seeking (i.e. psychomotor activation and exploration behaviour) based on systematic individual differences and its relationship to addiction is presented. Third, this will be followed by a comprehensive overview of individual differences in previous and present animal models for anxiety. Finally, critical aspects of such approaches in animal research are discussed, and suggestions are given where to go from here.

  13. D Recording for 2d Delivering - the Employment of 3d Models for Studies and Analyses -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, A.; Baratti, G.; Jiménez, B.; Girardi, S.; Remondino, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years, thanks to the advances of surveying sensors and techniques, many heritage sites could be accurately replicated in digital form with very detailed and impressive results. The actual limits are mainly related to hardware capabilities, computation time and low performance of personal computer. Often, the produced models are not visible on a normal computer and the only solution to easily visualized them is offline using rendered videos. This kind of 3D representations is useful for digital conservation, divulgation purposes or virtual tourism where people can visit places otherwise closed for preservation or security reasons. But many more potentialities and possible applications are available using a 3D model. The problem is the ability to handle 3D data as without adequate knowledge this information is reduced to standard 2D data. This article presents some surveying and 3D modeling experiences within the APSAT project ("Ambiente e Paesaggi dei Siti d'Altura Trentini", i.e. Environment and Landscapes of Upland Sites in Trentino). APSAT is a multidisciplinary project funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy) with the aim documenting, surveying, studying, analysing and preserving mountainous and hill-top heritage sites located in the region. The project focuses on theoretical, methodological and technological aspects of the archaeological investigation of mountain landscape, considered as the product of sequences of settlements, parcelling-outs, communication networks, resources, and symbolic places. The mountain environment preserves better than others the traces of hunting and gathering, breeding, agricultural, metallurgical, symbolic activities characterised by different lengths and environmental impacts, from Prehistory to the Modern Period. Therefore the correct surveying and documentation of this heritage sites and material is very important. Within the project, the 3DOM unit of FBK is delivering all the surveying and 3D material to

  14. Individualization of the parameters of the three-elements Windkessel model using carotid pulse signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Strasz, Anna; GÄ siorowska, Anna; Berka, Martin; Młyńczak, Marcel; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The haemodynamics of the arterial system can be described by the three-elements Windkessel model. As it is a lumped model, it does not account for pulse wave propagation phenomena: pulse wave velocity, reflection, and pulse pressure profile changes during propagation. The Modelflowmethod uses this model to calculate stroke volume and total peripheral resistance (TPR) from pulse pressure obtained from finger; the reliability of this method is questioned. The model parameters are: aortic input impedance (Zo), TPR, and arterial compliance (Cw). They were obtained from studies of human aorta preparation. Individual adjustment is performed based on the subject's age and gender. As Cw is also affected by diseases, this may lead to inaccuracies. Moreover, the Modelflowmethod transforms the pulse pressure recording from the finger (Finapres©) into a remarkably different pulse pressure in the aorta using a predetermined transfer function — another source of error. In the present study, we indicate a way to include in the Windkessel model information obtained by adding carotid pulse recording to the finger pressure measurement. This information allows individualization of the values of Cw and Zo. It also seems reasonable to utilize carotid pulse, which better reflects aortic pressure, to individualize the transfer function. Despite its simplicity, the Windkessel model describes essential phenomena in the arterial system remarkably well; therefore, it seems worthwhile to check whether individualization of its parameters would increase the reliability of results obtained with this model.

  15. Towards intelligent diagnostic system employing integration of mathematical and engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Nor Ashidi Mat

    2015-05-01

    The development of medical diagnostic system has been one of the main research fields during years. The goal of the medical diagnostic system is to place a nosological system that could ease the diagnostic evaluation normally performed by scientists and doctors. Efficient diagnostic evaluation is essentials and requires broad knowledge in order to improve conventional diagnostic system. Several approaches on developing the medical diagnostic system have been designed and tested since the earliest 60s. Attempts on improving their performance have been made which utilizes the fields of artificial intelligence, statistical analyses, mathematical model and engineering theories. With the availability of the microcomputer and software development as well as the promising aforementioned fields, medical diagnostic prototypes could be developed. In general, the medical diagnostic system consists of several stages, namely the 1) data acquisition, 2) feature extraction, 3) feature selection, and 4) classifications stages. Data acquisition stage plays an important role in converting the inputs measured from the real world physical conditions to the digital numeric values that can be manipulated by the computer system. One of the common medical inputs could be medical microscopic images, radiographic images, magnetic resonance image (MRI) as well as medical signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG). Normally, the scientist or doctors have to deal with myriad of data and redundant to be processed. In order to reduce the complexity of the diagnosis process, only the significant features of the raw data such as peak value of the ECG signal or size of lesion in the mammogram images will be extracted and considered in the subsequent stages. Mathematical models and statistical analyses will be performed to select the most significant features to be classified. The statistical analyses such as principal component analysis and discriminant analysis as well

  16. Transport and diffusion using a diagnostic mesoscale model employing mass and total energy conservation constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, R E; Cederwall, R T; Ohmstede, W D; aufm Kampe, W

    1976-01-01

    Several steps are described that have been taken to advance the method of ''interpolation'' associated with meteorological measurements. These newer methods incorporate some physical constraints into the interpolation. It is the intent of this paper to qualitatively describe early fruits of a joint project at Brookhaven National Laboratory and White Sands Missile Range which has as its objective the formulation of a numerical objective methodology for reconstructing the meteorological fields suitable for the exercise of meso/regional scale transport, chemical and radioactive transformation, and diffusion models.

  17. Towards intelligent diagnostic system employing integration of mathematical and engineering model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isa, Nor Ashidi Mat [Imaging and Intelligent System Research Team (ISRT), School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    The development of medical diagnostic system has been one of the main research fields during years. The goal of the medical diagnostic system is to place a nosological system that could ease the diagnostic evaluation normally performed by scientists and doctors. Efficient diagnostic evaluation is essentials and requires broad knowledge in order to improve conventional diagnostic system. Several approaches on developing the medical diagnostic system have been designed and tested since the earliest 60s. Attempts on improving their performance have been made which utilizes the fields of artificial intelligence, statistical analyses, mathematical model and engineering theories. With the availability of the microcomputer and software development as well as the promising aforementioned fields, medical diagnostic prototypes could be developed. In general, the medical diagnostic system consists of several stages, namely the 1) data acquisition, 2) feature extraction, 3) feature selection, and 4) classifications stages. Data acquisition stage plays an important role in converting the inputs measured from the real world physical conditions to the digital numeric values that can be manipulated by the computer system. One of the common medical inputs could be medical microscopic images, radiographic images, magnetic resonance image (MRI) as well as medical signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG). Normally, the scientist or doctors have to deal with myriad of data and redundant to be processed. In order to reduce the complexity of the diagnosis process, only the significant features of the raw data such as peak value of the ECG signal or size of lesion in the mammogram images will be extracted and considered in the subsequent stages. Mathematical models and statistical analyses will be performed to select the most significant features to be classified. The statistical analyses such as principal component analysis and discriminant analysis as well

  18. Modelling and modal properties of the railway vehicle bogie with two individual wheelset drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling of vibration and modal analysis of two-axled bogie of a railway vehicle. In comparison with recent publications introducing mathematical models of an individual wheelset drive, this paper is focused on modelling of complex bogie vibration. The bogie frame is linked by primary suspension to the two wheelset drives with hollow shafts and by secondary suspension to the car body. The method is based on the system decomposition into three subsystems – two individual wheelset drives including the mass of the rail and the bogie frame coupled with a half of the car body – and on modelling of couplings among subsystems. The eigenvalues of a linearized autonomous model and stability conditions are investigated in dependence on longitudinal creepage and forward velocity of the railway vehicle. The nonlinear model will be used for investigating the dynamic loading of bogie components caused by different types of excitation.

  19. Modeling and Optimization of Vehicle Suspension Employing a Nonlinear Fluid Inerter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal inerter has been applied to various vibration engineering fields because of its superior vibration isolation performance. This paper proposes a new type of fluid inerter and analyzes the nonlinearities including friction and nonlinear damping force caused by the viscosity of fluid. The nonlinear model of fluid inerter is demonstrated by the experiments analysis. Furthermore, the full-car dynamic model involving the nonlinear fluid inerter is established. It has been detected that the performance of the vehicle suspension may be influenced by the nonlinearities of inerter. So, parameters of the suspension system including the spring stiffness and the damping coefficient are optimized by means of QGA (quantum genetic algorithm, which combines the genetic algorithm and quantum computing. Results indicate that, compared with the original nonlinear suspension system, the RMS (root-mean-square of vertical body acceleration of optimized suspension has decreased by 9.0%, the RMS of pitch angular acceleration has decreased by 19.9%, and the RMS of roll angular acceleration has decreased by 9.6%.

  20. THE DYNAMIC MODEL FOR CONTROL OF STUDENT’S LEARNING INDIVIDUAL TRAJECTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Mitsel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the transition of the educational system to a competence-oriented approach, the problem of learning outcomes assessment and creating an individual learning trajectory of a student has become relevant. Its solution requires the application of modern information technologies. The third generation of Federal state educational standards of higher professional education (FSES HPE defines the requirements for the results of Mastering the basic educational programs (BEP. According to FSES HPE up to 50% of subjects have a variable character, i.e. depend on the choice of a student. It significantly influences on the results of developing various competencies. The problem of forming student’s learning trajectory is analyzed in general and the choice of an individual direction was studied in details. Various methods, models and algorithms of the student’s individual learning trajectory formation were described. The analysis of the model of educational process organization in terms of individual approach makes it possible to develop a decision support system (DSS. DSS is a set of interrelated programs and data used for analysis of situation, development of alternative solutions and selection of the most acceptable alternative. DSSs are often used when building individual learning path, because this task can be considered as a discrete multi-criteria problem, creating a significant burden on the decision maker. A new method of controlling the learning trajectory has been developed. The article discusses problem statement and solution of determining student’s optimal individual educational trajectory as a dynamic model of learning trajectory control, which uses score assessment to construct a sequence of studied subjects. A new model of management learning trajectory is based on dynamic models for tracking the reference trajectory. The task can be converted to an equivalent model of linear programming, for which a reliable solution

  1. Understanding Individual Resilience in the Workplace: The International Collaboration of Workforce Resilience (ICWR Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Samantha Rees

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as ‘resilient’. A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g. neuroticism as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g. coping style, enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesised to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping and psychological adjustment.

  2. Understanding individual resilience in the workplace: the international collaboration of workforce resilience model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S; Breen, Lauren J; Cusack, Lynette; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as "resilient." A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g., neuroticism) as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g., coping style), enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, and psychological adjustment.

  3. Understanding individual resilience in the workplace: the international collaboration of workforce resilience model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S.; Breen, Lauren J.; Cusack, Lynette; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as “resilient.” A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g., neuroticism) as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g., coping style), enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, and psychological adjustment. PMID:25698999

  4. Competition of Dynamic Self-Confidence and Inhomogeneous Individual Influence in Voter Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In social systems, agents often have different ability to persuade neighbors to adopt their opinions. In this paper, we aim to investigate how the location and heterogeneity of influencers in social networks can improve convergence. We propose a voter model with dynamic self-conviction and heterogeneous individual influence which is related to the underlying network topology. An agent may keep its current opinion according to personal conviction, or otherwise, it may preferentially choose the opinion of the neighbor that has a great influence. Individual conviction evolves during the dynamic process, and can be strengthened by social recognition. Simulations indicate our model has three nontrivial results. First, the conservation of average magnetization in the voter model is broken under the effect of individual conviction and influence, and the system evolves to an ordered state in which one opinion is dominant, but total consensus is prevented by extremists. Furthermore, individual influence has a subtle action on opinion evolution. The heterogeneity of individual influence accelerates the relaxation process, but, with the action of dynamic conviction, more heterogeneous influence does not mean the average magnetization will be more ordered. In addition, when competing with agents’ conviction, more heterogeneous individual influence plays a more significant role in agents’ decisions. These results are helpful for understanding some aspects of collective phenomena that occur on online social media.

  5. The effects of tree species grouping in tropical rain forest modelling - simulations with the individual based model FORMIND

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Peter; Huth, A.

    1998-01-01

    Due to high biodiversity in tropical rainforests, tree species are aggregatedinto functional groups for modelling purposes. In this article the influencesof two different classifications of tropical tree species into functionalgroups on the output of a rainforest model are analysed. The FORMIND modelis documented. FORMIND simulates the tree growth of tropical rainforests.The model is individual-based and developed from the FORMIX3 model. In themodel, trees compete for light and space in plots...

  6. Intermittent heating in the solar corona employing a 3D MHD model

    CERN Document Server

    Bingert, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the heating of the corona of a cool star such as our Sun in a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (3D MHD) model. We solve the 3D MHD problem numerically in a box representing part of the (solar) corona. The energy balance includes Spitzer heat conduction along the magnetic field and optically thin radiative losses. The self-consistent heating mechanism is based on the braiding of magnetic field lines rooted in the convective photosphere. Magnetic stress induced by photospheric motions leads to currents in the atmosphere which heat the corona through Ohmic dissipation. While the horizontally averaged quantities, such as heating rate, temperature or density, are relatively constant in time, the simulated corona is highly variable and dynamic, on average reaching temperatures and densities as found in observations. The strongest heating per particle is found in the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona. The heating is concentrated in curren...

  7. Student modeling: Recognizing the individual needs of users in e-learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Somyürek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with numerous universities and large trading companies heavily relying on e-learning environments to train their students and employees, the design and development of adaptive educational hypermedia that customize the content and navigation for each student has gained importance and priority all around the world. This study aims to describe the concept of student modeling, heart of the adaptive learning systems, and analyze the information collection, construction and updating phases of a student modeling process. In the study, the classification of student models in numerous ways is explained, and the different methods employed in the representation of information in the student model are addressed. Moreover, the problem of uncertainty, which is one of the most important challenges in the student modeling process, is mentioned, and the trends in student modeling are discussed.

  8. A reciprocal model of face recognition and autistic traits: evidence from an individual differences perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Drew W R; MacDonald, Stuart W S; Scherf, K Suzanne; Sherf, Suzanne K; Tanaka, James W

    2014-01-01

    Although not a core symptom of the disorder, individuals with autism often exhibit selective impairments in their face processing abilities. Importantly, the reciprocal connection between autistic traits and face perception has rarely been examined within the typically developing population. In this study, university participants from the social sciences, physical sciences, and humanities completed a battery of measures that assessed face, object and emotion recognition abilities, general perceptual-cognitive style, and sub-clinical autistic traits (the Autism Quotient (AQ)). We employed separate hierarchical multiple regression analyses to evaluate which factors could predict face recognition scores and AQ scores. Gender, object recognition performance, and AQ scores predicted face recognition behaviour. Specifically, males, individuals with more autistic traits, and those with lower object recognition scores performed more poorly on the face recognition test. Conversely, university major, gender and face recognition performance reliably predicted AQ scores. Science majors, males, and individuals with poor face recognition skills showed more autistic-like traits. These results suggest that the broader autism phenotype is associated with lower face recognition abilities, even among typically developing individuals.

  9. The construction of individual eye model based on eye's wavefront aberration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-Qi; Guo, Huan-Qing

    2005-08-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There were four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software -ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  10. Employment of Lithuanian Statistical Data Into Tax-Benefit Micro-Simulation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viginta Ivaškaitė-Tamošiūnė

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aim to assess the “best fit” of the existing Lithuanian micro-datasets for constructing a national micro-simulation model. Specifically, we compare and evaluate the potential of two (state level representative micro-data surveys in terms of their potential to simulate Lithuanian (direct taxes, social contributions and social benefits. Both selected datasets contain rich information on the socio-economic and demographical conditions of the country: the Household Budget Survey (HBS for the years 2004 and 2005 and the European Community Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC in Lithuania for the year 2005. The selected databases offer the most comprehensive range of income and other socio-demographic attributes, needed for simulation of tax and contributions’ payers/amounts and benefits’ recipients/amounts. The evaluation of the dataset capacity to simulate these measures is done by a comparative statistical analysis. Among the comparative categories are definitions (of households, incomes, survey collection modes, level of aggregation of various variables, demographic and incomes variables and corresponding numbers (amounts.The comparative analysis of the HBS and EU-SILC datasets shows, that despite embedded differences and shortages regarding simulation capacities of both surveys, these datasets contain valuable and sufficient information for the purpose of simulation of Lithuanian tax-benefit policies.In general a conclusion could be drawn, that HBS offers higher possibilities of simulating the Lithuanian tax-benefit system. This dataset contains more detailed national income categories (i.e. recipients of maternity/paternity insurance, diverse pensions, etc.— information on which is not available in the EU-SILC. The latter dataset does not contain national policy system specific components, but offer information on income aggregates, such all old-age pensions, social exclusion benefits, etc. Additionally

  11. A Neotropical Miocene Pollen Database Employing Image-Based Search and Semantic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ginger Han

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Digital microscopic pollen images are being generated with increasing speed and volume, producing opportunities to develop new computational methods that increase the consistency and efficiency of pollen analysis and provide the palynological community a computational framework for information sharing and knowledge transfer. Methods: Mathematical methods were used to assign trait semantics (abstract morphological representations of the images of neotropical Miocene pollen and spores. Advanced database-indexing structures were built to compare and retrieve similar images based on their visual content. A Web-based system was developed to provide novel tools for automatic trait semantic annotation and image retrieval by trait semantics and visual content. Results: Mathematical models that map visual features to trait semantics can be used to annotate images with morphology semantics and to search image databases with improved reliability and productivity. Images can also be searched by visual content, providing users with customized emphases on traits such as color, shape, and texture. Discussion: Content- and semantic-based image searches provide a powerful computational platform for pollen and spore identification. The infrastructure outlined provides a framework for building a community-wide palynological resource, streamlining the process of manual identification, analysis, and species discovery.

  12. Employer Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Mønsted, Bolette Rye

    2012-01-01

    Employer branding er både for den private og den offentlige sektor blevet en måde, de kan imødekomme ændrede arbejdsmarkedsvilkår og organisatoriske udfordringer i en postmoderne og globaliseret verden. Den aktuelle finanskrise har skabt nye udfordringer for organisationer i deres bestræbelser på...... at tiltrække- og fastholde attraktive medarbejdere. Men hvilken betydning har det, når Grundfos siger ”Mennesket er i fokus”, og hvad siger ”mangfoldighed” om Københavns Kommune som arbejdsplads i relation til employer branding? Er der egentlig sammenhæng mellem tankerne bag employer branding og de eksternt...... kommunikerede employer brandprodukter. Eller bliver det unikke ved arbejdspladserne ersattet af buzzwords uden substans og inddragelse af ansatte og interessenter? Artiklen har til formål at vurdere disse spørgsmål på baggrund af analyser af to cases med employer branding....

  13. Employer Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Mønsted, Bolette Rye

    2012-01-01

    Employer branding er både for den private og den offentlige sektor blevet en måde, de kan imødekomme ændrede arbejdsmarkedsvilkår og organisatoriske udfordringer i en postmoderne og globaliseret verden. Den aktuelle finanskrise har skabt nye udfordringer for organisationer i deres bestræbelser på...... at tiltrække- og fastholde attraktive medarbejdere. Men hvilken betydning har det, når Grundfos siger ”Mennesket er i fokus”, og hvad siger ”mangfoldighed” om Københavns Kommune som arbejdsplads i relation til employer branding? Er der egentlig sammenhæng mellem tankerne bag employer branding og de eksternt...... kommunikerede employer brandprodukter. Eller bliver det unikke ved arbejdspladserne ersattet af buzzwords uden substans og inddragelse af ansatte og interessenter? Artiklen har til formål at vurdere disse spørgsmål på baggrund af analyser af to cases med employer branding....

  14. A Multidisciplinary Model to Guide Employment Outcomes Among People Living With Spinal Cord Injuries in South Africa: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Pefile, Ntsikelelo; Mothabeng, Joyce; Naidoo, Saloshni

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in complete or partial loss of functioning of the upper and/or lower limbs, leading to the affected individual experiencing difficulties in performing activities of daily living. This results in reduced participation in social, religious, recreational, and economic activities (employment). The South Africa legal framework promotes the employment and assistance of people with disabilities. However, rehabilitation interventions focus mainly on i...

  15. A multi-scale modeling framework for individualized, spatiotemporal prediction of drug effects and toxicological risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo eDiaz Ochoa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on a novel multi-scale modeling approach for spatiotemporal prediction of the distribution of substances and resulting hepatotoxicity by combining cellular models, a 2D liver model, and whole-body model. As a case study, we focused on predicting human hepatotoxicity upon treatment with acetaminophen based on in vitro toxicity data and potential inter-individual variability in gene expression and enzyme activities. By aggregating mechanistic, genome-based in silico cells to a novel 2D liver model and eventually to a whole body model, we predicted pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and the onset of hepatotoxicity in an in silico patient. Depending on the concentration of acetaminophen in the liver and the accumulation of toxic metabolites, cell integrity in the liver as a function of space and time as well as changes in the elimination rate of substances were estimated. We show that the variations in elimination rates also influence the distribution of acetaminophen and its metabolites in the whole body. Our results are in agreement with experimental results. What is more, the integrated model also predicted variations in drug toxicity depending on alterations of metabolic enzyme activities. Variations in enzyme activity, in turn, reflect genetic characteristics or diseases of individuals. In conclusion, this framework presents an important basis for efficiently integrating inter-individual variability data into models, paving the way for personalized or stratified predictions of drug toxicity and efficacy.

  16. Employment of Lithuanian Statistical Data Into Tax-Benefit Micro-Simulation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viginta Ivaškaitė-Tamošiūnė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aim to assess the “best fit” of the existing Lithuanian micro-datasets for constructing a national micro-simulation model. Specifically, we compare and evaluate the potential of two (state level representative micro-data surveys in terms of their potential to simulate Lithuanian (direct taxes, social contributions and social benefits. Both selected datasets contain rich information on the socio-economic and demographical conditions of the country: the Household Budget Survey (HBS for the years 2004 and 2005 and the European Community Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC in Lithuania for the year 2005. The selected databases offer the most comprehensive range of income and other socio-demographic attributes, needed for simulation of tax and contributions’ payers/amounts and benefits’ recipients/amounts. The evaluation of the dataset capacity to simulate these measures is done by a comparative statistical analysis. Among the comparative categories are definitions (of households, incomes, survey collection modes, level of aggregation of various variables, demographic and incomes variables and corresponding numbers (amounts. The comparative analysis of the HBS and EU-SILC datasets shows, that despite embedded differences and shortages regarding simulation capacities of both surveys, these datasets contain valuable and sufficient information for the purpose of simulation of Lithuanian tax-benefit policies. In general a conclusion could be drawn, that HBS offers higher possibilities of simulating the Lithuanian tax-benefit system. This dataset contains more detailed national income categories (i.e. recipients of maternity/paternity insurance, diverse pensions, etc.— information on which is not available in the EU-SILC. The latter dataset does not contain national policy system specific components, but offer information on income aggregates, such all old-age pensions, social exclusion benefits, etc

  17. Evaluating the Scenic Beauty of Individual Trees: A Case Study Using a Nonlinear Model for a Pinus Tabulaeformis Scenic Forest in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Mao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between scenic beauty grade and measured tree indicators was studied through evaluation of 427 photos of individual Pinus tabulaeformis trees by using the scenic beauty estimation (SBE method. Thirteen indices to reflect trunk, crown and stem-to-canopy ratios of individual trees were evaluated by invited students. Results showed that students preferred large diameters at breast height, full canopies and straight stems or some trees with minor crook stems. Tree height had a minor contribution to individual tree quality. Correlation analysis and factor analysis were employed to select indices and to integrate them into a comprehensive index. The stepwise method of nonlinear model incorporation of four comprehensive indices—tree crown form, stem-crown coordination, tree growth and stem for—were proven valuable in order to evaluate the scenic beauty of individual trees.

  18. Use of pharmacokinetic modelling to individualize FFP dosing in factor V deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhnovich, V; Daniel, J; Wicklund, B; Kearns, G; Neville, K

    2013-03-01

    Therapy with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) confers serious risks, such as contraction of blood-borne viruses, allergic reaction, volume overload and development of alloantibodies. The aim of this study was to apply principles of pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling to individual factor content of FFP to optimize individualized dosing, while minimizing potential risks of therapy. We used PK modelling to successfully target individual factor replacement in an 8-month-old patient receiving FFP for treatment of a severe congenital factor V (FV) deficiency. The model fit for the FV activity vs. time data was excellent (r = 0.98) and the model accurately predicted FV activity during the intraoperative and postoperative period. Accurate PK modelling of individual factor activity in FFP has the potential to provide better targeted therapy, enabling clinicians to more precisely dose patients requiring coagulation products, while avoiding wasteful and expensive product overtreatment, minimizing potentially life-threatening complications due to undertreatment and limiting harmful product-associated risks.

  19. The relationship between relational models and individualism and collectivism: evidence from culturally diverse work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodosek, Markus

    2009-04-01

    Relational models theory (Fiske, 1991 ) proposes that all thinking about social relationships is based on four elementary mental models: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. Triandis and his colleagues (e.g., Triandis, Kurowski, & Gelfand, 1994 ) have suggested a relationship between the constructs of horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism and Fiske's relational models. However, no previous research has examined this proposed relationship empirically. The objective of the current study was to test the association between the two frameworks in order to further our understanding of why members of culturally diverse groups may prefer different relational models in interactions with other group members. Findings from this study support a relationship between Triandis' constructs and Fiske's four relational models and uphold Fiske's ( 1991 ) claim that the use of the relational models is culturally dependent. As hypothesized, horizontal collectivism was associated with a preference for equality matching and communal sharing, vertical individualism was related to a preference for authority ranking, and vertical collectivism was related to a preference for authority ranking and communal sharing. However, contrary to expectations, horizontal individualism was not related to a preference for equality matching and market pricing, and vertical individualism was not associated with market pricing. By showing that there is a relationship between Triandis' and Fiske's frameworks, this study closes a gap in relational models theory, namely how culture relates to people's preferences for relational models. Thus, the findings from this study will enable future researchers to explain and predict what relational models are likely to be used in a certain cultural context.

  20. Perceived Risk of Burglary and Fear of Crime: Individual- and Country-Level Mixed Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Don Soo; Wilson, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Given the scarcity of prior studies, the current research introduced country-level variables, along with individual-level ones, to test how they are related to an individual's perceived risk of burglary (PRB) and fear of crime (FC), separately, by using mixed-level logistic regression analyses. The analyses of 104,218 individuals, residing in 50 countries, showed that country-level poverty was positively associated with FC only. However, individual-level variables, such as prior property crime victimization and female gender, had consistently positive relationships with both PRB and FC. However, age group and socioeconomic status were inconsistent between those two models, suggesting that PRB and FC are two different concepts. Finally, no significant difference in the pattern of PRB and FC was found between a highly developed group of countries and a less developed one.

  1. Optimization of Actuarial Model for Individual Account of Rural Social Pension Insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxian; CAO

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly analyzes different payment methods of individual account and the pension replacement rate under the pension payment method.Results show that it will be more scientific and reasonable for the individual account of new rural social pension insurance to adopt the actuarial model of payment according to proportion of income and periodic prestation at variable amount.The Guiding Opinions on New Rural Social Pension Insurance sets forth individual account should be paid at fixed amount,and the insured voluntarily selects payment level as per criteria set by the State.The monthly calculation and distribution amount of pension is the total amount of individual account divided by139.Therefore,it should start from continuation of policies and make adjustment of payment level in accordance with growth of per capita net income of rural residents.When condition permits,it is expected to realize transition to payment as per income proportion and periodic prestation at variable amount.

  2. An approach to incorporate individual personality in modeling fish dispersal across in-stream barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Thorlacius, Magnus; Brodin, Tomas; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Animal personalities are an important factor that affects the dispersal of animals. In the context of aquatic species, dispersal modeling needs to consider that most freshwater ecosystems are highly fragmented by barriers reducing longitudinal connectivity. Previous research has incorporated such barriers into dispersal models under the neutral assumption that all migrating animals attempt to ascend at all times. Modeling dispersal of animals that do not perform trophic or reproductive migrations will be more realistic if it includes assumptions of which individuals attempt to overcome a barrier. We aimed to introduce personality into predictive modeling of whether a nonmigratory invasive freshwater fish (the round goby, Neogobius melanostomus) will disperse across an in-stream barrier. To that end, we experimentally assayed the personalities of 259 individuals from invasion fronts and established round goby populations. Based on the population differences in boldness, asociability, and activity, we defined a priori thresholds with bolder, more asocial, and more active individuals having a higher likelihood of ascent. We then combined the personality thresholds with swimming speed data from the literature and in situ measurements of flow velocities in the barrier. The resulting binary logistic regression model revealed probabilities of crossing a barrier which depended not only on water flow and fish swimming speed but also on animal personalities. We conclude that risk assessment through predictive dispersal modeling across fragmented landscapes can be advanced by including personality traits as parameters. The inclusion of behavior into modeling the spread of invasive species can help to improve the accuracy of risk assessments.

  3. Can plasticity make spatial structure irrelevant in individual-tree models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar García

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Distance-dependent individual-tree models have commonly been found to add little predictive power to that of distance-independent ones. One possible reason is plasticity, the ability of trees to lean and to alter crown and root development to better occupy available growing space. Being able to redeploy foliage (and roots into canopy gaps and less contested areas can diminish the importance of stem ground locations. Methods Plasticity was simulated for 3 intensively measured forest stands, to see to what extent and under what conditions the allocation of resources (e.g., light to the individual trees depended on their ground coordinates. The data came from 50 × 60 m stem-mapped plots in natural monospecific stands of jack pine, trembling aspen and black spruce from central Canada. Explicit perfect-plasticity equations were derived for tessellation-type models. Results Qualitatively similar simulation results were obtained under a variety of modelling assumptions. The effects of plasticity varied somewhat with stand uniformity and with assumed plasticity limits and other factors. Stand-level implications for canopy depth, distribution modelling and total productivity were examined. Conclusions Generally, under what seem like conservative maximum plasticity constraints, spatial structure accounted for less than 10% of the variance in resource allocation. The perfect-plasticity equations approximated well the simulation results from tessellation models, but not those from models with less extreme competition asymmetry. Whole-stand perfect plasticity approximations seem an attractive alternative to individual-tree models.

  4. Sequential Learning Models for the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: Assessing Processes in Substance Dependent Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Kruschke, John K.; Stout, Julie C.; Bechara, Antoine; McCabe, David P.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) is a commonly used neuropsychological test of executive or frontal lobe functioning. Traditional behavioral measures from the task (e.g., perseverative errors) distinguish healthy controls from clinical populations, but such measures can be difficult to interpret. In an attempt to supplement traditional measures, we developed and tested a family of sequential learning models that allowed for estimation of processes at the individual subject level in the WCST. Testing the model with substance dependent individuals and healthy controls, the model parameters significantly predicted group membership even when controlling for traditional behavioral measures from the task. Substance dependence was associated with a) slower attention shifting following punished trials and b) reduced decision consistency. Results suggest that model parameters may offer both incremental content validity and incremental predictive validity. PMID:20495607

  5. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yuki

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  6. A Review of Models for Dose Assessment Employed by SKB in the Renewed Safety Assessment for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-01

    This document provides a critical review, on behalf of SSI, of the models employed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) for dose assessment in the renewed safety assessment for the final repository for radioactive operational waste (SFR 1) in Forsmark, Sweden. The main objective of the review is to examine the models used by SKB for radiological dose assessment in a series of evolving biotopes in the vicinity of the Forsmark repository within a time frame beginning in 3000 AD and extending beyond 7500 AD. Five biosphere models (for coasts, lakes, agriculture, mires and wells) are described in Report TR-01-04. The principal consideration of the review is to determine whether these models are fit for the purpose of dose evaluation over the time frames involved and in the evolving sequence of biotopes specified. As well as providing general observations and comments on the modelling approach taken, six specific questions are addressed, as follows. Are the assumptions underlying the models justifiable? Are all reasonably foreseeable environmental processes considered? Has parameter uncertainty been sufficiently and reasonably addressed? Have sufficient models been used to address all reasonably foreseeable biotopes? Are the transitions between biotopes modelled adequately (specifically, are initial conditions for developing biotopes adequately specified by calculations for subsiding biotopes)? Have all critical radionuclides been identified? It is concluded that, in general, the assumptions underlying most of the models are justifiable. The exceptions are a) the rather simplistic approach taken in the Coastal Model and b) the lack of consideration of wild foods and age-dependence when calculating exposures of humans to radionuclides via dietary pathways. Most foreseeable processes appear to have been accounted for within the constraints of the models used, although it is recommended that attention be paid to future climate states when considering

  7. Successful Succession in Family Businesses : Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleem, Majid; Islam, Md. Shariful

    2009-01-01

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities...

  8. Individual-based models of collective dynamics in socio-economic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Carro Patiño, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of how complex collective behaviors emerge in social and economic systems. To this end, we use a combination of mathematical analysis and computational simulations along the lines of the agent- or individual-based modeling paradigm. In particular, we focus on three main topics: opinion dynamics, herding behavior in financial markets, and language competition. Opinion dynamics models focus on the processes of opinion for...

  9. Modeling Individual Subtests of the WAIS IV with Multiple Latent Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results...

  10. AccesSports: A Model for Adapting Mainstream Sports Activities for Individuals with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchilla, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    The AccesSports Model allows professionals with basic knowledge of visual impairments and mainstream sports to analyze any sports activity and design adaptations needed for targets or goals, boundaries, and rules to enable individuals with visual impairments to participate. Suggestions for modifying baseball, table tennis, swim racing, wrestling,…

  11. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  12. Selection of thrombolytic therapy for individual patients: development of a clinical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Califf (Robert); L.H. Woodlief (Lynn); F.E. Harrell (Frank); K.L. Lee (Kerry); H.D. White (Harvey); A.D. Guerci (Alan); G.I. Barbash; R.J. Simes (John); W.D. Weaver; M.L. Simoons (Maarten); E.J. Topol (Eric)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a logistic regression model with data from the GUSTO-I trial to predict mortality rate differences in individual patients who received accelerated tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) versus streptokinase treatment for acute myocardial infarction. A nomogram was developed from

  13. Modelling collective foraging by means of individual behaviour rules in honey-bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H; Biesmeijer, JC

    1998-01-01

    An individual-oriented model is constructed which simulates the collective foraging behaviour of a colony of honey-bees, Apis mellifera. Each bee follows the same set of behavioural rules. Each rule consists of a set of conditions followed by the behavioural act to be performed if the conditions are

  14. Using ROC curves to compare neural networks and logistic regression for modeling individual noncatastrophic tree mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan L. King

    2003-01-01

    The performance of two classifiers, logistic regression and neural networks, are compared for modeling noncatastrophic individual tree mortality for 21 species of trees in West Virginia. The output of the classifier is usually a continuous number between 0 and 1. A threshold is selected between 0 and 1 and all of the trees below the threshold are classified as...

  15. Assessing risk prediction models using individual participant data from multiple studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Jespersen, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    -reactive protein and conventional risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, a collation of individual data from multiple prospective studies with an average follow-up duration of 9.8 years (dates varied). We derive risk prediction models using Cox proportional hazards...

  16. Personality Predicts Individual Variation in Fear Learning : A Multilevel Growth Modeling Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Femke J.; Kamphuis, Jan H.; Eigenhuis, Annemarie; Huizenga, Hilde M H; Soeter, Marieke; Bos, Marieke G N; Sevenster, Dieuwke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375491104; Kindt, Merel

    2015-01-01

    Although fear-learning research has tended to focus on typical responses, there is substantial individual variation in response to threat. Here, we investigated how personality is related to variability in associative fear learning. We used multilevel growth curve modeling to examine the unique and

  17. Personality predicts individual variation in fear learning: a multilevel growth modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, F.J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Eigenhuis, A.; Huizenga, H.M.; Soeter, M.; Bos, M.G.N.; Sevenster, D.; Kindt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Although fear-learning research has tended to focus on typical responses, there is substantial individual variation in response to threat. Here, we investigated how personality is related to variability in associative fear learning. We used multilevel growth curve modeling to examine the unique and

  18. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  19. Crowd of individuals walking in opposite directions. A toy model to study the segregation of the group into lanes of individuals moving in the same direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsztein, Guillermo H.

    2017-08-01

    Consider a corridor, street or bridge crowded with pedestrians walking in both directions. The individuals do not walk in a completely straight line. They adjust their path to avoid colliding with incoming pedestrians. As a result of these adjustments, the whole group sometimes end up split into lanes of individuals moving in the same direction. While this formation of lanes facilitates the flow and benefits the whole group, it is believed that results from the actions of the individuals acting only on their behalf, without considering others. This phenomenon is an example of self-organization. We analyze a simple model. We assume that individuals move around a two-lane circular track. All of them at the same speed. Half of them in one direction and the rest in the opposite direction. Each time two individuals collide, one of them moves to the other lane. The individual changing lanes is selected randomly. The system self-organizes. Eventually each lane is occupied with individuals moving in only one direction. We show that the time required for the system to self-organize is bounded by a linear function on the number of individuals. This toy model provides an example where global self-organization occurs even though each member of the group acts without considering the rest.

  20. Supported Employment in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Borja, F.; de Urries, Jordan; Bellver, Fernando; Martinez, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    Supported employment is growing in Spain, assisted by models from other countries and national legislation. The Spanish Association of Supported Employment is providing a framework for program development. The field must deal with the lack of systematic evaluation and with funding problems. (SK)

  1. Investor Sentiment and Employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Montone (Maurizio); R.C.J. Zwinkels (Remco)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We find that investor sentiment should affect a firm's employment policy in a world with moral hazard and noise traders. Consistent with the model's predictions, we show that higher sentiment among US investors leads to: (1) higher employment growth worldwide; (2) lower

  2. Maine's Employability Skills Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, John M.; Wolffe, Karen E.; Wolfe, Judy; Brooker, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    This Practice Report describes the development and implementation of the "Maine Employability Skills Program," a model employment program developed by the Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DBVI). The program was designed to support the efforts of the chronically unemployed or underemployed. These consumers were either…

  3. A global model of stress in parents of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Pozo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research sought to analyse stress among mothers and fathers of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD to determine the relevant variables for its explanation and the possible gender differences. To examine parents' stress, we propose a multidimensional model based on the Double ABCX theoretical model. We argue that the result of stress depends on the following four interrelated factors: the characteristics of the individual with ASD (the severity of the disorder and behaviour problems, the social supports, the parents' perception of the situation (evaluated by sense of coherence and the coping strategies. Fiftynine sets of parents (59 mothers and 59 fathers of individuals diagnosed with ASD participated in the study. The data were analysed using a path analysis through the LISREL 8.80 program. We obtained two empirical models of stress: one model for mothers and one for fathers. In both models, the severity of the disorder and the behaviour problems had a direct and positive effect on stress. The sense of coherence (SOC and active avoidance coping strategies had a mediating role in models. Social support was relevant only for mothers. Finally, the results offer some guidelines for professionals working with families.

  4. Navigating the flow: individual and continuum models for homing in flowing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Kevin J; Hillen, Thomas

    2015-11-06

    Navigation for aquatic and airborne species often takes place in the face of complicated flows, from persistent currents to highly unpredictable storms. Hydrodynamic models are capable of simulating flow dynamics and provide the impetus for much individual-based modelling, in which particle-sized individuals are immersed into a flowing medium. These models yield insights on the impact of currents on population distributions from fish eggs to large organisms, yet their computational demands and intractability reduce their capacity to generate the broader, less parameter-specific, insights allowed by traditional continuous approaches. In this paper, we formulate an individual-based model for navigation within a flowing field and apply scaling to derive its corresponding macroscopic and continuous model. We apply it to various movement classes, from drifters that simply go with the flow to navigators that respond to environmental orienteering cues. The utility of the model is demonstrated via its application to 'homing' problems and, in particular, the navigation of the marine green turtle Chelonia mydas to Ascension Island.

  5. Adjudicating between face-coding models with individual-face fMRI responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan D Carlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The perceptual representation of individual faces is often explained with reference to a norm-based face space. In such spaces, individuals are encoded as vectors where identity is primarily conveyed by direction and distinctiveness by eccentricity. Here we measured human fMRI responses and psychophysical similarity judgments of individual face exemplars, which were generated as realistic 3D animations using a computer-graphics model. We developed and evaluated multiple neurobiologically plausible computational models, each of which predicts a representational distance matrix and a regional-mean activation profile for 24 face stimuli. In the fusiform face area, a face-space coding model with sigmoidal ramp tuning provided a better account of the data than one based on exemplar tuning. However, an image-processing model with weighted banks of Gabor filters performed similarly. Accounting for the data required the inclusion of a measurement-level population averaging mechanism that approximates how fMRI voxels locally average distinct neuronal tunings. Our study demonstrates the importance of comparing multiple models and of modeling the measurement process in computational neuroimaging.

  6. Altered vocal fold kinematics in synthetic self-oscillating models that employ adipose tissue as a lateral boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Hiba; Erath, Byron D.

    2015-11-01

    The vocal folds play a major role in human communication by initiating voiced sound production. During voiced speech, the vocal folds are set into sustained vibrations. Synthetic self-oscillating vocal fold models are regularly employed to gain insight into flow-structure interactions governing the phonation process. Commonly, a fixed boundary condition is applied to the lateral, anterior, and posterior sides of the synthetic vocal fold models. However, physiological observations reveal the presence of adipose tissue on the lateral surface between the thyroid cartilage and the vocal folds. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of including this substrate layer of adipose tissue on the dynamics of phonation. For a more realistic representation of the human vocal folds, synthetic multi-layer vocal fold models have been fabricated and tested while including a soft lateral layer representative of adipose tissue. Phonation parameters have been collected and are compared to those of the standard vocal fold models. Results show that vocal fold kinematics are affected by adding the adipose tissue layer as a new boundary condition.

  7. Modeling individual subtests of the WAIS IV with multiple latent factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J McFarland

    Full Text Available Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-fourth edition (WAIS-IV subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple.

  8. Modeling individual subtests of the WAIS IV with multiple latent factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple.

  9. Employment protection legislation in Croatia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunovac, Marina

    2014-01-01

    ... the observed period, primarily as concerns individual dismissal in the cases of regular employment contracts, while in the case of temporary employment the protection strengthened slightly. On the other hand, despite the adoption of amendments to the Labour Act (LA), Croatian labour legislation governing employment protection for regular employme...

  10. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully

  11. Experimental studies on model reference adaptive control with integral action employing a rotary encoder and tachometer sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Shu-Nan; Bai, Yu-Guang; Liu, Lei

    2013-04-10

    In this paper, an adaptive law with an integral action is designed and implemented on a DC motor by employing a rotary encoder and tachometer sensors. The stability is proved by using the Lyapunov function. The tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero according to the Barbalat lemma. The tracking performance is specified by a reference model, the convergence rate of Lyapunov function is specified by the matrix Q and the control action and the state weighting are restricted by the matrix Γ. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control. The maximum errors of the position and velocity with the integral action are reduced from 0.4 V and 1.5 V to 0.2 V and 0.4 V, respectively. The adaptive control with the integral action gives satisfactory performance, even when it suffers from input disturbance.

  12. Development and validation of an individual based Daphnia magna population model: The influence of crowding on population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preuss, T.G.; Hammers-Wirtz, M.; Hommen, U.; Rubach, M.N.; Ratte, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    An individual-based model was developed to predict the population dynamics of Daphnia magna at laboratory conditions from individual life-history traits observed in experiments with different feeding conditions. Within the model, each daphnid passes its individual life cycle including feeding on alg

  13. Modelling Diverse Soil Attributes with Visible to Longwave Infrared Spectroscopy Using PLSR Employed by an Automatic Modelling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Kopačková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study tested a data mining engine (PARACUDA® to predict various soil attributes (BC, CEC, BS, pH, Corg, Pb, Hg, As, Zn and Cu using reflectance data acquired for both optical and thermal infrared regions. The engine was designed to utilize large data in parallel and automatic processing to build and process hundreds of diverse models in a unified manner while avoiding bias and deviations caused by the operator(s. The system is able to systematically assess the effect of diverse preprocessing techniques; additionally, it analyses other parameters, such as different spectral resolutions and spectral coverages that affect soil properties. Accordingly, the system was used to extract models across both optical and thermal infrared spectral regions, which holds significant chromophores. In total, 2880 models were evaluated where each model was generated with a different preprocessing scheme of the input spectral data. The models were assessed using statistical parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2, square error of prediction (SEP, relative percentage difference (RPD and by physical explanation (spectral assignments. It was found that the smoothing procedure is the most beneficial preprocessing stage, especially when combined with spectral derivation (1st or 2nd derivatives. Automatically and without the need of an operator, the data mining engine enabled the best prediction models to be found from all the combinations tested. Furthermore, the data mining approach used in this study and its processing scheme proved to be efficient tools for getting a better understanding of the geochemical properties of the samples studied (e.g., mineral associations.

  14. Illegal employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Mervartová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007 Labour Code contains the definition of dependent work, which can be carried out only in labour-law relations. The Amendment to Labour Code from 2012 makes the definition more precise, when it stipulates essential elements of dependent work and designates the others as conditions, under which dependent work should be carried out. The Amendment to Employment Act changes the definition of illegal work. Illegal work is a performance of dependent work by natural person except for labour-law relation, or if natural person – foreigner carries out work in conflict with issued permission to employment or without this permission. Since 2012 sanctions for illegal work were increased. Labour inspection is entitled to impose sanctions, in case of foreigners it is Customs Office. For control purposes employer is obliged to have copies of documents at the workplace proving the existence of labour-law relation. Goal of controls and high fines is to limit illegal employment of citizens of Czech Republic and foreigners as well. Illegal work has unfavourable economic impact on state budget. It comes to extensive tax evasions and also to evasions within health insurance and social security. If a concluded commercial-law relation meets the attributes of dependent work, then it stands for a concealed legal relationship. Tax Office can subsequently assess an income tax to businessman. Labour-law relationship enjoys a higher legal protection than commercial-law relationship; nonetheless it is not suitable to limit liberty of contract in cases when it is not unambiguously a dependent activity.

  15. An individual-based growth and competition model for coastal redwood forest restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Das, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Thinning treatments to accelerate coastal redwood forest stand development are in wide application, but managers have yet to identify prescriptions that might best promote Sequoia sempervirens (Lamb. ex D. Don) Endl. (redwood) growth. The creation of successful thinning prescriptions would be aided by identifying the underlying mechanisms governing how individual tree growth responds to competitive environments in coastal redwood forests. We created a spatially explicit individual-based model of tree competition and growth parameterized using surveys of upland redwood forests at Redwood National Park, California. We modeled competition for overstory trees (stems ≥ 20 cm stem diameter at breast height, 1.37 m (dbh)) as growth reductions arising from sizes, distances, and species identity of competitor trees. Our model explained up to half of the variation in individual tree growth, suggesting that neighborhood crowding is an important determinant of growth in this forest type. We used our model to simulate the effects of novel thinning prescriptions (e.g., 40% stand basal area removal) for redwood forest restoration, concluding that these treatments could lead to substantial growth releases, particularly for S. sempervirens. The results of this study, along with continued improvements to our model, will help to determine spacing and species composition that best encourage growth.

  16. Daphnias: from the individual based model to the large population equation

    CERN Document Server

    Metz, J A J

    2012-01-01

    The class of deterministic 'Daphnia' models treated by Diekmann et al. (J Math Biol 61: 277-318, 2010) has a long history going back to Nisbet and Gurney (Theor Pop Biol 23: 114-135, 1983) and Diekmann et al. (Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde 4: 82-109, 1984). In this note, we formulate the individual based models (IBM) supposedly underlying those deterministic models. The models treat the interaction between a general size-structured consumer population ('Daphnia') and an unstructured resource ('algae'). The discrete, size and age-structured Daphnia population changes through births and deaths of its individuals and throught their aging and growth. The birth and death rates depend on the sizes of the individuals and on the concentration of the algae. The latter is supposed to be a continuous variable with a deterministic dynamics that depends on the Daphnia population. In this model setting we prove that when the Daphnia population is large, the stochastic differential equation describing the IBM can be approxima...

  17. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeço, C T; Luz, P M

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc.), human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc.), as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  18. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codeço Cláudia Torres

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc., human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc., as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  19. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Torres Codeço

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc., human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc., as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  20. Emergence of social cohesion in a model society of greedy, mobile individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Carlos P; Helbing, Dirk

    2011-07-12

    Human wellbeing in modern societies relies on social cohesion, which can be characterized by high levels of cooperation and a large number of social ties. Both features, however, are frequently challenged by individual self-interest. In fact, the stability of social and economic systems can suddenly break down as the recent financial crisis and outbreaks of civil wars illustrate. To understand the conditions for the emergence and robustness of social cohesion, we simulate the creation of public goods among mobile agents, assuming that behavioral changes are determined by individual satisfaction. Specifically, we study a generalized win-stay-lose-shift learning model, which is only based on previous experience and rules out greenbeard effects that would allow individuals to guess future gains. The most noteworthy aspect of this model is that it promotes cooperation in social dilemma situations despite very low information requirements and without assuming imitation, a shadow of the future, reputation effects, signaling, or punishment. We find that moderate greediness favors social cohesion by a coevolution between cooperation and spatial organization, additionally showing that those cooperation-enforcing levels of greediness can be evolutionarily selected. However, a maladaptive trend of increasing greediness, although enhancing individuals' returns in the beginning, eventually causes cooperation and social relationships to fall apart. Our model is, therefore, expected to shed light on the long-standing problem of the emergence and stability of cooperative behavior.

  1. Controlling chaos in ecology: from deterministic to individual-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, R V; Gamarra, J G; Ginovart, M; López, D

    1999-11-01

    The possibility of chaos control in biological systems has been stimulated by recent advances in the study of heart and brain tissue dynamics. More recently, some authors have conjectured that such a method might be applied to population dynamics and even play a nontrivial evolutionary role in ecology. In this paper we explore this idea by means of both mathematical and individual-based simulation models. Because of the intrinsic noise linked to individual behavior, controlling a noisy system becomes more difficult but, as shown here, it is a feasible task allowed to be experimentally tested.

  2. Predictors of employment after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Amandeep; Zaghla, Hassan; Adkins, Rodney; Ramji, Alnoor; Lewis, Susan; Moser, Jennifer; Sher, Linda S; Fong, Tse-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Employment after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) indicates recipients' physical/psychosocial adjustment. Our aim was to determine clinical, socioeconomic and health-related quality of life parameters influencing employment after OLT. Questionnaire on demographics, medical conditions, alcohol and drug use before/after OLT, and a validated 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) were mailed to 126 adult OLT patients. Stepwise logistic regression was conducted to identify best predictors of post-OLT employment. Among non-retirees, 49% were employed after OLT. The predictors of employment were: employment status, income, disability status before OLT and Model of End Stage Liver Disease score. These variables had prediction rate of 82%. Individuals working during the five yr prior to OLT were likely to return to work (p6 months prior to OLT (p$80 000 before OLT compared with or=6 months prior to OLT, were less likely to work (p=0.0005). Severity/duration of liver dysfunction prior to OLT did not correlate with employment. Sense of physical health was poorer in those employed after OLT than in unemployed (p=0.0003). Socioeconomic factors were the most important predictors of post-OLT employment.

  3. Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts with public activity and individual reachability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts is vital both for understanding the spread of airborne pathogens and word-of-mouth spreading of information. Although many efforts have been devoted to model these temporal networks, there are still two important social features, public activity and individual reachability, have been ignored in these models. Here we present a simple model that captures these two features and other typical properties of empirical face-to-face contact networks. The model describes agents which are characterized by an attractiveness to slow down the motion of nearby people, have event-triggered active probability and perform an activity-dependent biased random walk in a square box with periodic boundary. The model quantitatively reproduces two empirical temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts which are testified by their network properties and the epidemic spread dynamics on them.

  4. Individuality of breathing patterns in patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation evidenced by chaotic global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Christophe; Rodrigues, Giovani G.; Muir, Jean-François; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2013-03-01

    Autonomous global models based on radial basis functions were obtained from data measured from patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Some of these models, which are discussed in the paper, turn out to have chaotic or quasi-periodic solutions, thus providing a first piece of evidence that the underlying dynamics of the data used to estimate the global models are likely to be chaotic or, at least, have a chaotic component. It is explicitly shown that one of such global models produces attractors characterized by a Horseshoe map, two models produce toroidal chaos, and one model produces a quasi-periodic regime. These topologically inequivalent attractors evidence the individuality of breathing profiles observed in patient under noninvasive ventilation.

  5. An individual-based model of Zebrafish population dynamics accounting for energy dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudouin, Remy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model......, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can...

  6. Who will have Sustainable Employment After a Back Injury? The Development of a Clinical Prediction Model in a Cohort of Injured Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Heather M; Côté, Pierre; Boyle, Eleanor; Hayden, Jill A; Frank, John; Johnson, William G

    2016-11-02

    Purpose Our objective was to develop a clinical prediction model to identify workers with sustainable employment following an episode of work-related low back pain (LBP). Methods We used data from a cohort study of injured workers with incident LBP claims in the USA to predict employment patterns 1 and 6 months following a workers' compensation claim. We developed three sequential models to determine the contribution of three domains of variables: (1) basic demographic/clinical variables; (2) health-related variables; and (3) work-related factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop the predictive models. We constructed receiver operator curves and used the c-index to measure predictive accuracy. Results Seventy-nine percent and 77 % of workers had sustainable employment at 1 and 6 months, respectively. Sustainable employment at 1 month was predicted by initial back pain intensity, mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type (c-index = 0.77). At 6 months, sustainable employment was predicted by physical and mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type (c-index = 0.77). Adding health-related and work-related variables to models improved predictive accuracy by 8.5 and 10 % at 1 and 6 months respectively. Conclusion We developed clinically-relevant models to predict sustainable employment in injured workers who made a workers' compensation claim for LBP. Inquiring about back pain intensity, physical and mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type may be beneficial in developing programs of care. Our models need to be validated in other populations.

  7. Deficiency of employability capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelse I.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Young unemployed people have comprised one of the significantly largest groups of the unemployed people in Latvia in recent years. One of the reasons why young people have difficulty integrating into the labour market is the “expectation gap” that exists in the relations between employers and the new generation of workers. Employers focus on capacity-building for employability such individual factors as strength, patience, self-discipline, self-reliance, self-motivation, etc., which having a nature of habit and are developed in a long-term work socialization process, which begins even before the formal education and will continue throughout the life cycle. However, when the socialization is lost, these habits are depreciated faster than they can be restored. Currently a new generation is entering the labour market, which is missing the succession of work socialization. Factors, such as rising unemployment and poverty in the background over the past twenty years in Latvia have created a very unfavourable employability background of “personal circumstances” and “external factors”, which seriously have impaired formation of the skills and attitudes in a real work environment. The study reveals another paradox – the paradox of poverty. Common sense would want to argue that poverty can be overcome by the job. However, the real state of affairs shows that unfavourable coincidence of the individual, personal circumstances and external factors leads to deficit of employability capacity and possibility of marked social and employment deprivation.

  8. [Individualized three-dimensional finite element model of facial soft tissue and preliminary application in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Xu, Tian-min; Lou, Hang-di; Rong, Qi-guo

    2012-12-01

    To get individualized facial three-dimensional finite element (FE) model from transformation of a generic one to assist orthodontic analysis and prediction of treatment-related morphological change of facial soft tissue. A generic three-dimensional FE model of craniofacial soft and hard tissue was constructed based on a volunteer's spiral CT data. Seven pairs of main peri-oral muscles were constructed based on a combination of CT image and anatomical method. Individualized model could be obtained through transformation of the generic model based on selection of corresponding anatomical landmarks and radial basis functions (RBF) method. Validation was analyzed through superimposition of the transformed model and cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction data. Pre- and post-treatment CBCT data of two patients were collected, which were superimposed to gain the amount of anterior teeth retraction and anterior alveolar surface remodeling that could be used as boundary condition. Different values of Poisson ratio ν and Young's modulus E were tested during simulation. Average deviation was 0.47 mm and 0.75 mm in the soft and hard tissue respectively. It could be decreased to a range of +0.29 mm and -0.21 mm after a second transformation at the lip-mouth region. The best correspondence between simulation and post-treatment result was found with elastic properties of soft tissues defined as follows. Poisson ratio ν for skin, muscle and fat being set as 0.45 while Young's modulus being set as 90.0 kPa, 6.2 kPa and 2.0 kPa respectively. Individualized three-dimensional facial FE model could be obtained through mathematical model transformation. With boundary condition defined according to treatment plan such FE model could be used to analyze the effect of orthodontic treatment on facial soft tissue.

  9. An individual-based model of the krill Euphausia pacifica in the California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey G.; Sydeman, William J.; Bograd, Steven J.; Powell, Thomas M.

    2015-11-01

    Euphausia pacifica is an abundant and important prey resource for numerous predators of the California Current and elsewhere in the North Pacific. We developed an individual-based model (IBM) for E. pacifica to study its bioenergetics (growth, stage development, reproduction, and mortality) under constant/ideal conditions as well as under varying ocean conditions and food resources. To model E. pacifica under varying conditions, we coupled the IBM to an oceanographic-ecosystem model over the period 2000-2008 (9 years). Model results under constant/ideal food conditions compare favorably with experimental studies conducted under food unlimited conditions. Under more realistic variable oceanographic conditions, mean growth rates over the continental shelf were positive only when individuals migrated diurnally to the depth of maximum phytoplankton layer during nighttime feeding. Our model only used phytoplankton as prey and coastal growth rates were lower than expected (0.01 mm d-1), suggesting that a diverse prey base (zooplankton, protists, marine snow) may be required to facilitate growth and survival of modeled E. pacifica in the coastal environment. This coupled IBM-ROMS modeling framework and its parameters provides a tool for understanding the biology and ecology of E. pacifica and could be developed to further the understanding of climatic effects on this key prey species and enhance an ecosystem approach to fisheries and wildlife management in this region.

  10. Learning Disabilities and Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Paul J., Ed.; Brown, Dale S., Ed.

    This book provides information on preparing individuals with learning disabilities for the challenges of employment and outlines the rights of those with learning disabilities in the workplace. Introductory chapters in Part 1 include: "Life after School: Challenges in the Workplace" (Paul J. Gerber); "The New Economy in the 21st…

  11. An individual reproduction model sensitive to milk yield and body condition in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun-Lafleur, L; Cutullic, E; Faverdin, P; Delaby, L; Disenhaus, C

    2013-08-01

    To simulate the consequences of management in dairy herds, the use of individual-based herd models is very useful and has become common. Reproduction is a key driver of milk production and herd dynamics, whose influence has been magnified by the decrease in reproductive performance over the last decades. Moreover, feeding management influences milk yield (MY) and body reserves, which in turn influence reproductive performance. Therefore, our objective was to build an up-to-date animal reproduction model sensitive to both MY and body condition score (BCS). A dynamic and stochastic individual reproduction model was built mainly from data of a single recent long-term experiment. This model covers the whole reproductive process and is composed of a succession of discrete stochastic events, mainly calving, ovulations, conception and embryonic loss. Each reproductive step is sensitive to MY or BCS levels or changes. The model takes into account recent evolutions of reproductive performance, particularly concerning calving-to-first ovulation interval, cyclicity (normal cycle length, prevalence of prolonged luteal phase), oestrus expression and pregnancy (conception, early and late embryonic loss). A sensitivity analysis of the model to MY and BCS at calving was performed. The simulated performance was compared with observed data from the database used to build the model and from the bibliography to validate the model. Despite comprising a whole series of reproductive steps, the model made it possible to simulate realistic global reproduction outputs. It was able to well simulate the overall reproductive performance observed in farms in terms of both success rate (recalving rate) and reproduction delays (calving interval). This model has the purpose to be integrated in herd simulation models to usefully test the impact of management strategies on herd reproductive performance, and thus on calving patterns and culling rates.

  12. Electric Field Model of Transcranial Electric Stimulation in Nonhuman Primates: Correspondence to Individual Motor Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-09-01

    To develop a pipeline for realistic head models of nonhuman primates (NHPs) for simulations of noninvasive brain stimulation, and use these models together with empirical threshold measurements to demonstrate that the models capture individual anatomical variability. Based on structural MRI data, we created models of the electric field (E-field) induced by right unilateral (RUL) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in four rhesus macaques. Individual motor threshold (MT) was measured with transcranial electric stimulation (TES) administered through the RUL electrodes in the same subjects. The interindividual anatomical differences resulted in 57% variation in median E-field strength in the brain at fixed stimulus current amplitude. Individualization of the stimulus current by MT reduced the E-field variation in the target motor area by 27%. There was significant correlation between the measured MT and the ratio of simulated electrode current and E-field strength (r(2) = 0.95, p = 0.026). Exploratory analysis revealed significant correlations of this ratio with anatomical parameters including of the superior electrode-to-cortex distance, vertex-to-cortex distance, and brain volume (r(2) > 0.96, p stimulation interventions, help link the results to clinical studies, and ultimately lead to more rational brain stimulation dosing paradigms.

  13. A multi-stage compartmental model for HIV-infected individuals: I--waiting time approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, L; Dayananda, P W A

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, epidemic processes have focused on establishing systems of differential-difference equations governing the number of individuals at each stage of the epidemic. Except for simple situations such as when transition rates are linear, these equations are notoriously intractable mathematically. In this work, the process is described as a compartmental model. The model also allows for individuals to go directly from any prior compartment directly to a final stage corresponding to death. This allows for the possibility that individuals can die earlier due to some non-disease related cause. Then, the model is based on waiting times in each compartment. Survival probabilities of moving from a given compartment to another compartment are established. While our approach can be used for general epidemic processes, our framework is for the HIV/AIDS process. It is then possible to establish the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic process on, e.g., insurance premiums and payouts and health-care costs. The effect of changing model parameter values on these entities is investigated.

  14. PHYSICAL OBJECT-ORIENTED MODELING IN DEVELOPMENT OF INDIVIDUALIZED TEACHING AND ORGANIZATION OF MINI-RESEARCH IN MECHANICS COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Chirtsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper presents a relatively simple method to develop interactive computer models of physical systems without computer programming skills or automatic generation of the numerical computer code for the complex physical systems. Developed computer models are available over the Internet for educational purposes and can be edited by users in an unlimited number of possibilities. An applicability of computer simulations for the massive open individualized teaching and an organization of undergraduate research are also discussed. Method. The presented approach employs an original physical object-oriented modeling method, which is an extension of object-oriented programming ideas to tasks of developing simulations of the complex physical systems. In this framework, a computer model of the physical system is constructed as a set of interconnected computer objects simulating the system components: particles and fields. Interactions between the system components are described by self-adapting algorithms that are specified during the model initiation stage and are set according to either the classical or relativistic approach. The utilized technique requires neither a priori knowledge regarding an evolution of the physical system nor a formulation of differential equations describing the physical system. Main Results. Testing of the numerical implementation and an accuracy of the algorithms was performed with the use of benchmarks with the known analytical solutions. The developed method - a physical reality constructor - has provided an opportunity to assemble a series of computer models to demonstrate physical phenomena studied in the high school and university mechanic courses. More than 150 original interactive models were included into the collections of multi-level multimedia resources to support teaching of the mechanics. The physical reality constructor was successfully tested to serve as a test bed for the independent

  15. An equation-free computational approach for extracting population-level behavior from individual-based models of biological dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, R; Othmer, H G; Erban, Radek; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of many organisms can be described as a random walk at either or both the individual and population level. The rules for this random walk are based on complex biological processes and it may be difficult to develop a tractable, quantitatively-accurate, individual-level model. However, important problems in areas ranging from ecology to medicine involve large collections of individuals, and a further intellectual challenge is to model population-level behavior based on a detailed individual-level model. Because of the large number of interacting individuals and because the individual-level model is complex, classical direct Monte Carlo simulations can be very slow, and often of little practical use. In this case, an equation-free approach may provide effective methods for the analysis and simulation of individual-based models. In this paper we analyze equation-free coarse projective integration. For analytical purposes, we start with known partial differential equations describing biological rando...

  16. Conceptual models for Mental Distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: A contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Mary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental distress is common in primary care and overrepresented among Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals, but access to effective treatment is limited, particularly in developing countries. Explanatory models (EM are contextualised explanations of illnesses and treatments framed within a given society and are important in understanding an individual's perspective on the illness. Although individual variations are important in determining help-seeking and treatment behaviour patterns, the ability to cope with an illness and quality of life, the role of explanatory models in shaping treatment preferences is undervalued. The aim was to identify explanatory models employed by HIV-infected and uninfected individuals and to compare them with those employed by local health care providers. Furthermore, we aimed to build a theoretical model linking the perception of mental distress to treatment preferences and coping mechanisms. Methods Qualitative investigation nested in a cross-sectional validation study of 28 (male and female attendees at four primary care clinics in Lusaka, Zambia, between December 2008 and May 2009. Consecutive clinic attendees were sampled on random days and conceptual models of mental distress were examined, using semi-structured interviews, in order to develop a taxonomic model in which each category was associated with a unique pattern of symptoms, treatment preferences and coping strategies. Results Mental distress was expressed primarily as somatic complaints including headaches, perturbed sleep and autonomic symptoms. Economic difficulties and interpersonal relationship problems were the most common causal models among uninfected individuals. Newly diagnosed HIV patients presented with a high degree of hopelessness and did not value seeking help for their symptoms. Patients not receiving anti-retroviral drugs (ARV questioned their effectiveness and were equivocal about seeking help

  17. Conceptual models for mental distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: a contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipimo, Peter J; Tuba, Mary; Fylkesnes, Knut

    2011-01-10

    Mental distress is common in primary care and overrepresented among Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, but access to effective treatment is limited, particularly in developing countries. Explanatory models (EM) are contextualised explanations of illnesses and treatments framed within a given society and are important in understanding an individual's perspective on the illness. Although individual variations are important in determining help-seeking and treatment behaviour patterns, the ability to cope with an illness and quality of life, the role of explanatory models in shaping treatment preferences is undervalued. The aim was to identify explanatory models employed by HIV-infected and uninfected individuals and to compare them with those employed by local health care providers. Furthermore, we aimed to build a theoretical model linking the perception of mental distress to treatment preferences and coping mechanisms. Qualitative investigation nested in a cross-sectional validation study of 28 (male and female) attendees at four primary care clinics in Lusaka, Zambia, between December 2008 and May 2009. Consecutive clinic attendees were sampled on random days and conceptual models of mental distress were examined, using semi-structured interviews, in order to develop a taxonomic model in which each category was associated with a unique pattern of symptoms, treatment preferences and coping strategies. Mental distress was expressed primarily as somatic complaints including headaches, perturbed sleep and autonomic symptoms. Economic difficulties and interpersonal relationship problems were the most common causal models among uninfected individuals. Newly diagnosed HIV patients presented with a high degree of hopelessness and did not value seeking help for their symptoms. Patients not receiving anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) questioned their effectiveness and were equivocal about seeking help. Individuals receiving ARV were best adjusted to their

  18. The individual tolerance concept is not the sole explanation for the probit dose-effect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    2000-02-01

    Predominant methods for analyzing dose- or concentration-effect data (i.e., probit analysis) are based on the concept of individual tolerance or individual effective dose (IED, the smallest characteristic dose needed to kill an individual). An alternative explanation (stochasticity hypothesis) is that individuals do not have unique tolerances: death results from stochastic processes occurring similarly in all individuals. These opposing hypotheses were tested with two types of experiments. First, time to stupefaction (TTS) was measured for zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) exposed to benzocaine. The same 40 fish were exposed during five trials to test if the same order for TTS was maintained among trials. The IED hypothesis was supported with a minor stochastic component being present. Second, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) were exposed to sublethal or lethal NaCl concentrations until a large portion of the lethally exposed fish died. After sufficient time for recovery, fish sublethally exposed and fish surviving lethal exposure were exposed simultaneously to lethal NaCl concentrations. No statistically significant effect was found of previous exposure on survival time but a large stochastic component to the survival dynamics was obvious. Repetition of this second type of test with pentachlorophenol also provided no support for the IED hypothesis. The authors conclude that neither hypothesis alone was the sole or dominant explanation for the lognormal (probit) model. Determination of the correct explanation (IED or stochastic) or the relative contributions of each is crucial to predicting consequences to populations after repeated or chronic exposures to any particular toxicant.

  19. Speciation rates decline through time in individual-based models of speciation and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Anping; Fang, Jingyun; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-09-01

    A well-documented pattern in the fossil record is a long-term decline in the origination rate of new taxa after diversity rebounds from a mass extinction. The mechanisms for this pattern remain elusive. In this article, we investigate the macroevolutionary predictions of an individual-based birth-death model (BDI model) where speciation and extinction rates emerge from population dynamics. We start with the simplest neutral model in which every individual has the same per capita rates of birth, death, and speciation. Although the prediction of the simplest neutral model agrees qualitatively with the fossil pattern, the predicted decline in per-species speciation rates is too fast to explain the long-term trend in fossil data. We thus consider models with variation among species in per capita rates of speciation and a suite of alternative assumptions about the heritability of speciation rate. The results show that interspecific variation in per capita speciation rate can induce differences among species in their ability to resist extinction because a low speciation rate confers a small but important demographic advantage. As a consequence, the model predicts an appropriately slow temporal decline in speciation rates, which provides a mechanistic explanation for the fossil pattern.

  20. Individual-based model of yellow perch and walleye populations in Oneida Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Rutherford, E.S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Inst. for Fisheries Research; McDermot, D.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Forney, J.L.; Mills, E.L. [Cornell Univ. Biological Station, Bridgeport, NY (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Predator-prey dynamics and density dependence are fundamental issues in ecology. The authors use a detailed, individual-based model of walleye and yellow perch to investigate the effects of alternative prey and compensatory responses on predator and prey population dynamics. The analyses focus on the numerical and developmental responses of the predator, rather than the traditional emphasis on functional responses. The extensive database for Oneida Lake, New York, USA was used to configure the model and ensure its realism. The model follows the daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals of each species through their lifetime. Three ecologically distinct periods in the history of Oneida Lake were simulated: baseline, high mayfly densities, and high forage fish densities. Mayflies and forage fish act as alternative prey for walleye. For model corroboration, the three periods were simulated sequentially as they occurred in Oneida Lake. Model predictions of abundances, size at age, and growth and survival rates compared favorably with Oneida Lake data. Three hypotheses suggested by the data were evaluated: alternative prey stabilizes yellow perch and walleye populations; alternative prey increases yellow perch and walleye recruitment; and density-dependent growth and survival compensate for changes in young-of-the-year mortality. Model simulations were performed under increased mayfly densities, increased forage fish densities, and increased egg mortality rates.

  1. Soldiers’ employment attitude and employability: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nowadays it is very difficult for Chinese retired soldiers to find proper jobs, and the primary reason is the significant gap between job requirements and soldiers owned job skills. Therefore, it is very important to improve the soldiers’ job skills and enhance their understanding of employment.Design/methodology/approach: This paper expands the study scope from the soldiers’ job skills to the employability, initiatively introduces the employment attitude which has obvious impact on the employment of soldiers, and analyses the influence that employment attitude can play on employability. At last, this paper develops statistical method to find the relationship between soldiers’ employment attitude and employability.Findings: The empirical analysis shows that soldiers’ employment attitude has the positive linkage with employability, which makes the employment attitude a measurable variable for the employability rather than an absolute standard.Research limitations/implications: According to the research purpose, more variables should be considered in the model, consequently, there are only three indicators to describe solders’ employment attitude and four indicators to describe solders’ employability.Originality/value: This paper takes research on soldiers’ employability in a new perspective. The soldiers’ employment attitude is served as the entry point, showing the influence that soldiers’ employment attitude has on employability.

  2. Modelling the effects of environmental and individual variability when measuring the costs of first reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbraud, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available How do animals balance their investment in young against their own chances to survive and reproduce in the future? This life–history trade–off, referred to as the cost of reproduction (Williams, 1966, holds a central place in life–history theory (Roff, 1992; Stearns, 1992; McNamara & Houston, 1996. Because individuals can only acquire a limited amount of energy, reproduction and survival as well as current and future reproduction are considered as functions competing for the same resources. In this framework, individuals may optimise life–history decisions. If the reproductive effort in one year leads to a loss in future reproductive output through decreased adult survival or reduced fecundity, then the optimal effort in the current season is less than the effort that would maximize the number of offspring produced in that season (Charnov & Krebs, 1974. There are at least two kinds of factors likely to confound the measurement of the costs of reproduction in the wild. First, there could be differences in the amount of energy individuals acquire and allocate to various functions. This phenotypic heterogeneity can mask or exacerbate individual allocation patterns when trends are averaged across a population (Vaupel & Yashin, 1985; McDonald et al., 1996; Cam & Monnat, 2000. Second, there could be variations in resource availability affecting energy acquisition and allocation. Theoretical models examining the optimal phenotypic balance between reproduction and survival under variable breeding conditions have investigated the influence of environmental stochasticity on the cost of reproduction in birds (Erikstad et al., 1998; Orzack & Tuljapurkar, 2001. However, there is little empirical evidence supporting these theoretical models. Here, we present analysis of the influence of experience, but also of the differential effects of environmental and individual variation on survival and future breeding probability. We address the question of the

  3. A PATH-DEPENDENT MODEL OF INVESTMENT AND EMPLOYMENT FLOW IN A LARGE ECONOMY IN A PROCESS OF INTEGRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU An-guo; YANG Kai-zhong

    2004-01-01

    This paper meant to analyze the spatial evolution of a large country in its process of integration with the world economy in general, and, to look into the possible effect of China's accession into WTO on the future development of its spatial economy in particular. Through an approach of increasing returns, external economy, product differentiation and path-dependence, with foreign trade costs incurred by different regions within the large country discriminated, a model of investment and employment flow is developed as a simulation of a large country's process of integration with the world economy. The modeling indicates that in the process of integration, as there exist differences in foreign trade costs among different regions within the large country, either the spatial economy of the country deviates from its symmetric structure in autarky and falls into a core-periphery relationship, or the effect of industrial agglomeration is reinforced, amplified and locked in, if the agglomeration had been started. The economic gap on either the aggregate or structural basis between different regions within the large country will increase rapidly as the integration proceeds.

  4. Modelling individual preferences, State of the art, recent advances and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Despite the above famous statement, individuals have always disputed about individual tastes, and the decision making processes behind consumers’ choices has been a focal interest for decades. Although challenges against the theory of rational behaviour date back to the work of von Neumann...... Value (GEV) formulation, which generalised the work of Williams (1977), provides a rigorous foundation for consumer choice modelling derived from economic theory. Although the original formulation of the random utility maximisation (RUM) as a behavioural model followed the economists’ theory of consumer...... the representation of the true phenomenon. However, the goal has always been that the measurable part of utility should be able to explain (as much as possible) the true behaviour in order to reduce the explanatory power left in the error term. This is correct except that, under the neo-classical theory...

  5. Analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates using data augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    I consider the analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates that influence detection probability. Bayesian analysis of the joint likelihood is carried out using a flexible data augmentation scheme that facilitates analysis by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, and a simple and straightforward implementation in freely available software. This approach is applied to a study of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) in which auxiliary data on a continuous covariate (body mass) are recorded, and it is thought that detection probability is related to body mass. In a second example, the model is applied to an aerial waterfowl survey in which a double-observer protocol is used. The fundamental unit of observation is the cluster of individual birds, and the size of the cluster (a discrete covariate) is used as a covariate on detection probability.

  6. Mathematical Analysis of a General Two-Patch Model of Tuberculosis Disease with Lost Sight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdias Laohombé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-patch model, SEi1,…,EinIiLi,  i=1,2, is used to analyze the spread of tuberculosis, with an arbitrary number n of latently infected compartments in each patch. A fraction of infectious individuals that begun their treatment will not return to the hospital for the examination of sputum. This fact usually occurs in sub-Saharan Africa, due to many reasons. The model incorporates migrations from one patch to another. The existence and uniqueness of the associated equilibria are discussed. A Lyapunov function is used to show that when the basic reproduction ratio is less than one, the disease-free equilibrium is globally and asymptotically stable. When it is greater than one, there exists at least one endemic equilibrium. The local stability of endemic equilibria can be illustrated using numerical simulations. Numerical simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results and analyze the influence of lost sight individuals.

  7. The impact of individual and organisational factors on engagement of individuals with intellectual disability living in community group homes: a multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Tichá, R; Larson, S A; Stancliffe, R J; Wuorio, A

    2015-06-01

    Being engaged in daily activities is a strong indicator of quality of life for individuals with intellectual disability (ID) who live in small community group homes. This study aimed to identify individual and organisational factors that predict high levels of engagement. Individuals with ID (n = 78), direct support professionals (DSPs; n = 174) and supervisors (n = 21) from 21 US group homes participated in the study. For each individual with ID, we conducted 80 min of observation at the person's residence. Information was also gathered regarding demographic characteristics, DSP competence, supervisor years of experience and management practices. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling. On average, individuals were engaged in social activities 12% of observed time and non-social activities 35% of the time. Individuals with greater adaptive skills who were supported by more competent staff showed significantly higher levels of social engagement. Individuals with less severe deficits in adaptive behaviours and less challenging behaviour showed higher levels of non-social engagement. Although none of the factors related to group homes were significant, 24% of the variance in non-social engagement existed among group homes. These results suggested that engagement is a dynamic construct. The extent to which an individual with ID is engaged in daily life is a result of interplay between the individual's characteristics and the group home environment. Future research is needed to investigate the influence of variables specific to the group home on the engagement level of individuals with disabilities. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Study of Commercial Bank Risk Monitoring Model in Individual Consumption Credit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红

    2003-01-01

    With the development of individual consumption credit (ICC) in China, commercial banks have been exposed to more and more risks. The loan failure has been an important problem that the banking must face and revolve. This paper develops a factor system to explain how the borrower's risk is affected, and then establishes a risk monitoring model with AHP to pre-warn the banks how much the risk is.

  9. Predation and the phasing of sleep : an evolutionary individual-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Acerbi, Alberto; Nunn, Charles Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    All mammals thus far studied sleep, yet important questions remain concerning the ecological factors that influence sleep patterns. Here, we developed an evolutionary individual-based model to investigate the effect of predation pressure on prey sleep. We investigated three ecological conditions, including one that assumed a dynamic interaction between predator and prey behaviour. In condition 1, we found that monophasic predators (i.e. with one sleep bout per 24 h) select for monophasic prey...

  10. Simulation Modeling and Analysis of the Impact of Individual Mobility Augmentee Loss at the Tanker Airlift Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL MOBILITY AUGMENTEE LOSS AT THE TANKER...States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT-OR-MS-ENS-12-18 SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE...58 1 SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL MOBILITY AUGMENTEE LOSS AT THE TANKER AIRLIFT CONTROL CENTER I

  11. Explaining the suicide risk of sexual minority individuals by contrasting the minority stress model with suicide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöderl, Martin; Sellmeier, Maximilian; Fartacek, Clemens; Pichler, Eva-Maria; Fartacek, Reinhold; Kralovec, Karl

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have found elevated levels of suicide ideation and attempts among sexual minority (homosexual and bisexual) individuals as compared to heterosexual individuals. The suicide risk difference has mainly been explained by minority stress models (MSTM), but the application of established suicidological models and testing their interrelations with the MSTM has been lacking so far. Therefore, we have contrasted two established models explaining suicide risk, the Interpersonal Psychological Theory (IPT) (Joiner, 2005) and the Clinical Model (CM) (Mann et al., 1999), with the MSTM (Meyer, 2003) in a Bavarian online-sample of 255 adult sexual minority participants and 183 heterosexual participants. The results suggested that the CM and the IPT model can well explain suicide ideation among sexual minorities according to the factors depression, hopelessness, perceived burdensomeness, and failed belongingness. The CM and the IPT were intertwined with the MSTM via internalized homophobia, social support, and early age of coming out. Early coming out was associated with an increased suicide attempt risk, perhaps through violent experiences that enhanced the capability for suicide; however, coming out likely changed to a protective factor for suicide ideation by enhanced social support and reduced internalized homophobia. These results give more insight into the development of suicide risk among sexual minority individuals and may be helpful to tailor minority-specific suicide prevention strategies.

  12. An individual-based model for population viability analysis of humpback chub in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, William Pine; Healy, Brian; Smith, Emily Omana; Trammell, Melissa; Speas, Dave; Valdez, Rich; Yard, Mike; Walters, Carl; Ahrens, Rob; Vanhaverbeke, Randy; Stone, Dennis; Wilson, Wade

    2013-01-01

    We developed an individual-based population viability analysis model (females only) for evaluating risk to populations from catastrophic events or conservation and research actions. This model tracks attributes (size, weight, viability, etc.) for individual fish through time and then compiles this information to assess the extinction risk of the population across large numbers of simulation trials. Using a case history for the Little Colorado River population of Humpback Chub Gila cypha in Grand Canyon, Arizona, we assessed extinction risk and resiliency to a catastrophic event for this population and then assessed a series of conservation actions related to removing specific numbers of Humpback Chub at different sizes for conservation purposes, such as translocating individuals to establish other spawning populations or hatchery refuge development. Our results suggested that the Little Colorado River population is generally resilient to a single catastrophic event and also to removals of larvae and juveniles for conservation purposes, including translocations to establish new populations. Our results also suggested that translocation success is dependent on similar survival rates in receiving and donor streams and low emigration rates from recipient streams. In addition, translocating either large numbers of larvae or small numbers of large juveniles has generally an equal likelihood of successful population establishment at similar extinction risk levels to the Little Colorado River donor population. Our model created a transparent platform to consider extinction risk to populations from catastrophe or conservation actions and should prove useful to managers assessing these risks for endangered species such as Humpback Chub.

  13. DISPLACE: a dynamic, individual-based model for spatial fishing planning and effort displacement: Integrating underlying fish population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastardie, Francois; Nielsen, J. Rasmus; Miethe, Tanja

    We previously developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model (IBM) evaluating the bio-economic efficiency of fishing vessel movements between regions according to the catching and targeting of different species based on the most recent high resolution spatial fishery data. The main purpose...... version couples the vessel model to selected size-based population models and considers the underlying resource dynamics in the distribution and density patterns of the targeted stocks for the cases of Danish and German vessels harvesting the North Sea and Baltic fish stocks. The stochastic fishing...... by vessels on the fish stocks, with resulting fishing mortality, and the vessels’ economic consequences are evaluated on high spatial and seasonal disaggregation levels by simulating different individual choices of vessel speed, fishing grounds and ports. All tested scenarios led to increased overall energy...

  14. Method for evaluating prediction models that apply the results of randomized trials to individual patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattan Michael W

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The clinical significance of a treatment effect demonstrated in a randomized trial is typically assessed by reference to differences in event rates at the group level. An alternative is to make individualized predictions for each patient based on a prediction model. This approach is growing in popularity, particularly for cancer. Despite its intuitive advantages, it remains plausible that some prediction models may do more harm than good. Here we present a novel method for determining whether predictions from a model should be used to apply the results of a randomized trial to individual patients, as opposed to using group level results. Methods We propose applying the prediction model to a data set from a randomized trial and examining the results of patients for whom the treatment arm recommended by a prediction model is congruent with allocation. These results are compared with the strategy of treating all patients through use of a net benefit function that incorporates both the number of patients treated and the outcome. We examined models developed using data sets regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer and Dutasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy. Results For adjuvant chemotherapy, we found that patients who would opt for chemotherapy even for small risk reductions, and, conversely, those who would require a very large risk reduction, would on average be harmed by using a prediction model; those with intermediate preferences would on average benefit by allowing such information to help their decision making. Use of prediction could, at worst, lead to the equivalent of an additional death or recurrence per 143 patients; at best it could lead to the equivalent of a reduction in the number of treatments of 25% without an increase in event rates. In the Dutasteride case, where the average benefit of treatment is more modest, there is a small benefit of prediction modelling, equivalent to a reduction of

  15. The Roy Adaptation Model: A Theoretical Framework for Nurses Providing Care to Individuals With Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Karen M

    2017-08-18

    Using a nursing theoretical framework to understand, elucidate, and propose nursing research is fundamental to knowledge development. This article presents the Roy Adaptation Model as a theoretical framework to better understand individuals with anorexia nervosa during acute treatment, and the role of nursing assessments and interventions in the promotion of weight restoration. Nursing assessments and interventions situated within the Roy Adaptation Model take into consideration how weight restoration does not occur in isolation but rather reflects an adaptive process within external and internal environments, and has the potential for more holistic care.

  16. Employment relations, flexibility and risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Strøby

    Employment relations literature often distinguishes between social democratic/corporatist models of employment relations and liberal models of employment relations as they are seen as opposite or at least different ways of organizing labor markets. They are often characterized as having very...... different risk profiles in terms of relationships between employees, employers, and the state. Low levels of labor market regulation very often characterize the liberal models of employment relations as we know them from, for instance, the USA and the UK. This means that employment conditions are very often...... insecure and that the burden of unemployment risk mostly lies with the employees rather than the employer. Corporatist – or social democratic – employment relations models are, in contrast to the liberal models, often characterized by stricter regulation of the labor market and by high standards...

  17. A linearization approach for the model-based analysis of combined aggregate and individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Patanjali; Karlsson, Mats O; French, Jonathan L

    2014-04-30

    The application of model-based meta-analysis in drug development has gained prominence recently, particularly for characterizing dose-response relationships and quantifying treatment effect sizes of competitor drugs. The models are typically nonlinear in nature and involve covariates to explain the heterogeneity in summary-level literature (or aggregate data (AD)). Inferring individual patient-level relationships from these nonlinear meta-analysis models leads to aggregation bias. Individual patient-level data (IPD) are indeed required to characterize patient-level relationships but too often this information is limited. Since combined analyses of AD and IPD allow advantage of the information they share to be taken, the models developed for AD must be derived from IPD models; in the case of linear models, the solution is a closed form, while for nonlinear models, closed form solutions do not exist. Here, we propose a linearization method based on a second order Taylor series approximation for fitting models to AD alone or combined AD and IPD. The application of this method is illustrated by an analysis of a continuous landmark endpoint, i.e., change from baseline in HbA1c at week 12, from 18 clinical trials evaluating the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. The performance of this method is demonstrated by a simulation study where the effects of varying the degree of nonlinearity and of heterogeneity in covariates (as assessed by the ratio of between-trial to within-trial variability) were studied. A dose-response relationship using an Emax model with linear and nonlinear effects of covariates on the emax parameter was used to simulate data. The simulation results showed that when an IPD model is simply used for modeling AD, the bias in the emax parameter estimate increased noticeably with an increasing degree of nonlinearity in the model, with respect to covariates. When using an appropriately derived AD model, the linearization

  18. Use of an individual-based simulation model to explore and evaluate potential insecticide resistance management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Russell; Stratonovitch, Pierre; Elias, Jan; Semenov, Mikhail A; Denholm, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Tools with the potential to predict risks of insecticide resistance and aid the evaluation and design of resistance management tactics are of value to all sectors of the pest management community. Here we describe use of a versatile individual-based model of resistance evolution to simulate how strategies employing single and multiple insecticides influence resistance development in the pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus. Under repeated exposure to a single insecticide, resistance evolved faster to a pyrethroid (lambda-cyhalothrin) than to a pyridine azomethane (pymetrozine), due to difference in initial efficacy. A mixture of these compounds delayed resistance compared to use of single products. The effectiveness of rotations depended on the sequence in which compounds were applied in response to pest density thresholds. Effectiveness of a mixture strategy declined with reductions in grower compliance. At least 50% compliance was needed to cause some delay in resistance development. No single strategy meets all requirements for managing resistance. It is important to evaluate factors that prevail under particular pest management scenarios. The model used here provides operators with a valuable means for evaluating and extending sound resistance management advice, as well as understanding needs and opportunities offered by new control techniques. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Process mining for individualized behavior modeling using wireless tracking in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llatas, Carlos; Benedi, José-Miguel; García-Gómez, Juan M; Traver, Vicente

    2013-11-11

    The analysis of human behavior patterns is increasingly used for several research fields. The individualized modeling of behavior using classical techniques requires too much time and resources to be effective. A possible solution would be the use of pattern recognition techniques to automatically infer models to allow experts to understand individual behavior. However, traditional pattern recognition algorithms infer models that are not readily understood by human experts. This limits the capacity to benefit from the inferred models. Process mining technologies can infer models as workflows, specifically designed to be understood by experts, enabling them to detect specific behavior patterns in users. In this paper, the eMotiva process mining algorithms are presented. These algorithms filter, infer and visualize workflows. The workflows are inferred from the samples produced by an indoor location system that stores the location of a resident in a nursing home. The visualization tool is able to compare and highlight behavior patterns in order to facilitate expert understanding of human behavior. This tool was tested with nine real users that were monitored for a 25-week period. The results achieved suggest that the behavior of users is continuously evolving and changing and that this change can be measured, allowing for behavioral change detection.

  20. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  1. Innovations in individual feature history management - The significance of feature-based temporal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Seong, J.C.; Kim, B.; Usery, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    A feature relies on three dimensions (space, theme, and time) for its representation. Even though spatiotemporal models have been proposed, they have principally focused on the spatial changes of a feature. In this paper, a feature-based temporal model is proposed to represent the changes of both space and theme independently. The proposed model modifies the ISO's temporal schema and adds new explicit temporal relationship structure that stores temporal topological relationship with the ISO's temporal primitives of a feature in order to keep track feature history. The explicit temporal relationship can enhance query performance on feature history by removing topological comparison during query process. Further, a prototype system has been developed to test a proposed feature-based temporal model by querying land parcel history in Athens, Georgia. The result of temporal query on individual feature history shows the efficiency of the explicit temporal relationship structure. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  2. Self-optimization, community stability, and fluctuations in two individual-based models of biological coevolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-01-01

    We compare and contrast the long-time dynamical properties of two individual-based models of biological coevolution. Selection occurs via multispecies, stochastic population dynamics with reproduction probabilities that depend nonlinearly on the population densities of all species resident in the community. New species are introduced through mutation. Both models are amenable to exact linear stability analysis, and we compare the analytic results with large-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining the population size as a function of an average interspecies interaction strength. Over time, the models self-optimize through mutation and selection to approximately maximize a community fitness function, subject only to constraints internal to the particular model. If the interspecies interactions are randomly distributed on an interval including positive values, the system evolves toward self-sustaining, mutualistic communities. In contrast, for the predator-prey case the matrix of interactions is antisym...

  3. An individual-based model for biofilm formation at liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardré, Maxime; Henry, Hervé; Douarche, Carine; Plapp, Mathis

    2015-12-01

    The bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently forms biofilms at the interface between the culture medium and the air. We present a mathematical model that couples a description of bacteria as individual discrete objects to the standard advection-diffusion equations for the environment. The model takes into account two different bacterial phenotypes. In the motile state, bacteria swim and perform a run-and-tumble motion that is biased toward regions of high oxygen concentration (aerotaxis). In the matrix-producer state they excrete extracellular polymers, which allows them to connect to other bacteria and to form a biofilm. Bacteria are also advected by the fluid, and can trigger bioconvection. Numerical simulations of the model reproduce all the stages of biofilm formation observed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we study the influence of various model parameters on the dynamics and morphology of biofilms.

  4. Collaborative recovery: an integrative model for working with individuals who experience chronic and recurring mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades, Lindsay; Deane, Frank; Crowe, Trevor; Lambert, W Gordon; Kavanagh, David; Lloyd, Chris

    2005-09-01

    Recovery is an emerging movement in mental health. Evidence for recovery-based approaches is not well developed and approaches to implement recovery-oriented services are not well articulated. The collaborative recovery model (CRM) is presented as a model that assists clinicians to use evidence-based skills with consumers, in a manner consistent with the recovery movement. A current 5 year multisite Australian study to evaluate the effectiveness of CRM is briefly described. The collaborative recovery model puts into practice several aspects of policy regarding recovery-oriented services, using evidence-based practices to assist individuals who have chronic or recurring mental disorders (CRMD). It is argued that this model provides an integrative framework combining (i) evidence-based practice; (ii) manageable and modularized competencies relevant to case management and psychosocial rehabilitation contexts; and (iii) recognition of the subjective experiences of consumers.

  5. Modelling hen harrier dynamics to inform human-wildlife conflict resolution: a spatially-realistic, individual-based approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinonen, Johannes P M; Palmer, Stephen C F; Redpath, Steve M; Travis, Justin M J

    2014-01-01

    Individual-based models have gained popularity in ecology, and enable simultaneous incorporation of spatial explicitness and population dynamic processes to understand spatio-temporal patterns of populations...

  6. Evaluating carbon fluxes of global forest ecosystems by using an individual tree-based model FORCCHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianyong; Shugart, Herman H; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Cougui; Wu, Shuang; Fang, Jing

    2017-02-14

    The carbon budget of forest ecosystems, an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle, needs to be accurately quantified and predicted by ecological models. As a preamble to apply the model to estimate global carbon uptake by forest ecosystems, we used the CO2 flux measurements from 37 forest eddy-covariance sites to examine the individual tree-based FORCCHN model's performance globally. In these initial tests, the FORCCHN model simulated gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem production (NEP) with correlations of 0.72, 0.70 and 0.53, respectively, across all forest biomes. The model underestimated GPP and slightly overestimated ER across most of the eddy-covariance sites. An underestimation of NEP arose primarily from the lower GPP estimates. Model performance was better in capturing both the temporal changes and magnitude of carbon fluxes in deciduous broadleaf forest than in evergreen broadleaf forest, and it performed less well for sites in Mediterranean climate. We then applied the model to estimate the carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale over 1982-2011. This application of FORCCHN gave a total GPP of 59.41±5.67 and an ER of 57.21±5.32PgCyr(-1) for global forest ecosystems during 1982-2011. The forest ecosystems over this same period contributed a large carbon storage, with total NEP being 2.20±0.64PgCyr(-1). These values are comparable to and reinforce estimates reported in other studies. This analysis highlights individual tree-based model FORCCHN could be used to evaluate carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale.

  7. Simulating Amazon forest carbon cycling using an individual- and trait-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Baker, T. R.; Johnson, M. O.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.; Gloor, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon forest, a regional and global regulator of climate and store of enormous biodiversity, is an incredibly complex ecosystem. Just one ha of forest can contain 300 different species of tree, with an estimated 16,000 tree species present in the region. Different tree species, and even different individuals of a species, vary in their functional traits, influencing how they behave in response to the environment. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are commonly used to simulate the response of the Amazon forest to global environmental change. Yet, such DGVMs typically use a plant functional type (PFT) approach where variation between individuals and species are not represented, which inherently limits the range of outcomes for Amazonia under climate change. Here, we report on recent advances in an alternative approach to tropical forest modeling that represents the size structure and variation of traits within a community, which we term the Trait-based Forest Simulator (TFS). As originally proposed, TFS was strictly a steady-state model and here we present an extension of TFS which includes full forest dynamics, and has been evaluated with data collected from intensive carbon cycling inventory plots from the GEM (Global Ecosystems Monitoring) network. Specifically, we compare the model output to stand-level data on productivity and respiration of the canopy, stems and roots. The model development process has highlighted ecological tradeoffs that are necessary to integrate into trait-based models, such as a shorter leaf lifetime with a lower leaf mass per area. The adapted TFS model simulates carbon cycling in forest plots, including variation in productivity between sites. These results lend confidence to the ability of next-generation vegetation models to accurately simulate forest sensitivity to future changes.

  8. Predicting longitudinal change in language production and comprehension in individuals with Down syndrome: hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robin S; Hesketh, Linda J; Kistler, Doris J

    2002-10-01

    Longitudinal change in syntax comprehension and production skill, measured four times across a 6-year period, was modeled in 31 individuals with Down syndrome who were between the ages of 5 and 20 years at the start of the study. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to fit individual linear growth curves to the measures of syntax comprehension (TACL-R) and mean length of spontaneous utterances obtained in 12-min narrative tasks (MLU-S), yielding two parameters for each participant's comprehension and production: performance at study start and growth trajectory. Predictor variables were obtained by fitting linear growth curves to each individual's concurrent measures of nonverbal visual cognition (Pattern Analysis subtest of the Stanford-Binet), visual short-term memory (Bead Memory subtest), and auditory short-term memory (digit span), yielding two individual predictor parameters for each measure: performance at study start and growth trajectory. Chronological age at study start (grand-mean centered), sex, and hearing status were also taken as predictors. The best-fitting HLM model of the comprehension parameters uses age at study start, visual short-term memory, and auditory short-term memory as predictors of initial status and age at study start as a predictor of growth trajectory. The model accounted for 90% of the variance in intercept parameters, 79% of the variance in slope parameters, and 24% of the variance at level 1. The some predictors were significant predictors of initial status in the best model for production, with no measures predicting slope. The model accounted for 81% of the intercept variance and 43% of the level 1 variance. When comprehension parameters are added to the predictor set, the best model, accounting for 94% of the intercept and 22% of the slope variance, uses only comprehension at study start as a predictor of initial status and comprehension slope as a predictor of production slope. These results reflect the fact that expressive

  9. A model-driven approach to quantify migration patterns: individual, regional and yearly differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnefeld, Nils; Börger, Luca; van Moorter, Bram; Rolandsen, Christer M; Dettki, Holger; Solberg, Erling Johan; Ericsson, Göran

    2011-03-01

    1. Animal migration has long intrigued scientists and wildlife managers alike, yet migratory species face increasing challenges because of habitat fragmentation, climate change and over-exploitation. Central to the understanding migratory species is the objective discrimination between migratory and nonmigratory individuals in a given population, quantifying the timing, duration and distance of migration and the ability to predict migratory movements. 2. Here, we propose a uniform statistical framework to (i) separate migration from other movement behaviours, (ii) quantify migration parameters without the need for arbitrary cut-off criteria and (iii) test predictability across individuals, time and space. 3. We first validated our novel approach by simulating data based on established theoretical movement patterns. We then formulated the expected shapes of squared displacement patterns as nonlinear models for a suite of movement behaviours to test the ability of our method to distinguish between migratory movement and other movement types. 4. We then tested our approached empirically using 108 wild Global Positioning System (GPS)-collared moose Alces alces in Scandinavia as a study system because they exhibit a wide range of movement behaviours, including resident, migrating and dispersing individuals, within the same population. Applying our approach showed that 87% and 67% of our Swedish and Norwegian subpopulations, respectively, can be classified as migratory. 5. Using nonlinear mixed effects models for all migratory individuals we showed that the distance, timing and duration of migration differed between the sexes and between years, with additional individual differences accounting for a large part of the variation in the distance of migration but not in the timing or duration. Overall, the model explained most of the variation (92%) and also had high predictive power for the same individuals over time (69%) as well as between study populations (74

  10. Exact solution of gyration radius of individual's trajectory for a simplified human mobility model

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Gyration radius of individual's trajectory plays a key role in quantifying human mobility patterns. Of particular interests, empirical analyses suggest that the growth of gyration radius is slow versus time except the very early stage and may eventually arrive to a steady value. However, up to now, the underlying mechanism leading to such a possibly steady value has not been well understood. In this Letter, we propose a simplified human mobility model to simulate individual's daily travel with three sequential activities: commuting to workplace, going to do leisure activities and returning home. With the assumption that individual has constant travel speed and inferior limit of time at home and work, we prove that the daily moving area of an individual is an ellipse, and finally get an exact solution of the gyration radius. The analytical solution well captures the empirical observation reported in [M. C. Gonz`alez et al., Nature, 453 (2008) 779]. We also find that, in spite of the heterogeneous displacement ...

  11. Employability Skills Valued by Employers as Important for Entry-Level Employees with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Song; Zhang, Dalun; Pacha, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities face persistent challenges in gaining meaningful employment. One of the barriers to successful employment is a lack of employability skills. The purpose of this study was to identify employability skills that employers value as being important and to examine whether employers have different expectations for…

  12. Employability Skills Valued by Employers as Important for Entry-Level Employees with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Song; Zhang, Dalun; Pacha, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities face persistent challenges in gaining meaningful employment. One of the barriers to successful employment is a lack of employability skills. The purpose of this study was to identify employability skills that employers value as being important and to examine whether employers have different expectations for…

  13. Implementing the employability agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Donna; Snaith, Holly Grace; Foster, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on research commissioned by the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and conducted during 2013. It interrogates the ways in which the employability agenda has been fed through to the level of individual politics departments. The project was particularly concerned with establishing...... whether, and how, colleagues in politics and international relations (IR) had taken ownership of student employability at the level of the curriculum. In the article, the key findings of the research are summarised. There is also discussion of the (sometimes troubling) professional implications...

  14. Systematic comparison of barriers for heavy-ion fusion calculated on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    A systematic calculation of barriers for heavy-ion fusion was performed on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction: M3Y interaction and Migdal interaction. The results of calculations by the Hartree-Fockmethod with the SKX coefficients were taken for nuclear densities. The calculations reveal that the fusion barrier is higher in the case of employing theMigdal interaction than in the case of employing the M3Y interaction. In view of this, the use of the Migdal interaction in describing heavy-ion fusion is questionable.

  15. Regression models for estimating leaf area of seedlings and adult individuals of Neotropical rainforest tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brito-Rocha

    Full Text Available Abstract Individual leaf area (LA is a key variable in studies of tree ecophysiology because it directly influences light interception, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration of adult trees and seedlings. We analyzed the leaf dimensions (length – L and width – W of seedlings and adults of seven Neotropical rainforest tree species (Brosimum rubescens, Manilkara maxima, Pouteria caimito, Pouteria torta, Psidium cattleyanum, Symphonia globulifera and Tabebuia stenocalyx with the objective to test the feasibility of single regression models to estimate LA of both adults and seedlings. In southern Bahia, Brazil, a first set of data was collected between March and October 2012. From the seven species analyzed, only two (P. cattleyanum and T. stenocalyx had very similar relationships between LW and LA in both ontogenetic stages. For these two species, a second set of data was collected in August 2014, in order to validate the single models encompassing adult and seedlings. Our results show the possibility of development of models for predicting individual leaf area encompassing different ontogenetic stages for tropical tree species. The development of these models was more dependent on the species than the differences in leaf size between seedlings and adults.

  16. Are individual based models a suitable approach to estimate population vulnerability? - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Griebeler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available European populations of the Large Blue Butterfly Maculinea arion have experienced severe declines in the last decades, especially in the northern part of the species range. This endangered lycaenid butterfly needs two resources for development: flower buds of specific plants (Thymus spp., Origanum vulgare, on which young caterpillars briefly feed, and red ants of the genus Myrmica, whose nests support caterpillars during a prolonged final instar. I present an analytically solvable deterministic model to estimate the vulnerability of populations of M. arion. Results obtained from the sensitivity analysis of this mathematical model (MM are contrasted to the respective results that had been derived from a spatially explicit individual based model (IBM for this butterfly. I demonstrate that details in landscape configuration which are neglected by the MM but are easily taken into consideration by the IBM result in a different degree of intraspecific competition of caterpillars on flower buds and within host ant nests. The resulting differences in mortalities of caterpillars lead to erroneous estimates of the extinction risk of a butterfly population living in habitat with low food plant coverage and low abundance in host ant nests. This observation favors the use of an individual based modeling approach over the deterministic approach at least for the management of this threatened butterfly.

  17. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF STAGED FORMATION OF AN INDIVIDUAL CREATIVE METHOD OF AN ARCHITECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolstet O. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the development of a model of gradual formation of individual creative method of an architect in the propaedeutic level since preuniversity stage (with the involvement of distance training and its continuity of the first courses of architectural disciplines in high school in terms of the Rostov school of architecture. There have been examined some studies by Nechaev N.N. and Sulimenko S.D. at the architectural department of the Far Eastern Technical University, that have revealed a non-linear nature of the formation of spatial thinking and the need to develop a systematic approach in the propaedeutic phase of training. These studies formed the basis of a new conceptual model. A list of the input competence requirements for applicants entering architectural universities to ensure the quality of training at university propaedeutic phase is done. Methodological feature of the Rostov school of architecture, which is both a synthesis of problems in the field of threedimensional composition and design problems is revealed, as well as a combination of methods of modeling and manual architectural drawing with computer graphics (SketchUp, CorelDraw, Photoshop, AutoCad. The schemes of a number of separate stages of the formation of individual creative method of the architect, as well as the general scheme of the whole conceptual model is given

  18. Development and evaluation of the herd dynamic milk model with focus on the individual cow component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, E; Delaby, L; Wallace, M; Shalloo, L

    2016-12-01

    The herd dynamic milk (HDM) model is a dynamic model capable of simulating the performance of individual dairy animals (from birth to death), with a daily time step. Within this study, the HDM model is described and evaluated in relation to milk production, body condition score (BCS) and BCS change throughout lactation by comparing model simulations against data from published experimental studies. The model's response to variation in genetic potential, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation was tested in a sensitivity analysis. Data from experiments in Ireland and France over a 3-year period (2009-11) were used to complete the evaluation. The aim of the Irish experiment was to determine the impact of different stocking rates (SRs) (SR1: 3.28 cow/ha, SR2: 2.51 cow/ha) on key physical, biological and economic performance. The aim of the French experiment was to evaluate over a prolonged time period, the ability of two breeds of dairy cows (Holstein and Normande) to produce and to reproduce under two feeding strategies (high level and low level) in the context of compact calving. The model evaluation was conducted at the herd level with separate evaluations for the primiparous and multiparous cows. The evaluation included the two extreme SRs for the Irish experiment, and an evaluation at the overall herd and individual animal level for the different breeds and feeding levels for the French data. The comparison of simulation and experimental data for all scenarios resulted in a relative prediction error, which was consistently model responded in a realistic fashion to variation in genetic potential for milk production, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation.

  19. Predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy in individual glioblastoma patients in vivo: a mathematical modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockne, R; Alvord, E C Jr; Swanson, K R [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Rockhill, J K; Kalet, I; Hendrickson, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Mrugala, M; Spence, A M [Department of Neurology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lai, A; Cloughesy, T, E-mail: krae@uw.ed [Department of Neurology, University of California, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of primary brain tumors known as gliomas. They proliferate and invade extensively and yield short life expectancies despite aggressive treatment. Response to treatment is usually measured in terms of the survival of groups of patients treated similarly, but this statistical approach misses the subgroups that may have responded to or may have been injured by treatment. Such statistics offer scant reassurance to individual patients who have suffered through these treatments. Furthermore, current imaging-based treatment response metrics in individual patients ignore patient-specific differences in tumor growth kinetics, which have been shown to vary widely across patients even within the same histological diagnosis and, unfortunately, these metrics have shown only minimal success in predicting patient outcome. We consider nine newly diagnosed GBM patients receiving diagnostic biopsy followed by standard-of-care external beam radiation therapy (XRT). We present and apply a patient-specific, biologically based mathematical model for glioma growth that quantifies response to XRT in individual patients in vivo. The mathematical model uses net rates of proliferation and migration of malignant tumor cells to characterize the tumor's growth and invasion along with the linear-quadratic model for the response to radiation therapy. Using only routinely available pre-treatment MRIs to inform the patient-specific bio-mathematical model simulations, we find that radiation response in these patients, quantified by both clinical and model-generated measures, could have been predicted prior to treatment with high accuracy. Specifically, we find that the net proliferation rate is correlated with the radiation response parameter (r = 0.89, p = 0.0007), resulting in a predictive relationship that is tested with a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. This relationship predicts the tumor size post-therapy to within inter

  20. Employment models in social enterprises : does the mission matter for job quality, discrimination, and motivations of workers in low-skilled positions ?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Social enterprises (SEs) represent a consequent number of jobs and are being established in increasingly diverse types of industries. Besides, employers and workers are starting to structure themselves in more visible and identifiable professional organizations. In this context, the existence of a specific employment model in SEs may be discussed, particularly with regards to (low-skilled) job quality. Nowadays, this question is even of upmost importance because such organizations are more an...

  1. Optimization of an individual re-identification modeling process using biometric features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzner, Shari; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2014-09-24

    We present results from the optimization of a re-identification process using two sets of biometric data obtained from the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource Project (CAESAR) database. The datasets contain real measurements of features for 2378 individuals in a standing (43 features) and seated (16 features) position. A genetic algorithm (GA) was used to search a large combinatorial space where different features are available between the probe (seated) and gallery (standing) datasets. Results show that optimized model predictions obtained using less than half of the 43 gallery features and data from roughly 16% of the individuals available produce better re-identification rates than two other approaches that use all the information available.

  2. Best practice: E-Model--prescribing physical activity and exercise for individuals with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Angela J; Thille, Patty; Barber, Karen A R; Schachter, Candice L; Bidonde, Julia; Collacott, Brenda K

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a serious and debilitating condition, encompassing a wide range of symptoms. Physical therapists often advocate the incorporation of leisure time physical activity (exercise training or recreational physical activity) as an important management strategy for individuals with FM. Decisions about physical activity prescription in clinical practice are informed by a variety of sources. This topical review considers physical activity prescription using the E-Model as a framework for best practice decision making. We examine findings from randomized trials, published experts, and qualitative studies through the lens of the model's five Es: 1) evidence, 2) expectations, 3) environment, 4) ethics, and 5) experience. This approach provides a robust foundation from which to make best practice decisions. Application of this model also facilitates the identification of gaps and discrepancies in the literature, future opportunities for knowledge exchange and translation, and future research.

  3. Psychological resilience, pain catastrophizing, and positive emotions: perspectives on comprehensive modeling of individual pain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a complex construct that contributes to profound physical and psychological dysfunction, particularly in individuals coping with chronic pain. The current paper builds upon previous research, describes a balanced conceptual model that integrates aspects of both psychological vulnerability and resilience to pain, and reviews protective and exacerbating psychosocial factors to the process of adaptation to chronic pain, including pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and positive psychological resources predictive of enhanced pain coping. The current paper identifies future directions for research that will further enrich the understanding of pain adaptation and espouses an approach that will enhance the ecological validity of psychological pain coping models, including introduction of advanced statistical and conceptual models that integrate behavioral, cognitive, information processing, motivational and affective theories of pain.

  4. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose...

  5. Practical prediction model for the risk of 2-year mortality of individuals in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander; Gautam, Shiva; Brown, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    This study proposed to validate a prediction model and risk-stratification tool of 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population suitable for office practice use. A risk indicator (R) derived from data in the literature was based on only 6 variables: to calculate R for an individual, starting with 0, for each year of age above 60, add 0.14; for a male, add 0.9; for diabetes mellitus, add 0.7; for albuminuria > 30 mg/g of creatinine, add 0.7; for stage ≥ 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD), add 0.9; for cardiovascular disease (CVD), add 1.4; or for both CKD and CVD, add 1.7. We developed a univariate logistic regression model predicting 2-year individual mortality rates. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data set (1999-2004 with deaths through 2006) was used as the target for validation. These 12,515 subjects had a mean age of 48.9 ± 18.1 years, 48% males, 9.5% diabetes, 11.7% albuminuria, 6.8% CVD, 5.4% CKD, and 2.8% both CKD and CVD. Using the risk indicator R alone to predict mortality demonstrated good performance with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.84. Dividing subjects into low-risk (R=0-1.0), low intermediate risk (R > 1.0-3.0), high intermediate risk (R > 3.0-5.0) or high-risk (R > 5.0) categories predicted 2-year mortality rates of 0.52%, 1.44%, 5.19% and 15.24%, respectively, by the prediction model compared with actual mortality rates of 0.29%, 2.48%, 5.13% and 13.40%, respectively. We have validated a model of risk stratification using easily identified clinical characteristics to predict 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population. The model demonstrated performance adequate for its potential use for clinical practice and research decisions.

  6. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  7. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  8. Agents, Individuals, and Networks: Modeling Methods to Inform Natural Resource Management in Regional Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lael Parrott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes are complex systems. Landscape dynamics are the result of multiple interacting biophysical and socioeconomic processes that are linked across a broad range of spatial, temporal, and organizational scales. Understanding and describing landscape dynamics poses enormous challenges and demands the use of new multiscale approaches to modeling. In this synthesis article, we present three regional systems--i.e., a forest system, a marine system, and an agricultural system--and describe how hybrid, bottom-up modeling of these systems can be used to represent linkages across scales and between subsystems. Through the use of these three examples, we describe how modeling can be used to simulate emergent system responses to different conservation policy and management scenarios from the bottom up, thereby increasing our understanding of important drivers and feedback loops within a landscape. The first case study involves the use of an individual-based modeling approach to simulate the effects of forest harvesting on the movement patterns of large mammals in Canada's boreal forest and the resulting emergent population dynamics. This model is being used to inform forest harvesting and management guidelines. The second case study combines individual and agent-based approaches to simulate the dynamics of individual boats and whales in a marine park. This model is being used to inform decision-makers on how to mitigate the impacts of maritime traffic on whales in the Saint Lawrence Estuary in eastern Canada. The third example is a case study of biodiversity conservation efforts on the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia. In this example, the social-ecological system is represented as a complex network of interacting components. Methods of network analysis can be used to explore the emergent responses of the system to changes in the network structure or configuration, thus informing managers about the resilience of the system. These three examples

  9. Significance of genetic information in risk assessment and individual classification using silicosis as a case model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCanlies, E.; Landsittel, D.P.; Yucesoy, B.; Vallyathan, V.; Luster, M.L.; Sharp, D.S. [NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Over the last decade the role of genetic data in epidemiological research has expanded considerably. The authors recently published a case-control study that evaluated the interaction between silica exposure and minor variants in the genes coding for interleukin-1alpha. (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) as risk factors associated with silicosis, a fibrotic lung disease. In contrast, this report uses data generated from these studies to illustrate the utility of genetic information for the purposes of risk assessment and clinical prediction. Specifically, this study addresses how, given a known exposure, genetic information affects the characterization of risk groups. Relative operating characteristic (ROC) curves were then used to determine the impact of genetic information on individual classification. Logistic regression modeling procedures were used to estimate the predicted probability of developing silicosis. This probability was then used to construct predicted risk deciles, first for a model with occupational exposure only and then for a model containing occupational exposure and genetic main effects and interactions. The results indicate that genetic information plays a valuable role in effectively characterizing risk groups and mechanisms of disease operating in a substantial proportion of the population. However, in the case of fibrotic lung disease caused by silica exposure, information about the presence or absence of the minor variants of IL-1alpha, IL-1RA and TNFalpha is unlikely to be a useful tool for individual classification.

  10. Testing the health promotion model for adherence and quality of life in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Lewis, Kimberly; Valvano, Abbey; Smith, Suzanne; Rahn, Rebecca; Stepleman, Lara

    2017-02-01

    The nature of multiple sclerosis (MS) presents challenges to health-promoting behaviors (e.g. adherence) and quality of life. The Health Promotion Model (HPM) proposes that these outcomes are explained by individual characteristics (i.e. biological, social, psychological) and behavior-specific cognitions (e.g. self-efficacy). The current study sought to test the HPM in explaining self-reported adherence and MS quality of life among 121 MS patients receiving care in an MS clinic in the southeastern United States. Hierarchical regression models partially supported the HPM for adherence (R(2) = .27) and more fully for quality of life (QoL) (R(2) = .64). Depression and stigma were among the variables most strongly related to both adherence and QoL; contrary to HPM theory, self-efficacy was not significantly related to adherence but was to QoL. Thus, the HPM may help to guide strategies used to improve QoL among individuals living with MS; however, the model may need further refinement to be used with adherence.

  11. Real beards and real networks: a spin-glass model for interacting individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neale, Dion

    ''I want to be different, just like all the other different people'' sang the band King Missile. Whether they are the Beatniks of the 1950s, the punks of the 1970s, or the hipsters of today, non-conformists often tend to look the same, seemingly at odds with their goal of non-conformity. The spin-glass model, originally developed to describe the interaction of magnetic spins, and since applied to situations as diverse as the electrical activity of networks of neurons, to trades on a financial market, has recently been used in social science to study populations of interacting individuals comprised of a mix of both conformists and anti-conformists - or hipsters. Including delay effects for the interactions between individuals has been shown to give a system with non-trivial dynamics with a phase transition from stable behaviour to periodic switching between two states (let's call them bushy bearded and clean shaven). Analytic solutions to such a model are possible, but only for particular assumptions about the interaction and delay matrices. In this work we will show what happens when the interactions in the model are based on real-world networks with ''small-world'' effects and clustering.

  12. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka

    2015-11-24

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  13. A mediation model of individual differences in attitudes toward affirmative actions for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Silvia; García-Izquierdo, Antonio L; Bastida, María

    2012-06-01

    A mediation model of the relation between gender and attitudes toward affirmative action in favor of working women was tested. Four mediation variables were considered: perceived unfairness in the situation of working women, perceived threat to the non-designated group (men), self-esteem, and gender self-concept (masculinity and femininity). 192 women and 128 men, with differing occupations, participated. Gender affects individuals' attitudes toward affirmative actions for women, mediated by perceived unfairness in the situation of working women, perceived threat to the non-designated group, and feminine self-concept. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  14. Health behavior models for informing digital technology interventions for individuals with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Kim, Sunny Jung; McHugo, Gregory J; Unützer, Jürgen; Bartels, Stephen J; Marsch, Lisa A

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical models offer valuable insights for designing effective and sustainable behavioral health interventions, yet the application of theory for informing digital technology interventions for people with mental illness has received limited attention. We offer a perspective on the importance of applying behavior theories and models to developing digital technology interventions for addressing mental and physical health concerns among people with mental illness. In this commentary, we summarize prominent theories of human behavior, highlight key theoretical constructs, and identify opportunities to inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. We consider limitations with existing theories and models, and examine recent theoretical advances that can specifically guide development of digital technology interventions. Established behavioral frameworks including health belief model, theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory consist of important and overlapping constructs that can inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. As digital technologies continue to evolve and enable longitudinal data collection, real-time behavior monitoring, and adaptive features tailored to users' changing needs over time, there are new opportunities to broaden our understanding of health behaviors and mechanisms of behavior change. Recent advances include dynamic models of behavior, persuasive system design, the behavioral intervention technology model, and behavioral models for just-in-time adaptive interventions. Behavior theories offer advantages for guiding use of digital technologies. Future researchers must explore how theoretical models can effectively advance efforts to develop, evaluate, and disseminate digital health interventions targeting individuals with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona BÉRES

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C developing critical thinking skills, (I integrating individual evaluation and (P generating learner profile. Our CECIP methodology integrates individual learning style dimensions and their preferences into e-learning environment by filling out MBTI, Gardner, GEFT and Felder-Silverman questionnaires during our four-semester-research. The paper covers the theoretical foundations of Learning Styles giving analogies to preferred learning strategies. A three-part-research process is described through which the described CECIP model emerged: (1 analysing Learning Styles and Learning Management Systems that claim to support their work; (2 raising the background knowledge of students in cognitive psychology in order to improve design and evaluation methodologies of multimedia learning materials; (3 personalising tasks and assessment based on Bloom's Taxonomy.

  16. Evaluation of an e-PBL model to promote individual reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2013-01-01

    Medical educators should promote the development of student clinical reasoning toward independence in clinical settings. The objective of this study was to evaluate an online problem-based learning (e-PBL) model designed to promote student individual reasoning in supplement to traditional PBL. Twelve e-PBL modules were added to the fully problem-based curriculum for Year 2 at Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (SKKUSOM). In this e-PBL, students worked on the problems individually in an online setting, followed by face-to-face discussions in a colloquium. The cases were presented using interactive multimedia to enhance the authenticity of the case and stimulate student interest in learning. A formative evaluation study was conducted to determine student satisfaction with e-PBL and its effectiveness as perceived by the students using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A cohort of Year 2 students at SKKUSOM (n = 38) took part in this study. Students perceived e-PBL significantly more positively after they had taken a module in terms of its ability to foster problem-solving skills and its ability to allow them to learn in ways suited to individual learning styles. Additionally, student survey and interview revealed that a vast majority of students were satisfied with the overall learning process in e-PBL and perceived it positively in fostering knowledge acquisition and clinical reasoning. Moreover, students found the cases realistic and engaging. The results show the potential of e-PBL to enhance traditional PBL by promoting the development of individual reasoning in a flexible online-learning environment and offering cases in an interactive multimedia format, which warrants further investigation into its impact on student learning outcomes.

  17. An individual-based predator-prey model for biological coevolution: Fluctuations, stability, and community structure

    CERN Document Server

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-01-01

    We study an individual-based predator-prey model of biological coevolution, using linear stability analysis and large-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The model exhibits approximate 1/f noise in diversity and population-size fluctuations, and it generates a sequence of quasi-steady communities in the form of simple food webs. These communities are quite resilient toward the loss of one or a few species, which is reflected in different power-law exponents for the durations of communities and the lifetimes of species. The exponent for the former is near -1, while the latter is close to -2. Statistical characteristics of the evolving communities, including degree (predator and prey) distributions and proportions of basal, intermediate, and top species, compare reasonably with data for real food webs.

  18. Participatory medicine: model based tools for engaging and empowering the individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Mark; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-04-06

    The long-term goal of the Virtual Physiological Human and Digital Patient projects is to run 'simulations' of health and disease processes on the virtual or 'digital' patient, and use the results to make predictions about real health and determine the best treatment specifically for an individual. This is termed 'personalized medicine', and is intended to be the future of healthcare. How will people interact and engage with their virtual selves, and how can virtual models be used to motivate people to actively participate in their own healthcare? We discuss these questions, and describe our current efforts to integrate and realistically embody psychobiological models of face-to-face interaction to enliven and increase engagement of virtual humans in healthcare. Overall, this paper highlights the need for attention to the design of human-machine interfaces to address patient engagement in healthcare.

  19. Communities that care for families: the LINC Model for enhancing individual, family, and community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Judith

    2010-10-01

    The resilience of families and communities is inextricably linked. Their healthy functioning relies on a balance of stressors and resources. Both can be jeopardized by major challenges such as socioeconomic change or natural and man-made disasters. Such events can cause increased incidences of physical and mental problems such as addiction, posttraumatic stress syndrome, and heart disease. Trauma breeds marginalization, abuse of power, and prejudice. How these stressors are handled is profoundly influenced by the degree of connectedness-attachment-to family and culture of origin. Connectedness can be enhanced by mobilizing support systems, facilitating access to resources, strengthening family, community and cultural ties, and fostering resilience. The LINC Model increases connectedness at the individual, family, and community levels. This article includes methods for designing interventions, studies and clinical vignettes that illustrate the application of the LINC Model, and examples of communities that have overcome major stress.

  20. Technical note: A model to estimate individual feed intake of swine in group feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, M D; Kim, B G

    2007-04-01

    In most animal growth experiments, groups of animals are housed within a pen. Occasionally, an individual animal shows a very different growth rate than its pen mates or dies during the experiment. When this happens, if pen feed intake (PFI) cannot be reestimated for the calculation of ADFI and feed efficiency, an observation will be lost from the data set. Therefore, we propose a model to estimate individual feed intake (IFI) of pigs in group feeding, with subsequent validation of the model using group feeding simulation studies. In the proposed model, the feed intake (FI) of each affected pen is partitioned into FI for maintenance (FI(m)) and FI for growth (FI(g)) for each animal within that pen. First, individual pig FI(m) for the period is calculated using the 1998 National Research Council estimation of ME for maintenance. Then, FI(m) for all pigs in the pen is summed. The difference between the summed FI(m) and the total PFI is that which supported growth in the pen. Next, FI(g) is calculated by apportioning the remaining feed equally to each unit of gain within the pen. Finally, the estimated IFI for the pig being removed from the pen is the sum of FI(m) and FI(g) for that pig; this FI estimate is subtracted from the original PFI to leave the new PFI for the remaining pigs. The validity of the estimated IFI is dependent on the accuracy of the maintenance energy equation and the energy analysis of the feedstuffs. In simulation studies, we compared the accuracy of the proposed method with 2 other methods. In simulation study 1, the proposed model showed better accuracy than at least one of the other methods during all tested periods (P Excel spreadsheet containing macros for FI correction. All of the calculation procedures in the proposed model are included within the feed intake correction spreadsheet. The Excel file and instructions are being made available via a Web site.

  1. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  2. Individual based modeling and parameter estimation for a Lotka-Volterra system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, J; Jedruch, W

    1999-03-15

    Stochastic component, inevitable in biological systems, makes problematic the estimation of the model parameters from a single sequence of measurements, despite the complete knowledge of the system. We studied the problem of parameter estimation using individual-based computer simulations of a 'Lotka-Volterra world'. Two kinds (species) of particles--X (preys) and Y (predators)--moved on a sphere according to deterministic rules and at the collision (interaction) of X and Y the particle X was changed to a new particle Y. Birth of preys and death of predators were simulated by addition of X and removal of Y, respectively, according to exponential probability distributions. With this arrangement of the system, the numbers of particles of each kind might be described by the Lotka-Volterra equations. The simulations of the system with low (200-400 particles on average) number of individuals showed unstable oscillations of the population size. In some simulation runs one of the species became extinct. Nevertheless, the oscillations had some generic properties (e.g. mean, in one simulation run, oscillation period, mean ratio of the amplitudes of the consecutive maxima of X and Y numbers, etc.) characteristic for the solutions of the Lotka-Volterra equations. This observation made it possible to estimate the four parameters of the Lotka-Volterra model with high accuracy and good precision. The estimation was performed using the integral form of the Lotka-Volterra equations and two parameter linear regression for each oscillation cycle separately. We conclude that in spite of the irregular time course of the number of individuals in each population due to stochastic intraspecies component, the generic features of the simulated system evolution can provide enough information for quantitative estimation of the system parameters.

  3. Effects of landscape composition and configuration on migrating songbirds: inference from an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily B; Pearson, Scott M; Moore, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of long-distance migrants during stopover is constrained by the need to quickly and safely replenish energetic reserves. Replenishing fuel stores at stopover sites requires adjusting to unfamiliar landscapes with little to no information about the distribution of resources. Despite their critical importance to the success of songbird migration, the effects of landscape composition and configuration on fuel deposition rates (FDR [g/d]), the currency of migration, has not been tested empirically. Our objectives were to understand the effects of heterogeneous landscapes on FDR of forest-dwelling songbirds during spring migration. The results of field experiments were used to parameterize a spatially explicit, individual-based model of forest songbird movement and resulting FDR. Further field experiments were used to validate the results from the individual-based model. In simulation experiments, we altered a Gulf South landscape in a factorial design to predict the effects of future patterns under different scenarios of land use change in which the abundance of high-quality hardwood habitat and the spatial aggregation of habitat varied. Simulated FDR decreased as the amount of hardwood in the landscape decreased from 41% to 22% to 12%. Further, migrants that arrived in higher-quality habitat types gained more mass. Counter to our expectations, FDR was higher with lower spatial aggregation of habitat. Differences in refueling rates may be most influenced by whether or not an individual experiences an initial searching cost after landing in poor-quality habitat. Therefore, quickly locating habitat with sufficient food resources at each stopover may be the most important factor determining a successful migration. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the argument that hardwood forest cover is a primary determinant of the quality of a stopover site in this region. This study represents the first effort to empirically quantify FDRs based on the

  4. Individual-based models for adaptive diversification in high-dimensional phenotype spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Madhok, Vaibhav; Doebeli, Michael

    2016-02-07

    Most theories of evolutionary diversification are based on equilibrium assumptions: they are either based on optimality arguments involving static fitness landscapes, or they assume that populations first evolve to an equilibrium state before diversification occurs, as exemplified by the concept of evolutionary branching points in adaptive dynamics theory. Recent results indicate that adaptive dynamics may often not converge to equilibrium points and instead generate complicated trajectories if evolution takes place in high-dimensional phenotype spaces. Even though some analytical results on diversification in complex phenotype spaces are available, to study this problem in general we need to reconstruct individual-based models from the adaptive dynamics generating the non-equilibrium dynamics. Here we first provide a method to construct individual-based models such that they faithfully reproduce the given adaptive dynamics attractor without diversification. We then show that a propensity to diversify can be introduced by adding Gaussian competition terms that generate frequency dependence while still preserving the same adaptive dynamics. For sufficiently strong competition, the disruptive selection generated by frequency-dependence overcomes the directional evolution along the selection gradient and leads to diversification in phenotypic directions that are orthogonal to the selection gradient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. How the spatial position of individuals affects their influence on swarms: a numerical comparison of two popular swarm dynamics models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Kolpas

    Full Text Available Schools of fish and flocks of birds are examples of self-organized animal groups that arise through social interactions among individuals. We numerically study two individual-based models, which recent empirical studies have suggested to explain self-organized group animal behavior: (i a zone-based model where the group communication topology is determined by finite interacting zones of repulsion, attraction, and orientation among individuals; and (ii a model where the communication topology is described by Delaunay triangulation, which is defined by each individual's Voronoi neighbors. The models include a tunable parameter that controls an individual's relative weighting of attraction and alignment. We perform computational experiments to investigate how effectively simulated groups transfer information in the form of velocity when an individual is perturbed. A cross-correlation function is used to measure the sensitivity of groups to sudden perturbations in the heading of individual members. The results show how relative weighting of attraction and alignment, location of the perturbed individual, population size, and the communication topology affect group structure and response to perturbation. We find that in the Delaunay-based model an individual who is perturbed is capable of triggering a cascade of responses, ultimately leading to the group changing direction. This phenomenon has been seen in self-organized animal groups in both experiments and nature.

  6. Employability Skills. At a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibrow, Bridget

    2011-01-01

    In a competitive workforce it is not just having the right qualification or technical skills that will land an individual a job; it could very well be their interpersonal skills. How someone communicates is often the first impression an employer has of a possible worker. Yet, it is precisely communication skills that employers feel applicants are…

  7. Discovering the Power of Individual-Based Modelling in Teaching and Learning: The Study of a Predator-Prey System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The general aim is to promote the use of individual-based models (biological agent-based models) in teaching and learning contexts in life sciences and to make their progressive incorporation into academic curricula easier, complementing other existing modelling strategies more frequently used in the classroom. Modelling activities for the study…

  8. Griffin and Neal's safety model: Determinants and components of individual safety performance in the Italian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toderi, S; Gaggia, A; Mariani, M G; Mancini, G; Broccoli, M

    2015-11-22

    Griffin and Neal's model is a useful model to understand workers' different safety behaviour (compliance and participation) starting from their mastery of safety procedures (safety knowledge) and the motivation to put them in place (safety motivation). Although the theoretical model has proven to be adequate and is widely used in research, two problems arise: 1) there is no Italian validation of the four scales measuring the key constructs of the model; 2) the hypothesis regarding the differential impact of the determinants on the components of safety performance produced mixed evidence. The study had a twofold objective: 1) validate an Italian version of the four scales, primarily assessing their construct validity; 2) verify the relationships between the constructs according to the assumptions made within the theoretical model. The psychometric properties of the scales as well as the relationships between the constructs were investigated in a sample of 277 workers in the construction and logistics sectors, using questionnaires. The analyses were based on the use of structural equation modelling technique. Results confirmed the validity and reliability of the Italian scales, showing indices that were both satisfactory and aligned with those from previous studies. The relationships between the constructs were substantially consistent with the safety model. The study provided a valid version of the scales measuring determinants and components of individual safe performance. Such scales can be appropriately used in the Italian context for the development of theoretical as well as practical contributions on work safety. The results suggest that interventions to increase overall safe performance should address both knowledge and motivation for safety.

  9. Using connectome-based predictive modeling to predict individual behavior from brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xilin; Finn, Emily S; Scheinost, Dustin; Rosenberg, Monica D; Chun, Marvin M; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd

    2017-03-01

    Neuroimaging is a fast-developing research area in which anatomical and functional images of human brains are collected using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and electroencephalography (EEG). Technical advances and large-scale data sets have allowed for the development of models capable of predicting individual differences in traits and behavior using brain connectivity measures derived from neuroimaging data. Here, we present connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM), a data-driven protocol for developing predictive models of brain-behavior relationships from connectivity data using cross-validation. This protocol includes the following steps: (i) feature selection, (ii) feature summarization, (iii) model building, and (iv) assessment of prediction significance. We also include suggestions for visualizing the most predictive features (i.e., brain connections). The final result should be a generalizable model that takes brain connectivity data as input and generates predictions of behavioral measures in novel subjects, accounting for a considerable amount of the variance in these measures. It has been demonstrated that the CPM protocol performs as well as or better than many of the existing approaches in brain-behavior prediction. As CPM focuses on linear modeling and a purely data-driven approach, neuroscientists with limited or no experience in machine learning or optimization will find it easy to implement these protocols. Depending on the volume of data to be processed, the protocol can take 10-100 min for model building, 1-48 h for permutation testing, and 10-20 min for visualization of results.

  10. Impulsive vaccination and dispersal on dynamics of an SIR epidemic model with restricting infected individuals boarding transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianjun; Cai, Shaohong; Li, Limei

    2016-05-01

    To understand the effect of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports on disease spread, we establish an SIR model with impulsive vaccination, impulsive dispersal and restricting infected individuals boarding transports. This SIR epidemic model for two regions, which are connected by transportation of non-infected individuals, portrays the evolvement of diseases. We prove that all solutions of the investigated system are uniformly ultimately bounded. We also prove that there exists globally asymptotically stable infection-free boundary periodic solution. The condition for permanence is discussed. It is concluded that the approach of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports provides reliable tactic basis for preventing disease spread.

  11. Individual-based and continuum models of growing cell populations: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Helen; Drasdo, Dirk

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we compare two alternative theoretical approaches for simulating the growth of cell aggregates in vitro: individual cell (agent)-based models and continuum models. We show by a quantitative analysis of both a biophysical agent-based and a continuum mechanical model that for densely packed aggregates the expansion of the cell population is dominated by cell proliferation controlled by mechanical stress. The biophysical agent-based model introduced earlier (Drasdo and Hoehme in Phys Biol 2:133-147, 2005) approximates each cell as an isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, spherical object parameterised by measurable biophysical and cell-biological quantities and has been shown by comparison to experimental findings to explain the growth patterns of dense monolayers and multicellular spheroids. Both models exhibit the same growth kinetics, with initial exponential growth of the population size and aggregate diameter followed by linear growth of the diameter and power-law growth of the cell population size. Very sparse monolayers can be explained by a very small or absent cell-cell adhesion and large random cell migration. In this case the expansion speed is not controlled by mechanical stress but by random cell migration and can be modelled by the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) reaction-diffusion equation. The growth kinetics differs from that of densely packed aggregates in that the initial spread, as quantified by the radius of gyration, is diffusive. Since simulations of the lattice-free agent-based model in the case of very large random migration are too long to be practical, lattice-based cellular automaton (CA) models have to be used for a quantitative analysis of sparse monolayers. Analysis of these dense monolayers leads to the identification of a critical parameter of the CA model so that eventually a hierarchy of three model types (a detailed biophysical lattice-free model, a rule-based cellular automaton and a continuum approach

  12. Individual patient data meta-analysis of survival data using Poisson regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowther Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Individual Patient Data (IPD meta-analysis is often considered the gold-standard for synthesising survival data from clinical trials. An IPD meta-analysis can be achieved by either a two-stage or a one-stage approach, depending on whether the trials are analysed separately or simultaneously. A range of one-stage hierarchical Cox models have been previously proposed, but these are known to be computationally intensive and are not currently available in all standard statistical software. We describe an alternative approach using Poisson based Generalised Linear Models (GLMs. Methods We illustrate, through application and simulation, the Poisson approach both classically and in a Bayesian framework, in two-stage and one-stage approaches. We outline the benefits of our one-stage approach through extension to modelling treatment-covariate interactions and non-proportional hazards. Ten trials of hypertension treatment, with all-cause death the outcome of interest, are used to apply and assess the approach. Results We show that the Poisson approach obtains almost identical estimates to the Cox model, is additionally computationally efficient and directly estimates the baseline hazard. Some downward bias is observed in classical estimates of the heterogeneity in the treatment effect, with improved performance from the Bayesian approach. Conclusion Our approach provides a highly flexible and computationally efficient framework, available in all standard statistical software, to the investigation of not only heterogeneity, but the presence of non-proportional hazards and treatment effect modifiers.

  13. The Employment of spatial autoregressive models in predicting demand for natural gas; O Emprego de modelos auto-regressivos espaciais na previsao de demanda para gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Jorge Henrique de [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Alexandre Pinto Alves da [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica

    2010-07-01

    Develop the natural gas network is critical success factor for the distribution company. It is a decision that employs the demand given location 'x' and a future time 't' so that the net allows the best conditions for the return of the capital. In this segment, typical network industry, the spatial infra-structure vision associated to the market allows better evaluation of the business because to mitigate costs and risks. In fact, economic models little developed in order to assess the question of the location, due to its little employment by economists. The objective of this article is to analyze the application of spatial perspective in natural gas demand forecasting and to identify the models that can be employed observing issues of dependency and spatial heterogeneity; as well as the capacity of mapping of variables associated with the problem. (author)

  14. The probability of self-employment exit: An event history analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Debrulle, Jonas; Verbruggen, Marijke; Maes, Johan; Sels, Luc

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines demographic and career related determinants of the probability of self-employment survival and exit, separately for prior unemployed and prior employed individuals. Using data from a longitudinal panel of Belgian men and women for the period 1998 Q2 - 2007 Q4, we estimate discrete single and competing risks models. Our results indicate that 48% of the prior unemployed exit self-employment before the end of data collection, compared to 36% of the prior employed. Furthermore...

  15. Autoregressive spatial analysis and individual tree modeling as strategies for the management of Eremanthus erythropappus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henrique Ferraco Scolforo; Jose Roberto Soares Scolforo; Jose Marcio de Mello; Antonio Carlos Ferraz Filho; Diogo Francisco Rossoni; Thiza Falqueto Altoe; Antonio Donizette Oliveira; Renato Ribeiro de Lima

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to apply statistical techniques to discriminate fertilization treat-ments of Eremanthus erythropappus (DC.) MacLeish. through autoregressive modeling, and to develop individual tree models for diameter and crown area (CA) projection to define management strategies for candeia plantations sub-jected to different fertilization treatments. This is an important tree species originating from the Brazilian Atlantic Rain forest and Savannah biomes, intensively used in the cosmetic industry. Nonetheless, to date, research has not addressed the management of natural stands or plan-tations of the species. Our experiment was located in Baependi, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and comprised of four randomized blocks and 13 treatments. The treatments consisted of 12 different regimes of fertilization plus a control. Each sample plot was composed of 50 plants plus two border plants in a planting spacing of 2.5 9 2.0 m and undergoing pruning at 5 and 6 years of age. Starting in the second year, total tree height (H) and circumference (at 1.30 m from the ground or breast height, CBH) were measured every 6 months. Starting in the fifth year CA was measured. Tree growth varied by fertilization strategy. Differences were detected by using an autoregressive approach, considering that standard statistical methods were not powerful enough to detect significant differences. Three growth groups were formed, and maximum growth was obtained for treatment 10 (NPK, 8-28-16). Manage-ment guidelines are provided based on individual tree models for different fertilization levels.

  16. Error propagation models to examine the effects of geocoding quality on spatial analysis of individual-level datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandbergen, P A; Hart, T C; Lenzer, K E; Camponovo, M E

    2012-04-01

    The quality of geocoding has received substantial attention in recent years. A synthesis of published studies shows that the positional errors of street geocoding are somewhat unique relative to those of other types of spatial data: (1) the magnitude of error varies strongly across urban-rural gradients; (2) the direction of error is not uniform, but strongly associated with the properties of local street segments; (3) the distribution of errors does not follow a normal distribution, but is highly skewed and characterized by a substantial number of very large error values; and (4) the magnitude of error is spatially autocorrelated and is related to properties of the reference data. This makes it difficult to employ analytic approaches or Monte Carlo simulations for error propagation modeling because these rely on generalized statistical characteristics. The current paper describes an alternative empirical approach to error propagation modeling for geocoded data and illustrates its implementation using three different case-studies of geocoded individual-level datasets. The first case-study consists of determining the land cover categories associated with geocoded addresses using a point-in-raster overlay. The second case-study consists of a local hotspot characterization using kernel density analysis of geocoded addresses. The third case-study consists of a spatial data aggregation using enumeration areas of varying spatial resolution. For each case-study a high quality reference scenario based on address points forms the basis for the analysis, which is then compared to the result of various street geocoding techniques. Results show that the unique nature of the positional error of street geocoding introduces substantial noise in the result of spatial analysis, including a substantial amount of bias for some analysis scenarios. This confirms findings from earlier studies, but expands these to a wider range of analytical techniques.

  17. Perceptual compensation is correlated with individuals' "autistic" traits: implications for models of sound change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C L Yu

    Full Text Available Variation is a ubiquitous feature of speech. Listeners must take into account context-induced variation to recover the interlocutor's intended message. When listeners fail to normalize for context-induced variation properly, deviant percepts become seeds for new perceptual and production norms. In question is how deviant percepts accumulate in a systematic fashion to give rise to sound change (i.e., new pronunciation norms within a given speech community. The present study investigated subjects' classification of /s/ and // before /a/ or /u/ spoken by a male or a female voice. Building on modern cognitive theories of autism-spectrum condition, which see variation in autism-spectrum condition in terms of individual differences in cognitive processing style, we established a significant correlation between individuals' normalization for phonetic context (i.e., whether the following vowel is /a/ or /u/ and talker voice variation (i.e., whether the talker is male or female in speech and their "autistic" traits, as measured by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ. In particular, our mixed-effect logistic regression models show that women with low AQ (i.e., the least "autistic" do not normalize for phonetic coarticulation as much as men and high AQ women. This study provides first direct evidence that variability in human's ability to compensate for context-induced variations in speech perceptually is governed by the individual's sex and cognitive processing style. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that the systematic infusion of new linguistic variants (i.e., the deviant percepts originate from a sub-segment of the speech community that consistently under-compensates for contextual variation in speech.

  18. Environmental and Individual Determinants of Female Entrepreneurship in Algeria: Applying the Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrezzak BENHABIB

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the seminal work of Fishbein and Ajzen (1975, we try  to clarify  how  individual  and  environment  factors  influence  the students’  attitudes towards Entrepreneurship and Entrepreneurial Intention. After a short review of literature, we present the results of an empirical study conducted among a sample of 290 final year students by using a structural  equation  modeling  validated  through  the  use  of  a  two-stage  analysis  of Anderson  and  Gerbing  (1988  and  a  factorial  confirmatory  analysis  and  a measurement adjustment (Hair et al.1998. Attitude driven from individual variables is negative while that derived from environmental  variables  is  positive.  Our  results  show  furthermore,  that  the  role  of media and institutions is still Limited and needs redeployment. Woman is now recognized as one of the  sources of  economic  growth  (Arasti  2008.  Although  female  entrepreneurship  is  attracting more and more researchers, it is still considered as an understudied field of research (De Bruin et al.2006, 2007; Brush, De Bruin, & Welter, 2009. Research  on  female  entrepreneurship  has  intensified since  the  early  80s,  but  few  have  explored  the  influence  of  environmental  and individual factors related to female entrepreneurship.

  19. Individual, Model-independent Masses of the Closest Known Brown Dwarf Binary to the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E. Victor; Ammons, S. Mark; Salama, Maissa; Crossfield, Ian; Bendek, Eduardo; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Garrel, Vincent; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Konopacky, Quinn; Lu, Jessica R.; Macintosh, Bruce; Marin, Eduardo; Marois, Christian; Nielsen, Eric; Neichel, Benoît; Pham, Don; De Rosa, Robert J.; Ryan, Dominic M.; Service, Maxwell; Sivo, Gaetano

    2017-09-01

    At a distance of ∼2 pc, our nearest brown dwarf neighbor, Luhman 16 AB, has been extensively studied since its discovery 3 years ago, yet its most fundamental parameter—the masses of the individual dwarfs—has not been constrained with precision. In this work, we present the full astrometric orbit and barycentric motion of Luhman 16 AB and the first precision measurements of the individual component masses. We draw upon archival observations spanning 31 years from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt Telescope, the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS), public FORS2 data on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), and new astrometry from the Gemini South Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). Finally, we include three radial velocity measurements of the two components from VLT/CRIRES, spanning one year. With this new data sampling a full period of the orbit, we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to fit a 16-parameter model incorporating mutual orbit and barycentric motion parameters and constrain the individual masses to be {27.9}-1.0+1.1 {M}J for the T dwarf and {34.2}-1.1+1.3 {M}J for the L dwarf. Our measurements of Luhman 16 AB’s mass ratio and barycentric motion parameters are consistent with previous estimates in the literature utilizing recent astrometry only. The GeMS-derived measurements of the Luhman 16 AB separation in 2014–2015 agree closely with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurements made during the same epoch, and the derived mutual orbit agrees with those measurements to within the HST uncertainties of 0.3–0.4 mas.

  20. How much do differences in medical schools influence student performance? A longitudinal study employing hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Kent; Violato, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Medical school curricula have undergone considerable change in the past half century. There is little evidence, however, for the impact of various curricula and educational policies on student learning once incoming performance and the nonrandom nature of students nested within schools has been accounted for. To investigate effects of school variables on United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1-3 scores over an 11-year period (1994-2004). Using Association of American Medical Colleges and USMLE longitudinal data for 116 medical schools, hierarchical linear modeling was used to study the effects of school variables on Step 1-3. Mean unadjusted between school variance was 14.74%, 10.50%, and 11.25%, for USMLE Step 1-3. When student covariates were included, between-school variation was less than 5%. The variance accounted for in student performance by the student covariates ranged from 27.58% to 36.51% for Step 1,16.37% to 24.48% for Step 2 and 19.22% to 25.32% for Step 3.The proportion of the between-school variance that was accounted for by the student covariates ranged between 81.22% and 88.26% for Step 1, 48.44% and 79.77% for Step 2, and 68.41% and 80.78% for Step 3 [corrected]. School-level variables did not consistently predict for adjusted mean school Step performance. Individual student differences account for most of the variation in USMLE performance with small contributions from between-school variation and even smaller contribution from curriculum and educational policies.