WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling height development

  1. Development of large Area Covering Height Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, K.

    2014-04-01

    Height information is a basic part of topographic mapping. Only in special areas frequent update of height models is required, usually the update cycle is quite lower as for horizontal map information. Some height models are available free of charge in the internet; for commercial height models a fee has to be paid. Mostly digital surface models (DSM) with the height of the visible surface are given and not the bare ground height, as required for standard mapping. Nevertheless by filtering of DSM, digital terrain models (DTM) with the height of the bare ground can be generated with the exception of dense forest areas where no height of the bare ground is available. These height models may be better as the DTM of some survey administrations. In addition several DTM from national survey administrations are classified, so as alternative the commercial or free of charge available information from internet can be used. The widely used SRTM DSM is available also as ACE-2 GDEM corrected by altimeter data for systematic height errors caused by vegetation and orientation errors. But the ACE-2 GDEM did not respect neighbourhood information. With the worldwide covering TanDEM-X height model, distributed starting 2014 by Airbus Defence and Space (former ASTRIUM) as WorldDEM, higher level of details and accuracy is reached as with other large area covering height models. At first the raw-version of WorldDEM will be available, followed by an edited version and finally as WorldDEM-DTM a height model of the bare ground. With 12 m spacing and a relative standard deviation of 1.2 m within an area of 1° x 1° an accuracy and resolution level is reached, satisfying also for larger map scales. For limited areas with the HDEM also a height model with 6 m spacing and a relative vertical accuracy of 0.5 m can be generated on demand. By bathymetric LiDAR and stereo images also the height of the sea floor can be determined if the water has satisfying transparency. Another method of getting

  2. Modelling the development of mixing height in near equatorial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samah, A.A. [Univ. of Malaya, Air Pollution Research Unit, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1997-10-01

    Most current air pollution models were developed for mid-latitude conditions and as such many of the empirical parameters used were based on observations taken in the mid-latitude boundary layer which is physically different from that of the equatorial boundary layer. In the equatorial boundary layer the Coriolis parameter f is small or zero and moisture plays a more important role in the control of stability and the surface energy balance. Therefore air pollution models such as the OMLMULTI or the ADMS which were basically developed for mid-latitude conditions must be applied with some caution and would need some adaptation to properly simulate the properties of equatorial boundary layer. This work elucidates some of the problems of modelling the evolution of mixing height in the equatorial region. The mixing height estimates were compared with routine observations taken during a severe air pollution episodes in Malaysia. (au)

  3. Optimally combined regional geoid models for the realization of height systems in developing countries - ORG4heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Verena; Schmidt, Michael; Willberg, Martin; Pail, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Precise height systems require high-resolution and high-quality gravity data. However, such data sets are sparse especially in developing or newly industrializing countries. Thus, we initiated the DFG-project "ORG4heights" for the formulation of a general scientific concept how to (1) optimally combine all available data sets and (2) estimate realistic errors. The resulting regional gravity field models then deliver the fundamental basis for (3) establishing physical national height systems. The innovative key aspects of the project incorporate the development of a method which links (low- up to mid-resolution) gravity satellite mission data and (high- down to low-quality) terrestrial data. Hereby, an optimal combination of the data utilizing their highest measure of information including uncertainty quantification and analyzing systematic omission errors is pursued. Regional gravity field modeling via Multi-Resolution Representation (MRR) and Least Squares Collocation (LSC) are studied in detail and compared based on their theoretical fundamentals. From the findings, MRR shall be further developed towards implementing a pyramid algorithm. Within the project, we investigate comprehensive case studies in Saudi Arabia and South America, i. e. regions with varying topography, by means of simulated data with heterogeneous distribution, resolution, quality and altitude. GPS and tide gauge records serve as complementary input or validation data. The resulting products include error propagation, internal and external validation. A generalized concept then is derived in order to establish physical height systems in developing countries. The recommendations may serve as guidelines for sciences and administration. We present the ideas and strategies of the project, which combines methodical development and practical applications with high socio-economic impact.

  4. Development and Evaluation of Models for the Relationship between Tree Height and Diameter at Breast Height for Chinese-Fir Plantations in Subtropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-qiong; Deng, Xiang-wen; Huang, Zhi-hong; Xiang, Wen-hua; Yan, Wen-de; Lei, Pi-feng; Zhou, Xiao-lu; Peng, Chang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Tree diameter at breast height (dbh) and height are the most important variables used in forest inventory and management as well as forest carbon-stock estimation. In order to identify the key stand variables that influence the tree height-dbh relationship and to develop and validate a suit of models for predicting tree height, data from 5961 tree samples aged from 6 years to 53 years and collected from 80 Chinese-fir plantation plots were used to fit 39 models, including 33 nonlinear models and 6 linear models, were developed and evaluated into two groups. The results showed that composite models performed better in height estimate than one-independent-variable models. Nonlinear composite Model 34 and linear composite Model 6 were recommended for predicting tree height in Chinese fir plantations with a dbh range between 4 cm and 40 cm when the dbh data for each tree and the quadratic mean dbh of the stand (Dq) and mean height of the stand (Hm) were available. Moreover, Hm could be estimated by using the formula Hm = 11.707 × l n(Dq)-18.032. Clearly, Dq was the primary stand variable that influenced the height-dbh relationship. The parameters of the models varied according to stand age and site. The inappropriate application of provincial or regional height-dbh models for predicting small tree height at local scale may result in larger uncertainties. The method and the recommended models developed in this study were statistically reliable for applications in growth and yield estimation for even-aged Chinese-fir plantation in Huitong and Changsha. The models could be extended to other regions and to other tree species only after verification in subtropical China.

  5. Development and validation of fuel height models for terrestrial lidar - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric M. Rowell; Carl A. Seielstad; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to collect spatially continuous measurements of fuelbed characteristics across the plots and burn blocks of the 2012 RxCADRE experiments in Florida. Fuelbeds were scanned obliquely from plot/block edges at a height of 20 m above ground. Pre-fire blocks were scanned from six perspectives and four perspectives for post-...

  6. Technical note: Boundary layer height determination from lidar for improving air pollution episode modeling: development of new algorithm and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Wang, Zifa; Zhang, Wei; Gbaguidi, Alex; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Wang, Xiquan; Matsui, Ichiro; Sun, Yele

    2017-05-01

    Predicting air pollution events in the low atmosphere over megacities requires a thorough understanding of the tropospheric dynamics and chemical processes, involving, notably, continuous and accurate determination of the boundary layer height (BLH). Through intensive observations experimented over Beijing (China) and an exhaustive evaluation of existing algorithms applied to the BLH determination, persistent critical limitations are noticed, in particular during polluted episodes. Basically, under weak thermal convection with high aerosol loading, none of the retrieval algorithms is able to fully capture the diurnal cycle of the BLH due to insufficient vertical mixing of pollutants in the boundary layer associated with the impact of gravity waves on the tropospheric structure. Consequently, a new approach based on gravity wave theory (the cubic root gradient method: CRGM) is developed to overcome such weakness and accurately reproduce the fluctuations of the BLH under various atmospheric pollution conditions. Comprehensive evaluation of CRGM highlights its high performance in determining BLH from lidar. In comparison with the existing retrieval algorithms, CRGM potentially reduces related computational uncertainties and errors from BLH determination (strong increase of correlation coefficient from 0.44 to 0.91 and significant decreases of the root mean square error from 643 to 142 m). Such a newly developed technique is undoubtedly expected to contribute to improving the accuracy of air quality modeling and forecasting systems.

  7. A hierarchical linear model for tree height prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente J. Monleon

    2003-01-01

    Measuring tree height is a time-consuming process. Often, tree diameter is measured and height is estimated from a published regression model. Trees used to develop these models are clustered into stands, but this structure is ignored and independence is assumed. In this study, hierarchical linear models that account explicitly for the clustered structure of the data...

  8. A site dependent top height growth model for hybrid aspen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tord Johansson

    2013-01-01

    In this study height growth models for hybrid aspen were developed using three growth equations. The mean age of the hybrid aspen was 21 years (range 15−51 years) with a mean stand density of 946 stems ha-1 (87−2374) and a mean diameter at breast height (over bark) of 19.6 cm (8.5−40.8 cm). Site index was also examined in relation to soil type. Multiple samples were collected for three types of soil: light clay, medium clay and till. Site index curves were constructed using the col-lected data and compared with published reports. A number of dynamic equations were assessed for modeling top-height growth from total age. A Generalized Algebraic Difference Approach model derived by Cieszewski (2001) performed the best. This model explained 99% of the observed variation in tree height growth and exhibited no apparent bias across the range of predicted site indices. There were no significant differences between the soil types and site indices.

  9. Diagnostic test of predicted height model in Indonesian elderly: a study in an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmah Fatmah

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim In an anthropometric assessment, elderly are frequently unable to measure their height due to mobility and skeletal deformities. An alternative is to use a surrogate value of stature from arm span, knee height, and sitting height. The equations developed for predicting height in Indonesian elderly using these three predictors. The equations put in the nutritional assessment card (NSA of older people. Before the card which is the first new technology in Indonesia will be applied in the community, it should be tested. The study aimed was to conduct diagnostic test of predicted height model in the card compared to actual height.Methods Model validation towards 400 healthy elderly conducted in Jakarta City with cross-sectional design. The study was the second validation test of the model besides Depok City representing semi urban area which was undertaken as the first study.Result Male elderly had higher mean age, height, weight, arm span, knee height, and sitting height as compared to female elderly. The highest correlation between knee height and standing height was similar in women (r = 0.80; P < 0.001 and men (r = 0.78; P < 0.001, and followed by arm span and sitting height. Knee height had the lowest difference with standing height in men (3.13 cm and women (2.79 cm. Knee height had the biggest sensitivity (92.2%, and the highest specificity on sitting height (91.2%.Conclusion Stature prediction equation based on knee-height, arm span, and sitting height are applicable for nutritional status assessment in Indonesian elderly. (Med J Indones 2010;19:199-204Key words: diagnostic test, elderly, predicted height model

  10. Socioeconomic development and secular trend in height in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xin-Nan; Li, Hui; Wu, Hua-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Qin

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of socioeconomic development on secular trend in height among children and adolescents in China. Body height and spermarcheal/menarcheal ages were obtained from two periodic large-scale national representative surveys in China between 1975 and 2010. Chinese socioeconomic development indicators were obtained from the United Nations world population prospects. The effects of plausible determinants were assessed by partial least-squares regression. The average height of children and adolescents improved in tandem with socioeconomic development, without any tendency to plateau. The increment of height trend presented larger around puberty than earlier or later ages. The partial least-squares regressions with gross national income, life expectancy and spermarcheal/menarcheal age accounted for increment of height trend from 88.3% to 98.3% for males and from 82.9% to 97.3% for females in adolescence. Further, through the analysis of the variable importance for projection, the contributions of gross national income and life expectancy on height increment were confirmed to be significant in childhood and adolescence, and the contribution of spermarcheal/menarcheal age was superior to both of them in adolescence. We concluded that positive secular trend in height in China was significantly associated with socioeconomic status (GNI as indicator) and medical and health conditions (life expectancy as indicator). Earlier onset of spermarche and menarche proved to be an important role in larger increment of the trend over time of height at puberty for a population.

  11. 36 CFR 910.61 - Height of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Height of development. 910.61 Section 910.61 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  12. U.S. Geoid Heights, Scientific Model (G96SSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for the conterminous United States is the G96SSS model. The computation used about 1.8 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in...

  13. Analysis and Correction of Systematic Height Model Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    The geometry of digital height models (DHM) determined with optical satellite stereo combinations depends upon the image orientation, influenced by the satellite camera, the system calibration and attitude registration. As standard these days the image orientation is available in form of rational polynomial coefficients (RPC). Usually a bias correction of the RPC based on ground control points is required. In most cases the bias correction requires affine transformation, sometimes only shifts, in image or object space. For some satellites and some cases, as caused by small base length, such an image orientation does not lead to the possible accuracy of height models. As reported e.g. by Yong-hua et al. 2015 and Zhang et al. 2015, especially the Chinese stereo satellite ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) has a limited calibration accuracy and just an attitude recording of 4 Hz which may not be satisfying. Zhang et al. 2015 tried to improve the attitude based on the color sensor bands of ZY-3, but the color images are not always available as also detailed satellite orientation information. There is a tendency of systematic deformation at a Pléiades tri-stereo combination with small base length. The small base length enlarges small systematic errors to object space. But also in some other satellite stereo combinations systematic height model errors have been detected. The largest influence is the not satisfying leveling of height models, but also low frequency height deformations can be seen. A tilt of the DHM by theory can be eliminated by ground control points (GCP), but often the GCP accuracy and distribution is not optimal, not allowing a correct leveling of the height model. In addition a model deformation at GCP locations may lead to not optimal DHM leveling. Supported by reference height models better accuracy has been reached. As reference height model the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital surface model (DSM) or the new AW3D30 DSM, based on ALOS PRISM images, are

  14. ANALYSIS AND CORRECTION OF SYSTEMATIC HEIGHT MODEL ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jacobsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The geometry of digital height models (DHM determined with optical satellite stereo combinations depends upon the image orientation, influenced by the satellite camera, the system calibration and attitude registration. As standard these days the image orientation is available in form of rational polynomial coefficients (RPC. Usually a bias correction of the RPC based on ground control points is required. In most cases the bias correction requires affine transformation, sometimes only shifts, in image or object space. For some satellites and some cases, as caused by small base length, such an image orientation does not lead to the possible accuracy of height models. As reported e.g. by Yong-hua et al. 2015 and Zhang et al. 2015, especially the Chinese stereo satellite ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3 has a limited calibration accuracy and just an attitude recording of 4 Hz which may not be satisfying. Zhang et al. 2015 tried to improve the attitude based on the color sensor bands of ZY-3, but the color images are not always available as also detailed satellite orientation information. There is a tendency of systematic deformation at a Pléiades tri-stereo combination with small base length. The small base length enlarges small systematic errors to object space. But also in some other satellite stereo combinations systematic height model errors have been detected. The largest influence is the not satisfying leveling of height models, but also low frequency height deformations can be seen. A tilt of the DHM by theory can be eliminated by ground control points (GCP, but often the GCP accuracy and distribution is not optimal, not allowing a correct leveling of the height model. In addition a model deformation at GCP locations may lead to not optimal DHM leveling. Supported by reference height models better accuracy has been reached. As reference height model the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM digital surface model (DSM or the new AW3D30 DSM, based on ALOS

  15. Estimating Tree Height-Diameter Models with the Bayesian Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Six candidate height-diameter models were used to analyze the height-diameter relationships. The common methods for estimating the height-diameter models have taken the classical (frequentist approach based on the frequency interpretation of probability, for example, the nonlinear least squares method (NLS and the maximum likelihood method (ML. The Bayesian method has an exclusive advantage compared with classical method that the parameters to be estimated are regarded as random variables. In this study, the classical and Bayesian methods were used to estimate six height-diameter models, respectively. Both the classical method and Bayesian method showed that the Weibull model was the “best” model using data1. In addition, based on the Weibull model, data2 was used for comparing Bayesian method with informative priors with uninformative priors and classical method. The results showed that the improvement in prediction accuracy with Bayesian method led to narrower confidence bands of predicted value in comparison to that for the classical method, and the credible bands of parameters with informative priors were also narrower than uninformative priors and classical method. The estimated posterior distributions for parameters can be set as new priors in estimating the parameters using data2.

  16. Dependence of gait parameters on height in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Valentina; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Di Nardo, Francesco; Fioretti, Sandro; Burattini, Laura; Knaflitz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In clinical gait analysis is fundamental to have access to normative data, to be used as a reference in the interpretation of pathological walking. In a paediatric population this may be complicated by the dependence of gait parameters on child growth. The aim of this work is to provide the correlations of spatial-temporal gait parameters with children's height. We obtained the regression lines of cadence, double support, and gait phases, with respect to height, from a sample of 85 normally typically developing children aged 6 to 11. Our analysis of gait phases was not limited to the traditional analysis of stance and swing, but rather focused on the sub-phases of stance - heel contact, flat foot contact, push off - which proved to be an innovative approach to gait analysis. Heel contact decreased, flat foot contact increased and push off remained essentially unchanged with respect to children's height. These results may be useful in the interpretation of gait data in developing children, and the regression lines obtained may be used to normalize their gait parameters.

  17. Incorporating shape constraints in generalized additive modelling of the height-diameter relationship for Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Pya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measurements of tree heights and diameters are essential in forest assessment and modelling. Tree heights are used for estimating timber volume, site index and other important variables related to forest growth and yield, succession and carbon budget models. However, the diameter at breast height (dbh can be more accurately obtained and at lower cost, than total tree height. Hence, generalized height-diameter (h-d models that predict tree height from dbh, age and other covariates are needed. For a more flexible but biologically plausible estimation of covariate effects we use shape constrained generalized additive models as an extension of existing h-d model approaches. We use causal site parameters such as index of aridity to enhance the generality and causality of the models and to enable predictions under projected changeable climatic conditions. Methods: We develop unconstrained generalized additive models (GAM and shape constrained generalized additive models (SCAM for investigating the possible effects of tree-specific parameters such as tree age, relative diameter at breast height, and site-specific parameters such as index of aridity and sum of daily mean temperature during vegetation period, on the h-d relationship of forests in Lower Saxony, Germany. Results: Some of the derived effects, e.g. effects of age, index of aridity and sum of daily mean temperature have significantly non-linear pattern. The need for using SCAM results from the fact that some of the model effects show partially implausible patterns especially at the boundaries of data ranges. The derived model predicts monotonically increasing levels of tree height with increasing age and temperature sum and decreasing aridity and social rank of a tree within a stand. The definition of constraints leads only to marginal or minor decline in the model statistics like AIC. An observed structured spatial trend in tree height is modelled via 2-dimensional surface

  18. Development of Sediment Deposition Height Capacity Equation in Sewer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yangho; Jo, Deokjun; Lee, Jungho

    2017-04-01

    Sediment characteristics and transport processes in sewers are markedly different from river. There is a wide range of particle densities and smaller particle size variation in sewers. Sediment supply and the available erodible material are more limited in sewers, and the diverse hydraulic characteristics in sewer systems are more unsteady. Prevention of sewer sediment accumulation, which can cause major sewer operational problems, is imperative and has been an immense concern for engineers. The effects of sediment formation in sewer systems, an appropriate sediment transport modelling with the ability to determine the location and depth of sediment deposit is needed. It is necessary to design efficiently considering the transfer and settling phenomena of the sediment coming into the sewer systems. During transport in the sewer, the minimum shear flow velocity and possible shear stress at which the sediment is transported smoothly. However, the interaction of sediment and fluid within the sewer systems has been very complex and the rigorous theoretical handling of this problem has not been developed. It is derived from the empirical values obtained from the river bed. The basic theory that particles float is based on the balance between sedimentation of particles by gravity and turbulent diffusion of fluids. There are many variables related. Representative parameters include complex phenomena due to collisions between particles, particles and fluids, and interactions between particles and tube walls. In general, the main parameters that form the boundary between the main transport and sediment are particle size, density, volume fraction, pipe diameter and gravity. As the particle size and volume concentration increase, the minimum feed rate increases and the same tendency is observed for the change of the capillary diameter. Based on this tendency, this study has developed a sediment deposition height capacity formula to take into consideration the sewer discharge

  19. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms - 2. Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of height-integrated conductivity from 31 individual Dynamics Explorer (DE 2) substorm crossings presented by Gjerloev and Hoffman [this issue] are used to compile empirical models of the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities (conductances) in a bulge-type auroral substorm....... Global auroral images obtained by Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) were used to select substorms displaying a typical bulge-type emission pattern and each individual DE 2 pass was positioned with respect to key features in the observed emission pattern. The conductances were calculated for each DE 2 pass using...... electron precipitation data and a monoenergetic conductance model. All passes were divided into six different sectors, and average conductance profiles were carefully deduced for each of these sectors. Using a simple boxcar filter, smoothed average sector passes were calculated and from linear...

  20. Is the effect of a countermovement on jump height due to active state development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Casius, L J Richard

    2005-03-01

    To investigate whether the difference in jump height between countermovement jumps (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ) could be explained by a difference in active state during propulsion. Simulations were performed with a model of the human musculoskeletal system comprising four body segments and six muscles. The model's only input was STIM, the stimulation of muscles, which could be switched "off" or "on." After switching "on," STIM increased to its maximum at a fixed rate of change (dSTIM/dt). For various values of dSTIM/dt, stimulation switch times were optimized to produce a maximum height CMJ. From this CMJ, the configuration at the lowest height of the center of gravity (CG) was selected and used as static starting configuration for simulation of SJ. Next, STIM-switch times were optimized to find the maximum height SJ. Simulated CMJ and SJ closely resembled jumps of human subjects. Maximum jump height of the model was greater in CMJ than in SJ, with the difference ranging from 0.4 cm at infinitely high dSTIM/dt to about 2.5 cm at the lowest dSTIM/dt investigated. The greater jump height in CMJ was due to a greater work output of the hip extensor muscles. These muscles could produce more force and work over the first 30% of their shortening range in CMJ, due to the fact that they had a higher active state in CMJ than in SJ. The greater jump height in CMJ than in SJ could be explained by the fact that in CMJ active state developed during the preparatory countermovement, whereas in SJ it inevitably developed during the propulsion phase, so that the muscles could produce more force and work during shortening in CMJ.

  1. Modeling Dynamic Height and Crown Growth in Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, O.; Fransson, P.; Brännström, Å.

    2015-12-01

    Previously we have shown how principles based on productivity maximization (e.g. maximization of net primary production, net growth maximization, or functional balance) can explain allocation responses to resources, such as nutrients and light (Franklin et al., 2012). However, the success of these approaches depend on how well they align with the ultimate driver of plant behavior, fitness, or life time reproductive success. Consequently, they may not fully explain how allocation changes during the life cycle of trees where not only growth but also survival and reproduction are important. In addition, maximizing instantaneous productivity does not account for path dependence of tree growth. For example, maximizing productivity during early growth in shade may delay emergence in the forest canopy and reduce lifetime fitness compared to a more height oriented strategy. Here we present an approach to model how growth of stem diameter and leaf area in relation to stem height dynamically responds to light conditions in a way that maximizes life-time fitness (rather than instantaneous growth). The model is able to predict growth of trees growing in different types of forests, including trees emerging under a closed canopy and seedlings planted in a clear-cut area. It can also predict the response to sudden changes in the light environment, due to disturbances or harvesting. We envisage two main applications of the model, (i) Modeling effects of forest management, including thinning and planting (ii) Elucidating height growth strategies in trees and how they can be represented in vegetation models. ReferenceFranklin O, Johansson J, Dewar RC, Dieckmann U, McMurtrie RE, Brännström Å, Dybzinski R. 2012. Modeling carbon allocation in trees: a search for principles. Tree Physiology 32(6): 648-666.

  2. Active numerical model of human body for reconstruction of falls from height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanowicz, Marcin; Kędzior, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Falls from height constitute the largest group of incidents out of approximately 90,000 occupational accidents occurring each year in Poland. Reconstruction of the exact course of a fall from height is generally difficult due to lack of sufficient information from the accident scene. This usually results in several contradictory versions of an incident and impedes, for example, determination of the liability in a judicial process. In similar situations, in many areas of human activity, researchers apply numerical simulation. They use it to model physical phenomena to reconstruct their real course over time; e.g. numerical human body models are frequently used for investigation and reconstruction of road accidents. However, they are validated in terms of specific road traffic accidents and are considerably limited when applied to the reconstruction of other types of accidents. The objective of the study was to develop an active numerical human body model to be used for reconstruction of accidents associated with falling from height. Development of the model involved extension and adaptation of the existing Pedestrian human body model (available in the MADYMO package database) for the purposes of reconstruction of falls from height by taking into account the human reaction to the loss of balance. The model was developed by using the results of experimental tests of the initial phase of the fall from height. The active numerical human body model covering 28 sets of initial conditions related to various human reactions to the loss of balance was developed. The application of the model was illustrated by using it to reconstruct a real fall from height. From among the 28 sets of initial conditions, those whose application made it possible to reconstruct the most probable version of the incident was selected. The selection was based on comparison of the results of the reconstruction with information contained in the accident report. Results in the form of estimated

  3. Mixing height computation from a numerical weather prediction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jericevic, A. [Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Zagreb (Croatia); Grisogono, B. [Univ. of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia). Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical Inst., Faculty of Science

    2004-07-01

    Dispersion models require hourly values of the mixing height, H, that indicates the existence of turbulent mixing. The aim of this study was to investigate a model ability and characteristics in the prediction of H. The ALADIN, limited area numerical weather prediction (NWP) model for short-range 48-hour forecasts was used. The bulk Richardson number (R{sub iB}) method was applied to determine the height of the atmospheric boundary layer at one grid point nearest to Zagreb, Croatia. This specific location was selected because there were available radio soundings and the verification of the model could be done. Critical value of bulk Richardson number R{sub iBc}=0.3 was used. The values of H, modelled and measured, for 219 days at 12 UTC are compared, and the correlation coefficient of 0.62 is obtained. This indicates that ALADIN can be used for the calculation of H in the convective boundary layer. For the stable boundary layer (SBL), the model underestimated H systematically. Results showed that R{sub iBc} evidently increases with the increase of stability. Decoupling from the surface in the very SBL was detected, which is a consequence of the flow ease resulting in R{sub iB} becoming very large. Verification of the practical usage of the R{sub iB} method for H calculations from NWP model was performed. The necessity for including other stability parameters (e.g., surface roughness length) was evidenced. Since ALADIN model is in operational use in many European countries, this study would help the others in pre-processing NWP data for input to dispersion models. (orig.)

  4. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo by a clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Carlo; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Yang, Wenze; Schaaf, Crystal; Aleinov, Igor; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Sun, Qingsong; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as boundary conditions to the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer scheme (Ni-Meister et al., 2010) incorporated into the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources about land surface and vegetation characteristics obtained from a number of earth observation platforms and algorithms include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), soil albedo derived from MODIS (Carrer et al., 2014), along with vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014). Three widely used Leaf Area Index (LAI) products are compared as input to the GVSD and ACTS forcing in terms of vegetation albedo: Global Data Sets of Vegetation (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013), Beijing Normal University LAI (Yuan et al., 2011), and MODIS MOD15A2H product (Yang et al., 2006). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU; Harris et al., 2013) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC; Scheider et al., 2014) data. Final

  5. Modeling of the height control system using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Tahavvor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Automation of agricultural and machinery construction has generally been enhanced by intelligent control systems due to utility and efficiency rising, ease of use, profitability and upgrading according to market demand. A broad variety of industrial merchandise are now supplied with computerized control systems of earth moving processes to be performed by construction and agriculture field vehicle such as grader, backhoe, tractor and scraper machines. A height control machine which is used in measuring base thickness is consisted of two mechanical and electronic parts. The mechanical part is consisted of conveyor belt, main body, electrical engine and invertors while the electronic part is consisted of ultrasonic, wave transmitter and receiver sensor, electronic board, control set, and microcontroller. The main job of these controlling devices consists of the topographic surveying, cutting and filling of elevated and spotted low area, and these actions fundamentally dependent onthe machine's ability in elevation and thickness measurement and control. In this study, machine was first tested and then some experiments were conducted for data collection. Study of system modeling in artificial neural networks (ANN was done for measuring, controlling the height for bases by input variable input vectors such as sampling time, probe speed, conveyer speed, sound wave speed and speed sensor are finally the maximum and minimum probe output vector on various conditions. The result reveals the capability of this procedure for experimental recognition of sensors' behavior and improvement of field machine control systems. Inspection, calibration and response, diagnosis of the elevation control system in combination with machine function can also be evaluated by some extra development of this system. Materials and Methods Designing and manufacture of the planned apparatus classified in three dissimilar, mechanical and electronic module, courses of

  6. Model of topside ionosphere scale height based on topside sounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiev, I.; Marinov, P.; Watanabe, S.

    A new model of topside ionosphere scale height (TISH) is developed, based on the vertical electron density (Ne) profiles obtained from topside ionosondes. The model provides the vertical scale height as a function of month of the year, local time, geomagnetic latitude, longitude and solar flux F107. To define TISH, the O+ scale height above the peak of the F2 layer is assumed to be represented by the lowest gradient in the measured profile. Then a regression line is calculated over those Ne values of the measured profile at which the gradient is within 39% from the lowest. This 30% tolerance accounts for the increase of plasma temperature with altitude. The model data base contains 170,033 TISH values, extracted from individual N(h) profiles gathered between 1962 and 1978 by Aluoette and ISIS satellites. The data sample sufficiently all parameter's ranges. The model describes the vertical plasma scale height by a multivariable polynomial consisted from Chebishev's and trigonometric base functions, which is fitted to the data in the 5-dimensional space. The model TISH variations along the different parameters are presented. The model results are compared with IRI and other available models.

  7. Height-for-age z scores increase despite increasing height deficits among children in 5 developing countries123

    OpenAIRE

    Lundeen, Elizabeth A.; Aryeh D. Stein; Adair, Linda S.; Behrman, Jere R.; Bhargava, Santosh K.; Dearden, Kirk A; Gigante,Denise; Norris, Shane A; Richter, Linda M.; Fall, Caroline HD; Martorell, Reynaldo; Sachdev, Harshpal Singh; Victora, Cesar G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Growth failure remains a persistent challenge in many countries, and understanding child growth patterns is critical to the development of appropriate interventions and their evaluation. The interpretation of changes in mean height-for-age z scores (HAZs) over time to define catch-up growth has been a subject of debate. Most studies of child growth have been cross-sectional or have focused on children through age 5 y.

  8. Modeling low-height vegetation with airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-height vegetation, common in semiarid regions, is difficult to characterize with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) due to similarities, in time and space, of the point returns of vegetation and ground. Other complications may occur due to the low-height vegetation structural characteristics a...

  9. Mixing height derived from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model, and used for ETEX dispersion modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, J.H.; Rasmussen, A. [Danish Meteorological Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    For atmospheric dispersion modelling it is of great significance to estimate the mixing height well. Mesoscale and long-range diffusion models using output from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models may well use NWP model profiles of wind, temperature and humidity in computation of the mixing height. This is dynamically consistent, and enables calculation of the mixing height for predicted states of the atmosphere. In autumn 1994, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) was carried out with the objective to validate atmospheric dispersion models. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) participates in the model evaluations with the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA) using NWP model data from the DMI version of the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM) as well as from the global model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). In DERMA, calculation of mixing heights are performed based on a bulk Richardson number approach. Comparing with tracer gas measurements for the first ETEX experiment, a sensitivity study is performed for DERMA. Using DMI-HIRLAM data, the study shows that optimum values of the critical bulk Richardson number in the range 0.15-0.35 are adequate. These results are in agreement with recent mixing height verification studies against radiosonde data. The fairly large range of adequate critical values is a signature of the robustness of the method. Direct verification results against observed missing heights from operational radio-sondes released under the ETEX plume are presented. (au) 10 refs.

  10. Validation of mixing heights derived from the operational NWP models at the German weather service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, B.; Schrodin, R.; Jacobsen, I. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach (Germany); Engelbart, D. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorol. Observ. Lindenberg (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    NWP models incorporate an ever-increasing number of observations via four-dimensional data assimilation and are capable of providing comprehensive information about the atmosphere both in space and time. They describe not only near surface parameters but also the vertical structure of the atmosphere. They operate daily, are well verified and successfully used as meteorological pre-processors in large-scale dispersion modelling. Applications like ozone forecasts, emission or power plant control calculations require highly resolved, reliable, and routine values of the temporal evolution of the mixing height (MH) which is a critical parameter in determining the mixing and transformation of substances and the resulting pollution levels near the ground. The purpose of development at the German Weather Service is a straightforward mixing height scheme that uses only parameters derived from NWP model variables and thus automatically provides spatial and temporal fields of mixing heights on an operational basis. An universal parameter to describe stability is the Richardson number Ri. Compared to the usual diagnostic or rate equations, the Ri number concept of determining mixing heights has the advantage of using not only surface layer parameters but also regarding the vertical structure of the boundary layer resolved in the NWP models. (au)

  11. Modeling nonstationary extreme wave heights in present and future climate of Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Galiatsatou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV distribution function was used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum wave heights for selected locations in the Greek Seas, both in the present and future climate. The available significant wave height data were divided into groups corresponding to the present period (1951 to 2000, a first future period (2001 to 2050, and a second future period (2051 to 2100. For each time period, the parameters of the GEV distribution were specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN. For each location and selected time period, a total number of 29 linear and nonlinear models were fitted to the wave data, for a given combination of covariates. The covariates used in the GEV-CDN models consisted of wind fields resulting from the Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3 developed by the International Center for Theoritical Physics (ICTP with a spatial resolution of 10 km × 10 km, after being processed using principal component analysis (PCA. The results obtained from the best fitted models in the present and future periods for each location were compared, revealing different patterns of relationships between wind components and extreme wave height quantiles in different parts of the Greek Seas and different periods. The analysis demonstrates an increase of extreme wave heights in the first future period as compared with the present period, causing a significant threat to Greek coastal areas in the North Aegean Sea and the Ionian Sea.

  12. Development of MCNPX-ESUT computer code for simulation of neutron/gamma pulse height distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfazl Hosseini, Seyed; Vosoughi, Naser; Zangian, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the development of the MCNPX-ESUT (MCNPX-Energy Engineering of Sharif University of Technology) computer code for simulation of neutron/gamma pulse height distribution is reported. Since liquid organic scintillators like NE-213 are well suited and routinely used for spectrometry in mixed neutron/gamma fields, this type of detectors is selected for simulation in the present study. The proposed algorithm for simulation includes four main steps. The first step is the modeling of the neutron/gamma particle transport and their interactions with the materials in the environment and detector volume. In the second step, the number of scintillation photons due to charged particles such as electrons, alphas, protons and carbon nuclei in the scintillator material is calculated. In the third step, the transport of scintillation photons in the scintillator and lightguide is simulated. Finally, the resolution corresponding to the experiment is considered in the last step of the simulation. Unlike the similar computer codes like SCINFUL, NRESP7 and PHRESP, the developed computer code is applicable to both neutron and gamma sources. Hence, the discrimination of neutron and gamma in the mixed fields may be performed using the MCNPX-ESUT computer code. The main feature of MCNPX-ESUT computer code is that the neutron/gamma pulse height simulation may be performed without needing any sort of post processing. In the present study, the pulse height distributions due to a monoenergetic neutron/gamma source in NE-213 detector using MCNPX-ESUT computer code is simulated. The simulated neutron pulse height distributions are validated through comparing with experimental data (Gohil et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 664 (2012) 304-309.) and the results obtained from similar computer codes like SCINFUL, NRESP7 and Geant4. The simulated gamma pulse height distribution for a 137Cs

  13. Multiresolution wavelet-ANN model for significant wave height forecasting.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deka, P.C.; Mandal, S.; Prahlada, R.

    Hybrid wavelet artificial neural network (WLNN) has been applied in the present study to forecast significant wave heights (Hs). Here Discrete Wavelet Transformation is used to preprocess the time series data (Hs) prior to Artificial Neural Network...

  14. A Photogrammetric Workflow for the Creation of a Forest Canopy Height Model from Small Unmanned Aerial System Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lejeune

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of operational small unmanned aerial systems (UASs opens the door for their extensive use in forest mapping, as both the spatial and temporal resolution of UAS imagery better suit local-scale investigation than traditional remote sensing tools. This article focuses on the use of combined photogrammetry and “Structure from Motion” approaches in order to model the forest canopy surface from low-altitude aerial images. An original workflow, using the open source and free photogrammetric toolbox, MICMAC (acronym for Multi Image Matches for Auto Correlation Methods, was set up to create a digital canopy surface model of deciduous stands. In combination with a co-registered light detection and ranging (LiDAR digital terrain model, the elevation of vegetation was determined, and the resulting hybrid photo/LiDAR canopy height model was compared to data from a LiDAR canopy height model and from forest inventory data. Linear regressions predicting dominant height and individual height from plot metrics and crown metrics showed that the photogrammetric canopy height model was of good quality for deciduous stands. Although photogrammetric reconstruction significantly smooths the canopy surface, the use of this workflow has the potential to take full advantage of the flexible revisit period of drones in order to refresh the LiDAR canopy height model and to collect dense multitemporal canopy height series.

  15. Hybrid Modeling of Flotation Height in Air Flotation Oven Based on Selective Bagging Ensemble Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of the flotation height is very necessary for the precise control of the air flotation oven process, therefore, avoiding the scratch and improving production quality. In this paper, a hybrid flotation height prediction model is developed. Firstly, a simplified mechanism model is introduced for capturing the main dynamic behavior of the process. Thereafter, for compensation of the modeling errors existing between actual system and mechanism model, an error compensation model which is established based on the proposed selective bagging ensemble method is proposed for boosting prediction accuracy. In the framework of the selective bagging ensemble method, negative correlation learning and genetic algorithm are imposed on bagging ensemble method for promoting cooperation property between based learners. As a result, a subset of base learners can be selected from the original bagging ensemble for composing a selective bagging ensemble which can outperform the original one in prediction accuracy with a compact ensemble size. Simulation results indicate that the proposed hybrid model has a better prediction performance in flotation height than other algorithms’ performance.

  16. Height-diameter relationships for Scots pine plantations in Bulgaria: optimal combination of model type and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vassileva Stankova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The height-diameter relationship is an important and extensively investigated forest model, but generalized and mixed-effects models of wider applicability are currently lacking in the forest modeling literature for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. plantations in Bulgaria. Considering the practical advantages of deterministic and mixed-effects models, the present study aims to derive a generalized deterministic height-diameter relationship and a simple mixed-effects model for plantation-grown Scots pine in Bulgaria. Ten generalized and six local models of adequate mathematical properties were selected and examined in several subsequent steps with a representative data set. A deterministic model was derived for tree height reconstruction from the individual tree diameters, stand dominant height and diameter, number of trees per hectare and stand age. Mixed-effects models were developed from the individual-tree and stand diameters and heights applicable to determine the height-diameter relationship in field surveys. Both types of models can be applied with confidence, according to their advantages and specifications, for estimating the height-diameter relationship of Scots pine plantations in Bulgaria, presenting a unique contribution for the particular species, study area and type of model. The choice of the tested models is relevant to the height-diameter relationship investigation of biologically related and geographically close species and types of stands and the study procedure allows repetition of the work to provide reliable solutions of the problem where information on such type of model is deficient or incomplete. 

  17. Sensitivity analysis of the boundary layer height on idealised cities (model study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schayes, G. [Univ. of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Grossi, P. [Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The behaviour of the typical diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over cities is a complex function of very numerous environmental parameters. Two types of geographical situations have been retained: (i) inland city only surrounded by uniform fields, (ii) coastal city, thus influenced by the sea/land breeze effect. We have used the three-dimensional Thermal Vorticity-mode Mesoscale (TVM) model developed jointly by the UCL (Belgium) and JRC (Italy). In this study it has been used in 2-D mode allowing to perform many sensitivity runs. This implies that a kind of infinitely wide city has been effectively stimulated, but this does not affect the conclusions for the ABL height. The sensibility study has been performed for two turbulence closure schemes, for various assumptions for the ABL height definition in the model, and for a selected parameter, the soil water content. (LN)

  18. Local and generalized height-diameter models with random parameters for mixed, uneven-aged forests in Northwestern Durango, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacramento Corral-Rivas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We used mixed models with random components to develop height-diameter (h-d functions for mixed, uneven-aged stands in northwestern Durango (Mexico, considering the breast height diameter (d and stand variables as predictors. Methods The data were obtained from 44 permanent plots used to monitor stand growth under forest management in the study area. Results The generalized Bertalanffy-Richards model performed better than the other generalized models in predicting the total height of the species under study. For the genera Pinus and Quercus, the models were successfully calibrated by measuring the height of a subsample of three randomly selected trees close to the mean d, whereas for species of the genera Cupressus, Arbutus and Alnus, three trees were also selected, but they are specifically the maximum, minimum and mean d trees. Conclusions The presented equations represent a new tool for the evaluation and management of natural forest in the region.

  19. The relationship between height and economic development in Spain, 1850-1958.

    Science.gov (United States)

    María-Dolores, Ramón; Martínez-Carrión, José Miguel

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between height and some economic-development indicators in modern Spain by means of a recently constructed times series of data on conscripts. We estimate a Vector Autoregressive Equilibrium Correction Model (VECqM) to quantify the height and GDP per capita response to various living-standard indicators. We observe that conditions that perpetuate an elevated level of sickness and mortality and that raise the relative price of consumption goods tend to impede human growth, as reflected in a decline in average adult height, whereas factors that promote the purchase of health services and that help to open up the economy to international trade and ideas have tended to have an opposite effect from the 1850s onward. Our results also indicate that neither the level of per capita GDP nor its growth rate has a unidirectional relation to various measures of living standards, chiefly adult stature. Instead, our findings suggest that there may be behavioral factors (e.g., emphasis on health services), political factors (e.g., degree of openness), and economic factors (e.g., relative consumer costs to GDP deflator) whose affects may have been influenced the level of GDP, over the sample period.

  20. Modeling the height of young forests regenerating from recent disturbances in Mississippi using Landsat and ICESat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Huang, C.; Sun, G.; Shi, H.; Toney, C.; Zhu, Z.; Rollins, M.G.; Goward, S.N.; Masek, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Many forestry and earth science applications require spatially detailed forest height data sets. Among the various remote sensing technologies, lidar offers the most potential for obtaining reliable height measurement. However, existing and planned spaceborne lidar systems do not have the capability to produce spatially contiguous, fine resolution forest height maps over large areas. This paper describes a Landsat–lidar fusion approach for modeling the height of young forests by integrating historical Landsat observations with lidar data acquired by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation (ICESat) satellite. In this approach, “young” forests refer to forests reestablished following recent disturbances mapped using Landsat time-series stacks (LTSS) and a vegetation change tracker (VCT) algorithm. The GLAS lidar data is used to retrieve forest height at sample locations represented by the footprints of the lidar data. These samples are used to establish relationships between lidar-based forest height measurements and LTSS–VCT disturbance products. The height of “young” forest is then mapped based on the derived relationships and the LTSS–VCT disturbance products. This approach was developed and tested over the state of Mississippi. Of the various models evaluated, a regression tree model predicting forest height from age since disturbance and three cumulative indices produced by the LTSS–VCT method yielded the lowest cross validation error. The R2 and root mean square difference (RMSD) between predicted and GLAS-based height measurements were 0.91 and 1.97 m, respectively. Predictions of this model had much higher errors than indicated by cross validation analysis when evaluated using field plot data collected through the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program of USDA Forest Service. Much of these errors were due to a lack of separation between stand clearing and non-stand clearing

  1. One-dimensional simulation of fire injection heights in contrasted meteorological scenarios with PRM and Meso-NH models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, S.; Freitas, S. R.; Mari, C.; Longo, K. M.; Paugam, R.

    2013-02-01

    Wild-fires release huge amounts of aerosol and hazardous trace gases in the atmosphere. The residence time and the dispersion of fire pollutants in the atmosphere can range from hours to days and from local to continental scales. These various scenarios highly depend on the injection height of smoke plumes. The altitude at which fire products are injected in the atmosphere is controlled by fire characteristics and meteorological conditions. Injection height however is still poorly accounted in chemistry transport models for which fires are sub-grid scale processes which need to be parametrised. Only recently, physically-based approaches for estimating the fire injection heights have been developed which consider both the convective updrafts induced by the release of fire sensible heat and the impact of background meteorological environment on the fire convection dynamics. In this work, two different models are used to simulate fire injection heights in contrasted meteorological scenarios: a Mediterranean arson fire and two Amazonian deforestation fires. A Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach, formerly developed to reproduce convective boundary layer in the non-hydrostatic meteorological model Meso-NH, is compared to the 1-D Plume Rise Model. For both models, radiosonde data and re-analyses from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have been used as initial conditions to explore the sensitivity of the models responses to different meteorological forcings. The two models predict injection heights for the Mediterranean fire between 1.7 and 3.3 km with the Meso-NH/EDMF model systematically higher than the 1-D PRM model. Both models show a limited sensitivity to the meteorological forcings with a 20-30% difference in the injection height between radiosondes and ECMWF data for this case. Injection heights calculated for the two Amazonian fires ranges from 5 to 6.5 km for the 1-D PRM model and from 2 to 4 km for the Meso-NH/EDMF model. The

  2. One-dimensional simulation of fire injection heights in contrasted meteorological scenarios with PRM and Meso-NH models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Strada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wild-fires release huge amounts of aerosol and hazardous trace gases in the atmosphere. The residence time and the dispersion of fire pollutants in the atmosphere can range from hours to days and from local to continental scales. These various scenarios highly depend on the injection height of smoke plumes. The altitude at which fire products are injected in the atmosphere is controlled by fire characteristics and meteorological conditions. Injection height however is still poorly accounted in chemistry transport models for which fires are sub-grid scale processes which need to be parametrised. Only recently, physically-based approaches for estimating the fire injection heights have been developed which consider both the convective updrafts induced by the release of fire sensible heat and the impact of background meteorological environment on the fire convection dynamics. In this work, two different models are used to simulate fire injection heights in contrasted meteorological scenarios: a Mediterranean arson fire and two Amazonian deforestation fires. A Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach, formerly developed to reproduce convective boundary layer in the non-hydrostatic meteorological model Meso-NH, is compared to the 1-D Plume Rise Model. For both models, radiosonde data and re-analyses from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF have been used as initial conditions to explore the sensitivity of the models responses to different meteorological forcings. The two models predict injection heights for the Mediterranean fire between 1.7 and 3.3 km with the Meso-NH/EDMF model systematically higher than the 1-D PRM model. Both models show a limited sensitivity to the meteorological forcings with a 20–30% difference in the injection height between radiosondes and ECMWF data for this case. Injection heights calculated for the two Amazonian fires ranges from 5 to 6.5 km for the 1-D PRM model and from 2 to 4 km for the Meso

  3. Effect of slope on treetop detection using a LiDAR Canopy Height Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosravipour, A.; Skidmore, A.K.; Wang, Tiejun; Isenburg, M.; Khoshelham, K.

    2015-01-01

    Canopy Height Models (CHMs) or normalized Digital Surface Models (nDSM) derived from LiDAR data have been applied to extract relevant forest inventory information. However, generating a CHM by height normalizing the raw LiDAR points is challenging if trees are located on complex terrain. On steep

  4. Wave Prediction Model To Study On The Wave Height Variation In Terengganu Coast Of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Amalina Abdul Latif

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study the significant wave height at the Terengganu and the change of wave height at Kuala Terengganu to Merang shoreline were simulated by using the 2D Near-Shore Wave 2D NSW model. The significant wave height by the 2D NSW model at Kuala Terengganu to Merang shoreline from 2008-2012 were simulated. The model was forced by ECMWF European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast data. The simulated significant wave height by the 2D NSW model at Airport Kuala Terengganu AWAC station was compared with the observed significant wave height. The mean annual significant wave height indicate the higher wave height with average mean value in a range of 1.08-1.10 m in Kuala Terengganu to Batu Rakit area and lower in Merang area with average mean value in a range of 0.74 m. The detailed 5 years simulation period demonstrates that the strong variability of wave height exists during North-East monsoon. The findings of this study could be useful for the erosive calculation shoreline protection and coastal zone management activities.

  5. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    -layer height: friction velocity, kinematic heat flux near the ground and potential temperature gradient in the free atmosphere above the entrainment zone. When information is available on the horizontal divergence of the large-scale flow field, the model also takes into account the effect of subsidence......A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth...

  6. Geoid Height and Deflection of the Vertical Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of the National Geodetic Survey has produced a series of high-resolution gravimetric geoid models, hybrid geoid models, and associated deflection of the...

  7. Stability and bistability in a one-dimensional model of coastal foredune height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Evan B.; Moore, Laura J.

    2016-05-01

    On sandy coastlines, foredunes provide protection from coastal storms, potentially sheltering low areas—including human habitat—from elevated water level and wave erosion. In this contribution we develop and explore a one-dimensional model for coastal dune height based on an impulsive differential equation. In the model, coastal foredunes continuously grow in a logistic manner as the result of a biophysical feedback and they are destroyed by recurrent storm events that are discrete in time. Modeled dunes can be in one of two states: a high "resistant-dune" state or a low "overwash-flat" state. The number of stable states (equilibrium dune heights) depends on the value of two parameters, the nondimensional storm frequency (the ratio of storm frequency to the intrinsic growth rate of dunes) and nondimensional storm magnitude (the ratio of total water level during storms to the maximum theoretical dune height). Three regions of phase space exist (1) when nondimensional storm frequency is small, a single high resistant-dune attracting state exists; (2) when both the nondimensional storm frequency and magnitude are large, there is a single overwash-flat attracting state; (3) within a defined region of phase space model dunes exhibit bistable behavior—both the resistant-dune and the low overwash-flat states are stable. Comparisons to observational studies suggest that there is evidence for each state to exist independently, the coexistence of both states (i.e., segments of barrier islands consisting of overwash-flats and segments of islands having large dunes that resist erosion by storms), as well as transitions between states.

  8. Implementation of spaceborne lidar-retrieved canopy height in the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junhong; Hong, Jinkyu

    2016-06-01

    Canopy height is closely related to biomass and aerodynamic properties, which regulate turbulent transfer of energy and mass at the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. However, this key information has been prescribed as a constant value in a fixed plant functional type in atmospheric models. This paper is the first to report impacts of using realistic forest canopy height, retrieved from spaceborne lidar, on regional climate simulation by using the canopy height data in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model's land surface model. Numerical simulations were conducted over the Amazon Basin during summer season. Over this region, the lidar-retrieved canopy heights were higher than the default values used in the WRF, which are dependent only on plant functional type. By modifying roughness length and zero-plane displacement height, the change of canopy height resulted in changes in surface energy balance by regulating aerodynamic conductances and vertical temperature gradient, thus modifying the lifting condensation level and equivalent potential temperature in the atmospheric boundary layer. Our analysis also showed that the WRF model better reproduced the observed precipitation when lidar-retrieved canopy height was used over the Amazon Basin.

  9. A linear scale height Chapman model supported by GNSS occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Pulido, G.; Hernández-Pajares, M.; Aragón-Àngel, A.; Garcia-Rigo, A.

    2016-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) radio occultations allow the vertical sounding of the Earth's atmosphere, in particular, the ionosphere. The physical observables estimated with this technique permit to test theoretical models of the electron density such as, for example, the Chapman and the Vary-Chap models. The former is characterized by a constant scale height, whereas the latter considers a more general function of the scale height with respect to height. We propose to investigate the feasibility of the Vary-Chap model where the scale height varies linearly with respect to height. In order to test this hypothesis, the scale height data provided by radio occultations from a receiver on board a low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite, obtained by iterating with a local Chapman model at every point of the topside F2 layer provided by the GNSS satellite occultation, are fitted to height data by means of a linear least squares fit (LLS). Results, based on FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC GPS occultation data inverted by means of the Improved Abel transform inversion technique (which takes into account the horizontal electron content gradients) show that the scale height presents a more clear linear trend above the F2 layer peak height, hm, which is in good agreement with the expected linear temperature dependence. Moreover, the parameters of the linear fit obtained during four representative days for all seasons, depend significantly on local time and latitude, strongly suggesting that this approach can significantly contribute to build realistic models of the electron density directly derived from GNSS occultation data.

  10. Marine boundary-layer height estimated from the HIRLAM model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    2002-01-01

    -number estimates based on output from the operational numerical weather prediction model HIRLAM (a version of SMHI with a grid resolution of 22.5 km x 22.5 km). For southwesterly winds it was found that a relatively large island (Bornholm) lying 20 km upwind of the measuring site influences the boundary...

  11. Assimilating satellite-based canopy height within an ecosystem model to estimate aboveground forest biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joetzjer, E.; Pillet, M.; Ciais, P.; Barbier, N.; Chave, J.; Schlund, M.; Maignan, F.; Barichivich, J.; Luyssaert, S.; Hérault, B.; von Poncet, F.; Poulter, B.

    2017-07-01

    Despite advances in Earth observation and modeling, estimating tropical biomass remains a challenge. Recent work suggests that integrating satellite measurements of canopy height within ecosystem models is a promising approach to infer biomass. We tested the feasibility of this approach to retrieve aboveground biomass (AGB) at three tropical forest sites by assimilating remotely sensed canopy height derived from a texture analysis algorithm applied to the high-resolution Pleiades imager in the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems Canopy (ORCHIDEE-CAN) ecosystem model. While mean AGB could be estimated within 10% of AGB derived from census data in average across sites, canopy height derived from Pleiades product was spatially too smooth, thus unable to accurately resolve large height (and biomass) variations within the site considered. The error budget was evaluated in details, and systematic errors related to the ORCHIDEE-CAN structure contribute as a secondary source of error and could be overcome by using improved allometric equations.

  12. A new statistical model of wave heights based on the concept of wave breaking critical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiaxuan; LI Xunqiang; ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing; WANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    When waves propagate from deep water to shallow water, wave heights and steepness increase and then waves roll back and break. This phenomenon is called surf. Currently, the present statistical calculation model of surf was derived mainly from the wave energy conservation equation and the linear wave dispersion relation, but it cannot reflect accurately the process which is a rapid increasing in wave height near the broken point. So, the concept of a surf breaking critical zone is presented. And the nearshore is divided as deep water zone, shallow water zone, surf breaking critical zone and after breaking zone. Besides, the calculation formula for the height of the surf breaking critical zone has founded based on flume experiments, thereby a new statistical calculation model on the surf has been established. Using the new model, the calculation error of wave height maximum is reduced from 17.62% to 6.43%.

  13. Use of national and international growth charts for studying height in European children: development of up-to-date European height-for-age charts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Bonthuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth charts based on data collected in different populations and time periods are key tools to assess children's linear growth. We analyzed the impact of geographic factors and the secular trend on height-for-age charts currently used in European populations, developed up-to-date European growth charts, and studied the effect of using different charts in a sample of growth retarded children. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In an international survey we obtained 18 unique national height-for-age charts from 28 European countries and compared them with charts from the World Health Organization (WHO, Euro-Growth reference, and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. As an example, we obtained height data from 3,534 children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD from 13 countries via the ESPN/ERA-EDTA registry, a patient group generally suffering from growth retardation. National growth charts showed a clear secular trend in height (mean height increased on average 0.6 cm/decade and a North-South height gradient in Europe. For countries without a recent (>1990 national growth chart novel European growth charts were constructed from Northern and Southern European reference populations, reflecting geographic height differences in mean final height of 3.9 cm in boys and 3.8 cm in girls. Mean height SDS of 2- to 17-year-old ESRD patients calculated from recent national or derived European growth charts (-1.91, 95% CI: -1.97 to -1.85 was significantly lower than when using CDC or WHO growth charts (-1.55, 95% CI: -1.61 to -1.49 (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Differences between height-for-age charts may reflect true population differences, but are also strongly affected by the secular trend in height. The choice of reference charts substantially affects the clinical decision whether a child is considered short-for-age. Therefore, we advocate using recent national or European height-for-age charts derived from recent national data when monitoring growth

  14. Impacts of Tree Height-Dbh Allometry on Lidar-Based Tree Aboveground Biomass Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, R.

    2016-06-01

    Lidar has been widely used in tree aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation at plot or stand levels. Lidar-based AGB models are usually constructed with the ground AGB reference as the response variable and lidar canopy indices as predictor variables. Tree diameter at breast height (dbh) is the major variable of most allometric models for estimating reference AGB. However, lidar measurements are mainly related to tree vertical structure. Therefore, tree height-dbh allometric model residuals are expected to have a large impact on lidar-based AGB model performance. This study attempts to investigate sensitivity of lidar-based AGB model to the decreasing strength of height-dbh relationship using a Monte Carlo simulation approach. Striking decrease in R2 and increase in relative RMSE were found in lidar-based AGB model, as the variance of height-dbh model residuals grew. I, therefore, concluded that individual tree height-dbh model residuals fundamentally introduce errors to lidar-AGB models.

  15. A new model to estimate significant wave heights with ERS-1/2 scatterometer data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jie; HE Yijun; William Perrie; SHEN Hui; CHU Xiaoqing

    2009-01-01

    A new model is proposed to estimate the significant wave heights with ERS-1/2 scatterometer data. The results show that the relationship between wave parameters and radar backscattering cross section is similar to that between wind and the radar backscattering cross section. Therefore, the relationship between significant wave height and the radar backscattering cross section is established with a neural network algorithm, which is, if the average wave period is ≤7s, the root mean square of significant wave height retrieved from ERS-1/2 data is 0.51 m, or 0.72 m if it is >7s otherwise.

  16. Through precision straits to next standard model heights

    CERN Document Server

    David, André

    2016-01-01

    After the LHC Run 1, the standard model (SM) of particle physics has been completed. Yet, despite its successes, the SM has shortcomings vis-\\`{a}-vis cosmological and other observations. At the same time, while the LHC restarts for Run 2 at 13 TeV, there is presently a lack of direct evidence for new physics phenomena at the accelerator energy frontier. From this state of affairs arises the need for a consistent theoretical framework in which deviations from the SM predictions can be calculated and compared to precision measurements. Such a framework should be able to comprehensively make use of all measurements in all sectors of particle physics, including LHC Higgs measurements, past electroweak precision data, electric dipole moment, $g-2$, penguins and flavor physics, neutrino scattering, deep inelastic scattering, low-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ scattering, mass measurements, and any search for physics beyond the SM. By simultaneously describing all existing measurements, this framework then becomes an intermed...

  17. Impact of implementation of spaceborne lidar-retrieved canopy height in the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junhong; Hong, Jinkyu

    2017-04-01

    Canopy height is closely related to biomass and aerodynamic properties, which regulate turbulent transfer of energy and mass at the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. However, this key information has been prescribed as a constant value in a fixed plant functional type in atmospheric models. This presentation reports impacts of using realistic forest canopy height, retrieved from spaceborne LiDAR, on regional climate simulation in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model's land surface model. Numerical simulations were conducted over the Amazon Basin and East Asia during summer season. Over these regions, the LiDAR-retrieved canopy heights were higher than the default values used in the WRF,which are dependent only on plant functional type. By modifying roughness length and zero-plane displacement height, the change of canopy height resulted in changes in surface energy balance by regulating aerodynamic conductances and vertical temperature gradient, thus modifying the lifting condensation level and equivalent potential temperature in the atmospheric boundary layer. Our analysis also showed that the WRF model better reproduced the observed precipitation when LiDAR-retrieved canopy height was used over the Amazon Basin.

  18. Height and bone age development in children with a malignant disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Zweens, M; Drayer, NM; Kamps, WA

    2000-01-01

    Because controversy exists about the growth inhibiting effect of chemotherapy, we studied up to 4 years after diagnosis, height, growth and bone age de development in 28 children treated with cytostatic drugs for a solid tumor or Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The results were compared with those

  19. Height and bone age development in children with a malignant disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Zweens, M; Drayer, NM; Kamps, WA

    2000-01-01

    Because controversy exists about the growth inhibiting effect of chemotherapy, we studied up to 4 years after diagnosis, height, growth and bone age de development in 28 children treated with cytostatic drugs for a solid tumor or Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The results were compared with those pr

  20. A Model Chain Application to Estimate Mixing Layer Height Related to PM10 Dispersion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guarnieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixing layer height (MLH is a crucial parameter in order to investigate the near surface concentrations of air pollutants. The MLH can be estimated by measurements of some atmospheric variables, by indirect estimates based on trace gases concentration or aerosol, or by numerical models. Here, a modelling approach is proposed. The developed modelling system is based on the models WRF-ARW and CALMET. This system is applied on Firenze-Prato-Pistoia area (Central Italy, during 2010, and it is compared with in situ measurements. The aim of this work is to evaluate the use of MLH model estimates to characterize the critical episodes for PM10 in a limited area. In order to find out the meteorological conditions predisposing accumulation of PM10 in the atmosphere’s lower level, some indicators are used: daily mean wind speed, cumulated rainfall, and mean MLH estimates from CALMET model. This indicator is linked to orography, which has important consequences on local weather dynamics. However, during critical events the local emission sources are crucial to the determination of threshold exceeding of PM10. Results show that the modelled MLH, together with cumulative rainfall and wind speed, can identify the meteorological conditions predisposing accumulation of air pollutant at ground level.

  1. Converting NAD83 GPS Heights Into NAVD88 Elevations With LVGEOID, a Hybrid Geoid Height Model for the Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Dzurisin, Daniel; Langbein, John; Svarc, Jerry; Hill, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A GPS survey of leveling benchmarks done in Long Valley Caldera in 1999 showed that the application of the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) geoid model GEOID99 to tie GPS heights to historical leveling measurements would significantly underestimate the caldera ground deformation (known from other geodetic measurements). The NGS geoid model was able to correctly reproduce the shape of the deformation, but required a local adjustment to give a realistic estimate of the magnitude of the uplift. In summer 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a new leveling survey along two major routes crossing the Long Valley region from north to south (Hwy 395) and from east to west (Hwy 203 - Benton Crossing). At the same time, 25 leveling bench marks were occupied with dual frequency GPS receivers to provide a measurement of the ellipsoid heights. Using the heights from these two surveys, we were able to compute a precise geoid height model (LVGEOID) for the Long Valley volcanic region. Our results show that although the LVGEOID and the latest NGS GEOID03 model practically coincide in areas outside the caldera, there is a difference of up to 0.2 m between the two models within the caldera. Accounting for this difference is critical when using the geoid height model to estimate the ground deformation due to magmatic or tectonic activity in the caldera.

  2. Topside correction of IRI by global modeling of ionospheric scale height using COSMIC radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. J.; Guo, P.; Fu, N. F.; Xu, T. L.; Xu, X. S.; Jin, H. L.; Hu, X. G.

    2016-06-01

    The ionosphere scale height is one of the most significant ionospheric parameters, which contains information about the ion and electron temperatures and dynamics in upper ionosphere. In this paper, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis method is applied to process all the ionospheric radio occultations of GPS/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) from the year 2007 to 2011 to reconstruct a global ionospheric scale height model. This monthly medium model has spatial resolution of 5° in geomagnetic latitude (-87.5° ~ 87.5°) and temporal resolution of 2 h in local time. EOF analysis preserves the characteristics of scale height quite well in the geomagnetic latitudinal, anural, seasonal, and diurnal variations. In comparison with COSMIC measurements of the year of 2012, the reconstructed model indicates a reasonable accuracy. In order to improve the topside model of International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), we attempted to adopt the scale height model in the Bent topside model by applying a scale factor q as an additional constraint. With the factor q functioning in the exponent profile of topside ionosphere, the IRI scale height should be forced equal to the precise COSMIC measurements. In this way, the IRI topside profile can be improved to get closer to the realistic density profiles. Internal quality check of this approach is carried out by comparing COSMIC realistic measurements and IRI with or without correction, respectively. In general, the initial IRI model overestimates the topside electron density to some extent, and with the correction introduced by COSMIC scale height model, the deviation of vertical total electron content (VTEC) between them is reduced. Furthermore, independent validation with Global Ionospheric Maps VTEC implies a reasonable improvement in the IRI VTEC with the topside model correction.

  3. Evaluation of Parameterization Schemes in the WRF Model for Estimation of Mixing Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of parameterization schemes in the WRF model for estimation of mixing height. Numerical experiments were performed using various combinations of parameterization schemes and the results were compared with the mixing height estimated using the radiosonde observations taken by the India Meteorological Department (IMD at Mangalore site for selected days of the warm and cold season in the years 2004–2007. The results indicate that there is a large variation in the mixing heights estimated by the model using various combinations of parameterization schemes. It was seen that the physics option consisting of Mellor Yamada Janjic (Eta as the PBL scheme, Monin Obukhov Janjic (Eta as the surface layer scheme, and Noah land surface model performs reasonably well in reproducing the observed mixing height at this site for both the seasons as compared to the other combinations tested. This study also showed that the choice of the land surface model can have a significant impact on the simulation of mixing height by a prognostic model.

  4. Comparison of measured and modelled mixing heights during the Borex`95 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Astrup, P.; Joergensen, H.E.; Ott, S. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Soerensen, J.H. [Danish Meteorological Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Loefstroem, P. [National Environmental Research Inst., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A real-time modelling system designed for `on-the-fly` assessment of atmospheric dispersion during accidental releases is under establishment within the framework of the European Union. It integrates real-time dispersion models for both local scale and long range transport with wind, turbulence and deposition models. As meteorological input, the system uses both on-situ measured and on-line available meteorology. The resulting real-time dispersion system is called MET-RODOS. This paper focuses on evaluation of the MET-RODOS systems build-in local scale pre-processing software for real-time determination of mixing height, - an important parameter for the local scale dispersion assessments. The paper discusses the systems local scale mixing height algorithms as well as its in-line mixing height acquisition from the DMI-HIRLAM model. Comparisons of the diurnal mixing height evolution is made with measured mixing heights from in-situ radio-sonde data during the Borex`95 field trials, and recently also with remote sensed (LIDAR) aerosol profiles measured at Risoe. (LN)

  5. Three-DOF dynamic model with lubricant contact for thermal fly-height control nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Hadjicostis, Christoforos N.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom dynamic contact model with friction and lubricant contact is introduced for thermal fly-height control of a near-contact flying slider. The proposed model addresses the issue of contact with a molecularly thin lubricant layer and includes a third degree-of-freedom, roll. Ne

  6. Height-diameter Models of Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata Based on Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models in Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tree height and diameter at breast height are two important forest factors. The best model from 23 height-diameter equations was selected as the basic model to fit the height-diameter relationships of Chinese fir with one level (sites or plots effects and nested two levels (nested effects of sites and plots Nonlinear Mixed Effects (NLME models. The best model was chosen by smaller Bias, RMSE and larger Radj2. Then the best random-effects combinations for the NLME models were determined by AIC, BIC and -2LL. The results showed that the basic model with three random effects parameters &Phi &Phi &Phi1 &Phi2 and &Phi3 was considered the best mixed model. The nested two levels NLME model considering heteroscedasticity structure (power function possessed with higher predictable accuracy and significantly improved model performance (LRT = 469.43, p<0.0001. The NLME model would be allowed for estimating accuracy the height-diameter relationships of Chinese fir and provided better height predictions than the models using only fixed-effects parameters.

  7. A predictive nondestructive model for the covariation of tree height, diameter, and stem volume scaling relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongrui; Zhong, Quanlin; Niklas, Karl J.; Cai, Liang; Yang, Yusheng; Cheng, Dongliang

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) posits that the scaling exponents among plant height H, diameter D, and biomass M will covary across phyletically diverse species. However, the relationships between scaling exponents and normalization constants remain unclear. Therefore, we developed a predictive model for the covariation of H, D, and stem volume V scaling relationships and used data from Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) in Jiangxi province, China to test it. As predicted by the model and supported by the data, normalization constants are positively correlated with their associated scaling exponents for D vs. V and H vs. V, whereas normalization constants are negatively correlated with the scaling exponents of H vs. D. The prediction model also yielded reliable estimations of V (mean absolute percentage error = 10.5 ± 0.32 SE across 12 model calibrated sites). These results (1) support a totally new covariation scaling model, (2) indicate that differences in stem volume scaling relationships at the intra-specific level are driven by anatomical or ecophysiological responses to site quality and/or management practices, and (3) provide an accurate non-destructive method for predicting Chinese fir stem volume.

  8. A predictive nondestructive model for the covariation of tree height, diameter, and stem volume scaling relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongrui; Zhong, Quanlin; Niklas, Karl J; Cai, Liang; Yang, Yusheng; Cheng, Dongliang

    2016-08-24

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) posits that the scaling exponents among plant height H, diameter D, and biomass M will covary across phyletically diverse species. However, the relationships between scaling exponents and normalization constants remain unclear. Therefore, we developed a predictive model for the covariation of H, D, and stem volume V scaling relationships and used data from Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) in Jiangxi province, China to test it. As predicted by the model and supported by the data, normalization constants are positively correlated with their associated scaling exponents for D vs. V and H vs. V, whereas normalization constants are negatively correlated with the scaling exponents of H vs. D. The prediction model also yielded reliable estimations of V (mean absolute percentage error = 10.5 ± 0.32 SE across 12 model calibrated sites). These results (1) support a totally new covariation scaling model, (2) indicate that differences in stem volume scaling relationships at the intra-specific level are driven by anatomical or ecophysiological responses to site quality and/or management practices, and (3) provide an accurate non-destructive method for predicting Chinese fir stem volume.

  9. Transferability of Models for Estimating Paddy Rice Biomass from Spatial Plant Height Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Tilly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is known that plant height is a suitable parameter for estimating crop biomass. The aim of this study was to confirm the validity of spatial plant height data, which is derived from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, as a non-destructive estimator for biomass of paddy rice on the field scale. Beyond that, the spatial and temporal transferability of established biomass regression models were investigated to prove the robustness of the method and evaluate the suitability of linear and exponential functions. In each growing season of two years, three campaigns were carried out on a field experiment and on a farmer’s conventionally managed field. Crop surface models (CSMs were generated from the TLS-derived point clouds for calculating plant height with a very high spatial resolution of 1 cm. High coefficients of determination between CSM-derived and manually measured plant heights (R2: 0.72 to 0.91 confirm the applicability of the approach. Yearly averaged differences between the measurements were ~7% and ~9%. Biomass regression models were established from the field experiment data sets, based on strong coefficients of determination between plant height and dry biomass (R2: 0.66 to 0.86 and 0.65 to 0.84 for linear and exponential models, respectively. The spatial and temporal transferability of the models to the farmer’s conventionally managed fields is supported by strong coefficients of determination between estimated and measured values (R2: 0.60 to 0.90 and 0.56 to 0.85 for linear and exponential models, respectively. Hence, the suitability of TLS-derived spatial plant height as a non-destructive estimator for biomass of paddy rice on the field scale was verified and the transferability demonstrated.

  10. The Impact of Forest Density on Forest Height Inversion Modeling from Polarimetric InSAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changcheng Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest height is of great significance in analyzing the carbon cycle on a global or a local scale and in reconstructing the accurate forest underlying terrain. Major algorithms for estimating forest height, such as the three-stage inversion process, are depending on the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG model. However, the RVoG model is characterized by a lot of parameters, which influence its applicability in forest height retrieval. Forest density, as an important biophysical parameter, is one of those main influencing factors. However, its influence to the RVoG model has been ignored in relating researches. For this paper, we study the applicability of the RVoG model in forest height retrieval with different forest densities, using the simulated and real Polarimetric Interferometric SAR data. P-band ESAR datasets of the European Space Agency (ESA BioSAR 2008 campaign were selected for experiments. The test site was located in Krycklan River catchment in Northern Sweden. The experimental results show that the forest density clearly affects the inversion accuracy of forest height and ground phase. For the four selected forest stands, with the density increasing from 633 to 1827 stems/Ha, the RMSEs of inversion decrease from 4.6 m to 3.1 m. The RVoG model is not quite applicable for forest height retrieval especially in sparsely vegetated areas. We conclude that the forest stand density is positively related to the estimation accuracy of the ground phase, but negatively correlates to the ground-to-volume scattering ratio.

  11. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Tree Heights: Part 1. Model Optimization and Testing over Continental USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna R. Nemani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology to generate spatially continuous fields of tree heights with an optimized Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations (ASRL model is reported in this first of a multi-part series of articles. Model optimization is performed with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS waveform data. This methodology is demonstrated by mapping tree heights over forested lands in the continental USA (CONUS at 1 km spatial resolution. The study area is divided into 841 eco-climatic zones based on three forest types, annual total precipitation classes (30 mm intervals and annual average temperature classes (2 °C intervals. Three model parameters (area of single leaf, α, exponent for canopy radius, η, and root absorption efficiency, γ were selected for optimization, that is, to minimize the difference between actual and potential tree heights in each of the eco-climatic zones over the CONUS. Tree heights predicted by the optimized model were evaluated against GLAS heights using a two-fold cross validation approach (R2 = 0.59; RMSE = 3.31 m. Comparison at the pixel level between GLAS heights (mean = 30.6 m; standard deviation = 10.7 and model predictions (mean = 30.8 m; std. = 8.4 were also performed. Further, the model predictions were compared to existing satellite-based forest height maps. The optimized ASRL model satisfactorily reproduced the pattern of tree heights over the CONUS. Subsequent articles in this series will document further improvements with the ultimate goal of mapping tree heights and forest biomass globally.

  12. A new global model for the ionospheric F2 peak height for radio wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hoque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The F2-layer peak density height hmF2 is one of the most important ionospheric parameters characterizing HF propagation conditions. Therefore, the ability to model and predict the spatial and temporal variations of the peak electron density height is of great use for both ionospheric research and radio frequency planning and operation. For global hmF2 modelling we present a nonlinear model approach with 13 model coefficients and a few empirically fixed parameters. The model approach describes the temporal and spatial dependencies of hmF2 on global scale. For determining the 13 model coefficients, we apply this model approach to a large quantity of global hmF2 observational data obtained from GNSS radio occultation measurements onboard CHAMP, GRACE and COSMIC satellites and data from 69 worldwide ionosonde stations. We have found that the model fits to these input data with the same root mean squared (RMS and standard deviations of 10%. In comparison with the electron density NeQuick model, the proposed Neustrelitz global hmF2 model (Neustrelitz Peak Height Model – NPHM shows percentage RMS deviations of about 13% and 12% from the observational data during high and low solar activity conditions, respectively, whereas the corresponding deviations for the NeQuick model are found 18% and 16%, respectively.

  13. A background error covariance model of significant wave height employing Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanyou; HOU Yijun; ZHANG Chunmei; YANG Jie

    2012-01-01

    The quality of background error statistics is one of the key components for successful assimilation of observations in a numerical model.The background error covariance(BEC)of ocean waves is generally estimated under an assumption that it is stationary over a period of time and uniform over a domain.However,error statistics are in fact functions of the physical processes governing the meteorological situation and vary with the wave condition.In this paper,we simulated the BEC of the significant wave height(SWH)employing Monte Carlo methods.An interesting result is that the BEC varies consistently with the mean wave direction(MWD).In the model domain,the BEC of the SWH decreases significantly when the MWD changes abruptly.A new BEC model of the SWH based on the correlation between the BEC and MWD was then developed.A case study of regional data assimilation was performed,where the SWH observations of buoy 22001 were used to assess the SWH hindcast.The results show that the new BEC model benefits wave prediction and allows reasonable approximations of anisotropy and inhomogeneous errors.

  14. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Tree Heights: Part 3. Model Optimization and Testing over Continental China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Ni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of our multi-article series is to demonstrate the Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitation (ASRL approach for mapping tree heights and biomass. This third article tests the feasibility of the optimized ASRL model over China at both site (14 meteorological stations and continental scales. Tree heights from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS waveform data are used for the model optimizations. Three selected ASRL parameters (area of single leaf, α; exponent for canopy radius, η; and root absorption efficiency, γ are iteratively adjusted to minimize differences between the references and predicted tree heights. Key climatic variables (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation are needed for the model simulations. We also exploit the independent GLAS and in situ tree heights to examine the model performance. The predicted tree heights at the site scale are evaluated against the GLAS tree heights using a two-fold cross validation (RMSE = 1.72 m; R2 = 0.97 and bootstrapping (RMSE = 4.39 m; R2 = 0.81. The modeled tree heights at the continental scale (1 km spatial resolution are compared to both GLAS (RMSE = 6.63 m; R2 = 0.63 and in situ (RMSE = 6.70 m; R2 = 0.52 measurements. Further, inter-comparisons against the existing satellite-based forest height maps have resulted in a moderate degree of agreements. Our results show that the optimized ASRL model is capable of satisfactorily retrieving tree heights over continental China at both scales. Subsequent studies will focus on the estimation of woody biomass after alleviating the discussed limitations.

  15. High-Throughput Phenotyping of Sorghum Plant Height Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Its Application to Genomic Prediction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kakeru; Guo, Wei; Arai, Keigo; Takanashi, Hideki; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Yano, Kentaro; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Toru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Genomics-assisted breeding methods have been rapidly developed with novel technologies such as next-generation sequencing, genomic selection and genome-wide association study. However, phenotyping is still time consuming and is a serious bottleneck in genomics-assisted breeding. In this study, we established a high-throughput phenotyping system for sorghum plant height and its response to nitrogen availability; this system relies on the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing with either an RGB or near-infrared, green and blue (NIR-GB) camera. We evaluated the potential of remote sensing to provide phenotype training data in a genomic prediction model. UAV remote sensing with the NIR-GB camera and the 50th percentile of digital surface model, which is an indicator of height, performed well. The correlation coefficient between plant height measured by UAV remote sensing (PHUAV) and plant height measured with a ruler (PHR) was 0.523. Because PHUAV was overestimated (probably because of the presence of taller plants on adjacent plots), the correlation coefficient between PHUAV and PHR was increased to 0.678 by using one of the two replications (that with the lower PHUAV value). Genomic prediction modeling performed well under the low-fertilization condition, probably because PHUAV overestimation was smaller under this condition due to a lower plant height. The predicted values of PHUAV and PHR were highly correlated with each other (r = 0.842). This result suggests that the genomic prediction models generated with PHUAV were almost identical and that the performance of UAV remote sensing was similar to that of traditional measurements in genomic prediction modeling. UAV remote sensing has a high potential to increase the throughput of phenotyping and decrease its cost. UAV remote sensing will be an important and indispensable tool for high-throughput genomics-assisted plant breeding.

  16. High-Throughput Phenotyping of Sorghum Plant Height Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Its Application to Genomic Prediction Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kakeru; Guo, Wei; Arai, Keigo; Takanashi, Hideki; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Yano, Kentaro; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Toru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Genomics-assisted breeding methods have been rapidly developed with novel technologies such as next-generation sequencing, genomic selection and genome-wide association study. However, phenotyping is still time consuming and is a serious bottleneck in genomics-assisted breeding. In this study, we established a high-throughput phenotyping system for sorghum plant height and its response to nitrogen availability; this system relies on the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing with either an RGB or near-infrared, green and blue (NIR-GB) camera. We evaluated the potential of remote sensing to provide phenotype training data in a genomic prediction model. UAV remote sensing with the NIR-GB camera and the 50th percentile of digital surface model, which is an indicator of height, performed well. The correlation coefficient between plant height measured by UAV remote sensing (PHUAV) and plant height measured with a ruler (PHR) was 0.523. Because PHUAV was overestimated (probably because of the presence of taller plants on adjacent plots), the correlation coefficient between PHUAV and PHR was increased to 0.678 by using one of the two replications (that with the lower PHUAV value). Genomic prediction modeling performed well under the low-fertilization condition, probably because PHUAV overestimation was smaller under this condition due to a lower plant height. The predicted values of PHUAV and PHR were highly correlated with each other (r = 0.842). This result suggests that the genomic prediction models generated with PHUAV were almost identical and that the performance of UAV remote sensing was similar to that of traditional measurements in genomic prediction modeling. UAV remote sensing has a high potential to increase the throughput of phenotyping and decrease its cost. UAV remote sensing will be an important and indispensable tool for high-throughput genomics-assisted plant breeding.

  17. Height-Diameter Models for Mixed-Species Forests Consisting of Spruce, Fir, and Beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petráš Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Height-diameter models define the general relationship between the tree height and diameter at each growth stage of the forest stand. This paper presents generalized height-diameter models for mixed-species forest stands consisting of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst., Silver fir (Abies alba L., and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Slovakia. The models were derived using two growth functions from the exponential family: the two-parameter Michailoff and three-parameter Korf functions. Generalized height-diameter functions must normally be constrained to pass through the mean stand diameter and height, and then the final growth model has only one or two parameters to be estimated. These “free” parameters are then expressed over the quadratic mean diameter, height and stand age and the final mathematical form of the model is obtained. The study material included 50 long-term experimental plots located in the Western Carpathians. The plots were established 40-50 years ago and have been repeatedly measured at 5 to 10-year intervals. The dataset includes 7,950 height measurements of spruce, 21,661 of fir and 5,794 of beech. As many as 9 regression models were derived for each species. Although the “goodness of fit” of all models showed that they were generally well suited for the data, the best results were obtained for silver fir. The coefficient of determination ranged from 0.946 to 0.948, RMSE (m was in the interval 1.94-1.97 and the bias (m was -0.031 to 0.063. Although slightly imprecise parameter estimation was established for spruce, the estimations of the regression parameters obtained for beech were quite less precise. The coefficient of determination for beech was 0.854-0.860, RMSE (m 2.67-2.72, and the bias (m ranged from -0.144 to -0.056. The majority of models using Korf’s formula produced slightly better estimations than Michailoff’s, and it proved immaterial which estimated parameter was fixed and which parameters

  18. Research on Inversion Models for Forest Height Estimation Using Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Duan, B.; Zou, B.

    2017-09-01

    The forest height is an important forest resource information parameter and usually used in biomass estimation. Forest height extraction with PolInSAR is a hot research field of imaging SAR remote sensing. SAR interferometry is a well-established SAR technique to estimate the vertical location of the effective scattering center in each resolution cell through the phase difference in images acquired from spatially separated antennas. The manipulation of PolInSAR has applications ranging from climate monitoring to disaster detection especially when used in forest area, is of particular interest because it is quite sensitive to the location and vertical distribution of vegetation structure components. However, some of the existing methods can't estimate forest height accurately. Here we introduce several available inversion models and compare the precision of some classical inversion approaches using simulated data. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of these inversion methods, researchers can find better solutions conveniently based on these inversion methods.

  19. EVALUATION OF NO SEGMENTED TAPER MODELS TO ESTIMATE HEIGHT AND MERCHANTABLE VOLUME FROM Eucalyptus sp. STEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Martinelli de Souza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate different taper models in the estimate of the merchantable height and volume and along the bole volumes of Eucalyptus sp., to the obtention of multiproducts. Considering the data of rigorous scaling of trees of Eucalyptus sp. with 16 years-old, it was appraised the models of taper of Demaerschalk (1972, Ormerod (1973, Schöepfer (1966, Hradetzky (1976, Garay (1979 and Biging (1984. Based on graphical analysis of the residues and on the statistics bias (B, average of the differences (MD and deviation pattern of the differences (DPD, it could be verified that, in the estimate of the merchantable height and volume of the models, Biging, Schöepfer and Hradetzky presented the best results, followed by the models of Garay, which have also shown good results. In general, considering the treatment of the volumes of the logs, the Biging model presented the best resuts.

  20. Mixed effect models for predicting breast height diameter from stump diameter of Oriental beech in Göldağ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Ercanli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diameter at breast height (DBH is the simplest, most common and most important tree dimension in forest inventory and is closely correlated with wood volume, height and biomass. In this study, a number of linear and nonlinear models predicting diameter at breast height from stump diameter were developed and evaluated for Oriental beech (Fagus orientalisLipsky stands located in the forest region of Ayancık, in the northeast of Turkey. A set of 1,501 pairs of diameter at breast height-stump measurements, originating from 70 sample plots of even-aged Oriental beech stands, were used in this study. About 80 % of the otal data (1,160 trees in 55 sample plots was used to fit a number of linear and nonlinear model parameters; the remaining 341 trees in 15 sample plots were randomly reserved for model validation and calibration response. The power model data set was found to produce the most satisfactory fits with the Adjusted Coefficient of Determination, R2adj (0.990, Root Mean Square Error, RMSE (1.25, Akaike’s Information Criterion, AIC (3820.5, Schwarz’s Bayesian Information Criterion, BIC (3837.2, and Absolute Bias (1.25. The nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach for power model with R2adj(0.993, AIC (3598, BIC (3610.1, Absolute Bias (0.73 and RMSE (1.04 provided much better fitting and precise predictions for DBH from stump diameter than the conventional nonlinear fixed effect model structures for this model. The calibration response including tree DBH and stump diameter measurements of the four largest trees in a calibrated sample plot in calibration produced the highest Bias, -5.31 %, and RMSE, -6.30 %, the greatest reduction percentage.

  1. Developments in the Aerosol Layer Height Retrieval Algorithm for the Copernicus Sentinel-4/UVN Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Swadhin; Sanders, Abram; Veefkind, Pepijn

    2016-04-01

    The Sentinel-4 mission is a part of the European Commission's Copernicus programme, the goal of which is to provide geo-information to manage environmental assets, and to observe, understand and mitigate the effects of the changing climate. The Sentinel-4/UVN instrument design is motivated by the need to monitor trace gas concentrations and aerosols in the atmosphere from a geostationary orbit. The on-board instrument is a high resolution UV-VIS-NIR (UVN) spectrometer system that provides hourly radiance measurements over Europe and northern Africa with a spatial sampling of 8 km. The main application area of Sentinel-4/UVN is air quality. One of the data products that is being developed for Sentinel-4/UVN is the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH). The goal is to determine the height of aerosol plumes with a resolution of better than 0.5 - 1 km. The ALH product thus targets aerosol layers in the free troposphere, such as desert dust, volcanic ash and biomass during plumes. KNMI is assigned with the development of the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH) algorithm. Its heritage is the ALH algorithm developed by Sanders and De Haan (ATBD, 2016) for the TROPOMI instrument on board the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission that is to be launched in June or July 2016 (tentative date). The retrieval algorithm designed so far for the aerosol height product is based on the absorption characteristics of the oxygen-A band (759-770 nm). The algorithm has heritage to the ALH algorithm developed for TROPOMI on the Sentinel 5 precursor satellite. New aspects for Sentinel-4/UVN include the higher resolution (0.116 nm compared to 0.4 for TROPOMI) and hourly observation from the geostationary orbit. The algorithm uses optimal estimation to obtain a spectral fit of the reflectance across absorption band, while assuming a single uniform layer with fixed width to represent the aerosol vertical distribution. The state vector includes amongst other elements the height of this layer and its aerosol optical

  2. Height in mid childhood and psychosocial competencies in late childhood: evidence from four developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, Stefan; Sánchez, Alan

    2013-12-01

    We use longitudinal data from children growing up in four developing countries (Peru, India, Vietnam, Ethiopia) to study the relationship between height at the age of 7-8 and a set of psychosocial competencies measured at the age of 11-12 that are known to be correlated with earnings during adulthood: self-efficacy, self-esteem and aspirations. Results show that a one standard deviation increase in height-for-age tends to increase self-efficacy, self-esteem and aspirations by 10.4%, 6.4% and 5.1%, respectively. We argue that these findings are likely to be informing of an underlying relationship between undernutrition and the formation of non-cognitive skills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Navicula height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, M; Nielsen, RG; Olesen, Christian Gammelgaard;

    2008-01-01

    position and relaxed standing posture. Excessive movement of the navicula is considered a predisposing factor in the development of shin splits. No single direct static measurement of navicula height has yet shown to predict a high degree of mid foot movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate...

  4. Wuthering Heights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronte, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Wuthering Heights tells the story of a romance between two youngsters: Catherine Earnshaw and an orphan boy, Heathcliff. After she rejects him for a boy from a better background he develops a lust for revenge that takes over his life. In attempting to win her back and destroy those he blames for his

  5. Effect of slope on treetop detection using a LiDAR Canopy Height Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravipour, Anahita; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; Isenburg, Martin; Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Canopy Height Models (CHMs) or normalized Digital Surface Models (nDSM) derived from LiDAR data have been applied to extract relevant forest inventory information. However, generating a CHM by height normalizing the raw LiDAR points is challenging if trees are located on complex terrain. On steep slopes, the raw elevation values located on either the downhill or the uphill part of a tree crown are height-normalized with parts of the digital terrain model that may be much lower or higher than the tree stem base, respectively. In treetop detection, a highest crown return located in the downhill part may prove to be a "false" local maximum that is distant from the true treetop. Based on this observation, we theoretically and experimentally quantify the effect of slope on the accuracy of treetop detection. The theoretical model presented a systematic horizontal displacement of treetops that causes tree height to be systematically displaced as a function of terrain slope and tree crown radius. Interestingly, our experimental results showed that the effect of CHM distortion on treetop displacement depends not only on the steepness of the slope but more importantly on the crown shape, which is species-dependent. The influence of the systematic error was significant for Scots pine, which has an irregular crown pattern and weak apical dominance, but not for mountain pine, which has a narrow conical crown with a distinct apex. Based on our findings, we suggest that in order to minimize the negative effect of steep slopes on the CHM, especially in heterogeneous forest with multiple species or species which change their morphological characteristics as they mature, it is best to use raw elevation values (i.e., use the un-normalized DSM) and compute the height after treetop detection.

  6. Estimation of urban mixed layer height in Zanjan using LIDAR observations and numerical modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Bidokhti; M Khoshsima; S Sabetghadam; H M Khalesifard

    2008-12-01

    Air pollution predictions often require the height of atmospheric mixed layer in time especially in big cities. Here, the variation of the height of this layer is estimated from direct measurements and also from a numerical forecast model with a high resolution boundary layer scheme. The height of the daytime mixed layer for the city of Zanjan (48.5°N, 36.7°E, 1700 m above sea level)is measured using a LIDAR (532 nm)system, which works based on aerosols scattering of laser light. The mixed layer height () for Zanjan city, well above mean sea level compared to other major cities in the world,is found to be between 1.4 km typically in spring and 2.2 km in summer, for synoptic calm conditions. Also, the MM5 forecast model with a proper boundary layer scheme (MRF)is used to estimate which shows rather good agreement with direct observations using the LIDAR system. The entrainment zone of the mixed layer was also found to undergo some occasional temporal growth that may be attributed to shear instability that led to more mixed layer growth.

  7. Compatible dominant height - site index model for juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the site quality of juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud. in the San Dimas region of the state of Durango, Mexico, using the site index method. The database comes from stem analysis of 43 trees felled in harvesting activities. The Chapman-Richards and Schumacher models, by means of the algebraic difference and generalized algebraic difference approaches, were tested to determine the site index; in addition, the error structure was modeled with a second-order autoregressive model to remedy the dependency of existing longitudinal errors. The results showed that the Chapman-Richards model in generalized algebraic difference form provided the best fit according to the adjusted coefficient of determination (R2 adj = 0.98 and root mean square error (RMSE = 0.46 m. Plotting of the quality curves generated with this model, superimposed on the observed heights, corroborated the goodness of fit of the model selected. The equation obtained with the generalized algebraic difference approach directly estimates the dominant height and site index at any height and base age.

  8. Fast unilateral isometric knee extension torque development and bilateral jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Van Leeuwen, Daniel; Heijblom, Arjan; Bobbert, Maarten F; de Haan, Arnold

    2006-10-01

    We hypothesized that the initial rate (first 40 ms) of unilateral knee extensor torque development during a maximally fast isometric contraction would depend on the subjects' ability for fast neural activation and that it would predict bilateral jumping performance. Nine males (21.8 +/- 0.9 yr, means +/- SD) performed unilateral fast isometric knee extensions (120 degrees knee angle) without countermovement on a dynamometer and bilateral squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) starting from 90 and 120 degrees knee angles (full extension = 180 degrees ). The dynamometer contractions started either from full relaxation or from an isometric pre-tension (15% maximal isometric torque, Tmax). Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI-40, normalized to Tmax) and averaged normalized rectified knee extensor EMG for 40 ms before fast torque onset (EMG-40) were used to quantify initial torque rise and voluntary muscle activation. TTI-40 without pre-tension (range: 0.02-0.19% Tmax per second) was significantly lower than TTI-40 with pre-tension, and both were significantly (r = 0.81 and 0.80) related to EMG-40. During jumping, similar significant positive relations were found between jump height and knee extensor EMG during the first 100 ms of the rise in ground reaction force. There also were significant positive linear relations between dynamometer TTI-40 and jump height (r = 0.75 (SJ 90), 0.84 (SJ 120), 0.76 (CMJ 90), and 0.86 (CMJ 120)) but not between dynamometer Tmax and jump height (-0.16 < r < 0.02). One-legged TTI-40 to a large extent explained the variation in jump height. The ability to produce a high efferent neural drive before muscle contraction seemed to dominate performance in both the simple single-joint isometric task and the complex multijoint dynamic task.

  9. A model intercomparison analysing the link between column ozone and geopotential height anomalies in January

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Braesicke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A statistical framework to evaluate the performance of chemistry-climate models with respect to the interaction between meteorology and column ozone during northern hemisphere mid-winter, in particularly January, is used. Different statistical diagnostics from four chemistry-climate models (E39C, ME4C, UMUCAM, ULAQ are compared with the ERA-40 re-analysis. First, we analyse vertical coherence in geopotential height anomalies as described by linear correlations between two different pressure levels (30 and 200 hPa of the atmosphere. In addition, linear correlations between column ozone and geopotential height anomalies at 200 hPa are discussed to motivate a simple picture of the meteorological impacts on column ozone on interannual timescales. Secondly, we discuss characteristic spatial structures in geopotential height and column ozone anomalies as given by their first two empirical orthogonal functions. Finally, we describe the covariance patterns between reconstructed anomalies of geopotential height and column ozone. In general we find good agreement between the models with higher horizontal resolution (E39C, ME4C, UMUCAM and ERA-40. The Pacific-North American (PNA pattern emerges as a useful qualitative benchmark for the model performance. Models with higher horizontal resolution and high upper boundary (ME4C and UMUCAM show good agreement with the PNA tripole derived from ERA-40 data, including the column ozone modulation over the Pacfic sector. The model with lowest horizontal resolution does not show a classic PNA pattern (ULAQ, and the model with the lowest upper boundary (E39C does not capture the PNA related column ozone variations over the Pacific sector. Those discrepancies have to be taken into account when providing confidence intervals for climate change integrations.

  10. An extreme value model for maximum wave heights based on weather types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Ana; Camus, Paula; Méndez, Fernando J.; Tomás, Antonio; Luceño, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Extreme wave heights are climate-related events. Therefore, special attention should be given to the large-scale weather patterns responsible for wave generation in order to properly understand wave climate variability. We propose a classification of weather patterns to statistically downscale daily significant wave height maxima to a local area of interest. The time-dependent statistical model obtained here is based on the convolution of the stationary extreme value model associated to each weather type. The interdaily dependence is treated by a climate-related extremal index. The model's ability to reproduce different time scales (daily, seasonal, and interannual) is presented by means of its application to three locations in the North Atlantic: Mayo (Ireland), La Palma Island, and Coruña (Spain).

  11. Height-diameter relationships for Scots pine plantations in Bulgaria: optimal combination of model type and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vassileva Stankova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The height-diameter relationship is an important and extensivelyinvestigated forest model, but generalized and mixed-effects models of wider applicability are currently lacking in the forest modeling literature for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. plantations in Bulgaria. Considering the practical advantages of deterministic and mixed-effects models, the present study aims to derive a generalized deterministic height-diameter relationship and a simple mixed-effects model for plantation-grown Scots pine in Bulgaria. Ten generalized and six local models of adequate mathematical properties were selected and examined in several subsequent steps with a representative data set.A deterministic model was derived for tree height reconstruction fromthe individual tree diameters, stand dominant height and diameter,number of trees per hectare and stand age. Mixed-effects models weredeveloped from the individual-tree and stand diameters and heights applicable to determine the height-diameter relationship in field surveys. Both types of models can be applied with confidence, according to their advantages and specifications, for estimating the height-diameter relationship of Scots pine plantations in Bulgaria, presenting a unique contribution for the particular species, study area and type of model. The choice of the tested models is relevant to the height-diameter relationship investigation of biologically related and geographically close species and types of stands and the study procedure allows repetition of the work to provide reliable solutions of the problem where information on such type of model is deficient or incomplete.

  12. Evidence for a non-associative model of the acquisition of a fear of heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, R; Davies, S; Menzies, R G; Langley, J D; Silva, P A

    1998-05-01

    Theories that fear results from previous traumatic experience (i.e. conditioning theories) have enjoyed widespread support for over half a century. Recent research, however, has cast doubt on the validity of these models in some specific phobias. Two studies on the etiology of height phobia have obtained findings consistent with a non-associative, evolutionary explanation of fear acquisition (Menzies and Clarke, 1993a, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31, 355-365; Menzies and Clarke, 1995a, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 795-805). Unfortunately, the retrospective nature of these studies limits the conclusions that can be drawn from these data. Like all retrospective research, these studies depend on adult subjects imperfect ability to recall conditioning events that may have occurred many years earlier. The present investigation overcomes these methodological shortcomings by examining the relationship between putative conditioning events before the age of 9 yr and the presence of height fear at ages 11 and 18 yr in a large birth cohort studied longitudinally. To our knowledge this is the first study that has prospectively examined the relationship between relevant traumatic events early in life and the onset of height fear in late adolescence. No positive relationship was found between a history of falls resulting in injury (i.e. fracture, dislocation, intracranial injury or laceration) before the age of 9 and fear of heights at age 11 or 18. Interestingly, falls resulting in injury between the ages of 5 and 9 occurred more frequently in those without a fear of heights at 18 (P fear acquisition. In general, the results provide strong support for non-associative models of fear and are difficult to reconcile with conditioning theories.

  13. Assessing a Template Matching Approach for Tree Height and Position Extraction from Lidar-Derived Canopy Height Models of Pinus Pinaster Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pirotti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an assessment of a method using a correlation filter over a lidar-derived digital canopy height model (CHM is presented. The objective of the procedure is to obtain stem density, position, and height values, on a stand with the following characteristics: ellipsoidal canopy shape (Pinus pinaster, even-aged and single-layer structure. The process consists of three steps: extracting a correlation map from CHM by applying a template whose size and shape resembles the canopy to be detected, applying a threshold mask to the correlation map to keep a subset of candidate-pixels, and then applying a local maximum filter to the remaining pixel groups. The method performs satisfactorily considering the experimental conditions. The mean tree extraction percentage is 65% with a coefficient of agreement of 0.4. The mean absolute error of height is ~0.5 m for all plots except one. It can be considered a valid approach for extracting tree density and height in regularly spaced stands (i.e., poplar plantations which are fundamental for extracting related forest parameters such as volume and biomass.

  14. Using scale heights derived from bottomside ionograms for modelling the IRI topside profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Reinisch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundbased ionograms measure the Chapman scale height HT at the F2-layer peak that is used to construct the topside profile. After a brief review of the topside model extrapolation technique, comparisons are presented between the modeled profiles with incoherent scatter radar and satellite measurements for the mid latitude and equatorial ionosphere. The total electron content TEC, derived from measurements on satellite beacon signals, is compared with the height-integrated profiles ITEC from the ionograms. Good agreement is found with the ISR profiles and with results using the low altitude TOPEX satellite. The TEC values derived from GPS signal analysis are systematically larger than ITEC. It is suggested to use HT , routinely measured by a large number of Digisondes around the globe, for the construction of the IRI topside electron density profile.

  15. Speaker height estimation from speech: Fusing spectral regression and statistical acoustic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John H L; Williams, Keri; Bořil, Hynek

    2015-08-01

    Estimating speaker height can assist in voice forensic analysis and provide additional side knowledge to benefit automatic speaker identification or acoustic model selection for automatic speech recognition. In this study, a statistical approach to height estimation that incorporates acoustic models within a non-uniform height bin width Gaussian mixture model structure as well as a formant analysis approach that employs linear regression on selected phones are presented. The accuracy and trade-offs of these systems are explored by examining the consistency of the results, location, and causes of error as well a combined fusion of the two systems using data from the TIMIT corpus. Open set testing is also presented using the Multi-session Audio Research Project corpus and publicly available YouTube audio to examine the effect of channel mismatch between training and testing data and provide a realistic open domain testing scenario. The proposed algorithms achieve a highly competitive performance to previously published literature. Although the different data partitioning in the literature and this study may prevent performance comparisons in absolute terms, the mean average error of 4.89 cm for males and 4.55 cm for females provided by the proposed algorithm on TIMIT utterances containing selected phones suggest a considerable estimation error decrease compared to past efforts.

  16. OSGM02: A new model for converting GPS-derived heights to local height datums in Great Britain and Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliffe, J.C.; Ziebart, M.; Cross, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    The background to the recent computation of a new vertical datum model for the British Isles (OSGM02) is described After giving a brief description of the computational techniques and the data sets used for the derivation of the gravimetric geoid, the paper focuses on the fitting of this surface...

  17. A fuzzy quantification approach of uncertainties in an extreme wave height modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; CAO Yingyi

    2015-01-01

    A non-traditional fuzzy quantification method is presented in the modeling of an extreme significant wave height. First, a set of parametric models are selected to fit time series data for the significant wave height and the extrapolation for extremes are obtained based on high quantile estimations. The quality of these results is compared and discussed. Then, the proposed fuzzy model, which combines Poisson process and gener-alized Pareto distribution (GPD) model, is applied to characterizing the wave extremes in the time series data. The estimations for a long-term return value are considered as time-varying as a threshold is regarded as non-stationary. The estimated intervals coupled with the fuzzy theory are then introduced to construct the probability bounds for the return values. This nontraditional model is analyzed in comparison with the traditional model in the degree of conservatism for the long-term estimate. The impact on the fuzzy bounds of extreme estimations from the non stationary effect in the proposed model is also investigated.

  18. Non-conventional modeling of extreme significant wave height through random sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; LAM Jasmine Siu Lee

    2014-01-01

    The analysis and design of offshore structures necessitates the consideration of wave loads. Realistic model-ing of wave loads is particularly important to ensure reliable performance of these structures. Among the available methods for the modeling of the extreme significant wave height on a statistical basis, the peak over threshold method has attracted most attention. This method employs Poisson process to character-ize time-varying properties in the parameters of an extreme value distribution. In this paper, the peak over threshold method is reviewed and extended to account for subjectivity in the modeling. The freedom in selecting the threshold and the time span to separate extremes from the original time series data is incorpo-rated as imprecision in the model. This leads to an extension from random variables to random sets in the probabilistic model for the extreme significant wave height. The extended model is also applied to different periods of the sampled data to evaluate the significance of the climatic conditions on the uncertainties of the parameters.

  19. Wake interaction and power production of variable height model wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Malene Hovgaard; Hamilton, N.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2014-01-01

    of comparison. It was found that downstream of the exit row wind turbine, the power was increased by 25% in the case of a staggered height configuration. This is partly due to the fact that the taller turbines reach into a flow area with a softened velocity gradient. Another aspect is that the wake downstream......Understanding wake dynamics is an ongoing research topic in wind energy, since wakes have considerable effects on the power production when wind turbines are placed in a wind farm. Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted to study the wake to wake interaction in a model wind farm in tandem...... with measurements of the extracted power. The aim is to investigate how alternating mast height influences the interaction of the wakes and the power production. Via the use of stereo-particle image velocimetry, the flow field was obtained in the first and last rows of the wind turbine array as a basis...

  20. Schottky barrier height in metal-SiC contact - new approach to modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, P.A.; Ignat`ev, K.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-08-01

    A new approach to calculate Schottky barrier height in a metal-SiC contact is proposed proceeding from uniform spatial distribution of electron traps within metal-to-SiC gap represented by native oxide. The model explains well experimental data on metal-6H-SiC contacts, with comparatively low mid-gap surface state density. This is in contrast with widely used analytical model by Cowley and Sze providing high interface state density at the 6H-SiC mid-gap. (orig.) 5 refs.

  1. RESEARCH ON INVERSION MODELS FOR FOREST HEIGHT ESTIMATION USING POLARIMETRIC SAR INTERFEROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The forest height is an important forest resource information parameter and usually used in biomass estimation. Forest height extraction with PolInSAR is a hot research field of imaging SAR remote sensing. SAR interferometry is a well-established SAR technique to estimate the vertical location of the effective scattering center in each resolution cell through the phase difference in images acquired from spatially separated antennas. The manipulation of PolInSAR has applications ranging from climate monitoring to disaster detection especially when used in forest area, is of particular interest because it is quite sensitive to the location and vertical distribution of vegetation structure components. However, some of the existing methods can’t estimate forest height accurately. Here we introduce several available inversion models and compare the precision of some classical inversion approaches using simulated data. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of these inversion methods, researchers can find better solutions conveniently based on these inversion methods.

  2. Numerical Model on Frost Height of Round Plate Fin Used for Outdoor Heat Exchanger of Mobile Electric Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to provide the numerical model for prediction of the frost growth of the round plate fin for the purpose of using it as a round plate fin-tube heat exchanger (evaporator under frosting conditions. In this study, numerical model was considering the frost density change with time, and it showed better agreement with experimental data of Sahin (1994 than that of the Kim model (2004 and the Jonse and Parker model (1975. This is because the prediction on the frost height with time was improved by using the frost thermal conductivity reflecting the void fraction and density of ice crystal with frost growth. Therefore, the developed numerical model could be used for frosting performance prediction of the round plate fin-tube heat exchanger.

  3. Verification of model wave heights with long-term moored buoy data: Application to wave field over the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Polnikov, V.G.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.

    for the model comparison. Based on the error estimates of significant wave heights and spectral wave energy, improvement achieved in wave prediction using ModWAM is demonstrated. We find that the ModWAM improved the accuracy of significant wave height prediction...

  4. Health, height, and history: an overview of recent developments in anthropometric history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, B

    1994-08-01

    This paper examines some of the major developments in the field of anthropometric history since the end of the 1970s. The first two sections of the paper consider the conceptual basis of anthropometric history and the relationship between height and the standard of living. Sections 3-7 discuss the contributions made by anthropometric historians to our understanding of the social and economic history of the United States, the history of American slavery, the social history of the United Kingdom, the origins of Habsburg industrialization, and the standard of living in nineteenth-century Sweden. The concluding section summarizes the impact of anthropometric history and identifies a number of areas for further research.

  5. SGOTL: A Computer Program for Modeling High-Resolution, Height-Dependent Gravity Effect of Ocean Tide Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang Jiu-Fu Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SGOTL, a computer package coded in FORTRAN, has been developed to model the gravity effect due to ocean tide loading (OTL, especially for a coastal station with large ocean tides. SGOTL uses a regional and a global tide model to account separately for near (inner and far (outer zone contributions, and optimizes an inner-zone region and grid interval for numerical convolution. Height dependent Green¡¦s functions for Newtonian and elastic effects are developed. The coastline is defined by the full-resolution GMT shoreline, and optionally a digital elevation model (DEM. A case study using gravity observations at the Hsinchu superconducting gravity station and some offshore islands around the Taiwan Strait suggests that SGOTL outperforms some selected global OTL programs and achieves an accuracy of 0.1 μGal for 8 leading tidal constituents.

  6. Development of gait motor control: what happens after a sudden increase in height during adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita

    2016-05-20

    Basic understanding of motor control and its processes is a topic of well-known high relevance. During adolescence walking is theoretically a well-achieved fundamental skill, having reached a mature manifestation; on the other hand, adolescence is marked by a period of accelerated increases in both height and weight, referred as growth spurt. Thus, this period was chosen as a controlled and natural environment for partially isolating one of the factors influencing motor development (segment growth). The aim of the study was to compare gait performance of growing and not growing male adolescents during walking in single task (ST) and dual task (DT), in order to study which are the modifications that motor control handles when encountering a sudden change in segment length. 19 adolescents were selected as growing adolescents (they showed a height increase greater than 3 cm in 3 months). A group of BMI-matched peers were selected as not growing adolescents (they showed a height increase lower than 1 cm in 3 months). Measures of acceleration of the trunk (L5 level) were collected using one tri-axial wireless inertial sensor. The participants were asked to walk at self-selected speed back and forth four times in a 10 m long corridor in ST and DT conditions. The following characteristics of gait performance were evaluated using different indices: variability, smoothness, regularity, complexity and local dynamic stability. An unpaired t-test was performed on the two groups for each method. Different indices followed the hypothesized trend in the two groups, even if differences were not always statistically significant: not growing adolescents showed a lower variability and complexity of gait and a higher smoothness/rhythm. Stability results showed a similarly stable gait pattern (or even higher in DT) in the growing adolescents when compared to their not growing peers. The findings of the present work suggest that growth spurt affects gait variability, smoothness and

  7. Global aerosol modeling with the online NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model: sensitivity to fire injection height prescription and secondary organic aerosol schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Michele; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Soares, Joana; Obiso, Vincenzo; Janjic, Zavisa; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    We develop and evaluate a fully online-coupled model simulating the life-cycle of the most relevant global aerosols (i.e. mineral dust, sea-salt, black carbon, primary and secondary organic aerosols, and sulfate) and their feedbacks upon atmospheric chemistry and radiative balance. Following the capabilities of its meteorological core, the model has been designed to simulate both global and regional scales with unvaried parameterizations: this allows detailed investigation on the aerosol processes bridging the gap between global and regional models. Since the strong uncertainties affecting aerosol models are often unresponsive to model complexity, we choose to introduce complexity only when it clearly improves results and leads to a better understanding of the simulated aerosol processes. We test two important sources of uncertainty - the fires injection height and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production - by comparing a baseline simulation with experiments using more advanced approaches. First, injection heights prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with climatological injection heights derived from satellite measurements and produced through the Integrated Monitoring and Modeling System For Wildland Fires (IS4FIRES). Also global patterns of SOA produced by the yield conversion of terpenes as prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with those simulated by the two-product approach of Tsigaridis et al. (2003, ACP). We evaluate our simulations using a variety of observations and measurement techniques. Additionally, we discuss our results in comparison to other global models within AEROCOM and ACCMIP.

  8. A Maximum-Entropy Compound Distribution Model for Extreme Wave Heights of Typhoon-Affected Sea Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-ping; SUN Xiao-guang; LU Ke-bo; XU De-lun

    2012-01-01

    A new compound distribution model for extreme wave heights of typhoon-affected sea areas is proposed on the basis of the maximum-entropy principle.The new model is formed by nesting a discrete distribution in a continuous one,having eight parameters which can be determined in terms of observed data of typhoon occurrence-frequency and extreme wave heights by numerically solving two sets of equations derived in this paper.The model is examined by using it to predict the N-year return-periodwave height at two hydrology stations in the Yellow Sea,and the predicted results are compared with those predicted by use of some other compound distribution models.Examinations and comparisons show that the model has some advantages for predicting the N-year return-period wave height in typhoon-affected sea areas.

  9. Modeling extreme wave heights from laboratory experiments with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Guedes Soares, C.; Cherneva, Z.; Onorato, M.

    2014-04-01

    Spatial variation of nonlinear wave groups with different initial envelope shapes is theoretically studied first, confirming that the simplest nonlinear theoretical model is capable of describing the evolution of propagating wave packets in deep water. Moreover, three groups of laboratory experiments run in the wave basin of CEHIPAR (Canal de Experiencias Hidrodinámicas de El Pardo, known also as El Pardo Model Basin) was founded in 1928 by the Spanish Navy. are systematically compared with the numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Although a little overestimation is detected, especially in the set of experiments characterized by higher initial wave steepness, the numerical simulation still displays a high degree of agreement with the laboratory experiments. Therefore, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation catches the essential characteristics of the extreme waves and provides an important physical insight into their generation. The modulation instability, resulting from the quasi-resonant four-wave interaction in a unidirectional sea state, can be indicated by the coefficient of kurtosis, which shows an appreciable correlation with the extreme wave height and hence is used in the modified Edgeworth-Rayleigh distribution. Finally, some statistical properties on the maximum wave heights in different sea states have been related with the initial Benjamin-Feir index.

  10. Determination and climatology of the planetary boundary layer height by in-situ and remote sensing methods as well as the COSMO model above the Swiss plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collaud Coen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer (PBL height is a key parameter in air quality control and pollutant dispersion. The PBL height can however not be directly measured and its estimation relies on the analysis of the vertical profiles of the temperature, the turbulences or the atmospheric composition. An operational PBL height detection including several remote sensing instruments (windprofiler, Raman lidar, microwave radiometer and several algorithms (Parcel and bulk Richardson number methods, surface-based temperature inversion, aerosol or humidity gradient analysis were developed and the first year of application allowed validating these various detection methods against radio sounding measurements. The microwave radiometer provides convective boundary layer heights in good agreement with the radio sounding (median bias R2 > 0.70 and allows to fully analyzing the PBL height diurnal cycle due to its smaller time granularity. The Raman lidar also leads to good results whereas the windprofiler yields some more dispersed results. Comparisons with the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-2 were also established and point out a general overestimation by the model. Finally the seasonal cycles of the daytime and nighttime PBL heights are discussed for each instrument and each detection algorithm for two stations on the Swiss plateau.

  11. Mercury Dispersion Modeling And Purge Ventilation Stack Height Determination For Tank 40H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Giboyeaux, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-19

    The SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group performed an analysis for mercury emissions from H-Tank Farm - Tank 40 ventilation system exhaust in order to assess whether the Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), or Threshold Limit Value (TLV) levels for mercury will be exceeded during bulk sludge slurry mixing and sludge removal operations. The American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was used as the main dispersion modelling tool for this analysis. The results indicated that a 45-foot stack is sufficient to raise the plume centerline from the Tank 40 release to prevent mercury exposure problems for any of the stack discharge scenarios provided. However, a 42-foot stack at Tank 40 is sufficient to prevent mercury exposure concerns in all emission scenarios except the 50 mg/m3 release. At a 42-foot stack height, values exceeding the exposure standards are only measured on receptors located above 34 feet.

  12. Global cloud top height retrieval using SCIAMACHY limb spectra: model studies and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Kai-Uwe; Lelli, Luca; von Savigny, Christian; Sembhi, Harjinder; Burrows, John P.

    2016-03-01

    Cloud top heights (CTHs) are retrieved for the period 1 January 2003 to 7 April 2012 using height-resolved limb spectra measured with the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on board ENVISAT (ENVIronmental SATellite). In this study, we present the retrieval code SCODA (SCIAMACHY cloud detection algorithm) based on a colour index method and test the accuracy of the retrieved CTHs in comparison to other methods. Sensitivity studies using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN show that the method is capable of detecting cloud tops down to about 5 km and very thin cirrus clouds up to the tropopause. Volcanic particles can be detected that occasionally reach the lower stratosphere. Upper tropospheric ice clouds are observable for a nadir cloud optical thickness (COT) ≥ 0.01, which is in the subvisual range. This detection sensitivity decreases towards the lowermost troposphere. The COT detection limit for a water cloud top height of 5 km is roughly 0.1. This value is much lower than thresholds reported for passive cloud detection methods in nadir-viewing direction. Low clouds at 2 to 3 km can only be retrieved under very clean atmospheric conditions, as light scattering of aerosol particles interferes with the cloud particle scattering. We compare co-located SCIAMACHY limb and nadir cloud parameters that are retrieved with the Semi-Analytical CloUd Retrieval Algorithm (SACURA). Only opaque clouds (τN,c > 5) are detected with the nadir passive retrieval technique in the UV-visible and infrared wavelength ranges. Thus, due to the frequent occurrence of thin clouds and subvisual cirrus clouds in the tropics, larger CTH deviations are detected between both viewing geometries. Zonal mean CTH differences can be as high as 4 km in the tropics. The agreement in global cloud fields is sufficiently good. However, the land-sea contrast, as seen in nadir cloud occurrence frequency distributions, is not observed in limb geometry. Co

  13. Managing Information Uncertainty in Wave Height Modeling for the Offshore Structural Analysis through Random Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqin Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents a reliability study for an offshore jacket structure with emphasis on the features of nonconventional modeling. Firstly, a random set model is formulated for modeling the random waves in an ocean site. Then, a jacket structure is investigated in a pushover analysis to identify the critical wave direction and key structural elements. This is based on the ultimate base shear strength. The selected probabilistic models are adopted for the important structural members and the wave direction is specified in the weakest direction of the structure for a conservative safety analysis. The wave height model is processed in a P-box format when it is used in the numerical analysis. The models are applied to find the bounds of the failure probabilities for the jacket structure. The propagation of this wave model to the uncertainty in results is investigated in both an interval analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. The results are compared in context of information content and numerical accuracy. Further, the failure probability bounds are compared with the conventional probabilistic approach.

  14. Modelling of the humidity effect on the barrier height in SnO{sub 2} varistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratovsky, I. [Department of Radioelectronics, Dniepropetrovsk National University, Dniepropetrovsk 49050 (Ukraine); Glot, A. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: alexglot@mixteco.utm.mx; Traversa, E. [Dip. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Tin dioxide based SnO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic device with combined varistor and humidity-sensitive properties is studied. This varistor-sensor has high humidity sensitivity coefficient of about 420 at low electric field and high non-linearity coefficient of about 50 at electric field 3500 V cm{sup -1}. Current-voltage characteristics of the samples with separate electrodes for the central and the peripheral parts are studied in air with different relative humidity. It is shown that current through the peripheral part of a sample is increased much stronger than through the central part. The observed increase of low-field current on relative humidity is explained by the decrease of the barrier height. The estimations of the lowering of the barrier height in a humid air is performed using the suggested models.

  15. Scaling from individual plants to the globe in an Earth System Model: height structured competition and carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, E.; Malyshev, S.; Lichstein, J. W.; Farrior, C. E.; Dybzinski, R.; Zhang, T.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term and large scale dynamics of ecosystems are in large part determined by the performances of individual plants in competition with one another for light, water and nutrients. Woody biomass, a pool of carbon (C) larger than that in the atmosphere, exists because of height-structured competition for light. However, none of the current Earth System Models that predict climate change and C cycle feedbacks includes a mechanistic formulation for height-structured competition for light, or an explicit scaling from individual plants to the globe. In this study, we incorporate height-structured competition and explicit scaling from individuals to ecosystems into the land model (LM3) currently used in the Earth System Models developed by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory based on the Perfect Plasticity Approximation model (PPA), which has been shown to scale accurately from individual plants to stands in individual-based simulation models of plant competition for light, water and nutrients. Because of the tractability of the PPA, the coupled LM3-PPA model is able to include a large number of phenomena across a range of spatial and temporal scales, and still retain computational and mathematical tractability. We test a range of predictions against data from the temperate forests in northern USA. The results show the model predictions agree with diurnal and annual C fluxes, growth rates of individual trees in the canopy and understory, tree size distributions, and species-level population dynamics during succession. We also show how the competitively optimal allocation strategy shifts at different atmospheric CO2 concentrations due to competition with alternative strategies in the model. The results show that the competitively optimal allocation of carbon to leaves, wood, and fine roots depends on the atmospheric CO2 concentration, and that C sinks caused by CO2 fertilization in forests limited by light and water are down-regulated if allocation tracks

  16. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry based modeling for tree height and aboveground biomass retrieval in a tropical deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Khati, Unmesh G.; Chandola, Shreya; Agrawal, Shefali; Kushwaha, Satya P. S.

    2017-08-01

    The regulation of the carbon cycle is a critical ecosystem service provided by forests globally. It is, therefore, necessary to have robust techniques for speedy assessment of forest biophysical parameters at the landscape level. It is arduous and time taking to monitor the status of vast forest landscapes using traditional field methods. Remote sensing and GIS techniques are efficient tools that can monitor the health of forests regularly. Biomass estimation is a key parameter in the assessment of forest health. Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) remote sensing has already shown its potential for forest biophysical parameter retrieval. The current research work focuses on the retrieval of forest biophysical parameters of tropical deciduous forest, using fully polarimetric spaceborne C-band data with Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques. PolSAR based Interferometric Water Cloud Model (IWCM) has been used to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB). Input parameters to the IWCM have been extracted from the decomposition modeling of SAR data as well as PolInSAR coherence estimation. The technique of forest tree height retrieval utilized PolInSAR coherence based modeling approach. Two techniques - Coherence Amplitude Inversion (CAI) and Three Stage Inversion (TSI) - for forest height estimation are discussed, compared and validated. These techniques allow estimation of forest stand height and true ground topography. The accuracy of the forest height estimated is assessed using ground-based measurements. PolInSAR based forest height models showed enervation in the identification of forest vegetation and as a result height values were obtained in river channels and plain areas. Overestimation in forest height was also noticed at several patches of the forest. To overcome this problem, coherence and backscatter based threshold technique is introduced for forest area identification and accurate height estimation in non-forested regions. IWCM based modeling for forest

  17. Deconstructing acrophobia: physiological and psychological precursors to developing a fear of heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carlos M; Wallis, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Acrophobia is one of the most prevalent phobias, affecting as many as 1 in 20 individuals. Of course, heights often evoke fear in the general population too, and this suggests that acrophobia might actually represent the hypersensitive manifestation of an everyday, rational fear. In this study, we assessed the role of sensory and cognitive variables in acrophobia. Forty-five participants (Mean age 25.07 years, 71% female) were assessed using a booklet with self-reports as well as several behavioral measures. The data analysis consisted in multivariate linear regression using fear of heights as the outcome variable. The regression analyses found that visual field dependence (measured with the rod and frame test), postural control (measured with the Sharpened Romberg Test), space and motion discomfort (measured with the Situational Characteristics Questionnaire), and bodily symptoms (measured with the Bodily Sensation Questionnaire) all serve as strong predictors for fear of heights (Adjusted r(2)=.697, Pfear of heights, suggesting that this higher order vulnerability factor is not necessary for explaining this particular specific phobia in a large number of individuals. The findings reveal that fear of heights is an expression of a largely sensory phenomena, which can produce strong feelings of discomfort and fear in the otherwise calm individuals. We propose a theory that embraces all these factors and provides new insight into the aetiology and treatment of this prevalent and debilitating fear. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Modeling and test on height adjustment system of electrically-controlled air suspension for agricultural vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen Yuexia; Chen Long; Wang Ruochen; Xu Xing; Shen Yujie; Liu Yanling

    2016-01-01

      To reduce the damages of pavement, vehicle components and agricultural product during transportation, an electric control air suspension height adjustment system of agricultural transport vehicle...

  19. Automation of measurement of heights waves around a model ship; Mokeisen mawari no hako keisoku no jidoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, M.; Kato, M.; Yanagida, F. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Trial fabrication and tests were performed on an instrument to automate measurement of heights of waves around a model ship. The currently used electric wave height measuring instrument takes long time for measurement, hence poor in efficiency. The method for processing optical images also has a problem in accuracy. Therefore, a computer controlled system was structured by using AC servo motors in driving the X and Y axes of a traverse equipment. Equipment was fabricated to automate the wave height measurement, in which four servo type wave height meters are installed on a moving rack in the lateral (Y-axial) direction so that wave heights to be measured by four meters can be measured automatically all at once. Wave heights can be measured continuously by moving the moving rack at a constant speed, verifying that wave shapes in longitudinal cross sections can be acquired by only one towing. Time required in the measurements using the instrument was 40 hours as a net time for fixed point measurement and 12 hours for continuous measurement, or 52 hours in total. On the other hand, the time may reach 240 hours for fixed point measurement when the conventional all-point manual traverse equipment is used. Enormous effects were obtained from automating the instrument. Collection of wave height data will continue also on tankers and other types of ships. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. On the Improvement of Numerical Weather Prediction by Assimilation of Hub Height Wind Information in Convection-Resulted Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declair, Stefan; Stephan, Klaus; Potthast, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Determining the amount of weather dependent renewable energy is a demanding task for transmission system operators (TSOs). In the project EWeLiNE funded by the German government, the German Weather Service and the Fraunhofer Institute on Wind Energy and Energy System Technology strongly support the TSOs by developing innovative weather- and power forecasting models and tools for grid integration of weather dependent renewable energy. The key in the energy prediction process chain is the numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. With focus on wind energy, we face the model errors in the planetary boundary layer, which is characterized by strong spatial and temporal fluctuations in wind speed, to improve the basis of the weather dependent renewable energy prediction. Model data can be corrected by postprocessing techniques such as model output statistics and calibration using historical observational data. On the other hand, latest observations can be used in a preprocessing technique called data assimilation (DA). In DA, the model output from a previous time step is combined such with observational data, that the new model data for model integration initialization (analysis) fits best to the latest model data and the observational data as well. Therefore, model errors can be already reduced before the model integration. In this contribution, the results of an impact study are presented. A so-called OSSE (Observation Simulation System Experiment) is performed using the convective-resoluted COSMO-DE model of the German Weather Service and a 4D-DA technique, a Newtonian relaxation method also called nudging. Starting from a nature run (treated as the truth), conventional observations and artificial wind observations at hub height are generated. In a control run, the basic model setup of the nature run is slightly perturbed to drag the model away from the beforehand generated truth and a free forecast is computed based on the analysis using only conventional

  1. Modelling non-stationary annual maximum flood heights in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maposa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we fit a time-dependent generalised extreme value (GEV distribution to annual maximum flood heights at three sites: Chokwe, Sicacate and Combomune in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique. A GEV distribution is fitted to six annual maximum time series models at each site, namely: annual daily maximum (AM1, annual 2-day maximum (AM2, annual 5-day maximum (AM5, annual 7-day maximum (AM7, annual 10-day maximum (AM10 and annual 30-day maximum (AM30. Non-stationary time-dependent GEV models with a linear trend in location and scale parameters are considered in this study. The results show lack of sufficient evidence to indicate a linear trend in the location parameter at all three sites. On the other hand, the findings in this study reveal strong evidence of the existence of a linear trend in the scale parameter at Combomune and Sicacate, whilst the scale parameter had no significant linear trend at Chokwe. Further investigation in this study also reveals that the location parameter at Sicacate can be modelled by a nonlinear quadratic trend; however, the complexity of the overall model is not worthwhile in fit over a time-homogeneous model. This study shows the importance of extending the time-homogeneous GEV model to incorporate climate change factors such as trend in the lower Limpopo River basin, particularly in this era of global warming and a changing climate.Keywords: nonstationary extremes; annual maxima; lower Limpopo River; generalised extreme value

  2. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  3. Digitalni modeli visina i njihova primena u vojnoj analizi terena / Digital models of heights and military application for terrain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubomir J. Gigović

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Predstavljanje terena i zemljišnih oblika uopšte na konvencionalni način klasičnim topografskim kartama bilo je mnogo teže nego predstavljanje ma kog drugog elementa kartografskog sadržaja. Pojavom GIS tehnologija stvoreni su povoljniji uslovi za kreiranje i predstavljanje prirodnog i prostornog izgleda reljefa. Digitalni model terena (DMT predstavlja savremeni metod visinskog predstavljanja zemljišta i reljefnih oblika. Nastao je sa razvojem računarske tehnike i čini osnovu modernih geografskih informacionih sistema. Na osnovu DMT-a, kroz algoritamsku analizu morfometrijskih parametara reljefa, omogućen je kvalitativno nov način sagledavanja prostornih odnosa i reljefnih svojstava, što obezbeđuje kvalitetniju, višestruko bržu i racionalniju vojnu analizu terena. / The Digital Terrain Model (DTM is nowadays defined as a modern method for presenting heights of land and relief shapes. It has emerged with the development of computer technology and is the basis of modern geographic information systems. The DTM is a mathematical model of a large number of points on the surface of terrain where it is possible to perform various mathematical analyses. According to its organization structure, the best known and the most frequently applied models of terrain are models of surface terrain based on the grid (raster structure and digital models based on the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network data structures.

  4. Global validation of the wave model WAM over a one-year period using geosat wave height data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeiser, R. (Universitaet Hamburg (Germany))

    1993-03-15

    The high quality of wave fields simulated by the third-generation wave model WAM has already been demonstrated in various validation studies using in situ measurements as well as data from satellites as reference. However, owing to limitations of the reference data sets, the previous studies concentrated on relatively small regions or short time periods only, for which adequate measurements were available. In this paper the first global verification of the WAM model over a full 1-year period is presented. The significant wave heights hindcast for 1988 by the WAM model as implemented at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts are compared with measurements obtained by the Geosat radar altimeter. The wave heights from WAM and Geosat show good agreement in general. However, significant regional and seasonal differences are found. The hindcast wave heights are underestimated by about 20% in large parts of the southern hemisphere and the tropical region during May-September. For the rest of the time, the agreement with Geosat data is fairly good. Together with the fact that also the rms variability of wave heights in the tropical region is clearly underestimated by WAM, this can possibly be attributed to simplifications like the neglect of atmospheric stratification effects when converting wind speeds to the wind stress fields driving WAM. Furthermore, the intercomparison indicates that low wave heights below [approx]1.5 m are generally overestimated by WAM. As it is planned to use altimeter wave heights for updating wave models in future data assimilation systems, it is quite important to have efficient quality control criteria for these data. The difference between the Geosat and WAM wave heights shows a clear dependence on the additional parameters in some cases, which must be related to quality problems of the Geosat data. Some new criteria for the rejection of incorrect Geosat data points are obtained. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Triggered lightning sky waves, return stroke modeling, and ionosphere effective height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F. L.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Hill, J. D.; Cummer, S. A.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2017-03-01

    Ground waves and sky waves measured 209 km and 250 km south of six triggered lightning flashes containing 30 strokes that occurred in the half-hour before sunset on 27 August 2015 are presented and analyzed. We use a cross-correlation technique to find the ionospheric effective reflection height and compare our results to previous techniques that calculate effective height based on the time delay between ground wave and sky wave time domain features. From the first flash to the last flash there is, on average, a 1.6 km increase in effective ionospheric height, whereas no change in effective ionospheric height can be discerned along the individual strokes of a given flash. We show to what extent the triggered lightning radiation source can be described (using channel-base current, channel geometry, and channel luminosity versus time and height) and speculate that a well-characterized source could allow a more accurate determination of the electromagnetic fields radiated toward the ionosphere than has been done to date. We show that both channel geometry and the change in return stroke current amplitude and waveshape with channel height (inferred from measured channel luminosity versus height and time) determine the waveshape of the ground wave (and presumably the upward propagating wave that results in the sky wave) and that the waveshape of the ground wave does not appear to be related to the current versus time waveform measured at the channel base other than a roughly linear relationship between the two peak values.

  6. A Novel Geometrical Height Gain Model for Line-of-Sight Urban Micro Cells Below 6 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel height gain model applicable to line-of-sight urban micro cell scenarios and frequencies below 6 GHz. The model is knife-edge diffraction-based, and it is founded on simple geometrical and physical relationships. Typical system level simulator scenario parameters...

  7. Control of liquid column height in electromagnetic casting with fuzzy neural network model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朝霞; 郑贤淑

    2002-01-01

    The control of suitable and stable height of liquid column is the crucial point to operate the electromagnetic casting(EMC) process and to obtain ingots with desirable shape and dimensional accuracy. But due to the complicated interact parameters and special circumstances, the measure and control of liquid column are quite difficult. A fuzzy neural network was used to help control the liquid column by predicting its height on line. The results show that the stabilization of the height of liquid column and surface quality of the ingot are remarkably improved by using the neural network based control system.

  8. Development of a prototype algorithm for the operational retrieval of height-resolved products from GOME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Robert J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) level 2 products of total ozone column amounts have been generated on a routine operational basis since July 1996. These products and the level 1 radiance products are the major outputs from the ERS-2 ground segment GOME data processor (GDP) at DLR in Germany. Off-line scientific work has already shown the feasibility of ozone profile retrieval from GOME. It is demonstrated how the retrievals can be performed in an operational context. Height-resolved retrieval is based on the optimal estimation technique, #and cloud-contaminated scenes are treated in an equivalent reflecting surface approximation. The prototype must be able to handle GOME measurements routinely on a global basis. Requirements for the major components of the algorithm are described: this incorporates an overall strategy for operational height-resolved retrieval from GOME.

  9. Developing differential height, weight and body mass index references for girls that reflect the impact of the menarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, R; Scheffler, C; Hermanussen, M

    2014-07-01

    Growth is both a matter of amplitude and tempo. We aimed to develop references for body height, body weight and body mass index (BMI) with respect to tempo of maturity. Data obtained from the German KiGGS study (2003-2006) on body height, body weight and presence or absence of the menarche were re-analysed in 3776 girls, aged 10-17 years. We developed smoothed centiles for BMI-, body-height- and body-weight-for-age using the LMS method for premenarcheal and postmenarcheal girls. Body height, body weight and BMI differed significantly between premenarcheal and postmenarcheal girls. On average, postmenarcheal girls aged 11-17 years were 5.3 cm taller and 9.7 kg heavier, and their BMI was 2.9 kg/m² higher than in premenarcheal girls of the same calendar age. Adolescent BMI rises with calendar age and biological age. New reference charts for adolescent girls aged 10-18 years were generated to be inserted into the currently used references to avoid misclassifying underweight and overweight pubertal girls. © 2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. OZO v.1.0: software for solving a generalised omega equation and the Zwack-Okossi height tendency equation using WRF model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Mika; Räisänen, Jouni; Lento, Juha; Stepanyuk, Oleg; Räty, Olle; Sinclair, Victoria A.; Järvinen, Heikki

    2017-02-01

    A software package (OZO, Omega-Zwack-Okossi) was developed to diagnose the processes that affect vertical motions and geopotential height tendencies in weather systems simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. First, this software solves a generalised omega equation to calculate the vertical motions associated with different physical forcings: vorticity advection, thermal advection, friction, diabatic heating, and an imbalance term between vorticity and temperature tendencies. After this, the corresponding height tendencies are calculated with the Zwack-Okossi tendency equation. The resulting height tendency components thus contain both the direct effect from the forcing itself and the indirect effects (related to the vertical motion induced by the same forcing) of each physical mechanism. This approach has an advantage compared with previous studies with the Zwack-Okossi equation, in which vertical motions were used as an independent forcing but were typically found to compensate the effects of other forcings.The software is currently tailored to use input from WRF simulations with Cartesian geometry. As an illustration, results for an idealised 10-day baroclinic wave simulation are presented. An excellent agreement is found between OZO and the direct WRF output for both the vertical motion and the height tendency fields. The individual vertical motion and height tendency components demonstrate the importance of both adiabatic and diabatic processes for the simulated cyclone. OZO is an open-source tool for both research and education, and the distribution of the software will be supported by the authors.

  11. Scaling from individuals to ecosystems in an Earth System Model using a mathematically tractable model of height-structured competition for light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Weng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-term and large scale dynamics of ecosystems are in large part determined by the performances of individual plants in competition with one another for light, water and nutrients. Woody biomass, a pool of carbon (C larger than 50% of atmospheric CO2, exists because of height-structured competition for light. However, most of the current Earth System Models that predict climate change and C cycle feedbacks lack both a mechanistic formulation for height-structured competition for light and an explicit scaling from individual plants to the globe. In this study, we incorporate height-structured competition and explicit scaling from individuals to ecosystems into the land model (LM3 currently used in the Earth System Models developed by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL. The height-structured formulation is based on the Perfect Plasticity Approximation (PPA, which has been shown to accurately scale from individual-level plant competition for light, water and nutrients to the dynamics of whole communities. Because of the tractability of the PPA, the coupled LM3–PPA model is able to include a large number of phenomena across a range of spatial and temporal scales, and still retain computational tractability, as well as close linkages to mathematically tractable forms of the model. We test a range of predictions against data from temperate broadleaved forests in the northern USA. The results show the model predictions agree with diurnal and annual C fluxes, growth rates of individual trees in the canopy and understory, tree size distributions, and species-level population dynamics during succession. We also show how the competitively optimal allocation strategy – the strategy that can competitively exclude all others – shifts as a function of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. This strategy is referred as an evolutionary stable strategy (ESS in the ecological literature and is typically not the same as a productivity- or

  12. Scaling from individuals to ecosystems in an Earth System Model using a mathematically tractable model of height-structured competition for light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, E. S.; Malyshev, S.; Lichstein, J. W.; Farrior, C. E.; Dybzinski, R.; Zhang, T.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term and large scale dynamics of ecosystems are in large part determined by the performances of individual plants in competition with one another for light, water and nutrients. Woody biomass, a pool of carbon (C) larger than 50% of atmospheric CO2, exists because of height-structured competition for light. However, most of the current Earth System Models that predict climate change and C cycle feedbacks lack both a mechanistic formulation for height-structured competition for light and an explicit scaling from individual plants to the globe. In this study, we incorporate height-structured competition and explicit scaling from individuals to ecosystems into the land model (LM3) currently used in the Earth System Models developed by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). The height-structured formulation is based on the Perfect Plasticity Approximation (PPA), which has been shown to accurately scale from individual-level plant competition for light, water and nutrients to the dynamics of whole communities. Because of the tractability of the PPA, the coupled LM3-PPA model is able to include a large number of phenomena across a range of spatial and temporal scales, and still retain computational tractability, as well as close linkages to mathematically tractable forms of the model. We test a range of predictions against data from temperate broadleaved forests in the northern USA. The results show the model predictions agree with diurnal and annual C fluxes, growth rates of individual trees in the canopy and understory, tree size distributions, and species-level population dynamics during succession. We also show how the competitively optimal allocation strategy - the strategy that can competitively exclude all others - shifts as a function of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. This strategy is referred as an evolutionary stable strategy (ESS) in the ecological literature and is typically not the same as a productivity- or growth-maximizing strategy

  13. Dishabituation processes in height fear and dental fear: an indirect test of the non-associative model of fear acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, R; Waldie, K E; Craske, M G; Menzies, R G; McGee, R

    2000-09-01

    The fear dishabituation hypothesis described in the non-associative model of fear acquisition was tested in a longitudinal birth cohort study. Results were consistent with height fear and phobia dishabituation. That is, 're-emergence' of a fear of heights occurred between age 11 and 18 years among individuals who reported higher levels of non-specific stress at age 15. Interestingly, there was no evidence for dental fear dishabituation--a finding consistent with the non-associative model of fear acquisition. Strengths and weaknesses of the study were considered and the results discussed in relation to laboratory-based findings on (dis)habituation.

  14. Numerical modeling and validation of wave heights and directionality in the ice using WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Dumont, Dany; Accensi, Mickael; Sevigny, Caroline; Boutin, Guillaume; Rogers, Erick

    2016-04-01

    The poorly understood attenuation of waves, the key dynamic effect that defines the width of the Marginal Ice Zone, has been attributed to the combined effect of wave scattering and wave dissipation. Because scattering and dissipation have very different effects on the directional distribution of wave energy, it is possible to better understand the balance between scattering and dissipation by an analysis of the width of the directional wave spectrum. We have thus introduced dissipation and scattering terms in the spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III, and an estimation of the maximum ice floe size. Academic and realistic simulations show that the energy level and directional spreading far into the Arctic pack ice (Wadhams and Doble 2009) can be well explained by dissipative processes without the need for scattering. The same is true of observed swells in the Southern Ocean (Ardhuin et al. 2015). However, the dissipation level required to explain the observed wave height goes from 2 in the southern ocean to 12 times the viscous dissipation under a smooth ice plate. This and other data suggest that broken ice causes less dissipation than a continuous ice cover, possibly due to the dissipation by creep inside the ice when it is not broken and bends. Work is under way to parameterize that effect using the estimated maximum ice floe size.

  15. An MCV Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Model with Height-Based Terrain following Coordinate: Tests of Waves over Steep Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingliang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonhydrostatic atmospheric model was tested with the mountain waves over various bell-shaped mountains. The model is recently proposed by using the MCV (multimoment constrained finite volume schemes with the height-based terrain following coordinate representing the topography. As discussed in our previous work, the model has some appealing features for atmospheric modeling and can be expected as a practical framework of the dynamic cores, which well balances the numerical accuracy and algorithmic complexity. The flows over the mountains of various half widths and heights were simulated with the model. The semianalytic solutions to the mountain waves through the linear theory are used to check the performance of the MCV model. It is revealed that the present model can accurately reproduce various mountain waves including those generated by the mountains with very steep inclination and is very promising for numerically simulating atmospheric flows over complex terrains.

  16. Evaluation of structure specification in linear mixed models for modeling the spatial effects in tree height-diamater relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Lu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, linear mixed models (LMM have become more popular to deal with spatial effects in forestry and ecological data. In this study, different structure specifications of linear mixed model were applied to model tree height-diameter relationships, including LMM with random blocks only (LMM-block, LMM with spatial covariance only (LMM-covariance, and the combination of the last two (LMM-block-covariance. Further, the between-group heterogeneous variances were incorporated into LMM-covariance and LMM-block-covariance. The results indicated that, in general, LMM-covariance significantly reduced spatial autocorrelation in model residuals, while LMM-block was effective in dealing with spatial heterogeneity. LMM-block treated the blocks as random effects and avoided the estimation of parameters of the variogram model. Thus, it produced better model predictions than LMM-covariance. LMM-block-covariance took both block effects and spatial covariance into account, and significantly improve model fitting. However, it did not produce better model predictions due to the increase of model complexity and estimation of the local variogram within each block. 

  17. Non-linear height-diameter models for oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky in the Hyrcanian forests, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between tree height and diameter is an important element in growth and yield models, in carbon budget and timber volume models, and in the description of stand dynamics. Six non-linear growth functions (i.e. Chapman-Richards, Schnute, Lundqvist/Korf, Weibull, Modified Logistic and Exponential were fitted to tree height-diameter data of oriental beech in the Hyrcanian mixed hardwood forests of Iran. The predictive performance of these models was in the first place assessed by means of different model evaluation criteria such as adjusted R squared (adjR2, root mean square error (RMSE, Akaike information criterion (AIC, mean difference (MD, mean absolute difference (MAD and mean square (MS error criteria. Although each of the six models accounted for approximately 75% of total variation in height, a large difference in asymptotic estimates was observed. Apart from this, the predictive performance of the models was also evaluated by means of cross-validation and by splitting the data into 5-cm diameter classes. Plotting the MD in relation to these diameter at breast height (DBH classes showed for all growth functions, except for the Modified Logistic function, similar mean prediction errors for small- and medium-sized trees. Large-sized trees, however, showed a higher mean prediction error. The Modified Logistic function showed the worst performance due to a large model bias. The Exponential and Lundqvist/Korf models were discarded due to their showing biologically illogical behavior and unreasonable estimates for the asymptotic coefficient, respectively. Considering all the above-mentioned criteria, the Chapman-Richards, Weibull, and Schnute functions provided the most satisfactory height predictions. However, we would recommend the Chapman-Richards function for further analysis because of its higher predictive performance.

  18. [Height vertigo, fear of heights, acrophobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, H

    1990-06-01

    Height vertigo (acrophobia) is a very frequent phenomenon being of interest for its physiological and psychological background, though usually only of limited significance in neuropsychiatry and otology. The different aspects as to its nature and origin are discussed. If acrophobia has developed into a conditioned reaction of avoidance with pressure of suffering, or acrophobia in persons, who have to work at heights, behavior therapeutic measures with systematic desensibilisation, starting from an imaginative training, are indicated.

  19. Modeling vegetation heights from high resolution stereo aerial photography: an application for broad-scale rangeland monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Jeffrey K; Karl, Jason W; Duniway, Michael; Elaksher, Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Vertical vegetation structure in rangeland ecosystems can be a valuable indicator for assessing rangeland health and monitoring riparian areas, post-fire recovery, available forage for livestock, and wildlife habitat. Federal land management agencies are directed to monitor and manage rangelands at landscapes scales, but traditional field methods for measuring vegetation heights are often too costly and time consuming to apply at these broad scales. Most emerging remote sensing techniques capable of measuring surface and vegetation height (e.g., LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar) are often too expensive, and require specialized sensors. An alternative remote sensing approach that is potentially more practical for managers is to measure vegetation heights from digital stereo aerial photographs. As aerial photography is already commonly used for rangeland monitoring, acquiring it in stereo enables three-dimensional modeling and estimation of vegetation height. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and accuracy of estimating shrub heights from high-resolution (HR, 3-cm ground sampling distance) digital stereo-pair aerial images. Overlapping HR imagery was taken in March 2009 near Lake Mead, Nevada and 5-cm resolution digital surface models (DSMs) were created by photogrammetric methods (aerial triangulation, digital image matching) for twenty-six test plots. We compared the heights of individual shrubs and plot averages derived from the DSMs to field measurements. We found strong positive correlations between field and image measurements for several metrics. Individual shrub heights tended to be underestimated in the imagery, however, accuracy was higher for dense, compact shrubs compared with shrubs with thin branches. Plot averages of shrub height from DSMs were also strongly correlated to field measurements but consistently underestimated. Grasses and forbs were generally too small to be detected with the resolution of the DSMs. Estimates of

  20. Modeling vegetation heights from high resolution stereo aerial photography: an application for broad-scale rangeland monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Jeffrey K.; Karl, Jason W.; Duniway, Michael; Elaksher, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Vertical vegetation structure in rangeland ecosystems can be a valuable indicator for assessing rangeland health and monitoring riparian areas, post-fire recovery, available forage for livestock, and wildlife habitat. Federal land management agencies are directed to monitor and manage rangelands at landscapes scales, but traditional field methods for measuring vegetation heights are often too costly and time consuming to apply at these broad scales. Most emerging remote sensing techniques capable of measuring surface and vegetation height (e.g., LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar) are often too expensive, and require specialized sensors. An alternative remote sensing approach that is potentially more practical for managers is to measure vegetation heights from digital stereo aerial photographs. As aerial photography is already commonly used for rangeland monitoring, acquiring it in stereo enables three-dimensional modeling and estimation of vegetation height. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and accuracy of estimating shrub heights from high-resolution (HR, 3-cm ground sampling distance) digital stereo-pair aerial images. Overlapping HR imagery was taken in March 2009 near Lake Mead, Nevada and 5-cm resolution digital surface models (DSMs) were created by photogrammetric methods (aerial triangulation, digital image matching) for twenty-six test plots. We compared the heights of individual shrubs and plot averages derived from the DSMs to field measurements. We found strong positive correlations between field and image measurements for several metrics. Individual shrub heights tended to be underestimated in the imagery, however, accuracy was higher for dense, compact shrubs compared with shrubs with thin branches. Plot averages of shrub height from DSMs were also strongly correlated to field measurements but consistently underestimated. Grasses and forbs were generally too small to be detected with the resolution of the DSMs. Estimates of

  1. Approximation of the breast height diameter distribution of two-cohort stands by mixture models I Parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal Podlaski; Francis A. Roesch

    2013-01-01

    Study assessed the usefulness of various methods for choosing the initial values for the numerical procedures for estimating the parameters of mixture distributions and analysed variety of mixture models to approximate empirical diameter at breast height (dbh) distributions. Two-component mixtures of either the Weibull distribution or the gamma distribution were...

  2. Modeling rockfall frequency and bounce height from three-dimensional simulation process models and growth disturbances in submontane broadleaved trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Christophe; Lopez-Saez, Jérôme; Favillier, Adrien; Mainieri, Robin; Eckert, Nicolas; Trappmann, Daniel; Stoffel, Markus; Bourrier, Franck; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    The use of dynamic computational methods has become indispensable for the assessment of rockfall hazards and the quantification of uncertainties. Although a substantial number of models with various degrees of complexity has become available over the past few years, models have only rarely been parameterized against observations, especially because long-term records of rockfalls have proven to be scarce and typically incomplete. On forested slopes, tree-ring analyses may help to fill this gap, as they have been shown to provide annually resolved data on past rockfall activity over long periods. In this paper, a total of 1495 rockfall scars recorded on the stem surface of 1004 trees have been studied at a site in the Vercors massif (French Alps) to calibrate the 3D process based simulation model RockyFor3D. Uncertainties related to the choice of parameters accounting for energy dissipation and surface roughness have been investigated in detail. Because of the lack of reliable data, these parameters typically are estimated based on expert judgments, despite the fact that they have significant impacts on runout distances and bounce height. We demonstrate that slight variations in roughness can indeed strongly affect the performance of runout modeling and that the decreasing downward gradient, observed in field data, is properly reproduced only if reduced roughness (< 10 cm) enables blocks to reach the distal parts of the study plot. With respect to the height of impacts, our results also reveal that differences between simulations and observations can indeed be minimized if softer soil types are preferred during simulation, as they typically limit bouncing. We conclude that field-based dendrogeomorphic approaches represent an objective tool to improve rockfall simulations and to enhance our understanding of parameterization, which is of key importance for process dynamics and thus hazard zoning.

  3. Theta height and Faltings height

    CERN Document Server

    Pazuki, F

    2009-01-01

    Using original ideas from J.-B. Bost and S. David, we provide an explicit comparison between the Theta height and the stable Faltings height of a principally polarized abelian variety. We also give as an application an explicit upper bound on the number of K-rational points of a curve of genus g>1 over a number filed K under a conjecture of S. Lang and J. Silverman. We complete the study with a comparison between differential lattice structures.

  4. Application of Displacement Height and Surface Roughness Length to Determination Boundary Layer Development Length over Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangju Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most uncertain parameters in stepped spillway design is the length (from the crest of boundary layer development. The normal velocity profiles responding to the steps as bed roughness are investigated in the developing non-aerated flow region. A detailed analysis of the logarithmic vertical velocity profiles on stepped spillways is conducted through experimental data to verify the computational code and numerical experiments to expand the data available. To determine development length, the hydraulic roughness and displacement thickness, along with the shear velocity, are needed. This includes determining displacement height d and surface roughness length z0 and the relationship of d and z0 to the step geometry. The results show that the hydraulic roughness height ks is the primary factor on which d and z0 depend. In different step height, step width, discharge and intake Froude number, the relations d/ks = 0.22–0.27, z0/ks = 0.06–0.1 and d/z0 = 2.2–4 result in a good estimate. Using the computational code and numerical experiments, air inception will occur over stepped spillway flow as long as the Bauer-defined boundary layer thickness is between 0.72 and 0.79.

  5. Comparing the model forms estimating generalised diameter-height relationships in Tecomella undulata plantations in hot arid region of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vindhya Prasad Tewari

    2007-01-01

    Four generalised diameter-height equations were developed and compared for pure and even-aged stands of Tecomella undulata in hot arid region of Rajasthan State in India. The data used to fit the equations consisted of 1 540 diameter-height observations collected from the plots laid out in uniformly stocked stands of varying age and density. The performance of four equations was tested by non-linear least squares regression and evaluated using different statistical criteria. Finally, these equations, with the same values of coefficients obtained during the fitting phase, were validated by an independent data set consisting of 854 diameter-height observations. Overall, equation (4) (Hui and Gadow function) was found to perform best for both the fitting data set as well as validation data set.

  6. The pleiotropic ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 affects plant height, floral development and grain yield in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyong Ren; Li Zhu; Zhenyu Gao; Guojun Dong; Guangheng Zhang; Longbiao Guo; Dali Zeng; and Qian Qian; Yuchun Rao; Liwen Wu; Qiankun Xu; Zizhuang Li; Haiping Yu; Yu Zhang; Yujia Leng; Jiang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Moderate plant height and successful establish-ment of reproductive organs play pivotal roles in rice grain production. The molecular mechanism that controls the two aspects remains unclear in rice. In the present study, we characterized a rice gene, ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 (AFD1) that determined plant height, floral development and grain yield. The afd1 mutant showed variable defects including the dwarfism, long panicle, low seed setting and reduced grain yield. In addition, abnormal floral organs were also observed in the afd1 mutant including slender and thick hulls, and hull-like lodicules. AFD1 encoded a DUF640 domain protein and was ex-pressed in all tested tissues and organs. Subcellular localization showed AFD1-green fluorescent fusion protein (GFP) was localized in the nucleus. Meantime, our results suggested that AFD1 regulated the expression of cell division and expansion related genes.

  7. The pleiotropic ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 affects plant height, floral development and grain yield in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Deyong; Rao, Yuchun; Wu, Liwen; Xu, Qiankun; Li, Zizhuang; Yu, Haiping; Zhang, Yu; Leng, Yujia; Hu, Jiang; Zhu, Li; Gao, Zhenyu; Dong, Guojun; Zhang, Guangheng; Guo, Longbiao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Moderate plant height and successful establishment of reproductive organs play pivotal roles in rice grain production. The molecular mechanism that controls the two aspects remains unclear in rice. In the present study, we characterized a rice gene, ABNORMAL FLOWER AND DWARF1 (AFD1) that determined plant height, floral development and grain yield. The afd1 mutant showed variable defects including the dwarfism, long panicle, low seed setting and reduced grain yield. In addition, abnormal floral organs were also observed in the afd1 mutant including slender and thick hulls, and hull‐like lodicules. AFD1 encoded a DUF640 domain protein and was expressed in all tested tissues and organs. Subcellular localization showed AFD1‐green fluorescent fusion protein (GFP) was localized in the nucleus. Meantime, our results suggested that AFD1 regulated the expression of cell division and expansion related genes. PMID:26486996

  8. Statistical distribution of nonlinear random wave height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; Yijun; GUO; Peifang; SONG; Guiting; SONG; Jinbao; YIN; Baoshu; ZHAO; Xixi

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model of random wave is developed using Stokes wave theory of water wave dynamics. A new nonlinear probability distribution function of wave height is presented. The results indicate that wave steepness not only could be a parameter of the distribution function of wave height but also could reflect the degree of wave height distribution deviation from the Rayleigh distribution. The new wave height distribution overcomes the problem of Rayleigh distribution that the prediction of big wave is overestimated and the general wave is underestimated. The prediction of small probability wave height value of new distribution is also smaller than that of Rayleigh distribution. Wave height data taken from East China Normal University are used to verify the new distribution. The results indicate that the new distribution fits the measurements much better than the Rayleigh distribution.

  9. Height-diameter model for black locust, Anatolian black pine and Taurus cedar tree species in Lakes Region

    OpenAIRE

    ÇATAL, Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    The height of a tree is important for assessing tree volume and site index. Diameter of breast height-tree height releation equations are often used to predict the mean tree height for trees in case only diameter at breast height is measured. This study aim describes between the tree heights with diameter of breast height relationships for artificially grown black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), Anatolian black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe) and Taurus cedar (C...

  10. Effect of visual display height on modelled upper and lower cervical gravitational moment, muscle capacity and relative strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, L; Skoss, R; Burnett, A; Burgess-Limerick, R

    2009-02-01

    Head and neck posture is an important factor in neck pain related to computer use; however, the evidence for an optimal posture is unconvincing. This study measured the 3-D postures of 36 young adults during use of three different display heights. Cervical extensor muscle strain was estimated using modelled gravitational load moments and muscle capacities. The influence of more or less upper vs. lower cervical movement was also explored across a broad range of potential postures. Overall cervical extensor muscle capacity diminished away from a neutral posture whilst gravity moment increased with flexion. Overall cervical extensor muscle strain increased with head flexion but remained stable into head extension. Individual differences in the amount of upper and lower cervical movement had an important effect on strain, particularly for some muscles. Computer display height guidelines are an important component of ergonomics practice, yet the relative strain on neck extensor muscles as a function of display height has not been examined. The current findings provide more detailed biomechanical evidence that ergonomists can incorporate with usability and other evidence to determine appropriate display height recommendations.

  11. Prosthetic model, but not stiffness or height, affects the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M

    2017-07-01

    Running-specific prostheses enable athletes with lower limb amputations to run by emulating the spring-like function of biological legs. Current prosthetic stiffness and height recommendations aim to mitigate kinematic asymmetries for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations. However, it is unclear how different prosthetic configurations influence the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Consequently, we investigated how prosthetic model, stiffness, and height affect the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Ten athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations each performed 15 running trials at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s while we measured ground reaction forces and metabolic rates. Athletes ran using three different prosthetic models with five different stiffness category and height combinations per model. Use of an Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter prosthesis reduced metabolic cost by 4.3 and 3.4% compared with use of Freedom Innovations Catapult [fixed effect (β) = -0.177; P forces, prolonged ground contact times (β = -4.349; P = 0.012), and decreased leg stiffness (β = 0.071; P forces (β = 0.007; P = 0.003) but was unrelated to stride kinematic symmetry (P ≥ 0.636). Therefore, prosthetic recommendations based on symmetric stride kinematics do not necessarily minimize the metabolic cost of running. Instead, an optimal prosthetic model, which improves overall biomechanics, minimizes the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations depends on prosthetic model and is associated with lower peak and stance average vertical ground reaction forces, longer contact times, and reduced leg stiffness. Metabolic cost is unrelated to prosthetic stiffness, height, and stride kinematic symmetry. Unlike nonamputees who decrease leg stiffness with increased in-series surface stiffness, biological limb stiffness for athletes with unilateral

  12. Navicula height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten Møller; Olesen Gammelgaard, Christian; Nielsen, R. G.;

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 Cornwall and McPoil discovered that the static measurement of the rearfoot angle while standing on one leg in a relaxed position, could serve as a clinical indicator of the maximum amount of rearfoot eversion during walking. Due to the close relationship between midfoot and rearfoot motio...... the relationship between static measurements, using Navicual Drop Test and One Leg Standing (OLS) and the dynamic measurements of minimal navicula height loaded (NHL) and navicula drop (ΔNH)...

  13. Gaining insight into effective metrology height through the use of a compact CDSEM model for lithography simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Graves, Trey; Vaglio Pret, Alessandro; Robertson, Stewart; Smith, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Computer simulation of lithographic performance, including resist CD, film thickness, sidewall angle and profile has been extensively studied during the past three decades. Lithography simulation has been widely adopted as an enabling technology for high-volume chip manufacturing. However, measurement artifacts arising from CD-SEM metrology are typically ignored in simulation, due to the difficulty of accurately modeling the effect of the CD-SEM at acceptable computational speed. In this paper, we demonstrate how CD measurements can be improved by including a fast, compact CD-SEM model. For example, the variation in effective resist metrology height along contour lines extracted from a simulated CD-SEM image is characterized for a range of structures through focus. We also demonstrate how SEM settings affect the shape of extracted SEM contour and metrology height at contour edge. The Edge Placement Error (EPE) caused by SEM artifact is carefully studied.

  14. Comparing Johnson’s SBB, Weibull and Logit-Logistic bivariate distributions for modeling tree diameters and heights using copulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Javier Gorgoso-Varela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: In this study we compare the accuracy of three bivariate distributions: Johnson’s SBB, Weibull-2P and LL-2P functions for characterizing the joint distribution of tree diameters and heights.Area of study: North-West of Spain.Material and methods: Diameter and height measurements of 128 plots of pure and even-aged Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus Labill. stands located in the North-west of Spain were considered in the present study. The SBB bivariate distribution was obtained from SB marginal distributions using a Normal Copula based on a four-parameter logistic transformation. The Plackett Copula was used to obtain the bivariate models from the Weibull and Logit-logistic univariate marginal distributions. The negative logarithm of the maximum likelihood function was used to compare the results and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the related samples of these logarithms calculated for each sample plot and each distribution.Main results: The best results were obtained by using the Plackett copula and the best marginal distribution was the Logit-logistic.Research highlights: The copulas used in this study have shown a good performance for modeling the joint distribution of tree diameters and heights. They could be easily extended for modelling multivariate distributions involving other tree variables, such as tree volume or biomass.

  15. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    atmospheric pressure , and surface heat flux is provided by the 0.58 NOGAPS model every 3h (Rosmond et al. 2002); river forcing is provided via an...horizontal pressure -gradient force in an oceanic model with nonaligned vertical grid. J. Geophys. Res., 108, 3090, doi:10.1029/2001JC001047. ——, and... Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR 0602435N 73-4727-14-5 MATTHEW J. CARRIER, HANS E. NGODOCK, PHILIP MUSCARELLA, AND SCOTT SMITH Naval

  16. 一种预测成年身高的新方法%A New Model to Predict Final Height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江静; 王伟; 邱定众; 陆文丽; 黄晓萍; 陈凤生; 王德芬

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the validity of the two methods for target height estimation in Shanghai Chinese children and make a new model to predict final height in Shanghai Chinese children. Methods: Boys age > 20years (n = 160), girls age > 18 years ( n = 160) . Applied CMH method and FPH model to statistics the analysis final height of Shanghai Chinese children and their midparental height. Results: There is a considerable disparity in stature between the Shanghai Chinese and the Swedish study populations.The Shanghai Chinese were shorter than their Swedish counterparts. The Swedish fathers and mothers were 7cm and 6cm taller than the Chinese fathers and mothers , respectively. The Shanghai Chinese children were more than 5 cm shorter than the Swedes in stature. The secular increase in height over the two generations, however, was 3. 5 ~ 2.2 cm for the Shanghai Chinese, much larger than that of the Swedes (0. 7 ~ 1.0cm). The new model derived from Swedish population for estimating target height was shown to be applicable to the Shanghai Chinese children; the mean of residual final height values was close to zero (0. 04cm, P = 0. 85 ). However , the mean of residual final height values was significantly above the expected values of zero (2. 87cm, P <0. 001 ) when the CMH applied to the data.The mean absolute residual final height of FPH method (3cm) below CMH method (4cm) ( P =0. 000). A new model to predict final height (Y) in Shanghai Chinese children by a simple linear function of midparental height (X) in centimeters, boys: Y =0.5213X +89. 225; girls: Y = 1. 0458X - 11. 499. Conclusion: The FPH formula surpasses the CMH method in the Shanghai Chinese children.%目的 比较两种预测遗传终身高的方法在中国上海青年的正确性.并作出中国上海青年预测身高的新方法.方法 中国上海青年,男>20岁(n=160),女>18岁(n=160).以中国上海青年的终身高和他们双亲的平均身高对FPH(the Final Height for Parental

  17. Re-evaluation of individual diameter : height allometric models to improve biomass estimation of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, Alicia; Cornulier, Thomas; Illian, Janine B; Iida, Yoshiko; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Burslem, David F R P

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimation of tree biomass is necessary to provide realistic values of the carbon stored in the terrestrial biosphere. A recognized source of errors in tree aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation is introduced when individual tree height values (H) are not directly measured but estimated from diameter at breast height (DBH) using allometric equations. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of 12 alternative DBH : H equations and compare their effects on AGB estimation for three tropical forests that occur in contrasting climatic and altitudinal zones. We found that fitting a three-parameter Weibull function using data collected locally generated the lowest errors and bias in H estimation, and that equations fitted to these data were more accurate than equations with parameters derived from the literature. For computing AGB, the introduced error values differed notably among DBH : H allometric equations, and in most cases showed a clear bias that resulted in either over- or under-estimation of AGB. Fitting the three-parameter Weibull function minimized errors in AGB estimates in our study and we recommend its widespread adoption for carbon stock estimation. We conclude that many previous studies are likely to present biased estimates of AGB due to the method of H estimation. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Observations of Mixing Layer Heights from the Micropulse Lidar Network and Potential Implications for Regional and Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.; Hegarty, J. D.; Henderson, J.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Scarino, A. J.; Berkoff, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Stewart, S. A.; DeCola, P.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term, continuous measurements of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height are rare, but necessary to ascertain its seasonal and diurnal changes. Autonomous ground-based lidar measurements from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) have the potential to contribute to our current knowledge of the PBL. MPLNET is a global network of micropulse lidars which has operated for over 16 years using a standard instrument and suite of processing algorithms. In this work, we investigate the daytime mixing layer height (MLH) determined from aerosol backscatter profiles using the wavelet covariance transform and a fuzzy-logic scheme. First, we evaluate simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in the Washington D.C. - Baltimore, MD urban corridor during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign. In addition to MPLNET data, this field campaign utilizes data from field-deployed mini-Micropulse lidars, the CALIPSO satellite, and the NASA Langley Airborne High-Spectral Resolution Lidar. Next, we show a multi-year, multi-site comparison of MPLNET retrievals to PBL heights retrieved from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2). We discuss differences between the modeled and observed quantities and the potential for future research.

  19. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 1: A new empirical virtual height model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping the location of ionospheric backscatter targets (density irregularities identified by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radars can be a major problem, particularly at far ranges for which the radio propagation paths are longer and more uncertain. Assessing and increasing the accuracy of the mapping of scattering locations is crucial for the measurement of two-dimensional velocity structures on the small and meso-scale, for which overlapping velocity measurements from two radars need to be combined, and for studies in which SuperDARN data are used in conjunction with measurements from other instruments. The co-ordinates of scattering locations are presently estimated using a combination of the measured range and a model virtual height, assuming a straight line virtual propagation path. By studying elevation angle of arrival information of backscatterred signals from 5 years of data (1997–2001 from the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar we have determined the actual distribution of the backscatter target locations in range-virtual height space. This has allowed the derivation of a new empirical virtual height model that allows for a more accurate mapping of the locations of backscatter targets.

  20. Sequentially and alternatively developed heights for two representative bench marks: near Palmdale, California and along the Bill Williams River, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Thomas D.; Elliot, Michael R.

    1985-01-01

    This report consists chiefly of 41 tables that both describe and fully document the reconstructions of a series of alternately developed heights based on levelings leading into two representative bench marks in the southwestern United States. One of these marks, 3219, Vincent, California (fig. 1), lies within the area of the Pacific-North American plate boundary; the other, 22Q, Bill Williams River, Arizona (fig. 1), falls within what is believed to be a singularly stable section of southwestern Arizona. Because the levelings that produced these heights were characterized by especially disparate routes with respect to both terrain and climate, the resulting heights provide a test for the existence and magnitude of path-dependent error in geodetic leveling. These two marks were chosen both because of their relative stability with respect to adjacent marks and because their tectonic stability (or instability) can be inferred from the geologic record. Specifically, we can reasonably speculate that 3219 may have sustained measurably significant tectonic displacements during the 20th century, whereas 22Q probably has remained virtually invariant with respect to any fixed datum during the same period. Bench mark 3219 is a standard Geological Survey iron post stamped "3219" near the Southern Pacific Railroad station at Vincent (U.S. Geological Survey, 1898, p. 392); 22Q is a brass cap stamped "22Q (MWD)" set in a concrete post located in a gully immediately north of the Bill Williams River, Arizona (USC&GS Quad. 34114). 3219 was established by the Geological Survey no later than 1897 (Gannett and Baldwin, 1907, p. 365); 22Q was established by the Metropolitan Water District of southern California in advance of the 1931 control surveys along the projected route of the Colorado River Aqueduct.

  1. A model for the height of the internal boundary layer over an area with a irregular coastline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    1996-01-01

    for the temperature jump and the mean vertical air motion at the top of the internal boundary-layer. Four cases from experiments in Nanticoke and Vancouver are used for model validation. The agreement between the calculated and measured internal boundary layer height at the observational sites is fairly good....... The input information for the model consist of wind speed and direction, friction velocity and kinematic heat flux in time and space for the area, and the potential temperature gradient and the mean vertical air motion above the internal boundary layer. For the experiments used in the validation the effect...

  2. A development of cloud top height retrieval using thermal infrared spectra observed with GOSAT and comparison with CALIPSO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Saitoh, Naoko; Ota, Yoshifumi; Shiomi, Kei

    2016-05-01

    An algorithm based on CO2 slicing, which has been used for cirrus cloud detection using thermal infrared data, was developed for high-resolution radiance spectra from satellites. The channels were reconstructed based on sensitivity height information of the original spectral channels to reduce the effects of measurement errors. Selection of the reconstructed channel pairs was optimized for several atmospheric profile patterns using simultaneous studies assuming a cloudy sky. That algorithm was applied to data by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Results were compared with those obtained from the space-borne lidar instrument on-board Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). Monthly mean cloud amounts from the slicing generally agreed with those from CALIPSO observations despite some differences caused by surface temperature biases, optically very thin cirrus, multilayer structures of clouds, extremely low cloud tops, and specific atmospheric conditions. Comparison of coincident data showed good agreement, except for some cases, and revealed that the improved slicing method is more accurate than the traditional slicing method. Results also imply that improved slicing can detect low-level clouds with cloud top heights as low as approximately 1.5 km.

  3. Forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using general model-based decomposition for polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nghia Pham; Zou, Bin; Cai, Hongjun; Wang, Chengyi

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of forest parameters over mountain forest areas using polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PolInSAR) images is one of the greatest interests in remote sensing applications. For mountain forest areas, scattering mechanisms are strongly affected by the ground topography variations. Most of the previous studies in modeling microwave backscattering signatures of forest area have been carried out over relatively flat areas. Therefore, a new algorithm for the forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using the general model-based decomposition (GMBD) for PolInSAR image is proposed. This algorithm enables the retrieval of not only the forest parameters, but also the magnitude associated with each mechanism. In addition, general double- and single-bounce scattering models are proposed to fit for the cross-polarization and off-diagonal term by separating their independent orientation angle, which remains unachieved in the previous model-based decompositions. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated with simulated data from PolSARProSim software and ALOS-PALSAR spaceborne PolInSAR datasets over the Kalimantan areas, Indonesia. Experimental results indicate that forest height could be effectively estimated by GMBD.

  4. Development of a Methodology for Mapping Forest Height and Biomass Using Satellite Based SAR and Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Claudia; Schmullius, Christiane

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents first results of a study investigating satellite, multifrequent radar and lidar data for characterising the three-dimensional forest structure. Biomass is an important structural parameter to asses the carbon pool of forests. The synergy of lidar and SAR data for forest biomass mapping is promising. The study introduced here aims to combine TerraSAR-X, ALOS PALSAR and ICESat/GLAS data. Some preliminary results for the test site in Thuringian Forest, a low mountain range in eastern Germany, with a focus on the GLAS data will be described. Two methods for filtering invalid GLAS shots are investigated. Moreover, different ICESat/GLAS waveforms parameters were calculated and compared to an airborne lidar based Digital Height Model (DHM) and a forest inventory data base.

  5. [Effects of Reactive Jump Training in Handball Players Regarding Jump Height and Power Development in the Triceps Surae Muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, N; Westermann, A; Möller, D; von Piekartz, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown changes in the technical and physical demands in modern handball. The game has increased considerably in speed, power and dynamics. Jump training has, therefore, become ever more important in the training of the athletes. These developments contribute to the fact that handball is now one of the most injury-prone types of sport, with the lower extremities being most frequently affected. Reactive jump training is not only used in training by now, but also increasingly in injury prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of reactive jump training with handball players. 21 regional league handball players were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 9). The intervention group completed a six-week reactive jump training programme while the control group went through a non-specific training programme. Jump height (squat and counter movement jump), isokinetic and isometric maximum power as well as muscle activity served as measuring parameters. A comparison of the intervention and control groups revealed that the reactive jump training led to significant improvements in jump height. The isometric and isokinetic maximum power measurements and the electromyographic activities of the triceps surae muscle demonstrated an improvement in the values within the intervention group. However, this improvement was not significant compared with the control group. Likewise both jumps correlated with the muscle activity of the soleus muscle as shown by electromyography. A moderate correlation was noticed between the isokinetic maximum power measurement and the electromyographic activity of the soleus and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. Furthermore, the correlations of the isometric and isokinetic maximum power meas-urements resulted in a strong correlation coefficient. This study revealed a significant increase in jump height after reactive jump training. There was no significant difference in

  6. The roles of magmatic and external water in the March 8 tephra eruption at Mount St. Helens as assessed by a 1-D steady plume-height model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L. G.; Sherrod, D. R.; Vallance, J. W.; Thornber, C. T.; Ewert, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens has occurred through glacial ice and snow that would be expected to substantially affect the character of the eruption. Nevertheless, the role of water in the eruption to date has not always been clear. For example, on March 8, 2005, a half-hour-long tephra blast sent a plume to a maximum of ~9 km above the vent (based on pilot reports); seismicity and plume heights were greatest during the first ~10 minutes, then persisted for another ~15 minutes at a lower level before the eruption stopped. Tephra volume within 5 km2 downwind of the vent was ~5x104 m3 DRE, but trace amounts were reported at least to Ellensburg, WA (150 km NE), suggesting a total areal coverage >5,000 km2 and total volume >1x105 m3. Assuming that most of this material was expelled in the first ten minutes and had a density of 2500 kg/m3, the mass flow rate (M) during the vigorous phase was >~4x105 kg/s. The tephra, composed primarily of non-pumiceous broken and decrepitated dome rock, could have been expelled either by groundwater and steam at relatively modest (boiling-point) temperatures, or by magmatic gas at much higher temperatures. The high plume, however, suggested significant buoyancy, perhaps driven by temperatures closer to magmatic. To assess the effect of magmatic heat on plume height, we employ a 1-D steady volcanic plume model that uses specified vent diameter, exit velocity, eruption temperature, mass fractions of gas and added external water, and profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity, to calculate plume height and plume properties as a function of elevation. The model considers the enthalpy of equilibrium water condensation and of ice formation. Model results show that, under atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles measured near Mount St. Helens on the afternoon of March 8, 2005, a plume height (h) of 7-9 km could have developed with eruption temperatures (T) as low as 100° C, provided the mass fraction of water vapor

  7. Social inequalities in height: persisting differences today depend upon height of the parents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Galobardes

    Full Text Available Substantial increases in height have occurred concurrently with economic development in most populations during the last century. In high-income countries, environmental exposures that can limit genetic growth potential appear to have lessened, and variation in height by socioeconomic position may have diminished. The objective of this study is to investigate inequalities in height in a cohort of children born in the early 1990s in England, and to evaluate which factors might explain any identified inequalities.12,830 children from The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, a population based cohort from birth to about 11.5 years of age, were used in this analysis. Gender- and age-specific z-scores of height at different ages were used as outcome variables. Multilevel models were used to take into account the repeated measures of height and to analyze gender- and age-specific relative changes in height from birth to 11.5 years. Maternal education was the main exposure variable used to examine socioeconomic inequalities. The roles of parental and family characteristics in explaining any observed differences between maternal education and child height were investigated. Children whose mothers had the highest education compared to those with none or a basic level of education, were 0.39 cm longer at birth (95% CI: 0.30 to 0.48. These differences persisted and at 11.5 years the height difference was 1.4 cm (95% CI: 1.07 to 1.74. Several other factors were related to offspring height, but few changed the relationship with maternal education. The one exception was mid-parental height, which fully accounted for the maternal educational differences in offspring height.In a cohort of children born in the 1990s, mothers with higher education gave birth to taller boys and girls. Although height differences were small they persisted throughout childhood. Maternal and paternal height fully explained these differences.

  8. Estimation of Heights of Soil Plug Inside Bucket Foundations During Suction Penetration by Deformable Discrete Element Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The soil plug phenomenon involving the rising of the surface soil inside the bucket chamber under the suction pressure and seepage forces was simulated and calculated by deformable discrete element method (DDEM) models. The seepage forces, the effective gravity of soil, the friction on the chamber wall and the suction inside the chamber are considered as the main external forces of DDEM specimen. Three typical types of soil (silty clay, silt and sand) in the Bohai Sea are set as the main environmental conditions in the formation process of soil plug. It is found that the heights of soil plug simulated by DDEM models are 161.85 mm in silty clay, 125.22 mm in silt and 167.56 mm in sand, which are close to model test results and higher than those estimated by discrete element method (DEM). DDEM is an effective method to estimate and predict the heights of soil plug before suction penetration of bucket foundations on site.

  9. Boundary layer heights and surface fluxes of momentum and heat derived from ECMWF data for use in pollutant dispersion models - problems with data accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wotawa, G. [Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Inst. of Meteorology and Physics, Vienna (Austria); Stohl, A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    Certain boundary layer parameters, especially boundary layer heights, are very important for pollutant dispersion modelling. On the regional scale (>- 100 km), data of the numerical weather prediction model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are often used for that purpose. Based on ECMWF data, the meteorological preprocessor FLEXTRA for Lagrangian air quality simulation models and the Lagrangian particle diffusion model FLEXPART have been developed. Using analyses and short term forecasts, a temporal resolution of three hours can be achieved. Some alternative methods to obtain boundary layer parameters can be applied, producing different results which affect all subsequent calculations, for instance the calculation of boundary layer trajectories and the dispersion of air pollutants. (au)

  10. Height-dependence of spatio-temporal spectra of wall-bounded turbulence - LES results and model predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, Michael; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Wavenumber-frequency spectra of the streamwise velocity component obtained from large-eddy simulations are presented. Following a recent paper [Wilczek et al., J. Fluid. Mech., 769:R1, 2015] we show that the main features, a Doppler shift and a Doppler broadening of frequencies, are captured by an advection model based on the Tennekes-Kraichnan random-sweeping hypothesis with additional mean flow. In this paper, we focus on the height-dependence of the spectra within the logarithmic layer of the flow. We furthermore benchmark an analytical model spectrum that takes the predictions of the random-sweeping model as a starting point and find good agreement with the LES data. We also quantify the influence of LES grid resolution on the wavenumber-frequency spectra.

  11. Canonical Height Functions For Monomial Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jan-Li

    2012-01-01

    We show that the canonical height function defined by Silverman does not have the Northcott finiteness property in general. We develop a new canonical height function for monomial maps. In certain cases, this new canonical height function has nice properties.

  12. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  13. Compatible dominant height - site index model for juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.)

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Rodríguez-Carrillo; Francisco Cruz-Cobos; Benedicto Vargas-Larreta; Francisco J. Hernández

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the site quality of juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.) in the San Dimas region of the state of Durango, Mexico, using the site index method. The database comes from stem analysis of 43 trees felled in harvesting activities. The Chapman-Richards and Schumacher models, by means of the algebraic difference and generalized algebraic difference approaches, were tested to determine the site index; in addition, the error structure was modeled with a second-ord...

  14. Influence of the atmosphere on the evaluation of the geopotential from global models on the surface of the Earth: implications for the realization of a World Height System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko

    2016-04-01

    Outside the atmosphere, the potential of a standard atmosphere can with high accuracy be approximated with the potential of a surface layer with the same mass, independently of the scale height of the atmosphere. Not so when the potential is evaluated on the surface of the Earth. In a spherically symmetric approximation and assuming a scale height of 7.6 km, the potential at zero height is in a back-of-the-envelope calculation 0.12 percent less than the potential of the surface laýer. This corresponds to a difference of -1.2 ppb in the total geopotential evaluated on the surface of the Earth, the equivalent of a difference of +8 mm in height. Using a realistic atmospheric and Earth model, the difference is not constant. This has obvious implications for the geopotential values associated with a World Height System. The question has in fact already been extensively analyzed in the context of geoid determination.

  15. Perch-height specific predation on tropical lizard clay models: implications for habitat selection in mainland neotropical lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, John E

    2009-09-01

    Predation has been hypothesized to be a strong selective force structuring communities of tropical lizards. Comparisons of perch height and size-based predation frequencies can provide a unique window into understanding how predation might shape habitat selection and morphological patterns in lizards, especially anoles. Here I use plasticine clay models, placed on the trunks of trees and suspended in the canopy to show that predation frequency on clay models differs primarily according to habitat (canopy vs. trunk-ground), but not according to size. These data are discussed in light of observed lizard abundances in the lowland forests of Costa Rica, and are presented as partial explanation for why fewer lizards are found in tree canopies, and more lizards are found on ground-trunk habitats.

  16. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Significant wave height

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  17. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Significant wave height

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  18. Global variance in female population height: the influence of education, income, human development, life expectancy, mortality and gender inequality in 96 nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Quentin J

    2014-01-01

    Human height is a heritable trait that is known to be influenced by environmental factors and general standard of living. Individual and population stature is correlated with health, education and economic achievement. Strong sexual selection pressures for stature have been observed in multiple diverse populations, however; there is significant global variance in gender equality and prohibitions on female mate selection. This paper explores the contribution of general standard of living and gender inequality to the variance in global female population heights. Female population heights of 96 nations were culled from previously published sources and public access databases. Factor analysis with United Nations international data on education rates, life expectancy, incomes, maternal and childhood mortality rates, ratios of gender participation in education and politics, the Human Development Index (HDI) and the Gender Inequality Index (GII) was run. Results indicate that population heights vary more closely with gender inequality than with population health, income or education.

  19. Mixing heights and surface fluxes over Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for modeling of pollution episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, W. M.; Tucker, S. C.; Fairall, C.; Bariteau, L.; Wolfe, D.; Zagar, M.; Brewer, A.

    2007-12-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study, boundary layer measurements were made by in-situ instruments, lidars, and rawinsondes on the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown as well as by radar wind profilers on land. Brown also carried instruments to measure surface heat and momentum fluxes. This presentation will emphasize measurements made in Galveston Bay and in the Gulf of Mexico near the Houston area. Details of boundary layer depth and turbulence intensity over these waters have not been well known previously, but are quite important to the understanding of high ozone episodes in Houston. One somewhat surprising result is that the boundary layer over water was almost always slightly unstable, with positive surface heat flux. Mixing depths were moderate, although mixing was generally weak compared to that over land. Boundary layer heights over the water were substantially shallower than daytime heights over land. Experiments in modeling ozone episodes with WRF at 1.5-km grid spacing will be shown and compared with the measurements.

  20. Height and wavelength of alternate bars in rivers: Modelling vs. laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, M.A.F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Vriend, de H.J.; Harten, van A.

    2001-01-01

    Alternate bars are large wave patterns in sandy beds of rivers and channels. The crests and troughs alternate between the banks of the channel. These bars, which move downstream several meters per day, reduce the navigability of the river. Recent modelling of alternate bars has focused on stability

  1. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  2. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  3. An Improved Model for Operational Specification of the Electron Density Structure up to Geosynchronous Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    tracking of spacecraft as part of space surveillance programmes; the use of space-based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) to carry out remote sensing of...Profiler (TSMP) and the TSMP-assisted Digisonde (TaD) model b) To validate the results using ISR and topside electron density profiles, GNSS TEC and...derived from ground-based GNSS receivers ............................ 20  2.3 Comparison with data from Malvern ISR

  4. Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

    2007-04-06

    In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

  5. An atmosphere-wave regional coupled model: improving predictions of wave heights and surface winds in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Koch, Wolfgang; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Ho-Hagemann, Ha T. M.; Stanev, Emil V.

    2017-04-01

    The coupling of models is a commonly used approach when addressing the complex interactions between different components of earth systems. We demonstrate that this approach can result in a reduction of errors in wave forecasting, especially in dynamically complicated coastal ocean areas, such as the southern part of the North Sea - the German Bight. Here, we study the effects of coupling of an atmospheric model (COSMO) and a wind wave model (WAM), which is enabled by implementing wave-induced drag in the atmospheric model. The numerical simulations use a regional North Sea coupled wave-atmosphere model as well as a nested-grid high-resolution German Bight wave model. Using one atmospheric and two wind wave models simultaneously allows for study of the individual and combined effects of two-way coupling and grid resolution. This approach proved to be particularly important under severe storm conditions as the German Bight is a very shallow and dynamically complex coastal area exposed to storm floods. The two-way coupling leads to a reduction of both surface wind speeds and simulated wave heights. In this study, the sensitivity of atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and atmospheric pressure, to the wave-induced drag, in particular under storm conditions, and the impact of two-way coupling on the wave model performance, is quantified. Comparisons between data from in situ and satellite altimeter observations indicate that two-way coupling improves the simulation of wind and wave parameters of the model and justify its implementation for both operational and climate simulations.

  6. Accuracy Assessment of Timber Volume Maps Using Forest Inventory Data and LiDAR Canopy Height Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maps of standing timber volume provide valuable decision support for forest managers and have therefore been the subject of recent studies. For map production, field observations are commonly combined with area-wide remote sensing data in order to formulate prediction models, which are then applied over the entire inventory area. The accuracy of such maps has frequently been described by parameters such as the root mean square error of the prediction model. The aim of this study was to additionally address the accuracy of timber volume classes, which are used to better represent the map predictions. However, the use of constant class intervals neglects the possibility that the precision of the underlying prediction model may not be constant across the entire volume range, resulting in pronounced gradients between class accuracies. This study proposes an optimization technique that automatically identifies a classification scheme which accounts for the properties of the underlying model and the implied properties of the remote sensing support information. We demonstrate the approach in a mountainous study site in Eastern Switzerland covering a forest area of 2000 hectares using a multiple linear regression model approach. A LiDAR-based canopy height model (CHM provided the auxiliary information; timber volume observations from the latest forest inventory were used for model calibration and map validation. The coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.64 and the cross-validated root mean square error (RMSECV = 123.79 m3 ha−1 were only slightly smaller than those of studies in less steep and heterogeneous landscapes. For a large set of pre-defined number of classes, the optimization model successfully identified those classification schemes that achieved the highest possible accuracies for each class.

  7. Develop a Model Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  8. Sensitivity of Above-Ground Biomass Estimates to Height-Diameter Modelling in Mixed-Species West African Woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Rubén; Heiskanen, Janne; Aynekulu, Ermias; Pitkänen, Sari; Packalen, Petteri

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that above-ground biomass (AGB) inventories should include tree height (H), in addition to diameter (D). As H is a difficult variable to measure, H-D models are commonly used to predict H. We tested a number of approaches for H-D modelling, including additive terms which increased the complexity of the model, and observed how differences in tree-level predictions of H propagated to plot-level AGB estimations. We were especially interested in detecting whether the choice of method can lead to bias. The compared approaches listed in the order of increasing complexity were: (B0) AGB estimations from D-only; (B1) involving also H obtained from a fixed-effects H-D model; (B2) involving also species; (B3) including also between-plot variability as random effects; and (B4) involving multilevel nested random effects for grouping plots in clusters. In light of the results, the modelling approach affected the AGB estimation significantly in some cases, although differences were negligible for some of the alternatives. The most important differences were found between including H or not in the AGB estimation. We observed that AGB predictions without H information were very sensitive to the environmental stress parameter (E), which can induce a critical bias. Regarding the H-D modelling, the most relevant effect was found when species was included as an additive term. We presented a two-step methodology, which succeeded in identifying the species for which the general H-D relation was relevant to modify. Based on the results, our final choice was the single-level mixed-effects model (B3), which accounts for the species but also for the plot random effects reflecting site-specific factors such as soil properties and degree of disturbance.

  9. Sensitivity of Above-Ground Biomass Estimates to Height-Diameter Modelling in Mixed-Species West African Woodlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Valbuena

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that above-ground biomass (AGB inventories should include tree height (H, in addition to diameter (D. As H is a difficult variable to measure, H-D models are commonly used to predict H. We tested a number of approaches for H-D modelling, including additive terms which increased the complexity of the model, and observed how differences in tree-level predictions of H propagated to plot-level AGB estimations. We were especially interested in detecting whether the choice of method can lead to bias. The compared approaches listed in the order of increasing complexity were: (B0 AGB estimations from D-only; (B1 involving also H obtained from a fixed-effects H-D model; (B2 involving also species; (B3 including also between-plot variability as random effects; and (B4 involving multilevel nested random effects for grouping plots in clusters. In light of the results, the modelling approach affected the AGB estimation significantly in some cases, although differences were negligible for some of the alternatives. The most important differences were found between including H or not in the AGB estimation. We observed that AGB predictions without H information were very sensitive to the environmental stress parameter (E, which can induce a critical bias. Regarding the H-D modelling, the most relevant effect was found when species was included as an additive term. We presented a two-step methodology, which succeeded in identifying the species for which the general H-D relation was relevant to modify. Based on the results, our final choice was the single-level mixed-effects model (B3, which accounts for the species but also for the plot random effects reflecting site-specific factors such as soil properties and degree of disturbance.

  10. Research on ionospheric tomography based on variable pixel height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Li, Peiqing; He, Jie; Hu, Wusheng; Li, Chaokui

    2016-05-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel height was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The method considers the height of each pixel as an unknown variable, which is retrieved during the inversion process together with the electron density values. In contrast to conventional computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT), which parameterizes the model with a fixed pixel height, the variable-pixel-height computerized ionospheric tomography (VHCIT) model applies a disturbance to the height of each pixel. In comparison with conventional CIT models, the VHCIT technique achieved superior results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of VHCIT was performed. According to the results of the statistical analysis of the average root mean square errors, the proposed model offers an improvement by 15% compared with conventional CIT models.

  11. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  12. A proof of concept: Airborne LIDAR-measured ellipsoidal heights of a lake surface correspond to a local geoid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlinszky, András; Ressl, Camillo; Timár, Gábor; Weber, Robert; Székely, Balázs; Briese, Christian; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    The geoid is the theoretical model of the Earth, defined as an equipotential surface. Typically it corresponds to a mean ocean surface and is extended through the continents. Elevations are measured above "sea level" based on the fact that the surface of water in equilibrium closely follows this equipotential surface. On dry land, the geoid can be determined from gravimetric measurements, and interpolation methods are used to represent variations of gravity in a regular grid model. For practical reasons, these are represented as geoid undulation, which is the difference of the ellipsoidal height and the height of the equipotential surface. In his work Principia, Isaac Newton proposed the thought experiment of connecting the North Pole and the Equator through a "canal" filled with water in order to determine gravitational flattening of the Earth. It was also Newton's idea to use the level of water in a global network of canals and wells to survey the geoid. Of course, these experiments are impossible at a global scale, but a sufficiently large lake and an accurate method for measuring elevation independently from the geoid can be used to prove the concept. Our objective was to measure the ellipsoidal water surface elevation of Lake Balaton in Hungary with high spatial resolution and accuracy and compare these measurements with the gravimetrically determined local geoid model. Airborne laser scanning (ALS, also known as airborne LIDAR) is a remote sensing technique capable of delivering a large number of points with elevations and horizontal positions accurate to a few centimetres. Laser pulses are emitted in a scan pattern from an airborne sensor, and are reflected from the illuminated terrain (or water) surface. Based on the position and orientation of the aircraft (typically observed by GNSS and an inertial navigation system), the scan angle and the travel time of the laser pulse, the exact position of each measurement point is calculated. In this particular case

  13. A comparison of forest height prediction from FIA field measurement and LiDAR data via spatial models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhen Li

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a high correspondence between tree height measurements acquired from airborne LiDAR and that those measured using conventional field techniques. Though these results are very promising, most of the studies were conducted over small experimental areas and tree height was measured carefully or using expensive instruments in the field, which is...

  14. Developing mathematical modelling competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten; Jensen, Tomas Højgaard

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of mathematical modelling competence, by which we mean being able to carry through a whole mathematical modelling process in a certain context. Analysing the structure of this process, six sub-competences are identified. Mathematical modelling competence...... cannot be reduced to these six sub-competences, but they are necessary elements in the development of mathematical modelling competence. Experience from the development of a modelling course is used to illustrate how the different nature of the sub-competences can be used as a tool for finding...... the balance between different kinds of activities in a particular educational setting. Obstacles of social, cognitive and affective nature for the students' development of mathematical modelling competence are reported and discussed in relation to the sub-competences....

  15. Sclerostin antibody treatment causes greater alveolar crest height and bone mass in an ovariectomized rat model of localized periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Xu, Xinchen; Liu, Min; Zhang, Wen; Ke, Hua-zhu; Qin, An; Tang, Tingting; Lu, Eryi

    2015-07-01

    Periodontitis and osteoporosis are bone destructive diseases with a high prevalence in the adult population. The concomitant presence of osteoporosis may be a risk factor of progression of periodontal destruction. We studied the effect of sclerostin-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) on alveolar bone endpoints in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of induced experimental periodontitis. Sixty female, 4-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham operation or bilateral OVX and were left untreated for 2 months. Experimental periodontitis (ligature) was established by placing silk sutures subgingival to the right maxillary first and second molar teeth for 4 weeks, and feeding the rats food and high-sugar drinking water during this period. Thereafter, ligatures were removed and 25mg/kg vehicle or Scl-Ab was administered subcutaneously twice weekly for 6 weeks. Rats were randomized into four groups: (1) Control (Sham+Vehicle), (2) Sham+Ligature+Vehicle, (3) OVX+Ligature+Vehicle, and (4) OVX + Ligature + Scl-Ab. Terminal blood and right maxilla specimens were collected for analyses. Group 3 rats showed lower bone volume fraction (BVF) of alveolar bone with higher bone resorption and lower bone formation than Group 2 rats. Group 4 rats had higher alveolar crest height, as assessed by linear distance of cementoenamel junction to the alveolar bone crest and greater alveolar bone mass using Micro CT, than Group 3 rats. Significantly higher values of mineral apposition rate (MAR) and mineralizing surface/bone surface (MS/BS) were also observed in Group 4 rats by analyzing polychrome sequential labeling data. Increased serum osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin, and deceased serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CTx-1 illustrate the ability of Scl-Ab to increase alveolar bone mass by enhancing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption in an animal model of estrogen deficiency osteopenia plus periodontitis. Scl-Ab could be a potential bone anabolic agent for

  16. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, V.; Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-16

    The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

  17. RISK ANALYSIS DEVELOPED MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana Cristina NUKINA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Through Risk analysis developed model deciding whether control measures suitable for implementation. However, the analysis determines whether the benefits of a data control options cost more than the implementation.

  18. Modelling river dune development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Weerts, H.J.T.; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Ritsema, I.L; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; van Os, A.G.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Since river dunes influence flow resistance, predictions of dune dimensions are required to make accurate water level predictions. A model approach to simulate developing river dunes is presented. The model is set-up to be appropriate, i.e. as simple as possible, but with sufficient accuracy for

  19. Alaska Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' geoid height grid for Alaska is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  20. Mexico Geoid Heights (MEXICO97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for Mexico, and North-Central America, is the MEXICO97 geoid model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine gravity...

  1. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a…

  2. Predicting tree heights for biomass estimates in tropical forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Molto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of REDD+ mechanisms require reliable estimation of carbon stocks, especially in tropical forests that are particularly threatened by global changes. Even if tree height is a crucial variable to compute the above-ground forest biomass, tree heights are rarely measured in large-scale forest census because it requires consequent extra-effort. Tree height have thus to be predicted thanks to height models. Height and diameter of all trees above 10 cm of diameter were measured in thirty-three half-ha plots and nine one-ha plots throughout the northern French Guiana, an area with substantial climate and environmental gradients. We compared four different model shapes and found that the Michaelis–Menten shape was the most appropriate for the tree biomass prediction. Model parameters values were significantly different from one forest plot to another and neglecting these differences would lead to large errors in biomass estimates. Variables from the forest stand structure explained a sufficient part of the plot-to-plot variations of the height model parameters to affect the AGB predictions. In the forest stands dominated by small trees, the trees were found to have rapid height growth for small diameters. In forest stands dominated by larger trees, the trees were found to have the greatest heights for large diameters. The above-ground biomass estimation uncertainty of the forest plots was reduced by the use of the forest structure-based height model. It demonstrates the feasibility and the importance of height modeling in tropical forest for carbon mapping. Tree height is definitely an important variable for AGB estimations. When the tree heights are not measured in an inventory, they can be predicted with a height-diameter model. This model can account for plot-to plot variations in height-diameter relationship thank to variables describing the plots. The variables describing the stand structure of the plots are efficient for

  3. Fear of heights and visual height intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Huppert, Doreen

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review is, first, to cover the different aspects of visual height intolerance such as historical descriptions, definition of terms, phenomenology of the condition, neurophysiological control of gaze, stance and locomotion, and therapy, and, second, to identify warranted epidemiological and experimental studies. Vivid descriptions of fear of heights can be found in ancient texts from the Greek, Roman, and Chinese classics. The life-time prevalence of visual height intolerance is as high as 28% in the general population, and about 50% of those who are susceptible report an impact on quality of life. When exposed to heights, visual exploration by eye and head movements is restricted, and the velocity of locomotion is reduced. Therapy for fear of heights is dominated by the behavioral techniques applied during real or virtual reality exposure. Their efficacy might be facilitated by the administration of D-cycloserine or glucocorticoids. Visual height intolerance has a considerable impact on daily life and interpersonal interactions. It is much more frequent than fear of heights, which is defined as an environmental subtype of a specific phobia. There is certainly a continuum stretching from acrophobia to a less-pronounced visual height intolerance, to which the categorical distinction of a specific phobia does not apply.

  4. Perch-height specific predation on tropical lizard clay models: implications for habitat selection in mainland neotropical lizards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Steffen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Predation has been hypothesized to be a strong selective force structuring communities of tropical lizards. Comparisons of perch height and size-based predation frequencies can provide a unique window into understanding how predation might shape habitat selection and morphological patterns in lizards, especially anoles. Here i use plasticine clay models, placed on the trunks of trees and suspended in the canopy to show that predation frequency on clay models differs primarily according to habitat (canopy vs. trunk-ground, but not according to size. These data are discussed in light of observed lizard abundances in the lowland forests of Costa Rica, and are presented as partial explanation for why fewer lizards are found in tree canopies, and more lizards are found on ground-trunk habitats. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (3: 859-864. Epub 2009 September 30.Existe la hipótesis de que la depredación es una fuerte fuerza selectiva que estructura las comunidades de lagartijas tropicales. Las comparaciones de las frecuencias de altura de la percha y de depredación con base en el tamaño pueden proveer una ventana única en el entendimiento de cómo la depredación podría moldear la selección del hábitat y los patrones morfológicos en las lagartijas, especialmente anoles. En este estudio uso modelos de plasticina, ubicados en troncos de árboles y suspendidos en el dosel para mostrar que la frecuencia de depredación en los modelos de plasticina difiere primariamente según el hábitat (dosel vs. tronco-suelo pero no según el tamaño. Estos datos se discuten a la luz de las abundancias de lagartijas observadas en los bosques de bajura de Costa Rica, y se presentan como una explicación parcial a porqué menos lagartijas se encuentran en los doseles, y más lagartijas se encuentran en los hábitats suelo-tronco.

  5. Optimization of Truss Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Ulitinas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the task in truss height and in the optimization of the cross-sections of their elements. Element cross-sections are designed of steel profiles considering requirements for strength, stability and rigidity. A mathematical model is formulated as a nonlinear mathematical programming problem. It is solved as an iterative process, using mathematical software package “MATLAB” routine “fmincon”. The ratio of buckling is corrected in the each iteration. Optimization results are compared with those obtained applying software package “Robot Millennium”.Article in Lithuanian

  6. On High-Frequency Topography-Implied Gravity Signals for a Height System Unification Using GOCE-Based Global Geopotential Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombein, Thomas; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    National height reference systems have conventionally been linked to the local mean sea level, observed at individual tide gauges. Due to variations in the sea surface topography, the reference levels of these systems are inconsistent, causing height datum offsets of up to ±1-2 m. For the unification of height systems, a satellite-based method is presented that utilizes global geopotential models (GGMs) derived from ESA's satellite mission Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In this context, height datum offsets are estimated within a least squares adjustment by comparing the GGM information with measured GNSS/leveling data. While the GNSS/leveling data comprises the full spectral information, GOCE GGMs are restricted to long wavelengths according to the maximum degree of their spherical harmonic representation. To provide accurate height datum offsets, it is indispensable to account for the remaining signal above this maximum degree, known as the omission error of the GGM. Therefore, a combination of the GOCE information with the high-resolution Earth Gravitational Model 2008 (EGM2008) is performed. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the benefit, when high-frequency topography-implied gravity signals are additionally used to reduce the remaining omission error of EGM2008. In terms of a spectral extension, a new method is proposed that does not rely on an assumed spectral consistency of topographic heights and implied gravity as is the case for the residual terrain modeling (RTM) technique. In the first step of this new approach, gravity forward modeling based on tesseroid mass bodies is performed according to the Rock-Water-Ice (RWI) approach. In a second step, the resulting full spectral RWI-based topographic potential values are reduced by the effect of the topographic gravity field model RWI_TOPO_2015, thus, removing the long to medium wavelengths. By using the latest GOCE GGMs, the impact of topography

  7. Statistical Downscaling for Multi-Model Ensemble Prediction of Summer Monsoon Rainfall in the Asia-Pacific Region Using Geopotential Height Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Congwen; Chung-Kyu PARK; Woo-Sung LEE; Won-Tae YUN

    2008-01-01

    The 21-yr ensemble predictions of model precipitation and circulation in the East Asian and western North Pacific(Asia-Pacific)summer monsoon region(0°-50°N,100°-150°E)were evaluated in nine different AGCM,used in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Climate Center(APCCl multi.model ensemble seasonal prediction system.The analysis indicates that the precipitation anomaly patterns of model ensemble predictions are substantially difierent from the observed counterparts in this region.but the summer monsoon circulations are reasonably predicted.For example,all models can well produce the interannual variability of the western North Pacific monsoon index(WNPMI)defined by 850 hPa winds,but they failed to predict the relationship between WNPMI and precipitation anomalies.The interannual variability of the 500 hPa geopotential height(GPH)can be well predicted by the models in contrast to precipitation anomalies.On the basis of such model performances and the relationship between the interannual variations of 500 hPa GPH and precipitation anomalies.we developed a statistical scheme used to downscale the summer monsoon precipitation anomaly Oll the basis of EOF and singular value decomposition(SVD).In this scheme,the three leading EOF modes of 500 hPa GPH anomaly fields predicted by the models are firstly corrected by the linear regression between the principal components in each model and observation.respectively.Then. the corrected model GPH is chosen as the predictor to downscale the precipitation anomaly field,which is assembled by the forecasted expansion toeffcients of model 500 hPa GPH and the three leading SVD modes of observed precipitation anomaly corresponding to the prediction of model 500 hPa GPH during a 19-year training period.The cross-validated forecasts suggest that this dowuscaling scheme may have a potential to improve the forecast skill of the precipitation anomaly in the South China Sea,western North Pacific and the East Asia Pacific regions

  8. Design and Test of Mixed-flow Impellers IV : Experimental Results for Impeller Models MFI-1 and MFI-2 with Changes in Blade Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Beede, William L; Withee, Joseph R JR

    1954-01-01

    Modifications A and B of impeller model MFI-1 and A, B, and C of impeller model MFI-2 were investigated experimentally in an attempt to determine what allowance in blade height should be made for boundary layer and viscous losses in an impeller designed for isentropic compressible flow. A gradual increase in blade height was arbitrarily made from inlet to outlet in anticipation of a gradual build-up of boundary layer. Apparently there was a rapid build-up of boundary layer near the inlet in the experimental case rather than a gradual one. Therefore, the proper allowance for boundary layer cannot be described from the data obtained. Decreasing the pressure gradient along the shroud by reducing the blade height allowance apparently did little to increase the overall efficiency. At the design speed of 1400 feet per second, the overall adiabatic efficiency was increased from 0.83 for the MFI-1A to 0.85 for the MFI-1B with reduction in height; however, it is indicated from the theoretical velocity distribution and outlet surveys that the increase was due to a change from decelerating to accelerating flow along the hub rather than from any change along the shroud. It is further indicated that the consequences of a thickened or separated boundary layer depend not only on the design velocity gradients but also on the shape of the passage.

  9. Validity of self-reported weight, height, and body mass index among university students in Thailand: Implications for population studies of obesity in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleigh Adrian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale epidemiological studies commonly use self-reported weights and heights to determine weight status. Validity of such self-reported data has been assessed primarily in Western populations in developed countries, although its use is widespread in developing countries. We examine the validity of obesity based on self-reported data in an Asian developing country, and derive improved obesity prevalence estimates using the "reduced BMI threshold" method. Methods Self-reported and measured heights and weights were obtained from 741 students attending an open university in Thailand (mean age 34 years. Receiver operator characteristic techniques were applied to derive "reduced BMI thresholds." Results Height was over-reported by a mean of 1.54 cm (SD 2.23 in men and 1.33 cm (1.84 in women. Weight was under-reported by 0.93 kg (3.47 in men and 0.62 kg (2.14 in women. Sensitivity and specificity for determining obesity (Thai BMI threshold 25 kg/m2 using self-reported data were 74.2% and 97.3%, respectively, for men and 71.9% and 100% for women. For men, reducing the BMI threshold to 24.5 kg/m2 increased the estimated obesity prevalence based on self-reports from 29.1% to 33.8% (true prevalence was 36.9%. For women, using a BMI threshold of 24.4 kg/m2, the improvement was from 12.0% to 15.9% (true prevalence 16.7%. Conclusion Young educated Thais under-report weight and over-report height in ways similar to their counterparts in developed countries. Simple adjustments to BMI thresholds will overcome these reporting biases for estimation of obesity prevalence. Our study suggests that self-reported weights and heights can provide economical and valid measures of weight status in high school-educated populations in developing countries.

  10. Product Development Process Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The use of Concurrent Engineering and other modern methods of product development and maintenance require that a large number of time-overlapped "processes" be performed by many people. However, successfully describing and optimizing these processes are becoming even more difficult to achieve. The perspective of industrial process theory (the definition of process) and the perspective of process implementation (process transition, accumulation, and inter-operations between processes) are used to survey the method used to build one base model (multi-view) process model.

  11. Comparison of Mixed Layer Heights from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, Ground-based Measurements, and the WRP-Chem Model during CalNex and CARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarino, Amy Jo; Obland, Michael; Fast, Jerome D.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Berg, Larry K.; Lefer, Barry; Haman, C.; Hair, John; Rogers, Ray; Butler, Carolyn; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David

    2014-06-05

    The California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) field campaigns during May and June 2010 provided a data set appropriate for studying characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed to California onboard the NASA LaRC B-200 aircraft to aid incharacterizing aerosol properties during these two field campaigns. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 31 flights, many in coordination with other research aircraft and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as the depth and variability of the daytime mixed layer (ML), which is a subset within the PBL. This work illustrates the temporal and spatial variability of the ML in the vicinity of Los Angeles and Sacramento, CA. ML heights derived from HSRL measurements are compared to PBL heights derived from radiosonde profiles, ML heights measured from ceilometers, and simulated PBL heights from the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem) community model. Comparisons between the HSRL ML heights and the radiosonde profiles in Sacramento result in a correlation coefficient value (R) of 0.93 (root7 mean-square (RMS) difference of 157 m and bias difference (HSRL radiosonde) of 5 m). HSRL ML heights compare well with those from the ceilometer in the LA Basin with an R of 0.89 (RMS difference of 108 m and bias difference (HSRL Ceilometer) of -9.7 m) for distances of up to 30 km between the B-200 flight track and the ceilometer site. Simulated PBL heights from WRF-Chem were compared with those obtained from all flights for each campaign, producing an R of 0.58 (RMS difference of 604 m and a bias difference (WRF-Chem HSRL) of -157 m) for CalNex and 0

  12. Integrated Computational Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    68.5%, 9.6% and 21.9%, respectively. The alloy density and Vickers microhardness were ρ = 8.23 ± 0.01 g/cm3 and Hv = 5288 ± 1 MPa. [3...and 3-D. Techniques to mechanically test materials at smaller scales were developed to better inform the deformation models. Also methods were...situ microscale tension testing technique was adapted to enable microscale fatigue testing on tensile dog-bone specimens. Microscale tensile fatigue

  13. Developing a Model Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  14. 长白山云冷杉针阔混交林幼树树高--胸径模型%Height-diameter models for saplings in a spruce-fir mixed forest in Changbai Mountains.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢军; 张会儒; 雷相东; 杨英军; 王全军

    2015-01-01

    采用长白山林区2013年调查的12块1 hm2固定样地中5个树种的幼树树高-胸径数据,用35个树高曲线经验模型进行模拟、筛选.结果表明,Curtis于1967年提出的三次多项式h=a0 +a1 d+a2 d2 +a3 d3 能够很好地拟合5个树种幼树的树高-胸径模型,决定系数( R2 )最高可达0.786 5.用独立样本数据对该模型进行检验,结果表明,模型的表现能力良好,能够适用于本地区的云冷杉针阔混交林的幼树树高-胸径模拟.以空间代替时间的方法分析5个树种的幼树树高生长规律,发现色木幼树树高较大;红松和冷杉幼树树高生长类似;云杉幼树树高初期较小,而后期生长很快.本文提出的幼树树高模型可为抚育经营提供参考.%Total tree height ( H ) and diameter at breast height ( D ) outside bark are two most essential variables in most forest inventories, but the height curves for saplings have rarely been developed so far. Using the data from 12 permanent 1-ha sample plots investigated in 2013, we found that, among 35 empirical tree height-diameter at breast height model, the cubic polynomial proposed by Curtis in 1967 ( h=a0 +a1 d+a2 d2 +a3 d3 ) well fit the height-diameter model of saplings of five species in Changbai Mountains, and the coefficient of determination for Pinus koraiensis was the highest (R2 =0. 786 5). The validation of the models showed that all the models performed well and were quite suitable to the saplings in spruce-fir mixed forest in this area. The analysis of tree height growth for the five species by space substitute time indicated that the height of Acer mono was higher than others, the height growth of Pinus koraiensis and Abies nephrolepis was similar, and the height growth of spruce was low in early stage but increased quickly afterwards.

  15. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  16. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-21

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height winds to 26 parameters applied in a planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme and a surface layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over an area of complex terrain during the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. An efficient sampling algorithm and a generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of modeled turbine-height winds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is contributed by parameters related to the dissipation of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulence length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be the most important one, and a larger dissipation rate can produce larger hub-height winds. A larger Prandtl number results in weaker nighttime winds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong winds, implying a reduction in the variability of the wind speed. All of the above parameters can significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed, the altitude of the low-level jet and the magnitude of the wind shear strength. The wind direction is found to be modulated by the same subset of influential parameters. Remainder of abstract is in attachment.

  17. Effects of Boundary Layer Height on the Model of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations from AOD: Comparison of Stable and Convective Boundary Layer Heights from Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Zang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellites or ground-based sun photometer spectral observations has been widely used to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations by regression methods. The boundary layer height (BLH is a popular factor in the regression model of AOD and PM2.5, but its effect is often uncertain. This may result from the structures between the stable and convective BLHs and from the calculation methods of the BLH. In this study, the boundary layer is divided into two types of stable and convective boundary layer, and the BLH is calculated using different methods from radiosonde data and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data for the station in Beijing, China during 2014–2015. The BLH values from these methods show significant differences for both the stable and convective boundary layer. Then, these BLHs were introduced into the regression model of AOD-PM2.5 to seek the respective optimal BLH for the two types of boundary layer. It was found that the optimal BLH for the stable boundary layer is determined using the method of surface-based inversion, and the optimal BLH for the convective layer is determined using the method of elevated inversion. Finally, the optimal BLH and other meteorological parameters were combined to predict the PM2.5 concentrations using the stepwise regression method. The results indicate that for the stable boundary layer, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of surface relative humidity, BLH, and surface temperature. These three factors can significantly enhance the prediction accuracy of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations, with an increase of determination coefficient from 0.50 to 0.68. For the convective boundary layer, however, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of BLH and surface wind speed. These two factors improve the determination coefficient, with a relatively low increase from 0.65 to 0.70. It is found that the

  18. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  19. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  20. Modeling of 2008 Kasatochi volcanic sulfate direct radiative forcing: assimilation of OMI SO2 plume height data and comparison with MODIS and CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Omar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic SO2 column amount and injection height retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI with the Extended Iterative Spectral Fitting (EISF technique are used to initialize a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem to simulate the atmospheric transport and lifecycle of volcanic SO2 and sulfate aerosol from the 2008 Kasatochi eruption, and to subsequently estimate the direct shortwave, top-of-the-atmosphere radiative forcing of the volcanic sulfate aerosol. Analysis shows that the integrated use of OMI SO2 plume height in GEOS-Chem yields: (a good agreement of the temporal evolution of 3-D volcanic sulfate distributions between model simulations and satellite observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP, and (b a e-folding time for volcanic SO2 that is consistent with OMI measurements, reflecting SO2 oxidation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere is reliably represented in the model However, a consistent (~25% low bias is found in the GEOS-Chem simulated SO2 burden, and is likely due to a high (~20% bias of cloud liquid water amount (as compared to the MODIS cloud product and the resultant stronger SO2 oxidation in the GEOS meteorological data during the first week after eruption when part of SO2 underwent aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds. Radiative transfer calculations show that the forcing by Kasatochi volcanic sulfate aerosol becomes negligible 6 months after the eruption, but its global average over the first month is −1.3 W m−2 with the majority of the forcing-influenced region located north of 20° N, and with daily peak values up to −2 W m−2 on days 16–17. Sensitivity experiments show that every 2 km decrease of SO2 injection height in the GEOS-Chem simulations will result in a ~25% decrease in volcanic sulfate forcing; similar sensitivity but opposite sign also holds for a 0.03 μm increase of geometric radius of the

  1. Modeling of 2008 Kasatochi volcanic sulfate direct radiative forcing: assimilation of OMI SO2 plume height data and comparison with MODIS and CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krotkov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic SO2 column amount and injection height retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI with the Extended Iterative Spectral Fitting (EISF technique are used to initialize a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem to simulate the atmospheric transport and lifecycle of volcanic SO2 and sulfate aerosol from the 2008 Kasatochi eruption, and to subsequently estimate the direct shortwave, top-of-the-atmosphere radiative forcing of the volcanic sulfate aerosol. Analysis shows that the integrated use of OMI SO2 plume height in GEOS-Chem yields: (a good agreement of the temporal evolution of 3-D volcanic sulfate distributions between model simulations and satellite observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP, and (b an e-folding time for volcanic SO2 that is consistent with OMI measurements, reflecting SO2 oxidation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere is reliably represented in the model. However, a consistent (~25% low bias is found in the GEOS-Chem simulated SO2 burden, and is likely due to a high (~20% bias of cloud liquid water amount (as compared to the MODIS cloud product and the resultant stronger SO2 oxidation in the GEOS meteorological data during the first week after eruption when part of SO2 underwent aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds. Radiative transfer calculations show that the forcing by Kasatochi volcanic sulfate aerosol becomes negligible 6 months after the eruption, but its global average over the first month is −1.3 Wm−2, with the majority of the forcing-influenced region located north of 20° N, and with daily peak values up to −2 Wm−2 on days 16–17. Sensitivity experiments show that every 2 km decrease of SO2 injection height in the GEOS-Chem simulations will result in a ~25 % decrease in volcanic sulfate forcing; similar sensitivity but opposite sign also holds for a 0.03 μm increase of geometric radius of

  2. Modeling of 2008 Kasatochi Volcanic Sulfate Direct Radiative Forcing: Assimilation of OMI SO2 Plume Height Data and Comparison with MODIS and CALIOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Park, S.; Zeng, J.; Ge, C.; Yang, K.; Carn, S.; Krotkov, N.; Omar, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Volcanic SO2 column amount and injection height retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with the Extended Iterative Spectral Fitting (EISF) technique are used to initialize a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) to simulate the atmospheric transport and lifecycle of volcanic SO2 and sulfate aerosol from the 2008 Kasatochi eruption, and to subsequently estimate the direct shortwave, top-of-the-atmosphere radiative forcing of the volcanic sulfate aerosol. Analysis shows that the integrated use of OMI SO2 plume height in GEOS-Chem yields: (a) good agreement of the temporal evolution of 3-D volcanic sulfate distributions between model simulations and satellite observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP), and (b) an e-folding time for volcanic SO2 that is consistent with OMI measurements, reflecting SO2 oxidation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere is reliably represented in the model. However, a consistent (approx. 25 %) low bias is found in the GEOS-Chem simulated SO2 burden, and is likely due to a high (approx.20 %) bias of cloud liquid water amount (as compared to the MODIS cloud product) and the resultant stronger SO2 oxidation in the GEOS meteorological data during the first week after eruption when part of SO2 underwent aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds. Radiative transfer calculations show that the forcing by Kasatochi volcanic sulfate aerosol becomes negligible 6 months after the eruption, but its global average over the first month is -1.3W/sq m, with the majority of the forcing-influenced region located north of 20degN, and with daily peak values up to -2W/sq m on days 16-17. Sensitivity experiments show that every 2 km decrease of SO2 injection height in the GEOS-Chem simulations will result in a approx.25% decrease in volcanic sulfate forcing; similar sensitivity but opposite sign also holds for a 0.03 m increase of geometric radius of

  3. Water-Based Concurrent Training Improves Peak Oxygen Uptake, Rate of Force Development, Jump Height, and Neuromuscular Economy in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Alberton, Cristine L; Cadore, Eduardo L; Zaffari, Paula; Baroni, Bruno M; Lanferdini, Fábio J; Radaelli, Régis; Pantoja, Patrícia D; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A; Wolf Schoenell, Maira C; Vaz, Marco A; Kruel, Luiz F M

    2015-07-01

    The study investigated the effects of different intrasession exercise sequences on the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular adaptations induced by water-based concurrent training in young subjects. Twenty-six healthy young women (25.1 ± 2.9 years) were placed into 2 water-based concurrent training groups: resistance before (RA, n = 13) or after (AR, n = 13) aerobic training. Subjects trained resistance and aerobic training during 12 weeks, 2 times per week performing both exercise types in the same training session. Peak oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak), rate of force development (RFD) obtained during an isometric peak torque knee extension protocol, jump height, and neuromuscular economy (normalized electromyography at 80% of pretraining knee extension isometric peak torque) in young women were determined. After training, there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in both RA and AR in the V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, with no differences between groups (7 vs. 5%). The maximal isometric knee extension RFD showed significant increases (p = 0.003) after training (RA: 19 vs. AR: 30%), and both groups presented similar gains. In addition, the countermovement jump height also increased (p = 0.034) after training (RA: 5% vs. AR: 6%), with no difference between groups. After training, there were significant improvements on vastus lateralis (p < 0.001) (RA: -13% vs. AR: -20%) and rectus femoris (p = 0.025) (RA: -17% vs. AR: -7%) neuromuscular economy, with no difference between groups. In conclusion, 12 weeks of water-based concurrent training improved the peak oxygen uptake, RFD, jump height, and neuromuscular economy in young women independent from the intrasession exercise sequence.

  4. Glacial effects limiting mountain height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egholm, D L; Nielsen, S B; Pedersen, V K; Lesemann, J-E

    2009-08-13

    The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms-in particular, the potential link to climate-are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover, limits to crustal strength are thought to constrain the maximum elevation of large continental plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the central Andes. There are indications that the general height of mountain ranges is also directly influenced by the extent of glaciation through an efficient denudation mechanism known as the glacial buzzsaw. Here we use a global analysis of topography and show that variations in maximum mountain height correlate closely with climate-controlled gradients in snowline altitude for many high mountain ranges across orogenic ages and tectonic styles. With the aid of a numerical model, we further demonstrate how a combination of erosional destruction of topography above the snowline by glacier-sliding and commensurate isostatic landscape uplift caused by erosional unloading can explain observations of maximum mountain height by driving elevations towards an altitude window just below the snowline. The model thereby self-consistently produces the hypsometric signature of the glacial buzzsaw, and suggests that differences in the height of mountain ranges mainly reflect variations in local climate rather than tectonic forces.

  5. Plant development models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuine, I.; Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, I.; Kramer, K.; Hänninen, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we provide a brief overview of plant phenology modeling, focusing on mechanistic phenological models. After a brief history of plant phenology modeling, we present the different models which have been described in the literature so far and highlight the main differences between them,

  6. Height-Deterministic Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowotka, Dirk; Srba, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    of regular languages and still closed under boolean language operations, are considered. Several of such language classes have been described in the literature. Here, we suggest a natural and intuitive model that subsumes all the formalisms proposed so far by employing height-deterministic pushdown automata...

  7. Sea surface height and transport stream function of the South China Sea from a variable-grid global ocean circulation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏泽勋; 方国洪; 崔秉昊; 方越; 何宜军

    2003-01-01

    A fine-grid model (1/6°) covering the South China Sea (SCS), East China Sea and Japan/East Sea, which is embedded into a coarse-grid (3°) global model, was established to study the SCS circulation. In the present paper, we report the model-produced monthly and annual mean transport stream functions and sea surface heights(SSH) and their anomalies of the SCS. Comparison to the TOPEX/Poseidon data shows that the model-produced monthly sea surface height anomalies (SSHA) are in good agreement with altimeter measurements. Based on the results, the circulation of the SCS, especially the upper layer circulation, is discussed. In the surface layer, the western Philippine Sea water intrudes into the SCS through the Luzon Strait in autumn, winter and spring, but not in summer. However, as far as the whole water column is concerned, the water intrudes into the SCS through the Luzon Strait all the year round. This indicates that in summer the water still intrudes into the SCS in the subsurface and intermediate layers. The area near the northern continental slope of the SCS is dominated by a cyclonic circulation all the year round. The SCS Southern Anticyclonic Gyre, SE Vietnam Off-Shore Current in summertime and SCS Southern Cyclonic Gyre in wintertime are reproduced reasonably. The difference between the monthly averaged SSH and SSHA is significant, indicating the importance of the mean SSH in the SCS circulation.

  8. Monitoring and Modeling of Large-Scale Pattern of Forest Height and Biomass based on the Metabolic Scaling Theory and Water-Energy Balance Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOI, S.; Myneni, R. B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Park, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies the metabolic scaling theory (MST) and water-energy balance equation (PM: Penman-Monteith) to monitor and model the large-scale pattern of forest height and biomass. The WBE and PM theories grant a generalized mechanistic understanding of relationships between the forest structure and multiple geospatial predictors including topography and climatic variables. We successfully expanded the average trend and predictions of the MST and PM by including eco-regional and plant functional type variations. Our model now accounts for plant interaction, self-competition and disturbance effects to alleviate known limitations of the MST. The topographic heterogeneity and climate seasonality are additionally incorporated in the model predictions. A simple and clear mechanistic understanding in the model is promising for prognostic applications in contrast to conventional black-box approaches. This study provides baseline maps (circa 2005; 1-km2 grids) of the maximum forest canopy heights and aboveground biomass over the continental USA. Their future projections are also delivered using various climate scenarios. The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Downscaled Climate Projections (NEX-DCP30) dataset is used in this task.

  9. Differences among skeletal muscle mass indices derived from height-, weight-, and body mass index-adjusted models in assessing sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2016-07-01

    Aging processes are inevitably accompanied by structural and functional changes in vital organs. Skeletal muscle, which accounts for 40% of total body weight, deteriorates quantitatively and qualitatively with aging. Skeletal muscle is known to play diverse crucial physical and metabolic roles in humans. Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by significant loss of muscle mass and strength. It is related to subsequent frailty and instability in the elderly population. Because muscle tissue is involved in multiple functions, sarcopenia is closely related to various adverse health outcomes. Along with increasing recognition of the clinical importance of sarcopenia, several international study groups have recently released their consensus on the definition and diagnosis of sarcopenia. In practical terms, various skeletal muscle mass indices have been suggested for assessing sarcopenia: appendicular skeletal muscle mass adjusted for height squared, weight, or body mass index. A different prevalence and different clinical implications of sarcopenia are highlighted by each definition. The discordances among these indices have emerged as an issue in defining sarcopenia, and a unifying definition for sarcopenia has not yet been attained. This review aims to compare these three operational definitions and to introduce an optimal skeletal muscle mass index that reflects the clinical implications of sarcopenia from a metabolic perspective.

  10. Deciphering the Precision of Stereo IKONOS Canopy Height Models for U.S. Forests with G-LiHT Airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudasill-Neigh, Christopher S.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Bourget, Paul; Cook, Bruce; Huang, Chengquan; Rishmawi, Khaldoun; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the precision of IKONOS stereo data for measuring forest canopy height. The high cost of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data collection for large area studies and the present lack of a spaceborne instrument lead to the need to explore other low cost options. The US Government currently has access to a large archive of commercial high-resolution imagery, which could be quite valuable to forest structure studies. At 1 m resolution, we here compared canopy height models (CHMs) and height data derived from Goddard's airborne LiDAR Hyper-spectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) with three types of IKONOS stereo derived digital surface models (DSMs) that estimate CHMs by subtracting National Elevation Data (NED) digital terrain models (DTMs). We found the following in three different forested regions of the US after excluding heterogeneous and disturbed forest samples: (1) G-LiHT DTMs were highly correlated with NED DTMs with R (sup 2) greater than 0.98 and root mean square errors (RMSEs) less than 2.96 m; (2) when using one visually identifiable ground control point (GCP) from NED, G-LiHT DSMs and IKONOS DSMs had R (sup 2) greater than 0.84 and RMSEs of 2.7 to 4.1 m; and (3) one GCP CHMs for two study sites had R (sup 2) greater than 0.7 and RMSEs of 2.6 to 3 m where data were collected less than four years apart. Our results suggest that IKONOS stereo data are a useful LiDAR alternative where high-quality DTMs are available.

  11. Deciphering the Precision of Stereo IKONOS Canopy Height Models for US Forests with G-LiHT Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. R. Neigh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have evaluated the precision of IKONOS stereo data for measuring forest canopy height. The high cost of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR data collection for large area studies and the present lack of a spaceborne instrument lead to the need to explore other low cost options. The US Government currently has access to a large archive of commercial high-resolution imagery, which could be quite valuable to forest structure studies. At 1 m resolution, we here compared canopy height models (CHMs and height data derived from Goddard’s airborne LiDAR Hyper-spectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT with three types of IKONOS stereo derived digital surface models (DSMs that estimate CHMs by subtracting National Elevation Data (NED digital terrain models (DTMs. We found the following in three different forested regions of the US after excluding heterogeneous and disturbed forest samples: (1 G-LiHT DTMs were highly correlated with NED DTMs with R2 > 0.98 and root mean square errors (RMSEs < 2.96 m; (2 when using one visually identifiable ground control point (GCP from NED, G-LiHT DSMs and IKONOS DSMs had R2 > 0.84 and RMSEs of 2.7 to 4.1 m; and (3 one GCP CHMs for two study sites had R2 > 0.7 and RMSEs of 2.6 to 3 m where data were collected less than four years apart. Our results suggest that IKONOS stereo data are a useful LiDAR alternative where high-quality DTMs are available.

  12. A global boundary-layer height climatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dop, H. van; Krol, M.; Holtslag, B. [Inst. for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, IMAU, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    In principle the ABL (atmospheric boundary layer) height can be retrieved from atmospheric global circulation models since they contain algorithms which determine the intensity of the turbulence as a function of height. However, these data are not routinely available, or on a (vertical) resolution which is too crude in view of the application. This justifies the development of a separate algorithm in order to define the ABL. The algorithm should include the generation of turbulence by both shear and buoyancy and should be based on readily available atmospheric parameters. There is obviously a wide application for boundary heights in off-line global and regional chemistry and transport modelling. It is also a much used parameter in air pollution meteorology. In this article we shall present a theory which is based on current insights in ABL dynamics. The theory is applicable over land and sea surfaces in all seasons. The theory is (for various reasons) not valid in mountainous areas. In areas where boundary-layer clouds or deep cumulus convection are present the theory does not apply. However, the same global atmospheric circulation models contain parameterizations for shallow and deep convection from which separate estimates can be obtained for the extent of vertical mixing. (au)

  13. The Sustainable Development Model

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable development concept approaches quality of life in complexity, as economic, social and environmental issues, promoting the idea of balance between economic development, social equity, efficient utilization and environment conservation.     An essential condition for achieving sustainable development is the right mix of macroeconomic policies coherent, consistent with resources to ensure sustainability of materials and energy used for growth.

  14. Reconstruction of head-to-knee voxel model for Syrian adult male of average height and weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashira Taleb

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Comparisons with SAFs data of Zubal model accentuated the fact that the organ masses and the specific anatomy have a significant effect on SAFs. SyrMan model can be considered as the first model built in the Middle East region, and it is an important step toward the Syrian Reference Man.

  15. The 300 km threshold value for vertical drifts inferred from F-region heights: Past observations, present developments, and future works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebesin, B. O.

    2016-06-01

    The variability of the quiet time F-region vertical plasma drift in the low latitude region if well understood forms an essential subject in the equatorial ionosphere-thermosphere environment. Vertical drift velocities obtained from the time rate of change of the F-layer height have been adjudged a realistic representation of the true velocities when the F-layer altitudes are greater than a threshold value of 300 km. In this light, the sufficiency of this threshold value of some outstanding past results was discussed in relation to some present observations, especially in the African sector where there is paucity of data, and a new direction for future developments was suggested.

  16. Measuring Ice Sheet Height with ICESat-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, K.; Smith, B.; Neumann, T.; Hancock, D.

    2015-12-01

    ICESat-2 is NASA's next-generation laser altimeter, designed to measure changes in ice sheet height and sea ice freeboard. Over the ice sheets, it will use a continuous repeat-track pointing strategy to ensure that it accurately measures elevation changes along a set of reference tracks. Over most of the area of Earth's ice sheets, ICESat-2 will provide coverage with a track-to-track spacing better than ~3 km. The onboard ATLAS instrument will use a photon-counting approach to provide a global geolocated photon point cloud, which is then converted into surface-specific elevation data sets. In this presentation, we will outline our strategy for taking the low-level photon point cloud and turning it into measurements posted at 20 m along-track for a set of pre-defined reference points by (1) selecting groups of photon events (PEs) around each along-track point, (2) refining the initial PE selection by fitting selected PEs with an along-track segment model and eliminating outliers to the model, (3) applying histogram-based corrections to the surface height based on the residuals to the along-track segment model, (4) calculate error estimates based on estimates of relative contributions of signal and noise PEs to the observed PE count, and (5) determining the final location and surface height of the along-track segment. These measurements are then corrected for short-scale (100-200 m) across-track surface topography around the reference points to develop a time series of land ice heights. The resulting data products will allow us to measure ice sheet elevation change with a point-for-point accuracy of a few centimeters over Earth's ice sheets.

  17. Height-dependent sunrise and sunset: Effects and implications of the varying times of occurrence for local ionospheric processes and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Tobias G. W.; Stankov, Stanimir M.

    2017-10-01

    It is well established that the sunrise and sunset periods are of particular importance to ionospheric research and modelling because of the rapid changes in the ionospheric plasma density, temperature, and dynamics. In particular, the sharp increase in the ionisation following sunrise results in a quick increase in the ionospheric peak density, NmF2 , and a decrease in the peak height, hmF2 . Changes in plasma temperature, scale height and transport processes add further complexity which makes it difficult to investigate and model the ionospheric behaviour during this transitional period from night to day. One of the aspects contributing to this difficulty is that not all ionospheric altitudes are exposed to the first sunlight of the day at the same time. During sunrise, the upper part of the ionosphere is illuminated prior to the lower part which is still in the dark. The boundary between sunlit and dark regions moves downwards until it reaches the surface of the Earth, which is commonly taken as the moment of sunrise at certain geographical coordinates. This means that the sunrise at surface level does not occur until after the entire ionosphere has been illuminated. During sunset, the same process happens in reverse order. This paper addresses the issue of these altitude-dependent times of sunrise and sunset and reports on our study of some of the effects on the diurnal variations in the ionospheric characteristics.

  18. Approximation of the breast height diameter distribution of two-cohort stands by mixture models III Kernel density estimators vs mixture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal Podlaski; Francis A. Roesch

    2014-01-01

    Two-component mixtures of either the Weibull distribution or the gamma distribution and the kernel density estimator were used for describing the diameter at breast height (dbh) empirical distributions of two-cohort stands. The data consisted of study plots from the Å wietokrzyski National Park (central Poland) and areas close to and including the North Carolina section...

  19. Econometric models for biohydrogen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duu-Hwa; Lee, Duu-Jong; Veziroglu, Ayfer

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as an attractive clean energy source due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. Analyzing various economic scenarios can help decision makers to optimize development strategies for the biohydrogen sector. This study surveys econometric models of biohydrogen development, including input-out models, life-cycle assessment approach, computable general equilibrium models, linear programming models and impact pathway approach. Fundamentals of each model were briefly reviewed to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The input-output model and the simplified economic input-output life-cycle assessment model proved most suitable for economic analysis of biohydrogen energy development. A sample analysis using input-output model for forecasting biohydrogen development in the United States is given.

  20. Educational Game Development Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Korkusuz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on the subject shows that students spend more time on computer games than other activities such as reading book or watching TV. It is possible that this time-consuming activity can become much more effective by educator-game sector cooperation. Which type of game students prefer mostly; how the educational content can be articulated the games without diminishing the playability and enjoyableness of it; and the impact of the competition in the games on process and students are just several titles examined in the studies. This scope presents the types of computer game, qualities of educational games, and educational games designs which are recommended for developing educational games. It also presents a set of knowledge about the importance of educational games in mathematics and physic education, and some studies on this field. In the scope, some strategies, about educational game development process, are recommended educators and software developers in the sector who intend to develop educational games based on the literature.

  1. Satellite and Surface Data Synergy for Developing a 3D Cloud Structure and Properties Characterization Over the ARM SGP. Stage 1: Cloud Amounts, Optical Depths, and Cloud Heights Reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkova, I.; Long, C. N.; Heck, P. W.; Minnis, P.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program objectives is to obtain measurements applicable to the development of models for better understanding of radiative processes in the atmosphere. We address this goal by building a three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the cloud structure and properties over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP). We take the approach of juxtaposing the cloud properties as retrieved from independent satellite and ground-based retrievals, and looking at the statistics of the cloud field properties. Once these retrievals are well understood, they will be used to populate the 3D characterization database. As a first step we determine the relationship between surface fractional sky cover and satellite viewing angle dependent cloud fraction (CF). We elaborate on the agreement intercomparing optical depth (OD) datasets from satellite and ground using available retrieval algorithms with relation to the CF, cloud height, multi-layer cloud presence, and solar zenith angle (SZA). For the SGP Central Facility, where output from the active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) valueadded product (VAP) is available, we study the uncertainty of satellite estimated cloud heights and evaluate the impact of this uncertainty for radiative studies.

  2. Simulating the Black Saturday 2009 smoke plume with an interactive composition-climate model: Sensitivity to emissions amount, timing, and injection height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert D.; Luo, Ming; Fromm, Mike; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Mangeon, Stéphane; Worden, John

    2016-04-01

    We simulated the high-altitude smoke plume from the early February 2009 Black Saturday bushfires in southeastern Australia using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first single-plume analysis of biomass burning emissions injected directly into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) using a full-complexity composition-climate model. We compared simulated carbon monoxide (CO) to a new Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer/Microwave Limb Sounder joint CO retrieval, focusing on the plume's initial transport eastward, anticyclonic circulation to the north of New Zealand, westward transport in the lower stratospheric easterlies, and arrival over Africa at the end of February. Our goal was to determine the sensitivity of the simulated plume to prescribed injection height, emissions amount, and emissions timing from different sources for a full-complexity model when compared to Aura. The most realistic plumes were obtained using injection heights in the UTLS, including one drawn from ground-based radar data. A 6 h emissions pulse or emissions tied to independent estimates of hourly fire behavior produced a more realistic plume in the lower stratosphere compared to the same emissions amount being released evenly over 12 or 24 h. Simulated CO in the plume was highly sensitive to the differences between emissions amounts estimated from the Global Fire Emissions Database and from detailed, ground-based estimates of fire growth. The emissions amount determined not only the CO concentration of the plume but also the proportion of the plume that entered the stratosphere. We speculate that this is due to either or both nonlinear CO loss with a weakened OH sink or plume self-lofting driven by shortwave absorption of the coemitted aerosols.

  3. Models for Sustainable Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2008-01-01

    The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China.......The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China....

  4. Models for Sustainable Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2008-01-01

    The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China.......The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China....

  5. Ionospheric foF2 morphology and response of F2 layer height over Jicamarca during different solar epochs and comparison with IRI-2012 model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B O Adebesin; B J Adekoya; S O Ikubanni; S J Adebiyi; O A Adebesin; B W Joshua; K O Olonade

    2014-06-01

    Diurnal, seasonal and annual foF2 variability and the response of the F2-layer height over Jicamarca (11.9°S, 76.8°W, 1°N dip) during periods of low (LSA), moderate (MSA) and high (HSA) solar activities was investigated. The relative standard deviation (R) was used for the analysis. The F2-layer critical frequency pre-noon peak increases by a factor of 2 more than the post-noon peak as the solar activity increases. The variability coefficient (R) is lowest during the day (7–16%) for the three solar epochs; increases during nighttime (20–26%, 14–26%, and 10–20%, respectively for the LSA, MSA and HAS years); and attained highest magnitude during sunrise (21–27%, 24–27%, and 19–30%, respectively in similar order). Two major peaks were observed in R – the pre-sunrise peak, which is higher, and the post-sunset peak. Generally, the variability increases as the solar activity decreases. Annually, R peaks within 23–24%, 19–24% and 15–24% for the LSA, MSA, and HSA periods, respectively. The ionospheric F2-layer height rises to the higher level with increasing solar activity. The foF2 comparison results revealed that Jicamarca is well represented on the IRI-2012 model, with an improvement on the URSI option. The importance of vertical plasma drift and photochemistry in the F2-layer was emphasized.

  6. How many predictors in species distribution models at the landscape scale? Land use versus LiDAR-derived canopy height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ficetola, G.F.; Bonardi, A.; Mücher, C.A.; Gilissen, N.L.M.; Padoa-Schioppa, E.

    2014-01-01

    At the local spatial scale, land-use variables are often employed as predictors for ecological niche models (ENMs). Remote sensing can provide additional synoptic information describing vegetation structure in detail. However, there is limited knowledge on which environmental variables and how many

  7. Local average height distribution of fluctuating interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.

    2017-01-01

    Height fluctuations of growing surfaces can be characterized by the probability distribution of height in a spatial point at a finite time. Recently there has been spectacular progress in the studies of this quantity for the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation in 1 +1 dimensions. Here we notice that, at or above a critical dimension, the finite-time one-point height distribution is ill defined in a broad class of linear surface growth models unless the model is regularized at small scales. The regularization via a system-dependent small-scale cutoff leads to a partial loss of universality. As a possible alternative, we introduce a local average height. For the linear models, the probability density of this quantity is well defined in any dimension. The weak-noise theory for these models yields the "optimal path" of the interface conditioned on a nonequilibrium fluctuation of the local average height. As an illustration, we consider the conserved Edwards-Wilkinson (EW) equation, where, without regularization, the finite-time one-point height distribution is ill defined in all physical dimensions. We also determine the optimal path of the interface in a closely related problem of the finite-time height-difference distribution for the nonconserved EW equation in 1 +1 dimension. Finally, we discuss a UV catastrophe in the finite-time one-point distribution of height in the (nonregularized) KPZ equation in 2 +1 dimensions.

  8. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  9. Dynamic fe Model of Sitting Man Adjustable to Body Height, Body Mass and Posture Used for Calculating Internal Forces in the Lumbar Vertebral Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankoke, S.; Buck, B.; Woelfel, H. P.

    1998-08-01

    Long-term whole-body vibrations can cause degeneration of the lumbar spine. Therefore existing degeneration has to be assessed as well as industrial working places to prevent further damage. Hence, the mechanical stress in the lumbar spine—especially in the three lower vertebrae—has to be known. This stress can be expressed as internal forces. These internal forces cannot be evaluated experimentally, because force transducers cannot be implementated in the force lines because of ethical reasons. Thus it is necessary to calculate the internal forces with a dynamic mathematical model of sitting man.A two dimensional dynamic Finite Element model of sitting man is presented which allows calculation of these unknown internal forces. The model is based on an anatomic representation of the lower lumbar spine (L3-L5). This lumber spine model is incorporated into a dynamic model of the upper torso with neck, head and arms as well as a model of the body caudal to the lumbar spine with pelvis and legs. Additionally a simple dynamic representation of the viscera is used. All these parts are modelled as rigid bodies connected by linear stiffnesses. Energy dissipation is modelled by assigning modal damping ratio to the calculated undamped eigenvalues. Geometry and inertial properties of the model are determined according to human anatomy. Stiffnesses of the spine model are derived from static in-vitro experiments in references [1] and [2]. Remaining stiffness parameters and parameters for energy dissipation are determined by using parameter identification to fit measurements in reference [3]. The model, which is available in 3 different postures, allows one to adjust its parameters for body height and body mass to the values of the person for which internal forces have to be calculated.

  10. A Study on the Relationships among Surface Variables to Adjust the Height of Surface Temperature for Data Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J. H.; Song, H. J.; Han, H. J.; Ha, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The observation processing system, KPOP (KIAPS - Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems - Package for Observation Processing) have developed to provide optimal observations to the data assimilation system for the KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM). Currently, the KPOP has capable of processing almost all of observations for the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) operational global data assimilation system. The height adjustment of SURFACE observations are essential for the quality control due to the difference in height between observation station and model topography. For the SURFACE observation, it is usual to adjust the height using lapse rate or hypsometric equation, which decides values mainly depending on the difference of height. We have a question of whether the height can be properly adjusted following to the linear or exponential relationship solely with regard to the difference of height, with disregard the atmospheric conditions. In this study, firstly we analyse the change of surface variables such as temperature (T2m), pressure (Psfc), humidity (RH2m and Q2m), and wind components (U and V) according to the height difference. Additionally, we look further into the relationships among surface variables . The difference of pressure shows a strong linear relationship with difference of height. But the difference of temperature according to the height shows a significant correlation with difference of relative humidity than with the height difference. A development of reliable model for the height-adjustment of surface temperature is being undertaken based on the preliminary results.

  11. The height of the atmospheric boundary layer during unstable conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.

    2005-11-01

    The height of the convective atmospheric boundary layer, also called the mixed-layer, is one of the fundamental parameters that characterise the structure of the atmosphere near the ground. It has many theoretical and practical applications such as the prediction of air pollution concentrations, surface temperature and the scaling of turbulence. However, as pointed out by Builtjes (2001) in a review paper on Major Twentieth Century Milestones in Air Pollution Modelling and Its Application, the weakest point in meteorology data is still the determination of the height of the mixed-layer, the so-called mixing height. A simple applied model for the height of the mixed-layer over homogeneous terrain is suggested in chapter 2. It is based on a parameterised budget for the turbulent kinetic energy. In the model basically three terms - the spin-up term and the production of mechanical and convective turbulent kinetic energy - control the growth of the mixed layer. The interplay between the three terms is related to the meteorological conditions and the height of the mixed layer. A stable layer, the so-called entrainment zone, which is confined between the mixed layer and the free air above, caps the mixed layer. A parameterisation of the depth of the entrainment zone is also suggested, and used to devise a combined model for the height of the mixed layer and the entrainment zone. Another important aspect of the mixed layer development exists in coastal areas where an internal boundary layer forms downwind from the coastline. A model for the growth of the internal boundary layer is developed in analogy with the model for mixed layer development over homogeneous terrain. The strength of this model is that it can operate on a very fine spatial resolution with minor computer resources. Chapter 3 deals with the validation of the models. It is based in parts on data from the literature, and on own measurements. For the validation of the formation of the internal boundary layer

  12. 自动测量胸径和树高便携设备的研制与测量精度分析%Developing and accuracy analysis of portable device for automatically measuring diameter at breast height and tree height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓东; 冯仲科; 解明星; 陈金星; 刘金成

    2015-01-01

    Diameter at breast height and tree height are the foundations of evaluating site quality and tree’s growing situation. A portable mini multifunctional smart station has been developed based on the image automatic recognition theory, the photogrammetry theory, the similar triangles theory and the triangular function theory, which can measure the diameter at breast height and tree height. Simultaneously, this device integrates charge coupled device (CCD) image sensor with inclinometer, central processing unit, memory, liquid crystal screen, power supply and laser ranging sensor. After assembling the components, the station can be used to automatically measure the diameter and tree height accurately. It can be used to observe the plot after being mounted on the holder. During the measuring process, light spot needs to be aimed at the position of the diameter at breast height that is to be measured. The CCD sensor can automatically transform the light into electric charge signal and then into digital signal by the inner analog digital converter (ADC). After the hue correction and white balance processing by the digital signal processor, the digital signal is finally transformed into the visual image on the screen. When measuring, it can acquire 2 values, namely the inclination and the distance from the measuring point to the point needing measuring. Moreover, it can record and save the image information measured. The measurements of forest stand mean height, volume of wood and tree number density can be realized on the above basis. This device realizes the automatic measurement of the diameter at breast height, tree height and diameter at any part, and the basic measurement, a total of 4 functions through its imbedded running program. The distance measuring range for this device is between 0.05 and 120 m, and its effective reflection distance is between 0.05 and 100 m. The minimum display value is 0.001 m and its measuring precision is ±1.5 mm. The measuring range

  13. Establishment of mean sea surface height model for Zhejiang coastal areas based on satellite altimetry technique%基于卫星测高技术的浙江近海平均海面高模型建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 吉渊明; 岳建平; 彭刚跃; 宋亚宏

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Waveform data from Jason⁃2 and SARAL/AltiKa satellites, a new method of eliminating the gross error of altimetry data was developed. By eliminating the sea surface height that was not in the predetermined trajectory , the gross error in each segment of altimetry data was eliminated according to the sea surface height in each cycle of each Pass file, in order to improve the usability of satellite data in coastal areas. Through crossover adjustment, the time⁃varying signals for the radial orbit error and sea level were further weakened. The discrete sea surface height with high accuracy, which was obtained with the remove⁃restore technique, was gridded using the radial basis function method. A mean sea surface height model with grid resolutions of 2. 5′×2. 5′was established. The root mean square error between the sea surface height data from the established model and the data from tidal stations is ±0. 017 m, and the standard deviation between the established model and MSS⁃CNES⁃CLS11 was ±0. 070 m. The results show that the established mean sea surface height model for Zhejiang coastal areas is reliable.%利用Jason⁃2卫星与SARAL/AltiKa卫星的Waveform数据,研究一种新的测高数据粗差剔除方法,即剔除不在预定轨迹的海面高后,参考拟合各Pass每个Cycle的海面高值,对测高数据分段剔除粗差,以提高近海卫星数据的可用性;经过交叉点平差,进一步削弱径向轨道误差和海平面时变信号;采用“移去⁃恢复”法得到较高精度的离散海面高;采用径向基函数法格网化离散海面高,建立2.5′×2.5′格网分辨率的平均海面高模型;将所得模型与验潮站提供的海面高比较,均方根为±0.017 m,与MSS⁃CNES⁃CLS11比较,标准差为±0.070 m。研究结果表明,采用本文方法建立的浙江近海平均海面高模型精度可靠。

  14. A comparison of boundary-layer heights inferred from wind-profiler backscatter profiles with diagnostic calculations using regional model forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltink, H.K.; Holtslag, A.A.M. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    From October 1994 through January 1997 the Tropospheric Energy Budget Experiment (TEBEX) was executed by KNMI. The main objectives are to study boundary layer processes and cloud variability on the sub-grid scale of present Global Climate Models and to improve the related sub-grid parametrizations. A suite of instruments was deployed to measure a large number of variables. Measurements to characterize ABL processes were focussed around the 200 m high meteorological observation tower of the KNMI in Cabauw. In the framework of TEBEX a 1290 MHz wind-profiler/RASS was installed in July 1994 at 300 m from tower. Data collected during TEBEX are used to assess the performance of a Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). This climate model runs also in a operational forecast mode once a day. The diagnostic ABL-height (h{sub model}) is calculated from the RACMO forecast output. A modified Richardson`s number method extended with an excess parcel temperature is applied for all stability conditions. We present the preliminary results of a comparison of h{sub model} from forecasts with measured h{sub TS} derived from profiler and sodar data for July 1995. (au)

  15. Image based remote sensing method for modeling black-eyed beans (Vigna unguiculata) Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Crop Height (CH) over Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, Giorgos; Fasoula, Dionysia; Hadjimitsis, Michael; Skevi Perdikou, P.; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Crop Height (CH) are modeled to the most known spectral vegetation index — NDVI — using remotely sensed data. This approach has advantages compared to the classic approaches based on a theoretical background. A GER-1500 field spectro-radiometer was used in this study in order to retrieve the necessary spectrum data for estimating a spectral vegetation index (NDVI), for establishing a semiempirical relationship between black-eyed beans' canopy factors and remotely sensed data. Such semi-empirical models can be used then for agricultural and environmental studies. A field campaign was undertaken with measurements of LAI and CH using the Sun-Scan canopy analyzer, acquired simultaneously with the spectroradiometric (GER1500) measurements between May and June of 2010. Field spectroscopy and remotely sensed imagery have been combined and used in order to retrieve and validate the results of this study. The results showed that there are strong statistical relationships between LAI or CH and NDVI which can be used for modeling crop canopy factors (LAI, CH) to remotely sensed data. The model for each case was verified by the factor of determination. Specifically, these models assist to avoid direct measurements of the LAI and CH for all the dates for which satellite images are available and support future users or future studies regarding crop canopy parameters.

  16. FULLY AUTOMATED GIS-BASED INDIVIDUAL TREE CROWN DELINEATION BASED ON CURVATURE VALUES FROM A LIDAR DERIVED CANOPY HEIGHT MODEL IN A CONIFEROUS PLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. L. Argamosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of high resolution canopy height model (CHM from LiDAR makes it possible to delineate individual tree crown by means of a fully-automated method using the CHM’s curvature through its slope. The local maxima are obtained by taking the maximum raster value in a 3 m x 3 m cell. These values are assumed as tree tops and therefore considered as individual trees. Based on the assumptions, thiessen polygons were generated to serve as buffers for the canopy extent. The negative profile curvature is then measured from the slope of the CHM. The results show that the aggregated points from a negative profile curvature raster provide the most realistic crown shape. The absence of field data regarding tree crown dimensions require accurate visual assessment after the appended delineated tree crown polygon was superimposed to the hill shaded CHM.

  17. System dynamics model of the support-surrounding rock system in fully mechanized mining with large mining height face and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yong; Tu Shihao; Zhang Xiaogang; Li Bo

    2013-01-01

    Fully mechanized mining with large mining height (FMMLMH) is widely used in thick coal seam mining face for its higher recovery ratio, especially where the thickness is less than 7.0 m. However, because of the great mining height and intense rock pressure, the coal wall rib spalling, roof falling and the instabil-ity of support occur more likely in FMMLMH working face, and the above three types of disasters interact with each other with complicated relationships. In order to get the relationship between each two of coal wall, roof, floor and support, and reduce the occurrence probability of the three types of disasters, we established the system dynamics (SD) model of the support-surrounding rock system which is composed of‘coal wall-roof-floor-support’ (CW-R-F-S) in a FMMLMH working face based on the condition of No. 15104 working face in Sijiazhuang coal mine. With the software of Vensim, we also simulated the inter-action process between each two factors of roof, floor, coal wall and the support. The results show that the SD model of ‘CW-R-F-S’ system can reveal the complicated and interactive relationship clearly between the support and surrounding rock in the FMMLMH working face. By increasing the advancing speed of working face, the support resistance or the length of support guard, or by decreasing the tip-to-face distance, the stability of ‘CW-R-F-S’ system will be higher and the happening probability of the disasters such as coal wall rib spalling, roof falling or the instability of support will be lower. These research findings have been testified in field application in No. 15104 working face, which can provide a new approach for researching the interaction relationship of support and surrounding rock.

  18. Agribusiness model approach to territorial food development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murcia Hector Horacio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none;">Several research efforts have coordinated the academic program of Agricultural Business Management from the University De La Salle (Bogota D.C., to the design and implementation of a sustainable agribusiness model applied to food development, with territorial projection. Rural development is considered as a process that aims to improve the current capacity and potential of the inhabitant of the sector, which refers not only to production levels and productivity of agricultural items. It takes into account the guidelines of the Organization of the United Nations “Millennium Development Goals” and considered the concept of sustainable food and agriculture development, including food security and nutrition in an integrated interdisciplinary context, with holistic and systemic dimension. Analysis is specified by a model with an emphasis on sustainable agribusiness production chains related to agricultural food items in a specific region. This model was correlated with farm (technical objectives, family (social purposes and community (collective orientations projects. Within this dimension are considered food development concepts and methodologies of Participatory Action Research (PAR. Finally, it addresses the need to link the results to low-income communities, within the concepts of the “new rurality”.

  19. On Wuthering Heights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春玲

    2001-01-01

    本文剖析了小说主人公的悲惨命运及时代特征%Through the story of Wuthering Heights,the article analyzes the tragic fate of Heathcliff and the characteristic of the 19th century England.

  20. Narrators in Wuthering Heights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊红

    2009-01-01

    Wuthering Heights is Emily Bront e's only novel. The narrative is non-linear, involving several flashbacks an dtwo primary narrators. Emily Bronte has adopted the device of introducing two narrators--Mr. Lockwood and Ellen "Nel-ly" Dean so as to achieve certain purpose.

  1. Recurrent climate winter regimes in reconstructed and modelled 500 hPa geopotential height fields over the North Atlantic/European sector 1659-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casty, C.; Xoplaki, E.; Luterbacher, J.; Wanner, H. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Bern (Switzerland); University of Bern, NCCR Climate (Switzerland); Handorf, D.; Dethloff, K. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam (Germany); Raible, C.C. [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics (Switzerland); Gonzalez-Rouco, J.F. [University of Madrid, Department of Astrophysics and Atmospheric Sciences (Spain); Weisheimer, A. [Free University of Berlin, Institute of Meteorology (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Recurrent climate winter regimes are examined from statistically reconstructed and modelled 500 hPa geopotential height fields over the North Atlantic/European sector for the period 1659-1990. We investigate the probability density function of the state space spanned by the first two empirical orthogonal functions of combined winter data. Regimes are detected as patterns that correspond to areas of the state space with an unexpected high recurrence probability using a Monte Carlo approach. The reconstruction and the model reveal four recurrent climate regimes. They correspond to the two phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation and two opposite blocking patterns. Complemented by the investigation of the temporal evolution of the climate regimes this leads to the conclusion that the reconstructed and the modelled data for this geographic sector reproduce low-frequency atmospheric variability in the form of regime-like behaviour. The overall evidence for recurrent climate regimes is higher for the model than for the reconstruction. However, comparisons with independent data sources for the period 1659-1990 revealed a more realistic temporal evolution of the regimes for the reconstructed data. (orig.)

  2. On the analysis of temporal geoid height variations obtained from GRACE-based GGMs over the area of Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godah, Walyeldeen; Szelachowska, Malgorzata; Krynski, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Temporal mass variations in the Earth system, which can be detected from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission data, cause temporal variations of geoid heights. The main objective of this contribution is to analyze temporal variations of geoid heights over the area of Poland using global geopotential models (GGMs) developed on the basis of GRACE mission data. Time series of geoid height variations were calculated for the chosen subareas of the aforementioned area using those GGMs. Thereafter, these variations were analyzed using two different methods. On the basis of the analysis results, models of temporal geoid height variations were developed and discussed. The possibility of prediction of geoid height variations using GRACE mission data over the area of Poland was also investigated. The main findings reveal that the geoid height over the area of Poland vary within 1.1 cm which should be considered when defining the geoid model of 1 cm accuracy for this area.

  3. Modelling height to diameter ratio – an opportunity to increase Norway spruce stand stability in the Western Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošeľa Michal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smrek je jednou z najrozšírenejších a ekonomicky najdôležitejších ihličnatých drevín v Európe. Taktiež je drevinou veľmi často poškodzovanou vetrovými kalamitami. Štíhlostný kvocient (pomer výšky a hrúbky stromu sa považuje za vhodný indikátor statickej stability jednotlivých stromov a porastov. Preto cieľom práce bola identifikácia hlavných faktorov, ktoré majú významný vplyv na hodnoty kvocientu. Jednoduchý model bol vytvorený ako pomôcka pre lesníka pri rozhodovaní o intenzite prebierok v smrekových porastoch s cieľom potenciálneho zvýšenia statickej stability a zachovania optimálnej produkcie. Využili sa údaje Národnej inventarizácie a monitoringu lesov SR (260 plôch a taktiež údaje z predchádzajúcich výskumných projektov (48 plôch tak aby reprezentovali čo najširšie rozpätie ekologických podmienok, v ktorých smrek v súčasnosti rastie. Výsledky ukázali, že najvýznamnejšími ekologickými faktormi boli: nadmorská výška a bonita stanovišťa. Taktiež niektoré porastové charakteristiky sa významne podieľali na variabilite kvocientu: podiel koruny z výšky stromu, hustota porastu a stredná porastová výška reprezentujúca rastovú fázu porastu. Výsledky ďalej preukázali, že ekologické podmienky sú významnejšie ako porastové charakteristiky, a preto tieto treba brať do úvahy pri rozhodovacom procese. To znamená, že ak sa porast nachádza na pre smrek veľmi bonitnom stanovišti, sú potrebné silnejšie prebierky od mladých rastových fáz, aby sa ovplyvňovaním hrúbkového prírastku vyrovnal vplyv rýchleho výškového rastu. Zároveň je dôležitá rozdielna intenzita výškového a hrúbkového rastu počas vývoja porastu

  4. Developing a model: an illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenga, Yolanda; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Model development may seem a daunting task for the novice. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the steps of model development applied to a real-life phenomenon using an inductive theory-generating research approach. The value of the illustration is that nurse researchers can follow the application of the process as a point of departure for their own work. A logical stepwise discussion is followed for empirical theory development. The logical thought process from identifying the phenomenon to describing the model as a visual metaphor of the phenomenon is illustrated.

  5. A new methodology for PBL height estimations based on lidar depolarization measurements: analysis and comparison against MWR and WRF model-based results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; de Arruda Moreira, Gregori; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pozo-Vázquez, David; Arbizu-Barrena, Clara; José Olmo Reyes, Francisco; Mallet, Marc; Alados Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-06-01

    The automatic and non-supervised detection of the planetary boundary layer height (zPBL) by means of lidar measurements was widely investigated during the last several years. Despite considerable advances, the experimental detection still presents difficulties such as advected aerosol layers coupled to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) which usually produces an overestimation of the zPBL. To improve the detection of the zPBL in these complex atmospheric situations, we present a new algorithm, called POLARIS (PBL height estimation based on lidar depolarisation). POLARIS applies the wavelet covariance transform (WCT) to the range-corrected signal (RCS) and to the perpendicular-to-parallel signal ratio (δ) profiles. Different candidates for zPBL are chosen and the selection is done based on the WCT applied to the RCS and δ. We use two ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) campaigns with lidar and microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements, conducted in 2012 and 2013, for the POLARIS' adjustment and validation. POLARIS improves the zPBL detection compared to previous methods based on lidar measurements, especially when an aerosol layer is coupled to the PBL. We also compare the zPBL provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model with respect to the zPBL determined with POLARIS and the MWR under Saharan dust events. WRF underestimates the zPBL during daytime but agrees with the MWR during night-time. The zPBL provided by WRF shows a better temporal evolution compared to the MWR during daytime than during night-time.

  6. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  7. Height projection methods and sensitivity study. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, A. S.; Justus, C. G.

    1979-06-01

    A brief description is given of the different techniques for height projection of wind speed that have been developed at Georgia Tech. One of these techniques, the similarity model, is based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Other models examined are the empirical velocity-dependent power law model (power law model) and the semi-empirical modified velocity-dependent power law model (modified power law model). A detailed description of the methodologies is given and example applications are illustrated, with all the necessary input parameters to the models.

  8. Optimization of Drilling Parameters for Reducing the Burr Height in Machining the Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) Coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) Reinforced in Aluminum Alloy (A 356) Using Meta Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, M.; Prakash, S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper explains the optimization of drilling parameters using meta modeling approach to reduce the burr height while machining Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) and reinforced in aluminum alloy (A 356). The specimen is prepared by the combination of sonication and stir casting processes. The volume fraction of MWCNT used is 1.5% and the volume fraction of SiCp is 10%. The combination of input parameters for drilling the holes is designed using Taguchi experimental design technique. The input parameters chosen for drilling operations are spindle speed, feed rate and drill diameter. The ranges of input parameters are listed in Table 1. The tools used for drilling operation are made up of solid carbide drill bit. Meta model is a mathematical and statistical model whose second-order model can be fitted by factorial design. The optimization model can be improved significantly by the second-order model compared to the first-order model. Twenty-seven holes are drilled using vertical machining center in the prepared specimen (A 356/MWCNT coated SiCp). Desirability function shows the optimized values of input parameters to obtain minimum burr height. Meta modeling approach is used to design a model using input parameters and output response burr height. The residuals plot shows the predicted values are closer to the measured values. This plot explains that the Meta model is adequately used to predict the burr height. The optimized values of input parameters for obtaining minimum burr height are the combination of high speed, low feed and low drill diameter. The minimum value of burr height observed in this experiment is 0.002mm and it is obtained in the optimized combination of N3, f1 and d1.

  9. PR/VI Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 26,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data...

  10. Principal Hawaiian Islands Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 61,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data held...

  11. U.S. Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for the conterminous United States is the GEOID96 model. The computation used about 1.8 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in...

  12. Space Flight Cable Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, Kaitlin

    2013-01-01

    This work concentrates the modeling efforts presented in last year's VSGC conference paper, "Model Development for Cable-Harnessed Beams." The focus is narrowed to modeling of space-flight cables only, as a reliable damped cable model is not yet readily available and is necessary to continue modeling cable-harnessed space structures. New experimental data is presented, eliminating the low-frequency noise that plagued the first year's efforts. The distributed transfer function method is applied to a single section of space flight cable for Euler-Bernoulli and shear beams. The work presented here will be developed into a damped cable model that can be incorporated into an interconnected beam-cable system. The overall goal of this work is to accurately predict natural frequencies and modal damping ratios for cabled space structures.

  13. Discussion about reservoir area height system based on Guangxi quasi-geoid model refinement%基于广西似大地水准面精化模型的库区高程系统探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏中球

    2014-01-01

    根据大地高系统和正常高系统的特点,以瓦村水电站库区GNSS平面控制网的数据和广西似大地水准面精化模型的成果为基础,建立库区正常高系统,并对高程精度进行分析。探讨了利用广西似大地水准面精化模型建立库区正常高系统存在的问题,并参考传统附合水准路线提出了一种利用GNSS高程拟合技术进行四等水准测量的精度评价参考方法。%In accordance with the characteristics of Geodetic height system and normal height system ,the normal height system of Wacun Hydropower Station reservoir area was set up based on the data of GNSS plane control net-work and Guangxi quasi-geoid model refinement. The author analyzed the height accuracy,discussed the problem existing in setting up reservoir area normal height system by use of Guangxi quasi-geoid model refinement. With ref-erence to traditional annexed leveling line,the author put forward a method for the evaluation of grade IV leveling measurement accuracy with GNSS height fitting technology.

  14. Childhood height, adult height, and the risk of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lise Geisler; Aarestrup, Julie; Gamborg, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We previously showed that childhood height is positively associated with prostate cancer risk. It is, however, unknown whether childhood height exerts its effects independently of or through adult height. We investigated whether and to what extent childhood height has a direct effect...... on the risk of prostate cancer apart from adult height. METHODS: We included 5,871 men with height measured at ages 7 and 13 years in the Copenhagen School Health Records Register who also had adult (50-65 years) height measured in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study. Prostate cancer status was obtained...... through linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry. Direct and total effects of childhood height on prostate cancer risk were estimated from Cox regressions. RESULTS: From 1996 to 2012, 429 prostate cancers occurred. Child and adult heights were positively and significantly associated with prostate cancer risk...

  15. Validation of mixing height determined from vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model in comparison with readiosoundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, J.H.; Nielsen, N.W. [Danish Meteorological Inst., DMI, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A sensitivity study is performed of vertical profiles from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (DMI-HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model). The study involves profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and humidity in the lower troposphere up to 2500 meter. Detailed comparisons of analysed as well as forecast profiles are made with measured data from several radio-sonde stations throughout Europe. Methods for estimating the Mixing Height (MH) based on a bulk Richardson number method, the Vogelezang and Holtslag method and parcel methods are also studied. The methods are inter-compared, and MH based on data from DMI-HIRLAM are compared with the corresponding MH based on radiosonde data. For convective conditions the MH estimates are also compared with subjective estimates of the MH. In this paper preliminary results mainly based on data from Jaegersborg (Copenhagen) are presented. Results based on data from 1994-95 show that the resemblance between measured profiles and the DMI-HIRLAM profiles is fairly good in general. Also the estimates of the MH based on DMI-HIRLAM data is in general of nearly the same quality as estimations based on observed data. However, especially in convective conditions there is a tendency by DMI-HIRLAM to underestimate the strength of the mixing and thereby relatively large errors in the estimates of the MH can occur. (au)

  16. A new 500-m resolution map of canopy height for Amazon forest using spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yoshito; Suwa, Rempei; Jindo, Keiji; Endo, Takahiro; Oki, Kazuo; Sawada, Haruo; Arai, Egidio; Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Celes, Carlos Henrique Souza; Campos, Moacir Alberto Assis; Higuchi, Francisco Gasparetto; Lima, Adriano José Nogueira; Higuchi, Niro; Kajimoto, Takuya; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to map canopy heights in the Brazilian Amazon mainly on the basis of spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery with a new method (the Self-Organizing Relationships method) for spatial modeling of the LiDAR footprint. To evaluate the general versatility, we compared the created canopy height map with two different canopy height estimates on the basis of our original field study plots (799 plots located in eight study sites) and a previously developed canopy height map. The compared canopy height estimates were obtained by: (1) a stem diameter at breast height (D) - tree height (H) relationship specific to each site on the basis of our original field study, (2) a previously developed D-H model involving environmental and structural factors as explanatory variables (Feldpausch et al., 2011), and (3) a previously developed canopy height map derived from the spaceborne LiDAR data with different spatial modeling method and explanatory variables (Simard et al., 2011). As a result, our canopy height map successfully detected a spatial distribution pattern in canopy height estimates based on our original field study data (r = 0.845, p = 8.31 × 10-3) though our canopy height map showed a poor correlation (r = 0.563, p = 0.146) with the canopy height estimate based on a previously developed model by Feldpausch et al. (2011). We also confirmed that the created canopy height map showed a similar pattern with the previously developed canopy height map by Simard et al. (2011). It was concluded that the use of the spaceborne LiDAR data provides a sufficient accuracy in estimating the canopy height at regional scale.

  17. Effect of the height of the greenhouse on the plant - climate relationship as a development parameter in mint (Mentha Spicata crops in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Bustamante Valencia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of the height of the greenhouse on climatic conditions generated on a mint crop (Mentha spicata. The tests were conducted in the town of Carmen de Viboral, 40 minutes away from the city of Medellin (6º 05’ 09” N and 75º 20’ 19” W, 2150 m.a.s.l.. Three greenhouses with the same dimensions were used, changing only the gutter height in 2 m, 2,5 m and 3 m respectively. Temperature and relative humidity measurements were taken every 30 minutes for 3 years, time during which crop production was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine climatic variations caused by the difference in height between the greenhouses, and to determine differences in production levels. The results indicate that, under the study conditions, the greenhouse height directly affects the weather conditions and the mint crop yields.

  18. Dynamic Heights in the Great Lakes using OPUS Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D. R.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. will be implementing new geometric and vertical reference frames in 2022 to replace the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), respectively. Less emphasized is the fact that a new dynamic height datum will also be defined about the same time to replace the International Great Lakes Datum of 1985 (IGLD 85). IGLD 85 was defined concurrent with NAVD 88 and used the same geopotential values. This paper focuses on the use of an existing tool for determining geometric coordinates and a developing geopotential model as a means of determining dynamic heights. The Online Positioning User Service (OPUS) Projects (OP) is an online tool available from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) for use in developing geometric coordinates from simultaneous observations at multiple sites during multiple occupations. With observations performed at the water level gauges throughout the Great Lakes, the geometric coordinates of the mean water level surface can be determined. NGS has also developed the xGEOID15B model from satellite, airborne and surface gravity data. Using the input geometric coordinates determined through OP, the geopotential values for the water surface at the water level stations around the Great Lakes were determined using the xGEOID15B model. Comparisons were made between water level sites for each Lake as well as to existing IGLD 85 heights. A principal advantage to this approach is the ability to generate new water level control stations using OP, while maintaining the consistency between orthometric and dynamic heights by using the same gravity field model. Such a process may provide a means for determining dynamic heights for a future Great Lakes Datum.

  19. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  20. The origins of height fear: an evaluation of neoconditioning explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R G; Parker, L

    2001-02-01

    The present research sought to establish a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the relevance of neoconditioning factors (e.g. latent inhibition, UCS inflation/revaluation, prior fear levels, prior expectancies of harm, fear and pain levels experienced during supposed learning events), in the development of human fear. Fifty-four undergraduate height-fearful students completed the new origins instrument (OQ-II), while 54 matched controls completed a modified version (OQM-II) that examined their prior experiences with heights. In general, few differences between groups were found. Height-fearful and control subjects did not differ on trait anxiety, the frequency of negative encounters with heights, the age at which these events had occurred, prior fear levels, prior expectancies of harm, or reports of UCS inflation/revaluation procedures. However, in a finding directly opposite to that expected from a conditioning account, the mean fear and pain scores reported by subjects who had experienced direct conditioning events were significantly higher in the non-fearful group than in the height-fearful group. These findings are discussed in terms of associative and non-associative models of fear.

  1. OSPREY Model Development Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    During the processing of used nuclear fuel, volatile radionuclides will be discharged to the atmosphere if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Methods are being developed, via adsorption and absorption unit operations, to capture these radionuclides. It is necessary to model these unit operations to aid in the evaluation of technologies and in the future development of an advanced used nuclear fuel processing plant. A collaboration between Fuel Cycle Research and Development Offgas Sigma Team member INL and a NEUP grant including ORNL, Syracuse University, and Georgia Institute of Technology has been formed to develop off gas models and support off gas research. Georgia Institute of Technology is developing fundamental level model to describe the equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process, which are to be integrated with OSPREY. This report discusses the progress made on expanding OSPREY to be multiple component and the integration of macroscale and microscale level models. Also included in this report is a brief OSPREY user guide.

  2. VARTM Model Development and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Technical Monitor); Dowling, Norman E.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, a comprehensive Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process simulation model was developed and verified. The model incorporates resin flow through the preform, compaction and relaxation of the preform, and viscosity and cure kinetics of the resin. The computer model can be used to analyze the resin flow details, track the thickness change of the preform, predict the total infiltration time and final fiber volume fraction of the parts, and determine whether the resin could completely infiltrate and uniformly wet out the preform.

  3. Vehicle height and posture control of the electronic air suspension system using the hybrid system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Yingfeng; Chen, Long; Liu, Yanling; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-03-01

    The electronic air suspension (EAS) system can improve ride comfort, fuel economy and handling safety of vehicles by adjusting vehicle height. This paper describes the development of a novel controller using the hybrid system approach to adjust the vehicle height (height control) and to regulate the roll and pitch angles of the vehicle body during the height adjustment process (posture control). The vehicle height adjustment system of EAS poses challenging hybrid control problems, since it features different discrete modes of operation, where each mode has an associated linear continuous-time dynamic. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the modelling and controller design problem for the vehicle height adjustment system of EAS. The system model is described firstly in the hybrid system description language (HYSDEL) to obtain a mixed logical dynamical (MLD) hybrid model. For the resulting model, a hybrid model predictive controller is tuned to improve the vehicle height and posture tracking accuracy and to achieve the on-off statuses direct control of solenoid valves. The effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach are demonstrated by simulations and actual vehicle tests.

  4. Motorola Secure Software Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Mahendran

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In today's world, the key to meeting the demand for improved security is to implement repeatable processes that reliably deliver measurably improved security. While many organizations have announced efforts to institutionalize a secure software development process, there is little or no industry acceptance for a common process improvement framework for secure software development. Motorola has taken the initiative to develop such a framework, and plans to share this with the Software Engineering Institute for possible inclusion into its Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®. This paper will go into the details of how Motorola is addressing this issue. The model that is being developed is designed as an extension of the existing CMMI structure. The assumption is that the audience will have a basic understanding of the SEI CMM® / CMMI® process framework. The paper will not describe implementation details of a security process model or improvement framework, but will address WHAT security practices are required for a company with many organizations operating at different maturity levels. It is left to the implementing organization to answer the HOW, WHEN, WHO and WHERE aspects. The paper will discuss how the model is being implemented in the Motorola Software Group.

  5. Growth evaluation: parent and child specific height standards.

    OpenAIRE

    Sorva, R; Tolppanen, E M; Lankinen, S; Perheentupa, J

    1989-01-01

    Data on the growth of 1063 children and their parents were analysed. Of the variation in height at prepuberty about 20%, and of the final height 30-46%, were explained by the variation in parental heights; the children's own height at the age of 1.0 year increased the proportion explained to half. Two equations were developed for increasing the accuracy of the evaluation of growth. One defines parent specific mean height standard deviation score, and the other includes the parents' heights an...

  6. Rational cutting height for large cutting height fully mechanized top-coal caving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Bingxiang; Li Hongtao; Liu Changyou; Xing Shijun; Xue Weichao

    2011-01-01

    Large cutting height fully mechanized top-coal caving is a new mining method that improves recovery ratio and single-pass production.It also allows safe and efficient mining.A rational cutting height is one key parameter of this technique.Numerical simulation and a granular-media model experiment were used to analyze the effect of cutting height on the rock pressure of a fully mechanized top-coal caving work face.The recovery ratio was also studied.As the cutting height increases the top-coal thickness is reduced.Changing the ratio of cutting to drawing height intensifies the face pressure and the top-coal shattering.A maximum cutting height exists under a given set of conditions due to issues with surrounding rock-mass control.An increase in cutting height makes the top-coal cave better and the recovery ratio when drawing top-coal is then improved.A method of adjusting the face rock pressure is presented.Changing the cutting to drawing height ratio is the technique used to control face rock pressure.The recovery ratio when cutting coal exceeds that when caving top-coal so the face recovery ratio may be improved by over sizing the cutting height and increasing the top-coal drawing ratio.An optimum ratio of cutting to drawing height exists that maximizes the face recovery ratio.A rational cutting height is determined by comprehensively considering the surrounding rock-mass control and the recovery ratio.At the same time increasing the cutting height can improve single pass mining during fully mechanized top-coal caving.

  7. [Fear of Heights in Primary School Children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, D

    2016-03-01

    The life-time prevalence of visual height intolerance in adults is 28 percent, whereas in primary school children, as recently shown, it develops in 34 percent. Triggers and symptoms are similar in children and adults. A significant difference in visual height intolerance of prepubertal children compared to adults is the good prognosis with mostly spontaneous remission within a few years, possibly facilitated by repeated exposure to the triggering situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Modelling hormonal response and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2014-05-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin-cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. A new technique to determine fusion barrier heights using proximity potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Raj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new technique to calculate fusion barrier heights of any fixed target reaction series. We calculate the barrier heights for the fusion reactions of 119Sn and 197Au targets using this technique. This technique is simple and very useful for estimating the fusion barrier heights for those reactions for which empirical values are not available. A formula is derived by performing theoretical calculations using different versions of proximity potential. Using this formula, we can predict the barrier height for the fusion reaction of any projectile with 119Sn or 197Au target using the empirical barrier height for the fusion reaction of same projectile with 62Ni target. In order to check the accuracy of this technique, the fusion parameters calculated by this new technique are compared with the fusion parameters calculated by using parameterized formulae presented in a systematic study conducted by using double folding model.

  10. Challenging the role of social norms regarding body weight as an explanation for weight, height, and BMI misreporting biases: Development and application of a new approach to examining misreporting and misclassification bias in surveys

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brestoff, Jonathan R

    2011-05-18

    Abstract Background Cultural pressures to be thin and tall are postulated to cause people to misreport their body weight and height towards more socially normative (i.e., desirable) values, but a paucity of direct evidence supports this idea. We developed a novel non-linear approach to examining weight, height, and BMI misreporting biases and used this approach to examine the association between socially non-normative weight and misreporting biases in adults. Methods The Survey of Lifestyles, Attitudes, and Nutrition 2007 (SLÁN 2007), a nationally representative survey of the Republic of Ireland (N = 1942 analyzed) was used. Self-reported weight (height) was classified as under-reported by ≥2.0 kg (2.0 cm), over-reported by ≥2.0 kg (2.0 cm), or accurately reported within 2.0 kg (2.0 cm) to account for technical errors of measurement and short-term fluctuations in measured weight (height). A simulation strategy was used to define self-report-based BMI as under-estimated by more than 1.40 kg\\/m2, over-estimated by more than 1.40 kg\\/m2, or accurately estimated within 1.40 kg\\/m2. Patterns of biases in self-reported weight, height, and BMI were explored. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with mis-estimated BMI and to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 99% confidence intervals (99%CI). Results The patterns of bias contributing the most to BMI mis-estimation were consistently, in decreasing order of influence, (1) under-reported weight combined with over-reported height, (2) under-reported weight with accurately reported height, and (3) accurately reported weight with over-reported height. Average bias in self-report-based BMI was -1.34 kg\\/m2 overall and -0.49, -1.33, and -2.66 kg\\/m2 in normal, overweight, and obese categories, respectively. Despite the increasing degree of bias with progressively higher BMI categories, persons describing themselves as too heavy were, within any given BMI category, less likely to have under

  11. Height-diameter relationships of tropical Atlantic moist forest trees in southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Augusto da Silva Scaranello; Luciana Ferreira Alves; Simone Aparecida Vieira; Plinio Barbosa Camargo; Carlos Alfredo Joly; Luiz Antônio Martinelli

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific height-diameter models may be used to improve biomass estimates for forest inventories where only diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements are available. In this study, we fit height-diameter models for vegetation types of a tropical Atlantic forest using field measurements of height across plots along an altitudinal gradient. To fit height-diameter models, we sampled trees by DBH class and measured tree height within 13 one-hectare permanent plots established at four altitu...

  12. Space market model development project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the research program, Space Market Model Development Project, (Phase 1) were: (1) to study the need for business information in the commercial development of space; and (2) to propose a design for an information system to meet the identified needs. Three simultaneous research strategies were used in proceeding toward this goal: (1) to describe the space business information which currently exists; (2) to survey government and business representatives on the information they would like to have; and (3) to investigate the feasibility of generating new economical information about the space industry.

  13. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  14. Modelling meristem development in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Heisler, Marcus G.; Jönsson, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Meristems continually supply new cells for post-embryonic plant development and coordinate the initiation of new organs, such as leaves and flowers. Meristem function is regulated by a large and interconnected dynamic system that includes transcription networks, intercellular protein signalling, polarized transport of hormones and a constantly changing cellular topology. Mathematical modelling, in which the dynamics of a system are simulated using explicitly defined interactions, can serve as...

  15. Simulation of sludge blanket height in clarifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhen; WU Zhi-chao; WANG Zhi-wei; GU Guo-wei

    2009-01-01

    Sludge blanket height (SBH) is an important parameter in the clarifier design,operation and control.Based on an overview and classification of SBH algorithms,a modifed SBH algorithm is proposed by incorporating a threshold concentration limit into a relative concentration sharp change algorithm to eliminate the disturbance of compression interfaces on the correct simulation of SBH.Pilot-scale test data are adopted to compare reliability of three SBH algorithms reported in literature and the modified SBH algorithm developed in this paper.Calculated results demonstrate that the three SBH algorithms give results with large deviation (>50%) from measured SBH,especially under low solid flux conditions.The modified algorithm is computationally efficient and reliable in matching the measured data.It is incorporated into a onedimensional clarifier model for stable simulation of pilot-scale experimental clarifier data and into dynamic simulation of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) clarifier data.

  16. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  17. Route Height Connection Across the Sea by Using the Vertical Deflections and Ellipsoidal Height Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jin-yun; CHEN Yong-ning; LIU Xin; ZHONG Shi-xia; MAI Zhao-qiu

    2013-01-01

    Distance between the main land and island is so long that it is very difficult to precisely connect the height datum across the sea with the traditional method like the trigonometric leveling,or it is very expensive and takes long time to implement the height transfer with the geopotential technique.We combine the data of GPS surveying,astro-geodesy and EGM2008 to precisely connect the orthometric height across the sea with the improved astronomical leveling method in the paper.The Qiongzhou Strait is selected as the test area for the height connection over the sea.We precisely determine the geodetic latitudes,longitudes,heights and deflections of the vertical for four points on both sides across the strait.Modeled deflections of the vertical along the height connecting routes over the sea are determined with EGM2008 model based on the geodetic positions and heights of the sea segmentation points from DNSC08MSS model.Differences of the measured and modeled deflections of the vertical are calculated at four points on both sides and linearly change along the route.So the deflections of the vertical along the route over the sea can be improved by the linear interpolation model.The results are also in accord with those of trigonometirc levelings.The practical case shows that we can precisely connect the orthometric height across the Qiongzhou Strait to satisfy the requirement of order 3 leveling network of China.The method is very efficient to precisely connect the height datum across the sea along the route up to 80 km.

  18. Conservation reaches new heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation.

  19. Approximation of the breast height diameter distribution of two-cohort stands by mixture models II Goodness-of-fit tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal Podlaski; Francis .A. Roesch

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this study are (1) to analyse the accuracy of the approximation of empirical distributions of diameter at breast height (dbh) using two-component mixtures of either the Weibull distribution or the gamma distribution in two−cohort stands, and (2) to discuss the procedure of choosing goodness−of−fit tests. The study plots were...

  20. Challenges in Defining Tsunami Wave Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Paula; Mungov, George; Sweeney, Aaron; Stroker, Kelly; Arcos, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics maintain the global tsunami archive consisting of the historical tsunami database, imagery, and raw and processed water level data. The historical tsunami database incorporates, where available, maximum wave heights for each coastal tide gauge and deep-ocean buoy that recorded a tsunami signal. These data are important because they are used for tsunami hazard assessment, model calibration, validation, and forecast and warning. There have been ongoing discussions in the tsunami community about the correct way to measure and report these wave heights. It is important to understand how these measurements might vary depending on how the data were processed and the definition of maximum wave height. On September 16, 2015, an 8.3 M w earthquake located 48 km west of Illapel, Chile generated a tsunami that was observed all over the Pacific region. We processed the time-series water level data for 57 coastal tide gauges that recorded this tsunami and compared the maximum wave heights determined from different definitions. We also compared the maximum wave heights from the NCEI-processed data with the heights reported by the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers. We found that in the near field different methods of determining the maximum tsunami wave heights could result in large differences due to possible instrumental clipping. We also found that the maximum peak is usually larger than the maximum amplitude (½ peak-to-trough), but the differences for the majority of the stations were definition (maximum peak or amplitude) would have validated the forecasts issued by the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers. Since there is currently only one field in the NCEI historical tsunami database to store the maximum tsunami wave height for each tide gauge and deep-ocean buoy, NCEI will consider adding an additional field for the maximum

  1. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    . The maturity of individual scientific domains differs considerably. • Technologically and organisationally many different RI components have to be integrated. Individual systems are often complex and have a long-term history. Existing approaches are on different maturity levels, e.g. in relation to the standardisation of interfaces. • The concrete implementation process consists of independent and often parallel development activities. In many cases no detailed architectural blue-print for the envisioned system exists. • Most of the funding currently available for RI implementation is provided on a project basis. To increase the synergies in infrastructure development the authors propose a specific RI Maturity Model (RIMM) that is specifically qualified for open system-of-system environments. RIMM is based on the concepts of Capability Maturity Models for organisational development, concretely the Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model (LCIM) specifying the technical, syntactical, semantic, pragmatic, dynamic, and conceptual layers of interoperation [1]. The model is complemented by the identification and integration of growth factors (according to the Nolan Stages Theory [2]). These factors include supply and demand factors. Supply factors comprise available resources, e.g., data, services and IT-management capabilities including organisations and IT-personal. Demand factors are the overall application portfolio for RIs but also the skills and requirements of scientists and communities using the infrastructure. RIMM thus enables a balanced development process of RI and RI components by evaluating the status of the supply and demand factors in relation to specific levels of interoperability. [1] Tolk, A., Diallo, A., Turnitsa, C. (2007): Applying the Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model in Support of Integratability, Interoperability, and Composability for System-of-Systems Engineering. Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Volume 5 - Number 5. [2

  2. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  3. The determination of the mixing height. Current progress and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.; Beyrich, F.; Batchvarova, E. [eds.

    1997-10-01

    This report contains extended abstracts of presentations given at a EURASAP Workshop on The Determination of the Mixing Height - Current Progress and Problems. The Workshop, initiated from discussions with Peter Builtjes, was held at Risoe National Laboratory 1-3 October 1997 within the framework of EURASAP (European Association for the Sciences of Air Pollution). The specific topics and chairpersons of the Workshop were: Theoretical Considerations (Sven-Erik Gryning), Mixing Height Estimation from Turbulence Measurements and In-Situ Soundings (Douw Steyn), Mixing Height Determination from NWP-Models (Han van Dop), Climatology and Global Aspects (Werner Klug), Mixing Height Determination from Remote Systems (Werner Klug), Verification of Mixing Height Parameterizations and Models (Frank Beyrich), Mixing Height over Complex Terrain (Ekaterina Batchvarova), Internal Boundary Layers: Mixing Height in Coastal Areas and Over Cities (Allen White). The discussion at the end of the Workshop was chaired by Robert Bornstein. (au)

  4. Sliding Mode Robustness Control Strategy for Shearer Height Adjusting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Su

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly established mathematical model of height adjusting hydro cylinder of the shearer, as well as the state space equation of the shearer height adjusting system. Secondly we designed a shearer automatic height adjusting controller adopting the sliding mode robustness control strategy. The height adjusting controller includes the sliding mode surface switching function based on Ackermann formula, as well as sliding mode control function with the improved butterworth filter. Then simulation of the height adjustment controller shows that the sliding mode robustness control solves buffeting of typical controller, and achieves automatic control for the rolling drum of the shearer.

  5. NON DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF HEARTWOOD DIAMETER AT BREAST HEIGHT FOR EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS AND POPULUS EURAMERICANA HYBRID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alexandre Jóia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the evaluation of the heartwood diameter (dcerne at breast height on stand trees, for Eucalyptus globulus Labill and the hybrid Populus euramericana. The data used was collected in eucalyptus and popular pure plantations in Central and North Portugal.The non destructive methods tested in the evaluation of heartwood diameter at breast height were [1] visual identification of the heartwood on core samples and [2] indirect estimation using mathematic models. The results allow to consider that visual determination of dcerne is appropriate for Populus, and development of prediction models based diameter at breast height (d, total height (h and age (t, give better results for eucalyptus.

  6. Modeling and simulation on automatic height adjustment system of coal shearer cutter with ADAMS/Hydraulics and Matlab/Simulink%基于ADAMS/Hydraulics与Matlab/Simulink的采煤机自动调高系统建模与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔大文

    2011-01-01

    In order to solve the reliability problem associated with shearer automatic height adjustment system,this study applies Pro/ENGINEER, ANSYS and ADAMS/Hydraulics system to set up a virtual prototype model of flexible coupling shearer with a hydraulic system. Also,a mathematical model of control system using Matlab/Simulink simulation software is established for simulation. Based on virtual prototype technology, there is no need to manufacture a shearer for testing and verifying the design results of physical prototypes. This study provides the design and development of enterprises with a huge economic benefit and can significantly shorten the product development cycle. It is of significance for the shearer design and development.%为了解决某型号采煤机自动调高系统的可靠性问题,应用Pro/ENGINEER、ANSYS及ADAMS/Hydraulics 建立带有液压系统的采煤机刚柔耦合虚拟样机模型.建立控制系统数学模型并应用matlab/simulink仿真软件对建立好的数学模型进行仿真.基于虚拟样机技术的研究,无需制造物理样机就可验证设计结果,为企业的设计研发带来了巨大的经济效益并且能极大地缩短产品研发周期,对于采煤机的设计和研究具有非常重要的意义.

  7. [Influence of Mapuche origin and socioeconomic conditions on adult height].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erazo B, Marcia; Amigo C, Hugo; Bustos M, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    Studies in Chilean adults of low socioeconomic level suggest that their low height is likely to be due to their indigenous background. However this group also has been marginalized from socioeconomic development. To determine the influence of Mapuche ethnic origin and socioeconomic factors on the height of adults. In a cross sectional design, the height of 1,293 adults (528 males and 765 females) of Mapuche and non Mapuche origin were studied in the Araucania Region (Southern Chile) and in the Metropolitan Region (Central Chile). Subjects with Mapuche surnames were considered as pertaining to this ethnic community and those with Spanish surnames were considered as non Mapuche. Linear regression models were done, stratifying by sex, considering ethnic origin, to live in counties of different social vulnerability, and the level of family poverty. Among males, the mean height was 166.6+/-7.3 cm and among females, the figure was 153.6+/-5.9 cm. Mapuche subjects were significantly shorter: -3.2 cm (95% Confidence Interval (CI) -4.0 to -2.3) among females and -4.8 cm (CI -6.0 to -3.6) among males (non adjusted models). This deficit increased to -4.5 and -7.6 cm among females and males, respectively when they lived in poverty and in areas with highest social vulnerability. These differences decreased significantly if Mapuche subjects lived in communities with low social vulnerability and less poverty (-0.59 and -1.14 cm among females and males respectively). The studied population had low height, being lower in Mapuche subjects. The differences decreased among subjects living in counties of less vulnerability and less family poverty.

  8. A contribution to the problem of modelling the dispersion of pollutants in a time-varying, height-structured atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupini, R.; Malguzzi, P.

    The numerical solutions of the time dependent advection-diffusion equation reported in this paper suggest that, for moderately tall stacks (effective height H, ⩽ 200m), the computed ground level concentration, at a down-wind of about 10 km, can be treated approximately as a "quasi-steady" function of time, when the input parameters (emission rate, wind velocity and turbulent diffusivity) change on time scales larger than about an hour. As the lateral, crosswind distribution of a steady-state plume can be assumed as Gaussian, if the meteorological parameters are horizontally homogeneous and the air stratification is not too stable (the wind rotation with height is not too marked, at and below the source height), the above result implies that the known non-Gaussian, analytic solutions of the two dimensional K-equation (Huang, 1979; Demuth, 1978) can be used to predict the g.l.c. also under time-varying conditions, as long as the input parameters change "slowly" over an hour and the vertical profiles are well approximated by power-law functions.

  9. Development of allometric models for above and belowground biomass in swidden cultivation fallows of Northern Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNicol, Iain M.; Berry, Nicholas J.; Bruun, Thilde Bech

    2015-01-01

    in this region, which we hypothesised would be a major carbon pool given that resprouting, and associated high root biomass, is a common physiological/morphological trait in regularly disturbed ecosystems. We found that a general model including tree diameter (DBH, cm) and height (H, m) was best for estimating...... models for the prediction of both above- and below-ground woody biomass in swidden systems based on a destructive harvest of 150 trees in Luang Prabang Province, Laos People's Democratic Republic (PDR). This study is the first to develop allometric models of root biomass for swidden landscapes...... height was less important for estimating root biomass, with models including only DBH performing best. Re-sprouting trees exhibited greater root biomass (BGB=0.355DBH1.732) compared to those growing from seed (0.016DBH2.597) meaning different root allometric models were developed...

  10. Developing the Framed Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Michael J; Chan, H M; Tsou, S T

    2011-01-01

    The framed standard model (FSM) suggested earlier, which incorporates the Higgs field and 3 fermion generations as part of the framed gauge theory structure, is here developed further to show that it gives both quarks and leptons hierarchical masses and mixing matrices akin to what is experimentally observed. Among its many distinguishing features which lead to the above results are (i) the vacuum is degenerate under a global $su(3)$ symmetry which plays the role of fermion generations, (ii) the fermion mass matrix is "universal", rank-one and rotates (changes its orientation in generation space) with changing scale $\\mu$, (iii) the metric in generation space is scale-dependent too, and in general non-flat, (iv) the theta-angle term in the QCD action of topological origin gets transformed into the CP-violating phase of the CKM matrix for quarks, thus offering at the same time a solution to the strong CP problem.

  11. Quantifying Phenotypic Plasticity Using Genetic Information for Simulating Plant Height in Winter Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    A challenge for crop simulation modeling is to incorporate existing and rapidly emerging genomic information into models to develop new and improved algorithms. The objective of this effort was to simulate plant height in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) across a range of environments in Nebraska...

  12. Statistical analysis on extreme wave height

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Teena, N.V.; SanilKumar, V.; Sudheesh, K.; Sajeev, R.

    the distributions fitted to the GEV with annual maximum approach and GPD with peaks over threshold approach have indicated that both GEV and GPD models gave similar or comparable wave height for the study area since there is no multiple storm event in a year...

  13. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  14. Development of gene-based markers for use in construction of the chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genetic linkage map and identification of QTLs associated with seed weight and plant height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shefali; Kumar, Tapan; Verma, Subodh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-11-01

    Seed weight and plant height are important agronomic traits and contribute to seed yield. The objective of this study was to identify QTLs underlying these traits using an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea. A F11 population of 177 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between SBD377 (100-seed weight--48 g and plant height--53 cm) and BGD112 (100-seed weight--15 g and plant height--65 cm) was used. A total of 367 novel EST-derived functional markers were developed which included 187 EST-SSRs, 130 potential intron polymorphisms (PIPs) and 50 expressed sequence tag polymorphisms (ESTPs). Along with these, 590 previously published markers including 385 EST-based markers and 205 genomic SSRs were utilized. Of the 957 markers tested for analysis of parental polymorphism between the two parents of the mapping population, 135 (14.64%) were found to be polymorphic. Of these, 131 polymorphic markers could be mapped to the 8 linkage groups. The linkage map had a total length of 1140.54 cM with an average marker density of 8.7 cM. The map was further used for QTL identification using composite interval mapping method (CIM). Two QTLs each for seed weight, qSW-1 and qSW-2 (explaining 11.54 and 19.24% of phenotypic variance, respectively) and plant height, qPH-1 and qPH-2 (explaining 13.98 and 12.17% of phenotypic variance, respectively) were detected. The novel set of genic markers, the intra-specific linkage map and the QTLs identified in the present study will serve as valuable genomic resources in improving the chickpea seed yield using marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategies.

  15. Experiences of ZAMG on mixing height determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piringer, M. [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, ZAMG, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-10-01

    Temperature inversions in the boundary layer occur quite often, esp. in mountainous terrain by which Austria is covered to a large extent, and can lead to enhanced pollution at the surface because the air volume available for dilution is then vertically limited. The Department of Environmental Meteorology of ZAMG therefore set up several field programs in the past to study such conditions at a variety of sites in Austria, using tethersondes and Sodars. Early investigations aimed at comparing Sodar echo profiles to the tethersonde temperature profiles to derive mixing heights from the Sodar echo structure. More recently, evolving from KONGEX, the `convective boundary layer experiment`, mixing heights calculated for Vienna by the OML model were compared to those derived from radiosonde and tethersonde potential temperature profiles. Results of these investigations will be presented, focussing on the problems when using the different methods. New efforts to derive mixing heights from data were also undertaken and are discussed separately. (au)

  16. Developing Personal Network Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saugstrup, Dan; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    on the 'state of the art' in the field of business modeling. Furthermore, the paper suggests three generic business models for PNs: a service oriented model, a self-organized model, and a combination model. Finally, examples of relevant services and applications in relation to three different cases......The aim of the paper is to examine the issue of business modeling in relation to personal networks, PNs. The paper builds on research performed on business models in the EU 1ST MAGNET1 project (My personal Adaptive Global NET). The paper presents the Personal Network concept and briefly reports...... are presented and analyzed in light of business modeling of PN....

  17. Investigation on the Accuracy of Flame Height Relation Model for Crude Oil Pool Fire%油池火灾火焰高度关系模型的准确度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姗姗; 孙建刚; 王振; 王楠楠; 崔利富

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on the flame heights of crude oil pool fires with different pool diameters of 1. 5, 2, 3 and 5 m in daqing oil field, and the experimental values of flame height were compared with the calculated values by the relation models. The results show that the values of flame height calculated by the Thomas relation model agree well with the experi-mental data at the pool diameters of 1. 5 m and 2 m, but have a great deviation at the pool diam-eters of 3 m and 5 m. Also the Thomas relation model is corrected based on the experimental re-sults.%对大庆油田原油池火灾火焰高度进行实验测试,油池直径分别为1.5,2,3和5 m,将测试结果与池火灾关系模型计算结果进行比较。结果表明,当圆盘直径为1.5 m和2 m时,Thomas关系模型火焰高度计算值与实验值较为接近,当圆盘直径为3 m和5 m时,Thomas关系模型火焰高度计算值与实验值偏差较大。基于实验结果对Thomas关系模型进行了修正。

  18. The role of cloud contamination, aerosol layer height and aerosol model in the assessment of the OMI near-UV retrievals over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassó, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-07-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm ˜ distribution, aerosol height, particle shape). It was found that the spherical shape assumption for dust in the current retrieval is the main cause of the underestimate. In addition, it is demonstrated in an example how an incorrect assumption of the aerosol height can lead to an underestimate. Nevertheless, this is not as significant as the effect of particle shape. These findings will be incorporated in a future version of the retrieval algorithm.

  19. Height and Tilt Geometric Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vedrana; Desbrun, Mathieu; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new intrinsic representation of geometric texture over triangle meshes. Our approach extends the conventional height field texture representation by incorporating displacements in the tangential plane in the form of a normal tilt. This texture representation offers a good practical...... compromise between functionality and simplicity: it can efficiently handle and process geometric texture too complex to be represented as a height field, without having recourse to full blown mesh editing algorithms. The height-and-tilt representation proposed here is fully intrinsic to the mesh, making...

  20. Developing a dynamic growth model for teak plantations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindhya Prasad Tewari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Tectona grandis (teak is one of the most important tropical timber speciesoccurring naturally in India. Appropriate growth models, based on advanced modeling techniques,are not available but are necessary for the successful management of teak stands in the country.Long-term forest planning requires mathematical models, and the principles of Dynamical SystemTheory provide a solid foundation for these. Methods The state-space approach makes it possible to accommodate disturbances and avarying environment. In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop a dynamic growthmodel based on the limited data, consisting of three annual measurements, collected from 22 teak sample plots in Karnataka, Southern India. Results A biologically consistent whole-stand growth model has been presented which uses thestate-space approach for modelling rates of change of three state-variables viz., dominant height,stems per hectare and stand basal area. Moreover, the model includes a stand volume equationas an output function to estimate this variable at any point in time. Transition functions werefitted separately and simultaneously. Moreover, a continuous autoregressive error structure isalso included in the modelling process. For fitting volume equation, generalized method of moments was used to get efficient parameter estimates under heteroscedastic conditions. Conclusions A simple model containing few free parameters performed well and is particularlywell suited to situations where available data is scarce.

  1. The Use of High-Resolution Pléiades Images to Extract Volcanic-Cloud Top Heights and Plume Elevation Models: examples on Mount Etna (Italy) and Mount Ontake (Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; spinetti, claudia

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and spatially-detailed knowledge of Volcanic Cloud Top Height (VCTH) and velocity is crucial in volcanology. As an example, the ash/gas dispersion in the atmosphere, their impact and lifetime around the globe, greatly depends on the injection altitude. The VCTH is critical for ash dispersion modelling and air traffic security. Furthermore, the volcanic plume height during explosive volcanism is the primary parameter for estimating mass eruption rate. Satellite remote sensing offers a comprehensive and safe way to estimate VCTH. Recently, it has been shown that high spatial resolution optical imagery from Landsat-8 OLI sensor can be used to extract Volcanic Cloud Top Height with a precision of 250 meters and an accuracy or 300m (de Michele et al., 2016). This method allows to extract a Plume Elevation Model (PEM) by jointly measuring the parallax between two optical bands acquired with a time lag varying from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds depending on the bands chosen and the sensors employed. The measure of the parallax is biased because the volcanic cloud is moving between the two images acquisitions, even if the time lag is short. The precision of our measurements is enhanced by compensating the parallax by measuring the velocity of the volcanic cloud in the perpendicular-to-epipolar direction (which is height independent) and correcting the initial parallax measurement. In this study, we push this methodology forward. We apply it to the very high spatial resolution Pleiades data (1m pixel spacing) provided by the French Space Agency (CNES). We apply the method on Mount Etna, during the 05 September 2015 eruptive episode and on Mount Ontake eruption occurring on 30 September 2014. We are able to extract VCTH as a PEM with high spatial resolution and improved precision. Since Pléiades has an improved revisit time (1day), our method has potential for routine monitoring of volcanic plumes in clear sky conditions and when the VCTH is higher than meteo clouds.

  2. Evidence of inbreeding depression on human height.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth McQuillan

    Full Text Available Stature is a classical and highly heritable complex trait, with 80%-90% of variation explained by genetic factors. In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified many common additive variants influencing human height; however, little attention has been given to the potential role of recessive genetic effects. Here, we investigated genome-wide recessive effects by an analysis of inbreeding depression on adult height in over 35,000 people from 21 different population samples. We found a highly significant inverse association between height and genome-wide homozygosity, equivalent to a height reduction of up to 3 cm in the offspring of first cousins compared with the offspring of unrelated individuals, an effect which remained after controlling for the effects of socio-economic status, an important confounder (χ(2 = 83.89, df = 1; p = 5.2 × 10(-20. There was, however, a high degree of heterogeneity among populations: whereas the direction of the effect was consistent across most population samples, the effect size differed significantly among populations. It is likely that this reflects true biological heterogeneity: whether or not an effect can be observed will depend on both the variance in homozygosity in the population and the chance inheritance of individual recessive genotypes. These results predict that multiple, rare, recessive variants influence human height. Although this exploratory work focuses on height alone, the methodology developed is generally applicable to heritable quantitative traits (QT, paving the way for an investigation into inbreeding effects, and therefore genetic architecture, on a range of QT of biomedical importance.

  3. Economic Development and "Indian Model"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Dao: Early this year, there are many relevant reports on India's catching up from behind in economic development. It is reported that India and China will be the two engines to drive world economic development.

  4. Dynamic analysis of QTL for plant height at different developmental stages in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jianbing; TANG Hua; HUANG Yiqin; SHI Yonggang; LI Jiansheng; ZHENG Yonglian

    2003-01-01

    Plant height in maize is not only one of important agronomic traits, but also one of model traits suitablefor study of developmental biology. Using data from fieldtests in two locations (Wuhan and Xiangfan) within the sameyear and a molecular linkage map covering all of 10 chro-mosomes, QTLs affecting plant height at five different de-velopmental stages were mapped and analyzed by the com-bination of composite interval mapping and the conditionalanalysis method. Eight QTLs for plant height at differentstages were located at different regions of five chromosomes(LOD≥2.5). The results showed that there were differenteffect values of QTL on plant height at different develop-mental stages. Three QTLs were detected at all of five stages.With different stages, contributory percentage of single QTL to plant height varied between 3.8% and 17.1%. It suggestedthat the expression of each QTL controlling plant height wasdifferent at different stages. With net growth, seven condi-tional QTLs for plant height were detected. Conditional QTLs were nearly detected at each stage, and QTLs of Ph1-1, Ph1-2, Ph3, Ph5-2 and Ph9 were detected at both locations (Wuhan and Xiangfan). The contributory percentage of single conditional QTL to plant height varied between 3.8% and 12.3%, indicating that QTLs for plant height are expressed in different time-space. Therefore, QTL expressed at different stages should be considered when marker assistant selection is conducted for quantitative traits.

  5. Canopy Height Estimation by Characterizing Waveform LiDAR Geometry Based on Shape-Distance Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Ariel L. Salas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been few approaches developed for the estimation of height using waveform LiDAR data. Unlike any existing methods, we illustrate how the new Moment Distance (MD framework can characterize the canopy height based on the geometry and return power of the LiDAR waveform without having to go through curve modeling processes. Our approach offers the possibilities of using the raw waveform data to capture vital information from the variety of complex waveform shapes in LiDAR. We assess the relationship of the MD metrics to the key waveform landmarks—such as locations of peaks, power of returns, canopy heights, and height metrics—using synthetic data and real Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS data. In order to verify the utility of the new approach, we use field measurements obtained through the DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice campaign. Our results reveal that the MDI can capture temporal dynamics of canopy and segregate generations of stands based on curve shapes. The method satisfactorily estimates the canopy height using the synthetic (r2 = 0.40 and the LVIS dataset (r2 = 0.74. The MDI is also comparable with existing RH75 (relative height at 75% and RH50 (relative height at 50% height metrics. Furthermore, the MDI shows better correlations with ground-based measurements than relative height metrics. The MDI performs well at any type of waveform shape. This opens the possibility of looking more closely at single-peaked waveforms that usually carries complex extremes.

  6. Improving ergonomics in milking parlors: empirical findings for optimal working heights in five milking parlor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, M; Savary, P; Kauke, M; Schick, M; Hoehne-Hückstädt, U; Hermanns, I; Ellegast, R

    2015-02-01

    Milking postures have shifted from seated milking in tethered stalls to milking in a standing position in parlors. However, the musculoskeletal workload of dairy farmers remains high. Previous studies have shown that different working heights affect ergonomics, but they could not objectively evaluate and quantify the workload. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of working height in different milking parlor types on the milker's workload during the task of attaching milking clusters. Computer-assisted recording and long-term analysis of movements were used to record positions of joints and body regions while performing certain tasks in terms of angular degrees of joints (ADJ) according to the neutral zero method. The 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles described the distribution of angular degree values measured for each joint. The ADJ were evaluated according to international standards and other scientific literature on the issue to assess the muscular load. The workload was compared between 5 parlor types (auto tandem, herringbone 30°, herringbone 50°, parallel, and rotary) on 15 farms with 2 subjects per parlor and 1 milking period per subject. The working height was defined as a coefficient based on the milker's body height, the floor level, and the cow's udder height. The data recorded during the attachment task were analyzed using generalized linear mixed-effects models taking into account the hierarchical experimental design. The results indicated that the interaction of the cow's udder height, the milker's body height, and the parlor type had a larger effect on ergonomics than each parameter had independently. The interaction was significant in at least 1 of the 3 percentiles in 28 out of 31 ADJ. The postural differences between parlor types, however, were minor. A milking health formula was created to calculate the ideal depth of pit by considering the parlor type, the milker's height, and the mean herd udder height. This formula can be

  7. Curriculum Development: A Philosophical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, William H.

    Presenting models based on the philosophies of Carl Rogers, John Dewey, Erich Fromm, and Jean-Paul Sartre, this paper proposes a philosophical approach to education and concludes with pragmatic suggestions concerning teaching based on a fully-functioning-person model. The fully-functioning person is characterized as being open to experience,…

  8. A View of Earth System Model Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tianjun; YU Yongqiang; WANG Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a definition of earth system model and shows three development phases of it, including physical climate system model, earth climate system model, and earth system model, based on an inves-tigation of climate system models in the world. It provides an expatiation on the strategic significance of future development of earth system model, an introduction of some representative scientific research plans on development of earth system model home and abroad, and a review of its status and trends based on the models of the fourth assessment report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).Some suggestions on future development of earth system model in China are given, which are expected to be helpful to advance the development.

  9. Development of a technoeconomic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi; Tadayoni, Reza

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the key technical features to be considered for developing and deploying intelligent transportation systems (ITSs) in developing countries. The empirical data are taken from a detailed case study of ITS deployment in Ghana. The methodology used for data collection...

  10. Encounter Probability of Significant Wave Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Z.; Burcharth, H. F.

    The determination of the design wave height (often given as the significant wave height) is usually based on statistical analysis of long-term extreme wave height measurement or hindcast. The result of such extreme wave height analysis is often given as the design wave height corresponding to a c...

  11. Development of a technoeconomic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi; Tadayoni, Reza

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the key technical features to be considered for developing and deploying intelligent transportation systems (ITSs) in developing countries. The empirical data are taken from a detailed case study of ITS deployment in Ghana. The methodology used for data collection...... included interviews and surveys-face-to-face discussions and questionnaires. The results show that deployment of intelligent vehicle tracking technology (IVTT) will address the problems of inefficiencies experienced in the Ghanaian road transport haulage tracking industry. Research for ITS development...

  12. Development of ocean model LSOMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachl, Libor; Martinec, Zdenek

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to present the ocean general circulation model LSOMG. It originates from the LSG (Maier-Reimer and Mikolajewicz, 1992) ocean model, however, significant number of changes has been made. LSOMG is a z-coordinate baroclinic ocean model which solves the primitive equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We intend to use the model for a various geophysical applications with the focus on paleoclimate studies. Hence, the model is not as complex as the current state-of-art climate models, such as the Modular Ocean Model or NEMO models. On the other hand, it is less computationally demanding. The changes and improvements in the code will be reported. One of the obvious changes is that the governing equations are no more discretized on the Arakawa E grid. The whole model has been rewritten on the Arakawa C grid. The main motivation is to avoid a coexistence of two solutions on the grid that evolve independently of each other. A more natural treatment of boundary conditions and simpler structure of the grid are additional advantages. Another significant change is the treatment of time tendencies. The system of equations is split to barotropic and baroclinic subsystems. Both subsystems may either be discretized at the same time points (as in the original LSG model), or their discretizations may be staggered in time as described in Griffies (2004). The original fully implicit barotropic time stepping scheme was found to significantly dissipate energy. Three different time stepping schemes are available instead. Namely, the predictor-corrector scheme of Griffies (2004), the generalized forward-backward scheme of Shchepetkin and McWilliams (2008) and the implicit free surface scheme of Campin et al. (2004). The first two schemes are intended to be used with the split-explicit model configuration for short-term studies whereas the third scheme is suitable for long-term studies, e.g. paleoclimate studies. The short-term studies may also

  13. Towards an Alternative Development Model in Suriname

    OpenAIRE

    Dougal Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study advocates the adoption of an alternative development model in Suriname. Suriname adopted a state-centered and inward-looking development model in the early 1980s, although elements of the model had been present long before that time.

  14. Height and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ben; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Delahanty, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. METHODS: We performed a meta......-analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using...... a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. RESULTS: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence...

  15. replacing orthometric heights with ellipsoidal heights in engineering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This work investigates the use of ellipsoidal heights in place of orthometric ... be represented mathematically, and therefore enables computation to be .... suitable locations along the levelling routes. The ..... 5.3 Assumptions and theoretical approximations made ... tectonics movement, deformation and land subsidence.

  16. Tree Height Calculator: An Android App for Estimating Tree Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burca, V. S.; Htet, N. M.; Huang, X.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Morelli, R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventionally, measuring tree height requires a collection of different tools - clinometer, transit, pencil, paper, laptop computer. Results are recorded manually and entered into a spreadsheet or database for future calculation and analysis. Tree Height Calculator is a mobile Android app the integrates the various steps in this process thereby improving the accuracy and dramatically reducing the time required to go from taking measurements to analyzing data. Given the user's height and the distance from the base of the tree (which can be downloaded into the app from a server), the app uses the phone's orientation sensor to calculate the angle of elevation. A simple trigonometric formula is then used to calculate and record the tree's height in the phone's database. When the phone has a WiFi connection, the data are transmitted to a server, from where they can be downloaded directly into a spreadsheet. The application was first tested in an Environmental Science laboratory at Trinity College. On the first trial, 103 data samples were collected, stored, and uploaded to the online database with only couple of dropped data points. On the second trial, 98 data samples were gathered with no loss of data. The app combined the individual measurements taken by the students in the lab, reducing the time required to produce a graph of the class's results from days to hours.

  17. Maturity Models Development in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2015-01-01

    literature reveals that researchers have primarily focused on developing new maturity models pertaining to domain-specific problems and/or new enterprise technologies. We find rampant re-use of the design structure of widely adopted models such as Nolan’s Stage of Growth Model, Crosby’s Grid, and Capability...... of maturity models. Specifically, it explores maturity models literature in IS and standard guidelines, if any to develop maturity models, challenges identified and solutions proposed. Our systematic literature review of IS publications revealed over hundred and fifty articles on maturity models. Extant...

  18. Penggunaan Analisis Regresi Terboboti dalam Penyusunan Model Pertumbuhan Peninggi Acacia mangium Willd. (The Use of Weighted Regression Analysis for Constructing Top-height Growth Model of Acacia mangium Willd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhdin .

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of growth stand model usually uses the regression analysis. Homoscedasticity or residual kind homogeneity is one assumption which underlying the use of this regression analysis.  Breaking this assumption causes the low of model accuracy which is shown by the low of determination coefficient and the height of error standard. The problem of heteroscedasticity can be solved by using weighted regression analysis.The Selected Raiser Growth Model equation in this research was transformed into a model equation: ln P = a + b/A, where there was a significant correlation between the growth and the age (R2  = 55.04%, sb0 = 0.041, and sb1 = 0.171.  From the use of weighted regression analysis with weightier wi = 1/”Xi, it can be concluded that there was no real correlation between the growth and the age (R2 = 0.55%, sb0 = 0.572, and sb1 = 2.560.  The use of weightier shows much lower accuracy than without weightier.  However, from the use of weighted regression analysis with weightier: wi = 1/si2, where  si2  = residual kinds at free variable group to I (X1 shows that there was significant correlation between the growth and the age (R2 = 45.46%;  sb0  = 0.084, and sb1 = 0.205.  There fore it can be said that the accuracy was much better than regression without weightier.  Furthermore,  the use of weighted regression analysis with weightier wi = 1/si2, where  si2 is residual kind at free variable to i (X which is estimated through second orde polynomial regression model shows a very significant correlation between the growth and the age (where R2 = 87.22%, sb0 = 0.029, and sb1  = 0.072. The last result shows a better accuracy than the preceding treatments.  From this research, it can be concluded that by using a suitable weightier, the use of weighted regression analysis in compiling raiser growth model can improve the model accuracy.  Keywords: growth model, weighted regression, acacia mangium,regression analysis

  19. Fear of heights in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E; Kretch, Kari S; LoBue, Vanessa

    2014-02-01

    Based largely on the famous "visual cliff" paradigm, conventional wisdom is that crawling infants avoid crossing the brink of a dangerous drop-off because they are afraid of heights. However, recent research suggests that the conventional wisdom is wrong. Avoidance and fear are conflated, and there is no compelling evidence to support fear of heights in human infants. Infants avoid crawling or walking over an impossibly high drop-off because they perceive affordances for locomotion-the relations between their own bodies and skills and the relevant properties of the environment that make an action such as descent possible or impossible.

  20. Developing integrated care. Towards a development model for integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Minkman, Mirella M.N

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated care. Based on a systematic approach in which a literature study, a delphi study, a concept mapping study and questionnaire research are combined, a development model for integrated care is created....

  1. Down on heights? One in three has visual height intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Brandt, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The distressing phenomenon of visual height intolerance (vHI) occurs when a visual stimulus causes apprehension of losing control of balance and falling from some height. Epidemiological data of this condition in the general population are lacking. Assignment of prevalence, determinants, and compensation of vHI was performed in a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 3,517 individuals representing the German population. Life-time prevalence of vHI is 28 % (females 32 %). A higher prevalence is associated independently with a family history of vHI, anxiety disorders, migraine, or motion sickness susceptibility. Women aged 50-59 have a higher prevalence than younger women or men of all ages. Initial attacks occur most often (30 %) in the second decade; however, attacks can manifest throughout life. The main symptoms are fearfulness, inner agitation, a queasy-stomach feeling, subjective postural instability with to-and-fro vertigo, and weakness in the knees. Climbing a tower is the first most common precipitating stimulus; the spectrum of such stimuli widens with time in more than 50 % of afflicted individuals. The most frequent reaction to vHI is to avoid the triggering stimuli (>50 %); 11 % of susceptible individuals consult a doctor, most often a general practitioner, neurologist, ENT doctor, or psychiatrist. In brief, visual height intolerance affects one-third of the general population, considerably restricting the majority of these individuals in their daily activities. The data show that the two terms do not indicate a categorical distinction but rather a continuum from slight forms of visual height intolerance to the specific phobia of fear of heights.

  2. Developing Empirically Based Models of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Betty J.; Briar, Scott

    1985-01-01

    Over the last decade emphasis has shifted from theoretically based models of practice to empirically based models whose elements are derived from clinical research. These models are defined and a developing model of practice through the use of single-case methodology is examined. Potential impediments to this new role are identified. (Author/BL)

  3. Coastal Surveillance Baseline Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    that were considered too numerous for inclusion in this report. Therefore, the Access was reconfigured to cover only the first two weeks of...radar (SAR). One can also define jammers and detailed antenna models, as well as a variety of effects associated with specific types of atmospheric...line loss and temperature, antenna noise) to help simulate real-world RF situations more accurately if necessary. C.1.2 Radar Cross-Section Property

  4. Modeled water velocity, sea surface height, WATER TEMPERATURE, salinity, and others in the Caribbean Sea from 2007-01-01 to 2009-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0143929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data was produced with the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). The model resolved tides, and was forced by the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR)...

  5. Quantification of gait changes in subjects with visual height intolerance when exposed to heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eSchniepp

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Visual height intolerance (vHI manifests as instability at heights with apprehension of losing balance or falling. We investigated contributions of visual feedback and attention on gait performance of subjects with vHI. Material and Methods: Sixteen subjects with vHI walked over a gait mat (GAITRite® on a 15-m-high balcony and at ground-level. Subjects walked at different speeds (slow, preferred, fast, during changes of the visual input (gaze straight/ up/ down; eyes open /closed, and while doing a cognitive task. An rmANOVA with the factors height situation and gait condition was performed. Subjects were also asked to estimate the height of the balcony over ground level. The individual estimates were used for correlations with the gait parameters.Results: Study participants walked slower at heights, with reduced cadence and stride length. The double support phases were increased (all p<0.01, which correlated with the estimated height of the balcony (R2=0.453, p<0.05. . These changes were still present when walking with upward gaze or closure of the eyes. Under the conditions walking and looking down to the floor of the balcony, during dual-task and fast walking, there were no differences between the gait performance on the balcony and at ground-level. Discussion: The found gait changes are features of a cautious gait control. Internal, cognitive models with anxiety play an important role for vHI; gait was similarly affected when the visual perception of the depth was prevented. . Improvement by dual task at heights may be associated by a reduction of the anxiety level.Conclusion: It is conceivable that mental distraction by dual task or increasing the walking speed might be useful recommendations to reduce the imbalance during locomotion in subjects susceptible to vHI.

  6. Maturity Models Development in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2015-01-01

    Maturity models are widespread in IS research and in particular, IT practitioner communities. However, theoretically sound, methodologically rigorous and empirically validated maturity models are quite rare. This literature review paper focuses on the challenges faced during the development...... literature reveals that researchers have primarily focused on developing new maturity models pertaining to domain-specific problems and/or new enterprise technologies. We find rampant re-use of the design structure of widely adopted models such as Nolan’s Stage of Growth Model, Crosby’s Grid, and Capability...... Maturity Model (CMM). Only recently have there been some research efforts to standardize maturity model development. We also identify three dominant views of maturity models and provide guidelines for various approaches of constructing maturity models with a standard vocabulary. We finally propose using...

  7. Analysis of the accuracy of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height models using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Mukul; Vinee Srivastava; Malay Mukul

    2015-08-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) carried out in February 2000 has provided near global topographic data that has been widely used in many fields of earth sciences. The mission goal of an absolute vertical accuracy within 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m was achieved based on ground validation of SRTM data through various studies using global positioning system (GPS). We present a new and independent assessment of the vertical accuracy of both the X- and C-band SRTM datasets using data from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of high-precision static GPS stations. These stations exist worldwide, have better spatial distribution than previous studies, have a vertical accuracy of 6 mm and constitute the most accurate ground control points (GCPs) possible on earth; these stations are used as fiducial stations to define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Globally, for outlier-filtered data (135 X-band stations and 290 C-band stations), the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibits a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 8.2 ± 0.7 and 6.9 ± 0.5 m for X- and C-band data, respectively. Continent-wise, Africa, Australia and North America comply with the SRTM mission absolute vertical accuracy of 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m. However, Asia, Europe and South America have vertical errors higher than the SRTM mission goal. At stations where both the X- and C-band SRTM data were present, the root mean square error (RMSE) of both the X- and C-bands was identical at 11.5 m, indicating similar quality of both the X- and C-band SRTM data.

  8. Developing students' understanding of scientific modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christine Virginia

    Teaching students to create and use scientific models as well as to understand their nature has become an increasingly important goal in science education. This thesis reports on the evaluation of the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum, a ten and a half week physics curriculum designed to develop students' understanding of scientific modeling. In the curricular trials, eight classes of seventh grade students participated in model-oriented activities such as creating non-Newtonian computer microworlds to embody their conceptual models of force and motion, evaluating the accuracy and plausibility of their models, and reflecting on the nature of models. Analysis of pre- and post-curricular assessments as well as student research books, project reports, and in-depth interviews indicate that students had a significantly better understanding of the nature and utility of models after completing the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum. Students also gained an understanding of a number of processes for developing and evaluating models. While interacting with the software and engaging in reflective discussions about the nature of models, students learned that models can include abstract representations and that models are useful for predicting events and testing ideas. Students also demonstrated sophisticated understanding of models in their interviews several months after the curriculum, particularly about the nature and. utility of models. Further, the curriculum developed students' conceptual models of force and motion as well as their inquiry skills and epistemological beliefs about the nature of scientific knowledge and learning. Correlations among the four pre/post curricular assessments suggest that modeling knowledge may play a role in the acquisition of the other types of knowledge. These results indicate that, while modeling knowledge may be difficult to develop, progress can be made by engaging students in generating and reflecting on the nature of models

  9. Modeling Energy and Development : An Evaluation of Models and Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijven, Bas van; Urban, Frauke; Benders, René M.J.; Moll, Henri C.; Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der; Vries, Bert de; Vuuren, Detlef P. van

    2008-01-01

    Most global energy models are developed by institutes from developed countries focusing primarily oil issues that are important in industrialized countries. Evaluation of the results for Asia of the IPCC/SRES models shows that broad concepts of energy and development. the energy ladder and the envir

  10. Equations of bark thickness and volume profiles at different heights with easy-measurement variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellini, J. M.; Galarza, M.; Burns, S. L.; Martinez-Pastur, G. J.; Lencinas, M. V.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop equations of thickness profile and bark volume at different heights with easy-measurement variables, taking as a study case Nothofagus pumilio forests, growing in different site qualities and growth phases in Southern Patagonia. Data was collected from 717 harvested trees. Three models were fitted using multiple, non-lineal regression and generalized linear model, by stepwise methodology, iteratively reweighted least squares method for maximum likelihood estimation and Marquardt algorithm. The dependent variables were diameter at 1.30 m height (DBH), relative height (RH) and growth phase (GP). The statistic evaluation was made through the adjusted determinant coefficient (r2-adj), standard error of the estimation (SEE), mean absolute error and residual analysis. All models presented good fitness with a significant correlation with the growth phase. A decrease in the thickness was observed when the relative height increase. Moreover, a bark coefficient was made to calculate volume with and without bark of individual trees, where significant differences according to site quality of the stands and DBH class of the trees were observed. It can be concluded that the prediction of bark thickness and bark coefficient is possible using DBH, height, site quality and growth phase, common and easy measurement variables used in forest inventories. (Author) 23 refs.

  11. Reaching new heights: comparing interpretation bias modification to exposure therapy for extreme height fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Shari A; Teachman, Bethany A

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of anxiety disorders posit that biases in interpretation maintain, and potentially cause, anxiety. This study tested whether it is possible to decrease height fear symptoms through cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I). Additionally, the clinical utility of CBM-I was tested by comparing it to an already established treatment: exposure therapy. Extremely height fearful individuals (N = 110) participated in the study. Acrophobic symptoms were measured before and after 2 sessions of CBM-I and were compared to the standard treatment for acrophobia (exposure therapy), a combination of CBM-I and exposure therapy, and a Control condition. In line with hypotheses, participants in the 3 active conditions showed greater response to treatment than the Control condition in height-relevant interpretation bias, symptoms, and behavioral avoidance on a height stressor, with few differences between the active conditions. Further, symptom change was mediated by change in interpretation bias. Overall, findings suggest that different pathways to fear reduction (exposure vs. shifting interpretations) can lead to similar reductions in height fear. This study provides the first evidence that directly shifting cognitive processing, even with no therapist involvement, can reduce symptoms as effectively as the gold standard, therapist-directed exposure therapy. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Application of neural networks and support vector machine for significant wave height prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadran Berbić

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available For the purposes of planning and operation of maritime activities, information about wave height dynamics is of great importance. In the paper, real-time prediction of significant wave heights for the following 0.5–5.5 h is provided, using information from 3 or more time points. In the first stage, predictions are made by varying the quantity of significant wave heights from previous time points and various ways of using data are discussed. Afterwards, in the best model, according to the criteria of practicality and accuracy, the influence of wind is taken into account. Predictions are made using two machine learning methods – artificial neural networks (ANN and support vector machine (SVM. The models were built using the built-in functions of software Weka, developed by Waikato University, New Zealand.

  13. Prediction of Body Mass Index Using Concurrently Self-Reported or Previously Measured Height and Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhaohui; Stevens, June; Truesdale, Kimberly P.; Zeng, Donglin; French, Simone; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare alternative models for the imputation of BMIM (measured weight in kilograms/measured height in meters squared) in a longitudinal study. Methods We used data from 11,008 adults examined at wave III (2001–2002) and wave IV (2007–2008) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Participants were asked their height and weight before being measured. Equations to predict wave IV BMIM were developed in an 80% random subsample and evaluated in the remaining participants. The validity of models that included BMI constructed from previously measured height and weight (BMIPM) was compared to the validity of models that used BMI calculated from concurrently self-reported height and weight (BMISR). The usefulness of including demographics and perceived weight category in those models was also examined. Results The model that used BMISR, compared to BMIPM, as the only variable produced a larger R2 (0.913 vs. 0.693), a smaller root mean square error (2.07 vs. 3.90 kg/m2) and a lower bias between normal-weight participants and those with obesity (0.98 vs. 4.24 kg/m2). The performance of the model containing BMISR alone was not substantially improved by the addition of demographics, perceived weight category or BMIPM. Conclusions Our work is the first to show that concurrent self-reports of height and weight may be more useful than previously measured height and weight for imputation of missing BMIM when the time interval between measures is relatively long. Other time frames and alternatives to in-person collection of self-reported data need to be examined. PMID:27898706

  14. Development of a laparoscopic training model using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, André Takashi; Galvão, Lucas Nascimento; Pessoa, Thyago Cezar Prado; Rocha, Camylla Rodrigues de Oliveira; Monteiro, Andrew Moraes; Fonteles, Mauro José Pantoja; Brito, Marcus Vinicius Henriques; Yasojima, Edson Yuzur

    2017-01-01

    to develop a model of training in video-surgery, of low cost and that uses a smartphone as an image-generating source. We developed a 38cm high, 40cm wide, 40cm long hexagonal-shaped training box, with a front opening of 12x8 cm for coupling the smartphone. The internal illumination is made with LED lamps and for the support of the smartphone, we used a selfie stick, fixed in the upper part of the box, that allows control of height, distance, angulation, and the coupling of devices with different formats. We selected 20 undergraduate students without previous training in video-surgery, who performed four exercises in the box, with assessment of the time and amount of errors in the execution of the tasks. Each student completed the training for three consecutive weeks. We collected the data in spreadsheets for later analysis. Nineteen students completed the training program, with significant improvement in the times and in the number of errors. the developed model was feasible and promoted the acquisition of skills in this group of students. In addition, it presents low cost, is portable and uses common equipment, such as smartphones.

  15. Models of Integration, Models of Development in the Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Borrego

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the processes related to integration and development in the East Asian and Latin American societies this paper attempts to place those processes in the larger context of cycles of world accumulation. Many of the societies in East Asia, Latin America, and the South, in general, were integrated into the world economy during previous cycles of hegemony and accumulation. However, in the American cycle, and particularly at the height of this cycle, East Asia was developed while most of Latin America continued to experience truncated development. How do we understand these different trajectories? We argue that the best way to understand the different processes of integration and development in these two regions during the current historical period of global capitalist accumulation is to see them all as housed in a transition period between the waning American cycle of hegemony in the world economy and a new, as yet undefined cycle. We will look at the role that the East Asian region and its societies are playing in the transition to the next cycle, as well as analyze why these societies should not be viewed as successful products of the "modernization process," as proponents of that theory argue. The "success" of these societies is rooted in their historical entry point and the geopolitical importance to the United States of the region in which they were housed, and is not necessarily repeatable by other Third World societies such as those in Latin America.

  16. 最新中国陆地数字高程基准模型:重力似大地水准面CNGG2011%The Recent Chinese Terrestrial Digital Height Datum Model. Gravimetric Quasi-Geoid CNGG2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建成

    2012-01-01

    回顾近20年来国内外国家局部大地水准面模型研究的概况和发展背景,采用Stokes-Helmert方法,计算了一个新的2′×2′中国重力和1985国家高程基准似大地水准面数值模型(CNGG2011),采用了100万余陆地重力数据和SRTM7.5″×7.5″地形高数据,以及649个B级GPS水准点数据。CNGG2011平均精度为±0.13m,东部地区±0.07m,西部地区±0.14m。各省区局部似大地水准面平均精度为±0.06m,东部为±0.05m,西部为士0.11m。西藏精度为±0.22m。并讨论重力大地水准面与GPS水准的关系,提出今后进一步精化我国高程基准大地水准面模型的构想。%The status and development background on the research of the local geoid of the world in the recent 20 years is reviewed in this paper. An updated 2′×2′ digital quasi-geoid model (CNGG201;) for the National Height Datum 1985 of China is computed by using Stokes-Helmert method. More than one million land gravity measurements, 7.5″×7.5″ digital elevation data from SRTM, and 649 order B GPS/leveling data are used in the computation of CNGG2011. The average accuracy ofCNGG2011 is±0.13m in China, and±0.07m and ±0.14m in eastern and western China, respectively. The average accuracy in each province is±0.06 m, and they are±0.05 m and±0.11 m in the East and the West of China respectively, and it is±0. 22 m in the Tibet area. The relationship between the gravimetric geoid and the GPS/leveling is also discussed and some strategies for geoid refinement in the future are also proposed for National Height Datum in China.

  17. Height Determination Techniques for the Next National Height System of Finland- A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, T.; Saaranen, V.; Kaartinen, H.; Poutanen, M.; Kukko, A.; Nyberg, S.

    2014-11-01

    Precise levelling is known for its accuracy and reliability in height determination, but the process itself is slow, laborious and expensive. FGI has started a project to develop methods for height determination that could decrease the creation time of national height systems without losing the required accuracy. In this pilot project, we studied precise levelling and alternative techniques: MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) and GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) levelling, which included static GPS (Global Positioning System) and VRS (Virtual Reference Station) measurements.We compared the techniques in a field test, where the height difference of two known benchmarks were measured. All of the height differences were within 16 mm from each other, where the results from the precise levelling and the GPS levelling differed from 0.5-1.0 mm. Results from the MLS measurements were more than 5.0 mm off from the others and the average of the VRS measurements was 10.0 mm off. The uncertainties are compatible with the results, since the largest RMS values were calculated from the MLS and the VRS measurements.This research highlighted the differences of the techniques, but none of them is yet to be abandoned. The study should be expanded into a larger scale to better evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the techniques.

  18. Concurrent Development of Model and Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Gravell, A; Augusto, J C; Ferreira, C; Gruner, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how a formal mathematically-based model can be used in support of evolutionary software development, and in particular how such a model can be kept consistent with the implementation as it changes to meet new requirements. A number of techniques are listed can make use of such a model to enhance the development process, and also ways to keep model and implementation consistent. The effectiveness of these techniques is investigated through two case studies concerning the development of small e-business applications, a travel agent and a mortgage broker. Some successes are reported, notably in the use of rapid throwaway modelling to investigate design alternatives, and also in the use of close team working and modelbased trace-checking to maintain synchronisation between model and implementation throughout the development. The main areas of weakness were seen to derive from deficiencies in tool support. Recommendations are therefore made for future improvements to tools supporting formal mo...

  19. Satellite images analysis for shadow detection and building height estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasis, Gregoris; Stavrou, Stavros

    2016-09-01

    Satellite images can provide valuable information about the presented urban landscape scenes to remote sensing and telecommunication applications. Obtaining information from satellite images is difficult since all the objects and their surroundings are presented with feature complexity. The shadows cast by buildings in urban scenes can be processed and used for estimating building heights. Thus, a robust and accurate building shadow detection process is important. Region-based active contour models can be used for satellite image segmentation. However, spectral heterogeneity that usually exists in satellite images and the feature similarity representing the shadow and several non-shadow regions makes building shadow detection challenging. In this work, a new automated method for delineating building shadows is proposed. Initially, spectral and spatial features of the satellite image are utilized for designing a custom filter to enhance shadows and reduce intensity heterogeneity. An effective iterative procedure using intensity differences is developed for tuning and subsequently selecting the most appropriate filter settings, able to highlight the building shadows. The response of the filter is then used for automatically estimating the radiometric property of the shadows. The customized filter and the radiometric feature are utilized to form an optimized active contour model where the contours are biased to delineate shadow regions. Post-processing morphological operations are also developed and applied for removing misleading artefacts. Finally, building heights are approximated using shadow length and the predefined or estimated solar elevation angle. Qualitative and quantitative measures are used for evaluating the performance of the proposed method for both shadow detection and building height estimation.

  20. Model Driven Development of Data Sensitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Petur

    2014-01-01

    Model-driven development strives to use formal artifacts during the development process. Formal artifacts enables automatic analyses of some aspects of the system under development. This serves to increase the understanding of the (intended) behavior of the system as well as increasing error...... detection and pushing error detection to earlier stages of development. The complexity of modeling and the size of systems which can be analyzed is severely limited when introducing data variables. The state space grows exponentially in the number of variable and the domain size of the variables...... to the values of variables. This theses strives to improve model-driven development of such data-sensitive systems. This is done by addressing three research questions. In the first we combine state-based modeling and abstract interpretation, in order to ease modeling of data-sensitive systems, while allowing...

  1. Faculty Development Using the Situational Leadership Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    The situational leadership model developed by Hersey and Blanchard is described, and the task-specific model is then applied to the four primary tasks of college faculty--teaching, research, community service, and institutional service. The model combines directive and supportive behavior as they are reflected in four distinctive leadership…

  2. The Nomad Model: Theory, Developments and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campanella, M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Daamen, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents details of the developments of the Nomad model after being introduced more than 12 years ago. The model is derived from a normative theory of pedestrian behavior making it unique under microscopic models. Nomad has been successfully applied in several cases indicating that it ful

  3. Countermovement strategy changes with vertical jump height to accommodate feasible force constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Park, Sukyung; Choi, Sangkyu

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we developed a curve-fit model of countermovement dynamics and examined whether the characteristics of a countermovement jump can be quantified using the model parameter and its scaling; we expected that the model-based analysis would facilitate an understanding of the basic mechanisms of force reduction and propulsion with a simplified framework of the center of mass (CoM) mechanics. Ten healthy young subjects jumped straight up to five different levels ranging from approximately 10% to 35% of their body heights. The kinematic and kinetic data on the CoM were measured using a force plate system synchronized with motion capture cameras. All subjects generated larger vertical forces compared with their body weights from the countermovement and sufficiently lowered their CoM position to support the work performed by push-off as the vertical elevations became more challenging. The model simulation reasonably reproduced the trajectories of vertical force during the countermovement, and the model parameters were replaced by linear and polynomial regression functions in terms of the vertical jump height. Gradual scaling trends of the individual model parameters were observed as a function of the vertical jump height with different degrees of scaling, depending on the subject. The results imply that the subjects may be aware of the jumping dynamics when subjected to various vertical jump heights and may select their countermovement strategies to effectively accommodate biomechanical constraints, i.e., limited force generation for the standing vertical jump. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods

  5. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.N. Minkman (Mirella)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated c

  6. S/P模式计算的冷却塔烟气抬升高度敏感性试验%Sensitivity test of uplifted height of flue gas from cooling tower based on S/P model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪斌; 刘玉彻; 汪宏宇; 邹旭东; 张云海

    2011-01-01

    德国VDI3784的S/P模式为三维流体动力学积分模式,其方程主要描述了无穷小体积元素的质量、动量、静态污染物质量浓度及能量的守恒。利用德国模式进行了冷却塔烟气排放不同参数、不同大气条件下烟气抬升高度的敏感性试验。结果表明:在影响烟气抬升高度的3个气象要素(风速、气温和湿度)中,风速和气温的变化对结果影响较大,而湿度影响较小。在D类稳定度,当环境风速从0.1 m/s增加到15.0 m/s时,抬升高度从711.7 m变为38.5 m。随着环境温度的升高,抬升高度明显单调变小;当稳定度为A类,环境温度从10升到40时,烟气抬升最大高度从688.9 m降低到45.1 m,降低了14倍多。而环境湿度的变化,对抬升高度的影响不是很明显。对于E类稳定度和F类稳定度,当环境湿度从20%增加到70%,最大抬升高度分别从115.3 m和84.6 m降到112.9 m和81.7 m,分别降低了3.43%和2.08%。在影响烟气抬升高度的其他3个因素(凉水塔直径、烟气出口速度和混合气体温度)中,混合气体温度的变化对结果影响较大,而凉水塔直径和烟气出口速度的影响较小。在各类稳定度条件下,当出口温度从20变到90时,烟气抬升高度增加1.2—13.3倍;在各类稳定度条件下,当凉水塔直径从30 m变到90 m,烟气抬升高度仅增加0.63—1.40倍;在各类稳定度条件下,当出口速度从2.5 m/s变到8.0 m/s,烟气抬升高度增加了0.24—0.74倍。%The S/P model from German VDI3784 is a three-dimensional liquid dynamic integral model.Mass and momentum of infinitesimal element,mass concentration of static pollutant and energy balance were described.The sensitivity of uplifted height of flue gas from cooling tower was tested by the S/P model under different parameters and atmospheric conditions.The results indicate that wind speed,air temperature and humidity could influence the uplifted height of flue gas,especially wind speed

  7. Potential change in forest types and stand heights in central Siberia in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchebakova, N. M.; Parfenova, E. I.; Korets, M. A.; Conard, S. G.

    2016-03-01

    Previous regional studies in Siberia have demonstrated climate warming and associated changes in distribution of vegetation and forest types, starting at the end of the 20th century. In this study we used two regional bioclimatic envelope models to simulate potential changes in forest types distribution and developed new regression models to simulate changes in stand height in tablelands and southern mountains of central Siberia under warming 21st century climate. Stand height models were based on forest inventory data (2850 plots). The forest type and stand height maps were superimposed to identify how heights would change in different forest types in future climates. Climate projections from the general circulation model Hadley HadCM3 for emission scenarios B1 and A2 for 2080s were paired with the regional bioclimatic models. Under the harsh A2 scenario, simulated changes included: a 80%-90% decrease in forest-tundra and tundra, a 30% decrease in forest area, a ˜400% increase in forest-steppe, and a 2200% increase in steppe, forest-steppe and steppe would cover 55% of central Siberia. Under sufficiently moist conditions, the southern and middle taiga were simulated to benefit from 21st century climate warming. Habitats suitable for highly-productive forests (≥30-40 m stand height) were simulated to increase at the expense of less productive forests (10-20 m). In response to the more extreme A2 climate the area of these highly-productive forests would increase 10%-25%. Stand height increases of 10 m were simulated over 35%-50% of the current forest area in central Siberia. In the extremely warm A2 climate scenario, the tall trees (25-30 m) would occur over 8%-12% of area in all forest types except forest-tundra by the end of the century. In forest-steppe, trees of 30-40 m may cover some 15% of the area under sufficient moisture.

  8. Model Oriented Approach for Industrial Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Drobintsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the specifics of a model oriented approach to software development based on the usage of Model Driven Architecture (MDA, Model Driven Software Development (MDSD and Model Driven Development (MDD technologies. Benefits of this approach usage in the software development industry are described. The main emphasis is put on the system design, automated code generation for large systems, verification, proof of system properties and reduction of bug density. Drawbacks of the approach are also considered. The approach proposed in the article is specific for industrial software systems development. These systems are characterized by different levels of abstraction, which is used on modeling and code development phases. The approach allows to detail the model to the level of the system code, at the same time store the verified model semantics and provide the checking of the whole detailed model. Steps of translating abstract data structures (including transactions, signals and their parameters into data structures used in detailed system implementation are presented. Also the grammar of a language for specifying rules of abstract model data structures transformation into real system detailed data structures is described. The results of applying the proposed method in the industrial technology are shown.The article is published in the authors’ wording.

  9. Modelagem e análise de um sistema de controle automático da altura de corte em colhedoras Modeling and analysis of an automatic control system for harvesting machine cutting height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Z. L. Rafull

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, desenvolveu-se um modelo de simulação para analisar a dinâmica de um sistema a fim de controlar automaticamente a altura de corte em colhedoras. Este modelo foi implementado com base nas equações diferenciais, que descrevem a dinâmica da plataforma de corte, o comportamento do sistema hidráulico e o controlador. O sistema de controle realimentado simulado foi constituído de uma célula de carga, destinada a medir a força de contato entre o solo e o mecanismo de corte, um controlador PID e um sistema hidráulico de atuação, composto de uma válvula proporcional direcional de quatro vias e um atuador. Analisou-se a influência da velocidade de deslocamento da máquina (1,0, 1,5 e 2,0 m s-1, da pressão de suprimento do sistema hidráulico (6,8, 13,7 e 20,6 MPa, da massa da plataforma (40, 60 e 80 kg e da força de contato de referência do controlador (200, 400 e 800 N no desempenho do sistema de controle. Os aumentos na pressão de suprimento, massa da plataforma e força de referência, proporcionaram melhores condições para o funcionamento do sistema de controle proposto.A simulation model to analyze the dynamics of a system to control automatically the cutting height in harvesters was developed. The model was developed using the differential equations that describe the dynamics of the cuttig platform, the behavior of the hydraulic system and the controller. The simulated feedback control system was composed by a load cell that measures the contact force between the soil and the cutting device, a feedback controller (PID and a hydraulic system with proportional directional four-way valve and actuator. The effect of the following variables in the controller performance was analyzed: speed of the cutting device (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 m s-1; pressure in the supply line of the hydraulic system (6.8, 13.7 and 20.6 MPa; ballast added in the cutting mechanism (40, 60 and 80 kg and the contact force between the cutting device and

  10. On Displacement Height, from Classical to Practical Formulation: Stress, Turbulent Transport and Vorticity Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Displacement height ( d) is an important parameter in the simple modelling of wind speed and vertical fluxes above vegetative canopies, such as forests. Here we show that, aside from implicit definition through a (displaced) logarithmic profile, accepted formulations for d do not consistently predict flow properties above a forest. Turbulent transport can affect the displacement height, and is an integral part of what is called the roughness sublayer. We develop a more general approach for estimation of d, through production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport, and show how previous stress-based formulations for displacement height can be seen as simplified cases of a more general definition including turbulent transport. Further, we also give a simplified and practical form for d that is in agreement with the general approach, exploiting the concept of vortex thickness scale from mixing-layer theory. We assess the new and previous displacement height formulations by using flow statistics derived from the atmospheric boundary-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model SCADIS as well as from wind-tunnel observations, for different vegetation types and flow regimes in neutral conditions. The new formulations tend to produce smaller d than stress-based forms, falling closer to the classic logarithmically-defined displacement height. The new, more generally defined, displacement height appears to be more compatible with profiles of components of the turbulent kinetic energy budget, accounting for the combined effects of turbulent transport and shear production. The Coriolis force also plays a role, introducing wind-speed dependence into the behaviour of the roughness sublayer; this affects the turbulent transport, shear production, stress, and wind speed, as well as the displacement height, depending on the character of the forest. We further show how our practical (`mixing-layer') form for d matches the new turbulence-based relation, as well as

  11. Estimating Vegetation Height and Bare-Earth Topography from SRTM Data using Fourier Spectral Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Liu, D.; Alsdorf, D.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, LiDAR vegetation topography (bare-earth + vegetation height), LiDAR bare-earth topography, the National Elevation Data (NED) set, and Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission (SRTM) measurements are used to develop a statistical model to explore the possibility of extracting vegetation height measurements and accurate high resolution bare-earth topography from SRTM data. The key innovation is to obtain the statistical signature of the vegetation height measurements in the Fourier domain by taking advantage of the well-known linearity in additive properties of the Fourier transform. We demonstrate that the power-law relationship, P(k) α k^(-β), as shown by the bare-earth topography, breaks down approximately at a cross-over wavenumber, k=k_c, due to the vegetation height effect using four different topographic and vegetation study locations in the United States. We document that the vegetation effect mainly dominates the high-frequency contents of the vegetation topography from 2-180 m, 1-60 m, and 1-70 m for the South Fork Eel River, California; Flathead Lake, Montana; and Tenderfoot Creek, Montana, LiDAR data, respectively, and from 1-240 m for 30 m SRTM data for the Jesup, Georgia site. Finally, we demonstrate our ability to obtain a high resolution bare-earth topography with RMSE of 9.6 m, 2.2 m, and 2.9 m and vegetation height with RMSE of 11.0 m (11% error), 4.5 m (12% error), and 1.6 m (8% error) for LiDAR data study sites, whereas for the SRTM data, bare-earth topography and vegetation height are obtained with RMSE values of 5.4 m and 3.1 m, respectively, for the Jesup site. Model Vegetation height

  12. and the CMJ jump height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The elastic potential energy accumulated in the musculotendinous units during the countermovement phase of a jump adds up to the energy supplied by the contracting muscles used in the take-off phase. Consequently, the total mechanical energy used during the jump may reach higher values. Stiffness represents a quantitative measure of a body’s elastic properties. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the relationship between leg stiffness and the countermovement jump height.

  13. Developing a Domain Model for Relay Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    the statics as well as the dynamics of relay circuits, i.e. how a relay circuit can be composed legally from electrical components as well as how the components may change state over time. Finally the circuit model is transformed into an executable model, and we show how a concrete circuit can be defined......In this paper we stepwise develop a domain model for relay circuits as used in railway control systems. First we provide an abstract, property-oriented model of networks consisting of components that can be glued together with connectors. This model is strongly inspired by a network model...... for railways madeby Bjørner et.al., however our model is more general: the components can be of any kind and can later be refined to e.g. railway components or circuit components. Then we show how the abstract network model can be refined into an explicit model for relay circuits. The circuit model describes...

  14. An Aristotelian Model of Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderse, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Despite the Aristotelian renaissance in the philosophy of education, the development of virtue has not received much attention. This is unfortunate, because an attempt to draft an Aristotelian model of moral development can help philosophers to evaluate the contribution Aristotelian virtue ethics can make to our understanding of moral development,…

  15. Model based development of engine control algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.J.; Sturm, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Model based development of engine control systems has several advantages. The development time and costs are strongly reduced because much of the development and optimization work is carried out by simulating both engine and control system. After optimizing the control algorithm it can be executed b

  16. A Career Roles Model of Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career development crystallizing in the acquisition of career…

  17. Modelling energy systems for developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R.M.J.; Moll, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries' energy use is rapidly increasing, which affects global climate change and global and regional energy settings. Energy models are helpful for exploring the future of developing and industrialised countries. However, energy systems of developing countries differ from those of ind

  18. Statistical distribution of nonlinear random wave height in shallow water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a statistical model of random wave,using Stokes wave theory of water wave dynamics,as well as a new nonlinear probability distribution function of wave height in shallow water.It is more physically logical to use the wave steepness of shallow water and the factor of shallow water as the parameters in the wave height distribution.The results indicate that the two parameters not only could be parameters of the distribution function of wave height but also could reflect the degree of wave height distribution deviation from the Rayleigh distribution.The new wave height distribution overcomes the problem of Rayleigh distribution that the prediction of big wave is overestimated and the general wave is underestimated.The prediction of small probability wave height value of new distribution is also smaller than that of Rayleigh distribution.The effect of wave steepness in shallow water is similar to that in deep water;but the factor of shallow water lowers the wave height distribution of the general wave with the reduced factor of wave steepness.It also makes the wave height distribution of shallow water more centralized.The results indicate that the new distribution fits the in situ measurements much better than other distributions.

  19. Assessment of planetary boundary layer and residual layer heights in the Northeastern U.S. using Lidar, a network of surface observations, and the WRF-STILT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Y.; Nehrkorn, T.; Hegarty, J. D.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E.; Sargent, M. R.; Decola, P.; Jones, T.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and residual layer (RL) are key requirements for forecasting air quality in cities and detecting transboundary air pollution events. This study combines information from a network of Mini Micropulse Lidar (MPL) instruments, the CALIOP satellite, meteorological and air pollution measuring sensors, and a particle-transport model to critically test mesoscale transport models at the regional level. Aerosol backscattering measurements were continuously taken with MPL units in various locations within the Northeastern U.S., between September 2012 to August 2015. Data is analyzed using wavelet covariance transforms and image processing techniques. Initial results for the city of Boston show a PBL growth rate between approx. 150 and 300 meters per hour, in the morning to early afternoon (~12-19 UTC). The RL was present throughout the night and day at approx. 1.3 to 2.0 km. Transboundary air pollution events were detected and quantified, and variations in concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols were also evaluated. Results were compared to information retrieved from Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model and the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model.

  20. Modeling of Schottky Barrier Height and Volt-Amper Characteristics for Transition Metal-solid Solution (SіC1 – x(AlNx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Altukhov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Proposed nonlinear defect concentration model of metal-semiconductor contact. It is shown that taking into account nonlinear dependence of the Fermi energy EF defect concentration leads to higher barrier Schottky in 15-25 %. Calculated Volt-Amper characteristics of the diodes are consistent with experiment.

  1. Development of a comprehensive weld process model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.; Paul, A.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC`s expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three-dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above.

  2. Effective Height Upper Bounds on Algebraic Tori

    CERN Document Server

    Habegger, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    The main emphasis will be on height upper bounds in the algebraic torus G^{n}_{m}. By height we will mean the absolute logarithmic Weil height. Section 3.2 contains a precise definition of this and other more general height functions. The first appendix gives a short overview of known results in the abelian case. The second appendix contains a few height bounds in Shimura varieties.

  3. Analysis and Development of Walking Algorithm Kinematic Model for 5-Degree of Freedom Bipedal Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Wahyudi Setiono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A design of walking diagram and the calculation of a bipedal robot have been developed. The bipedal robot was designed and constructed with several kinds of servo bracket for the legs, two feet and a hip. Each of the bipedal robot leg was 5-degrees of freedom, three pitches (hip joint, knee joint and ankle joint and two rolls (hip joint and ankle joint. The walking algorithm of this bipedal robot was based on the triangle formulation of cosine law to get the angle value at each joint. The hip height, height of the swinging leg and the step distance are derived based on linear equation. This paper discussed the kinematic model analysis and the development of the walking diagram of the bipedal robot. Kinematics equations were derived, the joint angles were simulated and coded into Arduino board to be executed to the robot.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF WATER CIRCULATION MODEL INCLUDING IRRIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuki, Shunji; Tanaka, Kenji; Kojiri, Toshiharu; Hamaguchi, Toshio

    It is well known that since agricultural water withdrawal has much affect on water circulation system, accurate analysis of river discharge or water balance are difficult with less regard for it. In this study, water circulation model composed of land surface model and distributed runoff model is proposed at 10km 10km resolution. In this model, irrigation water, which is estimated with land surface model, is introduced to river discharge analysis. The model is applied to the Chao Phraya River in Thailand, and reproduced seasonal water balance. Additionally, the discharge on dry season simulated with the model is improved as a result of including irrigation. Since the model, which is basically developed from global data sets, simulated seasonal change of river discharge, it can be suggested that our model has university to other river basins.

  5. An algorithm to estimate PBL heights from wind profiler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, A.; Salmun, H.

    2016-12-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from hourlyarchived wind profiler data from the NOAA Profiler Network (NPN) sites located throughoutthe central United States from the period 1992-2012. The long period of record allows ananalysis of climatological mean PBL heights as well as some estimates of year to yearvariability. Under clear conditions, summertime averaged hourly time series of PBL heightscompare well with Richardson-number based estimates at the few NPN stations with hourlytemperature measurements. Comparisons with clear sky MERRA estimates show that the windprofiler (WP) and the Richardson number based PBL heights are lower by approximately 250-500 m.The geographical distribution of daily maximum WP PBL heights corresponds well with theexpected distribution based on patterns of surface temperature and soil moisture. Windprofiler PBL heights were also estimated under mostly cloudy conditions, but the WP estimatesshow a smaller clear-cloudy condition difference than either of the other two PBL height estimates.The algorithm presented here is shown to provide a reliable summer, fall and springclimatology of daytime hourly PBL heights throughout the central United States. The reliabilityof the algorithm has prompted its use to obtain hourly PBL heights from other archived windprofiler data located throughout the world.

  6. Measuring perceived ceiling height in a visual comparison task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Castell, Christoph; Hecht, Heiko; Oberfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    When judging interior space, a dark ceiling is judged to be lower than a light ceiling. The method of metric judgments (e.g., on a centimetre scale) that has typically been used in such tasks may reflect a genuine perceptual effect or it may reflect a cognitively mediated impression. We employed a height-matching method in which perceived ceiling height had to be matched with an adjustable pillar, thus obtaining psychometric functions that allowed for an estimation of the point of subjective equality (PSE) and the difference limen (DL). The height-matching method developed in this paper allows for a direct visual match and does not require metric judgment. It has the added advantage of providing superior precision. Experiment 1 used ceiling heights between 2.90 m and 3.00 m. The PSE proved sensitive to slight changes in perceived ceiling height. The DL was about 3% of the physical ceiling height. Experiment 2 found similar results for lower (2.30 m to 2.50 m) and higher (3.30 m to 3.50 m) ceilings. In Experiment 3, we additionally varied ceiling lightness (light grey vs. dark grey). The height matches showed that the light ceiling appeared significantly higher than the darker ceiling. We therefore attribute the influence of ceiling lightness on perceived ceiling height to a direct perceptual rather than a cognitive effect.

  7. Modeling Internet Diffusion in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott McCoy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing importance of the Internet, there is little work that addresses the degree to which the models and theories of Internet diffusion in developed countries can be applied to Internet diffusion in developing countries. This paper presents the first attempt to address this issue through theory driven modeling of Internet diffusion. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that economic development and technology infrastructure are musts for Internet diffusion. Interestingly, users’ cognition and government policies can accelerate Internet diffusion only after a certain level of human rights has been reached in a developing country.

  8. Continuous Competence Development Model for Teacher Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2014-01-01

    "This paper presents the development of the IT‐Pedagogical Think Tank for Teacher Teams (ITP4T), a continuous competence development model. The model was co‐designed following a design‐based research approach with teachers from VUC Storstrøm’s (VUC) Global Classroom (GC), an innovative hybrid...... synchronous videoconference concept (Weitze & Ørngreen 2014). The ITP4T model responds to the needs and challenges that the teachers and the organization in VUC’s GC are experiencing in the new technological teaching environment. Ultimately, it aims to create a new practise for teachers, enabling them...... to create their own continuous competence development. This article describes how and why the different components of the model were developed in response to the teachers’ challenges. Such challenges included lack of time, competence and support from the educational organisation to innovate learning design...

  9. Network Models for Cognitive Development and Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Han L J VanDer; Kees-Jan Kan; Maarten Marsman; Claire E Stevenson

    2017-01-01

    ... (dimensionality of individual differences). The welcome integration of the two fields requires the construction of mechanistic models of cognition and cognitive development that explain key phenomena in individual differences research...

  10. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  11. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  12. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  13. Developing Fast and Reliable Flood Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Cecilie; Toke, Jens; Borup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art flood modelling in urban areas are based on distributed physically based models. However, their usage is impeded by high computational demands and numerical instabilities, which make calculations both difficult and time consuming. To address these challenges we develop and test...... is modelled by response surface surrogates, which are empirical data driven models. These are trained using the volume-discharge relations by piecewise linear functions. (ii) The surface flooding is modelled by lower-fidelity physically based surrogates, which are based on surface depressions and flow paths....... A surrogate model is set up for a case study area in Aarhus, Denmark, to replace a MIKE FLOOD model. The drainage surrogates are able to reproduce the MIKE URBAN results for a set of rain inputs. The coupled drainage-surface surrogate model lacks details in the surface description which reduces its overall...

  14. MODELS OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borma Afrodita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Third year PhD candidate at the University of Oradea, under the guidance of Professor Mrs. Alina Bădulescu in the doctoral research project entitled: "Doctoral studies and Ph.D. candidates for competitive research on a knowledge based society", a co-financed project by the European Social Fund through the Sectoral Operational Program for Human Resources Development 2007 - 2013, Priority Axis 1. "Education and training in support for growth and development of a knowledge based society" I chose to present this subject in order to demonstrate the connection that exists between tourism and regional development. Having as research topic "Tourism and development in the Euro regional context” I felt it would be appropriate to devote a subchapter in presenting the impact of tourism in regional development. Thus I have analysed a number of specialised papers found at national and international level in order to achieve a synthesis on the approached topic. Authors such as Williams and Shaw (1991, Sharma (2004, Keskin and Cansiz (2010 were concerned with presenting the positive aspects of tourism in regional development. Condes (2004 presents on one hand the secrets regarding success in matter of tourist development, and on the other side he presents the possible risks that follow the development of tourism in a country / region (Condes 2004. Following the gathered information we found that indeed tourism plays an important role in regional development. The used research methodology consisted in using specialised literature in order to identify some models that illustrate the potential success of tourism in regional development. The space-temporal development model of tourism proposed by Opperman (1993, although it was developed at national level represents a useful tool in illustrating the potential success of tourism in regional development. Miossec's model (Sharma 2004:300 describes the structural evolution of touristic regions in

  15. Encounter Probability of Individual Wave Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Z.; Burcharth, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    wave height corresponding to a certain exceedence probability within a structure lifetime (encounter probability), based on the statistical analysis of long-term extreme significant wave height. Then the design individual wave height is calculated as the expected maximum individual wave height...... associated with the design significant wave height, with the assumption that the individual wave heights follow the Rayleigh distribution. However, the exceedence probability of such a design individual wave height within the structure lifetime is unknown. The paper presents a method for the determination...... of the design individual wave height corresponding to an exceedence probability within the structure lifetime, given the long-term extreme significant wave height. The method can also be applied for estimation of the number of relatively large waves for fatigue analysis of constructions....

  16. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  17. Regulation mechanisms in spatial stochastic development models

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelshtein, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze different regulation mechanisms in spatial continuous stochastic development models. We describe the density behavior for models with global mortality and local establishment rates. We prove that the local self-regulation via a competition mechanism (density dependent mortality) may suppress a unbounded growth of the averaged density if the competition kernel is superstable.

  18. Etymological study of Wuthering Heights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张倩; 张露

    2013-01-01

    In Wuthering Heights, the main characters and places have been delicately designed and cautiously named, which have their special implications based on the characters’identity, status and personalities or the features of the places. Therefore, through analyzing the implied meanings of the characters and place names in this novel, this essay illustrates that the author pur-posefully failed Heathcliff’s revenge. Meanwhile, the theme of this novel-Emily’s ultimate concern for the social inequality-is naturally exposed to the reader.

  19. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This model describes the primary quality management methods which may be used to assess an organization's present strengths and weaknesses with regard to its use of quality management methods. This model ...

  20. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained.

  1. Suitability of Modern Software Development Methodologies for Model Driven Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Picek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As an answer to today’s growing challenges in software industry, wide spectrum of new approaches of software development has occurred. One prominent direction is currently most promising software development paradigm called Model Driven Development (MDD. Despite a lot of skepticism and problems, MDD paradigm is being used and improved to accomplish many inherent potential benefits. In the methodological approach of software development it is necessary to use some kind of development process. Modern methodologies can be classified into two main categories: formal or heavyweight and agile or lightweight. But when it is a question about MDD and development process for MDD, currently known methodologies are very poor or better said they don't have any explanation of MDD process. As the result of research, in this paper, author examines the possibilities of using existing modern software methodologies in context of MDD paradigm.

  2. Developing modelling lenses among practicing teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awawdeh Shahbari, Juhaina; Tabach, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Growing awareness of the importance of modelling activities in mathematics education has raised the question of whether teachers are prepared to facilitate the engagement of students in such activities. The current study investigates the effects of how teachers cope with modelling activities in developing their abilities to identify modelling cycles. The research was conducted among 34 practicing teachers studying for master's degrees at a college of education. The data were collected from two reports and one reflection provided by the participants about a modelling activity conducted by a group of five sixth-grade students. The first report was submitted before the participants themselves dealt with the modelling activities, while the second report and the reflection were submitted after their participation in the modelling activities. The findings indicate that prior to participating in the activity most of the teachers described the students' participation in modelling activity as a linear process. The participating teachers noticed the final mathematical model and the mathematical results obtained from applying the model, but most of them ignored the realistic results, the validating process and the cyclical nature of the mathematical model's progress. However, after the practicing teachers participated in modelling activities as learners, their reports indicated that most were able to recognize all the modelling phases and to distinguish the cyclical processes of the progress of the mathematical models. Moreover, according to the analyses of the reflections, the participating teachers are aware of the changes in their descriptions.

  3. A career roles model of career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career develo

  4. A career roles model of career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career

  5. Conceptualizing Evolving Models of Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kym; Gosling, David; Sorcinelli, Mary Deane

    2010-01-01

    Educational development, which the authors use to refer to the field of professional and strategic development associated with university and college learning and teaching, can be described in many ways by referring to its different aspects. In this article the authors endeavor to categorize many of the models that have been used to describe…

  6. A career roles model of career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career develo

  7. BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pshunetlev A. A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains basic assumptions of the region sustainable economic development model, which can be used to gain new knowledge about economic processes, contribute to the stability of the regional development, as well as serve as an educational tool in the study of relevant disciplines

  8. MODEL DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT OF ONLINE BANKING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresfelean Vasile Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In case of online applications the cycle of software development varies from the routine. The online environment, the variety of users, the treatability of the mass of information created by them, the reusability and the accessibility from different devices are all factors of these systems complexity. The use of model drive approach brings several advantages that ease up the development process. Working prototypes that simplify client relationship and serve as the base of model tests can be easily made from models describing the system. These systems make possible for the banks clients to make their desired actions from anywhere. The user has the possibility of accessing information or making transactions.

  9. Development and Integration of Control System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.

    1998-01-01

    The computer simulation tool, TREETOPS, has been upgraded and used at NASA/MSFC to model various complicated mechanical systems and to perform their dynamics and control analysis with pointing control systems. A TREETOPS model of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-1) dynamics and control system was developed to evaluate the AXAF-I pointing performance for Normal Pointing Mode. An optical model of Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) was also developed and its optical performance analysis was done using the MACOS software.

  10. Determination of time- and height-resolved volcanic ash emissions and their use for quantitative ash dispersion modeling: the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The April–May, 2010 volcanic eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland caused significant economic and social disruption in Europe whilst state of the art measurements and ash dispersion forecasts were heavily criticized by the aviation industry. Here we demonstrate for the first time that large improvements can be made in quantitative predictions of the fate of volcanic ash emissions, by using an inversion scheme that couples a priori source information and the output of a Lagrangian dispersion model with satellite data to estimate the volcanic ash source strength as a function of altitude and time. From the inversion, we obtain a total fine ash emission of the eruption of 8.3 ± 4.2 Tg for particles in the size range of 2.8–28 μm diameter. We evaluate the results of our model results with a posteriori ash emissions using independent ground-based, airborne and space-borne measurements both in case studies and statistically. Subsequently, we estimate the area over Europe affected by volcanic ash above certain concentration thresholds relevant for the aviation industry. We find that during three episodes in April and May, volcanic ash concentrations at some altitude in the atmosphere exceeded the limits for the "Normal" flying zone in up to 14 % (6–16 %, 2 % (1–3 % and 7 % (4–11 %, respectively, of the European area. For a limit of 2 mg m−3 only two episodes with fractions of 1.5 % (0.2–2.8 % and 0.9 % (0.1–1.6 % occurred, while the current "No-Fly" zone criterion of 4 mg m−3 was rarely exceeded. Our results have important ramifications for determining air space closures and for real-time quantitative estimations of ash concentrations. Furthermore, the general nature of our method yields better constraints on the distribution and fate of volcanic ash in the Earth system.

  11. Whole-Genome Analyses of lung function, height and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sorensen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A joint analysis of FEV1 (forced expiratory volume after one second) and height is reported using novel methodology, as well as a single-trait analysis of smoking status. A first goal of the study was to incorporate dense genetic marker information in a random regression (Bayesian) model...... to quantify the relative contributions of genomic and environmental factors to the relationship between FEV1 and height. Smoking status was analysed using a probit random regression model and a second goal of the study was to estimate the genomic heritability of smoking status. Estimates of genomic...... heritabilities for height and FEV1 are equal to 0.47 and to 0.30, respectively. The estimates of the genomic and environmental correlations between height and FEV1 are 0.78 and 0.34, respectively. The posterior mean of the genomic heritability of smoking status is equal to 0.14 and provides evidence...

  12. The role of sample height in the stacking diagram of colloidal mixtures under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geigenfeind, Thomas; de las Heras, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Bulk phase separation is responsible for the occurrence of stacks of different layers in sedimentation of colloidal mixtures. A recently proposed theory (de las Heras and Schmidt 2013 Soft Matter 9 8636) establishes a unique connection between the bulk phase behaviour and sedimentation-diffusion-equilibrium. The theory constructs a stacking diagram of all possible sequences of stacks under gravity in the limit of very high (infinite) sample heights. Here, we study the stacking diagrams of colloidal mixtures at finite sample height, h. We demonstrate that h plays a vital role in sedimentation-diffusion-equilibrium of colloidal mixtures. The region of the stacking diagram occupied by a given sequence of stacks depends on h. Hence, two samples with different heights but identical colloidal concentrations can develop different stacking sequences. In addition, the stacking diagrams for different heights can be qualitatively different since some stacking sequences occur only in a given interval of sample heights. We use the theory to investigate the stacking diagrams of both model bulk systems and mixtures of patchy particles that differ either by the number or by the types of patches.

  13. Testing Strategies for Model-Based Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Whalen, Mike; Rajan, Ajitha; Miller, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an approach for testing artifacts generated in a model-based development process. This approach divides the traditional testing process into two parts: requirements-based testing (validation testing) which determines whether the model implements the high-level requirements and model-based testing (conformance testing) which determines whether the code generated from a model is behaviorally equivalent to the model. The goals of the two processes differ significantly and this report explores suitable testing metrics and automation strategies for each. To support requirements-based testing, we define novel objective requirements coverage metrics similar to existing specification and code coverage metrics. For model-based testing, we briefly describe automation strategies and examine the fault-finding capability of different structural coverage metrics using tests automatically generated from the model.

  14. Development of a working Hovercraft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, S. H. Mohamed; Syam, K.; Jaafar, A. A.; Mohamad Sharif, M. F.; Ghazali, M. R.; Ibrahim, W. I.; Atan, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the development process to fabricate a working hovercraft model. The purpose of this study is to design and investigate of a fully functional hovercraft, based on the studies that had been done. The different designs of hovercraft model had been made and tested but only one of the models is presented in this paper. In this thesis, the weight, the thrust, the lift and the drag force of the model had been measured and the electrical and mechanical parts are also presented. The processing unit of this model is Arduino Uno by using the PSP2 (Playstation 2) as the controller. Since our prototype should be functioning on all kind of earth surface, our model also had been tested in different floor condition. They include water, grass, cement and tile. The Speed of the model is measured in every case as the respond variable, Current (I) as the manipulated variable and Voltage (V) as the constant variable.

  15. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Organization (NATO) Sensors Electronics Technology (SET)-227 Panel on Cognitive Radar. The FAR M&S architecture developed in Phase I allows for...Air Force’s previously developed radar M&S tools. This report is organized as follows. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the FAR framework...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0074 FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT Kristine L. Bell and Anthony Kellems Metron, Inc

  16. An Interactive Whiteboard Model Survey: Reliable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bih-Yaw Shih

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications and practices of interactive whiteboards (IWBs in school learning is important focus and development trend for developmented countries in recent years. There are rare researches and discussions about IWB teaching materials for course teaching and teaching effectiveness. As for the aspect of academic studies, there is more practical teaching sharing for subjects such as language learning, mathematical learning and physical science learning; however, it is rarely seen empirical research on the application of IWB for educational acceptances of interactive whiteboards. Based on its imporatances, we summarize previous literatures to establish a theoretical model for interactive whiteboards (IWBs. Variables in this model are then discussed to find out the interaction between each other. The contribution of the study develops an innovative model for educational acceptances of interactive whiteboards using hybrid TAM, ECM, and Flow models.

  17. Modelling the canopy development of bambara groundnut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunaratne, A.S.; Azam-Ali, S.N.; Al-Shareef, I.

    2010-01-01

    and drought stress. The leaf area expansion is calculated as a function of leaf number and individual leaf size. The canopy development of bambara groundnut is modelled (and tested) in BAMGRO model by means of leaf initiation and leaf area expansion and branching and stem production are not considered. Nash......Canopy development of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) is affected by temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiod. The quantification of these documented effects by means of a suitable crop model, BAMGRO is presented in this paper. Data on canopy development from five growth...... chamber, four glasshouse and three field experiments were analyzed to calibrate and validate the BAMGRO model to produce simulations for temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiodic effect on two contrasting landraces; Uniswa Red (Swaziland) and S19-3 (Namibia). The daily initiation rate of new...

  18. SWOT Analysis of Software Development Process Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish B. Sasankar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Software worth billions and trillions of dollars have gone waste in the past due to lack of proper techniques used for developing software resulting into software crisis. Historically , the processes of software development has played an important role in the software engineering. A number of life cycle models have been developed in last three decades. This paper is an attempt to Analyze the software process model using SWOT method. The objective is to identify Strength ,Weakness ,Opportunities and Threats of Waterfall, Spiral, Prototype etc.

  19. The influence of vegetation height heterogeneity on forest and woodland bird species richness across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiongyu; Swatantran, Anu; Dubayah, Ralph; Goetz, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    Avian diversity is under increasing pressures. It is thus critical to understand the ecological variables that contribute to large scale spatial distribution of avian species diversity. Traditionally, studies have relied primarily on two-dimensional habitat structure to model broad scale species richness. Vegetation vertical structure is increasingly used at local scales. However, the spatial arrangement of vegetation height has never been taken into consideration. Our goal was to examine the efficacies of three-dimensional forest structure, particularly the spatial heterogeneity of vegetation height in improving avian richness models across forested ecoregions in the U.S. We developed novel habitat metrics to characterize the spatial arrangement of vegetation height using the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset for the year 2000 (NBCD). The height-structured metrics were compared with other habitat metrics for statistical association with richness of three forest breeding bird guilds across Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes: a broadly grouped woodland guild, and two forest breeding guilds with preferences for forest edge and for interior forest. Parametric and non-parametric models were built to examine the improvement of predictability. Height-structured metrics had the strongest associations with species richness, yielding improved predictive ability for the woodland guild richness models (r(2) = ∼ 0.53 for the parametric models, 0.63 the non-parametric models) and the forest edge guild models (r(2) = ∼ 0.34 for the parametric models, 0.47 the non-parametric models). All but one of the linear models incorporating height-structured metrics showed significantly higher adjusted-r2 values than their counterparts without additional metrics. The interior forest guild richness showed a consistent low association with height-structured metrics. Our results suggest that height heterogeneity, beyond canopy height alone, supplements habitat characterization and

  20. The influence of vegetation height heterogeneity on forest and woodland bird species richness across the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongyu Huang

    Full Text Available Avian diversity is under increasing pressures. It is thus critical to understand the ecological variables that contribute to large scale spatial distribution of avian species diversity. Traditionally, studies have relied primarily on two-dimensional habitat structure to model broad scale species richness. Vegetation vertical structure is increasingly used at local scales. However, the spatial arrangement of vegetation height has never been taken into consideration. Our goal was to examine the efficacies of three-dimensional forest structure, particularly the spatial heterogeneity of vegetation height in improving avian richness models across forested ecoregions in the U.S. We developed novel habitat metrics to characterize the spatial arrangement of vegetation height using the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset for the year 2000 (NBCD. The height-structured metrics were compared with other habitat metrics for statistical association with richness of three forest breeding bird guilds across Breeding Bird Survey (BBS routes: a broadly grouped woodland guild, and two forest breeding guilds with preferences for forest edge and for interior forest. Parametric and non-parametric models were built to examine the improvement of predictability. Height-structured metrics had the strongest associations with species richness, yielding improved predictive ability for the woodland guild richness models (r(2 = ∼ 0.53 for the parametric models, 0.63 the non-parametric models and the forest edge guild models (r(2 = ∼ 0.34 for the parametric models, 0.47 the non-parametric models. All but one of the linear models incorporating height-structured metrics showed significantly higher adjusted-r2 values than their counterparts without additional metrics. The interior forest guild richness showed a consistent low association with height-structured metrics. Our results suggest that height heterogeneity, beyond canopy height alone, supplements habitat

  1. Development of NASA's Models and Simulations Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, William J.; Zang, Thomas A.; Steele, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    From the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation, there were several NASA-wide actions that were initiated. One of these actions was to develop a standard for development, documentation, and operation of Models and Simulations. Over the course of two-and-a-half years, a team of NASA engineers, representing nine of the ten NASA Centers developed a Models and Simulation Standard to address this action. The standard consists of two parts. The first is the traditional requirements section addressing programmatics, development, documentation, verification, validation, and the reporting of results from both the M&S analysis and the examination of compliance with this standard. The second part is a scale for evaluating the credibility of model and simulation results using levels of merit associated with 8 key factors. This paper provides an historical account of the challenges faced by and the processes used in this committee-based development effort. This account provides insights into how other agencies might approach similar developments. Furthermore, we discuss some specific applications of models and simulations used to assess the impact of this standard on future model and simulation activities.

  2. Development of a Permafrost Modeling Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Jafarov, E. E.; Piper, M.; Schaefer, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost is seen as an essential Arctic climate indicator, and feedback of thawing permafrost to the global climate system through the impacts on the global carbon cycle remain an important research topic. Observations can assess the current state of permafrost, but models are eventually essential to make predictions of future permafrost extent. The purpose of our project, which we call PermaModel, is to develop an easy-to-access and comprehensive cyberinfrastructure aimed at promoting and improving permafrost modeling. The PermaModel Integrated Modeling Toolbox (IMT) includes three permafrost models of increasing complexity. The IMT will be housed within the existing cyberinfrastructure of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS), and made publically accessible through the CSDMS Web Modeling Tool (WMT). The WMT will provide easy online access to students, scientists, and stakeholders who want to use permafrost models, but lack the expertise. We plan to include multiple sets of sample inputs, representing a variety of conditions and locations, to enable immediate use of the IMT. We present here the first permafrost model, which is envisioned to be the most suitable for teaching purposes. The model promotes understanding of a 1D heat equation and permafrost active layer dynamics under monthly temperature/climate drivers in an online environment. Modeling labs are presented through the CSDMS Educational Repository and we solicit feedback from faculty for further design of these resources.

  3. DEVELOPING A COMPLEX MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Arabska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Common agricultural policy oriented towards balanced regional development and built in accordance with the overall strategic objectives for 2014-2020, puts forward goals for food safety, the application of technologies friendly to natural resources, accenting on the development of organic sector using production methods that are the most closely focused on the environment and health of animals and humans through the application of which can be answered fully to the regulatory requirements in this area. This report presents the results of a study in the dissertation "Approaches and instruments for sustainable rural development" of conditions, opportunities and challenges for organic production, considering current issues in the development and management of organic production in Bulgaria in response to current development trends imposed as a result of globalization and urbanization in connection with the pursuit of sustainable development and transfer of innovation. On one hand it underlines the contribution of organic farming to preservation of natural resources, environmental components (soil, water, biodiversity and landscape and welfare of animals - ecologically sustainable development. On the other hand, it shows the great potential of the sector to achieve sustainable economic and social growth and contribution to sustainable rural development. Scientific and applied contributions of this study are derived from the proposed comprehensive model for sustainable rural development by encouraging the development and improvement of management in organic production in accordance with the defined spheres of influence on different levels of management, including several key elements.

  4. Modeling socioeconomic status effects on language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S C; Forrester, Neil A; Ronald, Angelica

    2013-12-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important environmental predictor of language and cognitive development, but the causal pathways by which it operates are unclear. We used a computational model of development to explore the adequacy of manipulations of environmental information to simulate SES effects in English past-tense acquisition, in a data set provided by Bishop (2005). To our knowledge, this is the first application of computational models of development to SES. The simulations addressed 3 new challenges: (a) to combine models of development and individual differences in a single framework, (b) to expand modeling to the population level, and (c) to implement both environmental and genetic/intrinsic sources of individual differences. The model succeeded in capturing the qualitative patterns of regularity effects in both population performance and the predictive power of SES that were observed in the empirical data. The model suggested that the empirical data are best captured by relatively wider variation in learning abilities and relatively narrow variation in (and good quality of) environmental information. There were shortcomings in the model's quantitative fit, which are discussed. The model made several novel predictions, with respect to the influence of SES on delay versus giftedness, the change of SES effects over development, and the influence of SES on children of different ability levels (gene-environment interactions). The first of these predictions was that SES should reliably predict gifted performance in children but not delayed performance, and the prediction was supported by the Bishop data set. Finally, the model demonstrated limits on the inferences that can be drawn about developmental mechanisms on the basis of data from individual differences. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Developing a Model for Continuous Professional Development by Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Susan; Rainford, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the work of two teacher educators with an in-service science teacher. This case study forms one cycle of a larger action research study that will eventually lead to a model of how the third-space concept for teacher professional development can be realized in natural school settings. The case study took place in…

  6. DEVELOPMENT MODEL OF UNDER DEVELOPED SMALL ISLAND IN SUMENEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarti Sudarti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to build a Geographic Information System and Management Information System models of development of small islands in Sumenep. Based on the identification of economic potential there are few regions such as Nonggunong, Gayam, Ra'as, and Sapeken which have large contribution toward the rice plant production. The whole districts of the islands in Sumenep are the base of cow, horse, chicken and livestock commodities. Sapeken have significant contribution for marine fish. Giligenting, Nonggunong, Gayam, and Arjasa have large potential for brackish fish. Moreover, Gili-genting also has a great contribution for fresh fish.Keywords: Development model, under-developed area, small islandsJEL classification numbers: O13, O14

  7. Estimation of Volcanic Ash Plume Top Height using AATSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Timo; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriguez, Edith; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The AATSR Correlation Method (ACM) height estimation algorithm is presented. The algorithm uses Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) satellite data to detect volcanic ash plumes and to estimate the plume top height. The height estimate is based on the stereo-viewing capability of the AATSR instrument, which allows to determine the parallax between the satellite's 55° forward and nadir views, and thus the corresponding height. Besides the stereo view, AATSR provides another advantage compared to other satellite based instruments. With AATSR it is possible to detect ash plumes using brightness temperature difference between thermal infrared (TIR) channels centered at 11 and 12 µm. The automatic ash detection makes the algorithm efficient in processing large quantities of data: the height estimate is calculated only for the ash-flagged pixels. In addition, it is possible to study the effect of using different wavelengths in the height estimate, ranging from visible (555 nm) to thermal infrared (12 µm). The ACM algorithm can be applied to the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR), scheduled for launch at the end of 2015. Accurate information on the volcanic ash position is important for air traffic safety. The ACM algorithm can provide valuable data of both horizontal and vertical ash dispersion. These data may be useful for comparisons with existing volcanic ash dispersion models and retrieval methods. We present ACM plume top height estimate results for the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, and comparisons against available ground based and satellite observations.

  8. Global patterns and determinants of forest canopy height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengli; Guo, Qinghua; Li, Chao; Wang, Zhiheng; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-12-01

    Forest canopy height is an important indicator of forest biomass, species diversity, and other ecosystem functions; however, the climatic determinants that underlie its global patterns have not been fully explored. Using satellite LiDAR-derived forest canopy heights and field measurements of the world's giant trees, combined with climate indices, we evaluated the global patterns and determinants of forest canopy height. The mean canopy height was highest in tropical regions, but tall forests (>50 m) occur at various latitudes. Water availability, quantified by the difference between annual precipitation and annual potential evapotranspiration (P-PET), was the best predictor of global forest canopy height, which supports the hydraulic limitation hypothesis. However, in striking contrast with previous studies, the canopy height exhibited a hump-shaped curve along a gradient of P-PET: it initially increased, then peaked at approximately 680 mm of P-PET, and finally declined, which suggests that excessive water supply negatively affects the canopy height. This trend held true across continents and forest types, and it was also validated using forest inventory data from China and the United States. Our findings provide new insights into the climatic controls of the world's giant trees and have important implications for forest management and improvement of forest growth models.

  9. Properties of Star Clusters - II: Scale Height Evolution of Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Buckner, Anne S M

    2014-01-01

    Until now it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scale height evolves beyond 1Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here we establish a novel method to determine the scale height of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scale height with a 25% accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scale height, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC), Dias et al. (DAML02), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR). We identify a linear relationship between scale height and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scale height increases from about 40pc at 1Myr to 75pc at 1Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scale height linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550pc at 3.5Gyr. The most likely...

  10. Guiana Highlands, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Doyle's 1912 best-seller 'The Lost World.'Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.Location: 0.2 South to 8.7 degrees North latitude, 60 to 67.9 degrees West longitude Orientation: North toward the top Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM30 and GTOPO30 elevation models Data Resolution: SRTM 30 arcsecond (about 928 meters or 1496 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 for SRTM

  11. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  12. Development of Ensemble Model Based Water Demand Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun-Han; So, Byung-Jin; Kim, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Byung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, Smart Water Grid (SWG) concept has globally emerged over the last decade and also gained significant recognition in South Korea. Especially, there has been growing interest in water demand forecast and optimal pump operation and this has led to various studies regarding energy saving and improvement of water supply reliability. Existing water demand forecasting models are categorized into two groups in view of modeling and predicting their behavior in time series. One is to consider embedded patterns such as seasonality, periodicity and trends, and the other one is an autoregressive model that is using short memory Markovian processes (Emmanuel et al., 2012). The main disadvantage of the abovementioned model is that there is a limit to predictability of water demands of about sub-daily scale because the system is nonlinear. In this regard, this study aims to develop a nonlinear ensemble model for hourly water demand forecasting which allow us to estimate uncertainties across different model classes. The proposed model is consist of two parts. One is a multi-model scheme that is based on combination of independent prediction model. The other one is a cross validation scheme named Bagging approach introduced by Brieman (1996) to derive weighting factors corresponding to individual models. Individual forecasting models that used in this study are linear regression analysis model, polynomial regression, multivariate adaptive regression splines(MARS), SVM(support vector machine). The concepts are demonstrated through application to observed from water plant at several locations in the South Korea. Keywords: water demand, non-linear model, the ensemble forecasting model, uncertainty. Acknowledgements This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Projects for Developing Eco-Innovation Technologies (GT-11-G-02-001-6)

  13. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-08-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  14. Comparison of Methods of Height Anomaly Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurova, E.; Lapshin, A.; Menshova, A.

    2012-04-01

    As of today, accurate determination of height anomaly is one of the most difficult problems of geodesy, even with sustainable perfection of mathematical methods, computer possibilities. The most effective methods of height anomaly computation are based on the methods of discrete linear transformations, such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Fast Wavelet Transform (FWT). The main drawback of the classical FFT is weak localization in the time domain. If it is necessary to define the time interval of a frequency presence the STFT is used that allows one to detect the presence of any frequency signal and the interval of its presence. It expands the possibilities of the method in comparison with the classical Fourier Transform. However, subject to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, it is impossible to tell precisely what frequency signal is present at a given moment of time (it is possible to speak only about the range of frequencies); and it is impossible to tell at what precisely moment of time the frequency signal is present (it is possible to speak only about a time span). A wavelet-transform gives the chance to reduce the influence of the Heisenberg's uncertainty principle on the obtained time-and-frequency representation of the signal. With its help low frequencies have more detailed representation relative to the time, and high frequencies - relative to the frequency. The paper summarizes the results of height anomaly calculations done by the FFT, STFT, FWT methods and represents 3-D models of calculation results. Key words: Fast Fourier Transform(FFT), Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Fast Wavelet Transform(FWT), Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.

  15. Forest canopy height estimation using double-frequency repeat pass interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamvasis, Kleanthis; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made in order to assess forest stand parameters from remote sensing data, as a mean to estimate the above-ground carbon stock of forests in the context of the Kyoto protocol. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques have gained traction in last decade as a viable technology for vegetation parameter estimation. Many works have shown that forest canopy height, which is a critical parameter for quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle, can be estimated with InSAR. However, research is still needed to understand further the interaction of SAR signals with forest canopy and to develop an operational method for forestry applications. This work discusses the use of repeat pass interferometry with ALOS PALSAR (L band) HH polarized and COSMO Skymed (X band) HH polarized acquisitions over the Taxiarchis forest (Chalkidiki, Greece), in order to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) and estimate canopy height with interferometric processing. The effect of wavelength-dependent penetration depth into the canopy is known to be strong, and could potentially lead to forest canopy height mapping using dual-wavelength SAR interferometry at X- and L-band. The method is based on scattering phase center separation at different wavelengths. It involves the generation of a terrain elevation model underneath the forest canopy from repeat-pass L-band InSAR data as well as the generation of a canopy surface elevation model from repeat pass X-band InSAR data. The terrain model is then used to remove the terrain component from the repeat pass interferometric X-band elevation model, so as to enable the forest canopy height estimation. The canopy height results were compared to a field survey with 6.9 m root mean square error (RMSE). The effects of vegetation characteristics, SAR incidence angle and view geometry, and terrain slope on the accuracy of the results have also been studied in this work.

  16. Preform Characterization in VARTM Process Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hubert, Pascal; Loos, Alfred C.; Kellen, Charles B.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) is a Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) process where both resin injection and fiber compaction are achieved under pressures of 101.3 kPa or less. Originally developed over a decade ago for marine composite fabrication, VARTM is now considered a viable process for the fabrication of aerospace composites (1,2). In order to optimize and further improve the process, a finite element analysis (FEA) process model is being developed to include the coupled phenomenon of resin flow, preform compaction and resin cure. The model input parameters are obtained from resin and fiber-preform characterization tests. In this study, the compaction behavior and the Darcy permeability of a commercially available carbon fabric are characterized. The resulting empirical model equations are input to the 3- Dimensional Infiltration, version 5 (3DINFILv.5) process model to simulate infiltration of a composite panel.

  17. Counting Young Tableaux of Bounded Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Francois; Gascon, Francis

    2000-03-01

    We show that formulas of Gessel, for the generating functions for Young standard tableaux of height bounded by k (see [2]), satisfy linear differential equations, with polynomial coefficients, equivalent to P-recurrences conjectured by Favreau, Krob and the first author (see [1]) for the number of bounded height tableaux and pairs of bounded height tableaux.

  18. Significant wave heights from Sentinel-1 SAR: Validation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, J. E.; Mouche, A.

    2017-03-01

    Two empirical algorithms are developed for wave mode images measured from the synthetic aperture radar aboard Sentinel-1 A. The first method, called CWAVE_S1A, is an extension of previous efforts developed for ERS2 and the second method, called Fnn, uses the azimuth cutoff among other parameters to estimate significant wave heights (Hs) and average wave periods without using a modulation transfer function. Neural networks are trained using colocated data generated from WAVEWATCH III and independently verified with data from altimeters and in situ buoys. We use neural networks to relate the nonlinear relationships between the input SAR image parameters and output geophysical wave parameters. CWAVE_S1A performs well and has reduced precision compared to Fnn with Hs root mean square errors within 0.5 and 0.6 m, respectively. The developed neural networks extend the SAR's ability to retrieve useful wave information under a large range of environmental conditions including extratropical and tropical cyclones in which Hs estimation is traditionally challenging.Plain Language SummaryTwo empirical algorithms are developed to estimate integral wave parameters from high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ocean images measured from recently launched the Sentinel 1 satellite. These methods avoid the use of the complicated image to wave mapping typically used to estimate sea state parameters. In addition, we are able to estimate wave parameters that are not able to be measured using existing techniques for the Sentinel 1 satellite. We use a machine learning technique to create a model that relates the ocean image properties to geophysical wave parameters. The models are developed using data from a numerical model because of the sufficiently large sample of global ocean conditions. We then verify that our developed models perform well with respect to independently measured wave observations from other satellite sensors and buoys. We successfully created models that

  19. Development and application of earth system models

    OpenAIRE

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    The global environment is a complex and dynamic system. Earth system modeling is needed to help understand changes in interacting subsystems, elucidate the influence of human activities, and explore possible future changes. Integrated assessment of environment and human development is arguably the most difficult and most important “systems” problem faced. To illustrate this approach, we present results from the integrated global system model (IGSM), which consists of coupled submodels address...

  20. Recent Developments in OCL and Textual Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Brucker, A.D.; Cabot, J.; Daniel, G.; Gogolla, M.; Herrera, AS.-B.; Hilken, F.; Tuong, F.; Willink, E.D.; Wolff, B.

    2016-01-01

    The panel session of the 16th OCL workshop featured a lightning talk session for discussing recent developments and open questions in the area of OCL and textual modelling. During this session, the OCL community discussed, stimulated through short presentations by OCL experts, tool support, potential future extensions, and suggested initiatives to make the textual modelling community even more successful. This collaborative paper, to which each OCL expert contributed one section, summarises t...

  1. A new method for improved hub height mean wind speed estimates using short-term hub height data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Matthew A.; Rogers, Anthony L.; Manwell, James F.; McGowan, Jon G. [Wind Energy Center, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 160 Governors Dr., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The estimation of the wind resource at the hub height of a wind turbine is one of the primary goals of site assessment. Because the measurement heights of meteorological towers (met towers) are typically significantly lower than turbine hub heights, a shear model is generally needed to extrapolate the measured wind resource at the lower measurement height to the hub height of the turbine. This paper presents methods for improving the estimate of the hub height wind resource from met tower data through the use of ground-based remote sensing devices. The methods leverage the two major advantages of these devices: their portability and their ability to measure at the wind turbine hub height. Specifically, the methods rely on augmenting the one year of met tower measurements with short-term measurements from a ground-based remote sensing device. The results indicate that the methods presented are capable of producing substantial improvements in the accuracy and uncertainty of shear extrapolation predictions. The results suggest that the typical site assessment process can be reevaluated, and alternative strategies that utilize ground-based remote sensing devices can be incorporated to significantly improve the process. (author)

  2. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-13

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's researchers to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to also estimate the economic impacts of biofuels, coal, conventional hydro, concentrating solar power, geothermal, marine and hydrokinetic power, natural gas, photovoltaics, and transmission lines. This fact sheet focuses on JEDI for wind energy projects and is revised with 2017 figures.

  3. Development of a Comprehensive Weld Process Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC's expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three- dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above. The following technical tasks have been accomplished as part of the CRADA. 1. The LMES welding code has been ported to the Intel Paragon parallel computer at

  4. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  5. C++ Model Developer (CMD) User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    SIMULATION 66 5 SCALABILITY – BUILDING A 6 DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM (6DOF) SIMULATION One problem with a lot of simulation documentation is that simple...Directorate Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Ray Sells Michael Fennell DESE Research, Inc. 315 Wynn Drive...C++ Model Developer (CMD) is an open-source C++ source code based environment for building simulations of systems described by time-based

  6. Millimeter Wave Radio Frequency Propagation Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    assume that no excess attenuation or obstacles are present, and the signal propagates along a clear signal path directly between the transmitter and...performed by simple trigonometry . The angle is determined by: θ sin | |, (103) where CL is the channel length, hTX is the height of the

  7. Development of DCMC Site Selection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    3) THEN C C CHANGE ARC COST. C 190 WRITE(6,200) 200 FORMATC INPUT ARC NO. & INCREASE IN COSTO READ(5,*)ARC,DELC IF ((ARC.LE.O).OR...static OPENFILENAME ofn ; static int cxClient; // width of client area static int cyClient; // height of client area HMENU hMenu = GetMenu(hwnd

  8. Development of Model for Providing Feasible Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Dhika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development of a model to determine a feasible scholarship recipient on the basis of the naiv¨e Bayes’ method using very simple and limited attributes. Those attributes are the applicants academic year, represented by their semester, academic performance, represented by their GPa, socioeconomic ability, which represented the economic capability to attend a higher education institution, and their level of social involvement. To establish and evaluate the model performance, empirical data are collected, and the data of 100 students are divided into 80 student data for the model training and the remaining of 20 student data are for the model testing. The results suggest that the model is capable to provide recommendations for the potential scholarship recipient at the level of accuracy of 95%.

  9. Development of a simplified biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sushovan; Mazumder, Debabrata

    2017-07-01

    A simplified approach for analyzing the biofilm process in deriving an easy model has been presented. This simplified biofilm model formulated correlations between substrate concentration in the influent/effluent and at biofilm-liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness. The model essentially considered the external mass transport according to Fick's Law, steady state substrate as well as biomass balance for attached growth microorganisms. In substrate utilization, Monod growth kinetics has been followed incorporating relevant boundary conditions at the liquid-biofilm interface and at the attachment surface. The numerical solution of equations was accomplished using Runge-Kutta method and accordingly an integrated computer program was developed. The model has been successfully applied in a distinct set of trials with varying range of representative input variables. The model performance was compared with available existing methods and it was found an easy, accurate method that can be used for process design of biofilm reactor.

  10. Density Effects on Plant Height Growth and Inequality in Sunflower Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sa Xiao; Shu-Yan Chen; Lu-Qiang Zhao; Gang Wang

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons between competing and non-competing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) populations demonstrate pronounced effects of density on plant height growth, height-to-crown width ratio, and a population's height inequality. In the present study, non-destructive measurements of height and the projected crown area of sunflower plants were taken at seven times from emergence to fruit maturation in even-aged monospecific stands with initial densities of 1, 4, 16, and 64 plants/m2. The mean height of populations increased and then decreased with increasing population density; the height inequalities of uncrowded populations decreased during stand growth, whereas the height inequalities of crowded populations decreased first and then increased during stand development. The interindividual relationships between the relative height growth rate and height within uncrowded populations became significantly negative during population growth, whereas these relationships were negative first and then became positive during the development of crowded populations. In the uncrowded populations, the static interindividual relationship between height-to-crown width ratio and volume was positive, whereas for the crowded population these relationships became negative with increasing competition for light. The data suggest that the plastic responses of plant height and height-to-crown width ratio to light competition will become more intense with increasing competition intensity. The results of the present study argue strongly for the importance of size-dependent individual-level plastic responses due to size-asymmetric light competition in generating the variations in population height inequality.

  11. Estimating vehicle height using homographic projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo; Gee, Timothy F; Ghebretati, Jr., Frezghi H; Goddard, James S; Karnowski, Thomas P; Ziock, Klaus-peter

    2013-07-16

    Multiple homography transformations corresponding to different heights are generated in the field of view. A group of salient points within a common estimated height range is identified in a time series of video images of a moving object. Inter-salient point distances are measured for the group of salient points under the multiple homography transformations corresponding to the different heights. Variations in the inter-salient point distances under the multiple homography transformations are compared. The height of the group of salient points is estimated to be the height corresponding to the homography transformation that minimizes the variations.

  12. Compound leaf development in model plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Maya; Ori, Naomi

    2015-02-01

    Plant leaves develop in accordance with a common basic program, which is flexibly adjusted to the species, developmental stage and environment. Two key stages of leaf development are morphogenesis and differentiation. In the case of compound leaves, the morphogenesis stage is prolonged as compared to simple leaves, allowing for the initiation of leaflets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of how plant hormones and transcriptional regulators modulate compound leaf development, yielding a substantial diversity of leaf forms, focusing on four model compound leaf organisms: cardamine (Cardamine hirsuta), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), medicago (Medicago truncatula) and pea (Pisum sativum).

  13. A New Approach for Offshore Wind Farm Energy Yields Calculation with Mixed Hub Height Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Hu, Weihao; Soltani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for calculating the energy yields of offshore wind farm with mixed types of wind turbines is proposed. The Jensen model is selected as the base and developed to a three dimension wake model to estimate the energy yields. Since the wind turbines are with different...... hub heights, the wind shear effect is also taken into consideration. The results show that the proposed wake model is effective in calculating the wind speed deficit. The calculation framework is applicable for energy yields calculation in offshore wind farms....

  14. Development of an Integrated Global Energy Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1999-07-08

    The primary objective of this research was to develop a forefront analysis tool for application to enhance understanding of long-term, global, nuclear-energy and nuclear-material futures. To this end, an existing economics-energy-environmental (E{sup 3}) model was adopted, modified, and elaborated to examine this problem in a multi-regional (13), long-term ({approximately}2,100) context. The E{sup 3} model so developed was applied to create a Los Alamos presence in this E{sup 3} area through ''niche analyses'' that provide input to the formulation of policies dealing with and shaping of nuclear-energy and nuclear-materials futures. Results from analyses using the E{sup 3} model have been presented at a variety of national and international conferences and workshops. Through use of the E{sup 3} model Los Alamos was afforded the opportunity to participate in a multi-national E{sup 3} study team that is examining a range of global, long-term nuclear issues under the auspices of the IAEA during the 1998-99 period . Finally, the E{sup 3} model developed under this LDRD project is being used as an important component in more recent Nuclear Material Management Systems (NMMS) project.

  15. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  16. Developing a Motivational Model of College Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Abry, Dennis

    This study involves developing a motivational model of college achievement. The predictor variables, which were procrastination tendency, self-efficacy, self-regulation, intrinsic value, outcome value, cognitive strategy, test anxiety, students grade goals, parent grade goals, and grade point average, as well as the criterion variable exam…

  17. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  18. A Computational Model of Spatial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Kazuo; Sashima, Akio; Phillips, Steven

    Psychological experiments on children's development of spatial knowledge suggest experience at self-locomotion with visual tracking as important factors. Yet, the mechanism underlying development is unknown. We propose a robot that learns to mentally track a target object (i.e., maintaining a representation of an object's position when outside the field-of-view) as a model for spatial development. Mental tracking is considered as prediction of an object's position given the previous environmental state and motor commands, and the current environment state resulting from movement. Following Jordan & Rumelhart's (1992) forward modeling architecture the system consists of two components: an inverse model of sensory input to desired motor commands; and a forward model of motor commands to desired sensory input (goals). The robot was tested on the `three cups' paradigm (where children are required to select the cup containing the hidden object under various movement conditions). Consistent with child development, without the capacity for self-locomotion the robot's errors are self-center based. When given the ability of self-locomotion the robot responds allocentrically.

  19. Modeling Sustainability in Product Development and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert C.; Rafinejad, Dariush

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the framework of a model that integrates strategic product development decisions with the product's impact on future conditions of resources and the environment. The impact of a product on stocks of nonrenewable sources and sinks is linked in a feedback loop to the cost of manufacturing and using the product…

  20. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This mo

  1. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This mo

  2. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This

  3. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far....

  4. Global Unification Problem of the Height System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Houze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Some fundamental problems on the establishment of the global unified height system, including the geometry and gravity definition of the normal height, the global unification of the regional height systems obtained from leveling measurements, and the determination of geoid potential W0 are discussed. The main conclusions are summarized:①The definition of normal height in the sense of geometry leveling and gravity theory is different, so that h-ζ≠HL, here h, ζ and HL are geodetic height, height anomaly and levelling height respectively. Instead of it, we found HL=h-ζ+∂γ/∂hζH, in the mountain area, the last correction term have to be added. ②Based on the merging of GNSS/gravity/regional leveling, the regional leveling height can be transformed into a global relative unified height system, however the value of geoid potential W0 is still needed in order to establish an absolute height system. ③W0 can be determinated from the modern geodetic techniques with a certain accuracy, but it is time variable, so that people may only define a global absolute unified height system in a fixed epoch.

  5. A Rational Procedure for Determination of Directional Individual Design Wave Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2001-01-01

    crest elevation are available. In Sørensen & Sterndorff (2000) stochastic models for the annual maximum values of the omnidirectional and directional significant wave heights, individual wave heights, and individual crest heights were presented. The models include dependencies between the maximum wave......For code-based LRFD and for reliability-based assessment of offshore structures such as steel platforms it is essential that consistent directional and omnidirectional probability distributions for the maximum significant wave height, the maximum individual wave height, and the maximum individual...

  6. The development of a retroperitoneal dissection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Aisha A; Frecker, Helena; Satkunaratnam, Abheha; Shore, Eliane M

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of ureteric anatomy is essential for ureteric injury prevention in laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Rates of injury increase with limited surgical experience and reduced surgical volume. Currently, there are no low-fidelity or high-fidelity simulation models for teaching and practicing ureteric dissection. Our goal was to design a laparoscopic simulation model for retroperitoneal anatomy with high face validity that is low-cost and easily reproducible. A low-fidelity 3-dimensional simulation model was developed that represents key anatomic structures encountered during retroperitoneal dissection and ureteric identification. Materials, construction steps, and costs were determined. The models were trialed by expert laparoscopic surgeons. Demographic information that included age, gender, surgical experience, and complex laparoscopic case volumes was collected. Face validity was assessed with a 5-item Likert-scale. The total cost of 1 model ranged from $65 to $75. The majority of the materials that were used were reusable, except for 2 components that cost dissection (n=7; 100%), for assessing a learner's ability before performing in the operating room (n=6; 86%), was low-cost (n=7; 100%), and was easily reproducible (n=6; 86%). This unique model fills a gap in laparoscopic simulation training. No other low- or high-fidelity models for laparoscopic retroperitoneal ureteric dissection have been identified in the literature. This simulation model is low-cost, easily reproducible, closely resembles retroperitoneal dissection during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery, and can be used for education and assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Model Driven Software Development for Agricultural Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten

    The design and development of agricultural robots, consists of both mechan- ical, electrical and software components. All these components must be de- signed and combined such that the overall goal of the robot is fulfilled. The design and development of these systems require collaboration between...... processing, control engineering, etc. This thesis proposes a Model-Driven Software Develop- ment based approach to model, analyse and partially generate the software implementation of a agricultural robot. Furthermore, Guidelines for mod- elling the architecture of an agricultural robots are provided......, assisting with bridging the different engineering disciplines. Timing play an important role in agricultural robotic applications, synchronisation of robot movement and implement actions is important in order to achieve precision spraying, me- chanical weeding, individual feeding, etc. Discovering...

  8. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  9. Developing Project Duration Models in Software Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre Bourque; Serge Oligny; Alain Abran; Bertrand Fournier

    2007-01-01

    Based on the empirical analysis of data contained in the International Software Benchmarking Standards Group(ISBSG) repository, this paper presents software engineering project duration models based on project effort. Duration models are built for the entire dataset and for subsets of projects developed for personal computer, mid-range and mainframeplatforms. Duration models are also constructed for projects requiring fewer than 400 person-hours of effort and for projectsre quiring more than 400 person-hours of effort. The usefulness of adding the maximum number of assigned resources as asecond independent variable to explain duration is also analyzed. The opportunity to build duration models directly fromproject functional size in function points is investigated as well.

  10. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  11. Development and optimization of a wildfire plume rise model based on remote sensing data inputs - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, R.; Wooster, M.; Atherton, J.; Freitas, S. R.; Schultz, M. G.; Kaiser, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is one of a relatively few natural processes that can inject globally significant quantities of gases and aerosols into the atmosphere at altitudes well above the planetary boundary layer, in some cases at heights in excess of 10 km. The "injection height" of biomass burning emissions is therefore an important parameter to understand when considering the characteristics of the smoke plumes emanating from landscape scale fires, and in particular when attempting to model their atmospheric transport. Here we further extend the formulations used within a popular 1D plume rise model, widely used for the estimation of landscape scale fire smoke plume injection height, and develop and optimise the model both so that it can run with an increased set of remotely sensed observations. The model is well suited for application in atmospheric Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) aimed at understanding smoke plume downstream impacts, and whilst a number of wildfire emission inventories are available for use in such CTMs, few include information on plume injection height. Since CTM resolutions are typically too spatially coarse to capture the vertical transport induced by the heat released from landscape scale fires, approaches to estimate the emissions injection height are typically based on parametrizations. Our extensions of the existing 1D plume rise model takes into account the impact of atmospheric stability and latent heat on the plume up-draft, driving it with new information on active fire area and fire radiative power (FRP) retrieved from MODIS satellite Earth Observation (EO) data, alongside ECMWF atmospheric profile information. We extend the model by adding an equation for mass conservation and a new entrainment scheme, and optimise the values of the newly added parameters based on comparison to injection heights derived from smoke plume height retrievals made using the MISR EO sensor. Our parameter optimisation procedure is based on a twofold approach

  12. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  13. Climatology and evolution of the mixing height over water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempreviva, A.M. [Istituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera, CNR, Rome (Italy); Grynig, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present results from an experimental investigation on the height of the mixed layer h, using a meteorological station located on the Danish island of Anholt. The station was operational for two years from September 1990 to October 1992. We present the analysis of two years of radio-sounding showing the average daily evolution of h. Furthermore observations of the mixed layer growth under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions during six consecutive days has been modelled using a simple zero-order mixed-layer height model. Finally we have compared the evolution of the mixing height from the model with the evolution of the correlation coefficient between temperature and humidity to study the influence of the deepness of the convective layer on the mechanism of the correlation between temperature and humidity in the surface layer. (au)

  14. A multi-sensor lidar, multi-spectral and multi-angular approach for mapping canopy height in boreal forest regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, David J.; Green, Gordon; Peterson, Birgit E.; Wylie, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit representations of vegetation canopy height over large regions are necessary for a wide variety of inventory, monitoring, and modeling activities. Although airborne lidar data has been successfully used to develop vegetation canopy height maps in many regions, for vast, sparsely populated regions such as the boreal forest biome, airborne lidar is not widely available. An alternative approach to canopy height mapping in areas where airborne lidar data is limited is to use spaceborne lidar measurements in combination with multi-angular and multi-spectral remote sensing data to produce comprehensive canopy height maps for the entire region. This study uses spaceborne lidar data from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) as training data for regression tree models that incorporate multi-angular and multi-spectral data from the Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) to map vegetation canopy height across a 1,300,000 km2 swath of boreal forest in Interior Alaska. Results are compared to in situ height measurements as well as airborne lidar data. Although many of the GLAS-derived canopy height estimates are inaccurate, applying a series of filters incorporating both data associated with the GLAS shots as well as ancillary data such as land cover can identify the majority of height estimates with significant errors, resulting in a filtered dataset with much higher accuracy. Results from the regression tree models indicate that late winter MISR imagery acquired under snow-covered conditions is effective for mapping canopy heights ranging from 5 to 15 m, which includes the vast majority of forests in the region. It appears that neither MISR nor MODIS imagery acquired during the growing season is effective for canopy height mapping, although including summer multi-spectral MODIS data along with winter MISR imagery does appear to provide a slight increase in the accuracy of

  15. Dynamics models and modeling of tree stand development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Rogozin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brief analysis of scientific works in Russia and in the CIS over the past 100 years. Logical and mathematical models consider the conceptual and show some of the results of their verification. It was found that the models include different laws and the parameters, the sum of which allows you to divide them into four categories: models of static states, development models, models of care for the natural forest and models of cultivation. Each category has fulfilled and fulfills its tasks in economic management. Thus, the model states in statics (table traverse growth played a prominent role in figuring out what may be the most productive (full stands in different regions of the country. However, they do not answer the question of what the initial states lead to the production of complete stands. In a study of the growth of stands used system analysis, and it is observed dominance of works studying static state, snatched from the biological time. Therefore, the real drama of the growth of stands remained almost unexplored. It is no accident there were «chrono-forestry» «plantation forestry» and even «non-traditional forestry», where there is a strong case of a number of new concepts of development stands. That is quite in keeping with Kuhn (Kuhn, 2009 in the forestry crisis began – there were alternative theories and coexist conflicting scientific schools. To develop models of stand development, it is proposed to use a well-known method of repeated observations within 10–20 years, in conjunction with the explanation of the history of the initial density. It mounted on the basis of studying the dynamics of its indicators: the trunk, crown overlap coefficient, the sum of volumes of all crowns and the relative length of the crown. According to these indicators, the researcher selects natural series of development stands with the same initial density. As a theoretical basis for the models it is possible to postulate the general properties of

  16. Pubertal Stress and Nutrition and their Association with Sexual Orientation and Height in the Add Health Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorska, Malvina N; Bogaert, Anthony F

    2017-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that gay men tend to be shorter, on average, than heterosexual men. Less evidence exists that lesbian women are taller, on average, than heterosexual women. The most popular explanation of the association between sexual orientation and height involves prenatal factors, such that, for example, gay men may have been exposed to lower than typical androgens during fetal development, which impacts their height and sexual orientation as adults. An alternative explanation involves stress, given that stress has been associated with sexual minority identification and with lower height. Another alternative explanation involves nutrition, although its relationship is less clear with sexual minority identification. Using the Add Health data, which is a large, nationally representative and longitudinal sample of American adolescents (n = 14,786), we tested a mediation model, such that sexual orientation → pubertal stress/nutrition → height. Within men, we found that gay men (n = 126) were shorter, on average, than heterosexual men (n = 6412). None of the 24 pubertal stress-related and 15 pubertal nutrition-related variables assessed in the Add Health data mediated the relationship between sexual orientation and height in men. Within women, lesbians (n = 75) did not differ significantly in stature compared to heterosexual women (n = 6267). Thus, prenatal mechanisms (e.g., hormones, maternal immune response) are likely better candidates for explaining the height difference between gay men and heterosexual men.

  17. Vegetation height and cover fraction between 60° S and 60° N from ICESat GLAS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, S. O.; Rosette, J. A. B.; Kljun, N.; North, P. R. J.; Chasmer, L.; Suárez, J. C.; Hopkinson, C.; Hill, R. A.; van Gorsel, E.; Mahoney, C.; Berni, J. A. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present new coarse resolution (0.5° × 0.5°) vegetation height and vegetation-cover fraction data sets between 60° S and 60° N for use in climate models and ecological models. The data sets are derived from 2003-2009 measurements collected by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), the only LiDAR instrument that provides close to global coverage. Initial vegetation height is calculated from GLAS data using a development of the model of Rosette et al. (2008) with with further calibration on desert sites. Filters are developed to identify and eliminate spurious observations in the GLAS data, e.g. data that are affected by clouds, atmosphere and terrain and as such result in erroneous estimates of vegetation height or vegetation cover. Filtered GLAS vegetation height estimates are aggregated in histograms from 0 to 70 m in 0.5 m intervals for each 0.5° × 0.5°. The GLAS vegetation height product is evaluated in four ways. Firstly, the Vegetation height data and data filters are evaluated using aircraft LiDAR measurements of the same for ten sites in the Americas, Europe, and Australia. Application of filters to the GLAS vegetation height estimates increases the correlation with aircraft data from r = 0.33 to r = 0.78, decreases the root-mean-square error by a factor 3 to about 6 m (RMSE) or 4.5 m (68% error distribution) and decreases the bias from 5.7 m to -1.3 m. Secondly, the global aggregated GLAS vegetation height product is tested for sensitivity towards the choice of data quality filters; areas with frequent cloud cover and areas with steep terrain are the most sensitive to the choice of thresholds for the filters. The changes in height estimates by applying different filters are, for the main part, smaller than the overall uncertainty of 4.5-6 m established from the site measurements. Thirdly, the GLAS global vegetation height product is compared with a global vegetation height product

  18. Forest Canopy Height Estimation from Calipso Lidar Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Lucker, Patricia L.; Trepte, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The canopy height is an important parameter in aboveground biomass estimation. Lidar remote sensing from airborne or satellite platforms, has a unique capability for forestry applications. This study introduces an innovative concept to estimate canopy height using CALIOP two wavelengths lidar measurements. One main advantage is that the concept proposed here is dependent on the penetration depths at two wavelengths without making assumption about the last peak of waveform as the ground location, and it does not require the ancillary Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data in order to obtain the slope information of terrain. Canopy penetration depths at two wavelengths indicate moderately strong relationships for estimating the canopy height. Results show that the CALIOP-derived canopy heights were highly correlated with the ICESat/GLAS-derived values with a mean RMSE of 3.4 m and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.89. Our findings present a relationship between the penetration difference and canopy height, which can be used as another metrics for canopy height estimation, except the full waveforms.

  19. Recent developments in modeling groundwater systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1977-05-20

    This paper reviews the developments in the mathematical modeling of groundwater systems over the past decde. The first part of the paper is devoted to a description of the physics of the different types of problems that are of interest in hydrogeology and a statement of the related initial-boundary-value problems. The various numerical techniques that have been employed to solve the governing equations are discussed in the second part. In the third section a few typical case histories are presented to illustrate the trend of progress that has occurred in the application of mathematical modeling to actual field problems.

  20. Alternative Local Development models from the periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez Oropeza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As neoliberal capitalism continues to fail on reducing inequities, and continues to fail on fulfilling its promise of a kind of “development” that would allow impoverished men and women to improve their situation and be able to experience a “freedom” which would empower them with new and better opportunities to vanish their many types of “poverties”, new and alternative models raise, presenting a different and inclusive type of development which intends to respond to their particular situations of exclusion and build on an alternative model.

  1. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  2. Heritability of adult body height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Sammalisto, Sampo; Perola, Markus

    2003-01-01

    /unique environment (AE) model. Among women the heritability estimates were generally lower than among men with greater variation between countries, ranging from 0.68 to 0.84 when an additive genes/shared environment/unique environment (ACE) model was used. In four populations where an AE model fit equally well...

  3. A model for Business Intelligence Systems’ Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manole VELICANU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Often, Business Intelligence Systems (BIS require historical data or data collected from var-ious sources. The solution is found in data warehouses, which are the main technology used to extract, transform, load and store data in the organizational Business Intelligence projects. The development cycle of a data warehouse involves lots of resources, time, high costs and above all, it is built only for some specific tasks. In this paper, we’ll present some of the aspects of the BI systems’ development such as: architecture, lifecycle, modeling techniques and finally, some evaluation criteria for the system’s performance.

  4. Abiotic Controls on Macroscale Variations of Humid Tropical Forest Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation of tropical forest tree height is a key indicator of ecological processes associated with forest growth and carbon dynamics. Here we examine the macroscale variations of tree height of humid tropical forests across three continents and quantify the climate and edaphic controls on these variations. Forest tree heights are systematically sampled across global humid tropical forests with more than 2.5 million measurements from Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS satellite observations (2004–2008. We used top canopy height (TCH of GLAS footprints to grid the statistical mean and variance and the 90 percentile height of samples at 0.5 degrees to capture the regional variability of average and large trees globally. We used the spatial regression method (spatial eigenvector mapping-SEVM to evaluate the contributions of climate, soil and topography in explaining and predicting the regional variations of forest height. Statistical models suggest that climate, soil, topography, and spatial contextual information together can explain more than 60% of the observed forest height variation, while climate and soil jointly explain 30% of the height variations. Soil basics, including physical compositions such as clay and sand contents, chemical properties such as PH values and cation-exchange capacity, as well as biological variables such as the depth of organic matter, all present independent but statistically significant relationships to forest height across three continents. We found significant relations between the precipitation and tree height with shorter trees on the average in areas of higher annual water stress, and large trees occurring in areas with low stress and higher annual precipitation but with significant differences across the continents. Our results confirm other landscape and regional studies by showing that soil fertility, topography and climate may jointly control a significant variation of forest height and

  5. Animal models in drug development for MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    One of the foremost challenges of drug discovery in any therapeutic area is that of solidifying the correlation between in vitro activity and clinical efficacy. Between these is the confirmation that affecting a particular target in vivo will lead to a therapeutic benefit. In antibacterial drug discovery, there is a key advantage from the start, since the targets are bacteria-therefore, it is simple to ascertain in vitro whether a drug has the desired effect, i.e., bacterial cell inhibition or killing, and to understand the mechanism by which that occurs. The downstream criteria, whether a compound reaches the infection site and achieves appropriately high levels to affect bacterial viability, can be evaluated in animal models of infection. In this way animal models of infection can be a highly valuable and predictive bridge between in vitro drug discovery and early clinical evaluation.The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide variety of infections in humans (Archer, Clin Infect Dis 26:1179-1181, 1998) and has been said to be able to infect every tissue type. Fortunately, over the years a great deal of effort has been expended toward developing infection models in rodents using this organism, with good success. This chapter will describe the advantages, methods, and outcome measurements of the rodent models most used in drug discovery for S. aureus. Mouse models will be the focus of this chapter, as they are the most economical and thus most commonly used, but a rat infection model is included as well.

  6. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Khodade; Samta Malhotra; Nirmal Kumar; M Sriram Iyengar; N Balakrishnan; Nagasuma Chandra

    2007-08-01

    The biological cell, a natural self-contained unit of prime biological importance, is an enormously complex machine that can be understood at many levels. A higher-level perspective of the entire cell requires integration of various features into coherent, biologically meaningful descriptions. There are some efforts to model cells based on their genome, proteome or metabolome descriptions. However, there are no established methods as yet to describe cell morphologies, capture similarities and differences between different cells or between healthy and disease states. Here we report a framework to model various aspects of a cell and integrate knowledge encoded at different levels of abstraction, with cell morphologies at one end to atomic structures at the other. The different issues that have been addressed are ontologies, feature description and model building. The framework describes dotted representations and tree data structures to integrate diverse pieces of data and parametric models enabling size, shape and location descriptions. The framework serves as a first step in integrating different levels of data available for a biological cell and has the potential to lead to development of computational models in our pursuit to model cell structure and function, from which several applications can flow out.

  7. Vehicle Ride Height Change Due To Radial Expansion Of Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čavoj Ondřej

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In general, tire deformations caused by wheel rotation are not taken into account when developing vehicle aerodynamics. On the road the tires radially expand as speed increases, which affects the actual ride height of a vehicle. In turn this often increases the real aerodynamic drag compared to values obtained using CFD or a wind tunnel as the mass flow across the relatively rough underbody increases with ground clearance. In this study, on-road ride heights were measured while running a vehicle in a straight line with fixed velocity whilst the aerodynamic lift of the vehicle was determined in a wind tunnel. Subsequently, the relationships between ride height and axle load were obtained by loading the vehicle at standstill with ballast. By comparing the ride heights at high and very low velocities with expected vertical displacement caused purely by aerodynamic lift force as computed according to the ride height - axle load equations, the ride height change due to tire radial expansion was determined.

  8. Driver Behavior Modeling: Developments and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah AbuAli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in wireless communication schemes, mobile cloud and fog computing, and context-aware services boost a growing interest in the design, development, and deployment of driver behavior models for emerging applications. Despite the progressive advancements in various aspects of driver behavior modeling (DBM, only limited work can be found that reviews the growing body of literature, which only targets a subset of DBM processes. Thus a more general review of the diverse aspects of DBM, with an emphasis on the most recent developments, is needed. In this paper, we provide an overview of advances of in-vehicle and smartphone sensing capabilities and communication and recent applications and services of DBM and emphasize research challenges and key future directions.

  9. Model of the Product Development Lifecycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Sunny L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roe, Natalie H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wood, Evan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nachtigal, Noel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helms, Jovana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    While the increased use of Commercial Off-The-Shelf information technology equipment has presented opportunities for improved cost effectiveness and flexibility, the corresponding loss of control over the product's development creates unique vulnerabilities and security concerns. Of particular interest is the possibility of a supply chain attack. A comprehensive model for the lifecycle of hardware and software products is proposed based on a survey of existing literature from academic, government, and industry sources. Seven major lifecycle stages are identified and defined: (1) Requirements, (2) Design, (3) Manufacturing for hardware and Development for software, (4) Testing, (5) Distribution, (6) Use and Maintenance, and (7) Disposal. The model is then applied to examine the risk of attacks at various stages of the lifecycle.

  10. Development of an energy storage tank model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Robert Christopher

    A linearized, one-dimensional finite difference model employing an implicit finite difference method for energy storage tanks is developed, programmed with MATLAB, and demonstrated for different applications. A set of nodal energy equations is developed by considering the energy interactions on a small control volume. The general method of solving these equations is described as are other features of the simulation program. Two modeling applications are presented: the first using a hot water storage tank with a solar collector and an absorption chiller to cool a building in the summer, the second using a molten salt storage system with a solar collector and steam power plant to generate electricity. Recommendations for further study as well as all of the source code generated in the project are also provided.

  11. Macroeconomic model of national economy development (extended

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Diaconova

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The macroeconomic model offered in this paper describes complex functioning of national economy and can be used for forecasting of possible directions of its development depending on various economic policies. It is the extension of [2] and adaptation of [3]. With the purpose of determination of state policies influence in the field of taxes and exchange rate national economy is considered within the framework of three sectors: government, private and external world.

  12. BODY HEIGHT AND ITS ESTIMATION UTILIZING ARM SPAN MEASUREMENTS IN MALE ADOLESCENTS FROM CENTRAL REGION IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrislav Vujović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anthropologists recognized the tallness of nations in the Dinaric Alps long time ago (Popovic et al, 2013. As the modern Montenegrins fall partly into the Dinaric racial classification (Bjelica et al., 2012, the purpose of this study was to examine the body height in Montenegrin male adolescents from central region as well as the relationship between arm span as an alternative to estimating the body height, which would vary from region to region in Montenegro. Method: Our investigation analyses 548 male adolescents from the central region in Montenegro. The anthropometric mea