WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling fluctuating velocity

  1. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.

  2. An improved car-following model with multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lantian; Zhao, Xiangmo; Yu, Shaowei; Li, Xiuhai; Shi, Zhongke

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore and evaluate the effects of velocity variation trend of multiple preceding cars used in the Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) strategy on the dynamic characteristic, fuel economy and emission of the corresponding traffic flow, we conduct a study as follows: firstly, with the real-time car-following (CF) data, the close relationship between multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback and the host car's behaviors is explored, the evaluation results clearly show that multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation with different time window-width are highly correlated to the host car's acceleration/deceleration. Then, a microscopic traffic flow model is proposed to evaluate the effects of multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the CACC strategy on the traffic flow evolution process. Finally, numerical simulations on fuel economy and exhaust emission of the traffic flow are also implemented by utilizing VT-micro model. Simulation results prove that considering multiple preceding cars' velocity fluctuation feedback in the control strategy of the CACC system can improve roadway traffic mobility, fuel economy and exhaust emission performance.

  3. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pego, J.P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany); Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Lienhart, H.; Durst, F. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM, Erlangen, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen fuer Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  4. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo, J. P.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F.

    2007-08-01

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen für Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  5. Diffusive transport by thermal velocity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Bell, John B; de la Fuente, Anton; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2011-05-20

    We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. We find good agreement between a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory and particle and finite-volume simulations. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as ln(L/L₀) in quasi-two-dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it scales as L₀⁻¹ - L⁻¹, where L₀ is a reference length. Our results demonstrate that fluctuations play an important role in the hydrodynamics of small-scale systems.

  6. Velocity Fluctuations in Electrostatically Driven Granular Media

    OpenAIRE

    Aranson, I. S.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    We study experimentally the particle velocity fluctuations in an electrostatically driven dilute granular gas. The experimentally obtained velocity distribution functions have strong deviations from Maxwellian form in a wide range of parameters. We have found that the tails of the distribution functions are consistent with a stretched exponential law with typical exponents of the order 3/2. Molecular dynamic simulations shows qualitative agreement with experimental data. Our results suggest t...

  7. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  8. Motion of Euglena Gracilis: Active Fluctuations and Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 23, 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a...

  9. Photospheric modeling through spectral line inversion. temperature and radial velocity stratifications and fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Kucera, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We aim to determine average radial stratifications of various physical parameters throughout the solar photosphere at high angular resolution for non-magnetic and magnetic areas and to compare these with standard semiempirical 1D modeling and with 3D hydrodynamics (HD) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

  10. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  11. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3.

  12. Velocity Fluctuations in Gas-Fluidized Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, G. D.

    1998-03-01

    Increasing gas flow through a bed of particles produces, above a sharp threshold, a fluidized state which exhibits many of the properties of a liquid. Fluidized beds play a major role in refining, chemicals, and power generation, but the physics of the fluidized state is still uncertain, due to the complexity of the particle/gas interactions, the broad distribution of particle size, and the measurement challenge. One consequence can be the failure of sophisticated computer models to predict performance. Another is the failure to resolve fundamental questions, for example the source of the initial stability/instability of the uniform fluidized state, first addressed by Jackson in 1963(R. Jackson, in Fluidization, edited by J. F. Davidson et al. (Academic Press, New York, 1985), p. 47-72; G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 193, 75-110 (1988); M. Nicolas. J. Chomaz, and E. Guazelli, Phys. Fluids 6, 3936-3944 (1994).). To meet the measurement challenge, we have obtained the first comprehensive data on the mean squared fluctuation velocity, or granular temperature, T*, of monodispersed glass spheres of diameter, D, in a fluidized bed, by a novel acoustic shot noise probe of random particle impact on the wall(G. D. Cody, D. J. Goldfarb, G. V. Storch, Jr., A. N. Norris, Powder Technology 87, 211-232 (1996); G. D. Cody and D. J. Goldfarb, in Dynamics in Small Confining Systems-III, eds. M. Drake et al, (MRS, Pittsburgh, Pa, 1997), 464, p. 325-338.). Applying a dense gas kinetic model(D. Gidaspow, Multiphase Flow and Fluidization (Academic Press, San Diego, 1994).) to this data predicts values of particulate pressure, and viscosity, which are in excellent agreement with recent experiments, and encouraged us to revisit the stability question. We find that the unanticipated seven-fold bifurcation observed in T* for D less than 150 microns is sufficient, using Jackson's model, to account for the accepted empirical boundary of stable initial uniform fluidization for the spheres

  13. Calculating the respiratory flow velocity fluctuations in pericardial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniorakis, Eftychios; Arvanitakis, Spyridon; Zarreas, Elias; Barlagiannis, Dimitris; Skandalakis, Nikos; Karidis, Constantinos

    2010-11-01

    An excessive respiratory fluctuation (RTFV) in transmitral early diastolic velocity E is a pivotal Doppler echocardiographic sign of haemodynamic compromise, in constrictive pericardial diseases. RTFV is expressed as a percentage and 25% is considered a threshold value. Unfortunately there is no unanimity in calculating RTFV. Sometimes it is expressed as a percentage of expiratory E velocity, while others of inspiratory E velocity. This disparity has led to gross misinterpretations in medical literature. Here we emphasize the importance of a rational procedure calculating RTFV and we propose the appropriate mathematical model.

  14. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, D; Sbragaglia, M; Biferale, L; Gross, M; Varnik, F

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  15. Correlative velocity fluctuations over a gravel river bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinehart, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Velocity fluctuations in a steep, coarse-bedded river were measured in flow depths ranging from 0.8 to 2.2 m, with mean velocities at middepth from 1.1 to 3.1 m s−1. Analyses of synchronous velocity records for two and three points in the vertical showed a broad range of high coherence for wave periods from 10 to 100 s, centering around 10–30 s. Streamwise correlations over distances of 9 and 14 m showed convection velocities near mean velocity for the same wave periods. The range of coherent wave periods was a small multiple of predicted “boil” periods. Correlative fluctuations in synchronous velocity records in the vertical direction suggested the blending of short pulses into longer wave periods. The highest spectral densities were measured beyond the range of coherent wave periods and were probably induced by migration of low-relief bed forms.

  16. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  17. Particle fluctuation velocity in gas-fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, George

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the uniform state of a gas-fluidized bed was first discussed by Wilhelm and Kwauk in 1948, modeled by Jackson in 1963, and summarized in empirical rules by Geldart in 1973. Particles (Geldart-A) below a critical diameter fluidize before bubbling, and those above that diameter (Geldart-B) bubble at fluidization - why? The critical stability parameter is the mean-squared particle fluctuation velocity, or granular temperature, T*. It was first measured for monodispersed glass spheres by acoustic shot-noise excitation of the wall (Cody et al., 1996), and by diffusing-wave optical spectroscopy at the wall (Menon and Durian, 1997). For Geldart-B spheres the data agree, and both agree with a recent statistical model for T* based on random particle impact (Buyevich and Kapbasov, 1998). T* of Cody et al. jumps by tenfold at the Geldart-B/A transition, sufficient to make these Geldart-A spheres stable in the Jackson theory. It is proposed that the absence of this jump in the Menon and Durian data reflects the significant difference in bed geometry and circulation in the two experiments, and the dominant effect of random shear fluctuations on T* for sphere diameters in the Geldart-A regime (Cody, Kapbasov, Buyevich, Symp. B-1, Annual Meeting. AIChE 11/15-20/98).

  18. Modified Feynman ratchet with velocity-dependent fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Denur

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The randomness of Brownian motion at thermodynamic equilibrium can be spontaneously broken by velocity-dependence of fluctuations, i.e., by dependence of values or probability distributions of fluctuating properties on Brownian-motional velocity. Such randomness-breaking can spontaneously obtain via interaction between Brownian-motional Doppler effects --- which manifest the required velocity-dependence --- and system geometrical asymmetry. A non random walk is thereby spontaneously superposed on Brownian motion, resulting in a systematic net drift velocity despite thermodynamic equilibrium. The time evolution of this systematic net drift velocity --- and of velocity probability density, force, and power output --- is derived for a velocity-dependent modification of Feynman's ratchet. We show that said spontaneous randomness-breaking, and consequent systematic net drift velocity, imply: bias from the Maxwellian of the system's velocity probability density, the force that tends to accelerate it, and its power output. Maximization, especially of power output, is discussed. Uncompensated decreases in total entropy, challenging the second law of thermodynamics, are thereby implied.

  19. Fluctuating ideal-gas lattice Boltzmann method with fluctuation dissipation theorem for nonvanishing velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, G; Wagner, A J

    2013-06-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating ideal-gas descriptions with the lattice Boltzmann methods are based on a fluctuation dissipation theorem, which, while greatly simplifying the implementation, strictly holds only for zero mean velocity and small fluctuations. We show how to derive the fluctuation dissipation theorem for all k, which was done only for k=0 in previous derivations. The consistent derivation requires, in principle, locally velocity-dependent multirelaxation time transforms. Such an implementation is computationally prohibitively expensive but, with a small computational trick, it is feasible to reproduce the correct FDT without overhead in computation time. It is then shown that the previous standard implementations perform poorly for non vanishing mean velocity as indicated by violations of Galilean invariance of measured structure factors. Results obtained with the method introduced here show a significant reduction of the Galilean invariance violations.

  20. Particle Velocity Fluctuations in Steady State Sedimentation: Stratification Controlled Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Segrè, P N

    2007-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of steady state sedimentation of semi-concentrated ($\\phi=0.10$) monodisperse spheres are studied in liquid fluidized beds. Laser turbidity and particle imaging methods are used to measure the particle velocity fluctuations and the steady state concentration profiles. Using a wide range of particle and system sizes, we find that the measured gradients $\

  1. Lower limit for the velocity fluctuation level in wind tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, U.; Froebel, E.

    1988-01-01

    The origins of the velocity fluctuations in the test section of a wind tunnel are discussed. Vorticity (turbulence convected from upstream) can be reduced by a careful design of the settling chamber to almost any desired level. The amplitudes of pressure waves propagating round the tunnel circuit can also be reduced considerably. The lowest level of the velocity fluctuations in wind tunnels are determined by those pressure fields that are created on the outer boundaries of the test section. These boundaries are the free shear layers in the case of free jet facilities and the turbulent boundary layers in the case of closed wall test sections. The lower limit for the rms velocity level is achieved in many open jet wind tunnels (typically 0.15%). The corresponding limit for low speed tunnels with closed test sections is smaller by a factor of at least twenty but not yet known.

  2. Space-time correlations of fluctuating velocities in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-04-01

    Space-time correlations or Eulerian two-point two-time correlations of fluctuating velocities are analytically and numerically investigated in turbulent shear flows. An elliptic model for the space-time correlations in the inertial range is developed from the similarity assumptions on the isocorrelation contours: they share a uniform preference direction and a constant aspect ratio. The similarity assumptions are justified using the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses and verified using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flows. The model relates the space-time correlations to the space correlations via the convection and sweeping characteristic velocities. The analytical expressions for the convection and sweeping velocities are derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous turbulent shear flows, where the convection velocity is represented by the mean velocity and the sweeping velocity is the sum of the random sweeping velocity and the shear-induced velocity. This suggests that unlike Taylor's model where the convection velocity is dominating and Kraichnan and Tennekes' model where the random sweeping velocity is dominating, the decorrelation time scales of the space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows are determined by the convection velocity, the random sweeping velocity, and the shear-induced velocity. This model predicts a universal form of the space-time correlations with the two characteristic velocities. The DNS of turbulent channel flows supports the prediction: the correlation functions exhibit a fair good collapse, when plotted against the normalized space and time separations defined by the elliptic model.

  3. Spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities in bidirectional streams: Exploring the effects of self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Meead; Aghabayk, Kayvan; Sobhani, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Individual pedestrian velocities vary over time and space depending on the crowd size, location of individuals' within the crowd, and formation of self-organized lanes. We use empirical data to explore the spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities in bidirectional streams. We find that, unlike ordinary fluids, the velocity profile in bidirectional pedestrian streams does not necessarily follow a hyperbolic form. Rather, the shape of the velocity profile is highly dependent on the formation of self-organized lanes. We also show that the spatial fluctuations of pedestrian velocities along and transverse to the flow direction are widely distributed and can be modeled by a sum of Gaussian distributions. Results suggest that the effect of self-organization phenomenon is strong enough that for the same crowd size, the velocity distribution does not significantly change when pedestrians are highly mixed compared to when separate lanes are formed.

  4. Study of velocity centroids based on the theory of fluctuations in position-position-velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, D; Pogosyan, D

    2016-01-01

    We study possibility of obtaining velocity spectra by studying turbulence in an optically thick medium using velocity centroids (VCs).We find that the regime of universal, i.e. independent of underlying turbulence statistics, fluctuations discovered originally within the velocity channel analysis (VCA) carries over to the statistics of VCs. In other words, for large absorptions the VC lose their ability to reflect the spectra of turbulence. Combining our present study with the earlier studies of centroids in Esquivel & Lazarian, we conclude that centroids are applicable for studies subsonic/transsonic turbulence for the range of scales that is limited by the absorption effects. We also consider VCs based on absorption lines and define the range of their applicability. We address the problem of analytical description of spectra and anisotropies of fluctuations that are available through studies using VC. We obtain spectra and anisotropy of VC fluctuations arising from Alfv\\'en, slow and fast modes that con...

  5. The potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations on drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds in an idealized 2D setup

    CERN Document Server

    Andrejczuk, M; Blyth, A

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations of the air on a drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds. Two different representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations for a microphysics formulated in a Lagrangian framework are discussed - random walk model and the interpolation, and its effect on microphysical properties of the cloud investigated. Turbulent velocity fluctuations significantly enhances velocity differences between colliding droplets, especially those having small sizes. As a result drizzle forms faster in simulations including a representation of turbulence. Both representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations, random walk and interpolation, have similar effect on droplet spectrum evolution, but interpolation of the velocity does account for a possible anisotropy in the air velocity. All discussed simulations show relatively large standard deviation ($\\sim$1${\\mu}m$) of the cloud droplet distribution from the onset of cloud formation is observed. Because coalesen...

  6. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  7. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF CORRELATION AND SPECTRUM BETWEEN WALL FLUCTUATING PRESSURE AND FLUCTUATING VELOCITY OF IMPING-ING JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The correlation, the spectrum and the turbu-lent scale between wall fluctuating pressure and fluctuating ve-locity, on the bed of plunging pool under the action of single and twin impinging jet, are investigated in the paper by using 2-D LDA and the dynamic pressure scanning system of multi-ple points. It is found that the cross correlation between the horizontal fluctuating velocity and the fluctuating pressure of twin jet is bigger than that of sinlge jet, and the spectrum be-tween horizontal fluctuating velocity and fluctuating pressure obviously has approximately dominant frequency. The rela-tionship between the fluctuation pressure coefficient on wall and the turbulent intensity near the wall can be described with logarithmic curve.

  9. PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF NEAR-WALL TURBULENT VELOCITY FLUCTUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By large eddy simulation (LES), turbulent databases of channel flows at different Reynolds numbers were established. Then, the probability distribution functions of the streamwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations were obtained and compared with the corresponding normal distributions. By hypothesis test, the deviation from the normal distribution was analyzed quantitatively. The skewness and flatness factors were also calculated. And the variations of these two factors in the viscous sublayer, buffer layer and log-law layer were discussed. Still illustrated were the relations between the probability distribution functions and the burst events-sweep of high-speed fluids and ejection of low-speed fluids-in the viscous sub-layer, buffer layer and loglaw layer. Finally the variations of the probability distribution functions with Reynolds number were examined.

  10. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  11. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  12. Gulf stream: velocity fluctuations during the late cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneps, A G

    1979-04-20

    Biostratigraphic analysis of seven piston cores from the southeastern Blake Plateau suggests that the upper Miocene to Recent sedimentary section at this location represents a history of deposition of calcareous ooze alternating with current-induced nondeposition or erosion. This record is primarily a result of long-term fluctuations in the velocity of the western boundary current or Gulf Stream, which sweeps the plateau. High-velocity phases of this current system, as signaled by hiatuses in the section, lie within the time limits 4.8 to 6.1, 3.9 to 4.4, 2.3 to 2.9, and 0 to 1.5 million years before present (B.P.). These time intervals are coeval with dated episodes of climatic decline and glaciation. The most intense acceleration of the Gulf Stream, as indicated by deep erosion of the Blake Plateau, occurred in the latest Miocene to earliest Pliocene (4.8 to 6.1 million years B.P.) in conjunction with a major expansion of the Antarctic ice cap. Subsequent accelerations of the Gulf Stream coincide with early Pliocene cooling in the Southern Hemisphere, worldwide expansion of high-altitude-high-latitude glaciers in the late Pliocene, and the classical glaciations of the Pleistocene. An additional, protracted increase in the average velocity of the Gulf Stream, which began in the late Miocene and culminated in the mid-Pliocene (about 3.8 million years B.P.), can be attributed to the gradual emergence of the Central American isthmus.

  13. Intermittency and velocity fluctuations in hopper flows prone to clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. C.; Durian, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of granular media in a discharging hopper. In such flows, there often appears to be a critical outlet size Dc such that the flow never clogs for D >Dc . We report on the time-averaged velocity distributions, as well as temporal intermittency in the ensemble-averaged velocity of grains in a viewing window, for both D Dc , near and far from the outlet. We characterize the velocity distributions by the standard deviation and the skewness of the distribution of vertical velocities. We propose a measure for intermittency based on the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov DKS statistic for the velocity distributions as a function of time. We find that there is no discontinuity or kink in these various measures as a function of hole size. This result supports the proposition that there is no well-defined Dc and that clogging is always possible. Furthermore, the intermittency time scale of the flow is set by the speed of the grains at the hopper exit. This latter finding is consistent with a model of clogging as the independent sampling for stable configurations at the exit with a rate set by the exiting grain speed [C. C. Thomas and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 178001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.178001].

  14. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  15. A Model for Lightcone Fluctuations due to Stress Tensor Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Ribeiro, C C H

    2016-01-01

    We study a model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in which vacuum fluctuations of the electric field and of the squared electric field in a nonlinear dielectric material produce variations in the flight times of probe pulses. When this material has a non-zero third order polarizability, the flight time variations arise from squared electric field fluctuations, and are analogous to effects expected when the stress tensor of a quantized field drives passive spacetime geometry fluctuations. We also discuss the dependence of the squared electric field fluctuations upon the geometry of the material, which in turn determines a sampling function for averaging the squared electric field along the path of the pulse. This allows us to estimate the probability of especially large fluctuations, which is a measure of the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations.

  16. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  17. The Unsteady Fluctuating Pressure and Velocity in a Cross Flow Fan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaye Gan; Fei Liu; Min Liu; Keqi Wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the relations between the fluctuating pressure and velocity of the source by means of nu-merical method and sound pressure in the far field obtained with an noise experiment for a novel cross flow fan. The frequency characteristics of the fluctuating pressure and velocity in a cross flow fan are analyzed by means of spectral analysis and wavelet transform. The fluctuating pressures obtained by large eddy simulation on the cas-ing wall are compared with that of experiments and show good agreement. From the spectral analysis of sound source, it is found that the pressure fluctuating peak is correspond with the sound pressure in the far field.

  18. Design of a wind turbine-generator system considering the conformability to wind velocity fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Tetsuya; Hashizume, Takumi; Outa, Eisuke

    1999-07-01

    The conformability of the rated power output of the wind turbine-generator system and of the wind turbine type to wind velocity fluctuations are investigated with a simulation model. The authors examine three types of wind turbines: the Darrieus-Savonius hybrid, the Darrieus proper and the Propeller. These systems are mainly operated at a constant tip speed ratio, which refers to a maximum power coefficient points. As a computed result of the net extracting power, the Darrieus turbine proper has little conformability to wind velocity fluctuations because of its output characteristics. As for the other turbines, large-scale systems do not always have an advantage over small-scale systems as the effect of its dynamic characteristics. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the net extracting power of the Propeller turbine, under wind direction fluctuation, is much reduced when compared with the hybrid wind turbine. Thus, the authors conclude that the appropriate rated power output of the system exists with relation to the wind turbine type for each wind condition.

  19. Fluid Velocity Fluctuations in a Suspension of Swimming Protists

    CERN Document Server

    Rushkin, Ilia; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2010-01-01

    In dilute suspensions of swimming microorganisms the local fluid velocity is a random superposition of the flow fields set up by the individual organisms, which in turn have multipole contributions decaying as inverse powers of distance from the organism. Here we show that the conditions under which the central limit theorem guarantees a Gaussian probability distribution function of velocities are satisfied when the leading force singularity is a Stokeslet, but are not when it is any higher multipole. These results are confirmed by numerical studies and by experiments on suspensions of the alga Volvox carteri, which show that deviations from Gaussianity arise from near-field effects.

  20. Stationary bottom generated velocity fluctuations in one-dimensional open channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Bartele

    1993-01-01

    Statistical characteristics are calculated for stationary velocity fluctuations in a one-dimensional open channel flow with a given vertical velocity profile and with one-dimensional irregular bottom waves, characterized by a spectral density function. The calculations are based on an approximate ca

  1. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  2. Interferometric velocity measurements through a fluctuating gas-liquid interface employing adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Lars; Leithold, Christoph; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-12-16

    Optical transmission through fluctuating interfaces of mediums with different refractive indexes is limited by the occurring distortions. Temporal fluctuations of such distortions deteriorate optical measurements. In order to overcome this shortcoming we propose the use of adaptive optics. For the first time, an interferometric velocity measurement technique with embedded adaptive optics is presented for flow velocity measurements through a fluctuating air-water interface. A low order distortion correction technique using a fast deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack camera with high frame rate is employed. The obtained high control bandwidth enables precise measurements also at fast fluctuating media interfaces. This methodology paves the way for several kinds of optical flow measurements in various complex environments.

  3. Mean and fluctuating velocity fields of a diamond turbulent jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Min-Yi; Zhang Jian-Peng; Mi Jian-Chun; Nathan G.J.; Kalt P.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper reports the first investigation on a turbulent jet issuing from a diamond orifice (hereafter termed a "diamond jet") with an aspect ratio of 1.7.Velocity measurements were conducted in the transitional region,and the exit Reynolds number of the jet was 50000.For comparison,a round jet with identical normalized boundary conditions was also measured.It is shown that the diamond jet decays and spreads faster than the round jet does over the measured flow region.The axis-switching phenomenon is observed in the diamond jet.Although both jets display primary coherent structures in the near field,these structures are found to break down more rapidly in the diamond jet,due to the higher three-dimensionality of the flow.Moreover,the streamwise components of the Reynolds normal stress and all the shear stresses reach their maxima around the location of the maximal mean shear while the maxima of the lateral components of the Reynolds normal stresses occur around the centreline of the jet.

  4. Velocity fluctuations and population distribution in clusters of settling particles at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Annichini, M; Gauthier, G

    2016-01-01

    A study on the spatial organization and velocity fluctuations of non Brownian spherical particles settling at low Reynolds number in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is reported. The particle volume fraction ranged from 0.005 to 0.05, while the distance between cell plates ranged from 5 to 15 times the particle radius. Particle tracking revealed that particles were not uniformly distributed in space but assembled in transient settling clusters. The population distribution of these clusters followed an exponential law. The measured velocity fluctuations are in agreement with that predicted theoretically for spherical clusters, from the balance between the apparent weight and the drag force. This result suggests that particle clustering, more than a spatial distribution of particles derived from random and independent events, is at the origin of the velocity fluctuations.

  5. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  6. Understanding sprint velocity fluctuations for improved project plans with Scrum: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Albero, Filipe; Calvo-Manzano Villalón, José Antonio; Caballero, Edgar; Arcilla, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the documentation of high sprint velocity fluctuations in a Scrum project, this paper presents a thorough approach to identify the sources of issues arising in the context of Scrum implementation. Given that Scrum provides guidance on identifying process issues but not their root causes, various approaches are explored. This is of great relevance because Scrum defines project schedules relying heavily on sprint velocity and because it is the most widely used agile methodology. T...

  7. Velocity fluctuations in polar solar wind: a comparison between different solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar solar wind is a fast, tenuous and steady flow that, with the exception of a relatively short phase around the Sun's activity maximum, fills the high-latitude heliosphere. The polar wind properties have been extensively investigated by Ulysses, the first spacecraft able to perform in-situ measurements in the high-latitude heliosphere. The out-of-ecliptic phases of Ulysses cover about seventeen years. This makes possible to study heliospheric properties at high latitudes in different solar cycles. In the present investigation we focus on hourly- to daily-scale fluctuations of the polar wind velocity. Though the polar wind is a quite uniform flow, fluctuations in its velocity do not appear negligible. A simple way to characterize wind velocity variations is that of performing a multi-scale statistical analysis of the wind velocity differences. Our analysis is based on the computation of velocity differences at different time lags and the evaluation of statistical quantities (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis for the different ensembles. The results clearly show that, though differences exist in the three-dimensional structure of the heliosphere between the investigated solar cycles, the velocity fluctuations in the core of polar coronal holes exhibit essentially unchanged statistical properties.

  8. Gas Density Fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: Clumping Factor and Velocity Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Arevalo, P; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is low...

  9. Velocity Fluctuations Driven by the Damped, Aperiodic Mode in the Intergalactic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, U.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2017-08-01

    On account of its finite temperature, the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM) is subject to thermal fluctuations. Due to the fundamental coupling between particles and fields in a plasma, the field fluctuations generate current densities by means of the Lorentz force and thereby affect both the density and the velocity fluctuations of the particles. Recently, a new damped, aperiodic mode was discovered that dominates field fluctuations in the IGM. Apart from its impact on the transport properties of the IGM that determine the propagation of cosmic rays, previous research has shown that this mode provides turbulent magnetic seed fields of 6× {10}-18 {{G}} that are an essential ingredient in the generation of cosmic magnetic fields. The current investigation addresses the influence of the mode on the particle motion. In order to describe the corresponding state of the turbulence, both the spectrum and the integrated total value of the mode-driven proton velocity fluctuations are computed. It is found that the latter amounts to 1.16× {10}8{ T}47/2{n}-7-1/2 {cm} {{{s}}}-1 assuming a temperature of {T}e={T}p={10}4{T}4 {{K}} and a density of {n}e={n}p={10}-7{n}-7 {{cm}}-3. This value is two orders of magnitude larger than the thermal velocity. If the IGM neutrals adopt the same velocities as the protons by mutual charge exchange and elastic collisions (ambipolar diffusion), atomic lines propagating through the IGM are expected to display spectral broadening, enhanced by a factor of 90 beyond the thermal level in the case of hydrogen. This opens the window to a first direct observation of the damped aperiodic mode. Other observational techniques such as dispersion measure, rotation measure, and scintillation data are not applicable in this case because the mode is a transverse one, and, as such, it does not induce the required density fluctuations, as is shown here.

  10. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  11. Study of velocity centroids based on the theory of fluctuations in position-position-velocity space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, D.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2017-01-01

    We study the possibility of obtaining power spectrum of gas velocity in the turbulent interstellar medium from spatial correlation of velocity centroids (VCs) of optically thick emission lines. Combining this study with the earlier studies of centroids in Esquivel & Lazarian, we conclude that centroids are applicable for studies of subsonic/transonic turbulence for sufficiently small line-of-sight (LOS) separations at which self-absorption does not affect correlation scalings. At larger LOS separations where self-absorption becomes important, we find that there is a range of scales over which VC correlation demonstrates the universal scaling, similar to the effect found in the velocity channel analysis (VCA). In other words, for large absorptions the VCs lose their ability to reflect the spectra of turbulence. We develop analytical formalism that relates statistical properties of underlying magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence to observable scaling and anisotropy of VC correlations arising from Alfvén, slow and fast modes that constitute the compressible MHD modes, and show how the VC anisotropy can be used to find the media magnetization as well as to identify and separate the contributions from these MHD modes. Our study demonstrates that VCs are complementary to the VCA. In order to study turbulent volume with insufficient resolution of single-dish telescopes, we demonstrate how the studies of anisotropy can be performed using interferometers. We also suggest that restricted VC can be constructed for absorption lines by integrating LOS velocity weighted by the optical depth. We discuss the requirements for applicability of this approach.

  12. Study of velocity centroids based on the theory of fluctuations in position-position-velocity space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, D.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2016-10-01

    We study the possibility of obtaining power spectrum of gas velocity in the turbulent interstellar medium from spatial correlation of velocity centroids (VC) of optically thick emission lines. Combining our present study with the earlier studies of centroids in Esquivel & Lazarian, we conclude that centroids are applicable for studies of subsonic/transsonic turbulence for sufficiently small line of sight (LOS) separations at which self-absorption does not affect correlation scalings. At larger LOS separations where self-absorption becomes important, we find that there is a range of scales over which VC correlation demonstrates the universal scaling, similar to the effect found in the velocity channel analysis (VCA). In other words, for large absorptions the VC lose their ability to reflect the spectra of turbulence. We develop analytical formalism the relates statistical properties of underlying magnetohydrodynamical turbulence to observable scaling and anisotropy of VC correlations arising from Alfvén, slow and fast modes that constitute the compressible MHD modes, and show how the VC anisotropy can be used to find the media magnetization as well as to identify and separate the contributions from these MHD modes. Our study demonstrates that VC are complementary to the VCA. In order to study turbulent volume with insufficient resolution of single dish telescopes, we demonstrate how the studies of anisotropy can be performed using interferometers. We also suggest that restricted VC can be constructed for absorption lines by integrating line-of-sight velocity weighted by the optical depth. We discuss the requirements for applicability of this approach.

  13. Sound velocity fluctuations in confined granular materials: Coarse-graining lengths and elastic heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet; Tourin, Arnaud; Jia, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    We measure the consequences of elastic heterogeneities in confined granular layers using long-wavelength sound velocity determination. By progressively decreasing the coarse-graining length w, which is determined here by the sample size L, we measure the standard deviation of the longitudinal sound velocity δ VL and the packing density ϕ, normalized by their ensemble-averaged values. We find that the relative fluctuations in V L and ϕ increase when w is decreased. Importantly, we observe that decreasing the confining pressure P or using nonspherical particles leads to an important increase of the fluctuations in δ V_L/\\bar{V_L} . We conduct simulations of sound propagation in 2D hexagonal packings with contact-stiffness disorder to mimic the inhomogeneous contact networks. The sound velocity fluctuations of coherent longitudinal waves increase either with decreasing the sample size or with increasing the elastic disorder related to confining pressure, in consistency with the experiments. Our experimental observations thus support the scenario of a pressure-dependent mesoscopic length ξ∼10d (at P∼200 \\text{kPa} ), below which the continuum elasticity breaks down, likely due to the large spatial fluctuation of the shear modulus δ G/\\bar{G} ∼ 5δ V_L/\\bar{V_L}>20% .

  14. The effect of groundwater fluctuations on the velocity pattern of slow-moving landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. W. J. van Asch

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Slow-moving landslides show complex mechanical and fluid interactions. They show among others non linear intrinsic viscosity of the shear zone, undrained loading effects and the generation of excess pore water pressure. The parameterization of hydrological and geomechanical factors by field and laboratory tests to describe the movement pattern of these landslides is difficult. It is a challenge to simulate accurately the de- and acceleration of these landslides and particularly, to forecast catastrophic surges.

    In this paper the relation between groundwater fluctuation and landslide velocity for two deep-seated landslides of the Trièves Plateau (the Monestier-du-Percy landslide and the Saint-Guillaume landslide is analysed. Inclinometer measurements, showing the displacement in depth after 1–2 months periods, showed on both landslides shear band deformation within 1 m. At the Monestier-du-Percy landslide, depending on the position, the shear band depths vary between 25.0 m and 10.0 m. At the Saint-Guillaume landslide, the inclinometers detected several slip surfaces inside the clays, at respectively 37.0 m, 34.5 m, and 14.0 m depth. Two simple geomechanical models are developed to describe these displacements in depth in relation to measured groundwater fluctuations. Calibration of the models using the friction angle delivered no constant values for different measuring periods. It appeared that calibrated (apparent friction values increase with increasing groundwater levels. The paper discusses the possibility of the generation of negative excess pore water pressures as a feed back mechanism, which may explain the complex displacement pattern of these landslides developed in varved clays.

  15. Phase Fluctuations in the ABC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.

    2011-11-01

    We analyze the fluctuations of the steady state profiles in the modulated phase of the ABC model. For a system of L sites, the steady state profiles move on a microscopic time scale of order L 3. The variance of their displacement is computed in terms of the macroscopic steady state profiles by using fluctuating hydrodynamics and large deviations. Our analytical prediction for this variance is confirmed by the results of numerical simulations.

  16. Branching influences force-velocity curves and length fluctuations in actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansda, Deepak Kumar; Sen, Shamik; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-12-01

    We investigate collective dynamics of branched actin networks growing against a rigid movable wall constrained by a resistive force. Computing the force velocity relations, we show that the stall force of such networks depends not only on the average number of filaments touching the wall, but also on the amount of fluctuation of the leading edge of the network. These differences arise due to differences in the network architecture, namely, distance between two adjacent branching points and the initial distance of the starting filament from the wall, with their relative magnitudes influencing the nature of the force velocity curves (convex versus concave). We also show that the introduction of branching results in nonmonotonic diffusion constant, a quantity that measures the growth in length fluctuation of the leading edge of the network, as a function of externally applied force. Together our results demonstrate how the collective dynamics of a branched network differs from that of a parallel filament network.

  17. Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Simulations of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2007-11-01

    There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of the alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ&1/4circ;, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. The scaling has also been tested against observations of solar wind turbulence [Podesta et al. 2007]. We report here simulation results based on decaying 2D turbulence. The scaling of θ&1/4circ; and Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling has also been observed within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev's theory was developed for fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. As the external field is reduced in magnitude and becomes comparable to the magnitude of magnetic fluctuations or lower, the scale-dependent alignment is weakened. Implications for observations of solar wind turbulence will be discussed.

  18. Significance of face velocity fluctuation in relation to laboratory fume hood performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    In order to recognize the problems associated with the transport mechanism of containment during the ventilation process of a laboratory fume hood, a transparent, full scale chemical fume hood is constructed for experimental studies. Distributions of mean velocity and velocity fluctuation in the sash plane are measured using a thermal anemometer. Flow patterns and tracer-gas concentration leakages are respectively diagnosed via the laser-assisted flow visualization method and the EN 14175-3 test protocol. The magnitudes of measured velocity fluctuations exhibit a sharp peak along the perimeter of the sash opening. The results of flow visualization verify that the elevated turbulence fluctuations are induced by the boundary-layer separation when the flow passes over the edges of sash perimeter. The tracer gas experiment shows that the regions where high degree containment leakages detected are located along the perimeter of hood aperture. Eleven commercial hoods which are claimed with fine aerodynamic design are further tested for confirmation of these observations. The results show similar correlations. Conclusions thus are made that large-scale vortex structures occurring around the perimeters of hood aperture due to the boundary-layer separation could induce strong turbulence, and therefore enhance dispersion of the hood containment.

  19. Fluctuations of offshore wind generation: Statistical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Christensen, Lasse E.A.; Madsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of power fluctuations at large offshore wind farms has a significant impact on the control and management strategies of their power output. If focusing on the minute scale, one observes successive periods with smaller and larger power fluctuations. It seems that different regimes...... production averaged at a 1, 5, and 10-minute rate. The exercise consists in one-step ahead forecasting of these time-series with the various regime-switching models. It is shown that the MSAR model, for which the succession of regimes is represented by a hidden Markov chain, significantly outperforms...

  20. The stability analysis of the full velocity and acceleration velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaomei, Zhao; Ziyou, Gao

    2007-03-01

    The stability analysis is one of the important problems in the traffic flow theory, since the congestion phenomena can be regarded as the instability and the phase transition of a dynamical system. Theoretically, we analyze the stable conditions of the full velocity and acceleration difference model (FVADM), which is proposed by introducing the acceleration difference term based on the previous car-following models (the optimal velocity model and the full velocity difference model, OVM and FVDM). By numerical simulations, it is found that when the traffic flow is unstable, the traffic jam in the FVADM is weaker than that in the FVDM. Also it is observed that the spreading speed of the jam is slower in the FVADM than that in the FVDM and the fluctuations of vehicles in the FVADM are smaller than those in the FVDM. Therefore, the acceleration difference term has strong effects on traffic dynamics and plays an important role in stabilizing the traffic flow.

  1. Fluctuation spectra and velocity profile from Doppler backscattering on Tore Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, P.; Honoré, C.; Truc, A.; Quéméneur, A.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Hoang, G. T.; Tore Supra Team

    2006-09-01

    Backscattering of a microwave beam close to the cut-off allows for measurement of density fluctuations \\tilde n(\\vec k_\\perp) at a specified wave-number, selected by the scattering geometry \\vec k_\\perp=-2\\vec k_i , where ki is the beam wave-number at the reflection layer. On the Doppler reflectometry system installed on Tore Supra, both the scattering wave-number k⊥ and the scattering localization (r/a) can be changed during the shot owing to the steppable probing frequency and the motorized antenna. Operating in O mode, the spatial and wave-number ranges depend essentially on density profile, typically probing 0.5 electric field distribution. The dynamics of the fluctuation velocity can be studied from the time frequency analysis of the signal, for investigating intermittent behaviour and transient regimes.

  2. Estimation of Several Turbulent Fluctuation Quantities Using an Approximate Pulsatile Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent fluctuation behavior is approximately modeled using a pulsatile flow model analogy.. This model follows as an extension to the turbulent laminar sublayer model developed by Sternberg (1962) to be valid for a fully turbulent flow domain. Here unsteady turbulent behavior is modeled via a sinusoidal pulsatile approach. While the individual modes of the turbulent flow fluctuation behavior are rather crudely modeled, approximate temporal integration yields plausible estimates for Root Mean Square (RMS) velocity fluctuations. RMS pressure fluctuations and spectra are of particular interest and are estimated via the pressure Poisson expression. Both RMS and Power Spectral Density (PSD), i.e. spectra are developed. Comparison with available measurements suggests reasonable agreement. An additional fluctuating quantity, i.e. RMS wall shear fluctuation is also estimated, yielding reasonable agreement with measurement.

  3. Segregation mechanisms in granular systems: role of gravity and velocity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Size segregation patterns are often observed in natural granular systems: dune fields, debris flow deposits, river beds, asteroids surface... Identifying the underlying mechanisms and dynamics would be a significant progress towards understanding the evolution of these systems: discrimationsbetween different processes, relevant time-scales, history of the mechanical solicitation. In the case of the surface of asteroids exhibiting a granular nature, such as Itokawa, the origin of sorting patterns following grain size may have different origins. It can occur as a result of periodic changes in the gravity field, or seismic-shaking due to impacts, or be the signature of re-deposition of ejected material after impacts. It may also be related to size-dependent thermal weathering or impact bouncing dynamics, rather than mechanical segregation. It is thus crucial to explore the different candidate mechanisms and address their likeliness in spatial context. In this contribution, we use a discrete simulation model to reproduce the collective behaviour of rigid, frictional grains exhibiting different sizes. Segregation dynamics is obtained during gravity-driven flows, allowing for the detailed investigation of the micro-mechanical signature of segregation. In particular, we evidence the asymetry of the stress state induced by the different grain sizes. Discriminating between contacts stresses and kinematic stresses, we are able to discuss the respective role of gravity and velocity fluctuations in the segregation process. References L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Stress partition and micro-structure in size-segregating granular flows, Phys. Rev. E 92 022210 (2015) L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Segregation time-scales in bi-disperse granular flows, Phys. Fluids 26 (3), 033302 (2014)

  4. Role of large-scale velocity fluctuations in a two-vortex kinematic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, E J; Brown, B P; Rahbarnia, K; Forest, C B

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Dudley-James two-vortex flow, which inspired several laboratory-scale liquid-metal experiments, in order to better demonstrate its relation to astrophysical dynamos. A coordinate transformation splits the flow into components that are axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric relative to the induced magnetic dipole moment. The reformulation gives the flow the same dynamo ingredients as are present in more complicated convection-driven dynamo simulations. These ingredients are currents driven by the mean flow and currents driven by correlations between fluctuations in the flow and fluctuations in the magnetic field. The simple model allows us to isolate the dynamics of the growing eigenvector and trace them back to individual three-wave couplings between the magnetic field and the flow. This simple model demonstrates the necessity of poloidal advection in sustaining the dynamo and points to the effect of large-scale flow fluctuations in exciting a dynamo magnetic field.

  5. Giant natural fluctuation models and anthropogenic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Rio Amador, L.; Hébert, R.; Lima, I.

    2016-08-01

    Explanations for the industrial epoch warming are polarized around the hypotheses of anthropogenic warming (AW) and giant natural fluctuations (GNFs). While climate sceptics have systematically attacked AW, up until now they have only invoked GNFs. This has now changed with the publication by D. Keenan of a sample of 1000 series from stochastic processes purporting to emulate the global annual temperature since 1880. While Keenan's objective was to criticize the International Panel on Climate Change's trend uncertainty analysis (their assumption that residuals are only weakly correlated), for the first time it is possible to compare a stochastic GNF model with real data. Using Haar fluctuations, probability distributions, and other techniques of time series analysis, we show that his model has unrealistically strong low-frequency variability so that even mild extrapolations imply ice ages every ≈1000 years. Helped by statistics, the GNF model can easily be scientifically rejected.

  6. THE POWER SPECTRUM OF THE MILKY WAY: VELOCITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Bird, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Pérez, Ana E. García; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Zasowski, Gail, E-mail: bovy@ias.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the kinematics of stars in the mid-plane of the Milky Way (MW) on scales between 25 pc and 10 kpc with data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey (GCS). Using red-clump (RC) stars in APOGEE, we determine the large-scale line-of-sight velocity field out to 5 kpc from the Sun in (0.75 kpc){sup 2} bins. The solar motion V{sub ☉} {sub –} {sub c} with respect to the circular velocity V{sub c} is the largest contribution to the power on large scales after subtracting an axisymmetric rotation field; we determine the solar motion by minimizing the large-scale power to be V{sub ☉} {sub –} {sub c} = 24 ± 1 (ran.) ± 2 (syst. [V{sub c} ]) ± 5 (syst.[large-scale]) km s{sup –1}, where the systematic uncertainty is due to (1) a conservative 20 km s{sup –1} uncertainty in V{sub c} and (2) the estimated power on unobserved larger scales. Combining the APOGEE peculiar-velocity field with RC stars in RAVE out to 2 kpc from the Sun and with local GCS stars, we determine the power spectrum of residual velocity fluctuations in the MW's disk on scales between 0.2 kpc{sup –1} ≤ k ≤ 40 kpc{sup –1}. Most of the power is contained in a broad peak between 0.2 kpc{sup –1} < k < 0.9 kpc{sup –1}. We investigate the expected power spectrum for various non-axisymmetric perturbations and demonstrate that the central bar with commonly used parameters but of relatively high mass can explain the bulk of velocity fluctuations in the plane of the Galactic disk near the Sun. Streaming motions ≈10 km s{sup –1} on ≳ 3 kpc scales in the MW are in good agreement with observations of external galaxies and directly explain why local determinations of the solar motion are inconsistent with global measurements.

  7. The Evolution of the Spectrum of Velocity Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has shown that at 1AU from the Sun the power spectrum of the solar wind magnetic field has the -5/3 spectral slope expected for Kolmogorov turbulence, but that the velocity has closer to a -3/2 spectrum. This paper traces the changes in solar wind velocity spectra from 0.3 to 5 AU using data from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft to show that this is a transient stage in the evolution. The spectrum of the velocity is found to be flatter than that of the magnetic field for the higher frequencies examined for all cases until the slopes become equal (at -5/3) well past 1 AU when the wind is relatively nonAlfvenic. In some respects, in particular in the evolution of the frequency at which the spectrum changes from flatter at larger scales to a traditionally turbulent spectrum at smaller scales, the velocity field evolves more rapidly that the magnetic, and this is associated with the dominance of the magnetic energy over the kinetic at "inertial range" scales. The Alfvenicity of the fluctuations, not the speed of the flow, is shown to control the rate of the spectral evolution. This study shows that, for the solar wind ., the idea of a simple "inertial range" with uniform spectral properties is not realistic, and new phenomenologies will be needed to capture the true situation. In addition a flattening of the velocity spectrum persists at times for small scales, which may provide a clue to the nature of the small-scale interactions.

  8. A Regime Diagram for Autoignition of Homogeneous Reactant Mixtures with Turbulent Velocity and Temperature Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2015-04-02

    A theoretical scaling analysis is conducted to propose a diagram to predict weak and strong ignition regimes for a compositionally homogeneous reactant mixture with turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations. The diagram provides guidance on expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the mixture and the flow/scalar field conditions. The analysis is an extension of the original Zeldovich’s analysis by combining the turbulent flow and scalar characteristics in terms of the characteristic Damköhler and Reynolds numbers of the system, thereby providing unified and comprehensive understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling ignition characteristics. Estimated parameters for existing experimental measurements in a rapid compression facility show that the regime diagram predicts the observed ignition characteristics with good fidelity.

  9. A detailed procedure for measuring turbulent velocity fluctuations using constant-voltage anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Taifour, Abdelouahab; Weiss, Julien; Sadeghi, Atabak; Vétel, Jérôme; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    A detailed procedure to use a constant-voltage anemometer (CVA) for the accurate measurement of turbulent flows is proposed. The procedure is based on the usual small-perturbation analysis of hot-wire signals. It consists in three steps: (1) the calibration of internal elements, required to estimate the two main electrical parameters of the CVA circuitry that are needed in the data analysis, (2) a flow calibration to relate the CVA output voltage and the hot-wire time constant to the flow velocity, and (3) a data-processing algorithm to recover the fluctuating flow quantities from the output voltage. The procedure is tested in two classical turbulent flows: a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a round jet. In both cases, the CVA results are shown to be essentially indistinguishable from the results obtained with a research-grade constant-temperature anemometer.

  10. Statistics of velocity and temperature fluctuations in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Yong-Xiang; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Yu-Lu; Lu, Zhi-Ming; Qiu, Xiang; Zhou, Quan

    2017-08-01

    We investigate fluctuations of the velocity and temperature fields in two-dimensional (2D) Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) over the Rayleigh number range 106≤Ra≤1010 and for a fixed Prandtl number Pr=5.3 and aspect ratio Γ =1 . Our results show that there exists a counter-gradient turbulent transport of energy from fluctuations to the mean flow both locally and globally, implying that the Reynolds stress is one of the driving mechanisms of the large-scale circulation in 2D turbulent RB convection besides the buoyancy of thermal plumes. We also find that the viscous boundary layer (BL) thicknesses near the horizontal conducting plates and near the vertical sidewalls, δu and δv, are almost the same for a given Ra, and they scale with the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers as ˜Ra-0.26±0.03 and ˜Re-0.43±0.04 . Furthermore, the thermal BL thickness δθ defined based on the root-mean-square (rms) temperature profiles is found to agree with Prandtl-Blasius predictions from the scaling point of view. In addition, the probability density functions of turbulent energy ɛu' and thermal ɛθ' dissipation rates, calculated, respectively, within the viscous and thermal BLs, are found to be always non-log-normal and obey approximately a Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution first introduced to characterize rare fluctuations in a confined turbulent flow and critical phenomena.

  11. A Tall-Tower Instrument for Mean and Fluctuating Velocity, Fluctuating Temperature and Sensible Heat Flux Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Thomson, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor. The tem......For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor...

  12. Effect of operating methods of wind turbine generator system on net power extraction under wind velocity fluctuations in fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Hashizume, Takumi [Waseda Univ., Advanced Research Inst. for Science and Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Outa, Eisuke [Waseda Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tokyo (Japan); Tanzawa, Yoshiaki [Nippon Inst. of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Saitama (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of how a wind turbine generator system is operated is discussed from the viewpoint of net power extraction with wind velocity fluctuation in relation to the scale and the dynamic behaviour of the system. On a wind turbine generator system consisting of a Darrieus-Savonius hybrid wind turbine, a load generator and a battery, we took up two operating methods: constant tip speed ratio operation for a stand-alone system (Scheme 1) and synchronous operation by connecting a grid (Scheme 2). With our simulation model, using the result of the net extracting power, we clarified that Scheme 1 is more effective than Scheme 2 for small-scale systems. Furthermore, in Scheme 1, the appropriate rated power output of the system under each wind condition can be confirmed. (Author)

  13. The effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations on the convective heat transfer to droplets subjected to evaporation and thermolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Finnerman, Oskar; Ström, Henrik

    2016-06-01

    The effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations on the convective heat transfer to single droplets in a turbulent channel flow are investigated numerically. It is found that for properties relevant to typical liquid spray applications, the convective heat transfer is enhanced with increasing droplet size and bulk Reynolds number. The combined effect of convective heat transfer enhancement and increased driving forces for heat and mass transfer due to droplet dispersion is thereafter investigated for a commercial spray application. The probability distribution functions of droplet properties in the spray are found to be significantly affected by the presence of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the carrier phase.

  14. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  15. Spontaneous fluctuations in a zero-noise model of flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2016-11-01

    Investigations into the complex structure and dynamics of collectively moving groups of living organisms have provided valuable insights. Understanding the emergent features, especially, the origin of fluctuations, appears to be challenging in the current scheme of models. It has been argued that flocks are poised at criticality. We present a two-dimensional self-propelled particle model where neighbourhoods and forces are defined through topology-based rules. The attractive forces are modeled in order to maintain cohesion in the flock in open-boundary conditions. We find that fluctuations occur spontaneously in the absence of any external noise. For certain values of the parameters the flock shows a high degree of order as well as scale-free decay of spatial correlations in velocity and speed. We characterize the dynamical behaviour of the system using the Lyapunov spectrum. Largest exponents being positive but small in magnitude suggest that the apparent high susceptibility may result from the system operating near the borderline of order and chaos.

  16. Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a normally stagnant pipe connected downward to a high velocity and high temperature main pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Oumaya, Toru [Mechanical Engineering Group, Nuclear Power Division, Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., 8 Yokota, 13 Goichi, Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1141 (Japan); Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Shigeo; Hamatani, Daisuke; Hase, Masatsugu; Onojima, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Saito, Atsushi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Higashinada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Flow patterns in a branch pipe with a closed end were observed by visualization. • The penetration length was investigated using experiments and numerical simulations. • The temperature fluctuation mechanism related to spiral flow was discussed. - Abstract: Numerous pipes branch off from the main pipes in power plant facilities. Main pipe flow initiates a cavity flow in a downward branch pipe with a closed end and a thermally stratified layer may form in the branch pipe if there is significant temperature difference in the main and branch pipe fluids. Fluctuation of a thermally stratified layer may initiate thermal fatigue crack in the branch pipe. In the present study, flow structures and temperature fluctuations in a branch pipe are investigated by experiments and numerical simulations to understand detailed behavior of the layer in a straight pipe and in a bent pipe. The penetration length of the main flow is measured for various main pipe flow velocities. The flow patterns in a straight pipe are divided into three regions by visualization with a tracer method, i.e., cavity flow in region 1, disturbed flow in the transition region, and spiral flow in region 2. The fluid temperature fluctuation in a straight pipe after the increase of main pipe flow velocity is attenuated in several hundred seconds since the thermal stratified layer goes down under the area into which the spiral vortex reaches. The fluid temperature in a bent pipe fluctuates when the spiral vortex reaches its lowest point after a long time period. Periodical velocity fluctuations during several tens second period are observed in the spiral flow. The mechanism of temperature fluctuation near the thermal stratified layer is considered with respect to the interference by the spiral flow and the fixed thermal stratified layer at the bent section by the cold water provided from the horizontal section.

  17. A Global View of Velocity Fluctuations in the Corona below 1.3 R ⊙ with CoMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R. J.; Tomczyk, S.; Pinto, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    The Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) has previously demonstrated the presence of Doppler velocity fluctuations in the solar corona. The observed fluctuations are thought to be transverse waves, i.e., highly incompressible motions whose restoring force is dominated by the magnetic tension, some of which demonstrate clear periodicity. We aim to exploit CoMP’s ability to provide high cadence observations of the off-limb corona to investigate the properties of velocity fluctuations in a range of coronal features, providing insight into how (whether) the properties of the waves are influenced by the varying magnetic topology in active regions, quiet Sun and open field regions. An analysis of Doppler velocity time-series of the solar corona from the 10747 Å Iron xiii line is performed, determining the velocity power spectrum and using it as a tool to probe wave behavior. Further, the average phase speed and density for each region are estimated and used to compute the spectra for energy density and energy flux. In addition, we assess the noise levels associated with the CoMP data, deriving analytic formulae for the uncertainty on Doppler velocity measurements and providing a comparison by estimating the noise from the data. It is found that the entire corona is replete with transverse wave behavior. The corresponding power spectra indicate that the observed velocity fluctuations are predominately generated by stochastic processes, with the spectral slope of the power varying between the different magnetic regions. Most strikingly, all power spectra reveal the presence of enhanced power occurring at ∼3 mHz, potentially implying that the excitation of coronal transverse waves by p-modes is a global phenomenon.

  18. Measurement and interpretation of the velocity space correlation of a laboratory plasma fluctuation with laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, S. W.; Berumen, J.; Chu, F.; Hood, R.; Skiff, F.

    2013-11-01

    A technique for probing velocity space correlations has been developed using laser-induced fluorescence. In this paper, a description of the experimental setup is given, with results to follow in a later publication. The experiment consists of a cylindrical plasma column 3 m long and radius ~ 0.25 cm, holding singly-charged argon ions (Ar II) with density n ~ 109 cm-3, Te ~ 5 eV, Ti,|| ~ .06 eV, and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. Two separate metastable lines are excited by single frequency lasers at 611 nm and 668 nm. These lasers may tune with a precision of .01 pm. The separate lasers are used to measure independent slices of the velocity distribution function. To confirm the velocity distribution and magnetic field, the Doppler-broadened, sigma-polarized Zeeman line for each transition is measured. With this, the absolute parallel component of ion velocity subject to LIF can be determined. The two separate lasers then give us a signal as a function of two separate parallel ion velocities. Two point correlation is used to reduce the noise floor on the plasma fluctuation. This fluctuation is then investigated as a function of the difference in velocity.

  19. Velocity and pressure fluctuations induced by the precessing helical vortex in a conical diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, A.; Bosioc, A.; Nilsson, H.; Muntean, S.; Susan-Resiga, R.

    2014-03-01

    The flow unsteadiness generated in the draft tube cone of hydraulic turbines affects the turbine operation. Therefore, several swirling flow configurations are investigated using a swirling apparatus in order to explore the unsteady phenomena. The swirl apparatus has two parts: the swirl generator and the test section. The swirl generator includes two blade rows being designed such that the exit velocity profile resembles that of a turbine with fixed pitch. The test section includes a divergent part similar to the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine. A new control method based on a magneto rheological brake is used in order to produce several swirling flow configurations. As a result, the investigations are performed for six operating regimes in order to quantify the flow from part load operation, corresponding to runaway speed, to overload operation, corresponding to minimum speed, at constant guide vane opening. The part load operation corresponds to 0.7 times the best efficiency discharge, while the overload operation corresponds to 1.54 times the best efficiency discharge. LDV measurements are performed along three survey axes in the test section. The first survey axis is located just downstream the runner in order to check the velocity field at the swirl generator exit, while the next two survey axes are located at the inlet and at the outlet of the draft tube cone. Two velocity components are simultaneously measured on each survey axis. The measured unsteady velocity components are used to validate the results of unsteady numerical simulations, conducted using the OpenFOAM CFD code. The computational domain covers the entire swirling apparatus, including strouts, guide vanes, runner, and the conical diffuser. A dynamic mesh is used together with sliding GGI interfaces to include the effect of the rotating runner. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-ε turbulence model are utilized to simulate the unsteady turbulent flow

  20. A global view of velocity fluctuations in the corona below 1.3 $R_\\odot$ with CoMP

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, R J; Pinto, R F

    2016-01-01

    The Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) has previously demonstrated the presence of Doppler velocity fluctuations in the solar corona. The observed fluctuations are thought to be transverse waves, i.e. highly incompressible motions whose restoring force is dominated by the magnetic tension, some of which demonstrate clear periodicity. We aim to exploit CoMP's ability to provide high cadence observations of the off-limb corona to investigate the properties of velocity fluctuations in a range of coronal features, providing insight into how(if) the properties of the waves are influenced by the varying magnetic topology in active regions, quiet Sun and open fields regions. An analysis of Doppler velocity time-series of the solar corona from the $10,747$~{\\AA} Iron XIII line is performed, determining the velocity power spectra and using it as a tool to probe wave behaviour. Further, the average phase speed and density for each region are estimated and used to compute the spectra for energy density and energy ...

  1. Resonances and fluctuations in the statistical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrieri Giorgio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe how the study of resonances and fluctuations can help constrain the thermal and chemical freezeout properties of the fireball created in heavy ion collisions. This review is based on [1–5

  2. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  3. Velocity bias in a LCDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Pierre; Kravtsov, A V; Colin, Pedro; Klypin, Anatoly; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2000-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the velocity bias of dark matter halos, the difference in the velocity fields of dark matter and halos, in a flat low- density LCDM model. The high force, 2kpc/h, and mass, 10^9Msun/h, resolution allows dark matter halos to survive in very dense environments of groups and clusters making it possible to use halos as galaxy tracers. We find that the velocity bias pvb measured as a ratio of pairwise velocities of the halos to that of the dark matter evolves with time and depends on scale. At high redshifts (z ~5) halos move generally faster than the dark matter almost on all scales: pvb(r)~1.2, r>0.5Mpc/h. At later moments the bias decreases and gets below unity on scales less than r=5Mpc/h: pvb(r)~(0.6-0.8) at z=0. We find that the evolution of the pairwise velocity bias follows and probably is defined by the spatial antibias of the dark matter halos at small scales. One-point velocity bias b_v, defined as the ratio of the rms velocities of halos and dark matter, provides a mo...

  4. Critical fluctuations for quantum mean-field models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fannes, M.; Kossakowski, A.; Verbeure, A. (Univ. Louvain (Belgium))

    1991-11-01

    A Ginzburg-Landau-type approximation is proposed for the local Gibbs states for quantum mean-field models that leads to the exact thermodynamics. Using this approach, the spin fluctuations are computed for some spin-1/2 models. At the critical temperature, the distribution function showing abnormal fluctuations is found explicitly.

  5. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  6. State space modeling of groundwater fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendrecht, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater plays an important role in both urban and rural areas. It is therefore essential to monitor groundwater fluctuations. However, data that becomes available need to be analyzed further in order to extract specific information on the groundwater system. Until recently, simple linear time se

  7. Relationship between energy cost, swimming velocity, speed fluctuation in competitive swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Lima, A.B.; Portela, A; Novais, D.; L Machado; Colaço, P.; Gonçalves, P; Fernandes, R. J.; Keskinen, K.L.; Vilas-Boas, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the relationships between the total energy expenditure ( tot), the energy cost (EC), the intra-cycle variation of the horizontal velocity of displacement of centre of mass (dv) and the mean swimming velocity (v) in the four competitive swimming strokes.

  8. Measurements of the fluctuating liquid velocity of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan Carlos; Mendez, Santos; Zenit, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. The capillaries are small enough to generate bubbles in the range of 1 to 6 mm in diameter. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the vertical component of the fluctuating liquid velocity was obtained using a flying hot wire anemometer technique. The system is characterized by the dimensionless Reynolds and Weber numbers in the range of 22velocity variance increases with bubble concentration. We also found that the variance, normalized with the mean bubble velocity squared, Tf% =Uf^^'2/Ub^2, increased as the Reynolds number decreased. Bidisperse flows, in general, show larger values of fluctuation.

  9. Large velocity fluctuations in small-Reynolds-number pipe flow of polymer solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Ingremeau, F.; Amarouchene, Y.; Kellay, H.

    2011-01-01

    The flow of polymer solutions is examined in a flow geometry where a jet is used to inject the viscoelastic solution into a cylindrical tube. We show that this geometry allows for the generation of a "turbulentlike" flow at very low Reynolds numbers with a fluctuation level which can be as high as 3

  10. The triple decomposition of a fluctuating velocity field in a multiscale flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baj, P.; Bruce, P. J. K.; Buxton, O. R. H. [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    A new method for the triple decomposition of a multiscale flow, which is based on the novel optimal mode decomposition (OMD) technique, is presented. OMD provides low order linear dynamics, which fits a given data set in an optimal way and is used to distinguish between a coherent (periodic) part of a flow and a stochastic fluctuation. The method needs no external phase indication since this information, separate for coherent structures associated with each length scale introduced into the flow, appears as the output. The proposed technique is compared against two traditional methods of the triple decomposition, i.e., bin averaging and proper orthogonal decomposition. This is done with particle image velocimetry data documenting the near wake of a multiscale bar array. It is shown that both traditional methods are unable to provide a reliable estimation for the coherent fluctuation while the proposed technique performs very well. The crucial result is that the coherence peaks are not observed within the spectral properties of the stochastic fluctuation derived with the proposed method; however, these properties remain unaltered at the residual frequencies. This proves the method’s capability of making a distinction between both types of fluctuations. The sensitivity to some prescribed parameters is checked revealing the technique’s robustness. Additionally, an example of the method application for analysis of a multiscale flow is given, i.e., the phase conditioned transverse integral length is investigated in the near wake region of the multiscale object array.

  11. Rational Characterization Complex Geology Model——Macro Velocity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongWei

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of migration velocity construction is always a key problem of the image quality of pre-stack depth migration. The velocity model construction process is a process from an unknown to unknown iteration procedure and involves three important steps -- model building, migration and model modification. It is necessary to rationally describe the velocity model, according to the complexity of the problem. Taking the Marmousi model as a study object, We established some standards for a rational description of the velocity model on the basis of different velocity space scales, analysis varieties of travel time, and image quality. It is considered that for any given seismic data gathered in the migration velocity model the space wavelength of velocity, which should be expressed in variation of space wavelength of various frequency contents, appears in the seismic data. Some space wavelengths, which are necessary for a description of the model velocity field, are also varying with the layer complexity. For a simple layer velocity structure it is sufficient to apply a simple velocity model (the space wavelength is large enough), whereas, for a complicated layer velocity structure it is necessary to take a velocity model of a more precise scale. In fact, when we establish a velocity model, it is difficult to describe the velocity model at a full space scale, so it is important to limit the space scale of the velocity model according to the complexity of a layer structure and establish a rational macro velocity model.

  12. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102-103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103-105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave-particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  13. Solvable Optimal Velocity Models and Asymptotic Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, K; Igarashi, Y; Bando, M

    1996-01-01

    In the Optimal Velocity Model proposed as a new version of Car Following Model, it has been found that a congested flow is generated spontaneously from a homogeneous flow for a certain range of the traffic density. A well-established congested flow obtained in a numerical simulation shows a remarkable repetitive property such that the velocity of a vehicle evolves exactly in the same way as that of its preceding one except a time delay $T$. This leads to a global pattern formation in time development of vehicles' motion, and gives rise to a closed trajectory on $\\Delta x$-$v$ (headway-velocity) plane connecting congested and free flow points. To obtain the closed trajectory analytically, we propose a new approach to the pattern formation, which makes it possible to reduce the coupled car following equations to a single difference-differential equation (Rondo equation). To demonstrate our approach, we employ a class of linear models which are exactly solvable. We also introduce the concept of ``asymptotic traj...

  14. Reynolds number effects on the fluctuating velocity distribution in wall-bounded shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Jessen, Wilhelm; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuations of zero pressure gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layers are investigated for seven Reynolds numbers based on the momentum thickness in the range of 1009  ⩽  Re θ   ⩽  4070 by particle-image velocimetry (PIV) and micro-particle tracking velocimetry (µ-PTV) at a spatial resolution up to 0.06-0.23 wall units such that the viscous sublayer is well resolved. The statistics evidence good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experimental results from the literature. The experimental results show the streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuation to grow at increasing Reynolds numbers.

  15. Fluctuating selection models and McDonald-Kreitman type analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni I Gossmann

    Full Text Available It is likely that the strength of selection acting upon a mutation varies through time due to changes in the environment. However, most population genetic theory assumes that the strength of selection remains constant. Here we investigate the consequences of fluctuating selection pressures on the quantification of adaptive evolution using McDonald-Kreitman (MK style approaches. In agreement with previous work, we show that fluctuating selection can generate evidence of adaptive evolution even when the expected strength of selection on a mutation is zero. However, we also find that the mutations, which contribute to both polymorphism and divergence tend, on average, to be positively selected during their lifetime, under fluctuating selection models. This is because mutations that fluctuate, by chance, to positive selected values, tend to reach higher frequencies in the population than those that fluctuate towards negative values. Hence the evidence of positive adaptive evolution detected under a fluctuating selection model by MK type approaches is genuine since fixed mutations tend to be advantageous on average during their lifetime. Never-the-less we show that methods tend to underestimate the rate of adaptive evolution when selection fluctuates.

  16. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  17. Transport of Solar Wind Fluctuations: A Two-Component Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.; Breech, B.; Isenberg, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the transport of solar wind fluctuations which treats them as two interacting incompressible components: quasi-two-dimensional turbulence and a wave-like piece. Quantities solved for include the energy, cross helicity, and characteristic transverse length scale of each component, plus the proton temperature. The development of the model is outlined and numerical solutions are compared with spacecraft observations. Compared to previous single-component models, this new model incorporates a more physically realistic treatment of fluctuations induced by pickup ions and yields improved agreement with observed values of the correlation length, while maintaining good observational accord with the energy, cross helicity, and temperature.

  18. Analysis of Intensity Fluctuations of SASE using the AR Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Ryukou; Isoyama, Goro; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Okamoto, C; Suemine, Shoji; Yamamoto, Tamotsu

    2004-01-01

    We are conducting experimental study on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in the far-infrared region using the L-band linac at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University. The intensity of SASE fluctuates intrinsically because the number of coherent optical pulses generated in an electron bunch is limited. In the actual system, however, another factor producing intensity fluctuations also shows up, which is instability of the linac. Generally speaking, it is difficult to distinguish contributions of these two factors in measured intensity fluctuations. We have applied the autoregressive (AR) model, which is one of the techniques of statistical analysis, to exclude contributions of linac instability from measured data. In the AR model, the present data can be expressed with a linear combination of the past data plus white noise. In the analysis, contributions of the linac instability are identified with the AR model and can be subtracted from the measured data of SASE,...

  19. Velocity measurements in jets with application to noise source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Philip J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of turbulent velocity fluctuations in an axisymmetric jet. The focus is on those properties that are relevant to the prediction of noise. Measurements are performed using two single hot-wire anemometers as well as a two-component anemometer. Two-point cross correlations of the axial velocity fluctuations and of the fluctuations in the square of the axial velocity fluctuations are presented. Several reference locations in the jet are used including points on the jet lip and centerline. The scales of the turbulence and the convection velocity are determined, both in an overall sense as well as a function of frequency. The relationship between the second and fourth order correlations is developed and compared with the experimental data. The implications of the use of dimensional as well as non-dimensional correlations are considered. Finally, a comparison is made between the length scales deduced from the flow measurements and a RANS CFD calculation.

  20. A New Car Following Model: Comprehensive Optimal Velocity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jun-Fang; JIA Bin; LI Xing-Gang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new car-following model, i.e.comprehensive optimal velocity model (COVM),whose optimal velocity function not only depends on the following distance of the preceding vehicle, but also depends on the velocity difference with preceding vehicle.Simulation results show that COVM is an improvement over the previous ones theoretically.Then, the stability condition of the model is obtained by the linear stability analysis, which has shorwn that the model could obtain a bigger stable region than previous models in the phase diagram.Through the nonlinear analysis, the Burgers, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified KdV (mKdV) equations are derived for the triangular shock wave, the soliton wave, and the kink-antikink soliton wave.At the same time, numerical simulations are edso carried out to show that the model could simulate these density waves.

  1. Errors in mean and fluctuating velocity due to PIV bias and precision uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.; Smith, B.L. [Utah State Univ., Utah (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry is a powerful fluid velocity measurement tool that has recently become important for CFD validation experiments. Knowledge of experimental uncertainty is important to CFD validation, but the uncertainty of PIV is very complex and not well understood. Previous work has shown that PIV measurements can become 'noisy' in regions of high shear as well as regions of small displacement. This paper aims to demonstrate the impact of these effects on validation data by comparing PIV data to data acquired using hot-wire anemometry, which does not suffer from the same issues. It is confirmed that shear and insufficient particle displacements can result in elevated measurements of turbulence levels. (author)

  2. Fluctuations and entropy in models of quantum optical resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, S. J. D.; Knight, P. L.

    1988-09-01

    We use variances, entropy, and the Shannon entropy to analyse the fluctuations and quantum evolution of various simple models of quantum optical resonance. We discuss at length the properties of the single-mode radiation field coupled to a single two-level atom, and then extend our analysis to describe the micromaser in which a cavity mode is repeatedly pumped by a succession of atoms passing through the cavity. We also discuss the fluctuations in the single-mode laser theory of Scully and Lamb.

  3. Sample to sample fluctuations in the random energy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrida, B. (Service de Physique Theorique, CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Toulouse, G. (E.S.P.C.I., 75 - Paris (France))

    1985-03-15

    In the spin glass phase, mean field theory says that the weights of the valleys vary from sample to sample. Exact expressions for the probability laws of these fluctuations are derived, from the random energy model, without recourse to the replica method.

  4. [Analysis of seasonal fluctuations in the Lotka-Volterra model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A I; Sarancha, D A; Starozhilova, T K

    2002-01-01

    A modification of the Lotka-Volterra model was proposed. The modification takes into account the factor of seasonal fluctuations in a "predator-prey" model. In this modification, interactions between species in summer are described by the Lotka-Volterra equations; in winter, individuals of both species extinct. This generalization makes the classic model unrough, which substantially extends the field of its application. The results of numerical simulation illustrate the statement formulated above.

  5. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, D.; Mallick, K.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  6. Statistical fluctuations in a saturation laser model with correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shi-Bo; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of correlations between quantum and pump noises on fluctuations of the laser intensity in a saturation laser model. An approximative Fokker-Planck equation and analytic expressions of the steady-state probability distribution function (SPD) of the laser system are derived. Based on the SPD, the normalized mean, the normalized variance, and the normalized skewness of the steady-state laser intensity are calculated numerically. The results indicate that (i) the correlation strength λ of correlated noises always enhances the fluctuation of laser intensity;(ii) the correlation time τ of correlated noises strengthens the fluctuation of laser intensity for the below-threshold case but τ weakens it for the above-threshold case.

  7. Nondissipative Velocity and Pressure Regularizations for the ICON Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restelli, M.; Giorgetta, M.; Hundertmark, T.; Korn, P.; Reich, S.

    2009-04-01

    A challenging aspect in the numerical simulation of atmospheric and oceanic flows is the multiscale character of the problem both in space and time. The small spacial scales are generated by the turbulent energy and enstrophy cascades, and are usually dealt with by means of turbulence parametrizations, while the small temporal scales are governed by the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves, which are of little importance for the large scale dynamics and are often eliminated by means of a semi-implicit time discretization. We propose to treat both phenomena of subgrid turbulence and temporal scale separation in a unified way by means of nondissipative regularizations of the underlying model equations. More precisely, we discuss the use of two regularized equation sets: the velocity regularization, also know as Lagrangian averaged Navier-Stokes system, and the pressure regularization. Both regularizations are nondissipative since they do not enhance the dissipation of energy and enstrophy of the flow. The velocity regularization models the effects of the subgrid velocity fluctuations on the mean flow, it has thus been proposed as a turbulence parametrization and it has been found to yield promising results in ocean modeling [HHPW08]. In particular, the velocity regularization results in a higher variability of the numerical solution. The pressure regularization, discussed in [RWS07], modifies the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves so that the resulting system can be discretized explicitly in time with time steps analogous to those allowed by a semi-implicit method. Compared to semi-implicit time integrators, however, the pressure regularization takes fully into account the geostrophic balance of the flow. We discuss here the implementation of the velocity and pressure regularizations within the numerical framework of the ICON general circulation model (GCM) [BR05] for the case of the rotating shallow water system, showing how the original numerical

  8. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Fang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink-antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model.

  9. Theory and applications of fluctuating-charge models

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiahao

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuating-charge models are computationally efficient methods of treating polarization and charge-transfer phenomena in molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. They are also theoretically appealing as they are minimally parameterized, with parameters corresponding to the chemically important concepts of electronegativities and chemical hardness. However, they are known to overestimate charge transfer for widely separated atoms, leading to qualitative errors in the predicted charge distribution and exaggerated electrostatic properties. We present the charge transfer with polarization current equilibration (QTPIE) model, which solves this problem by introducing distance-dependent electronegativities. A graph-theoretic analysis of the topology of charge transfer allows us to relate the fundamental quantities of charge transfer back to the more familiar variables that represent atomic partial charges. This allows us to formulate a unified theoretical framework for fluctuating-charge mo...

  10. An Efficient Null Model for Conformational Fluctuations in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim Philipp; Borg, Mikael; Bottaro, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    limited to comparatively short timescales. TYPHON is a probabilistic method to explore the conformational space of proteins under the guidance of a sophisticated probabilistic model of local structure and a given set of restraints that represent nonlocal interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or disulfide...... bridges. The choice of the restraints themselves is heuristic, but the resulting probabilistic model is well-defined and rigorous. Conceptually, TYPHON constitutes a null model of conformational fluctuations under a given set of restraints. We demonstrate that TYPHON can provide information...

  11. A fluctuating quantum model of the CO vibration in carboxyhemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2011-06-07

    In this paper, we present a theoretical approach to construct a fluctuating quantum model of the CO vibration in heme-CO proteins and its interaction with external laser fields. The methodology consists of mixed quantum-classical calculations for a restricted number of snapshots, which are then used to construct a parametrized quantum model. As an example, we calculate the infrared absorption spectrum of carboxy-hemoglobin, based on a simplified protein model, and found the absorption linewidth in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. The Limit Deposit Velocity model, a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedema Sape A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred to as the velocity where a bed starts sliding or the velocity above which there is no stationary bed or sliding bed. Others use the velocity where the hydraulic gradient is at a minimum, because of the minimum energy consumption. Most models from literature are one term one equation models, based on the idea that the critical velocity can be explained that way.

  13. A modified full velocity difference model with the consideration of velocity deviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Shi, Zhong-Ke

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a modified full velocity difference model (FVDM) based on car-following theory is proposed with the consideration of velocity deviation which represents the inexact judgement of velocity. The stability condition is obtained by the use of linear stability analysis. It is shown that the stability of traffic flow varies with the deviation extent of velocity. The Burgers, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified K-dV (MKdV) equations are derived to describe the triangular shock waves, soliton waves and kink-antikink waves in the stable, metastable and unstable region, respectively. The numerical simulations show a good agreement with the analytical results, such as density wave, hysteresis loop, acceleration, deceleration and so on. The results show that traffic congestion can be suppressed by taking the positive effect of velocity deviation into account. By taking the positive effect of high estimate of velocity into account, the unrealistic high deceleration and negative velocity which occur in FVDM will be eliminated in the proposed model.

  14. Charge fluctuations in chiral models and the QCD phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Skokov, V; Karsch, F; Redlich, K

    2011-01-01

    We consider the Polyakov loop-extended two flavor chiral quark--meson model and discuss critical phenomena related with the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry. The model is explored beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalisation group. We discuss properties of the net-quark number density fluctuations as well as their higher cumulants. We show that with the increasing net-quark number density, the higher order cumulants exhibit a strong sensitivity to the chiral crossover transition. We discuss their role as probes of the chiral phase transition in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC.

  15. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included......, Mol. Simul. 33 (4–5) (2007) 449–457.]. The new one has advantages for systems with data points at dilute conditions. Prediction of bubble point pressures using parameters from the two objective functions are compared with experimental data for the binary mixtures methyl acetate–n-pentane and methyl...

  16. Computer simulation study of water using a fluctuating charge model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Krishnan; A Verma; S Balasubramanian

    2001-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding in small water clusters is studied through computer simulation methods using a sophisticated, empirical model of interaction developed by Rick et al (S W Rick, S J Stuart and B J Berne 1994 J. Chem. Phys. 101 6141) and others. The model allows for the charges on the interacting sites to fluctuate as a function of time, depending on their local environment. The charge flow is driven by the difference in the electronegativity of the atoms within the water molecule, thus effectively mimicking the effects of polarization of the charge density. The potential model is thus transferable across all phases of water. Using this model, we have obtained the minimum energy structures of water clusters up to a size of ten. The cluster structures agree well with experimental data. In addition, we are able to distinctly identify the hydrogens that form hydrogen bonds based on their charges alone, a feature that is not possible in simulations using fixed charge models. We have also studied the structure of liquid water at ambient conditions using this fluctuating charge model.

  17. Fluctuation relation based continuum model for thermoviscoplasticity in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.; Srinivasa, Arun

    2016-11-01

    A continuum plasticity model for metals is presented from considerations of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Of specific interest is the application of a fluctuation relation that subsumes the second law of thermodynamics en route to deriving the evolution equations for the internal state variables. The modelling itself is accomplished in a two-temperature framework that appears naturally by considering the thermodynamic system to be composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic vibrational subsystem corresponding to the atomic lattice vibrations and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom describing the motion of defects in a plastically deforming metal. An apparently physical nature of the present model derives upon considering the dislocation density, which characterizes the configurational subsystem, as a state variable. Unlike the usual constitutive modelling aided by the second law of thermodynamics that merely provides a guideline to select the admissible (though possibly non-unique) processes, the present formalism strictly determines the process or the evolution equations for the thermodynamic states while including the effect of fluctuations. The continuum model accommodates finite deformation and describes plastic deformation in a yield-free setup. The theory here is essentially limited to face-centered cubic metals modelled with a single dislocation density as the internal variable. Limited numerical simulations are presented with validation against relevant experimental data.

  18. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using...... the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...... separation. Finally, it is shown that the RDT output can deviate from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory....

  19. Langevin equation with fluctuating diffusivity: A two-state model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Tomoshige; Akimoto, Takuma; Yamamoto, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Recently, anomalous subdiffusion, aging, and scatter of the diffusion coefficient have been reported in many single-particle-tracking experiments, though the origins of these behaviors are still elusive. Here, as a model to describe such phenomena, we investigate a Langevin equation with diffusivity fluctuating between a fast and a slow state. Namely, the diffusivity follows a dichotomous stochastic process. We assume that the sojourn time distributions of these two states are given by power laws. It is shown that, for a nonequilibrium ensemble, the ensemble-averaged mean-square displacement (MSD) shows transient subdiffusion. In contrast, the time-averaged MSD shows normal diffusion, but an effective diffusion coefficient transiently shows aging behavior. The propagator is non-Gaussian for short time and converges to a Gaussian distribution in a long-time limit; this convergence to Gaussian is extremely slow for some parameter values. For equilibrium ensembles, both ensemble-averaged and time-averaged MSDs show only normal diffusion and thus we cannot detect any traces of the fluctuating diffusivity with these MSDs. Therefore, as an alternative approach to characterizing the fluctuating diffusivity, the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the time-averaged MSD is utilized and it is shown that the RSD exhibits slow relaxation as a signature of the long-time correlation in the fluctuating diffusivity. Furthermore, it is shown that the RSD is related to a non-Gaussian parameter of the propagator. To obtain these theoretical results, we develop a two-state renewal theory as an analytical tool.

  20. Stress-induced electric current fluctuations in rocks: a superstatistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We recorded spontaneous electric current flow in non-piezoelectric Carrara marble samples during triaxial deformation. Mechanical data, ultrasonic velocities and acoustic emissions were acquired simultaneously with electric current to constrain the relationship between electric current flow, differential stress and damage. Under strain-controlled loading, spontaneous electric current signals (nA) were generated and sustained under all conditions tested. In dry samples, a detectable electric current arises only during dilatancy and the overall signal is correlated with the damage induced by microcracking. Our results show that fracture plays a key role in the generation of electric currents in deforming rocks (Cartwright-Taylor et al., in prep). We also analysed the high-frequency fluctuations of these electric current signals and found that they are not normally distributed - they exhibit power-law tails (Cartwright-Taylor et al., 2014). We modelled these distributions with q-Gaussian statistics, derived by maximising the Tsallis entropy. This definition of entropy is particularly applicable to systems which are strongly correlated and far from equilibrium. Good agreement, at all experimental conditions, between the distributions of electric current fluctuations and the q-Gaussian function with q-values far from one, illustrates the highly correlated, fractal nature of the electric source network within the samples and provides further evidence that the source of the electric signals is the developing fractal network of cracks. It has been shown (Beck, 2001) that q-Gaussian distributions can arise from the superposition of local relaxations in the presence of a slowly varying driving force, thus providing a dynamic reason for the appearance of Tsallis statistics in systems with a fluctuating energy dissipation rate. So, the probability distribution for a dynamic variable, u under some external slow forcing, β, can be obtained as a superposition of temporary local

  1. Multiplicative Inhibitory Velocity Detector and Multi-Velocity Motion Detection Neural Network Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Motion perception is one of the most important aspects of the biological visual system,from which people get a lot of information of the natural world.In this paper,trying to simulate the neurons in MT(motion area in visual cortex)which respond selectively both in direction and speed,the authors propose a novel multiplicative inhibitory velocity detector(MIVD)model,whose spatiotemporal joint parameter K determines its optimal velocity.Based on the Response Amplitude Disparity(RAD) property of MIVD,two multi-velocity fusion neural networks(a simple one and an active one)are built to detect the velocity of 1-Dimension motion.The experiments show that the active MIVD Neural Network with a feedback fusion method has a relatively better result.

  2. a Revised Stochastic Optimal Velocity Model Considering the Velocity Gap with a Preceding Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Keizo; Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya

    The stochastic optimal velocity (SOV) model, which is a cellular automata model, has been widely used because of its good reproducibility of the fundamental diagram, despite its simplicity. However, it has a drawback: in SOV, a vehicle that is temporarily stopped takes a long time to restart. This study proposes a revised SOV model that suppresses this particular defect; the basic concept of this model is derived from the car-following model, which considers the velocity gap between a particular vehicle and the preceding vehicle. A series of simulations identifies the model parameters and clarifies that the proposed model can reproduce the three traffic phases: free, jam, and even synchronized phases, which cannot be achieved by the conventional SOV model.

  3. Fluctuation dissipation ratio in the one dimensional kinetic Ising model

    OpenAIRE

    Lippiello, E.; Zannetti, M.

    2000-01-01

    The exact relation between the response function $R(t,t^{\\prime})$ and the two time correlation function $C(t,t^{\\prime})$ is derived analytically in the one dimensional kinetic Ising model subjected to a temperature quench. The fluctuation dissipation ratio $X(t,t^{\\prime})$ is found to depend on time through $C(t,t^{\\prime})$ in the time region where scaling $C(t,t^{\\prime}) = f(t/t^{\\prime})$ holds. The crossover from the nontrivial form $X(C(t,t^{\\prime}))$ to $X(t,t^{\\prime}) \\equiv 1$ t...

  4. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Connell, John P.; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuation Solution Theory provides relationships between integrals of the molecular pair total and direct correlation functions and the pressure derivative of solution density, partial molar volumes, and composition derivatives of activity coefficients. For dense fluids, the integrals follow...... for densities and gas solubilities, including ionic liquids and complex mixtures such as coal liquids. The approach is especially useful in systems with strong nonidealities. This chapter describes successful application of such modeling to a wide variety of systems treated over several decades and suggests how...

  5. Baryon number fluctuations in quasi-particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ameng [Southeast University Chengxian College, Department of Foundation, Nanjing (China); Luo, Xiaofeng [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Zong, Hongshi [Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Baryon number fluctuations are sensitive to the QCD phase transition and the QCD critical point. According to the Feynman rules of finite-temperature field theory, we calculated various order moments and cumulants of the baryon number distributions in the quasi-particle model of the quark-gluon plasma. Furthermore, we compared our results with the experimental data measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. It is found that the experimental data can be well described by the model for the colliding energies above 30 GeV and show large discrepancies at low energies. This puts a new constraint on the qQGP model and also provides a baseline for the QCD critical point search in heavy-ion collisions at low energies. (orig.)

  6. Baryon Number Fluctuations in Quasi-particle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ameng; Zong, Hongshi

    2016-01-01

    Baryon number fluctuations are sensitive to the QCD phase transition and QCD critical point. According to the Feynman rules of finite-temperature field theory, we calculated various order moments and cumulants of the baryon number distributions in the quasi-particle model of quark gluon plasma. Furthermore, we compared our results with the experimental data measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. It is found that the experimental data can be well described by the model for the colliding energies above 30 GeV and show large discrepancies at low energies. It can put new constraint on qQGP model and also provide a baseline for the QCD critical point search in heavy-ion collisions at low energies.

  7. Kubo Fluctuation Relations in the Generalized Elastic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Taloni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized elastic model encompasses several linear stochastic models describing the dynamics of polymers, membranes, rough surfaces, and fluctuating interfaces. In this paper we show that the Fractional Langevin Equation (FLE is a suitable framework for the study of the tracer (probe particle dynamics, when an external force acts only on a single point x→⋆ (tagged probe belonging to the system. With the help of the Fox function formalism we study the scaling behaviour of the noise- and force-propagators for large and short times (distances. We show that the Kubo fluctuation relations are exactly fulfilled when a time periodic force is exerted on the tagged probe. Most importantly, by studying the large and low frequency behaviour of the complex mobility we illustrate surprising nontrivial physical scenarios. Our analysis shows that the system splits into two distinct regions whose size depends on the applied frequency, characterized by very different response to the periodic perturbation exerted, both in the phase shift and in the amplitude.

  8. Initial partonic eccentricity fluctuations in a multiphase transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.

    2016-10-01

    Initial partonic eccentricities in Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy √{sN N}=200 GeV are investigated by using a multiphase transport model with a string-melting scenario. The initial eccentricities in different order of harmonics are studied by using participant and cumulant definitions. Eccentricity in terms of second-, fourth- and sixth-order cumulants as a function of number of participant nucleons are compared systematically with the traditional participant definition. The ratio of the cumulant eccentricities ɛ {4 }/ɛ {2 } and ɛ {6 }/ɛ {4 } are studied in comparison with the ratio of the corresponding flow harmonics. The conversion coefficients (vn/ɛn ) are explored up to fourth-order harmonics based on the cumulant method. Furthermore, studies on transverse momentum (pT) and pseudorapidity (η ) dependencies of eccentricities and their fluctuations are presented. As in ideal hydrodynamics, initial eccentricities are expected to be closely related to the final flow harmonics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, studies of the fluctuating initial condition in the AMPT model will shed light on the tomography properties of the initial source geometry.

  9. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  10. A Computational Model for Velocity Separation in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋志尧; 严以新; 沈红艳; 孔俊

    2002-01-01

    Based on the hydrodynamical feature and the theoretical velocity profiles of tidal flow and wind-induced flow in shal-low sea, a computational model is established for the first time, which can separate observed velocity into tidal velocityand wind-induced velocity by use of the least square method. With the model, not only the surface velocities of tidal flowand wind-induced flow are obtained, but also the bed roughness height is determined and the wind velocity above the wa-ter surface is estimated. For verification of the model, the observed velocity in the Yellow River Estuary and the laborato-ry test is separated, then it is applied to the Yangtze River Estuary. All the results are satisfactory. The research resultsshow that the model is simple in method, feasible in process and reasonable in result. The model is a valid approach toanalysis and computation of field data, and can be applied to separate the observed velocity in shallow sea; at the sametime, reasonable boundary conditions of the surface and bottom can be obtained for two- and three-dimensional numericalsimulation.

  11. Multikanban model for disassembly line with demand fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Al-Turki, Yousef A. Y.

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, the continuous growth in consumer waste and dwindling natural resources has seriously threatened the environment. Realizing this, several countries have passed regulations that force manufacturers not only to manufacture environmentally conscious products, but also to take back their used products from consumers so that the components and materials recovered from the products may be reused and/or recycled. Disassembly plays an important role in product recovery. A disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable setting for disassembly of products in large quantities. Because a disassembly line has a tendency to generate excessive inventory, employing a kanban system can reduce the inventory level and let the system run more efficiently. A disassembly line is quite different from an assembly line. For example, not only can the demand arrive at the last station, it can also arrive at any of the other stations in the system. The demand for a component on the disassembly line could fluctuate widely. In fact, there are many other complicating matters that need to be considered to implement the concept of kanbans in such an environment. In this paper, we discuss the complications that are unique to a disassembly line. We discuss the complications in utilizing the conventional production control mechanisms in a disassembly line setting. We then show how to overcome them by implementing kanbans in a disassembly line setting with demand fluctuation and introduce the concept of multi-kanban mechanism. We demonstrate its effectiveness using a simulation model. An example is presented to illustrate the concept.

  12. Velocity dispersion of M87 using a population model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, R. J.; Junkkarinen, V.; Talbert, F. D.; Brandt, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity dispersion of M 87 (NGC 4486) is determined using (1) a single star of class K0 III and (2) two different population models to represent the spectral region of the G-band. Although the models fit the overall spectrum better than the single-star, there is only a small difference in the derived velocity dispersion. This work revises the earlier velocity dispersion result of Brandt and Roosen (1969) down to 350 km/sec, in agreement with Faber and Jackson (1976) and Sargent et al. (1978).

  13. Velocity model optimization for surface microseismic monitoring via amplitude stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyu; Wang, Zhongren; Zeng, Xiaoxian; Lü, Hao; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    A usable velocity model in microseismic projects plays a crucial role in achieving statistically reliable microseismic event locations. Existing methods for velocity model optimization rely mainly on picking arrival times at individual receivers. However, for microseismic monitoring with surface stations, seismograms of perforation shots have such low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) that they do not yield sufficiently reliable picks. In this study, we develop a framework for constructing a 1-D flat-layered a priori velocity model using a non-linear optimization technique based on amplitude stacking. The energy focusing of the perforation shot is improved thanks to very fast simulated annealing (VFSA), and the accuracies of shot relocations are used to evaluate whether the resultant velocity model can be used for microseismic event location. Our method also includes a conventional migration-based location technique that utilizes successive grid subdivisions to improve computational efficiency and source location accuracy. Because unreasonable a priori velocity model information and interference due to additive noise are the major contributors to inaccuracies in perforation shot locations, we use velocity model optimization as a compensation scheme. Using synthetic tests, we show that accurate locations of perforation shots can be recovered to within 2 m, even with pre-stack S/N ratios as low as 0.1 at individual receivers. By applying the technique to a coal-bed gas reservoir in Western China, we demonstrate that perforation shot location can be recovered to within the tolerance of the well tip location.

  14. A Total Generalized Optimal Velocity Model and Its Numerical Tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-xing; LIU Yun-cai

    2008-01-01

    A car-following model named total generalized optimal velocity model (TGOVM) was developed with a consideration of an arbitrary number of preceding vehicles before current one based on analyzing the previous models such as optimal velocity model (OVM), generalized OVM (GOVM) and improved GOVM (IGOVM). This model describes the physical phenomena of traffic flow more exactly and realistically than previous models. Also the performance of this model was checked out by simulating the acceleration and de- celeration process for a small delay time. On a single circular lane, the evolution of the traffic congestion was studied for a different number of headways and relative velocities of the preceding vehicles being taken into account. The simulation results show that TGOVM is reasonable and correct.

  15. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  16. Kinetic market models with single commodity having price fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, A; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.; Chatterjee, Arnab

    2006-01-01

    We study here numerically the behavior of an ideal gas like model of markets having only one non-consumable commodity. We investigate the behavior of the steady-state distributions of money, commodity and total wealth, as the dynamics of trading or exchange of money and commodity proceeds, with local (in time) fluctuations in the price of the commodity. These distributions are studied in markets with agents having uniform and random saving factors. The self-organizing features in money distribution are similar to the cases without any commodity (or with consumable commodities), the commodity distribution shows an exponential decay. The wealth distribution shows interesting behavior: Gamma like distribution for uniform saving propensity and has the same power-law tail, as that of the money distribution for a market with agents having random saving propensity.

  17. LAGRANGIAN MICROMIXING MODELS FOR CONCENTRATION FLUCTUATIONS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amicarelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a brief overview of the main features, theoretical formulations and validation tests of some Lagrangian micromixing models, currently used for estimations of the ensemble mean and the turbulent fluctuations of concentration. Their application fields regards several pollutant dispersion phenomena such as: accidents (power or production plants, terroristic attacks, hydrocarbons storage and transport, extraordinary emissions, odours (power plants and energy production from waste resources-compost, dumps, incinerators, biogas storage and smokes-, high enthalpy geothermic plants-sulfide hydrogen-, animal farms, micro-scale dispersion from continuous or spot emissions (traffic pollutants, power and production plants, dispersion in aquatic environments…, industrial processes (combustion, pollutant treatment,…, strong non-linear relationship between concentration and damage (inflammable substances, explosions,.., reactions depending on instantaneous concentrations.

  18. Crustal Velocity Model of the Altai-Sayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, M. J.; Mackey, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a crustal velocity model for the the region encompassed by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network of South-Central Russia (45o-55o N. X 79o-98o E.). Geographically, the study area includes the Altai and Sayan Mountain Ranges, Western Mongolia, Eastern Kazakhstan, and Northwest China. To develop our model we used phase arrival data from approximately 175 larger earthquakes recorded by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network between 1977 and 1981 and reported in the bulletin Materialy po Seismichnosti Sibiri. To develop our model, we divided the region into 1o N-S x 2o E-W cells. Events within each cell, plus a small surrounding area, were relocated multiple times using a grid-search routine, in effort to determine the best fitting Pg and Sg velocities. Pg and Sg phase arrivals are generally from the 100-1000 km range and represent secondary arriving phases. These arrivals are dominant in this region and we consider the time picks and phase identifications to be reliable. Velocities tested range from 5.650 to 6.350 km/s for Pg and from 3.310 to 3.710 km/s for Sg. The best fitting velocities for each cell were then assigned to the geographic coordinates of the cell's center point. The standard Jeffreys-Bullen model was used for Pn velocities. The best fitting Pg and Sg velocities are those that minimize the average event residuals in a cell. High residual arrivals were omitted from the location process. In our model, Pg velocities range from 5.975-6.325 km/s, while Sg velocities range from 3.510-3.630 km/s, though the higher velocity extremes are constrained by one event and are not statistically significant. The average Pg velocity of the study area was, 6.147 km/s, and average Sg, 3.576 km/s. Geologically, these velocities are associated with the Central Asiatic Foldbelt and are consistent with regional crustal velocities along the southern edge of the Siberian Craton to the East as determined by previous studies.

  19. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  20. Density Models for Velocity Analysis of Jet Impinged CEDM Missile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Kyo; Cho, Yeon Ho; Chang, Sang Gyoon; Lee, Dae Hee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A control element drive mechanism (CEDM) can be a potential missile in the reactor head area during one of the postulated accidents. The CEDM is propelled by the high speed water jet discharged from a broken upper head nozzle. The jet expansion models to predict the missile velocity have been investigated by Kang et al. The previous work of Kang et al. showed a continuous increase in missile velocity as the CEDM missile travels. But it is not natural in that two phase flow from the nozzle break exit tends to disperse and the thrust force on the missile decreases along the distance of the travel. The jet flow also interacts with the air surrounding itself. Therefore, the density change has to be included in the estimation of the missile velocity. In this paper, two density change models of the water jet are introduced for the jet expansion models along with the distance from the nozzle break location. The first one is the direct approximation model. Two density approximation models are introduced to predict the CEDM missile velocity. For each model, the effects of the expanded jet area were included as the area ratio to the exit nozzle area. In direct approximation model, the results have showed rapid decrease in both density and missile velocity. In pressure approach model, the density change is assumed perfectly proportional to the pressure change, and the results showed relatively smooth change in both density and missile velocity comparing to the direct approximation model. Using the model developed by Kang et al.., the maximum missile velocity is about 4 times greater comparing to the pressure approach model since the density is constant as the jet density at the nozzle exit in their model. Pressure approach model has benefits in that this model adopted neither curve fitting nor extrapolation unlike the direct approximation model, and included the effects of density change which are not considered in the model developed by Kang et al. So, this model is

  1. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  2. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei, E-mail: jwchu@nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K. [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99372 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  3. Detailed string stability analysis for bi-directional optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑亮

    2015-01-01

    The class of bi-directional optimal velocity models can describe the bi-directional looking effect that usually exists in the reality and is even enhanced with the development of the connected vehicle technologies. Its combined string stability condition can be obtained through the method of the ring-road based string stability analysis. However, the partial string stability about traffic fluctuation propagated backward or forward was neglected, which will be analyzed in detail in this work by the method of transfer function and its H∞norm from the viewpoint of control theory. Then, through comparing the conditions of combined and partial string stabilities, their relationships can make traffic flow be divided into three distinguishable regions, displaying various combined and partial string stability performance. Finally, the numerical experiments verify the theoretical results and find that the final displaying string stability or instability performance results from the accumulated and offset effects of traffic fluctuations propagated from different directions.

  4. Depinning transition and thermal fluctuations in the random-field Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roters, L; Hucht, A; Lübeck, S; Nowak, U; Usadel, K D

    1999-11-01

    We analyze the depinning transition of a driven interface in the three-dimensional (3D) random field Ising model (RFIM) with quenched disorder by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The interface initially built into the system is perpendicular to the [111] direction of a simple cubic lattice. We introduce an algorithm which is capable of simulating such an interface independent of the considered dimension and time scale. This algorithm is applied to the 3D RFIM to study both the depinning transition and the influence of thermal fluctuations on this transition. It turns out that in the RFIM characteristics of the depinning transition depend crucially on the existence of overhangs. Our analysis yields critical exponents of the interface velocity, the correlation length, and the thermal rounding of the transition. We find numerical evidence for a scaling relation for these exponents and the dimension d of the system.

  5. Propagation of fluctuations in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navez, P.; Tsironis, G. P.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate entanglement dynamics and correlations in the quantum Ising model in arbitrary dimensions using a large-coordination-number expansion. We start from the pure paramagnetic regime obtained through zero spin-spin coupling and subsequently turn on the interspin interaction in a time-dependent fashion. We investigate analytically and compare results for both the slow adiabatic onset of the interactions and the fast instantaneous switching. We find that in the latter case of an initial excitation mode a quantum correlation wave spreads through the system, propagating with twice the group velocity of the linearized equilibrium modes. This wave establishes the spatiotemporal regime of entangled quantum properties of the system for time scales shorter than the decoherence time and thus provides an indicator for the "quantumness" of the physical system that the specific system models.

  6. Theory of slightly fluctuating ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Shapochkina, I. V.; Lin, S. H.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a Brownian particle moving in a slightly fluctuating potential. Using the perturbation theory on small potential fluctuations, we derive a general analytical expression for the average particle velocity valid for both flashing and rocking ratchets with arbitrary, stochastic or deterministic, time dependence of potential energy fluctuations. The result is determined by the Green's function for diffusion in the time-independent part of the potential and by the features of correlations in the fluctuating part of the potential. The generality of the result allows describing complex ratchet systems with competing characteristic times; these systems are exemplified by the model of a Brownian photomotor with relaxation processes of finite duration.

  7. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M.; Tsuru, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  8. Study of TEC fluctuation via stochastic models and Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bires, A.; Roininen, L.; Damtie, B.; Nigussie, M.; Vanhamäki, H.

    2016-11-01

    We propose stochastic processes to be used to model the total electron content (TEC) observation. Based on this, we model the rate of change of TEC (ROT) variation during ionospheric quiet conditions with stationary processes. During ionospheric disturbed conditions, for example, when irregularity in ionospheric electron density distribution occurs, stationarity assumption over long time periods is no longer valid. In these cases, we make the parameter estimation for short time scales, during which we can assume stationarity. We show the relationship between the new method and commonly used TEC characterization parameters ROT and the ROT Index (ROTI). We construct our parametric model within the framework of Bayesian statistical inverse problems and hence give the solution as an a posteriori probability distribution. Bayesian framework allows us to model measurement errors systematically. Similarly, we mitigate variation of TEC due to factors which are not of ionospheric origin, like due to the motion of satellites relative to the receiver, by incorporating a priori knowledge in the Bayesian model. In practical computations, we draw the so-called maximum a posteriori estimates, which are our ROT and ROTI estimates, from the posterior distribution. Because the algorithm allows to estimate ROTI at each observation time, the estimator does not depend on the period of time for ROTI computation. We verify the method by analyzing TEC data recorded by GPS receiver located in Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.4°E). The results indicate that the TEC fluctuations caused by the ionospheric irregularity can be effectively detected and quantified from the estimated ROT and ROTI values.

  9. Fluctuation theorems for discrete kinetic models of molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks, we consider random walks (also not Markov) on quasi one dimensional (1d) lattices, obtained by gluing several copies of a fundamental graph in a linear fashion. We show that, for a suitable class of quasi-1d lattices, the large deviation rate function associated to the position of the walker satisfies a Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any choice of the dynamical parameters defining the stochastic walk. This class includes the linear model considered in Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915). We also derive fluctuation theorems for the time-integrated cycle currents and discuss how the matrix approach of Lacoste et al (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 011915) can be extended to derive the above Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for any Markov random walk on {Z} with periodic jump rates. Finally, we review in the present context some large deviation results of Faggionato and Silvestri (2017 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré 53 46-78) and give some specific examples with explicit computations.

  10. An Elliptical Model for Deformation Due to Groundwater Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiampo, Kristy F.; Ouegnin, Francois-Alexis; Valluri, Sreeram; Samsonov, Sergey; Fernández, José; Kapp, Garrett

    2012-08-01

    Historically, surface subsidence as a result of subsurface groundwater fluctuations have produced important and, at times, catastrophic effects, whether natural or anthropogenic. Over the past 30 years, numerical and analytical techniques for the modeling of this surface deformation, based upon elastic and poroelastic theory, have been remarkably successful in predicting the magnitude of that deformation (L e M ouélic and A dragna in Geophys Res Lett 29:1853, 2002). In this work we have extended the formula for a circular-shaped aquifer (Geertsma in J Petroleum Tech 25:734-744, 1973) to a more realistic elliptical shape. We have improved the accuracy of the approximation by making use of the cross terms of the expansion for the elliptic coordinates in terms of the eccentricity, e, and the mean anomaly angle, M, widely used in astronomy. Results of a number of simulations, in terms of e and M developed from the transcendental Kepler equation, are encouraging, giving realistic values for the elliptical approximation of the vertical deformation due to groundwater change. Finally, we have applied the algorithm to modeling of groundwater in southern California.

  11. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  12. A 3-mode, Variable Velocity Jet Model for HH 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Variable ejection velocity jet models can qualitatively explain the appearance of successive working surfaces in Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. This paper presents an attempt to explore which features of the HH 34 jet can indeed be reproduced by such a model.

  13. The Fluctuating Bond Model, a Glue for Cuprate Superconductivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newns, Dennis

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years of research have yet to produce a consensus on the origin of high temperature superconductivity (HTS). The mechanism of HTS - which originates in the CuO2 plane, common to all HTS families - can be constrained by some key experimental facts regarding superconducting and pseudogap behaviors. Superconductivity, involving a Tc of order 100 K, exhibits an unusual d-wave superconducting gap, with Fermi liquid nodal excitations, and an anomalous doping- dependent oxygen isotope shift. A ``pseudogap,'' also with d-symmetry, leads to a dip in the density of states below a characteristic temperature scale T^*, which has a negative isotope shift; we associate the pseudogap with the recently observed spatially inhomogeneous (nanometer- scale) C4 symmetry breaking. The isotope shifts and other evidence imply a key role for oxygen vibrations, but conventional BCS single-phonon coupling is essentially forbidden by symmetry and by the on-site Coulomb interaction U. In a novel approach, we introduce a model based on a strong, local, nonlinear interaction between electrons within the Cu-O-Cu bond in the CuO2 plane, and the oxygen vibrational degrees of freedom, termed the Fluctuating Bond Model (FBM) [D.M. Newns and C.C. Tsuei, Nature Physics 3, 184 (2007)]. In mean field the model predicts a phase manifesting broken C4 symmetry, with a d-type pseudogap, and an upper phase boundary in temperature, with a negative isotope shift, which we identify with T^*. An intrinsic d-wave pairing tendency is found, leading to a transition temperature dome and an anomalous isotope shift similar to that found experimentally. The softening in the oxygen vibrational frequency below Tc, seen in Raman and neutron spectra, has a natural explanation in the FBM. Recent ab initio calculations have been implemented which provide microscopic support for the model.

  14. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  15. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-05

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a novel multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semi-analytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models the dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of the Fluctuating Wall Pressure Field Beneath Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarski, Stephen R.

    2001-11-01

    Measurements have been performed to better understand the space-varying character of the fluctuating wall pressure field beneath a transitional boundary layer and to develop an appropriate model for the space-varying (nonhomogeneous) wavenumber-frequency wall pressure spectrum. Although a great deal is understood regarding the structure of the wall pressure field beneath turbulent boundary layers, the current understanding of the wall pressure field beneath the transitional boundary layer is incomplete. Overlooked have been critical issues concerning spatial variations in turbulence structure and the convection and decay of pressure producing disturbances—properties that define the character of the field and resulting form of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. The experiments involve measurement of the space-time fluctuating wall pressure field across the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer by means of a 64-element linear array of hearing-aid microphones and hot wire velocity measurements in the adjacent laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Because the field is nonhomogeneous, wavelet based transform methods are required to appropriately resolve the space-varying structure of the field and form of the nonhomogeneous wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  17. A Goldilocks principle for modeling radial velocity noise

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Fabo; Jones, H R A; Butler, R P; Vogt, S

    2016-01-01

    The doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interprete signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modeling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model w...

  18. Velocity selection in the symmetric model of dendritic crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Angelo; Hong, Daniel C.; Langer, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    An analytic solution of the problem of velocity selection in a fully nonlocal model of dendritic crystal growth is presented. The analysis uses a WKB technique to derive and evaluate a solvability condition for the existence of steady-state needle-like solidification fronts in the limit of small under-cooling Delta. For the two-dimensional symmetric model with a capillary anisotropy of strength alpha, it is found that the velocity is proportional to (Delta to the 4th) times (alpha exp 7/4). The application of the method in three dimensions is also described.

  19. Is flow velocity a significant parameter in flood damage modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is generally presumed to influence flood damage. However, this influence is hardly quantified and virtually no damage models take it into account. Therefore, the influences of flow velocity, water depth and combinations of these two impact parameters on various types of flood damage were investigated in five communities affected by the Elbe catchment flood in Germany in 2002. 2-D hydraulic models with high to medium spatial resolutions were used to calculate the impact parameters at the sites in which damage occurred. A significant influence of flow velocity on structural damage, particularly on roads, could be shown in contrast to a minor influence on monetary losses and business interruption. Forecasts of structural damage to road infrastructure should be based on flow velocity alone. The energy head is suggested as a suitable flood impact parameter for reliable forecasting of structural damage to residential buildings above a critical impact level of 2 m of energy head or water depth. However, general consideration of flow velocity in flood damage modelling, particularly for estimating monetary loss, cannot be recommended.

  20. Fluctuations, response, and resonances in a simple atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, Andrey; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-06-01

    We study the response of a simple quasi-geostrophic barotropic model of the atmosphere to various classes of perturbations affecting its forcing and its dissipation using the formalism of the Ruelle response theory. We investigate the geometry of such perturbations by constructing the covariant Lyapunov vectors of the unperturbed system and discover in one specific case-orographic forcing-a substantial projection of the forcing onto the stable directions of the flow. This results into a resonant response shaped as a Rossby-like wave that has no resemblance to the unforced variability in the same range of spatial and temporal scales. Such a climatic surprise corresponds to a violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, in agreement with the basic tenets of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The resonance can be attributed to a specific group of rarely visited unstable periodic orbits of the unperturbed system. Our results reinforce the idea of using basic methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and high-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems to approach the problem of understanding climate dynamics.

  1. Fluctuations, Response, and Resonances in a Simple Atmospheric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsun, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    We study the response of a simple quasi-geostrophic barotropic model of the atmosphere to various classes of perturbations affecting its forcing and its dissipation using the formalism of the Ruelle response theory. We investigate the geometry of such perturbations using the covariant Lyapunov vectors on the unperturbed system and discover in one specific case - orographic forcing - a substantial projection of the perturbation onto the stable directions of the flow. As a result, we find a clear violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, in agreement with the basic tenets of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. This results into a very strong response in the form of a forced Rossby-like wave that has no resemblance to the natural variability in the same range of spatial and temporal scales. We further analyze such a feature and discover it can be interpreted as resonant response to a specific group of rarely visited unstable periodic orbits of the unperturbed system. Our results reinforce the idea of u...

  2. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  3. Two velocity difference model for a car following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. X.; Cheng, R. J.; Li, Z. P.

    2008-09-01

    In the light of the optimal velocity model, a two velocity difference model for a car-following theory is put forward considering navigation in modern traffic. To our knowledge, the model is an improvement over the previous ones theoretically, because it considers more aspects in the car-following process than others. Then we investigate the property of the model using linear and nonlinear analyses. The Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the KdV equation) near the neutral stability line and the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the mKdV equation) around the critical point are derived by applying the reductive perturbation method. The traffic jam could be thus described by the KdV soliton and the kink-anti-kink soliton for the KdV equation and mKdV equation, respectively. Numerical simulations are made to verify the model, and good results are obtained with the new model.

  4. A nonlinear inversion for the velocity background and perturbation models

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the single scattered wavefield obtained using an image. However, current RWI methods usually neglect diving waves, which is an important source of information for extracting the long wavelength components of the velocity model. Thus, we propose a new optimization problem through breaking the velocity model into the background and the perturbation in the wave equation directly. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer the single scattering model, but includes all scattering. We optimize both components simultaneously, and thus, the objective function is nonlinear with respect to both the background and perturbation. The new introduced w can absorb the non-smooth update of background naturally. Application to the Marmousi model with frequencies that start at 5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Application to the SEG2014 demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  5. THE THEORETICAL MODEL FOR PREDICTING CIRCULATION VELOCITY OF HYDRAULIC BRAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英林; 侯春生

    1997-01-01

    By rational hypothesis of fluid flow pattern, applied the law of conservation of energy and integrated the laboratory test results, finished the prediction by the theoretical model of circulation velocity of hydraulic brake which is important parameter. Thus provide the theoritical basis for hydraulic brake of belt conveyor whose research has just been started.

  6. A non-parametric model for the cosmic velocity field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branchini, E; Teodoro, L; Frenk, CS; Schmoldt, [No Value; Efstathiou, G; White, SDM; Saunders, W; Sutherland, W; Rowan-Robinson, M; Keeble, O; Tadros, H; Maddox, S; Oliver, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a self-consistent non-parametric model of the local cosmic velocity field derived from the distribution of IRAS galaxies in the PSCz redshift survey. The survey has been analysed using two independent methods, both based on the assumptions of gravitational instability and linear biasing.

  7. Calculus and design of discrete velocity models using computer algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babovsky, Hans; Grabmeier, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    In [2, 3], a framework for a calculus with Discrete Velocity Models (DVM) has been derived. The rotatonal symmetry of the discrete velocities can be modelled algebraically by the action of the cyclic group C4 - or including reflections of the dihedral group D4. Taking this point of view, the linearized collision operator can be represented in a compact form as a matrix of elements in the group algebra. Or in other words, by choosing a special numbering it exhibits a certain block structure which lets it appear as a matrix with entries in a certain polynomial ring. A convenient way for approaching such a structure is the use of a computer algebra system able to treat these (predefined) algebraic structures. We used the computer algebra system FriCAS/AXIOM [4, 5] for the generation of the velocity and the collision sets and for the analysis of the structure of the collision operator. Concerning the fluid dynamic limit, the system provides the characterization of sets of collisions and their contribution to the flow parameters. It allows the design of rotationally invariant symmetric models for prescribed Prandtl numbers. The implementation in FriCAS/AXIOM is explained and its results for a 25-velocity model are presented.

  8. Effects of a Fluctuating Carrying Capacity on the Generalized Malthus-Verhulst Model

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Calisto; Chandía, Kristopher J.; Mauro Bologna

    2014-01-01

    We consider a generalized Malthus-Verhulst model with a fluctuating carrying capacity and we study its effects on population growth. The carrying capacity fluctuations are described by a Poissonian process with an exponential correlation function. We will find an analytical expression for the average of a number of individuals and show that even in presence of a fluctuating carrying capacity the average tends asymptotically to a constant quantity.

  9. Effects of a Fluctuating Carrying Capacity on the Generalized Malthus-Verhulst Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Calisto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a generalized Malthus-Verhulst model with a fluctuating carrying capacity and we study its effects on population growth. The carrying capacity fluctuations are described by a Poissonian process with an exponential correlation function. We will find an analytical expression for the average of a number of individuals and show that even in presence of a fluctuating carrying capacity the average tends asymptotically to a constant quantity.

  10. Free-energy fluctuations and chaos in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelmeier, T

    2008-03-21

    The sample-to-sample fluctuations Delta FN of the free-energy in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model are shown rigorously to be related to bond chaos. Via this connection, the fluctuations become analytically accessible by replica methods. The replica calculation for bond chaos shows that the exponent mu governing the growth of the fluctuations with system size N, Delta FN approximately Nmu, is bounded by mu< or =1/4.

  11. Fluctuations of the Free Energy of the Spherical Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Jinho; Lee, Ji Oon

    2016-10-01

    We consider the fluctuations of the free energy for the 2-spin spherical Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with no magnetic field. We show that the law of the fluctuations converges to the Gaussian distribution when the temperature is above the critical temperature, and to the GOE Tracy-Widom distribution when the temperature is below the critical temperature. The orders of the fluctuations are markedly different in these two regimes. A universality of the limit law is also proved.

  12. Critical fluctuations in models with van der Waals interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Vovchenko, V; Gorenstein, M I; Poberezhnyuk, R V; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    Particle number fluctuations are considered within the van der Waals (VDW) equation, which contains both attractive (mean-field) and repulsive (eigenvolume) interactions. The VDW equation is used to calculate the scaled variance of particle number fluctuations in generic Boltzmann VDW system and in nuclear matter. The strongly intensive measures $\\Delta[E^*,N]$ and $\\Sigma[E^*,N]$ of the particle number and excitation energy fluctuations are also considered, and, similarly, show singular behavior near the critical point. The $\\Delta[E^*,N]$ measure is shown to attain both positive and negative values in the vicinity of critical point. Based on universality argument, similar behavior is expected to occur in the vicinity of the QCD critical point.

  13. Modeling and comparative study of fluid velocities in heterogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Romanenko, Konstantin; Pini, Ronny; Balcom, Bruce; Benson, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the distribution of effective porosity and fluid velocities in heterogeneous rock samples is crucial for understanding and predicting spatially resolved fluid residence times and kinetic reaction rates of fluid-rock interactions. The applicability of conventional MRI techniques to sedimentary rocks is limited by internal magnetic field gradients and short spin relaxation times. The approach developed at the UNB MRI Centre combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE). These methods were designed to reduce the errors due to effects of background gradients and fast transverse relaxation. SPRITE is largely immune to time-evolution effects resulting from background gradients, paramagnetic impurities and chemical shift. Using these techniques quantitative 3D porosity maps as well as single-phase fluid velocity fields in sandstone core samples were measured. Using a new Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique developed at the MRI Centre at UNB, we created 3D maps of porosity distributions as well as single-phase fluid velocity distributions of sandstone rock samples. Then, we evaluated the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman relationship for modeling measured fluid velocity distributions in sandstones samples showing meso-scale heterogeneities using two different modeling approaches. The MRI maps were used as reference points for the modeling approaches. For the first modeling approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to the porosity distributions and computed respective permeability maps, which in turn provided input for a CFD simulation - using the Stanford CFD code GPRS - to compute averaged velocity maps. The latter were then compared to the measured velocity maps. For the second approach, the measured velocity distributions were used as input for inversely computing permeabilities using the GPRS CFD code. The computed

  14. The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

    2005-01-01

    The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

  15. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya S; Yde, Lars; Binning, Philip J; Rasmussen, Michael R; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2014-12-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full-scale measurements. Finally, it was shown that the representation of compression settling in the CFD model can significantly influence the prediction of sludge distribution in the SSTs under dry- and wet-weather flow conditions.

  16. Pairwise velocities in the Halo Model: Luminosity and Scale Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Slosar, A; Tasitsiomi, A; Slosar, Anze; Seljak, Uros; Tasitsiomi, Argyro

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the pairwise velocity dispersion as a function of galaxy luminosity in the context of a halo model. We derive the distribution of velocities of pairs at a given separation taking into account both one-halo and two-halo contributions. We show that pairwise velocity distribution in real space is a complicated mixture of host-satellite, satellite-satellite and two-halo pairs. The peak value is reached at around 1 Mpc/h and does not reflect the velocity dispersion of a typical halo hosting these galaxies, but is instead dominated by the satellite-satellite pairs in high mass clusters. This is true even for cross-correlations between bins separated in luminosity. As a consequence the velocity dispersion at a given separation can decrease with luminosity, even if the underlying typical halo host mass is increasing, in agreement with some recent observations. We compare our findings to numerical simulations and find a good agreement. Numerical simulations also suggest a luminosity de...

  17. Variable temperature hot wire anemometry applied to the joint analysis of the velocity and temperature fluctuations in a mixing layer

    OpenAIRE

    Ndoye, M.; Delville, J.; Dorignac, E.; Arroyo, G.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Our study provides a detailed description of the thermal mixing process in an anisothermal mixing layer. Velocity and temperature are simultaneously measured at the same point by using a new hot wire anemometer. This anemometer implements the multiple overheat principle, associated with a non linear Levenberg-Marquardt signal processing. These simultaneous measurements allowed an analysis based on conditional Probability Density Functions (PDFs), joint PDFs and a quadr...

  18. Orientation cues for high-flying nocturnal insect migrants: do turbulence-induced temperature and velocity fluctuations indicate the mean wind flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy M Reynolds

    Full Text Available Migratory insects flying at high altitude at night often show a degree of common alignment, sometimes with quite small angular dispersions around the mean. The observed orientation directions are often close to the downwind direction and this would seemingly be adaptive in that large insects could add their self-propelled speed to the wind speed, thus maximising their displacement in a given time. There are increasing indications that high-altitude orientation may be maintained by some intrinsic property of the wind rather than by visual perception of relative ground movement. Therefore, we first examined whether migrating insects could deduce the mean wind direction from the turbulent fluctuations in temperature. Within the atmospheric boundary-layer, temperature records show characteristic ramp-cliff structures, and insects flying downwind would move through these ramps whilst those flying crosswind would not. However, analysis of vertical-looking radar data on the common orientations of nocturnally migrating insects in the UK produced no evidence that the migrants actually use temperature ramps as orientation cues. This suggests that insects rely on turbulent velocity and acceleration cues, and refocuses attention on how these can be detected, especially as small-scale turbulence is usually held to be directionally invariant (isotropic. In the second part of the paper we present a theoretical analysis and simulations showing that velocity fluctuations and accelerations felt by an insect are predicted to be anisotropic even when the small-scale turbulence (measured at a fixed point or along the trajectory of a fluid-particle is isotropic. Our results thus provide further evidence that insects do indeed use turbulent velocity and acceleration cues as indicators of the mean wind direction.

  19. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@yahoo.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China); Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China)

    2012-04-30

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  1. Comparison of thermal aftereffect models for estimating the fluctuation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Torre, E. [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)], E-mail: edt@gwu.edu; Bennett, L.H.; Korman, C.E. [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    The sigmoidal decay of the magnetization in log time, which is geometrically similar to the major loop, starts at the major loop and decays to the anhysteretic magnetization for a given holding field. The linear displacement of these curves after normalization with holding field can be used to compute the fluctuation field. This paper discusses the errors in computing this field.

  2. Modelling surface pressure fluctuation on medium-rise buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snæbjörnsson, J.T.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the results of two experiments into the fluctuating characteristics of windinduced pressures on buildings in a built-up environment. The experiments have been carried out independently in Iceland and The Netherlands and can be considered to represent two separate cases of buildi

  3. Intraglottal velocity and pressure measurements in a hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Liran; Gutmark, Ephraim; Khosla, Sid

    2015-02-01

    Determining the mechanisms of self-sustained oscillation of the vocal folds requires characterization of the pressures produced by intraglottal aerodynamics. Because most of the intraglottal aerodynamic forces cannot be measured in a tissue model of the larynx, current understanding of vocal fold vibration mechanism is derived from mechanical, analytical, and computational models. Previous studies have computed intraglottal pressures from measured intraglottal velocity fields and intraglottal geometry; however, this technique for determining pressures is not yet validated. In this study, intraglottal pressure measurements taken in a hemilarynx model are compared with pressure values that are computed from simultaneous velocity measurements. The results showed that significant negative pressure formed near the superior aspect of the folds during closing, which agrees with previous measurements in other hemilarynx models. Intraglottal velocity measurements show that the flow near the superior aspect separates from the glottal wall during closing and may develop into a vortex, which further augments the magnitude of negative pressure. Intraglottal pressure distributions, computed by solving the pressure Poisson equation, showed good agreement with pressure measurements. The match between the pressure computations and its measurements validates the current technique, which was previously used to estimate intraglottal pressure distribution in a full larynx model.

  4. Comparison of induced velocity models for helicopter flight mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.E.; Houston, S.S.

    2002-07-01

    Modeling of rotor-induced velocity receives continued attention in the literature as the rotorcraft community addresses limitations in the fidelity of simulations of helicopter stability, control, and handling qualities. A comparison is presented of results obtained using a rigid-blade rotor-fuselage model configured with two induced velocity models: a conventional, first-order, finite state, dynamic inflow model and a wake model that solves a vorticity transport equation on a computational mesh enclosing the rotorcraft. Differences between the two models are quantified by comparing predictions of trimmed rotor blade flap, lag and feather angles, airframe pitch and roll attitudes, cross-coupling derivatives, response to control inputs, and airframe vibration. Results are presented in the context of measurements taken on a Puma aircraft in steady flight from hover to high speed. More accurate predictions of the cross-coupling derivatives, response to control, and airframe vibration obtained using the vorticity transport model suggest that incorporation of real flowfield effects is important to extending the bandwidth of applicability of helicopter simulation models. Unexpectedly small differences in some of the trim predictions obtained using the two wake models suggest that an overall improvement in simulation fidelity may not be achieved without equivalent attention to the rotor dynamic model. (Author)

  5. Soft-to-hard turbulence transition in vibrated bed of powder Power law velocity fluctuations due to inelastic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Taguchi, Y; Hideki Takayasu

    1994-01-01

    Distribution functions of relative velocities among particles in a vibrated bed of powder are studied both numerically and theoretically. In the solid phase where granular particles remain around their local stable states, the probability distribution obeys Gaussian. On the other hand in the fluidized phase where the particles can exchange their positions the distribution clearly deviates from Gaussian. The non-Gaussian distribution is approximated nicely by the t-distribution which is derived theoretically by considering the effect of clustering by inelastic collisions.

  6. On vertical velocity fluctuations and internal tides in an upwelling region off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    of flow and wind and temperature oscillations at a mooring site in the shelf waters off the west coast of India are discussed. The vertical velocities were computed from a time series of vertical temperature profiles assuming that horizontal advection... of tem- perature is negligible. The computed values at a depth of 40 m during the 72-h period of observation were of the order of 10-l to lo-* cm s-i, with a mean value of - 2.77 x lo-* cm s-i indicating a net upward movement of water. The com- puted...

  7. Intermittent dislocation density fluctuations in crystal plasticity from a phase-field crystal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Jens M.; Angheluta, Luiza; Mathiesen, Joachim;

    2014-01-01

    Plastic deformation mediated by collective dislocation dynamics is investigated in the two-dimensional phase-field crystal model of sheared single crystals. We find that intermittent fluctuations in the dislocation population number accompany bursts in the plastic strain-rate fluctuations. Disloc...

  8. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  9. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  10. Velocity and Celerity Characteristics in the MIPs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiple Interacting Pathways (MIPs) model has been shown to give good reproduction of both flows (controlled by celerities) and residence times (controlled by velocities) in comparisons with data from a small catchment. In this contribution we look at the difference in responses and basins of attraction for flow and transport inferred from the model with a view to determining the functional form of larger scale, computationally efficient, parameterisations that more properly represent the scale-dependent hysteresis that is expected as a result of velocity-celerity differences. It is hoped that this might lead to new scale-dependent formulations of runoff and water quality responses that can be applied at hillslope and catchment scales.

  11. Joint analysis of the seismic data and velocity gravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, A. S.; Lavrov, V. S.; Muchamedov, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We performed joint analysis of the seismic noises recorded at the Japanese Ogasawara station located on Titijima Island in the Philippine Sea using the STS-2 seismograph at the OSW station in the winter period of January 1-15, 2015, over the background of a velocity gravity model. The graphs prove the existence of a cause-and-effect relation between the seismic noise and gravity and allow us to consider it as a desired signal.

  12. Non-Gaussian PDF Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Fluctuating Pressure Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwolf, Alexander; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate properties of the probability density function (PDF) of turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressures measured on the exterior of a supersonic transport aircraft. It is shown that fluctuating pressure PDFs differ from the Gaussian distribution even for surface conditions having no significant discontinuities. The PDF tails are wider and longer than those of the Gaussian model. For pressure fluctuations upstream of forward-facing step discontinuities and downstream of aft-facing step discontinuities, deviations from the Gaussian model are more significant and the PDFs become asymmetrical. Various analytical PDF distributions are used and further developed to model this behavior.

  13. Pairwise velocities in the "Running FLRW" cosmological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiano, Antonio; Croton, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the pairwise velocity statistics from a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the "Running Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker" (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends ΛCDM with a time-evolving vacuum energy density, ρ _Λ. To enforce local conservation of matter a time-evolving gravitational coupling is also included. Our results constitute the first study of velocities in the R-FLRW cosmology, and we also compare with other dark energy simulations suites, repeating the same analysis. We find a strong degeneracy between the pairwise velocity and σ8 at z = 0 for almost all scenarios considered, which remains even when we look back to epochs as early as z = 2. We also investigate various Coupled Dark Energy models, some of which show minimal degeneracy, and reveal interesting deviations from ΛCDM which could be readily exploited by future cosmological observations to test and further constrain our understanding of dark energy.

  14. Traveling solar-wind bulk-velocity fluctuations and their effects on electron heating in the inner heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, Hans J; Verscharen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Ambient plasma electrons undergo strong heating in regions associated with compressive traveling interplanetary solar-wind bulk-velocity jumps due to their specific interactions with the jump-inherent electric fields. After thermalization of this energy gain per shock passage through the operation of the Buneman instability, strong electron heating occurs that substantially influences the radial electron temperature profile. We describe the reduction of the jump amplitude due to energy expended by the traveling jump structure. We consider three effects; namely energy loss due to heating of electrons, energy loss due to work done against the pick-up-ion pressure gradient, and an energy gain due to nonlinear jump steepening. Taking these effects into account, we show that the decrease in jump amplitude with solar distance is more pronounced when the initial jump amplitude is higher in the inner solar system. Independent of the initial jump amplitude, it eventually decreases with increasing distance to a value o...

  15. Space-time characteristics of wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-06-01

    We report the space-time characteristics of the wall-pressure fluctuations and wall shear-stress fluctuations from wall-modeled large eddy simulation (WMLES) of a turbulent channel flow at Reτ=2000 . Two standard zonal wall models (equilibrium stress model and nonequilibrium model based on unsteady RANS) are employed, and it is shown that they yield similar results in predicting these quantities. The wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fields from WMLES are analyzed in terms of their r.m.s. fluctuations, spectra, two-point correlations, and convection velocities. It is demonstrated that the resolution requirement for predicting the wall-pressure fluctuations is more stringent than that for predicting the velocity. At least δ /Δ x >20 and δ /Δ z >30 are required to marginally resolve the integral length scales of the pressure-producing eddies near the wall. Otherwise, the pressure field is potentially aliased. Spurious high wave number modes dominate in the streamwise direction, and they contaminate the pressure spectra leading to significant overprediction of the second-order pressure statistics. When these conditions are met, the pressure statistics and spectra at low wave number or low frequency agree well with the DNS and experimental data. On the contrary, the wall shear-stress fluctuations, modeled entirely through the RANS-based wall models, are largely underpredicted and relatively insensitive to the grid resolution. The short-time, small-scale near-wall eddies, which are neither resolved nor modeled adequately in the wall models, seem to be important for accurate prediction of the wall shear-stress fluctuations.

  16. Modeling of low- and high-frequency noise by slow and fast fluctuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both 1/f and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modeled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) ensembles of fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as biological complexes, semiconductors, superconducting, and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  17. Modeling of Low and High Frequency Noise by Slow and Fast Fluctuators

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both $1/f$ and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modelled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) effective fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as photosynthetic complexes, semiconductors, and superconducting and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  18. Comprehensive observation and modeling of earthquake and temperature-related seismic velocity changes in northern Chile with passive image interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-06-01

    We report on earthquake and temperature-related velocity changes in high-frequency autocorrelations of ambient noise data from seismic stations of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile project in northern Chile. Daily autocorrelation functions are analyzed over a period of 5 years with passive image interferometry. A short-term velocity drop recovering after several days to weeks is observed for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake at most stations. At the two stations PB05 and PATCX, we observe a long-term velocity decrease recovering over the course of around 2 years. While station PB05 is located in the rupture area of the Tocopilla earthquake, this is not the case for station PATCX. Station PATCX is situated in an area influenced by salt sediment in the vicinity of Salar Grande and presents a superior sensitivity to ground acceleration and periodic surface-induced changes. Due to this high sensitivity, we observe a velocity response of several regional earthquakes at PATCX, and we can show for the first time a linear relationship between the amplitude of velocity drops and peak ground acceleration for data from a single station. This relationship does not hold true when comparing different stations due to the different sensitivity of the station environments. Furthermore, we observe periodic annual velocity changes at PATCX. Analyzing data at a temporal resolution below 1 day, we are able to identify changes with a period of 24 h, too. The characteristics of the seismic velocity with annual and daily periods indicate an atmospheric origin of the velocity changes that we confirm with a model based on thermally induced stress. This comprehensive model explains the lag time dependence of the temperature-related seismic velocity changes involving the distribution of temperature fluctuations, the relationship between temperature, stress and velocity change, plus autocorrelation sensitivity kernels.

  19. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  20. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  1. Tracking energy fluctuations from fragment partitions in the Lattice Gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F; D'Agostino, M; Chomaz, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Partial energy fluctuations are known tools to reconstruct microcanonical heat capacities. For nuclear multifragmentation, approximations have been developed to infer fluctuations at freeze out from the observed fragment partitions. The accuracy of this procedure is under debate. Using a well controlled computer experiment, the Lattice Gas model, we show that the proposed method is very accurate if fluctuations are reconstructed following closely the experimental procedure. We also show that a precise reconstruction of the configurational energy at freeze out is especially delicate in the case of classical models like Lennard Jones or Lattice Gas that present a cristallized ground state.

  2. Direct Measurements of the Spatial and Velocity Dependence of the Ion Density Fluctuation Spectrum of a Laboratory Plasma with Two Independent LIF Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2014-10-01

    By using two independently tunable lasers, each with its own collection optics and Ar II LIF transition scheme, we are able to investigate plasma ion density fluctuations as a function of not only spatial scales but also as a function of ion velocities as sampled on different points of a single Doppler-broadened spectral emission line. We do this by measuring the two point correlation C (x , v ,x' ,v' , τ) = t . With the current system, the two carriages determine x and x', while the velocities selected by each laser determine v and v'. Using the two lasers to make two point correlations in phase space demonstrates effects that are not fully understood. In this experiment, we explore the striking difference in correlations when, in the past, the particle orbits overlap in space versus when they do not overlap. This is performed on a small cylindrical laboratory plasma with n ~109 cm-3 , Te ~ 5 eV, Ti ~ 0 . 06 , and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. LIF is performed on ions at two locations aligned with the magnetic field line with a viewing volume comparable to the size of the Larmor radius. Results and interpretations from these experiments are presented and discussed. DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  3. Growth models and the expected distribution of fluctuating asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John H.; Shimizu, Kunio; Emlen, John M.; Freeman, D. Carl; Merkel, John

    2003-01-01

    Multiplicative error accounts for much of the size-scaling and leptokurtosis in fluctuating asymmetry. It arises when growth involves the addition of tissue to that which is already present. Such errors are lognormally distributed. The distribution of the difference between two lognormal variates is leptokurtic. If those two variates are correlated, then the asymmetry variance will scale with size. Inert tissues typically exhibit additive error and have a gamma distribution. Although their asymmetry variance does not exhibit size-scaling, the distribution of the difference between two gamma variates is nevertheless leptokurtic. Measurement error is also additive, but has a normal distribution. Thus, the measurement of fluctuating asymmetry may involve the mixing of additive and multiplicative error. When errors are multiplicative, we recommend computing log E(l) − log E(r), the difference between the logarithms of the expected values of left and right sides, even when size-scaling is not obvious. If l and r are lognormally distributed, and measurement error is nil, the resulting distribution will be normal, and multiplicative error will not confound size-related changes in asymmetry. When errors are additive, such a transformation to remove size-scaling is unnecessary. Nevertheless, the distribution of l − r may still be leptokurtic.

  4. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  5. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribut......Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  6. Modeling Fluctuating Winds by Blending Mesoscale Model Data with Computational Fluid Dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, S. E.; Zajaczkowski, F. J.; Schmehl, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    both the inflow and assimilation into the Acusolve CFD model. Acusolve is then run with horizontal resolution on the order of 20 m and near-surface vertical resolution of 1 cm to resolve details of the flow structure as well as its fluctuations. The details of the fluctuations are enhanced by applying the Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) technique, which blends the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) method with Large Eddy Simulation (LES) applied in the detached wake regions expected to display turbulent fluctuations. The resulting modeled flow displays the temporal and spatial variability observed in the atmosphere. Such information could prove valuable for studying details of the fluctuating wind within a wind farm.

  7. Velocity potential formulations of highly accurate Boussinesq-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2009-01-01

    processes on the weather side of reflective structures. Coast. Eng. 53, 929-945). An exact infinite series solution for the potential is obtained via a Taylor expansion about an arbitrary vertical position z=(z) over cap. For practical implementation however, the solution is expanded based on a slow...... variation of (z) over cap and terms are retained to first-order. With shoaling enhancement, the new models obtain a comparable accuracy in linear shoaling to the original velocity formulation. General consistency relations are also derived which are convenient for verifying that the differential operators...

  8. Beyond pressureless gas dynamics : Quadrature-based velocity moment models

    CERN Document Server

    Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Following the seminal work of F. Bouchut on zero pressure gas dynamics which has been extensively used for gas particle-flows, the present contribution investigates quadrature-based velocity moments models for kinetic equations in the framework of the infinite Knudsen number limit, that is, for dilute clouds of small particles where the collision or coalescence probability asymptotically approaches zero. Such models define a hierarchy based on the number of moments and associated quadrature nodes, the first level of which leads to pressureless gas dynamics. We focus in particular on the four moment model where the flux closure is provided by a two-node quadrature in the velocity phase space and provide the right framework for studying both smooth and singular solutions. The link with both the kinetic underlying equation as well as with zero pressure gas dynamics is provided and we define the notion of measure solutions as well as the mathematical structure of the resulting system of four PDEs. We exhibit a fa...

  9. Stabilization and Riesz basis property for an overhead crane model with feedback in velocity and rotating velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toure K. Augustin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a variant of an overhead crane model's problem, with a control force in velocity and rotating velocity on the platform. We obtain under certain conditions the well-posedness and the strong stabilization of the closed-loop system. We then analyze the spectrum of the system. Using a method due to Shkalikov, we prove the existence of a sequence of generalized eigenvectors of the system, which forms a Riesz basis for the state energy Hilbert space.

  10. Velocity Structure Determination Through Seismic Waveform Modeling and Time Deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, B.; Zhu, L.; Tan, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    Through the use of seismic waveforms recorded by TriNet, a dataset of earthquake focal mechanisms and deviations (time shifts) relative to a standard model facilitates the investigation of the crust and uppermost mantle of southern California. The CAP method of focal mechanism determination, in use by TriNet on a routine basis, provides time shifts for surface waves and Pnl arrivals independently relative to the reference model. These shifts serve as initial data for calibration of local and regional seismic paths. Time shifts from the CAP method are derived by splitting the Pnl section of the waveform, the first arriving Pn to just before the arrival of the S wave, from the much slower surface waves then cross-correlating the data with synthetic waveforms computed from a standard model. Surface waves interact with the entire crust, but the upper crust causes the greatest effect. Whereas, Pnl arrivals sample the deeper crust, upper mantle, and source region. This natural division separates the upper from lower crust for regional calibration and structural modeling and allows 3-D velocity maps to be created using the resulting time shifts. Further examination of Pnl and other arrivals which interact with the Moho illuminate the complex nature of this boundary. Initial attempts at using the first 10 seconds of the Pnl section to determine upper most mantle structure have proven insightful. Two large earthquakes north of southern California in Nevada and Mammoth Lakes, CA allow the creation of record sections from 200 to 600 km. As the paths swing from east to west across southern California, simple 1-D models turn into complex structure, dramatically changing the waveform character. Using finite difference models to explain the structure, we determine that a low velocity zone is present at the base of the crust and extends to 100 km in depth. Velocity variations of 5 percent of the mantle in combination with steeply sloping edges produces complex waveform variations

  11. Shock-associated MHD waves - A model for interstellar density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the density fluctuations responsible for radio scintillations could be due to ion-beam-generated MHD waves near interstellar shock waves is discussed. This suggestion is inspired by spacecraft observations which reveal these phenomena near shocks in the solar system. The model quite naturally accounts for the scale on which these fluctuations occur; it is dictated by the wavelength of the unstable waves.

  12. Traveling waves in an optimal velocity model of freeway traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Woods, Andrew

    2001-03-01

    Car-following models provide both a tool to describe traffic flow and algorithms for autonomous cruise control systems. Recently developed optimal velocity models contain a relaxation term that assigns a desirable speed to each headway and a response time over which drivers adjust to optimal velocity conditions. These models predict traffic breakdown phenomena analogous to real traffic instabilities. In order to deepen our understanding of these models, in this paper, we examine the transition from a linear stable stream of cars of one headway into a linear stable stream of a second headway. Numerical results of the governing equations identify a range of transition phenomena, including monotonic and oscillating travelling waves and a time- dependent dispersive adjustment wave. However, for certain conditions, we find that the adjustment takes the form of a nonlinear traveling wave from the upstream headway to a third, intermediate headway, followed by either another traveling wave or a dispersive wave further downstream matching the downstream headway. This intermediate value of the headway is selected such that the nonlinear traveling wave is the fastest stable traveling wave which is observed to develop in the numerical calculations. The development of these nonlinear waves, connecting linear stable flows of two different headways, is somewhat reminiscent of stop-start waves in congested flow on freeways. The different types of adjustments are classified in a phase diagram depending on the upstream and downstream headway and the response time of the model. The results have profound consequences for autonomous cruise control systems. For an autocade of both identical and different vehicles, the control system itself may trigger formations of nonlinear, steep wave transitions. Further information is available [Y. Sugiyama, Traffic and Granular Flow (World Scientific, Singapore, 1995), p. 137].

  13. Models for microtubule cargo transport coupling the Langevin equation to stochastic stepping motor dynamics: Caring about fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional models coupling a Langevin equation for the cargo position to stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors constitute a relevant framework for analyzing multiple-motor microtubule transport. In this work we explore the consistence of these models focusing on the effects of the thermal noise. We study how to define consistent stepping and detachment rates for the motors as functions of the local forces acting on them in such a way that the cargo velocity and run-time match previously specified functions of the external load, which are set on the base of experimental results. We show that due to the influence of the thermal fluctuations this is not a trivial problem, even for the single-motor case. As a solution, we propose a motor stepping dynamics which considers memory on the motor force. This model leads to better results for single-motor transport than the approaches previously considered in the literature. Moreover, it gives a much better prediction for the stall force of the two-motor case, highly compatible with the experimental findings. We also analyze the fast fluctuations of the cargo position and the influence of the viscosity, comparing the proposed model to the standard one, and we show how the differences on the single-motor dynamics propagate to the multiple motor situations. Finally, we find that the one-dimensional character of the models impede an appropriate description of the fast fluctuations of the cargo position at small loads. We show how this problem can be solved by considering two-dimensional models.

  14. Wildfire simulation using LES with synthetic-velocity SGS models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, J. M.; Tang, Tingting

    2016-11-01

    Wildland fires are becoming more prevalent and intense worldwide as climate change leads to warmer, drier conditions; and large-eddy simulation (LES) is receiving increasing attention for fire spread predictions as computing power continues to improve (see, e.g.,). We report results from wildfire simulations over general terrain employing implicit LES for solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes (N.-S.) and thermal energy equations with Boussinesq approximation, altered with Darcy, Forchheimer and Brinkman extensions, to represent forested regions as porous media with varying (in both space and time) porosity and permeability. We focus on subgrid-scale (SGS) behaviors computed with a synthetic-velocity model, a discrete dynamical system, based on the poor man's N.-S. equations and investigate the ability of this model to produce fire whirls (tornadoes of fire) at the (unresolved) SGS level. Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.

  15. Model for probing membrane-cortex adhesion by micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Alert, Ricard; Brugués, Jan; Sens, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for membrane-cortex adhesion which couples membrane deformations, hydrodynamics and kinetics of membrane-cortex ligands. In its simplest form, the model gives explicit predictions for the critical pressure for membrane detachment and for the value of adhesion energy. We show that these quantities exhibit a significant dependence on the active acto-myosin stresses. The model provides a simple framework to access quantitative information on cortical activity by means of micropipette experiments. We also extend the model to incorporate fluctuations and show that detailed information on the stability of membrane-cortex coupling can be obtained by a combination of micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy measurements.

  16. From single molecule fluctuations to muscle contraction: a Brownian model of A.F. Huxley's hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marcucci

    Full Text Available Muscular force generation in response to external stimuli is the result of thermally fluctuating, cyclical interactions between myosin and actin, which together form the actomyosin complex. Normally, these fluctuations are modelled using transition rate functions that are based on muscle fiber behaviour, in a phenomenological fashion. However, such a basis reduces the predictive power of these models. As an alternative, we propose a model which uses direct single molecule observations of actomyosin fluctuations reported in the literature. We precisely estimate the actomyosin potential bias and use diffusion theory to obtain a brownian ratchet model that reproduces the complete cross-bridge cycle. The model is validated by simulating several macroscopic experimental conditions, while its interpretation is compatible with two different force-generating scenarios.

  17. Model predictive control for power fluctuation supression in hybrid wind/PV/battery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Liu, Zongyu; Zong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    predictive control (MPC)-based algorithm for battery management in a hybrid wind/PV/battery system to suppress the short-term power fluctuation on the ‘minute’ scale. A case study with data collected from a practical hybrid system setup is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm......A hybrid energy system, the combination of wind turbines, PV panels and battery storage with effective control mechanism, represents a promising solution to the power fluctuation problem when integrating renewable energy resources (RES) into conventional power systems. This paper proposes a model...... together with a Monte Carlo simulation-based sensitivity analysis. In addition to illustrating the complementarity between the fluctuations of wind power and PV power, the results prove the proposed MPC algorithm is effective in fluctuation suppression but sensitive to factors such as forecast accuracy...

  18. The Gallavotti-Cohen Fluctuation Theorem for a non-chaotic model

    CERN Document Server

    Lepri, S; Benettin, G

    1999-01-01

    We test the applicability of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation formula on a nonequilibrium version of the periodic Ehrenfest wind-tree model. This is a one-particle system whose dynamics is rather complex (e.g. it appears to be diffusive at equilibrium), but its Lyapunov exponents are nonpositive. For small applied field, the system exhibits a very long transient, during which the dynamics is roughly chaotic, followed by asymptotic collapse on a periodic orbit. During the transient, the dynamics is diffusive, and the fluctuations of the current are found to be in agreement with the fluctuation formula, despite the lack of real hyperbolicity. These results also constitute an example which manifests the difference between the fluctuation formula and the Evans-Searles identity.

  19. The Limit Deposit Velocity model: a new approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.; Ramsdell, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred

  20. Independent scattering model and velocity dispersion in trabecular bone: comparison with a multiple scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïat, G; Naili, S

    2011-02-01

    Speed of sound measurements are used clinically to assess bone strength. Trabecular bone is an attenuating composite material in which negative values of velocity dispersion have been measured; this behavior remaining poorly explained physically. The aim of this work is to describe the ultrasonic propagation in trabecular bone modeled by infinite cylinders immersed in a saturating matrix and to derive the physical determinants of velocity dispersion. An original homogenization model accounting for the coupling of independent scattering and absorption phenomena allows the computation of phase velocity and of dispersion while varying bone properties. The first step of the model consists in the computation of the attenuation coefficient at all frequencies. The second step of the model corresponds to the application of the general Kramers-Krönig relationship to derive the frequency dependence of phase velocity. The model predicts negative values of velocity dispersion in agreement with experimental results obtained in phantoms mimicking trabecular bone. In trabecular bone, only negative values of velocity dispersion are predicted by the model, which span within the range of values measured experimentally. However, the comparison of the present results with results obtained in Haiat et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 124:4047-4058, 2008) assuming multiple scattering indicates that accounting for multiple scattering phenomena leads to a better prediction of velocity dispersion in trabecular bone.

  1. Velocity field measurements in the wake of a propeller model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, R.; Kumar, A. Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Turboprop configurations are being revisited for the modern-day regional transport aircrafts for their fuel efficiency. The use of laminar flow wings is an effort in this direction. One way to further improve their efficiency is by optimizing the flow over the wing in the propeller wake. Previous studies have focused on improving the gross aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. It is known that the propeller slipstream causes early transition of the boundary layer on the wing. However, an optimized design of the propeller and wing combination could delay this transition and decrease the skin friction drag. Such a wing design would require the detailed knowledge of the development of the slipstream in isolated conditions. There are very few studies in the literature addressing the requirements of transport aircraft having six-bladed propeller and cruising at a high propeller advance ratio. Low-speed wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on a powered propeller model in isolated conditions, measuring the velocity field in the vertical plane behind the propeller using two-component hot-wire anemometry. The data obtained clearly resolved the mean velocity, the turbulence, the ensemble phase averages and the structure and development of the tip vortex. The turbulence in the slipstream showed that transition could be close to the leading edge of the wing, making it a fine case for optimization. The development of the wake with distance shows some interesting flow features, and the data are valuable for flow computation and optimization.

  2. Statistical properties of fluctuations of time series representing appearances of words in nationwide blog data and their applications: An example of modeling fluctuation scalings of nonstationary time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hayafumi; Sano, Yukie; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2016-11-01

    To elucidate the nontrivial empirical statistical properties of fluctuations of a typical nonsteady time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, we investigated approximately 3 ×109 Japanese blog articles over a period of six years and analyze some corresponding mathematical models. First, we introduce a solvable nonsteady extension of the random diffusion model, which can be deduced by modeling the behavior of heterogeneous random bloggers. Next, we deduce theoretical expressions for both the temporal and ensemble fluctuation scalings of this model, and demonstrate that these expressions can reproduce all empirical scalings over eight orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we show that the model can reproduce other statistical properties of time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, such as functional forms of the probability density and correlations in the total number of blogs. As an application, we quantify the abnormality of special nationwide events by measuring the fluctuation scalings of 1771 basic adjectives.

  3. A Two-Factor Autoregressive Moving Average Model Based on Fuzzy Fluctuation Logical Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Guan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the existing autoregressive moving average (ARMA forecast models are based on one main factor. In this paper, we proposed a new two-factor first-order ARMA forecast model based on fuzzy fluctuation logical relationships of both a main factor and a secondary factor of a historical training time series. Firstly, we generated a fluctuation time series (FTS for two factors by calculating the difference of each data point with its previous day, then finding the absolute means of the two FTSs. We then constructed a fuzzy fluctuation time series (FFTS according to the defined linguistic sets. The next step was establishing fuzzy fluctuation logical relation groups (FFLRGs for a two-factor first-order autoregressive (AR(1 model and forecasting the training data with the AR(1 model. Then we built FFLRGs for a two-factor first-order autoregressive moving average (ARMA(1,m model. Lastly, we forecasted test data with the ARMA(1,m model. To illustrate the performance of our model, we used real Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index (TAIEX and Dow Jones datasets as a secondary factor to forecast TAIEX. The experiment results indicate that the proposed two-factor fluctuation ARMA method outperformed the one-factor method based on real historic data. The secondary factor may have some effects on the main factor and thereby impact the forecasting results. Using fuzzified fluctuations rather than fuzzified real data could avoid the influence of extreme values in historic data, which performs negatively while forecasting. To verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the model, we also employed our method to forecast the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index (SHSECI from 2001 to 2015 and the international gold price from 2000 to 2010.

  4. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  5. Prediction accuracy of various models for angle-of-arrival fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, O.; Shapira, J.

    2016-03-01

    We have compared measured angle-of-arrival (AOA) fluctuations to the prediction of various models, for a laser beam propagating through a turbulent atmosphere at ground level. Three models have been investigated: a simple small perturbation model, a model which incorporates also inner and outer scale effects and a third model which takes into account the contribution of additional spatial scales and is able to predict a saturation regime. Data were collected in an approximately ten year time span. We have used near infra-red LIDAR systems to determine the AOA fluctuations by measuring the short term movement of a laser spot in the receiver plane, reflected from targets placed at various distances. In parallel, we have also measured the turbulence strength with a short-range scintilometer and recorded the average wind speed along the laser path. Our analysis indicates that the simple model predictions are quite good for weak turbulence and short distances, however on the majority of the scenarios the conditions (turbulence strength and distance) are such that the AOA fluctuations deviate from the simple model and even approach saturation. In these cases the fluctuations follows the general form of the third model. We also found some differences between the day and night behavior which wasn't considered by any of the models.

  6. Spectral coherence model for power fluctuations in a wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigueras-Rodriguez, A.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Viedma, A.;

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a model for the coherence between wind speeds located in a horizontal plane corresponding to hub height of wind turbines in a large wind farm. The model has been developed using wind speed and power measurements from the 72 Wind Turbines and two of the meteorological masts from...

  7. Dynamical Analysis of a Parasite-Host Model within Fluctuating Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A parasite-host model within fluctuating environment is proposed. Firstly, the positivity and boundedness of solutions of the model within deterministic environment are discussed, and, then, the asymptotical stability and global stability of equilibria of deterministic model are investigated. Secondly, we show that the stochastic model has a unique global positive solution; furthermore, we show that the stochastic model has a stationary distribution under certain conditions. Finally, we give some numerical simulations to illustrate our analytical results.

  8. Pressure fluctuations in gas fluidized beds

    OpenAIRE

    Leckner Bo.; Palchonok Genadij I.; Johnsson Filip

    2002-01-01

    The pressure fluctuations in a fluidized bed are a result of the actions of the bubbles. However, the bubbles may be influenced by the air supply system and by the pressure drop of the air distributor. These interactions are treated for low as well as for high velocity beds by means of a simple model of the principal frequency of the pressure fluctuations. The model includes the interaction with the air supply system and describes qualitatively two important bubbling regimes: the single bubbl...

  9. Fluctuation-Response Relation and modeling in systems with fast and slow dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lacorata

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We show how a general formulation of the Fluctuation-Response Relation is able to describe in detail the connection between response properties to external perturbations and spontaneous fluctuations in systems with fast and slow variables. The method is tested by using the 360-variable Lorenz-96 model, where slow and fast variables are coupled to one another with reciprocal feedback, and a simplified low dimensional system. In the Fluctuation-Response context, the influence of the fast dynamics on the slow dynamics relies in a non trivial behavior of a suitable quadratic response function. This has important consequences for the modeling of the slow dynamics in terms of a Langevin equation: beyond a certain intrinsic time interval even the optimal model can give just statistical prediction.

  10. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  11. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  12. Fluctuations in a mixed IS-LM business cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Talibi Alaoui

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we extend a delayed IS-LM business cycle model by introducing an additional advance (anticipated capital stock in the investment function. The resulting model is represented in terms of mixed differential equations. For the deviating argument $au$ (advance and delay being a bifurcation parameter we investigate the local stability and the local Hopf bifurcation. Also some numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical analysis.

  13. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  14. A Causal Model for Fluctuating Sugar Levels in Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinzang Chhogyal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Causal models of physiological systems can be immensely useful in medicine as they may be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic reasoning. Aims In this paper we investigate how an agent may use the theory of belief change to rectify simple causal models of changing blood sugar levels in diabetes patients. Method We employ the semantic approach to belief change together with a popular measure of distance called Dalal distance between different state descriptions in order to implement a simple application that simulates the effectiveness of the proposed method in helping an agent rectify a simple causal model. Results Our simulation results show that distance-based belief change can help in improving the agent’s causal knowledge. However, under the current implementation there is no guarantee that the agent will learn the complete model and the agent may at times get stuck in local optima. Conclusion Distance-based belief change can help in refining simple causal models such as the example in this paper. Future work will include larger state-action spaces, better distance measures and strategies for choosing actions.

  15. Melt nucleating and the three-dimension steady model of the temperature fluctuation with convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwen Chen; Renji Sun; Zidong Wang; Fengying Wang

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional steady model of temperature fluctuation with melt convection is studied. It is proved that there exists a unique and stable solution in the model and the solution is expressed in a Fourier series form. It theoretically conf1rms the mechanism of melt nucleating: as long as the convection with transverse directions exists, the melt temperature on the front of the solidliquid interface would be not only periodical along the direction which is perpendicular to the direction of crystal growth, but also oscillatory and exponential decay along the direction of crystal growth; this oscillatory property, i.e. temperature fluctuation, leads to local supercooling, accelerates local temperature fluctuation and then results in a large number of nuclei.

  16. Representation of fluctuation features in pathological knee joint vibroarthrographic signals using kernel density modeling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanshan; Cai, Suxian; Zheng, Fang; Wu, Yunfeng; Liu, Kaizhi; Wu, Meihong; Zou, Quan; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-01

    This article applies advanced signal processing and computational methods to study the subtle fluctuations in knee joint vibroarthrographic (VAG) signals. Two new features are extracted to characterize the fluctuations of VAG signals. The fractal scaling index parameter is computed using the detrended fluctuation analysis algorithm to describe the fluctuations associated with intrinsic correlations in the VAG signal. The averaged envelope amplitude feature measures the difference between the upper and lower envelopes averaged over an entire VAG signal. Statistical analysis with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that both of the fractal scaling index (p=0.0001) and averaged envelope amplitude (p=0.0001) features are significantly different between the normal and pathological signal groups. The bivariate Gaussian kernels are utilized for modeling the densities of normal and pathological signals in the two-dimensional feature space. Based on the feature densities estimated, the Bayesian decision rule makes better signal classifications than the least-squares support vector machine, with the overall classification accuracy of 88% and the area of 0.957 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Such VAG signal classification results are better than those reported in the state-of-the-art literature. The fluctuation features of VAG signals developed in the present study can provide useful information on the pathological conditions of degenerative knee joints. Classification results demonstrate the effectiveness of the kernel feature density modeling method for computer-aided VAG signal analysis.

  17. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Marx, Kenneth A; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a new theory for modeling forced indentation spectral lineshapes of biological particles, which considers non-linear Hertzian deformation due to an indenter-particle physical contact and bending deformations of curved beams modeling the particle structure. The bending of beams beyond the critical point triggers the particle dynamic transition to the collapsed state, an extreme event leading to the catastrophic force drop as observed in the force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra: the slope of the FX curves and the position of force-peak signal, in terms of mechanical characteristics --- the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations E_H and E_b, and the probability distribution of the maximum strength with the strength of the strongest beam F_b^* and the beams' failure rate m. The theory is applied to successfully characterize the $FX$ curves for spherical virus particles --- CCMV, TrV, and AdV.

  18. Coastal groundwater table estimation by an elevation fluctuation neural model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Bin; WANG Yi

    2007-01-01

    Restrictions of groundwater management are often derived from the insufficient or missing groundwater database. A suitable and complete groundwater database will allow sound engineering plans for sustainable water usage, including the drilling of wells, rates of water withdrawal, and eventually artificial recharge of the aquifer. The spatial-temporal variations of groundwater monitoring data are fluently influenced by the presence of manual factors, monitor equipment malfunctioning, natural phenomena, etc. Thus, it is necessary for researchers to check and infill the groundwater database before running the numerical groundwater model. In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based model is formulated using the hydrological and meteorological data to infill the inadequate data in the groundwater database. Prediction results present that ANN method could be a desirable choice for estimating the missing groundwater data.

  19. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  20. Welding wire velocity modelling and control using an optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for controlling the velocity of a welding wire at the tip of the handle is described. The method is an alternative to the traditional welding apparatus control system where the wire velocity is controlled internal in the welding machine implying a poor disturbance reduction...

  1. Reaction-diffusion-branching models of stock price fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei-Han; Tian, Guang-Shan

    Several models of stock trading (Bak et al., Physica A 246 (1997) 430.) are analyzed in analogy with one-dimensional, two-species reaction-diffusion-branching processes. Using heuristic and scaling arguments, we show that the short-time market price variation is subdiffusive with a Hurst exponent H=1/4. Biased diffusion towards the market price and blind-eyed copying lead to crossovers to the empirically observed random-walk behavior ( H=1/2) at long times. The calculated crossover forms and diffusion constants are shown to agree well with simulation data.

  2. Model for Assembly Line Re-Balancing Considering Additional Capacity and Outsourcing to Face Demand Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, TMAA; Sumihartati, Atin

    2016-02-01

    The most critical stage in a garment industry is sewing process, because generally, it consists of a number of operations and a large number of sewing machines for each operation. Therefore, it requires a balancing method that can assign task to work station with balance workloads. Many studies on assembly line balancing assume a new assembly line, but in reality, due to demand fluctuation and demand increased a re-balancing is needed. To cope with those fluctuating demand changes, additional capacity can be carried out by investing in spare sewing machine and paying for sewing service through outsourcing. This study develops an assembly line balancing (ALB) model on existing line to cope with fluctuating demand change. Capacity redesign is decided if the fluctuation demand exceeds the available capacity through a combination of making investment on new machines and outsourcing while considering for minimizing the cost of idle capacity in the future. The objective of the model is to minimize the total cost of the line assembly that consists of operating costs, machine cost, adding capacity cost, losses cost due to idle capacity and outsourcing costs. The model develop is based on an integer programming model. The model is tested for a set of data of one year demand with the existing number of sewing machines of 41 units. The result shows that additional maximum capacity up to 76 units of machine required when there is an increase of 60% of the average demand, at the equal cost parameters..

  3. Shear-wave Velocity Model from Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities Centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.; Erdem, Jemile

    2017-06-01

    Rayleigh wave group velocities obtained from ambient noise tomography are inverted for an upper crustal model of the Central Valley, California, centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta. Two methods were tried; the first uses SURF96, a least squares routine. It provides a good fit to the data, but convergence is dependent on the starting model. The second uses a genetic algorithm, whose starting model is random. This method was tried at several nodes in the model and compared to the output from SURF96. The genetic code is run five times and the variance of the output of all five models can be used to obtain an estimate of error. SURF96 produces a more regular solution mostly because it is typically run with a smoothing constraint. Models from the genetic code are generally consistent with the SURF96 code sometimes producing lower velocities at depth. The full model, calculated using SURF96, employed a 2-pass strategy, which used a variable damping scheme in the first pass. The resulting model shows low velocities near the surface in the Central Valley with a broad asymmetrical sedimentary basin located close to the western edge of the Central Valley near 122°W longitude. At shallow depths, the Rio Vista Basin is found nestled between the Pittsburgh/Kirby Hills and Midland faults, but a significant basin also seems to exist to the west of the Kirby Hills fault. There are other possible correlations between fast and slow velocities in the Central Valley and geologic features such as the Stockton Arch, oil or gas producing regions and the fault-controlled western boundary of the Central Valley.

  4. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Kononova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams modeling the particle structure. The beams' deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F-deformation (X spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young's moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams' survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications.

  5. Ultralow-velocity zone geometries resolved by multidimensional waveform modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are thin patches of material with strongly reduced seismic wave speeds situated on top of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A common phase used to detect ULVZs is SPdKS (SKPdS), an SKS wave with a short diffracted P leg along the CMB. Most previous efforts have examined ULVZ properties using 1-D waveform modelling approaches. We present waveform modelling results using the 2.5-D finite-difference algorithm PSVaxi allowing us better insight into ULVZ structure and location. We characterize ULVZ waveforms based on ULVZ elastic properties, shape and position along the SPdKS ray path. In particular, we vary the ULVZ location (e.g. source or receiver side), ULVZ topographical profiles (e.g. boxcar, trapezoidal or Gaussian) and ULVZ lateral scale along great circle path (2.5°, 5°, 10°). We observe several waveform effects absent in 1-D ULVZ models and show evidence for waveform effects allowing the differentiation between source and receiver side ULVZs. Early inception of the SPdKS/SKPdS phase is difficult to detect for receiver-side ULVZs with maximum shifts in SKPdS initiation of ˜3° in epicentral distance, whereas source-side ULVZs produce maximum shifts of SPdKS initiation of ˜5°, allowing clear separation of source- versus receiver-side structure. We present a case study using data from up to 300 broad-band stations in Turkey recorded between 2005 and 2010. We observe a previously undetected ULVZ in the southern Atlantic Ocean region centred near 45°S, 12.5°W, with a lateral scale of ˜3°, VP reduction of 10 per cent, VS reduction of 30 per cent and density increase of 10 per cent relative to PREM.

  6. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Interevent Time Series in a Modified OFC Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; YAN Shuang-Xi; ZHAO Gang; WANG Gang

    2013-01-01

    We use multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) method to investigate the multifractal behavior of the interevent time series in a modified Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) earthquake model on assortative scale-free networks.We determine generalized Hurst exponent and singularity spectrum and find that these fluctuations have multifractal nature.Comparing the MF-DFA results for the original interevent time series with those for shuffled and surrogate series,we conclude that the origin of multifractality is due to both the broadness of probability density function and long-range correlation.

  7. The Discrete Beverton-Holt Model with Periodic Harvesting in a Periodically Fluctuating Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad AlSharawi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of constant and periodic harvesting on the Beverton-Holt model in a periodically fluctuating environment. We show that in a periodically fluctuating environment, periodic harvesting gives a better maximum sustainable yield compared to constant harvesting. However, if one can also fix the environment, then constant harvesting in a constant environment can be a better option, especially for sufficiently large initial populations. Also, we investigate the combinatorial structure of the periodic sequence of carrying capacities and its effect on the maximum sustainable yield. Finally, we leave some questions worth further investigations.

  8. S-matrix Fluctuations in a model with Classical Diffusion and Quantum Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Borgonovi, F; Borgonovi, Fausto; Guarneri, Italo

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: The statistics of S-matrix fluctuations are numerically investigated on a model for irregular quantum scattering in which a classical chaotic diffusion takes place within the interaction region. Agreement with various random-matrix theoretic predictions is discussed in the various regimes (ballistic, diffusive, localized).

  9. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  10. Fluctuations around Periodic BPS-Density Waves in the Calogero Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bardek, V; Meljanac, S

    2010-01-01

    The collective field formulation of the Calogero model supports periodic density waves. An important set of such density waves is a two-parameter family of BPS solutions of the equations of motion of the collective field theory. One of these parameters is essentially the average particle density, which determines the period, while the other parameter determines the amplitude. These BPS solutions are sometimes referred to as "small amplitude waves" since they undulate around their mean density, but never vanish. We present complete analysis of quadratic fluctuations around these BPS solutions. The corresponding fluctuation hamiltonian (i.e., the stability operator) is diagonalized in terms of bosonic creation and annihilation operators which correspond to the complete orthogonal set of Bloch-Floquet eigenstates of a related periodic Schr\\"odinger hamiltonian, which we derive explicitly. Remarkably, the fluctuation spectrum is independent of the parameter which determines the density wave's amplitude. As a cons...

  11. Test of the Additivity Principle for Current Fluctuations in a Model of Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2009-06-01

    The additivity principle allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional (1D) nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we confirm this conjecture in the 1D Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti model of heat conduction for a wide current interval. The current distribution shows both Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes, and obeys the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. We verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation. This profile is independent of the sign of the current, and this symmetry extends to higher-order profiles and spatial correlations. We also show that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  12. Velocity measurement of model vertical axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; McWilliam, M. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An increasingly popular solution to future energy demand is wind energy. Wind turbine designs can be grouped according to their axis of rotation, either horizontal or vertical. Horizontal axis wind turbines have higher power output in a good wind regime than vertical axis turbines and are used in most commercial class designs. Vertical axis Savonius-based wind turbine designs are still widely used in some applications because of their simplistic design and low wind speed performance. There are many design variables that must be considered in order to optimize the power output in a given wind regime in a typical wind turbine design. Using particle image velocimetry, a study of the air flow around five different model vertical axis wind turbines was conducted in a closed loop wind tunnel. A standard Savonius design with two semi-circular blades overlapping, and two variations of this design, a deep blade and a shallow blade design were among the turbine models included in this study. It also evaluated alternate designs that attempt to increase the performance of the standard design by allowing compound blade curvature. Measurements were collected at a constant phase angle and also at random rotor orientations. It was found that evaluation of the flow patterns and measured velocities revealed consistent and stable flow patterns at any given phase angle. Large scale flow structures are evident in all designs such as vortices shed from blade surfaces. An important performance parameter was considered to be the ability of the flow to remain attached to the forward blade and redirect and reorient the flow to the following blade. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  13. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  14. Velocity Modeling and Inversion Techniques for Locating Microseismic Events in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianzhong Zhang; Han Liu; Zhihui Zou; Zhonglai Huang

    2015-01-01

    A velocity model is an important factor influencing microseismic event locations. We re-view the velocity modeling and inversion techniques for locating microseismic events in exploration for unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. We first describe the geological and geophysical characteristics of reservoir formations related to hydraulic fracturing in heterogeneity, anisotropy, and variability, then discuss the influences of velocity estimation, anisotropy model, and their time-lapse changes on the accuracy in determining microseismic event locations, and then survey some typical methods for build-ing velocity models in locating event locations. We conclude that the three tangled physical attributes of reservoirs make microseismic monitoring very challenging. The uncertainties in velocity model and ig-noring its anisotropies and its variations in hydraulic fracturing can cause systematic mislocations of microseismic events which are unacceptable in microseismic monitoring. So, we propose some potential ways for building accurate velocity models.

  15. Fluctuations of a surface relaxation model in interacting scale free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M. F.; La Rocca, C. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Isolated complex networks have been studied deeply in the last decades due to the fact that many real systems can be modeled using these types of structures. However, it is well known that the behavior of a system not only depends on itself, but usually also depends on the dynamics of other structures. For this reason, interacting complex networks and the processes developed on them have been the focus of study of many researches in the last years. One of the most studied subjects in this type of structures is the Synchronization problem, which is important in a wide variety of processes in real systems. In this manuscript we study the synchronization of two interacting scale-free networks, in which each node has ke dependency links with different nodes in the other network. We map the synchronization problem with an interface growth, by studying the fluctuations in the steady state of a scalar field defined in both networks. We find that as ke slightly increases from ke = 0, there is a really significant decreasing in the fluctuations of the system. However, this considerable improvement takes place mainly for small values of ke, when the interaction between networks becomes stronger there is only a slight change in the fluctuations. We characterize how the dispersion of the scalar field depends on the internal degree, and we show that a combination between the decreasing of this dispersion and the integer nature of our growth model are the responsible for the behavior of the fluctuations with ke.

  16. A Holographic Model for Pseudogap in BCS-BEC Crossover (I): Pairing Fluctuations, Double-Trace Deformation and Dynamics of Bulk Bosonic Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Wu, Chaolun

    2016-01-01

    We build a holographic model for the pairing fluctuation pseudogap phase in fermionic high temperature superconductivity/superfluidity based on the BCS-BEC crossover scenario. The pseudogap originates from incoherent Cooper pairing and has been observed in recent cold atom experiments. The strength of Cooper pairing and hence the BCS-BEC crossover is controlled by an effective 4-Fermi interaction and we argue that the double-trace deformation for charged scalar operator is a close analog in large N field theories. We employ the double-trace deformed Abelian Higgs model of holographic superconductors and propose that the incoherent fluctuations of the charged scalar in the bulk is the holographic dual of the fluctuating Cooper pairs. Using a Madelung transformation and the velocity-potential formalism, we develop a quantum fluid dynamics as an effective theory for these bulk fluctuations. The new fluid dynamics takes care of the boundary conditions required by AdS/CFT and encodes the vacuum polarization effect...

  17. Energy of ground state in B-B'-U-Hubbard model in approximation of static fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, G I

    2002-01-01

    To explain some features of CuO sub 2 base high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) one should take account of possibility of electron transfer to the crystalline structure mode next to the nearest one. It terms of approximation of static fluctuations one calculated the energy of ground state in two-dimensional B-B'-U Hubbard model. Lattice is assumed to consist of two sublattices formed by various type atoms. The calculation results of ground state energy are compared with the precise solution for one-dimensional Hubbard model derived previously. Comparison of the precise and the approximated solutions shows that approximation of static fluctuations describes adequately behavior of the Hubbard studied model within both weak and strong correlation ranges

  18. Resonance decay effect on conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of charged secondaries coming from resonance decay on the net-baryon, net-charge and net-strangeness fluctuations in high energy heavy-ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. We emphasize the importance of including weak decays along with other resonance decays in the HRG, while comparing with the experimental observables. The effect of kinematic cuts on resonances and primordial particles on the conserved number fluctuations are also studied. The HRG model calculations with the inclusion of resonance decays and kinematical cuts are compared with the recent experimental data from STAR and PHENIX experiments. We find a good agreement between our model calculations and the experimental measurements for both net-proton and net-charge distributions.

  19. Effect of resonance decay on conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D. K.; Garg, P.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Mohanty, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of charged secondaries coming from resonance decay on the net-baryon, net-charge, and net-strangeness fluctuations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. We emphasize the importance of including weak decays along with other resonance decays in the HRG, while comparing with the experimental observables. The effect of kinematic cuts on resonances and primordial particles on the conserved number fluctuations are also studied. The HRG model calculations with the inclusion of resonance decays and kinematical cuts are compared with the recent experimental data from STAR and PHENIX experiments. We find good agreement between our model calculations and the experimental measurements for both net-proton and net-charge distributions.

  20. The role of disorder in the dynamics of critical fluctuations of mean field models

    CERN Document Server

    Collet, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the disorder affects the dynamics of critical fluctuations for two different types of interacting particle system: the Curie-Weiss and Kuramoto model. The models under consideration are a collection of spins and rotators respectively. They both are subject to a mean field interaction and embedded in a site-dependent, i.i.d. random environment. As the number of particles goes to infinity their limiting dynamics become deterministic and exhibit phase transition. The main result concern the fluctuations around this deterministic limit at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. From a qualitative point of view, it indicates that when disorder is added spin and rotator systems belong to two different classes of universality, which is not the case for the homogeneous models (i.e., without disorder).

  1. An improved multidirectional velocity model for micro-seismic monitoring in rock engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健; 吴顺川; 高永涛; 李莉洁; 周喻

    2015-01-01

    An improved multidirectional velocity model was proposed for more accurately locating micro-seismic events in rock engineering. It was assumed that the stress wave propagation velocities from a micro-seismic source to three nearest monitoring sensors in a sensor’s array arrangement were the same. Since the defined objective function does not require pre-measurement of the stress wave propagation velocity in the field, errors from the velocity measurement can be avoided in comparison to three traditional velocity models. By analyzing 24 different cases, the proposed multidirectional velocity model iterated by the Simplex method is found to be the best option no matter the source is within the region of the sensor’s array or not. The proposed model and the adopted iterative algorithm are verified by field data and it is concluded that it can significantly reduce the error of the estimated source location.

  2. Estimation of flow velocity for a debris flow via the two-phase fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase fluid model is applied in this study to calculate the steady velocity of a debris flow along a channel bed. By using the momentum equations of the solid and liquid phases in the debris flow together with an empirical formula to describe the interaction between two phases, the steady velocities of the solid and liquid phases are obtained theoretically. The comparison of those velocities obtained by the proposed method with the observed velocities of two real-world debris flows shows that the proposed method can estimate accurately the velocity for a debris flow.

  3. A comparative study of velocity increment generation between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Norilmi Amilia, E-mail: aenorilmi@usm.my [School of Aerospace Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2016-02-01

    The motorized momentum exchange tether (MMET) is capable of generating useful velocity increments through spin–orbit coupling. This study presents a comparative study of the velocity increments between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET. The equations of motions of both models in the time domain are transformed into a function of true anomaly. The equations of motion are integrated, and the responses in terms of the velocity increment of the rigid body and flexible models are compared and analysed. Results show that the initial conditions, eccentricity, and flexibility of the tether have significant effects on the velocity increments of the tether.

  4. A Mathematical Model for Differential—Velocity Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZhao; XiangdongXu

    1999-01-01

    The scheme of differential-velocity circulating fluidized bed was put forward by Thermal Engineering Department of Tsinghua university in 1992 and got patent simultaneously.An internal bed material circulation in combustor can be established by the discrepancy of entrainment at different air velocity,and separates the combustor into three different velocity regions,which constitutes the differential-velocity inside circulation.Mathematical modeling and simulation may facilitate understanding,Development and operation of this new process.Here cell model method was adopted to set up the model.

  5. Mathematical model of the growth of a mollusk affected by a toxicant and by temperature fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurchenko, T.S.; Burtnaya, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to model the effect of a gamma isomer of hexachloran (lindane) and of temperature fluctuations on the growth of bivalves. The model is based on an experimental study of the effect of the toxicant on Radix ovata and Viviparus viviparus, and also on the Putter-Bertalanffy-Vinberg models and the model of Zotin. Quite good agreements has been obtained between calculated and experimental data, and growth curves have been constructed for the weight increase of the animals when exposed to lindane concentrations not tested in the experiment.

  6. Comparison of model measured runner blade pressure fluctuations with unsteady flow analysis predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate prediction of pressure fluctuations in Francis turbines has become more and more important over the last years, due to the continuously increasing requirements of wide operating range capability. Depending on the machine operator, Francis turbines are operated at full load, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load. Each of these operating conditions is associated with different flow phenomena and pressure fluctuation levels. The better understanding of the pressure fluctuation phenomena and the more accurate prediction of their amplitude along the hydraulic surfaces can significantly contribute to improve the hydraulic and mechanical design of Francis turbines, their hydraulic stability and their reliability. With the objective to acquire a deeper knowledge about the pressure fluctuation characteristics in Francis turbines and to improve the accuracy of numerical simulation methods used for the prediction of the dynamic fluid flow through the turbine, pressure fluctuations were experimentally measured in a mid specific speed model machine. The turbine runner of a model machine with specific speed around nq,opt = 60 min-1, was instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers at the runner blades. The model machine shaft was equipped with a telemetry system able to transmit the measured pressure values to the data acquisition system. The transient pressure signal was measured at multiple locations on the blade and at several operating conditions. The stored time signal was also evaluated in terms of characteristic amplitude and dominating frequency. The dynamic fluid flow through the hydraulic turbine was numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for selected operating points. Among others, operating points at full load, part load and deep part load were calculated. For the fluid flow numerical simulations more advanced turbulence models were used, such as the detached eddy simulation (DES) and scale adaptive simulation (SAS). At the

  7. Black Hole Variability in MHD: A Numerical Test of the Propagating Fluctuations Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    The variability properties of accreting black hole systems offer a crucial probe of the accretion physics providing the angular momentum transport and enabling the mass accretion. A few of the most telling signatures are the characteristic log-normal flux distributions, linear RMS-flux relations, and frequency-dependent time lags between energy bands. These commonly observed properties are often interpreted as evidence of inward propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations where fluctuations in the accretion flow combine multiplicatively. We present recent results from a long, semi-global MHD simulation of a thin (h/r=0.1) accretion disk that naturally reproduces this phenomenology. This bolsters the theoretical underpinnings of the “propagating fluctuations” model and demonstrates the viability of this process manifesting in MHD turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability. We find that a key ingredient to this model is the modulation of the effective α parameter by the magnetic dynamo.

  8. Isomorphism Between Estes’ Stimulus Fluctuation Model and a Physical- Chemical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Yamaguchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Estes’ Stimulus Sampling Theory has almost completely lost its influence, its theoretical framework has not been disproved. Particularly, one theory in that framework, Stimulus Fluctuation Model, is still important because it explains spontaneous recovery. In this short note, the process of the theory is shown to be isomorphic to the diffusion of solution between compartments. Envisioning the theory as diffusion will make it appear less artificial and suggest natural extensions.

  9. Fast simulation approaches for power fluctuation model of wind farm based on frequency domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Jin; Gao, Wen-zhong; Sun, Yuan-zhang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses one model developed by Riso, DTU, which is capable of simulating the power fluctuation of large wind farms in frequency domain. In the original design, the “frequency-time” transformations are time-consuming and might limit the computation speed for a wind farm of large size....... is more than 300 times if all these approaches are adopted, in any low, medium and high wind speed test scenarios....

  10. MODEL OF SEA ICE BREAKUP ON SHALLOW BEACH DUE TO TIDAL FLUCTUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    There are many factors that may lead to the breakup of shore fast ice, such as wind, wave, tide and so on.This paper mainly analyzed the ice breakup on the shallow beach due to tidal fluctuation.The theoretical model was set up and the fitting range was given.The calculated result shows that the slope angle α, the ice thickness h, and the ice length l are key factors in determining the ice breakup length lp.

  11. Attractors, statistics and fluctuations of the dynamics of the Schelling's model for social segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Vasco; Medina, Pablo; Goles, Eric; Zarama, Roberto; Rica, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Statistical properties, fluctuations and probabilistic arguments are shown to explain the robust dynamics of the Schelling's social segregation model. With the aid of probability density functions we characterize the attractors for multiple external parameters and conditions. We discuss the role of the initial states and we show that, indeed, the system evolves towards well defined attractors. Finally, we provide probabilistic arguments to explain quantitatively the observed behavior.

  12. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  13. Multijam Solutions in Traffic Models with Velocity-Dependent Driver Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Paul; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal-velocity follow-the-leader model is augmented with an equation that allows each driver to adjust their target headway according to the velocity difference between the driver and the car in front. In this more detailed model, which is investigated on a ring, stable and unstable...

  14. Temperature dependence of universal fluctuations in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, G

    2006-04-01

    We compute exact analytical expressions for the skewness and kurtosis in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model. These quantities correspond to the third and fourth normalized moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnetization of the model. From their behavior, we conclude that they depend explicitly on the system temperature even in the thermodynamic limit, and hence the PDF itself must depend on it. Our results correct the hypothesis called universal fluctuations, they confirm and extend previous results which showed a T dependence of the PDF, including perturbative expansions within the XY model up to first order in temperature.

  15. VARIATIONAL ITERATION SOLVING METHOD FOR SEA-AIR OSCILLATOR MODEL OF INTERDECADAL CLIMATE FLUCTUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Jia-qi; LIN Yi-hua; WANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric physics is a very complicated natural phenomenon and needs to simplify its basic models for the sea-air oscillator. And it is solved by using the approximate method. The variational iteration method is a simple and valid method. In this paper the coupled system for a sea-air oscillator model of interdecadal climate fluctuations is considered. Firstly, through introducing a set of functions, and computing the variations, the Lagrange multipliers are obtained. And then, the generalized expressions of variational iteration are constructed. Finally, through selecting appropriate initial iteration from the iteration expressions, the approximations of solution for the sea-air oscillator model are solved successively.

  16. A self-consistent 3D model of fluctuations in the helium-ionizing background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Frederick B.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2017-03-01

    Large variations in the effective optical depth of the He II Lyα forest have been observed at z ≳ 2.7, but the physical nature of these variations is uncertain: either the Universe is still undergoing the process of He II reionization, or the Universe is highly ionized but the He II-ionizing background fluctuates significantly on large scales. In an effort to build upon our understanding of the latter scenario, we present a novel model for the evolution of ionizing background fluctuations. Previous models have assumed the mean free path of ionizing photons to be spatially uniform, ignoring the dependence of that scale on the local ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM). This assumption is reasonable when the mean free path is large compared to the average distance between the primary sources of He II-ionizing photons, ≳ L⋆ quasars. However, when this is no longer the case, the background fluctuations become more severe, and an accurate description of the average propagation of ionizing photons through the IGM requires additionally accounting for the fluctuations in opacity. We demonstrate the importance of this effect by constructing 3D semi-analytic models of the helium-ionizing background from z = 2.5-3.5 that explicitly include a spatially varying mean free path of ionizing photons. The resulting distribution of effective optical depths at large scales in the He II Lyα forest is very similar to the latest observations with HST/COS at 2.5 ≲ z ≲ 3.5.

  17. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  18. Coefficient of variation of underwater irradiance fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, V. L.

    2010-06-01

    We consider underwater sunlight fluctuations in the case of a one-dimensional irregular sea surface. Several rigorous and approximate models are proposed, which make it possible to analytically treat and physically explain the dependence of the coefficient of variation of the underwater irradiance on the depth, the wind velocity, and optical parameters of the sea water.

  19. A Langevin model for fluctuating contact angle behaviour parametrised using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E R; Müller, E A; Craster, R V; Matar, O K

    2016-12-06

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to develop a theoretical model to predict the fluid-solid contact angle as a function of wall-sliding speed incorporating thermal fluctuations. A liquid bridge between counter-sliding walls is studied, with liquid-vapour interface-tracking, to explore the impact of wall-sliding speed on contact angle. The behaviour of the macroscopic contact angle varies linearly over a range of capillary numbers beyond which the liquid bridge pinches off, a behaviour supported by experimental results. Nonetheless, the liquid bridge provides an ideal test case to study molecular scale thermal fluctuations, which are shown to be well described by Gaussian distributions. A Langevin model for contact angle is parametrised to incorporate the mean, fluctuation and auto-correlations over a range of sliding speeds and temperatures. The resulting equations can be used as a proxy for the fully-detailed molecular dynamics simulation allowing them to be integrated within a continuum-scale solver.

  20. Fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation appearing in the 10-dimensional cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Tomita, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We consider a cosmological model starting from (1) the(1+3+6)-dimensional space-times consisting of the outer space (the 3-dimensional expanding section) and the inner space (the 6-dimensional section) and reaching (2) the Friedmann model after the decoupling between the outer space and the inner space, and derive fluctuations of the background radiation appearing in the above 10-dimensional space-times. For this purpose we first derive the fluid-dynamical perturbations in the above 10-dimensional space-times, corresponding to two kinds of curvature perturbations (in the scalar mode) in the non-viscous case, and next study the quantum fluctuations in the scalar and tensor modes, appearing at the stage when the perturbations are within the horizon of the inflating outer space. Lastly we derive the wave-number dependence of fluctuations (the power spectrum) in the two modes, which formed at the above decoupling epoch and are observed in the Friedmann stage. It is found that it can be consistent with the observe...

  1. The fluctuational region on the phase diagram of lattice Weinberg - Salam model

    CERN Document Server

    Zubkov, M A

    2009-01-01

    The lattice Weinberg - Salam model without fermions is investigated numerically for the realistic choice of bare coupling constants correspondent to the value of the Weinberg angle $\\theta_W \\sim 30^o$, and the fine structure constant $\\alpha \\sim {1/100}$. On the phase diagram there exists the vicinity of the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase, where the fluctuations of the scalar field become strong. The classical Nambu monopole can be considered as an embryo of the unphysical symmetric phase within the physical phase. In the fluctuational region quantum Nambu monopoles are dense and, therefore, the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum cannot be applied. The maximal value of the cutoff at the given values of coupling constants calculated using the lattices of sizes $8^3\\times 16$ and $12^3\\times 16$ is $\\Lambda_c \\sim 1.4 \\pm 0.2$ Tev.

  2. TEARHS - Modelling toxic impacts on the airway system from exposure to fluctuating concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, Frank; Ott, Søren

    2000-01-01

    information on toxic effects and the relevant time scale for exposure. Concentration-time-fatality relations areobtained from experiments with rats down to 5 minutes of exposure. If the information from these relations is extrapolated down to 5 to 10 seconds using different assumptions, the predicted...... to be small, in the order of a few seconds. Considering the aspiration pattern, it is concluded that relevant time scale for absorption in the airways is 5 to 10seconds. In real atmospheric, toxic gas clouds, fluctuations at this time scale are large. There is still a large gap between the empirical...... mortality is quite different. This study indicates thatatmospheric dispersion models for acutely toxic substances need to provide information about concentration fluctuations of time scales of 5 to 10 sec. Final conclusions can only be drawn when it becomes clear how the gap betweenconcentration...

  3. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in quark combination model

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical fluctuation and correlation of multiplicity distributions of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of the bulk quark system are systematically studied in quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of quark combination which are necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distribution of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting findings, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coincide flavor dependent two-baryon correlation and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization to study their influence on multiple production of baryons and ant...

  4. Numerical Investigation of Pressure Fluctuation in Centrifugal Pump Volute Based on SAS Model and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaorui Si

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of pressure fluctuation of a single-suction volute-type centrifugal pump, particularly volute casing, by using numerical and experimental methods. A new type of hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation, referred to as the shear stress transport-scale-adaptive simulation (SAS model, is employed to study the unsteady flow. Statistical analysis method is adopted to show the pressure fluctuation intensity distribution in the volute channel. A test rig for pressure pulsation measurement is built to validate the numerical simulation results using eight transient pressure sensors in the middle section of the volute wall. Results show that the SAS model can accurately predict the inner flow field of centrifugal pumps. Radial force acting on the impeller presents a star distribution related to the blade number. Pressure fluctuation intensity is strongest near the tongue and shows irregular distribution in the pump casing. Pressure fluctuation is distributed symmetrically at the cross-section of the volute casing because the volute can eliminate the rotational movement of the liquid discharged from the impeller. Blade passing frequency and its multiples indicate the dominant frequency of the monitoring points within the volute, and the low-frequency pulsation, particularly in the shaft component, increases when it operates at off-design condition, particularly with a small flow rate. The reason is that the vortex wave is enhanced at the off-design condition, which has an effect on the axle and is presented in the shaft component in the frequency domain.

  5. Modelling Solar Oscillation Power Spectra: II. Parametric Model of Spectral Lines Observed in Doppler Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudo modes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  6. A Mathematical Model to Predict Voltage Fluctuations in a Distribution System with Renewable Energy Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shivkumar Venkatraman; Wu, Bin; Li, Yunwei; Singh, Birendra

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a simplified mathematical model to predict the impact of connection of Distributed Generators (DGs) to the ac grid. The model allows the user to examine the fluctuations in the magnitude of voltages at different nodes in the distribution system. In order to use the model, the user does not require a commercial simulation software making it a handy tool for a practicing engineer. Analysis has been presented to describe how the detailed mathematical model of the system is reduced using elementary matrix manipulation techniques to obtain the final simplified mathematical model. Simulation results are presented to verify the mathematical model with a ring distribution system with three DGs connected to it and the results validate those attained from the mathematical model.

  7. An improved car-following model considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Zhao, Xiangmo; Xu, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-11-01

    The field car-following data at a signalized intersection of Jinan in China are collected for data mining. An improved car-following model considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference on a single-lane road was proposed, calibrated and verified based on full velocity difference model. The results of some numerical simulations indicate that the immediately ahead car's velocity difference has significant effects on the following car's motion, that the improved car-following model fits the measured data well and can qualitatively describe the impacts of the immediately ahead car's velocity difference on traffic flow, and that modeling the car-following behavior considering the immediately ahead car's velocity difference can improve the stability of the simulated traffic flow.

  8. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity-jump models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Benjamin; Taylor-King, Jake P.; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Group-level behavior of particles undergoing a velocity-jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive N -particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded-volume fraction is small.

  9. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity jump models

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Benjamin; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Group-level behaviour of particles undergoing a velocity jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive $N$-particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded volume fraction is small.

  10. A New Model for Prediction of Mean Liquid Circulating Velocity in Bubble Columns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new model without any fitting parameter for estimating the mean liquid recirculating velocity has been derived from previous work directly. The prediction agrees with experimental data reasonably well. Accurency of prediction from the new model is comparable with the models reported in the literature. However, the new model has a potential capability to predict the average liquid recirculation velocity at elevated pressure bubble columns since n and c is developed under pressure. However this needs to be further tested experimentally.

  11. Full velocity difference and acceleration model for a car-following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Liu, Qingling; Li, Xiuhai

    2013-05-01

    In order to describe the car-following behavior more actually in real traffic, a full velocity difference and acceleration model (for short, FVDAM) is proposed by synthetically taking into account headway, velocity difference and acceleration of the leading car on the basis of full velocity difference model. The analytical method and numerical simulation results show that the proposed model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, that incorporating the acceleration of the leading car into car-following model can stabilize traffic flow, suppress the traffic jam and increase capacity, and that the following car in FVDAM can accelerate more quickly than in FVDM.

  12. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Li, Hai-hong; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical multiplicity fluctuations and correlations of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of a bulk quark system are systematically studied in a quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of the quark combination which is necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness, and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distributions of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of a quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting results, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coinciding flavor-dependent two-baryon correlation, and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of the quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization and study their influence on multiple production of baryons and antibaryons. We find that quark number fluctuations and flavor conservation lead to a series of important results such as the negative p Ω¯ + multiplicity correlation and universal two-baryon correlations. We also study the influence of resonance decays in order to compare our results with future experimental data in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Calibration of the Khibiny Massif velocity model using registration of industrial explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asming V.E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of geodynamic activity of the Khibiny Massif assumes an accurate location of seismic events occurring here. This requires on the one hand knowledge of seismic wave velocities in the massif and adjacent territories and on the other hand software tools for seismic location in inhomogeneous media. The Seismic Configurator program developed in the Kola Branch of Geophysical Survey of RAS enables to create velocity models of 3D media, locate events and compute apparent velocities of seismic waves propagating along different paths. As a result of registration of industrial explosions in Khibiny, a set of apparent velocities of Pwaves along paths crossing the massif has been obtained. 2D and 3D velocity models matched the observations have been fitted by these data using the Seismic Configurator program. A method of modification of the existing location system for practical usage of the models has been proposed

  14. Influence of Velocity Shell Correlations on Anomalous Scaling Exponents of Passive Scalars in Shell Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Qiang; WANG Guang-Rui; CHEN Shi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the old-standing problem of the anomaly of the scaling exponents of passive scalars of turbulence.Different to the original problem,the distribution function of the prescribed random velocity field is multi-dimensional normal and delta-correlated in time.Here,our random velocity field is spatially correlative.For comparison,we also give the result obtained by the Gaussian random velocity field without spatial correlation.The anomalous scaling exponents H (p) of passive scalar advected by two kinds of random velocity above are determined for structure function up to p= 15 by numerical simulations of the random shell model with Runge-Kutta methods to solve the stochastic differential equations.We observed that the H (p)'s obtained by the multi-dimensional normal distribution random velocity are more anomalous than those obtained by the independent Gaussian random velocity.

  15. Lagrangian velocity statistics of directed launch strategies in a Gulf of Mexico model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial dependence of Lagrangian displacement and velocity statistics is studied in the context of a data assimilating numerical model of the Gulf Mexico. In the active eddy region of the Western Gulf, a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian measures are used to locate strongly hyperbolic regions of the flow. The statistics of the velocity field sampled by sets of drifters launched specifically in these hyperbolic regions are compared to those produced by randomly chosen launch sites. The results show that particle trajectories initialized in hyperbolic regions preferentially sample a broader range of Eulerian velocities than do members of ensembles of randomly launched drifters. The velocity density functions produced by the directed launches compare well with Eulerian velocity pdfs. Implications for the development of launch strategies to improve Eulerian velocity field reconstruction from drifter data are discussed.

  16. Rare events and their impact on velocity diffusion in a stochastic Fermi-Ulam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlis, A K; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V; Schmelcher, P

    2008-10-01

    A simplified version of the stochastic Fermi-Ulam model is investigated in order to elucidate the effect of a class of rare low-velocity events on the velocity diffusion process and consequently Fermi acceleration. The relative fraction of these events, for sufficiently large times, decreases monotonically with increasing variance of the magnitude of the particle velocity. However, a treatment of the diffusion problem which totally neglects these events, gives rise to a glaring inconsistency associated with the mean value of the magnitude of the velocity in the ensemble. We propose a general scheme for treating the diffusion process in velocity space, which succeeds in capturing the effect of the low-velocity events on the diffusion, providing a consistent description of the acceleration process. The present study exemplifies the influence of low-probability events on the transport properties of time-dependent billiards.

  17. Modeling of velocity field for vacuum induction melting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; JIANG Zhi-guo; LIU Kui; LI Yi-yi

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation for the recirculating flow of melting of an electromagnetically stirred alloy in a cylindrical induction furnace crucible was presented. Inductive currents and electromagnetic body forces in the alloy under three different solenoid frequencies and three different melting powers were calculated, and then the forces were adopted in the fluid flow equations to simulate the flow of the alloy and the behavior of the free surface. The relationship between the height of the electromagnetic stirring meniscus, melting power, and solenoid frequency was derived based on the law of mass conservation. The results show that the inductive currents and the electromagnetic forces vary with the frequency, melting power, and the physical properties of metal. The velocity and the height of the meniscus increase with the increase of the melting power and the decrease of the solenoid frequency.

  18. Nonaligned shocks for discrete velocity models of the Boltzmann equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Greenberg

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available At the conclusion of I. Bonzani's presentation on the existence of structured shock solutions to the six-velocity, planar, discrete Boltzmann equation (with binary and triple collisions, Greenberg asked whether such solutions were possible in directions e(α=(cosα ,sinα when α was not one of the particle flow directions. This question generated a spirited discussion but the question was still open at the conclusion of the conference. In this note the author will provide a partial resolution to the question raised above. Using formal perturbation arguments he will produce approximate solutions to the equation considered by Bonzani which represent traveling waves propagating in any direction e(α=(cosα ,sinα.

  19. Simple Model for Simulating Characteristics of River Flow Velocity in Large Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husin Alatas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple computer based phenomenological model to simulate the characteristics of river flow velocity in large scale. We use shuttle radar tomography mission based digital elevation model in grid form to define the terrain of catchment area. The model relies on mass-momentum conservation law and modified equation of motion of falling body in inclined plane. We assume inelastic collision occurs at every junction of two river branches to describe the dynamics of merged flow velocity.

  20. Improvements of model-test method for cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation in marine propeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Jeung-Hoon; HAN Jae-Moon; PARK Hyung-Gil; SEO Jong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Although the prediction of propeller cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation strongly depends on the model-scalemeasurement in a cavitation tunnel,there is still a lack of correlation with full-scale data.This paper deals with the enhancement of such a correlation deficiency by improving the conventional model-test technique,two majors of which are in the following.One is to take into account the boundary layer effect of wooden fairing plate at the ceiling of water cavitation tunnel.The other is to avoid the resonance frequency range of model-ship via adjusting the revolution speed of model propeller.Through a case study,for which both model and full-scale test data are available,the improved method in this study shows its validness,and furthermore a close correlation with full scale measurement.

  1. Modeling the underwater light field fluctuations in coastal oceanic waters: Validation with experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarabalan, Balasubramanian; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Ahn, Yu-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of the wave-induced underwater light fluctuations at near-surface depths in coastal oceanic waters is challenging because of the surface roughness and strong anisotropic effects of the light field. In the present work, a simple and computationally efficient radiative transfer model is used for the wind-driven sea surface for simulating underwater light fields such as downwelling irradiance ( E d ), upwelling irradiance ( E u ), and upwelling radiance ( L u ) in a spatial domain. It is an extension of our previous work that essentially combines the air-sea interface of the wind-driven sea surface with transmittance and reflectance along with the diffuse and direct components of the homogenous and inhomogeneous water column. The present model simulates underwater light fields for any possible values of absorption and backscattering coefficients. To assess the performance of the model, the E d , E u , and L u profiles predicted by the model are compared with experimental data from relatively clear and turbid coastal waters. Statistical results show significantly low mean relative differences regardless of the wavelength. Comparison of the simulated and in-situ time series data measured over rough sea surfaces demonstrates that model-observation agreement is good for the present model. The Hydrolight model when implemented with the modified bottom reflectance and phase function provides significantly better results than the original Hydrolight model without consideration of the bottom slope and vertically varying phase function. However, these results are non-spatial and have errors fluctuating at different wavelengths. To further demonstrate the efficiency of the present model, spatial distribution patterns of the underwater light fields are simulated based on the measured data from a coastal station for different solar zenith angles (under sunny condition). Simulated wave-induced fluctuations of the underwater lights fields show a good consistency with in

  2. Energy fluctuations and the singularity of specific heat in a 3D Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupuzs, Jevgenijs

    2004-05-01

    We study the energy fluctuations in 3D Ising model near the phase transition point. Specific heat is a relevant quantity which is directly related to the mean squared amplitude of the energy fluctuations in the system. We have made extensive Monte Carlo simulations in 3D Ising model to clarify the character of the singularity of the specific heat Cv based on the finite-size scaling of its maximal values Cvmax depending on the linear size of the lattice L. An original iterative method has been used which automatically finds the pseudocritical temperature corresponding to the maximum of Cv. The simulations made up to L Wolff's cluster algorithm allowed us to verify the possible power-like as well as logarithmic singularity of the specific heat predicted by different theoretical treatments. The most challenging and interesting result we have obtained is that the finite-size scaling of Cvmax in 3D Ising model is well described by a logarithmic rather than power-like ansatz, just like in 2D case. Another modification of our iterative method has been considered to estimate the critical coupling of 3D Ising model from the Binder cumulant data within L ɛ [96; 384]. Furthermore, the critical exponent β has been evaluated from the simulated magnetization data within the range of reduced temperatures t >= 0.000086 and system sizes L <= 410.

  3. Dynamic Runner Forces and Pressure Fluctuations on the Draft Tube Wall of a Model Pump-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Göde, E.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2016-11-01

    When Francis-turbines and pump-turbines operate at off-design conditions, typically a vortex rope develops. The vortex rope causes pressure oscillations leading to fluctuations of the forces affecting the runner. The presence of dynamic runner forces over a long period of time might damage the bearings and possibly the runner. In this experimental investigation, the fluctuating part of the runner forces and the pressure oscillations on the draft tube wall were measured on a model pump-turbine with a simplified straight cone draft tube in different operating conditions. The investigation focuses on the correlation of the pressure fluctuations frequency measured at the draft tube wall with the frequency of the fluctuating forces on the runner. The comparison between pressure fluctuations and dynamic forces shows a significant correlation in all operating points. For the comparison of different components in the spatial directions of the forces, the pressure fluctuations were separated in a synchronous part and a rotating part for operating points with higher amplitudes. The rotating pressure fluctuations correlate with the radial forces especially in the operating points with a rotating vortex rope. At frequencies with higher amplitudes in the pressure fluctuations caused by the vortex rope movement, there are also higher amplitudes in the radial forces at the same frequencies.

  4. A dual-phantom system for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models under steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, James R; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    A dual-phantom system is developed for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models. Pairs of phantoms with identical geometry and flow conditions are manufactured, one for ultrasound and one for particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV model is made from silicone rubber, and a new PIV fluid is made that matches the refractive index of 1.41 of silicone. Dynamic scaling was performed to correct for the increased viscosity of the PIV fluid compared with that of the ultrasound blood mimic. The degree of stenosis in the models pairs agreed to less than 1%. The velocities in the laminar flow region up to the peak velocity location agreed to within 15%, and the difference could be explained by errors in ultrasound velocity estimation. At low flow rates and in mild stenoses, good agreement was observed in the distal flow fields, excepting the maximum velocities. At high flow rates, there was considerable difference in velocities in the poststenosis flow field (maximum centreline differences of 30%), which would seem to represent real differences in hydrodynamic behavior between the two models. Sources of error included: variation of viscosity because of temperature (random error, which could account for differences of up to 7%); ultrasound velocity estimation errors (systematic errors); and geometry effects in each model, particularly because of imperfect connectors and corners (systematic errors, potentially affecting the inlet length and flow stability). The current system is best placed to investigate measurement errors in the laminar flow region rather than the poststenosis turbulent flow region.

  5. A spatio-velocity model based semantic event detection algorithm for traffic surveillance video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Detection of vehicle events is a research hotspot in digital traffic.In this paper,an approach is proposed to detect vehicle events with semantic analysis of traffic surveillance video using spatio-velocity statistic models.The approach includes two successive phases:trajectory clustering and semantic events detection.For trajectory clustering,a statistic model of vehicle trajectories are presented,for which a spatio-velocity model is trained by analyzing the trajectories of moving vehicles in the scene.Based on the trajectory,which represents both the position of the vehicle and its instantaneous velocity,a trajectory similarity measure is proposed.Then,an improved hierarchical clustering algorithm is adopted to cluster the trajectories according to different spatial and velocity distributions.In each cluster,trajectories that are spatially close have similar velocities of motion and represent one type of activity pattern.For the semantic events detection phase,statistic models of semantic regions in the scene are generated by estimating the probability density and velocity distributions of each type of activity pattern.Finally,semantic events are detected by the proposed spatio-velocity statistic models.The paper also presents experiments using real video sequence to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Quasi-coherent fluctuations limiting the pedestal growth on Alcator C-Mod: Experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hughes, J. W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Baek, S. -G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); LaBombard, Brian [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Terry, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Cziegler, I. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Hubbard, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Davis, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Walk, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Reinke, M. L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Theiler, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Churchhill, R. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Edlund, E. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Canik, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snyder, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); White, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-04-09

    Performance predictions for future fusion devices rely on an accurate model of the pedestal structure. The candidate for predictive pedestal structure is EPED, and it is imperative to test the underlying hypotheses to further gain confidence for ITER projections. Here, we present experimental work testing one of the EPED hypotheses, namely the existence of a soft limit set by microinstabilities such as the kinetic ballooning mode. Furthermore, this work extends recent work on Alactor C-Mod (Diallo et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 115001), to include detailed measurements of the edge fluctuations and comparisons of edge simulation codes and experimental observations.

  7. Fluctuation of the electronic coupling in DNA: Multistate versus two-state model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2007-05-01

    The electronic coupling for hole transfer between guanine bases G in the DNA duplex (GT) 6GTG(TG) 6 is studied using a QM/MD approach. The coupling V is calculated for 10 thousand snapshots within the two- and multistate state Generalized Mulliken-Hush model. We find that the two-state scheme considerably underestimates the rate of the hole transfer within the π stack. Moreover, the probability distributions computed with the two- and multistate schemes are quite different. It has been found that large fluctuations of V2, which are at least an order of magnitude larger than its average value, occur roughly every 1 ps.

  8. Model for energy transfer by coherent Fermi pressure fluctuations in quantum soft matter

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    A 1-dimensional model for coherent quantum energy transfer through a complex of compressible boxes is investigated by numerical integration of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. Energy is communicated from one box to the next by the resonant fluctuating Fermi pressure of the electrons in each box pushing on the walls and doing work on adjacent boxes. Parameters are chosen similar to the chain molecules of typical light harvesting complexes. For some parameter choices the system is found to have an instability leading to self-induced coherent energy transfer transparency.

  9. Stable explicit coupling of the Yee scheme with a linear current model in fluctuating magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Filipe da, E-mail: tanatos@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pinto, Martin Campos, E-mail: campos@ann.jussieu.fr [CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Després, Bruno, E-mail: despres@ann.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Heuraux, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.heuraux@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS – University Lorraine, Vandoeuvre (France)

    2015-08-15

    This work analyzes the stability of the Yee scheme for non-stationary Maxwell's equations coupled with a linear current model with density fluctuations. We show that the usual procedure may yield unstable scheme for physical situations that correspond to strongly magnetized plasmas in X-mode (TE) polarization. We propose to use first order clustered discretization of the vectorial product that gives back a stable coupling. We validate the schemes on some test cases representative of direct numerical simulations of X-mode in a magnetic fusion plasma including turbulence.

  10. Nonlinear Fluctuation Behavior of Financial Time Series Model by Statistical Physics System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a random financial time series model of stock market by one of statistical physics systems, the stochastic contact interacting system. Contact process is a continuous time Markov process; one interpretation of this model is as a model for the spread of an infection, where the epidemic spreading mimics the interplay of local infections and recovery of individuals. From this financial model, we study the statistical behaviors of return time series, and the corresponding behaviors of returns for Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index (SSECI and Hang Seng Index (HSI are also comparatively studied. Further, we investigate the Zipf distribution and multifractal phenomenon of returns and price changes. Zipf analysis and MF-DFA analysis are applied to investigate the natures of fluctuations for the stock market.

  11. Fluctuation complexity of agent-based financial time series model by stochastic Potts system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weijia; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Financial market is a complex evolved dynamic system with high volatilities and noises, and the modeling and analyzing of financial time series are regarded as the rather challenging tasks in financial research. In this work, by applying the Potts dynamic system, a random agent-based financial time series model is developed in an attempt to uncover the empirical laws in finance, where the Potts model is introduced to imitate the trading interactions among the investing agents. Based on the computer simulation in conjunction with the statistical analysis and the nonlinear analysis, we present numerical research to investigate the fluctuation behaviors of the proposed time series model. Furthermore, in order to get a robust conclusion, we consider the daily returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index, and the comparison analysis of return behaviors between the simulation data and the actual data is exhibited.

  12. Algorithmic modeling of the irrelevant sound effect (ISE) by the hearing sensation fluctuation strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlittmeier, Sabine J; Weissgerber, Tobias; Kerber, Stefan; Fastl, Hugo; Hellbrück, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Background sounds, such as narration, music with prominent staccato passages, and office noise impair verbal short-term memory even when these sounds are irrelevant. This irrelevant sound effect (ISE) is evoked by so-called changing-state sounds that are characterized by a distinct temporal structure with varying successive auditory-perceptive tokens. However, because of the absence of an appropriate psychoacoustically based instrumental measure, the disturbing impact of a given speech or nonspeech sound could not be predicted until now, but necessitated behavioral testing. Our database for parametric modeling of the ISE included approximately 40 background sounds (e.g., speech, music, tone sequences, office noise, traffic noise) and corresponding performance data that was collected from 70 behavioral measurements of verbal short-term memory. The hearing sensation fluctuation strength was chosen to model the ISE and describes the percept of fluctuations when listening to slowly modulated sounds (f(mod) sounds, the algorithm estimated behavioral performance data in 63 of 70 cases within the interquartile ranges. In particular, all real-world sounds were modeled adequately, whereas the algorithm overestimated the (non-)disturbance impact of synthetic steady-state sounds that were constituted by a repeated vowel or tone. Implications of the algorithm's strengths and prediction errors are discussed.

  13. Fluctuations and pseudo long range dependence in network flows: A non-stationary Poisson process model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yu-Dong; Li Li; Zhang Yi; Hu Jian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In the study of complex networks(systems),the scaling phenomenon of flow fluctuations rears to a certain power law between the mean flux(activity)(Fi)of the i-th node and its variance σi as σi ∝((Fi)α.Such scaling laws are found to be prevalent both in natural and man-made network systems,but the understanding of their origins still remains limited.This paper proposes a non-stationary Poisson process model to give an analytical explanation of the non-universal scaling phenomenon:the exponent α varies between 1/2 and 1 depending on the size of sampling time window and the relative strength of the external/internal driven forces of the systems.The crossover behaviour and the relation of fluctuation scaling with pseudo long range dependence are also accounted for by the model.Numerical experiments show that the proposed model can recover the multi-scaling phenomenon.

  14. Treatment of Fluctuation Effects in Mean-field Models of Chain Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jack; Mansfield, Marc

    1997-03-01

    Many recent studies of chain stretching in block copolymer materials, polymer brushes, and many-arm stars have been formulated in terms of mean- field models, leading generally to power-law potentials describing the chain stretching arising from interchain and intrachain excluded volume interactions. This type of model has been highly successful, but fluctuation effects associated with finite chain length are often neglected in model calculations. We investigate whether fluctuation effects can be accounted for by reintroducing these effective pseudo-potentials into a path-integral description to calculate the chain streching. Numerical treatment of chain swelling with repulsive power-law potentials leads to universal scaling curves which are similar to those found for chain swelling due to excluded volume in polymer solutions. Density profiles are also calculated and the parabolic potential led to a density profile having a "foot" for finite chain lengths, as in measurements on polymer "brushes". Analytic calculations indicate a general relation between the polymer size exponent nu and the power of the potential which also holds for Hamiltonian dynamical systems and thus the 2/3 power law describing the strong segregation scaling of block copolymer lamellae with chain mass corresponds to Kepler's third law of planetary motion relating the orbital scale to its period.

  15. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  16. Non-lane-based full velocity difference car following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sheng; Wang, Dianhai; Tao, Pengfei; Li, Pingfan

    2010-11-01

    In order to describe car following behavior in real world, this paper presents a non-lane-based car following model by incorporating the effects of the lane width in traffic. The stability condition of the model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. And numerical simulation is carried out to validate the analytic results. The property of the model is investigated, and it is found that the proposed model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion. The results implied that incorporating the lane width effects in car following model not only stabilize traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam, but also lower critical headway and increase capacity. Thus, the lateral separation effects greatly enhance the realism of car following models.

  17. A Discrete Velocity Traffic Kinetic Model Including Desired Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoufeng Lu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the desired speed variable into the table of games and formulate a new table of games and the corresponding discrete traffic kinetic model. We use the hybrid programming technique of VB and MATLAB to develop the program. Lastly, we compared the proposed model result and the detector data. The results show that the proposed model can describe the traffic flow evolution.

  18. Improving estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Injection and migration of CO2 during the geological carbon sequestration change the pore pressure and stress distribution in the reservoir. The change in stress may induce brittle failure on fractures, causing microseismic events. Focal mechanisms of induced microseismic events are useful for understanding stress evolution in the reservoir. An accurate estimation of microseismic focal mechanism depends on the accuracy of velocity models. In this work, we study the improvement on estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model. We obtain the velocity model using a velocity inversion algorithm with a modified total-variation scheme rather than the commonly used Tikhonov regularization technique. We demonstrate with synthetic microseismic data that the velocity inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme improves velocity inversion, and the improved velocity models enhance the accuracy of estimated focal mechanisms of microseismic events. We apply the new methodology to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) site at Aneth, Utah.

  19. Refined Turbulence Modeling for Swirl Velocity in Turbomachinery Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhyo Kim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized new form of the rotation-sensitive source term coefficient previously proposed by Bardina and colleagues as an extension of the standard k-ε turbulence model was developed. The proposal made by Bardina and colleagues focused on rotating flows without significant turbulence generation, and the result was a negative-valued constant coefficient. The new functional form developed here for the coefficient has global as well as local dependence. The new model predictions of laser Doppler anemometry measurements of swirling flows in labyrinth seals were compared with the swirl distribution measurements and with the standard k-ε model (i.e., no rotation source term predictions. It was found that for the labyrinth seal cases for which detailed measurements are available, the standard k-ε model gives unsatisfactory predictions, whereas the new model gives significantly improved predictions.

  20. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-20

    bottom). complicated tectonics . Lg appears to propagate well in the Arabian plate but is dramatically attenuated in the Lesser Caucasus. This may be...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1022 High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region Robert J. Mellors...Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0007 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. A WEAKLY NONLINEAR WATER WAVE MODEL TAKING INTO ACCOUNT DISPERSION OF WAVE PHASE VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 李东永

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a weakly nonlinear water wave model using a mild slope equation and a new explicit formulation which takes into account dispersion of wave phase velocity, approximates Hedges' (1987) nonlinear dispersion relationship, and accords well with the original empirical formula. Comparison of the calculating results with those obtained from the experimental data and those obtained from linear wave theory showed that the present water wave model considering the dispersion of phase velocity is rational and in good agreement with experiment data.

  2. When human walking becomes random walking: fractal analysis and modeling of gait rhythm fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Peng, Chang-K.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2001-12-01

    We present a random walk, fractal analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in the human gait rhythm. The gait of healthy young adults is scale-free with long-range correlations extending over hundreds of strides. This fractal scaling changes characteristically with maturation in children and older adults and becomes almost completely uncorrelated with certain neurologic diseases. Stochastic modeling of the gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, reproduces distinctive statistical properties of the gait pattern. By tuning one model parameter, the hopping (transition) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood - including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation.

  3. Thermal fluctuations and phase diagrams of the phase-field crystal model with pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J A P; Granato, E; Achim, C V; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2008-09-01

    We study the influence of thermal fluctuations in the phase diagram of a recently introduced two-dimensional phase field crystal model with an external pinning potential. The model provides a continuum description of pinned lattice systems allowing for both elastic deformations and topological defects. We introduce a nonconserved version of the model and determine the ground-state phase diagram as a function of lattice mismatch and strength of the pinning potential. Monte Carlo simulations are used to determine the phase diagram as a function of temperature near commensurate phases. The results show a rich phase diagram with commensurate, incommensurate, and liquidlike phases with a topology strongly dependent on the type of ordered structure. A finite-size scaling analysis of the melting transition for the c(2x2) commensurate phase shows that the thermal correlation length exponent nu and specific heat behavior are consistent with the Ising universality class as expected from analytical arguments.

  4. On the role of fluctuations in the modeling of complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Michel; Pekalski, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The study of models is ubiquitous in sciences like physics, chemistry, ecology, biology or sociology. Models are used to explain experimental facts or to make new predictions. For any system, one can distinguish several levels of description. In the simplest mean-field like description the dynamics is described in terms of spatially averaged quantities while in a microscopic approach local properties are taken into account and local fluctuations for the relevant variables are present. The properties predicted by these two different approaches may be drastically different. In a large body of research literature concerning complex systems this problem is often overlooked and simple mean-field like approximation are used without asking the question of the robustness of the corresponding predictions. The goal of this paper is twofold, first to illustrate the importance of the fluctuations in a self-contained and pedagogical way, by revisiting two different classes of problems where thorough investigations have been conducted (equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical physics). Second, we present our original research on the dynamics of population of annual plants which are competing among themselves for just one resource (water) through a stochastic dynamics. Depending on the observable considered, the mean-field like and microscopic approaches agree or totally disagree. There is not a general criterion allowing to decide a priori when the two approaches will agree.

  5. Thermodynamic phases and mesonic fluctuations in a chiral nucleon-meson model

    CERN Document Server

    Drews, Matthias; Klein, Bertram; Weise, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the QCD phase diagram must properly include nucleonic degrees of freedom and their thermodynamics in the range of baryon chemical potentials characteristic of nuclear matter. A useful framework for incorporating relevant nuclear physics constraints in this context is a chiral nucleon-meson effective Lagrangian. In the present paper, such a chiral nucleon-meson model is extended with systematic inclusion of mesonic fluctuations using the functional renormalization group approach. The resulting description of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition shows a remarkable agreement with three-loop calculations based on in-medium chiral effective field theory. No signs of a chiral first-order phase transition and its critical endpoint are found in the region of applicability of the model, at least up to twice the density of normal nuclear matter and at temperatures T<100 MeV. Fluctuations close to the critical point of the first-order liquid-gas transition are also examined with a detailed study of the ...

  6. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  7. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  8. Validity of Viscous Core Correction Models for Self-Induced Velocity Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hoydonck, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Viscous core correction models are used in free wake simulations to remove the infinite velocities at the vortex centreline. It will be shown that the assumption that these corrections converge to the Biot-Savart law in the far field is not correct for points near the tangent line of a vortex segment. Furthermore, the self-induced velocity of a vortex ring with a viscous core is shown to converge to the wrong value. The source of these errors in the model is identified and an improved model is presented that rectifies the errors. It results in correct values for the self-induced velocity of a viscous vortex ring and induced velocities that converge to the values predicted by the Biot-Savart law for all points in the far field.

  9. Fluctuation spectra and variances in convective turbulent boundary layers: A reevaluation of old models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglom, A. M.

    1994-02-01

    Most of the existing theoretical models for statistical characteristics of turbulence in convective boundary layers are based on the similarity theory by Monin and Obukhov [Trudy Geofiz. Inst. Akad. Nauk SSSR 24(151), 163 (1954)], and its further refinements. A number of such models was recently reconsidered and partially compared with available data by Kader and Yaglom [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 637 (1990); Turbulence and Coherent Structures (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1991), p. 387]. However, in these papers the data related to variances =σ2u and =σ2v of horizontal velocity components were not considered at all, and the data on horizontal velocity spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) were used only for a restricted range of not too small wave numbers k. This is connected with findings by Kaimal et al. [Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 98, 563 (1972)] and Panofsky et al. [Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 11, 355 (1977)], who showed that the Monin-Obukhov theory cannot be applied to velocity variance σ2u and σ2v and to spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) in energy ranges of wave numbers. It is shown in this paper that a simple generalization of the traditional similarity theory, which takes into account the influence of large-scale organized structures, leads to new models of horizontal velocity variances and spectra, which describe the observed deviations of these characteristics from the predictions based on the Monin-Obukhov theory, and agree satisfactorily with the available data. The application of the same approach to the temperature spectrum and variance explains why the observed deviations of temperature spectrum in convective boundary layers from the Monin-Obukhov similarity does not lead to marked violations of the same similarity as applied to temperature variance =σ2t.

  10. A Non-Stationary Poisson Model for the Scaling of Urban Traffic Fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Dong; LI Li; ZHANG Yi; JIN Xue-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the traffic flow volume data on the time dependent activity of Beijing's urban road network.The couplings between the average flux and the fluctuations on individual links are shown to follow certain scaling laws and yield a wide variety of scaling exponents between 1/2 and 1.To quantitatively explain this interesting phenomenon,a non-stationary Poisson arriving model is proposed.The scaling property is interpreted as the result of the time-variation of the arriving rate of flux over the network,which nicely explicates the effect of aggregation windows,and provides a concise model for the dependence of scaling exponent on the external/internal force ratio.

  11. Intermittency, chaos and singular fluctuations in the mixed Obukhov-Novikov shell model of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Dombre, T; Dombre, Thierry; Gilson, Jean Louis

    1995-01-01

    The multiscaling properties of the mixed Obukhov-Novikov shell model of turbulence are investigated numerically and compared with those of the complex GOY model, mostly studied in the recent years. Two types of generic singular fluctuations are identified~: first, self-similar solutions propagating from large to small scales and building up intermittency, second, complex time singularities inhibiting the cascade and promoting chaos. A simple and robust method is proposed to track these objects. It is shown that the scaling exponent of self-similar solutions selected by the dynamics is compatible with large order statistics whenever it departs enough from the Kolmogorov value. Complex time singularities on the other hand get trapped on the last shells, when the proportion of Novikov interactions exceeds a critical value which is argued to mark the boundary between chaotic and regular dynamics in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  12. An individual-based predator-prey model for biological coevolution: Fluctuations, stability, and community structure

    CERN Document Server

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-01-01

    We study an individual-based predator-prey model of biological coevolution, using linear stability analysis and large-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The model exhibits approximate 1/f noise in diversity and population-size fluctuations, and it generates a sequence of quasi-steady communities in the form of simple food webs. These communities are quite resilient toward the loss of one or a few species, which is reflected in different power-law exponents for the durations of communities and the lifetimes of species. The exponent for the former is near -1, while the latter is close to -2. Statistical characteristics of the evolving communities, including degree (predator and prey) distributions and proportions of basal, intermediate, and top species, compare reasonably with data for real food webs.

  13. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    CERN Document Server

    Antonov, A N; Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya

    2016-01-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS) and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  14. An evolving MHD vortex street model for quasi-periodic solar wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation are used to provide a dynamical basis for the 'vortex street' model of the quasi-periodic meridional flow observed by Voyager 2 in the outer heliosphere. Various observations suggest the existence near the current sheet at solar minimum, of a vorticity distribution of two opposite shear layers with an antisymmetric staggered velocity pattern due to structured high-speed wind surrounding low-speed equatorial flow. It is shown that this flow pattern leads to the formation of a highly stable vortex street through the nonlinear interaction of the two shear layers. Spatial profiles of various simulated parameters (velocity, density, meridional flow angle and the location of magnetic sector boundaries) and their relative locations in the quasi-steady vortex street are generally in good agreement with the observations.

  15. Three Dimensional P Wave Velocity Model for the Crust Containing Aftershocks of the Bhuj, India Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Vlahovic, G.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2001-12-01

    A three-dimensional P wave velocity model has been constructed for the crust in the vicinity of the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake using aftershock data obtained by CERI away teams. Aftershocks were recorded by 8 portable, digital K2 seismographs (the MAEC/ISTAR network) and by a continuously recording Guralp CMG40TD broad-band seismometer. Station spacing is roughly 30 km. The network was in place for 18 days and recorded ground motions from about 2000 aftershocks located within about 100 km of all stations. The 3-D velocity model is based upon an initial subset of 461 earthquakes with 2848 P wave arrivals. The initial 1-D velocity model was determined using VELEST and the 3-D model was determined using the nonlinear travel time tomography method of Benz et al. [1996]. Block size was set at 2 by 2 by 2 km. A 45% reduction in RMS travel time residuals was obtained after 10 iterations holding hypocenters fixed. We imaged velocity anomalies in the range -2 to 4%. Low velocities were found in the upper 6 km and the anomalies follow surface features such as the Rann of Kutch. High velocity features were imaged at depth and are associated with the aftershock hypocenters. High crustal velocities are present at depths exceeding 20 km with the exception of the crust below the Rann of Kutch. The imaged velocity anomaly pattern does not change when different starting models are used and when hypocenters are relocated using P wave arrivals only. The analysis will be extended to an expanded data set of 941 aftershocks.

  16. Underlying Dynamics of Typical Fluctuations of an Emerging Market Price Index: The Heston Model from Minutes to Months

    CERN Document Server

    Vicente, R; Leite, V B P; Caticha, N; Vicente, Renato; Toledo, Charles M. de; Leite, Vitor B.P.; Caticha, Nestor

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the Heston model with stochastic volatility and exponential tails as a model for the typical price fluctuations of the Brazilian S\\~ao Paulo Stock Exchange Index (IBOVESPA). Raw prices are first corrected for inflation and a period spanning 15 years characterized by memoryless returns is chosen for the analysis. Model parameters are estimated by observing volatility scaling and correlation properties. We show that the Heston model with at least two time scales for the volatility mean reverting dynamics satisfactorily describes price fluctuations ranging from time scales larger than 20 minutes to 160 days. At time scales shorter than 20 minutes we observe autocorrelated returns and power law tails incompatible with the Heston model. Despite major regulatory changes, hyperinflation and currency crises experienced by the Brazilian market in the period studied, the general success of the description provided may be regarded as an evidence for a general underlying dynamics of price fluctuations at i...

  17. Lane-changing behavior and its effect on energy dissipation using full velocity difference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Ding, Jian-Xun; Shi, Qin; Kühne, Reinhart D.

    2016-07-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane with lane-specific velocity limits. Most previous researches are derived from single-lane car-following theory which in the past years has been extensively investigated and applied. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane car-following model (full velocity difference model) to simulate the three-lane-changing behavior on an urban roadway which consists of three lanes. To meet incentive and security requirements, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed, taking safety distance and velocity difference into consideration and setting lane-specific speed restriction for each lane. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behavior on distribution of cars, velocity, headway, fundamental diagram of traffic and energy dissipation. Simulation results have demonstrated asymmetric lane-changing “attraction” on changeable lane-specific speed-limited roadway, which leads to dramatically increasing energy dissipation.

  18. The intrinsic periodic fluctuation of forest: a theoretical model based on diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Lin, G., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Most forest dynamic models predict the stable state of size structure as well as the total basal area and biomass in mature forest, the variation of forest stands are mainly driven by environmental factors after the equilibrium has been reached. However, although the predicted power-law size-frequency distribution does exist in analysis of many forest inventory data sets, the estimated distribution exponents are always shifting between -2 and -4, and has a positive correlation with the mean value of DBH. This regular pattern can not be explained by the effects of stochastic disturbances on forest stands. Here, we adopted the partial differential equation (PDE) approach to deduce the systematic behavior of an ideal forest, by solving the diffusion equation under the restricted condition of invariable resource occupation, a periodic solution was gotten to meet the variable performance of forest size structure while the former models with stable performance were just a special case of the periodic solution when the fluctuation frequency equals zero. In our results, the number of individuals in each size class was the function of individual growth rate(G), mortality(M), size(D) and time(T), by borrowing the conclusion of allometric theory on these parameters, the results perfectly reflected the observed "exponent-mean DBH" relationship and also gave a logically complete description to the time varying form of forest size-frequency distribution. Our model implies that the total biomass of a forest can never reach a stable equilibrium state even in the absence of disturbances and climate regime shift, we propose the idea of intrinsic fluctuation property of forest and hope to provide a new perspective on forest dynamics and carbon cycle research.

  19. How can a recurrent neurodynamic predictive coding model cope with fluctuation in temporal patterns? Robotic experiments on imitative interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Ahmadreza; Tani, Jun

    2017-08-01

    The current paper examines how a recurrent neural network (RNN) model using a dynamic predictive coding scheme can cope with fluctuations in temporal patterns through generalization in learning. The conjecture driving this present inquiry is that a RNN model with multiple timescales (MTRNN) learns by extracting patterns of change from observed temporal patterns, developing an internal dynamic structure such that variance in initial internal states account for modulations in corresponding observed patterns. We trained a MTRNN with low-dimensional temporal patterns, and assessed performance on an imitation task employing these patterns. Analysis reveals that imitating fluctuated patterns consists in inferring optimal internal states by error regression. The model was then tested through humanoid robotic experiments requiring imitative interaction with human subjects. Results show that spontaneous and lively interaction can be achieved as the model successfully copes with fluctuations naturally occurring in human movement patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong FAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of backflow, a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established. The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system. The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model, the numerical calculation format, and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed. Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated. The calculated water level, flow velocity distribution, amount of silting and scouring, and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data, which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable. The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  1. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong FAN

    2009-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of backflow,a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established.The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system.The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model,the numerical calculation format,and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed.Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated.The calculated water level,flow velocity distribution,amount of silting and scouring,and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data,which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable.The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  2. Initial partonic eccentricity fluctuations in a multi-phase transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, L; Ma, Y G

    2016-01-01

    Initial partonic eccentricities in Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV are investigated using a multi-phase transport model with string melting scenario. The initial eccentricities in different order of harmonics are studied using participant and cumulant definitions. Eccentricity in terms of second-, fourth- and sixth order cumulants as a function of number of participant nucleons are compared systematically with the traditional participant definition. The ratio of the cumulant eccentricities $\\varepsilon\\left\\{4\\right\\}/\\varepsilon\\left\\{2\\right\\}$ and $\\varepsilon\\left\\{6\\right\\}/\\varepsilon\\left\\{4\\right\\}$ are studied in comparison with the ratio of the corresponding flow harmonics. The conversion coefficients ($v_n/\\varepsilon_n$) are explored up to fourth order harmonic based on cumulant method. Furthermore, studies on transverse momentum ($p_T$) and pseudo-rapidity ($\\eta$) dependencies of eccentricities and their fluctuations are presented. As in ideal hydrodynamics in...

  3. Superconducting phase and pairing fluctuations in the half-filled two-dimensional Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentef, Michael; Werner, Philipp; Gull, Emanuel; Kampf, Arno P

    2011-09-16

    The two-dimensional Hubbard model exhibits superconductivity with d-wave symmetry even at half-filling in the presence of a next-nearest neighbor hopping. Using plaquette cluster dynamical mean-field theory with a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, we reveal the non-Fermi liquid character of the metallic phase in proximity to the superconducting state. Specifically, the low-frequency scattering rate for momenta near (π, 0) varies nonmonotonically at low temperatures, and the dc conductivity is T linear at elevated temperatures with an upturn upon cooling. Evidence is provided that pairing fluctuations dominate the normal-conducting state even considerably above the superconducting transition temperature.

  4. A Partial Backlogging Inventory Model for Deteriorating Items with Fluctuating Selling Price and Purchasing Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ling Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s competitive markets, selling price and purchasing cost are usually fluctuating with economic conditions. Both selling price and purchasing cost are vital to the profitability of a firm. Therefore, in this paper, I extend the inventory model introduced by Teng and Yang (2004 to allow for not only the selling price but also the purchasing cost to change from one replenishment cycle to another during a finite time horizon. The objective is to find the optimal replenishment schedule and pricing policy to obtain the profit as maximum as possible. The conditions that lead to a maximizing solution guarantee that the existence, uniqueness, and global optimality are proposed. An efficient solution procedure and some theoretical results are presented. Finally, numerical examples for illustration and sensitivity analysis for managerial decision making are also performed.

  5. An optimal model for balancing fluctuating power of large wind parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammoja, Heiki; Palu, Ivo; Keel, Matti; Oidram, Rein [Tallinn Univ. of Technology (Estonia). Dept. of Electrical Power Engineering; Agabus, Hannes [Nelja Energia LLC, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2009-07-01

    Different energy storage devices have different technical properties, including different energy storage capacity and power. The penetration of fluctuating energy sources in electricity generation portfolio is increasing and to keep the system stability new and effective balancing technologies are needed. It is very important in power systems where only thermal power plants for base load exist. The paper is focused on search for large-scale solutions and the outputs are plausible balancing scenarios for power systems. Paper gives brief overview of possible energy storing solutions and suitable technologies concerning local land and power grid specialty. Described model takes into account following generation units: hydro pumped storage power plants, oil-shale thermal power plant and gas turbine. Paper presents optimization problem and optimal conditions. (orig.)

  6. Large deviation statistics of non-equilibrium fluctuations in a sheared model-fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, Pritha; Simha, Aditi

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the statistics of the shear stress in a one dimensional model fluid, that exhibits a rich phase behaviour akin to real complex fluids under shear. We show that the energy flux satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen FT across all phases in the system. The theorem allows us to define an effective temperature which deviates considerably from the equilibrium temperature as the noise in the system increases. This deviation is negligible when the system size is small. The dependence of the effective temperature on the strain rate is phase-dependent. It doesn’t vary much at the phase boundaries. The effective temperature can also be determined from the large deviation function of the energy flux. The local strain rate statistics obeys the large deviation principle and satisfies a fluctuation relation. It does not exhibit a distinct kink near zero strain rate because of inertia of the rotors in our system.

  7. One-dimensional velocity model of the Middle Kura Depresion from local earthquakes data of Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetirmishli, G. C.; Kazimova, S. E.; Kazimov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the method for determining the velocity model of the Earth's crust and the parameters of earthquakes in the Middle Kura Depression from the data of network telemetry in Azerbaijan. Application of this method allowed us to recalculate the main parameters of the hypocenters of the earthquake, to compute the corrections to the arrival times of P and S waves at the observation station, and to significantly improve the accuracy in determining the coordinates of the earthquakes. The model was constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates one-dimensional minimal velocity models from the travel times of seismic waves.

  8. Hydrometeorology and basal sliding on the Kennicott Glacier, Alaska, USA: Evidence for seasonal, diurnal, and event-scale glacier velocity fluctuations due to varying meltwater inputs and precipitation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Anderson, R. S.; Pettit, E. C.; Rajaram, H.

    2013-12-01

    We examine GPS-derived glacier ice surface velocities along with on- and near-glacier hydrometeorologic data to investigate the linkage between subglacial hydrology and basal sliding on the Kennicott Glacier in southeastern Alaska. Connections between ice dynamics and glacier hydrology remain poorly understood, yet are critical for understanding and forecasting modern sea level rise. In addition, basal sliding is an important process in glacial erosion and, therefore, alpine landscape evolution. We differentially process 30-second GPS data at four monuments along the glacier centerline over the 2012 and 2013 melt seasons. In addition, we overwinter one GPS monument on the glacier, allowing us to observe glacier behavior through a full annual cycle. We monitor stage on ice-marginal lakes, supraglacial streams, and the outlet river with pressure transducers and timelapse cameras. In both years we observe complex early season hydrologic behavior, with a ice-marginal lake draining and filling many times before emptying for the season. This likely records the interplay between varying melt inputs and the evolution of the glacier's ability to transmit flow subglacially. Concurrent with these stage variations, we observe large diurnal velocity fluctuations superimposed on a sustained increase in glacier velocity, likely reflecting the glacier's sensitivity to melt inputs in the early season. In 2012, we observe glacier velocity during the annual outburst flood of Hidden Creek Lake, which drains ~25×106 m3 of water beneath the Kennicott Glacier. The flood hydrograph from an ice-marginal lake shows remarkable consistency from year to year despite differences in the timing of the flood and meteorology leading up to the jökulhlaup. As the flood wave passes through the glacier, ice surface velocity increases from ~0.3 m d-1 to ~1.5 m d-1 for a short time. We see speedups of a similar magnitude in autumn 2012 that appear to correlate precipitation events. In addition, we

  9. Consistent parameter fixing in the quark-meson model with vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignano, Stefano; Buballa, Michael; Elkamhawy, Wael

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the renormalization prescription for the quark-meson model in an extended mean-field approximation, where vacuum quark fluctuations are included. At a given cutoff scale the model parameters are fixed by fitting vacuum quantities, typically including the sigma-meson mass mσ and the pion decay constant fπ. In most publications the latter is identified with the expectation value of the sigma field, while for mσ the curvature mass is taken. When quark loops are included, this prescription is however inconsistent, and the correct identification involves the renormalized pion decay constant and the sigma pole mass. In the present article we investigate the influence of the parameter-fixing scheme on the phase structure of the model at finite temperature and chemical potential. Despite large differences between the model parameters in the two schemes, we find that in homogeneous matter the effect on the phase diagram is relatively small. For inhomogeneous phases, on the other hand, the choice of the proper renormalization prescription is crucial. In particular, we show that if renormalization effects on the pion decay constant are not considered, the model does not even present a well-defined renormalized limit when the cutoff is sent to infinity.

  10. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, J Drew

    2015-01-01

    The broad-band variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structure; log-normal flux distributions, RMS-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically-thin ($h/r\\approx0.1$) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially-coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear RMS-flux relations, and radial coher...

  11. Nonlocal quantum fluctuations and fermionic superfluidity in the imbalanced attractive Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, M O J; Kim, D-H; Troyer, M; Törmä, P

    2014-10-31

    We study fermionic superfluidity in strongly anisotropic optical lattices with attractive interactions utilizing the cluster dynamical mean-field theory method, and focusing in particular on the role of nonlocal quantum fluctuations. We show that nonlocal quantum fluctuations impact the BCS superfluid transition dramatically. Moreover, we show that exotic superfluid states with a delicate order parameter structure, such as the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase driven by spin population imbalance, can emerge even in the presence of such strong fluctuations.

  12. Traffic stability of a car-following model considering driver’s desired velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geng; Sun, Di-Hua; Liu, Wei-Ning; Liu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a new car-following model is proposed by considering driver’s desired velocity according to Transportation Cyber Physical Systems. The effect of driver’s desired velocity on traffic flow has been investigated through linear stability theory and nonlinear reductive perturbation method. The linear stability condition shows that driver’s desired velocity effect can enlarge the stable region of traffic flow. From nonlinear analysis, the Burgers equation and mKdV equation are derived to describe the evolution properties of traffic density waves in the stable and unstable regions respectively. Numerical simulation is carried out to verify the analytical results, which reveals that traffic congestion can be suppressed efficiently by taking driver’s desired velocity effect into account.

  13. Predicting the Water Level Fluctuation in an Alpine Lake Using Physically Based, Artificial Neural Network, and Time Series Forecasting Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of water level fluctuation is important in lake management due to its significant impacts in various aspects. This study utilizes four model approaches to predict water levels in the Yuan-Yang Lake (YYL in Taiwan: a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, an artificial neural network (ANN model (back propagation neural network, BPNN, a time series forecasting (autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs, ARMAX model, and a combined hydrodynamic and ANN model. Particularly, the black-box ANN model and physically based hydrodynamic model are coupled to more accurately predict water level fluctuation. Hourly water level data (a total of 7296 observations was collected for model calibration (training and validation. Three statistical indicators (mean absolute error, root mean square error, and coefficient of correlation were adopted to evaluate model performances. Overall, the results demonstrate that the hydrodynamic model can satisfactorily predict hourly water level changes during the calibration stage but not for the validation stage. The ANN and ARMAX models better predict the water level than the hydrodynamic model does. Meanwhile, the results from an ANN model are superior to those by the ARMAX model in both training and validation phases. The novel proposed concept using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in conjunction with an ANN model has clearly shown the improved prediction accuracy for the water level fluctuation.

  14. Modeling and Optimization of Coordinative Operation of Hydro-wind-photovoltaic Considering Power Generation and Output Fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianxun; Mei, Yadong

    2017-04-01

    Coordinative operation of hydro-wind-photovoltaic is the solution of mitigating the conflict of power generation and output fluctuation of new energy and conquering the bottleneck of new energy development. Due to the deficiencies of characterizing output fluctuation, depicting grid construction and disposal of power abandon, the research of coordinative mechanism is influenced. In this paper, the multi-object and multi-hierarchy model of coordinative operation of hydro-wind-photovoltaic is built with the aim of maximizing power generation and minimizing output fluctuation and the constraints of topotaxy of power grid and balanced disposal of power abandon. In the case study, the comparison of uncoordinative and coordinative operation is carried out with the perspectives of power generation, power abandon and output fluctuation. By comparison from power generation, power abandon and output fluctuation between separate operation and coordinative operation of multi-power, the coordinative mechanism is studied. Compared with running solely, coordinative operation of hydro-wind-photovoltaic can gain the compensation benefits. Peak-alternation operation reduces the power abandon significantly and maximizes resource utilization effectively by compensating regulation of hydropower. The Pareto frontier of power generation and output fluctuation is obtained through multiple-objective optimization. It clarifies the relationship of mutual influence between these two objects. When coordinative operation is taken, output fluctuation can be markedly reduced at the cost of a slight decline of power generation. The power abandon also drops sharply compared with operating separately. Applying multi-objective optimization method to optimize the coordinate operation, Pareto optimal solution set of power generation and output fluctuation is achieved.

  15. Fluctuations in seafloor spreading predicted by tectonic reconstructions and mantle convection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltice, Nicolas; Seton, Maria; Rolf, Tobias; Müller, R. Dietmar; Tackley, Paul J.

    2013-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics theory has enabled possible the reconstruction of the ancient seafloor and paleogeography. Over 50 years of data collection and kinematic reconstruction efforts, plate models have improved significantly (Seton et al., 2012) although reconstructions of ancient seafloor are naturally limited by the limited preservation of of very old seafloor. It is challenging to reconstruct ancient ocean basins and associated plate boundaries for times earlier than 200 Ma, since seafloor of this age is not preserved. This means we can merely reconstruct only 5% of the history of the planet in this fashion. However, geodynamic models can now help evaluate how seafloor spreading may evolve over longer time periods, since recent developments of numerical models of mantle convection with pseudo-plasticity can generate long-term solutions that simulate a form of seafloor spreading (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998; Tackley, 2000a; Tackley, 2000b). The introduction of models of continental lithosphere further improves the quality of the predictions: the computed distribution of seafloor ages reproduces the consumption of young seafloor as observed on the present-day Earth (Coltice et al., 2012). The time-dependence of the production of new seafloor has long been debated and there is no consensus on how much it has varied in the past 150My, and how it could have fluctuated over longer time-scales. Using plate reconstructions, Parsons (1982) and Rowley (2002) proposed the area vs. age distribution of the seafloor could have experienced limited fluctuations in the past 150My while others suggest stronger variations would fit the observations equally well (Seton et al., 2009. Here we propose to investigate the global dynamics of seafloor spreading using state-of-the-art plate reconstructions and geodynamic models. We focus on the evolution of the distribution of seafloor ages because fundamental geophysical observations like mantle heat flow or sea level provide

  16. A simple way to model the pressure dependency of rock velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tongcheng

    2016-04-01

    Modeling the pressure dependency of rock velocity is important for interpreting and comparing the seismic and earthquake data from different depths. This study develops a multicomponent differential effective medium model for the elastic properties of porous rocks with two types of pores in the grain background without mixing order. The developed model is applied to modeling the pressure dependent elastic velocity of porous rocks by incorporating the variation of stiff and compliant porosity as a function of pressure. The pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity were inverted from the measured total porosity under pressure using a dual porosity model, and the unknown constant stiff and compliant pore aspect ratios were inverted by best fitting the modeled velocity to the measured data. Application of the approach to a low porosity granite and a medium porosity sandstone sample showed that the pressure dependency of rock velocity can be satisfactorily modeled by the developed model using the pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity and carefully estimated stiff and compliant pore aspect ratio values.

  17. Studies on a Novel Neuro-dynamic Model for Prediction Learning of Fluctuated Data Streams: Beyond Dichotomy between Probabilistic and Deterministic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06 Mar 2013 – 05 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE (134067) Studies on a Novel Neuro -dynamic Model for...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The proposed study investigates a novel neuro -dynamic model which can learn to predictor regenerate fluctuated...Z39-18 Final/Annual/Midterm Report for AOARD 134067 “Studies on a Novel Neuro -dynamic Model for Prediction Learning of Fluctuated Data Streams

  18. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  19. From Levy to Brownian: a computational model based on biological fluctuation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya G Nurzaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theoretical studies predict that Lévy walks maximizes the chance of encountering randomly distributed targets with a low density, but Brownian walks is favorable inside a patch of targets with high density. Recently, experimental data reports that some animals indeed show a Lévy and Brownian walk movement patterns when forage for foods in areas with low and high density. This paper presents a simple, Gaussian-noise utilizing computational model that can realize such behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We extend Lévy walks model of one of the simplest creature, Escherichia coli, based on biological fluctuation framework. We build a simulation of a simple, generic animal to observe whether Lévy or Brownian walks will be performed properly depends on the target density, and investigate the emergent behavior in a commonly faced patchy environment where the density alternates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the model, animal behavior of choosing Lévy or Brownian walk movement patterns based on the target density is able to be generated, without changing the essence of the stochastic property in Escherichia coli physiological mechanism as explained by related researches. The emergent behavior and its benefits in a patchy environment are also discussed. The model provides a framework for further investigation on the role of internal noise in realizing adaptive and efficient foraging behavior.

  20. Phase behavior of electrostatically complexed polyelectrolyte gels using an embedded fluctuation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audus, Debra J; Gopez, Jeffrey D; Krogstad, Daniel V; Lynd, Nathaniel A; Kramer, Edward J; Hawker, Craig J; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2015-02-14

    Nanostructured, responsive hydrogels formed due to electrostatic interactions have promise for applications such as drug delivery and tissue mimics. These physically cross-linked hydrogels are composed of an aqueous solution of oppositely charged triblocks with charged end-blocks and neutral, hydrophilic mid-blocks. Due to their electrostatic interactions, the end-blocks microphase separate and form physical cross-links that are bridged by the mid-blocks. The structure of this system was determined using a new, efficient embedded fluctuation (EF) model in conjunction with self-consistent field theory. The calculations using the EF model were validated against unapproximated field-theoretic simulations with complex Langevin sampling and were found consistent with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on an experimental system. Using both the EF model and SAXS, phase diagrams were generated as a function of end-block fraction and polymer concentration. Several structures were observed including a body-centered cubic sphere phase, a hexagonally packed cylinder phase, and a lamellar phase. Finally, the EF model was used to explore how parameters that directly relate to polymer chemistry can be tuned to modify the resulting phase diagram, which is of practical interest for the development of new hydrogels.

  1. Modeling and numerical investigation of the inlet circumferential fluctuations of swept and bowed blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingzhi; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin

    2017-02-01

    The circumferential fluctuation (CF) source terms induced by the inviscid blade force can affect the inlet distribution of flow parameters and radial equilibrium of swept and bowed blades. However, these phenomena cannot be adequately described by throughflow methods based on the axisymmetric assumption. A transport model for the CF stresses is proposed and correlated to the distribution of circulation to reflect the effect of the inviscid blade force. To investigate the effect of the inlet CFs on swept and bowed blades, the model is integrated into a throughflow model and applied to a series of cascades with different sweep and bow angles. For swept cascades, the CF source terms change the distributions of incidence angles, as well as the radial equilibrium at the inlet of the blade passage. And the influence is enhanced as the absolute value of the sweep angle increases. For bowed cascades, the distributions of incidence angles are also altered. For both cases, the model can offer a good prediction of the inlet CF source terms, and prove to exert a better prediction of blade design key parameters such as flow angles.

  2. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  4. a Dynamical Model with Next-Nearest Interaction in Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Yuncai; Liu, Fuqiang

    By introducing the velocity difference between the preceding car and the car before the preceding one into the optimal velocity model (OVM), we present an extended dynamical model which takes into account the next-nearest-neighbor interaction in relative velocity. The stability condition of this model is derived by considering a small perturbation around the uniform flow solution and the validity of our theoretical analysis is also confirmed by direct simulations. The analytic and simulation results indicate that traffic congestion is suppressed efficiently by incorporating the effect of new consideration. Moreover, the effect of the new consideration is investigated by numerical simulation. In particular, the jamming flow, the current-density relation, and the propagation speed of small disturbance are examined in detail by varying various values of the parameter.

  5. A 1D P-wave velocity model of the Gargano promontory (south-eastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Michele, Maddalena; Emolo, Antonio; Tallarico, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the elastic properties of the crust in the Gargano promontory, located in the northern part of the Apulia region (Southeastern Italy). Starting on April, 2013, a local-scale seismic network, composed of 12 short-period (1 Hz) seismic stations, was deployed on the Gargano promontory. Starting on October, 2013, the network was integrated with the recordings of nine seismic stations managed by the Italian Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV). The network recorded more than 1200 seismic events in about 15 months of data acquisition, with more than 700 small magnitude events localized in the Gargano promontory and surrounding areas. A Wadati-modified method allowed us to infer VP/VS = 1.73 for the area. A subset of about 400 events having a relatively smaller azimuthal gap (inversion code. The preferred model was obtained from the average of ten velocity models, each of them representing the inversion result from given initial velocity models, calibrated on previous geological and geophysical studies in the area. The results obtained under the assumption that VP could decrease with depth are unstable, with very different depths of the top of low-velocity layers. Therefore, the velocity model was obtained from the average of the results obtained under the assumption that VP cannot decrease with depth. A strong reduction of both RMS (about 58%) and errors on the location of the events was obtained with respect to the starting model. The final velocity model shows a strong velocity gradient in the upper 5 km of the crust and a small increase (from 6.7 to 7 km) at 30 km of depth. The epicenters of relocated events do not show clear correlations with the surface projection of known seismic faults. A cluster of the epicenters of the relocated events intersects almost perpendicularly the Candelaro fault trace at the surface.

  6. Habitat fragmentation, vole population fluctuations, and the ROMPA hypothesis: An experimental test using model landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, George O

    2016-11-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation leads to smaller size of habitat patches and to greater distance between patches. The ROMPA hypothesis (ratio of optimal to marginal patch area) uniquely links vole population fluctuations to the composition of the landscape. It states that as ROMPA decreases (fragmentation increases), vole population fluctuations will increase (including the tendency to display multi-annual cycles in abundance) because decreased proportions of optimal habitat result in greater population declines and longer recovery time after a harsh season. To date, only comparative observations in the field have supported the hypothesis. This paper reports the results of the first experimental test. I used prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and mowed grassland to create model landscapes with 3 levels of ROMPA (high with 25% mowed, medium with 50% mowed and low with 75% mowed). As ROMPA decreased, distances between patches of favorable habitat (high cover) increased owing to a greater proportion of unfavorable (mowed) habitat. Results from the first year with intensive live trapping indicated that the preconditions for operation of the hypothesis existed (inversely density dependent emigration and, as ROMPA decreased, increased per capita mortality and decreased per capita movement between optimal patches). Nevertheless, contrary to the prediction of the hypothesis that populations in landscapes with high ROMPA should have the lowest variability, 5 years of trapping indicated that variability was lowest with medium ROMPA. The design of field experiments may never be perfect, but these results indicate that the ROMPA hypothesis needs further rigorous testing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. A Model for the Calculation of Velocity Reduction Behind A Plane Fishing Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Fu-kun; LI Yu-cheng; ZHAO Yun-peng; DONG Guo-hai

    2006-01-01

    A model for the calculation of velocity reduction behind a fishing net is proposed in this paper. Comparisons are made between the calculated results and experimental data. It is shown that by the application of the effective adjacent area coefficient of fluid flowing around a solid structure to the fishing net, the calculated results agree well with the experimental data. The model proposed in this paper can also be applied to the analysis of the velocity reduction within a fishing cage and can be introduced into the numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of fishing cages for the improvement of computational accuracy.

  8. Finite-Source Inversion for the 2004 Parkfield Earthquake using 3D Velocity Model Green's Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Dreger, D.; Larsen, S.

    2008-12-01

    We determine finite fault models of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using 3D Green's functions. Because of the dense station coverage and detailed 3D velocity structure model in this region, this earthquake provides an excellent opportunity to examine how the 3D velocity structure affects the finite fault inverse solutions. Various studies (e.g. Michaels and Eberhart-Phillips, 1991; Thurber et al., 2006) indicate that there is a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas Fault along the Parkfield segment. Also the fault zone at Parkfield is wide as evidenced by mapped surface faults and where surface slip and creep occurred in the 1966 and the 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. For high resolution images of the rupture process"Ait is necessary to include the accurate 3D velocity structure for the finite source inversion. Liu and Aurchuleta (2004) performed finite fault inversions using both 1D and 3D Green's functions for 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake using the same source paramerization and data but different Green's functions and found that the models were quite different. This indicates that the choice of the velocity model significantly affects the waveform modeling at near-fault stations. In this study, we used the P-wave velocity model developed by Thurber et al (2006) to construct the 3D Green's functions. P-wave speeds are converted to S-wave speeds and density using by the empirical relationships of Brocher (2005). Using a finite difference method, E3D (Larsen and Schultz, 1995), we computed the 3D Green's functions numerically by inserting body forces at each station. Using reciprocity, these Green's functions are recombined to represent the ground motion at each station due to the slip on the fault plane. First we modeled the waveforms of small earthquakes to validate the 3D velocity model and the reciprocity of the Green"fs function. In the numerical tests we found that the 3D velocity model predicted the individual phases well at frequencies lower than 0

  9. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Rivera, Y. J.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jennings, P. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory intensity observations in four solar environments: an active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Å waveband, which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range of 15-45 minutes is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than that for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long-term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Å waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with added noise. The multiscaling of the extreme-ultraviolet data agrees qualitatively with the radiance from a phenomenological model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also from ohmic dissipation in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model for coronal loop heating. The parameter space must be further explored to seek quantitative agreement. Thus, the observational “signatures” obtained by the combined tests of the PDF of increments and the MF-DFA offer strong constraints that can systematically discriminate among models for coronal heating.

  10. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  11. Joint probability density function modeling of velocity and scalar in turbulence with unstructured grids

    CERN Document Server

    Bakosi, J; Boybeyi, Z

    2010-01-01

    In probability density function (PDF) methods a transport equation is solved numerically to compute the time and space dependent probability distribution of several flow variables in a turbulent flow. The joint PDF of the velocity components contains information on all one-point one-time statistics of the turbulent velocity field, including the mean, the Reynolds stresses and higher-order statistics. We developed a series of numerical algorithms to model the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and scalar compositions for high-Reynolds-number incompressible flows in complex geometries using unstructured grids. Advection, viscous diffusion and chemical reaction appear in closed form in the PDF formulation, thus require no closure hypotheses. The generalized Langevin model (GLM) is combined with an elliptic relaxation technique to represent the non-local effect of walls on the pressure redistribution and anisotropic dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The governing system of equations is solved fully...

  12. Refining the 3D seismic velocity and attenuation models for Katmai National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R. A.; Thurber, C. H.; Prejean, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    We invert data from approximately 4,000 local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and August 2009 to determine the 3D P-wave velocity and P-wave attenuation structures in the Katmai volcanic region. Arrival information and waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory’s permanent network of 20 seismometers in the area, which are predominantly single-component, short period instruments. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for an improved velocity model for the main volcanic centers. We use the resulting 3D velocity model to relocate all catalog earthquakes in Katmai between January 1996 and August 2009. Inversions for the quality factor Q are completed using a spectral decay approach to determine source parameters, t*, and site response with a nonlinear inversion. Using the final 3D velocity model to define the ray paths, t* values are then inverted to determine frequency-independent Q models. The final models developed through these inversions reveal a low velocity and low Q zone from the surface to ~7 km depth centered on the volcanic axis and extending ~25 km between Martin and Katmai volcanoes. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident, and Katmai. While the Martin, Mageik, and Katmai clusters are all at 3-4 km depth, the Trident cluster is slightly deeper at 4-6 km. Many new features are apparent within these clusters, including a strand of earthquakes trending NE-SW between the main Martin and Mageik clusters. Smaller linear features are also visible in the Katmai cluster along with a small migrating swarm which occurred NW of the Katmai caldera during mid-2006. Data from an array of 11 three-component broadband instruments currently deployed in the area between Mageik volcano and Katmai caldera will be

  13. A method to filter out the effect of river stage fluctuation on groundwater level using time series models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heesung; Park, Eungyu; Yoon, Pilsun; Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Gyoo-Bum

    2016-04-01

    A method to filter out the effect of river stage fluctuations on groundwater level was designed using an artificial neural network-based time series model of groundwater level prediction. The designed method was applied to daily groundwater level data near the Gangjeong-Koryeong Barrage in the Nakdong river, South Korea. First, one-step ahead direct prediction time series models were successfully developed for both cases of before and after the barrage construction using past measurement data of rainfall, river stage, and groundwater level as inputs. The correlation coefficient values between observed and predicted data were over 0.97. Based on the direct prediction models, recursive prediction models for the simulation of groundwater level fluctuations were designed. The effect of river stage fluctuation on groundwater level data was filtered out by setting a constant value for river stage inputs of the recursive time series models. The hybrid water table fluctuation method was employed to estimate the groundwater recharge using the filtered data. The calculated ratios of groundwater recharge to precipitation before and after the barrage construction were 11.0% and 4.3%, respectively. It is expected that the proposed method can be a useful tool for groundwater level prediction and recharge estimation in the riverside area.

  14. Broadband Waveform Modeling to Evaluate the USGS Seismic Velocity Model for the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A.; Petersson, A.; Nilsson, S.; Sjogreen, B.; McCandless, K.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake centenary, the USGS developed a three-dimensional seismic velocity and attenuation model for Northern California based on detailed geologic and geophysical constraints. The model was used to predict ground motions for the 1906 rupture. In this study we evaluate the model to assess its ability to accurately predict ground motions from moderate earthquakes recorded on broadband stations. Satisfactory prediction of ground motions from these events will provide hope for accurate modeling of future scenario earthquakes. Simulations were performed on large parallel computer(s) with a new elastic finite difference code developed at LLNL. We simulated broadband ground motions (0-0.25 Hz) for several moderate (magnitude 3.5-5.0) earthquakes in the region observed at Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN) broadband stations. These events are well located and can be modeled with simple point moment tensor sources (taken from the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory catalog), helping to isolate the effects of structure on the waveforms. These data sample the region's diverse tectonic structures, such as the bay muds, sedimentary basins and hard rock complexes. Preliminary results indicate that the simulations reproduce many important features in the data. For example, observed long duration surface waves are often predicted for complex paths (traveling across contrasting structures) and through sedimentary basins. Excellent waveform fits were frequently obtained for long-period comparisons (0.02-0.1) and good fits were often obtained for shorter periods. We will attempt higher frequency simulations to test the ability of the model to match the high frequency response. Finally, we performed large scenario earthquake simulations for the Hayward Fault. These simulations predict large amplifications across the Santa Clara and San Ramon/Livermore Valley sedimentary basins and with the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta.

  15. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wágner, Dorottya S; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter; Dechesne, Arnaud; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient and compression settling velocity functions were estimated by carrying out biweekly batch settling tests using a novel column setup through a four-month long measurement campaign. To estimate viscosity model parameters, rheological experiments were carried out on the same sludge sample using a rotational viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through altering the hindered settling velocity and yield stress parameter. Strikingly, this is not the case for Chloroflexi, occurring in more than double the abundance of M. parvicella, and forming filaments primarily protruding from the flocs. The transient and compression settling parameters show a comparably high variability, and no significant association with filamentous abundance. A two-dimensional, axi-symmetrical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to assess calibration scenarios to model filamentous bulking. Our results suggest that model predictions can significantly benefit from explicitly accounting for filamentous bulking by calibrating the hindered settling velocity function. Furthermore, accounting for the transient and compression settling velocity in the computational domain is crucial to improve model accuracy when modelling filamentous bulking. However, the case-specific calibration of transient and compression settling parameters as well as yield stress is not necessary, and an average parameter set - obtained under bulking and good settling

  16. Thermodynamic Modeling of Developed Structural Turbulence Taking into Account Fluctuations of Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.

    2004-03-01

    A thermodynamic approach to the construction of a phenomenological macroscopic model of developed turbulence in a compressible fluid is considered with regard for the formation of space-time dissipative structures. A set of random variables were introduced into the model as internal parameters of the turbulent-chaos subsystem. This allowed us to obtain, by methods of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetic Fokker-Planck equation in the configuration space. This equation serves to determine the temporary evolution of the conditional probability distribution function of structural parameters pertaining to the cascade process of fragmentation of large-scale eddies and temperature inhomogeneities and to analyze Markovian stochastic processes of transition from one nonequilibrium stationary turbulent-motion state to another as a result of successive loss of stability caused by a change in the governing parameters. An alternative method for investigating the mechanisms of such transitions, based on the stochastic Langevin-type equation intimately related to the derived kinetic equation, is also considered. Some postulates and physical and mathematical assumptions used in the thermodynamic model of structurized turbulence are discussed in detail. In particular, we considered, using the deterministic transport equation for conditional means, the cardinal problem of the developed approach-the possibility of the existence of asymptotically stable stationary states of the turbulent-chaos subsystem. Also proposed is the nonequilibrium thermodynamic potential for internal coordinates, which extends the well-known Boltzmann-Planck relationship for equilibrium states to the nonequilibrium stationary states of the representing ensemble. This potential is shown to be the Lyapunov function for such states. The relation is also explored between the internal intermittence in the inertial interval of scales and the fluctuations of the energy of dissipation. This study is aimed at

  17. Continuum modelling of shock waves through granular gases and the role of statistical fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2016-11-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. Two-dimensional event-driven Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were previously completed to investigate the stability of piston driven shock waves through dilute granular gases. By considering viscoelastic collisions, allowing for finite dissipation within the shock wave, instabilities were found in the form of distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. This work is now extended to the continuum level. Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for granular gases are modelled with a modified cooling rate to include an impact threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. The shock structure predicted by the continuum formulation is found in good agreement with the structure obtained by MD. Introducing strong perturbations to the incoming density field, in accordance with the spacial fluctuations in the upstream state seen in MD, yields similar instabilities as those previously observed. While the inviscid model predicts a highly turbulent structure from these perturbations, the inclusion of viscosity and heat conductivity yields comparable wavelengths of pattern formations to those seen in MD.

  18. A stage structured mosquito model incorporating effects of precipitation and daily temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2016-12-21

    An outbreak of dengue fever in Guangdong province in 2014 was the most serious outbreak ever recorded in China. Given the known positive correlation between the abundance of mosquitoes and the number of dengue fever cases, a stage structured mosquito model was developed to investigate the cause of the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 and its implications for outbreaks of the disease. Data on the Breteau index (number of containers positive for larvae per 100 premises investigated), temperature and precipitation were used for model fitting. The egg laying rate, the development rate and the mortality rates of immatures and adults were obtained from the estimated parameters. Moreover, effects of daily fluctuations of temperature on these parameters were obtained and the effects of temperature and precipitation were analyzed by simulations. Our results indicated that the abundance of mosquitoes depended not only on the total annual precipitation but also on the distribution of the precipitation. The daily mean temperature had a nonlinear relationship with the abundance of mosquitoes, and large diurnal temperature differences can reduce the abundance of mosquitoes. In addition, effects of increasing precipitation and temperature were interdependent. Our findings suggest that the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 was mainly caused by the distribution of the precipitation. In the perspective of mosquito control, our results reveal that it is better to clear water early and spray insecticide between April and August in case of limited resources.

  19. A Model of Genome Size Evolution for Prokaryotes in Stable and Fluctuating Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentkowski, Piotr; Van Oosterhout, Cock; Mock, Thomas

    2015-08-04

    Temporal variability in ecosystems significantly impacts species diversity and ecosystem productivity and therefore the evolution of organisms. Different levels of environmental perturbations such as seasonal fluctuations, natural disasters, and global change have different impacts on organisms and therefore their ability to acclimatize and adapt. Thus, to understand how organisms evolve under different perturbations is a key for predicting how environmental change will impact species diversity and ecosystem productivity. Here, we developed a computer simulation utilizing the individual-based model approach to investigate genome size evolution of a haploid, clonal and free-living prokaryotic population across different levels of environmental perturbations. Our results show that a greater variability of the environment resulted in genomes with a larger number of genes. Environmental perturbations were more effectively buffered by populations of individuals with relatively large genomes. Unpredictable changes of the environment led to a series of population bottlenecks followed by adaptive radiations. Our model shows that the evolution of genome size is indirectly driven by the temporal variability of the environment. This complements the effects of natural selection directly acting on genome optimization. Furthermore, species that have evolved in relatively stable environments may face the greatest risk of extinction under global change as genome streamlining genetically constrains their ability to acclimatize to the new environmental conditions, unless mechanisms of genetic diversification such as horizontal gene transfer will enrich their gene pool and therefore their potential to adapt.

  20. Coupled Oscillator Model of the Business Cycle withFluctuating Goods Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y.; Aoyama, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Iyetomi, H.; Ogimoto, K.; Souma, W.; Yoshikawa, H.

    The sectoral synchronization observed for the Japanese business cycle in the Indices of Industrial Production data is an example of synchronization. The stability of this synchronization under a shock, e.g., fluctuation of supply or demand, is a matter of interest in physics and economics. We consider an economic system made up of industry sectors and goods markets in order to analyze the sectoral synchronization observed for the Japanese business cycle. A coupled oscillator model that exhibits synchronization is developed based on the Kuramoto model with inertia by adding goods markets, and analytic solutions of the stationary state and the coupling strength are obtained. We simulate the effects on synchronization of a sectoral shock for systems with different price elasticities and the coupling strengths. Synchronization is reproduced as an equilibrium solution in a nearest neighbor graph. Analysis of the order parameters shows that the synchronization is stable for a finite elasticity, whereas the synchronization is broken and the oscillators behave like a giant oscillator with a certain frequency additional to the common frequency for zero elasticity.

  1. Current fluctuations and statistics during a large deviation event in an exactly solvable transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2009-02-01

    We study the distribution of the time-integrated current in an exactly solvable toy model of heat conduction, both analytically and numerically. The simplicity of the model allows us to derive the full current large deviation function and the system statistics during a large deviation event. In this way we unveil a relation between system statistics at the end of a large deviation event and for intermediate times. The mid-time statistics is independent of the sign of the current, a reflection of the time-reversal symmetry of microscopic dynamics, while the end-time statistics does depend on the current sign, and also on its microscopic definition. We compare our exact results with simulations based on the direct evaluation of large deviation functions, analyzing the finite-size corrections of this simulation method and deriving detailed bounds for its applicability. We also show how the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem can be used to determine the range of validity of simulation results.

  2. On the assimilation of ice velocity and concentration data into large-scale sea ice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dulière

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation into sea ice models designed for climate studies has started about 15 years ago. In most of the studies conducted so far, it is assumed that the improvement brought by the assimilation is straightforward. However, some studies suggest this might not be true. In order to elucidate this question and to find an appropriate way to further assimilate sea ice concentration and velocity observations into a global sea ice-ocean model, we analyze here results from a number of twin experiments (i.e. experiments in which the assimilated data are model outputs carried out with a simplified model of the Arctic sea ice pack. Our objective is to determine to what degree the assimilation of ice velocity and/or concentration data improves the global performance of the model and, more specifically, reduces the error in the computed ice thickness. A simple optimal interpolation scheme is used, and outputs from a control run and from perturbed experiments without and with data assimilation are thoroughly compared. Our results indicate that, under certain conditions depending on the assimilation weights and the type of model error, the assimilation of ice velocity data enhances the model performance. The assimilation of ice concentration data can also help in improving the model behavior, but it has to be handled with care because of the strong connection between ice concentration and ice thickness.

    This study is preliminary study towards real observation data assimilation into NEMOLIM, a global sea ice-ocean model.

  3. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-07-01

    The broadband variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structures; log-normal flux distributions, root-mean square (rms)-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations of the mass accretion rate in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically thin (h/r ≈ 0.1) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses, which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear rms-flux relations, and radial coherence that would produce inter-band lags. Hence, we successfully relate and connect the phenomenology of propagating fluctuations to modern MHD accretion disk theory.

  4. Car-following model with relative-velocity effect and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Daisuke; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishi, Ryosuke; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2011-04-01

    In driving a vehicle, drivers respond to the changes of both the headway and the relative velocity to the vehicle in front. In this paper a new car-following model including these maneuvers is proposed. The acceleration of the model becomes infinite (has a singularity) when the distance between two vehicles is zero, and the asymmetry between the acceleration and the deceleration is incorporated in a nonlinear way. The model is simple but contains enough features of driving for reproducing real vehicle traffic. From the linear stability analysis, we confirm that the model shows the metastable homogeneous flow around the critical density, beyond which a traffic jam emerges. Moreover, we perform experiments to verify this model. From the data it is shown that the acceleration of a vehicle has a positive correlation with the relative velocity.

  5. Spectral sensitivity analysis of FWI in a constant-gradient background velocity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from local minima, due to a lack of low frequencies in the data. A reflector below the zone of interest may help in recovering the long-wavelength components of a velocity perturbation, as demonstrated in a paper by Mora. Because smooth models are more popular as init

  6. Inertialess Velocity Change and a Two Particle Model of the Photon

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Building on the idea presented earlier that the gravitational fields outside of basic particles are those particles’ inertia and that acceleration results only from inertial field imbalances, inertialess velocity changes may result when motivation for motion arises from within basic particles. A two particle model of the photon shows how this might work

  7. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  8. A hydro-economic model for water level fluctuations: combining limnology with economics for sustainable development of hydropower.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Emanuel Hirsch

    Full Text Available Water level fluctuations in lakes lead to shoreline displacement. The seasonality of flooding or beaching of the littoral area affects nutrient cycling, redox gradients in sediments, and life cycles of aquatic organisms. Despite the ecological importance of water level fluctuations, we still lack a method that assesses water levels in the context of hydropower operations. Water levels in reservoirs are influenced by the operator of a hydropower plant, who discharges water through the turbines or stores water in the reservoir, in a fashion that maximizes profit. This rationale governs the seasonal operation scheme and hence determines the water levels within the boundaries of the reservoir's water balance. For progress towards a sustainable development of hydropower, the benefits of this form of electricity generation have to be weighed against the possible detrimental effects of the anthropogenic water level fluctuations. We developed a hydro-economic model that combines an economic optimization function with hydrological estimators of the water balance of a reservoir. Applying this model allowed us to accurately predict water level fluctuations in a reservoir. The hydro-economic model also allowed for scenario calculation of how water levels change with climate change scenarios and with a change in operating scheme of the reservoir (increase in turbine capacity. Further model development will enable the consideration of a variety of additional parameters, such as water withdrawal for irrigation, drinking water supply, or altered energy policies. This advances our ability to sustainably manage water resources that must meet both economic and environmental demands.

  9. A Hydro-Economic Model for Water Level Fluctuations: Combining Limnology with Economics for Sustainable Development of Hydropower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Schillinger, Sebastian; Weigt, Hannes; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Water level fluctuations in lakes lead to shoreline displacement. The seasonality of flooding or beaching of the littoral area affects nutrient cycling, redox gradients in sediments, and life cycles of aquatic organisms. Despite the ecological importance of water level fluctuations, we still lack a method that assesses water levels in the context of hydropower operations. Water levels in reservoirs are influenced by the operator of a hydropower plant, who discharges water through the turbines or stores water in the reservoir, in a fashion that maximizes profit. This rationale governs the seasonal operation scheme and hence determines the water levels within the boundaries of the reservoir's water balance. For progress towards a sustainable development of hydropower, the benefits of this form of electricity generation have to be weighed against the possible detrimental effects of the anthropogenic water level fluctuations. We developed a hydro-economic model that combines an economic optimization function with hydrological estimators of the water balance of a reservoir. Applying this model allowed us to accurately predict water level fluctuations in a reservoir. The hydro-economic model also allowed for scenario calculation of how water levels change with climate change scenarios and with a change in operating scheme of the reservoir (increase in turbine capacity). Further model development will enable the consideration of a variety of additional parameters, such as water withdrawal for irrigation, drinking water supply, or altered energy policies. This advances our ability to sustainably manage water resources that must meet both economic and environmental demands. PMID:25526619

  10. Oil price fluctuations and their impact on the macroeconomic variables of Kuwait: a case study using a VAR model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltony, M. Nagy; Al-Awadi, Mohammad [Arab Planning Inst., Safat (Kuwait)

    2001-09-01

    In this study, a vector autoregression model (VAR) and a vector error correction model (VECM) were estimated to examine the impact of oil price fluctuations on seven key macroeconomic variables for the Kuwaiti economy. Quarterly data for the period 1984-1998 were utilised. Theoretically and empirically speaking, VECM is superior to the VAR approach. Also, the results corresponding to the VECM model are closer to common sense. However, the estimated models indicate a high degree of interrelation between major macroeconomic variables. The empirical results highlight the causality running from the oil prices and oil revenues, to government development and current expenditure and then towards other variables. For the most part, the empirical evidence indicates that oil price shocks and hence oil revenues have a notable impact on government expenditure, both development and current. However, government development expenditure has been influenced relatively more. The results also point out the significant of the CPI in explaining a notable part of the variations of both types of government expenditure. On the other hand, the variations in value of imports are mostly accounted for by oil revenue fluctuations. On the other hand, the variations in value of imports are mostly accounted for by oil revenue fluctuations and then by the fluctuation in government development expenditures. Also, the results from the VECM approach indicate that a significant part of LM2 variance is explained by the variance in oil revenue. It reaches about 46 per cent in the 10th quarter, even more than its own variations. (Author)

  11. A hydro-economic model for water level fluctuations: combining limnology with economics for sustainable development of hydropower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Schillinger, Sebastian; Weigt, Hannes; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Water level fluctuations in lakes lead to shoreline displacement. The seasonality of flooding or beaching of the littoral area affects nutrient cycling, redox gradients in sediments, and life cycles of aquatic organisms. Despite the ecological importance of water level fluctuations, we still lack a method that assesses water levels in the context of hydropower operations. Water levels in reservoirs are influenced by the operator of a hydropower plant, who discharges water through the turbines or stores water in the reservoir, in a fashion that maximizes profit. This rationale governs the seasonal operation scheme and hence determines the water levels within the boundaries of the reservoir's water balance. For progress towards a sustainable development of hydropower, the benefits of this form of electricity generation have to be weighed against the possible detrimental effects of the anthropogenic water level fluctuations. We developed a hydro-economic model that combines an economic optimization function with hydrological estimators of the water balance of a reservoir. Applying this model allowed us to accurately predict water level fluctuations in a reservoir. The hydro-economic model also allowed for scenario calculation of how water levels change with climate change scenarios and with a change in operating scheme of the reservoir (increase in turbine capacity). Further model development will enable the consideration of a variety of additional parameters, such as water withdrawal for irrigation, drinking water supply, or altered energy policies. This advances our ability to sustainably manage water resources that must meet both economic and environmental demands.

  12. A simple stochastic model for dipole moment fluctuations in numerical dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meduri, Domenico G.; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Earth's axial dipole field changes in a complex fashion on many different time scales ranging from less than a year to tens of million years. Documenting, analysing, and replicating this intricate signal is a challenge for data acquisition, theoretical interpretation, and dynamo modelling alike. Here we explore whether axial dipole variations can be described by the superposition of a slow deterministic drift and fast stochastic fluctuations, i.e. by a Langevin-type system. The drift term describes the time averaged behaviour of the axial dipole variations, whereas the stochastic part mimics complex flow interactions over convective time scales. The statistical behaviour of the system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation which allows useful predictions, including the average rates of dipole reversals and excursions. We analyse several numerical dynamo simulations, most of which have been integrated particularly long in time, and also the palaeomagnetic model PADM2M which covers the past 2 Myr. The results show that the Langevin description provides a viable statistical model of the axial dipole variations on time scales longer than about 1 kyr. For example, the axial dipole probability distribution and the average reversal rate are successfully predicted. The exception is PADM2M where the stochastic model reversal rate seems too low. The dependence of the drift on the axial dipole moment reveals the nonlinear interactions that establish the dynamo balance. A separate analysis of inductive and diffusive magnetic effects in three dynamo simulations suggests that the classical quadratic quenching of induction predicted by mean-field theory seems at work.

  13. The analysis of volatility of gold coin price fluctuations in Iran using ARCH & VAR models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younos Vakilolroaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in gold price and modeling of its return volatility and conditional variance model. The study gathers daily prices of gold coins as the dependent variable and the price of gold in world market, the price of oil in OPEC, exchange rate USD to IRR and index of Tehran Stock Exchange from March 2007 to July 2013 and using ARCH family models and VAR methods, the study analysis the data. The study first examines whether the data are stationary or not and then it reviews the household stability, Arch and Garch models. The proposed study investigates the causality among variables, selects different factors, which could be blamed of uncertainty in the coin return. The results indicate that the effect of sudden changes of standard deviation and after a 14-day period disappears and gold price goes back to its initial position. In addition, in this study we observe the so-called leverage effect in Iran’s Gold coin market, which means the good news leads to more volatility in futures market than bad news in an equal size. Finally, the result of analysis of variance implies that in the short-term, a large percentage change in uncertainty of the coin return is due to changes in the same factors and volatility of stock returns in the medium term, global gold output, oil price and exchange rate fluctuation to some extent will show the impact. In the long run, the effects of parameters are more evident.

  14. Modeling the spatiotemporal organization of velocity storage in the vestibuloocular reflex by optokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T.; Sturm, D.; Cohen, B. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    1. A generalized three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was developed. Matrix and dynamical system operators associated with inputs from the semicircular canals, otolith velocity estimator, and the visual system have been incorporated into the model, which focus on their relationship to the velocity storage integrator. 2. A relationship was postulated between the eigenvalues and the direction of the eigenvectors of the system matrix and the orientation of the spatial vertical. It was assumed that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix, whereas another rotates the eigenvectors of the system matrix. The pitch and roll eigenvectors rotate with the head, whereas the yaw axis eigenvector remains approximately spatially invariant. 3. Based on the three-dimensional model, a computational procedure was formulated to identify the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix with the use of a modification of the marquardt algorithm. With the use of data obtained from a monkey, it was shown that the three-dimensional behavior of velocity storage cannot be predicted solely in terms of its time constants, i.e., the inverse of its eigenvalues. With the use of the same eigenvalues the data could either be fit or not fit, depending on the eigenvector directions. Therefore, it is necessary to specify eigenvector directions when characterizing velocity storage in three dimensions. 4. Parameters found with the use of the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced for coupling the visual system to the integrator and to the direct optokinetic pathway. Simulations of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) were run. The model predicted the behavior of yaw and pitch OKN and OKAN when the animal is

  15. Collapse Velocity and Prompt Explosion for the Presupernova Model Ws15M⊙

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Quan Luo; Men-Quan Liu; Qiu-He Peng; Zuo-Heng Xie

    2006-01-01

    For the presupernova model Ws15M⊙, we re-calculate the electron capture (EC) timescale and hydrodynamical (HD) timescale. We found that the EC timescale can be smaller than the HD timescale in the inner region of the collapse iron core at the moment immediately before the shock wave bounce. The change in these two timescales at the late stage of core collapse is expected to affect the collapse velocity. If the late-time collapse velocity is artificially increased by a small quantity, then prompt explosion of the supernova may happen. Further calculations are still needed to check the plausibility of the acceleration mechanism caused by the faster EC process.

  16. Tide-induced fluctuations of salinity and groundwater level in unconfined aquifers - Field measurements and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Elad; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gvirtzman, Haim; Shalev, Eyal

    2017-08-01

    The responses of the fresh-saline water interface (FSI) and the groundwater level (GWL) to the Mediterranean Sea tide were monitored in the coastal aquifer of Israel, modeled numerically and analyzed using cross-correlation analysis. Different time-lags between sea level fluctuations and hydraulic head and salinity fluctuations were detected for the FSI and the GWL. At the FSI, the time-lag of hydraulic head behind the sea level is much shorter than the lag of the salinity at the same point. Surprisingly, similar time-lags behind the sea level were measured for both the hydraulic head at the GWL and the salinity at the FSI, both at the same distance from the shoreline. Results from a numerical model, simulating the flow and transport processes at the field scale, agree with field measurements. In both, the GWL and the salinity in the FSI fluctuate almost simultaneously, while the hydraulic head in the FSI reacts faster to sea level fluctuations. The actual movement of the fresh water body, which is controlled by the unsaturated flow in the capillary fringe ('capillary effect'), lags behind the pressure head fluctuations in the deeper parts of the aquifer, which is controlled by saturated parameters of the aquifer. The overall results agree with the conceptual mechanism suggested by Levanon et al. (2016), in which the effect of sea tide on the coastal groundwater system comprises two main processes: (1) tidal fluctuations at the sea floor boundary which cause pressure wave propagation into the aquifer, and (2) attenuation at the GWL due to the capillary effect which control also the change in the salinity and the actual movement of the FSI.

  17. Systems-level modeling the effects of arsenic exposure with sequential pulsed and fluctuating patterns for tilapia and freshwater clam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.-Y. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, J.-W. [Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Ecology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Ju, Y.-R. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liao, C.-M., E-mail: cmliao@ntu.edu.t [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this paper was to use quantitative systems-level approach employing biotic ligand model based threshold damage model to examine physiological responses of tilapia and freshwater clam to sequential pulsed and fluctuating arsenic concentrations. We tested present model and triggering mechanisms by carrying out a series of modeling experiments where we used periodic pulses and sine-wave as featured exposures. Our results indicate that changes in the dominant frequencies and pulse timing can shift the safe rate distributions for tilapia, but not for that of freshwater clam. We found that tilapia increase bioenergetic costs to maintain the acclimation during pulsed and sine-wave exposures. Our ability to predict the consequences of physiological variation under time-varying exposure patterns has also implications for optimizing species growing, cultivation strategies, and risk assessment in realistic situations. - Systems-level modeling the pulsed and fluctuating arsenic exposures.

  18. Upper mantle SH velocity structure beneath Qiangtang Terrane by modeling triplicated phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG RuiQing; WU QingJu; LI YongHua; ZENG RongSheng

    2008-01-01

    We constrain SH wave velocity structure for the upper mantle beneath western Qiangtang Terrane by comparing regional distance seismic triplicated waveforms with synthetic seismograms, based on an intermediate event (~220 km) recorded by the INDEPTH-Ⅲ seismic array. The ATIP model reveals a low-velocity anomaly with up to -4% variation at the depth of 190--270 km and a relatively small ve-locity gradient above the depth of 410 km in the upper mantle, which is in agreement with previous results. In combination with other geological studies, we suggest that the depth of top asthenosphere is 190 km and no large-scale lithosphere thinning occurs in western Qiangtang Terrane, besides, Qiangtang Terrane has the same kind of upper mantle structure as the stable Eurasia.

  19. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  20. Angular velocity estimation based on star vector with improved current statistical model Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, He

    2016-11-20

    Angular velocity information is a requisite for a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control system. In this paper, an approach for angular velocity estimation based merely on star vector measurement with an improved current statistical model Kalman filter is proposed. High-precision angular velocity estimation can be achieved under dynamic conditions. The amount of calculation is also reduced compared to a Kalman filter. Different trajectories are simulated to test this approach, and experiments with real starry sky observation are implemented for further confirmation. The estimation accuracy is proved to be better than 10-4  rad/s under various conditions. Both the simulation and the experiment demonstrate that the described approach is effective and shows an excellent performance under both static and dynamic conditions.

  1. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  2. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. A Discrete Velocity Kinetic Model with Food Metric: Chemotaxis Traveling Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Ho; Kim, Yong-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a mesoscopic scale chemotaxis model for traveling wave phenomena which is induced by food metric. The organisms of this simplified kinetic model have two discrete velocity modes, [Formula: see text] and a constant tumbling rate. The main feature of the model is that the speed of organisms is constant [Formula: see text] with respect to the food metric, not the Euclidean metric. The uniqueness and the existence of the traveling wave solution of the model are obtained. Unlike the classical logarithmic model case there exist traveling waves under super-linear consumption rates and infinite population pulse-type traveling waves are obtained. Numerical simulations are also provided.

  4. A rapid and accurate two-point ray tracing method in horizontally layered velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yue; CHEN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for two-point ray tracing in horizontally layered velocity model is presented in this paper. Numerical experiments show that this method provides stable and rapid convergence with high accuracies, regardless of various 1-D velocity structures, takeoff angles and epicentral distances. This two-point ray tracing method is compared with the pseudobending technique and the method advanced by Kim and Baag (2002). It turns out that the method in this paper is much more efficient and accurate than the pseudobending technique, but is only applicable to 1-D velocity model. Kim(s method is equivalent to ours for cases without large takeoff angles, but it fails to work when the takeoff angle is close to 90o. On the other hand, the method presented in this paper is applicable to cases with any takeoff angles with rapid and accurate convergence. Therefore, this method is a good choice for two-point ray tracing problems in horizontally layered velocity model and is efficient enough to be applied to a wide range of seismic problems.

  5. Fluctuations of a surface relaxation model in interacting scale free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Marcos F; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2016-01-01

    Isolated complex networks has been studied deeply in the last decades due to the fact that many real systems can be modeled using these type of structures. However, it is well known that the behavior of a system not only depends on itself, but usually also depends on the dynamics of other structures. For this reason, interacting complex networks and the processes developed on them have been the focus of study of many researches in the last years. One of the most studied subjects in this type of structures is the Synchronization problem, which is important in a wide variety of processes in real systems. In this manuscript we study the synchronization of two interacting scale-free networks, in which each node has $ke$ dependency links with different nodes in the other network. We map the synchronization problem with an interface growth, by studying the fluctuations in the steady state of a scalar field defined in both networks. We find that as $ke$ slightly increases from $ke=0$, there is a really significant d...

  6. Maintenance of polygenic sex determination in a fluctuating environment: An individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Andrew W; Anholt, Bradley R

    2017-02-10

    R. A. Fisher predicted that individuals should invest equally in offspring of both sexes, and that the proportion of males and females produced (the primary sex ratio) should evolve towards 1:1 when unconstrained. For many species, sex determination is dependent on sex chromosomes, creating a strong tendency for balanced sex ratios, but in other cases multiple autosomal genes interact to determine sex. In such cases, the maintenance of multiple sex-determining alleles at multiple loci and the consequent between-family variability in sex ratios presents a puzzle, as theory predicts that such systems should be unstable. Theory also predicts that environmental influences on sex can complicate outcomes of genetic sex determination, and that population structure may play a role. Tigriopus californicus, a copepod that lives in splash-pool metapopulations and exhibits polygenic and environment-dependent sex determination, presents a test case for relevant theory. We use this species as a model for parameterizing an individual-based simulation to investigate conditions that could maintain polygenic sex determination. We find that metapopulation structure can delay the degradation of polygenic sex determination and that periods of alternating frequency-dependent selection, imposed by seasonal fluctuations in environmental conditions, can maintain polygenic sex determination indefinitely. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in $^{152}$Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, A K Rhine

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the hot and rotating nucleus $^{152}$Gd within the framework of thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) built on the microscopic-macroscopic calculations of the free energies with a macroscopic approach for the GDR. Our results for GDR cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental values except for a component peaking around 17 MeV where the data has large uncertainties. Such a component is beyond our description which properly takes care of the splitting of GDR components due to the deformation and Coriolis effects. Around this 17 MeV lies the half maximum in experimental cross sections, and hence the extracted GDR widths and deformations (estimated from these widths) turn out to be overestimated and less reliable. Reproducing these widths with empirical formulae could conceal the information contained in the cross sections. Fully microscopic GDR calculations and a more careful look at the data could be useful to understand the GDR component aro...

  8. Deconstructing an Atmospheric Model: Variability and Response, Unstable Periodic Orbits, and the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, Andrei; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) provide the so-called skeletal dynamics of a sufficiently well-behaved chaotic dynamical system and provide a powerful tool for relating the response of the system to its variability. In fact, UPOs constitute natural modes of variability of the system, and resonant behaviour of the response of the system to can be associated to good correspondence between the geometry of one UPO and of the forcing term and between their periodicities. We have here analyzed a simple barotropic model of the atmosphere and constructed and found algorithmically a large number of UPOs. We have then studied the change in the climate resulting from changes in the forcing, in the orography, and in the Eckman friction. The most interesting result is the presence of a strong resonance in the orographic response on time scales of the order of about 3 days, corresponding to forced waves. Interestingly, such a spectral feature is entirely absent from the natural variability of the system and correspond to the excitation of a specific group of UPOs. This clarifies the fact that, as opposed to the case of quasi-equilibrium systems, it is far from obvious to associate forced and free variability in the spirit of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Reassuringly, ysing the complementary point of view of covariant Lyapunov vectors, we discover that the forcing projects substantially in the stable direction of the flow, which is exactly the mathematical setting under which the FDT cannot be applied.

  9. Measurement of Pressure Fluctuations inside a Model Thrust Bearing Using PVDF Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew; Matthews, David; Guzzomi, Andrew; Pan, Jie

    2017-04-16

    Thrust bearings play a vital role in propulsion systems. They rely on a thin layer of oil being trapped between rotating surfaces to produce a low friction interface. The "quality" of this bearing affects many things from noise transmission to the ultimate catastrophic failure of the bearing itself. As a result, the direct measure of the forces and vibrations within the oil filled interface would be very desirable and would give an indication of the condition of the bearing in situ. The thickness of the oil film is, however, very small and conventional vibration sensors are too cumbersome to use in this confined space. This paper solves this problem by using a piezoelectric polymer film made from Polyvinylidine Fluoride (PVDF). These films are very thin (50 m) and flexible and easy to install in awkward spaces such as the inside of a thrust bearing. A model thrust bearing was constructed using a 3D printer and PVDF films inserted into the base of the bearing. In doing so, it was possible to directly measure the force fluctuations due to the rotating pads and investigate various properties of the thrust bearing itself.

  10. Recurrent network models for perfect temporal integration of fluctuating correlated inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okamoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporal integration of input is essential to the accumulation of information in various cognitive and behavioral processes, and gradually increasing neuronal activity, typically occurring within a range of seconds, is considered to reflect such computation by the brain. Some psychological evidence suggests that temporal integration by the brain is nearly perfect, that is, the integration is non-leaky, and the output of a neural integrator is accurately proportional to the strength of input. Neural mechanisms of perfect temporal integration, however, remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a recurrent network model of cortical neurons that perfectly integrates partially correlated, irregular input spike trains. We demonstrate that the rate of this temporal integration changes proportionately to the probability of spike coincidences in synaptic inputs. We analytically prove that this highly accurate integration of synaptic inputs emerges from integration of the variance of the fluctuating synaptic inputs, when their mean component is kept constant. Highly irregular neuronal firing and spike coincidences are the major features of cortical activity, but they have been separately addressed so far. Our results suggest that the efficient protocol of information integration by cortical networks essentially requires both features and hence is heterotic.

  11. Generalized Cauchy model of sea level fluctuations with long-range dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Jia-Yue

    2017-10-01

    This article suggests the contributions with two highlights. One is to propose a novel model of sea level fluctuations (sea level for short), which is called the generalized Cauchy (GC) process. It provides a new outlook for the description of local and global behaviors of sea level from a view of fractal in that the fractal dimension D that measures the local behavior of sea level and the Hurst parameter H which characterizes the global behavior of sea level are independent of each other. The other is to show that sea level appears multi-fractal in both spatial and time. Such a meaning of multi-fractal is new in the sense that a pair of fractal parameters (D, H) of sea level is varying with measurement sites and time. This research exhibits that the ranges of D and H of sea level, in general, are 1 ≤ D 0 . 96 for all data records at all measurement sites, implying that strong LRD may be a general phenomenon of sea level. On the other side, regarding with the local behavior, we will reveal that there appears D = 1 or D ≈ 1 for data records at a few stations and at some time, but D > 0 . 96 at most stations and at most time, meaning that sea level may appear highly local irregularity more frequently than weak local one.

  12. Entanglement and fluctuations in the XXZ model with power-law interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frérot, Irénée; Naldesi, Piero; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the ground-state properties of the spin-1 /2 XXZ model with power-law-decaying (1 /rα ) interactions, which describe spins interacting with long-range transverse (XX) ferromagnetic interactions and longitudinal (Z) antiferromagnetic interactions, or hard-core bosons with long-range repulsion and hopping. The long-range nature of the couplings allows us to quantitatively study the spectral, correlation, and entanglement properties of the system by making use of linear spin-wave theory, supplemented with density-matrix renormalization group in one-dimensional systems. Our most important prediction is the existence of three distinct coupling regimes, depending on the decay exponent α and number of dimensions d : (1) a short-range regime for α >d +σc (where σc=1 in the gapped Néel antiferromagnetic phase exhibited by the XXZ model, and σc=2 in the gapless XY ferromagnetic phase), sharing the same properties as those of finite-range interactions (α =∞ ); (2) a long-range regime α model the z exponent is found to control the scaling of fluctuations, the decay of correlations, and a universal subdominant term in the entanglement entropy, leading to a very rich palette of behaviors for ground-state quantum correlations beyond what is known for finite-range interactions.

  13. Underlying dynamics of typical fluctuations of an emerging market price index: The Heston model from minutes to months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Renato; de Toledo, Charles M.; Leite, Vitor B. P.; Caticha, Nestor

    2006-02-01

    We investigate the Heston model with stochastic volatility and exponential tails as a model for the typical price fluctuations of the Brazilian São Paulo Stock Exchange Index (IBOVESPA). Raw prices are first corrected for inflation and a period spanning 15 years characterized by memoryless returns is chosen for the analysis. Model parameters are estimated by observing volatility scaling and correlation properties. We show that the Heston model with at least two time scales for the volatility mean reverting dynamics satisfactorily describes price fluctuations ranging from time scales larger than 20 min to 160 days. At time scales shorter than 20 min we observe autocorrelated returns and power law tails incompatible with the Heston model. Despite major regulatory changes, hyperinflation and currency crises experienced by the Brazilian market in the period studied, the general success of the description provided may be regarded as an evidence for a general underlying dynamics of price fluctuations at intermediate mesoeconomic time scales well approximated by the Heston model. We also notice that the connection between the Heston model and Ehrenfest urn models could be exploited for bringing new insights into the microeconomic market mechanics.

  14. Modelling an infinite nucleonic system. Static and dynamical properties. Study of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sébille, F.

    For one decade, several fields in physics as well microscopic as macroscopic benefit from the computational particle-models (astrophysics, electronics, fluids mechanics...). In particular, the nuclear matter offers an interesting challenge as many body problem, owing to the quantal nature of its components and the complexity of the in-medium interaction. Using a model derived from semi-classical Vlasov equation and the projection of the Wigner function on a Gaussian coherent states basis (pseudo-particles), static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter are studied, featuring the growing of bulk instabilities in dilute matter. Using different zero and finite range effective interactions, the effect of the model parameters upon the relation total energy - density - temperature and surface energy of the pseudo-particles fluid is pointed out. The dynamical feature is first based upon a model of the 2-body Uehling-Ulhenbeck collisionnal term. A study of the relaxation of a nucleonic system is performed. At last, the pseudo-particle model is used in order to extract time scale for the growing of density fluctuations. This process is supposed to be a possible way to clusterization during heavy nuclei collisions. Depuis une dizaine d'années, plusieurs domaines de la physique aussi bien microscopiques que macroscopiques bénéficient des modèles à particules pour ordinateurs (astrophysique, électronique, plasmas...). En particulier, la matière nucléaire constitue un objet intéressant pour le problème à N corps ; tant par la nature quantique des nucléons que par la complexité des interactions dans ce milieu. A travers un modèle dérivant de l'équation de Vlasov semi-classique et de la projection de la fonction de Wigner sur une base d'état cohérents gaussiens (les pseudo-particules), on étudie les propriétés statiques et dynamiques de la matière nucléaire dont en particulier le développement des instabilités de volume en milieu dilué. Pour diff

  15. Comparison of solar wind velocity measurements with a theoretical acceleration model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, W.A. (Univ. of California, La Jolla (United States)); Esser, R. (Univ. of Tromsoe (Norway)); Loevhaug, U.P. (EISCAT, Ramfjordbotn (Norway)); Markkanen, J. (Geophysical Observatory, Sodankyla (Finland))

    1991-08-01

    Interplanetary radio scintillation (IPS) measurements of the solar wind velocity were made using the receiving antennas of the European Incoherent Scatter Facility (EISCAT) radar system in northern Scandinavia from June through October 1990. The observations, which cover the distance range from 11 to 90 R{sub s} from Sun center, were taken with sufficient density to measure the same stream at two (or more) different distances. The deduced velocities are in the range 100 {approx lt} U {approx lt} 540 km s{sup {minus}1}. The authors selected from 192 observations, 16 examples of streams observed with good radial alignment, of which 12 were observed unchanged for several days. The measured velocities are compared with calculations based on a two-fluid solar wind model with Alfven waves. In eight cases the measurements are in good agreement with the model when a moderate amount of wave energy is added to the flow. In four cases the observed streams show low or moderate velocities below, say, 20 R{sub s} but then accelerate fast at larger distances from the Sun. This delayed acceleration is much steeper than the acceleration in the model at these distances. In the remaining four cases the streams seem to reach their final velocities much closer to the base than in other cases, and they are not observed to accelerate much between 10 and 90 R{sub s}. At these distances all related solar wind models they have seen give the same results; they all fit half the data, and none can fit the other half.

  16. Depth-integrated modelling on onshore and offshore sandbar migration: Revision of fall velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin; Caceres, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of morphodynamic modelling and analysis of onshore and offshore sandbar migration based on a depth-integrated approach. The coastal flow was modeled using the Boussinesq equation and the morphological evolution was modeled using the suspended sediment transport equation and bed load formulae based on the instantaneous velocity and acceleration. The proposed model was applied to the accretive and erosive conditions and the model reproduced the onshore and offshore sandbar migration and the formation of a berm around the shoreline reasonably. An analysis of the computed results revealed the following. (i) The vertical flow velocity can affect the suspension time of the sediments considerably and the bottom evolution. (ii) The suspended load is the main contributor to the morphological changes in terms of the quantity and quality, regardless of the accretive or erosive conditions. (iii) Regardless of accretive or erosive conditions, in terms of the time-average, the instantaneous flow velocity and acceleration-based bed load models always yielded an offshore and onshore direction sediment flux, respectively, except in the swash zone. On the other hand, the suspended sediment flux calculated by the advection-diffusion equation results in the sediment transport in either direction depending on the flow field.

  17. Comparative Experimental and Modeling Study of Fluid Velocities in Heterogeneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, F.; Romanenko, K.; Pini, R.; Balcom, B.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of fluid velocities and effective porosities in rocks is crucial for predicting kinetic reaction rates and fluid-rock interactions in a plethora of geo-engineering applications, ranging from geothermal systems, Enhanced Oil Recovery to Carbon Capture and Storage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to measure spatially resolved porosities and fluid velocities in porous media. Large internal field gradients and short spin relaxation times, however, constrain the usability of the conventional MRI technique in natural rock samples. The combination of three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE) and the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme - a method developed at the UNB MRI Center - is able to compensate for those challenges and quantitative 3 dimensional maps of porosities and fluid velocities can be obtained. In this study we measured velocities and porosities using MRI in a sandstone rock sample showing meso-scale heterogeneities. Then we generated permeabilities using three independent approaches, employed them to model single-phase fluid flow in the measured rock sample and compared the generated velocity maps with the respective MRI measurements. For the first modeling approach, we applied the Kozeny-Carman relationship to create a permeability map based on porosities measured using MRI. For the second approach we used permeabilities derived from CO2-H2O multi-phase experiments performed in the same rock sample assuming the validity of the J-Leverett function. The permeabilities in the third approach were generated by applying a new inverse iterative-updating technique. The resulting three permeability maps were then used as input for a CFD simulation - using the Stanford CFD code AD-GPRS - to create a respective velocity map, which in turn was then compared to the measured velocity map. The results of the different independent methods for generating

  18. A simple stochastic model for dipole moment fluctuations in numerical dynamo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico G. eMeduri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Earth's axial dipole field changes in a complex fashion on many differenttime scales ranging from less than a year to tens of million years.Documenting, analysing, and replicating this intricate signalis a challenge for data acquisition, theoretical interpretation,and dynamo modelling alike. Here we explore whether axial dipole variationscan be described by the superposition of a slow deterministic driftand fast stochastic fluctuations, i.e. by a Langevin-type system.The drift term describes the time averaged behaviour of the axial dipole variations,whereas the stochastic part mimics complex flow interactions over convective time scales.The statistical behaviour of the system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation whichallows useful predictions, including the average rates of dipole reversals and excursions.We analyse several numerical dynamo simulations, most of which havebeen integrated particularly long in time, and also the palaeomagneticmodel PADM2M which covers the past 2 Myr.The results show that the Langevin description provides a viable statistical modelof the axial dipole variations on time scales longer than about 1 kyr.For example, the axial dipole probability distribution and the average reversalrate are successfully predicted.The exception is PADM2M where the stochastic model reversal rate seems too low.The dependence of the drift on the axial dipolemoment reveals the nonlinear interactions that establish thedynamo balance. A separate analysis of inductive and diffusive magnetic effectsin three dynamo simulations suggests that the classical quadraticquenching of induction predicted by mean-field theory seems at work.

  19. A model of the geochemical and physical fluctuations of the lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Indira; Burgisser, Alain; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2015-12-01

    Erebus volcano, Antarctica, exhibits periodical surface fluctuations of both geochemical and physical nature. Modeling the physics driving the lake oscillation is a challenge, even with a relatively simple theoretical framework. We present a quantitative analysis that aims to reconcile both lake level and gas geochemical cycles. Our model is based on the assumption that the periodicity is caused by the regular release of magma batches and/or core annular flow that have a fixed volume of melt and ascend and degas in equilibrium. Results suggest that cycles are not caused by the mixing between magma residing in the lake and a deep magma but by two distinct deep sources that rise separately. These sources of bubbly magma come from at most 2-3 km depth and rise buoyantly. Individual batches detach from the rising magmas at depths of 20-250 m. The two batch types can coexist in a single conduit up to a depth of ~ 30 m, above which they rise alternately to release respectively 19 and 23 kg/s of gas at the lake surface every 10 min. The temperature of the descending flow is between 890 and 950 °C, which is roughly 100 °C colder than the ascending currents. Batch pairs have shapes likely constrained by the conduit width. Regardless of their shapes, the pairs reach very high porosities near the surface and have diameters of 4-14 m that are consistent with video observations showing spreading waves at the lake surface. The alternating arrival of these large batches suggests a lava lake mostly filled with gas-rich magma.

  20. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  1. The Probabilities of Orbital-Companion Models for Stellar Radial Velocity Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Fengji; Hogg, David W

    2014-01-01

    The fully marginalized likelihood, or Bayesian evidence, is of great importance in probabilistic data analysis, because it is involved in calculating the posterior probability of a model or re-weighting a mixture of models conditioned on data. It is, however, extremely challenging to compute. This paper presents a geometric-path Monte Carlo method, inspired by multi-canonical Monte Carlo to evaluate the fully marginalized likelihood. We show that the algorithm is very fast and easy to implement and produces a justified uncertainty estimate on the fully marginalized likelihood. The algorithm performs efficiently on a trial problem and multi-companion model fitting for radial velocity data. For the trial problem, the algorithm returns the correct fully marginalized likelihood, and the estimated uncertainty is also consistent with the standard deviation of results from multiple runs. We apply the algorithm to the problem of fitting radial velocity data from HIP 88048 ($\

  2. Cluster statistics and quasisoliton dynamics in microscopic optimal-velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Xu, Xihua; Pang, John Z. F.; Monterola, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Using the non-linear optimal velocity models as an example, we show that there exists an emergent intrinsic scale that characterizes the interaction strength between multiple clusters appearing in the solutions of such models. The interaction characterizes the dynamics of the localized quasisoliton structures given by the time derivative of the headways, and the intrinsic scale is analogous to the "charge" of the quasisolitons, leading to non-trivial cluster statistics from the random perturbations to the initial steady states of uniform headways. The cluster statistics depend both on the quasisoliton charge and the density of the traffic. The intrinsic scale is also related to an emergent quantity that gives the extremum headways in the cluster formation, as well as the coexistence curve separating the absolute stable phase from the metastable phase. The relationship is qualitatively universal for general optimal velocity models.

  3. Regional three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle of northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, C.; Zhang, H.; Brocher, T.; Langenheim, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic model of the P wave velocity (Vp) structure of northern California. We employed a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm that incorporates a finite-difference travel time calculator and spatial smoothing constraints. Arrival times from earthquakes and travel times from controlled-source explosions, recorded at network and/or temporary stations, were inverted for Vp on a 3D grid with horizontal node spacing of 10 to 20 km and vertical node spacing of 3 to 8 km. Our model provides an unprecedented, comprehensive view of the regional-scale structure of northern California, putting many previously identified features into a broader regional context and improving the resolution of a number of them and revealing a number of new features, especially in the middle and lower crust, that have never before been reported. Examples of the former include the complex subducting Gorda slab, a steep, deeply penetrating fault beneath the Sacramento River Delta, crustal low-velocity zones beneath Geysers-Clear Lake and Long Valley, and the high-velocity ophiolite body underlying the Great Valley. Examples of the latter include mid-crustal low-velocity zones beneath Mount Shasta and north of Lake Tahoe. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Stochastic Simulation of a Full-Chain Reptation Model with Constraint Release, Chain-Length Fluctuations and Chain Stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Schieber, Jay D.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent reptation model that includes chain stretching, chain-length fluctuations, segment connectivity and constraint release is used to predict transient and steady flows. Quantitative comparisons are made with entangledsolution data. The model is able to capture quantitatively all fe...... for differentmolecular weight, the transient and steady-state behavior of the extinction angle, and the stress relaxation in cessation of steady shear flow....

  5. Dynamical analysis of a differential algebraic bio-economic model with stage-structured and stochastic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qingling; Li, Aihua

    2016-11-01

    This study considers a class of differential algebraic stage-structured bio-economic models with stochastic fluctuations. The stochastic bio-economic model is simplified to an Itô equation using the stochastic averaging method. The stochastic stability, Hopf bifurcation, and P-bifurcation are discussed based on the singular boundary theory of the diffusion process for the system and the invariant measure theory of dynamic systems. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate our main results.

  6. Validating Velocities in the GeoClaw Tsunami Model using Observations Near Hawaii from the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

    CERN Document Server

    Arcos, M E M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to measure, predict, and compute tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be done by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Moreover, advancing the study of sediment transport and tsunami deposits depends on the accurate interpretation and modeling of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities existed to compare with model results. During the 11 March 2011 Tohoku Tsunami 328 current meters were in place around the Hawaiian Islands, USA, that captured time series of water velocity in 18 locations, in both harbors and deep channels, at a series of depths. We compare several of these velocity records against numerical simulations performed using the GeoClaw numerical tsunami model, based on solving the depth-averaged shallow water equations with adaptive mesh refinement, to confirm that this model can accurately predict velo...

  7. A comparison of measured and modeled velocity fields for a laminar flow in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. D.; Apte, S. V.; Liburdy, J. A.; Ziazi, R. M.; He, X.; Finn, J. R.; Patil, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining highly-resolved velocity data from experimental measurements in porous media is a significant challenge. The goal of this work is to compare the velocity fields measured in a randomly-packed porous medium obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) with corresponding fields predicted from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Experimentally, the porous medium was comprised of 15 mm diameter spherical beads made of optical glass placed in a glass flow cell to create the packed bed. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate was refractive-index matched to the glass creating a medium that could be illuminated with a laser sheet without distortion. The bead center locations were quantified using the imaging system so that the geometry of the porous medium was known very accurately. Two-dimensional PIV data were collected and processed to provide high-resolution velocity fields at a single plane within the porous medium. A Cartesian-grid-based fictitious domain approach was adopted for the direct numerical simulation of flow through the same geometry as the experimental measurements and without any adjustable parameters. The uncertainties associated with characterization of the pore geometry, PIV measurements, and DNS predictions were all systematically quantified. Although uncertainties in bead position measurements led to minor discrepancies in the comparison of the velocity fields, the axial and normal velocity deviations exhibited normalized root mean squared deviations (NRMSD) of only 11.32% and 4.74%, respectively. The high fidelity of both the experimental and numerical methods have significant implications for understanding and even for engineering the micro-macro relationship in porous materials. The ability to measure and model sub-pore-scale flow features also has relevance to the development of upscaled models for flow in porous media, where physically reasonable closure models must be developed at the sub-pore scale. These results provide valuable data

  8. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for multiple optimal velocity functions with different probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-08-01

    Due to the maximum velocity and safe headway distance of the different vehicles are not exactly the same, an extended macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of multiple optimal velocity functions with probabilities is proposed in this paper. By means of linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability condition considering multiple probabilities optimal velocity is obtained. The KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line through nonlinear analysis. The numerical simulations of influences of multiple maximum velocities and multiple safety distances on model's stability and traffic capacity are carried out. The cases of two different kinds of maximum speeds with same safe headway distance, two different types of safe headway distances with same maximum speed and two different max velocities and two different time-gaps are all explored by numerical simulations. First cases demonstrate that when the proportion of vehicles with a larger vmax increase, the traffic tends to unstable, which also means that jerk and brakes is not conducive to traffic stability and easier to result in stop and go phenomenon. Second cases show that when the proportion of vehicles with greater safety spacing increases, the traffic tends to be unstable, which also means that too cautious assumptions or weak driving skill is not conducive to traffic stability. Last cases indicate that increase of maximum speed is not conducive to traffic stability, while reduction of the safe headway distance is conducive to traffic stability. Numerical simulation manifests that the mixed driving and traffic diversion does not have effect on the traffic capacity when traffic density is low or heavy. Numerical results also show that mixed driving should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when the traffic density is lower, while the traffic diversion should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when

  9. Adaptive modelling and forecasting of offshore wind power fluctuations with Markov-switching autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    optimized is based on penalized maximum likelihood, with exponential forgetting of past observations. MSAR models are then employed for one-step-ahead point forecasting of 10 min resolution time series of wind power at two large offshore wind farms. They are favourably compared against persistence...

  10. Adaptive modelling and forecasting of offshore wind power fluctuations with Markov-switching autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    optimized is based on penalized maximum-likelihood, with exponential forgetting of past observations. MSAR models are then employed for 1-step-ahead point forecasting of 10-minute resolution time-series of wind power at two large offshore wind farms. They are favourably compared against persistence and Auto...

  11. Interstellar cloud structure: The statistics of centroid velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Lazarian, A; Stutzki, J

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of the statistical properties of maps of line centroids has been used for almost 50 years, but there is still no general agreement on their interpretation. We try to quantify which properties of underlying turbulent velocity fields can be derived from centroid velocity maps, and we test conditions under which the scaling behaviour of the centroid velocities matches the scaling of the three-dimensional velocity field. Using fractal cloud models we study systematically the relation between three-dimensional density and velocity fields and the statistical properties of the produced line centroid maps. We put special attention to cases with large density fluctuations resembling supersonic interstellar turbulence. Starting from the Delta-variance analysis we derive a new tool to compute the scaling behaviour of the three-dimensional velocity field from observed intensity and centroid velocity maps. We provide two criteria to decide whether the information from the centroid velocities directly ref...

  12. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  13. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  14. Assessing waveform predictions of recent three-dimensional velocity models of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xueyang; Shen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Accurate velocity models are essential for both the determination of earthquake locations and source moments and the interpretation of Earth structures. With the increasing number of three-dimensional velocity models, it has become necessary to assess the models for accuracy in predicting seismic observations. Six models of the crustal and uppermost mantle structures in Tibet and surrounding regions are investigated in this study. Regional Rayleigh and Pn (or Pnl) waveforms from two ground truth events, including one nuclear explosion and one natural earthquake located in the study area, are simulated by using a three-dimensional finite-difference method. Synthetics are compared to observed waveforms in multiple period bands of 20-75 s for Rayleigh waves and 1-20 s for Pn/Pnl waves. The models are evaluated based on the phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between synthetic and observed waveforms. A model generated from full-wave ambient noise tomography best predicts Rayleigh waves throughout the data set, as well as Pn/Pnl waves traveling from the Tarim Basin to the stations located in central Tibet. In general, the models constructed from P wave tomography are not well suited to predict Rayleigh waves, and vice versa. Possible causes of the differences between observed and synthetic waveforms, and frequency-dependent variations of the "best matching" models with the smallest prediction errors are discussed. This study suggests that simultaneous prediction for body and surface waves requires an integrated velocity model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of other important properties, such as anisotropy.

  15. Efficient fitting of multiplanet Keplerian models to radial velocity and astrometry data

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, J T Wright A W

    2009-01-01

    We describe a technique for solving for the orbital elements of multiple planets from radial velocity (RV) and/or astrometric data taken with 1 m/s and microarcsecond precision, appropriate for efforts to detect Earth-massed planets in their stars' habitable zones, such as NASA's proposed Space Interferometry Mission. We include details of calculating analytic derivatives for use in the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm for the problems of fitting RV and astrometric data separately and jointly. We also explicate the general method of separating the linear and nonlinear components of a model fit in the context of an LM fit, show how explicit derivatives can be calculated in such a model, and demonstrate the speed up and convergence improvements of such a scheme in the case of a five-planet fit to published radial velocity data for 55 Cnc.

  16. Velocity mode transition of dynamic crack propagation in hyperviscoelastic materials: A continuum model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-10

    Experiments of crack propagation in rubbers have shown that a discontinuous jump of crack propagation velocity can occur as energy release rate increases, which is known as the "mode transition" phenomenon. Although it is believed that the mode transition is strongly related to the mechanical properties, the nature of the mode transition had not been revealed. In this study, dynamic crack propagation on an elastomer was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) with a hyperviscoelastic material model. A series of pure shear test was carried out numerically with FEM simulations and crack velocities were measured under various values of tensile strain. As a result, our FEM simulations successfully reproduced the mode transition. The success of realising the mode transition phenomenon by a simple FEM model, which was achieved for the first time ever, helped to explain that the phenomenon occurs owing to a characteristic non-monotonic temporal development of principal stress near the crack tip.

  17. Velocity mode transition of dynamic crack propagation in hyperviscoelastic materials: A continuum model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    Experiments of crack propagation in rubbers have shown that a discontinuous jump of crack propagation velocity can occur as energy release rate increases, which is known as the “mode transition” phenomenon. Although it is believed that the mode transition is strongly related to the mechanical properties, the nature of the mode transition had not been revealed. In this study, dynamic crack propagation on an elastomer was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) with a hyperviscoelastic material model. A series of pure shear test was carried out numerically with FEM simulations and crack velocities were measured under various values of tensile strain. As a result, our FEM simulations successfully reproduced the mode transition. The success of realising the mode transition phenomenon by a simple FEM model, which was achieved for the first time ever, helped to explain that the phenomenon occurs owing to a characteristic non-monotonic temporal development of principal stress near the crack tip.

  18. Velocity selection at large undercooling in a two-dimensional nonlocal model of solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Angelo

    1987-01-01

    The formation of needle-crystal dendrites from an undercooled melt is investigated analytically, applying the method of Caroli et al. (1986) to Langer's (1980) symmetric two-dimensional nonlocal model of solidification with finite anisotropy in the limit of large undercooling. A solution based on the WKB approximation is obtained, and a saddle-point evaluation is performed. It is shown that needle-crystal solutions exist only if the capillary anisotropy is nonzero, in which case a particular value of the growth velocity can be selected. This finding and the expression for the dependence of the selected velocity on the singular perturbation parameter and the strength of the anisotropy are found to be in complete agreement with the results of a boundary-layer model (Langer and Hong, 1986).

  19. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient...... viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through...... and compression settling velocity functions were estimated by carrying out biweekly batch settling tests using a novel column setup through a four-month long measurement campaign. To estimate viscosity model parameters, rheological experiments were carried out on the same sludge sample using a rotational...

  20. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  1. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  2. Unsteady Velocity Measurements Taken Behind a Model Helicopter Rotor Hub in Forward Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Drag caused by separated flow behind the hub of a helicopter has an adverse effect on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. To determine the effect of separated flow on a configuration used extensively for helicopter aerodynamic investigations, an experiment was conducted using a laser velocimeter to measure velocities in the wake of a model helicopter hub operating at Mach-scaled conditions in forward flight. Velocity measurements were taken using a laser velocimeter with components in the vertical and downstream directions. Measurements were taken at 13 stations downstream from the rotor hub. At each station, measurements were taken in both a horizontal and vertical row of locations. These measurements were analyzed for harmonic content based on the rotor period of revolution. After accounting for these periodic velocities, the remaining unsteady velocities were treated as turbulence. Turbulence intensity distributions are presented. Average turbulent intensities ranged from approximately 2 percent of free stream to over 15 percent of free stream at specific locations and azimuths. The maximum average value of turbulence was located near the rear-facing region of the fuselage.

  3. Quantitative explanation of circuit experiments and real traffic using the optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Macoto; Shibata, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Yuki; Tadaki, Shin-ichi; Yukawa, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the occurrence of a traffic jam is a dynamical phase transition (Tadaki et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 103034, Sugiyama et al 2008 New J. Phys. 10 033001). In this study, we investigate whether the optimal velocity (OV) model can quantitatively explain the results of experiments. The occurrence and non-occurrence of jammed flow in our experiments agree with the predictions of the OV model. We also propose a scaling rule for the parameters of the model. Using this rule, we obtain critical density as a function of a single parameter. The obtained critical density is consistent with the observed values for highway traffic.

  4. Global bifurcation investigation of an optimal velocity traffic model with driver reaction time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Wilson, R. Eddie; Krauskopf, Bernd

    2004-08-01

    We investigate an optimal velocity model which includes the reflex time of drivers. After an analytical study of the stability and local bifurcations of the steady-state solution, we apply numerical continuation techniques to investigate the global behavior of the system. Specifically, we find branches of oscillating solutions connecting Hopf bifurcation points, which may be super- or subcritical, depending on parameters. This analysis reveals several regions of multistability.

  5. The role of ocean velocity in chlorophyll variability. A modelling study in the Alboran Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Solé, Jordi; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Macías, Diego; Catalán, Ignacio A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we focus on the Alboran Sea (western Mediterranean) to relate wind field and ocean velocity variability with chlorophyll a (Chl a) behaviour, using a 2-km resolution, coupled 3D ocean circulation-NPZD model (ROMS). The analysis is done in three steps. First, we split the seasonal and residual contribution for the fields under study. Second, we calculate the corresponding empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) for the seasonal and residual parts. Finally, we relate each pair of var...

  6. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  7. The influence of bus stop on traffic flow with velocity-difference-separation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengjun; Wang, Wei; Ge, Hongxia

    2016-06-01

    Based on velocity-difference-separation model, the mixed traffic flow on two-lane road is investigated. For a fixed road length, the influence of bus and bus stops on traffic flow is studied with the increasing traffic density. Compared with the result without bus stops given by Li et al., a new traffic state is found, which is valuable for studying the impacts of public transport on urban traffic flow.

  8. Analytic solutions for seismic travel time and ray path geometry through simple velocity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    The geometry of ray paths through realistic Earth models can be extremely complex due to the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of the velocity distribution within the models. Calculation of high fidelity ray paths and travel times through these models generally involves sophisticated algorithms that require significant assumptions and approximations. To test such algorithms it is desirable to have available analytic solutions for the geometry and travel time of rays through simpler velocity distributions against which the more complex algorithms can be compared. Also, in situations where computational performance requirements prohibit implementation of full 3D algorithms, it may be necessary to accept the accuracy limitations of analytic solutions in order to compute solutions that satisfy those requirements. Analytic solutions are described for the geometry and travel time of infinite frequency rays through radially symmetric 1D Earth models characterized by an inner sphere where the velocity distribution is given by the function V (r) = A-Br{sup 2}, optionally surrounded by some number of spherical shells of constant velocity. The mathematical basis of the calculations is described, sample calculations are presented, and results are compared to the Taup Toolkit of Crotwell et al. (1999). These solutions are useful for evaluating the fidelity of sophisticated 3D travel time calculators and in situations where performance requirements preclude the use of more computationally intensive calculators. It should be noted that most of the solutions presented are only quasi-analytic. Exact, closed form equations are derived but computation of solutions to specific problems generally require application of numerical integration or root finding techniques, which, while approximations, can be calculated to very high accuracy. Tolerances are set in the numerical algorithms such that computed travel time accuracies are better than 1 microsecond.

  9. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  10. Modeling brain injury response for rotational velocities of varying directions and magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    An estimated 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. To investigate the effects of rotational motions on TBI risk and location, this study modeled rotational velocities of five magnitudes and 26 directions of rotation using the Simulated Injury Monitor finite element brain model. The volume fraction of the total brain exceeding a predetermined strain threshold, the Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (CSDM), was investigated to evaluate global model response. To evaluate regional response, this metric was computed relative to individual brain structures and termed the Structure Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (SCSDM). CSDM increased as input magnitude increased and varied with the direction of rotation. CSDM was 0.55-1.7 times larger in simulations with transverse plane rotation compared to those without transverse plane rotation. The largest SCSDM in the cerebrum and brainstem occurred with rotations in the transverse and sagittal planes, respectively. Velocities causing medial rotation of the cerebellum resulted in the largest SCSDM in this structure. For velocities of the same magnitude, injury risk calculated from CSDM varied from 0 to 97% with variations in the direction of rotation. These findings demonstrate injury risk, as estimated by CSDM and SCSDM, is affected by the direction of rotation and input magnitude, and these may be important considerations for injury prediction.

  11. Coarse grained normal mode analysis vs. refined Gaussian Network Model for protein residue-level structural fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Koo; Jernigan, Robert; Wu, Zhijun

    2013-01-01

    We investigate several approaches to coarse grained normal mode analysis on protein residual-level structural fluctuations by choosing different ways of representing the residues and the forces among them. Single-atom representations using the backbone atoms C(α), C, N, and C(β) are considered. Combinations of some of these atoms are also tested. The force constants between the representative atoms are extracted from the Hessian matrix of the energy function and served as the force constants between the corresponding residues. The residue mean-square-fluctuations and their correlations with the experimental B-factors are calculated for a large set of proteins. The results are compared with all-atom normal mode analysis and the residue-level Gaussian Network Model. The coarse-grained methods perform more efficiently than all-atom normal mode analysis, while their B-factor correlations are also higher. Their B-factor correlations are comparable with those estimated by the Gaussian Network Model and in many cases better. The extracted force constants are surveyed for different pairs of residues with different numbers of separation residues in sequence. The statistical averages are used to build a refined Gaussian Network Model, which is able to predict residue-level structural fluctuations significantly better than the conventional Gaussian Network Model in many test cases.

  12. Laboratory model study of the effect of aeration on axial velocity attenuation of turbulent jet flows in plunge pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 张法星; 田忠; 许唯临; 刘斌; 卫望汝

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory model experiment, the velocities of the jet flow along the axis are measured, using the CQY−Z8a velocity-meter. The velocity attenuations of the jet flow along the axis under different conditions are studied. The effects of the aeration concentration, the initial jet velocity at the entry and the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation of the jet flow are analyzed. It is seen that the velocity attenuation of the jet flow along the axis sees a regular variation. It is demonstrated by the test results that under the experimental conditions, the velocity along the axis decreases linearly. The higher the air concentration is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. The absolute value of the slopeK increases with the rise of the air concentration. The relationship can be defined as=a+bKACK. The coefficientA is 0.03 under the experimental conditions. With the low air concentration of the jet flow, the thinner the jet flow is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. With the increase of the air concentra- tion, the influence of the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation is reduced. When the air concentration is increased to a certain value, the thickness of the jet flow may not have any influence on the velocity attenuation. The initial jet velocity itself at the entry has no influence on the variation of the velocity attenuation as the curves of the velocity attenuation at different velocities at the entry are practically parallel, even coinciding one with another. Therefore, improving the air concentration of the jet flow and disper- sing the jet flow in the plunge pool could reduce the influence of the jet flow on the scour.

  13. Modeling a nucleon system: static and dynamical properties - density fluctuations; Modelisation d`un system de nucleons: proprietes statiques et dynamiques - fluctuation de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idier, D. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1997-02-15

    This thesis sets forth a quasi-particle model for the static and dynamical properties of nuclear matter. This model is based on a scale ratio of quasi-particle to nucleons and the projection of the semi-classical distribution on a coherent Gaussian state basis. The first chapter is dealing with the transport equations, particularly with the Vlasov equation for Wigner distribution function. The second one is devoted to the statics of nuclear matter. Here, the sampling effect upon the nuclear density is treated and the state equation of the Gaussian fluid is compared with that given by Hartree-Fock approximation. We define state equation as the relationship between the nucleon binding energy and density, for a given temperature. The curvature around the state equation minimum of the quasi-particle system is shown to be related to the speed of propagation of density perturbation. The volume energy and the surface properties of a (semi-)infinite nucleon system are derived. For the resultant saturated auto-coherent semi-infinite system of quasi-particles the surface coefficient appearing in the mass formula is extracted as well as the system density profile. The third chapter treats the dynamics of the two-particle residual interactions. The effect of different parameters on relaxation of a nucleon system without a mean field is studied by means of a Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling. The fourth chapter treats the volume instabilities (spinodal decomposition) in nuclear matter. The quasi-particle systems, initially prepared in the spinodal region of the utilized interaction, are set to evolve. It is shown then that the scale ratio acts upon the amount of fluctuations injected in the system. The inhomogeneity degree and a proper time are defined and the role of collisions in the spinodal decomposition as well as that of the initial temperature and density, are investigated. Assuming different effective macroscopic interactions, the influence of quantities as

  14. Stochastic periodic solution of a non-autonomous toxic-producing phytoplankton allelopathy model with environmental fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Yuan, Sanling; Zhang, Tonghua

    2017-03-01

    Phytoplankton allelopathy is an ecological phenomenon that concerns the interaction among toxic-producing phytoplankton. Recently, researchers pay great attention to whether the cyclic outbreaks of the harmful algal blooms are related with the allelopathy in a random fluctuating environment. In this paper, we are particularly interested in a non-autonomous toxic-producing phytoplankton allelopathy model with environmental fluctuation. For the model, we first consider the existence of the global positive solution and the boundary periodic solution. Then, by using Khasminskii's method and Lyapunov function, we derive the sufficient conditions for the existence of the nontrivial positive stochastically periodic solution. Our results show that the allelopathic effect plays an important role in the existence of the stochastic periodic solution, for example it can lead to the decrease of the peaks of the cyclic outbreaks of the harmful algal blooms. Numerical simulations are carried out to support our theoretical results.

  15. Block modeling of crustal deformation in Tierra del Fuego from GNSS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Fritsche, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Dietrich, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Tierra del Fuego (TDF) main island is divided by a major transform boundary between the South America and Scotia tectonic plates. Using a block model, we infer slip rates, locking depths and inclinations of active faults in TDF from inversion of site velocities derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations. We use interseismic velocities from 48 sites, obtained from field measurements spanning 20 years. Euler vectors consistent with a simple seismic cycle are estimated for each block. In addition, we introduce far-field information into the modeling by applying constraints on Euler vectors of major tectonic plates. The difference between model and observed surface deformation near the Magallanes Fagnano Fault System (MFS) is reduced by considering finite dip in the forward model. For this tectonic boundary global plate circuits models predict relative movements between 7 and 9 mm yr- 1, while our regional model indicates that a strike-slip rate of 5.9 ± 0.2 mm yr- 1 is accommodated across the MFS. Our results indicate faults dipping 66- 4+ 6° southward, locked to a depth of 11- 5+ 5 km, which are consistent with geological models for the MFS. However, normal slip also dominates the fault perpendicular motion throughout the eastern MFS, with a maximum rate along the Fagnano Lake.

  16. Modeling the Radial Velocity Curve of the Water Vapor Maser in VX UMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, D. M.; Benson, P. J.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    1999-12-01

    VX UMa is a unique Mira-type star that demonstrates a triple-peaked spectrum of its 1.35-cm H2O maser emission. We used the high-precision curves of radial velocities of the spectral peaks, obtained by Benson & Little-Marenin from 1988 to 1992, as probes of the kinematics of the masing region. The pronounced periodicity of the radial velocity of the central component, with a period equal to the pulsational period of the optical variations, suggests the involvement of pulsations in the observed excursions of radial velocity. However, the radial velocity of the central spectral component produced by a symmetrical, pulsating spherical layer should be constantly zero. Rotation seems to be the most obvious mechanism to impart a small non-zero component to the central feature. We assume that the bulk of maser radiation originates in the equatorial "belt" around the star and approximate this region as a two-dimensional, rotating and pulsating ring. We found that any combination of rotation and pulsation produces a quadruple peaked, not a triple peaked spectrum. Therefore, some asymmetry in the disk or unequal absorption of the two central peaks by ionized gas (e.g. in the shock responsible for the maser emission) is needed. We demonstrate that one of the central peaks can then undergo periodic changes of its radial velocity with the period of pulsation, as observed. A VLBA experiment that may verify our model is under way. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-9820555.

  17. Gas-dynamic modeling of gas flow in semi-closed space including channel surface fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E. N.; Salnikov, A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In this article frequency interaction conditions, that affect on acoustic stability of solid-propellant rocket engine (SPRE) action, and its influence on level change of pressure fluctuations with longitudinal gas oscillations in the combustion chamber (CC) are considered. Studies of CC in the assessment of the operating rocket engine stability are reported.

  18. Model-based Permeability Estimation of Shaly Sands Using Seismic Velocity and Resistivity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is an indispensable parameter for hydraulic characterization of soils and rocks in many applications. Permeability of soils and rocks is usually obtained with the in-situ permeability test in a borehole and/or laboratory permeability test of soil/rock core samples obtained in the borehole. Many boreholes are necessary for building a hydraulic model of a large soil/rock mass. It is, however, often difficult to drill many boreholes due to time and cost constraints. For such a case, geophysical methods can be effectively utilized for profiling permeability of a large soil/rock mass if geophysical properties such as seismic velocity and resistivity can be used for estimating permeability. We, therefore, propose an effective method for estimating permeability of shaly sands by applying a rock physics model to seismic velocity and resistivity data. Because consolidated shaly sand is a key rock for aquifers and oil/gas reservoirs, and unconsolidated shaly sand is very common soils whose hydraulic properties are often important for safety evaluation of river embankments and designing countermeasure of its liquefaction. The method first estimates the grain size distribution of the shaly sand by applying a shaly sand model to seismic velocity and resistivity data obtained with seismic and resistivity measurements. The grain size of the soil/rock thus obtained and porosity estimated from resistivity data by applying the Glover's equation are then input to the Kozeny-Carman equation for estimating permeability of the shaly sand. The proposed method is applied to P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity data measured in the laboratory, well logging and surface seismic and electric surveys for shaly sands. Comparison of estimated permeability with actual measurements reveals that permeability can be estimated in accuracy less than one order of magnitude and the method can be used for profiling permeability of a large shaly sand using geophysical data measured on it.

  19. Assessment of earthquake locations in 3-D deterministic velocity models: A case study from the Altotiberina Near Fault Observatory (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, D.; Mirabella, F.; Chiaraluce, L.; Trippetta, F.; Lomax, A.

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of earthquake locations and their correspondence with subsurface geology depends strongly on the accuracy of the available seismic velocity model. Most modern methods to construct a velocity model for earthquake location are based on the inversion of passive source seismological data. Another approach is the integration of high-resolution geological and geophysical data to construct deterministic velocity models in which earthquake locations can be directly correlated to the geological structures. Such models have to be kinematically consistent with independent seismological data in order to provide precise hypocenter solutions. We present the Altotiberina (AT) seismic model, a three-dimensional velocity model for the Upper Tiber Valley region (Northern Apennines, Italy), constructed by combining 300 km of seismic reflection profiles, six deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth), detailed data from geological surveys and direct measurements of P and S wave velocities performed in situ and in laboratory. We assess the robustness of the AT seismic model by locating 11,713 earthquakes with a nonlinear, global-search inversion method and comparing the probabilistic hypocenter solutions to those calculated in three previously published velocity models, constructed by inverting passive seismological data only. Our results demonstrate that the AT seismic model is able to provide higher-quality hypocenter locations than the previous velocity models. Earthquake locations are consistent with the subsurface geological structures and show a high degree of spatial correlation with specific lithostratigraphic units, suggesting a lithological control on the seismic activity evolution.

  20. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  1. Lithospheric velocity model of Texas and implications for the Ouachita orogeny and the opening of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Li, Aibing

    2016-12-01

    A 3-D shear wave velocity model of Texas has been developed from Rayleigh wave phase velocities by using ambient noise data recorded at the USArray stations. In the upper crust, the Ouachita front separates high velocity in the Laurentia to its west from low velocity in the east and south Texas basins. The Ouachita belt is characterized as a high-velocity zone with local maximums coinciding with known uplifts, which we interpret as accreted island arcs during the Ouachita orogeny. Our model evidences a strong Ouachita lithosphere that helped to buffer crust thinning from the Mesozoic rifting. A significantly low-velocity anomaly is present in southeast Texas in the lower crust and upper mantle. We associate this anomaly with a past asthenosphere upwelling that likely originated from the edge of the subducted slab during the Ouachita collision and was potentially responsible for the opening of the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. Crossover behavior of multiscale fluctuations in Big Data: Langevin model and substorm time-scales in Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Setty, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multiscale fluctuations in large and complex data are usually characterized by a power law with a scaling exponent but many systems require more than one exponent and thus exhibit crossover behavior. The scaling exponents, such as Hurst exponents, represent the nature of correlation in the system and the crossover shows the presence of more than one type of correlation. An accurate characterization of the crossover behavior is thus needed for a better understanding of the inherent correlations in the system, and is an important method of Big Data analysis. A multi-step process is developed for accurate computation of the crossover behavior. First the detrended fluctuation analysis is used to remove the trends in the data and the scaling exponents are computed. The crossover point is then computed by a Hyperbolic regression technique, with no prior assumptions. The time series data of the magnetic field variations during substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere is analyzed with these techniques and yields a crossover behavior with a time scale of ~4 hrs. A Langevin model derived from the data provides an excellent fit to the crossover in the scaling exponents and a good model of magnetospheric dynamics. The combination of fluctuation analysis and mathematical modeling thus yields a comprehensive approach in the analysis of Big Data.

  3. A Layer-Stripping Method for 3D Near-Surface Velocity Model Building Using Seismic First-Arrival Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taikun Shi; Jianzhong Zhang; Zhonglai Huang; Changkun Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of 3D near-surface velocity model building, we develop a layer-stripping method using seismic first-arrival times. The velocity model within a Common Mid-Point (CMP) gather is assumed to be stratified into thin layers, and the velocity of each layer var-ies linearly with depth. The thickness and velocity of the top layer are estimated using minimum-offset first-arrival data in a CMP gather. Then the top layer is stripped and the second layer becomes a new top layer. After removing the effect of the top layer from the former first-arrival data, the new first-arrival data are obtained and then used to estimate the parameters of the second layer. In this manner, the velocity model, being regarded as that at a CMP location, is built layer-by-layer from the top to the bottom. A 3D near-surface velocity model is then formed using the velocity models at all CMP locations. The tests on synthetic and observed seismic data show that the layer-stripping method can be used to build good near-surface velocity models for static correction, and its computation speed is ap-proximately hundred times faster than that of grid tomography.

  4. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  5. Markov random field modelling for fluid distributions from the seismic velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwatani, T.; Nagata, K.; Okada, M.; Toriumi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent development of geophysical observations, such as seismic tomography, seismic reflection method and geomagnetic method, provide us detailed images of the earth's interior. However, it has still been difficult to interpret these data geologically, including predicting lithology and fluid distributions, mainly because (1) available data usually have large noise and uncertainty, and (2) the number of observable parameters is usually smaller than the number of target parameters. Therefore, the statistical analyses of geophysical data sets are essential for the objective and quantitative geological interpretation. We propose the use of Markov random field (MRF) model to geophysical image data as an alternative to classical deterministic approaches. The MRF model is a Bayesian stochastic model using a generalized form of Markov Chains, and is often applied to the analysis of images, particularly in the detection of visual patterns or textures. The MRF model assumes that the spatial gradients of physical properties are relatively small compared to the observational noises. By hyperparameter estimation, the variances of noises can be appropriately estimated only from available data sets without prior information about observational noises. In this study, we try to image the fluid distributions based on the seismic velocity structure by using the Markov random field model. According to Nakajima et al. (2005), seismic velocities (Vp and Vs) are expressed as functions of porosity and pore geometry using the unified formulation proposed by Takei (2002). Additionally, the spatial continuity of porosity and pore geometry is incorporated by Gaussian Markov Chains as prior probabilities. The most probable estimation can be obtained by maximizing the posterior probability of the fluid distribution given the observed velocity structures. In the present study, the steepest descent method was implemented in order to minimize the free energy (i.e. maximize the posterior

  6. General spherical anisotropic Jeans models of stellar kinematics: including proper motions and radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Cappellari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Cappellari (2008) presented a flexible and efficient method to model the stellar kinematics of anisotropic axisymmetric and spherical stellar systems. The spherical formalism could be used to model the line-of-sight velocity second moments allowing for essentially arbitrary radial variation in the anisotropy and general luminous and total density profiles. Here we generalize the spherical formalism by providing the expressions for all three components of the projected second moments, including the two proper motion components. A reference implementation is now included in the public JAM package available at http://purl.org/cappellari/software

  7. Referee comment on Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmela Herzog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many archaeological studies assessing the impact of topography on past human movement, only weak arguments without validation for the weights assigned to different terrain features are given. Therefore a study presenting terrain coefficients relying on sound tests is most welcome though the range of applications in archaeological modelling is limited. This article is a referee comment for de Gruchy, M., Caswell, E and Edwards, J. 2017 Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement, Internet Archaeology.

  8. Spiral Galaxies - classical description of spiral arms and rotational velocity pattern - toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    We propose an explanation of features of spiral galaxies: spiral arms and observed flat rotation curves, without the presence of an exotic form of matter. The formalism is based on Boltzmanns transport equation for the collisional matter and the very-low-velocity post-Newtonian approximation of the general relativity equations expressed in the Maxwell-like form. The Maxwell-like formulation provides the base for the explanation of the above phenomena in the language of dynamically created gravitoelectromagnetic fields by the movement of mass streams in the plane of the galaxy disc. In the model we use radical simplifications expressed as neglect of the gravitational interaction between neighbors and approximation of the incompressible mass flow. In this frame we show that if the galaxy is fuelled constantly by mass from an external gas reservoir, then the amplification of the gravitomagnetic field can be large enough to create the rotational velocity pattern and spiral arms without the necessity of introducin...

  9. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-03-21

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  10. Development of the EUREF Velocity Model - Status and Roadmap for Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidberg, Martin; Steffen, Holger; Altamimi, Zuheir; Bruyninx, Carine; Caporali, Alessandro; Dousa, Jan; Habrich, Heinz; Kenyeres, Ambrus; da Silva Fernandes, Rui Manuel; Stangl, Günter

    2013-04-01

    Interplate and intraplate deformations are present all over Europe. They can be subdivided by their spatial or temporal nature as well as their magnitude. For example, different, partly overlapping processes are related to several geodynamic zones such as plate boundaries, micro-plates, volcanoes, (formerly) glaciated areas, hydrological basins etc. On the other side, there are long-term processes such as the Fennoscandian post-glacial rebound, episodic events such as earthquakes and many temporarily intermediate deformations from e.g. volcanic swelling or anthropogenic influences due to oil or gas extraction or CO2 sequestration. The corresponding deformations of different scales are measured as three-dimensional crustal velocities by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reference stations with meanwhile sufficient detail and accuracy. The IAG Reference Frame Sub-Commission for Europe (EUREF) working group on "Deformation models" aims at obtaining velocity models for Europe and adjacent areas and significantly improving the prediction of the time evolution of coordinates, thus overcoming the limitations in the use of the European Terrestrial Reference System 1989 (ETRS89). A general understanding of the physics behind such a velocity field is also a major goal. In particular, the working group will model and correct for interplate and intraplate deformations, while using the reference frame, and thus extend the useful lifetime of a realisation of the ETRS89. Hence, the purpose of this working group are twofold; first, pure scientific interests in improved knowledge of the surface deformations of Eurasia and adjacent areas, and second, providing a valuable tool in the management and use of the national realisations of the ETRS89. The work will strongly benefit from sophisticated infrastructures such as the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Key information for improved knowledge of crustal deformations is observed motions at stations. This includes

  11. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  12. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Shallow Shear-Wave Velocities for Las Vegas, Nevada, Using Sediment Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Luke; Helena Murvosh; Wanda Taylor; Jeff Wagoner

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of near-surface shear-wave velocity in the deep alluvial basin underlying the metropolitan area of Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), is being developed for earthquake site response projections. The velocity dataset, which includes 230 measurements, is interpolated across the model using depth-dependent correlations of velocity with sediment type. The sediment-type database contains more than 1 400 well and borehole logs. Sediment sequences reported in logs are assigned to one of four units. A characteristic shear-wave velocity profile b developed for each unit by analyzing closely spaced pairs of velocity profiles and well or borehole logs. The resulting velocity model exhibits reasonable values and patterns, although it does not explicitly honor the measured shear-wave velocity profiles. Site response investigations that applied a preliminary version of the velocity model support a two-zone ground-shaking hazard model for the valley. Areas in which clay predominates in the upper 30 m are predicted to have stronger ground motions than the rest of the basin.

  13. Application of neural models as controllers in mobile robot velocity control loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkala, Jakub; Jadlovska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an inverse neural models used as controllers in comparison to classical PI controllers for velocity tracking control task used in two-wheel, differentially driven mobile robot. The PI controller synthesis is based on linear approximation of actuators with equivalent load. In order to obtain relevant datasets for training of feed-forward multi-layer perceptron based neural network used as neural model, the mathematical model of mobile robot, that combines its kinematic and dynamic properties such as chassis dimensions, center of gravity offset, friction and actuator parameters is used. Neural models are trained off-line to act as an inverse dynamics of DC motors with particular load using data collected in simulation experiment for motor input voltage step changes within bounded operating area. The performances of PI controllers versus inverse neural models in mobile robot internal velocity control loops are demonstrated and compared in simulation experiment of navigation control task for line segment motion in plane.

  14. Robust seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, E.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Garnier, J.; Melis, N. S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Tsogka, C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings. Motivated by Zhan et al., we study how the velocity change estimation is affected by seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. More precisely, we consider a numerical model and introduce spatio-temporal seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. We show that indeed, as pointed out by Zhan et al., the stretching method is affected by these fluctuations and produces misleading apparent velocity variations which reduce dramatically the signal to noise ratio of the method. We also show that these apparent velocity variations can be eliminated by an adequate normalization of the cross-correlation functions. Theoretically we expect our approach to work as long as the seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources are uniform, an assumption which holds for closely located seismic stations. We illustrate with numerical simulations in homogeneous and scattering media that the proposed normalization significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity change estimation. Similar behaviour is also observed with real data recorded in the Aegean volcanic arc. We study in particular the volcano of Santorini during the seismic unrest of 2011-2012 and observe a decrease in the velocity of seismic waves which is correlated with GPS measured elevation.

  15. Transient and stationary characteristics of the Malthus-Verhulst-Bernoulli model with non-Gaussian fluctuating parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubkov, Alexander A.; Kharcheva, Anna A.

    2014-05-01

    Two generalized Verhulst equations with non-Gaussian fluctuations of the reproduction rate and the volume of resources are under analytical investigation. For the first model, using the central limit theorem, we find the asymptotic behavior of the probability distribution of population density for an arbitrary non-Gaussian colored noise with nonzero power spectral density at zero frequency. Specifically, we confirm this result in the case of Markovian dichotomous noise and examine the evolution of mean population density. For fluctuating resources with one-sided stable distribution the transient dynamics of probability density function and statistical characteristics in the steady state are obtained. As shown, the scenario of the population's evolution depends on the parameter of nonlinearity in the original stochastic equation.

  16. Effects of correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise on intensity fluctuation for a saturation laser model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yue-Hong; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of cross-correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise on the laser intensity in a saturation laser model.It derives the analytic expressions of the intensity correlation function C(Υ)and the associated relaxation time T(C) in the case of a stable locked phase resulting from the cross-correlation λq between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise.Based on numerical computations it finds that the presence of cross correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise slow down the decay of intensity fluctuation,i.e.,it causes the increase of intensity fluctuation.

  17. A model for the optimal design of a supply chain network driven by stochastic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Petridis, Kostas; Dey, Prasanta K

    2015-01-01

    Supply chain optimization schemes have more often than not underplayed the role of inherent stochastic fluctuations in the associated variables. The present article focuses on the associated reengagement and correlated renormalization of supply chain predictions now with the inclusion of stochasticity induced fluctuations in the structure. With a processing production plant in mind that involves stochastically varying production and transportation costs both from the site to the plant as well as from the plant to the customer base, this article proves that the producer may benefit through better outlay in the form of higher sale prices with lowered optimized production costs only through a suitable selective choice of producers whose production cost probability density function abides a Pareto distribution. Lower the Pareto exponent, better is the supply chain prediction for cost optimization. On the other hand, other symmetric (normal) and asymmetric (lognormal) distributions lead to upscaled costs both in t...

  18. Angular multiplicity fluctuations in hadronic Z decays and comparison to QCD models and analytical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Local multiplicity fluctuations in angular phase space intervals are studied using factorial moments measured in hadronic events at $\\sqrt{s}\\simeq 91.2\\GeV$, which were collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1994. Parton shower Monte Carlo programs agree well with the data. On the other hand, first-order QCD calculations in the Double Leading Log Approximation and the Modified Leading Log Approximation are found to deviate significantly from the data.

  19. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  20. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Malservisi, Rocco; Hugentobler, Urs; Wonnacott, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is quite demanding and are usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies.

  1. Interacting price model and fluctuation behavior analysis from Lempel–Ziv complexity and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui, E-mail: lirui1401@bjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-08

    A financial price model is developed based on the voter interacting system in this work. The Lempel–Ziv complexity is introduced to analyze the complex behaviors of the stock market. Some stock market stylized facts including fat tails, absence of autocorrelation and volatility clustering are investigated for the proposed price model firstly. Then the complexity of fluctuation behaviors of the real stock markets and the proposed price model are mainly explored by Lempel–Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis and multi-scale weighted-permutation entropy (MWPE) analysis. A series of LZC analyses of the returns and the absolute returns of daily closing prices and moving average prices are performed. Moreover, the complexity of the returns, the absolute returns and their corresponding intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) derived from the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with MWPE is also investigated. The numerical empirical study shows similar statistical and complex behaviors between the proposed price model and the real stock markets, which exhibits that the proposed model is feasible to some extent. - Highlights: • A financial price dynamical model is developed based on the voter interacting system. • Lempel–Ziv complexity is the firstly applied to investigate the stock market dynamics system. • MWPE is employed to explore the complexity fluctuation behaviors of the stock market. • Empirical results show the feasibility of the proposed financial model.

  2. Assessing waveform predictions of recent three-dimensional velocity models of Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution tomographic models are essential for understanding the physical and compositional properties in the lithosphere and obtaining accurate earthquake source locations and moment tensors. Yet, there are significant disagreements in recent three-dimensional velocity models of the crust and uppermost mantle in Tibet. Question also remains as to whether models constructed from one type of seismic waves (body or surface waves) can be used to predict travel times and waveforms of another. In this study, six global or regional models are selected for Tibet, most of which became publically available in the past five years. A three-dimensional finite-difference method in the spherical coordinates is applied to simulate full-wave propagation of regional Pn (with periods longer than 1 second) and Rayleigh waves (20-75 s period) for ground-truth events located at regional distances. The models are evaluated based on the phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between synthetic and observed waveforms. A model generated from full-wave ambient noise tomography by Shen and Zhang (2012) consistently produces the best predictions for Rayleigh waves throughout the dataset and the Pn waves for the paths from the Tarim Basin to central Tibet. LITHO1.0, inverted from surface wave dispersions, shows a relatively stable but intermediate performance in predicting Pn and Rayleigh waves. None of the models provide the best matches to both waves throughout the region. Furthermore, the models constructed from surface waves are not well suited to predict Pn, and vice versa. We attribute this mainly to lack of accurate constraints on radial anisotropy and Vp/Vs ratios in the upper mantle, and Moho topography. We conclude that simultaneous prediction for P, S, and surface waves requires an integrated velocity model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of other important properties, such as anisotropy and attenuation.

  3. Applying the critical velocity model for an off-season interval training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ida E; West, Brianne M; Reynolds, Sheila K; Murray, Steven R; Pettitt, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    The critical velocity (CV) model offers an opportunity to prescribe and to test empirically different velocity-time (V-t) configurations of high-intensity interval training (HIIT); however, such experiments are lacking. We evaluated a group of competitive, female soccer players (age = 19 ± 1 years, height = 168 ± 6 cm, mass = 61 ± 6 kg) completing 1 of 2 different HIIT regimes: a short group (n = 6) completing higher V and shorter t configurations, and a long group (n = 10) completing lower V, longer t configurations. Both groups trained 2 d·wk for 4 weeks. For each workout, both groups ran at velocities exceeding CV and designed to deplete identical fractional percentages of the finite work capacity above CV (D'). The metrics of CV and D' were evaluated at pretraining and posttraining using the 3-minute all-out exercise test on an indoor track using video digitizing of displacement relative to time. Despite differences in the V-t configurations, both groups increased their CV (+0.22 m·s, +6%) and decreased their D' (-24 m, -13%; p 130% of maximum oxygen uptake.

  4. a computational modeling for image motion velocity on focal plane of aerial & aerospace frame camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Jin, G.; Li, Z. Y.

    As the resolving power and geometric accuracy of aerial aerospace imaging is demanded to be higher the researches in technology of IMC become very important In order to compensate the image motion on focal plane the rule of FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity should be grasped while the posture of aircraft and the modes of imaging are under changing In this paper a reasonable computational modeling scheme to the problem is introduced Coordinates transformation method is utilized for calculation of forward FPIMV under different condition of vertical and sloped imaging meanwhile integrated with three axes posture and angle velocity of aircraft Forward FPIMV combine with pitch roll and yaw FPIMV is considered simultaneously and the derivation calculating expressions of frame camera FPIMV under different conditions is presented in detail The solution is applied to computational simulation and has been confirmed to be effective based on the calculation result and it lays the foundation for our farther researches on frame camera IMC technology Key words IMC FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity Coordinates transformation method

  5. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  6. A velocity-difference-separation model for car-following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a velocity-difference-separation model that modifies the previous models in the literature. The improvement of this new model over the previous ones lies in that it not only theoretically retains many strong points of the previous ones, but also performs more realistically than others in the dynamical evolution of congestion. Furthermore, the proposed model is investigated with analytic and numerical methods, with the finding that it can demonstrate some complex physical features observed in real traffic such as the existence of three phases: free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jam; sudden flow drop in flow-density plane; and traffic hysteresis in transition between the free and the synchronized flow.

  7. A velocity-difference-separation model for car-following theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Peng; Liu Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a velocity-difference-separation model that modifies the previous models in the literature. The improvement of this new model over the previous ones lies in that it not only theoretically retains many strong points of the previous ones, but also performs more realistically than others in the dynamical evolution of congestion. Furthermore,the proposed model is investigated with analytic and numerical methods, with the finding that it can demonstrate some complex physical features observed in real traffic such as the existence of three phases: free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jam; sudden flow drop in flow-density plane; and traffic hysteresis in transition between the free and the synchronized flow.

  8. A simple model for flyer velocity from laser-induced forward transfer with a dynamic release layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw-Stewart, James, E-mail: james.shaw-stewart@empa.ch [Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Materials Group, General Energies Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lippert@psi.ch [Materials Group, General Energies Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Nagel, Matthias; Nueesch, Frank [Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Wokaun, Alexander [Materials Group, General Energies Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First model for LIFT flyer velocity, based on explosive Gurney energy model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model takes into account laser beam and decomposition energies as inputs and assumes all deposited laser energy above a threshold is used as kinetic energy of decomposition products and the flyer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental flyer velocities obtained by shadowgraphy of aluminium flyers in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model velocities fit experimental velocities well just by adjusting reflective losses of laser beam energy. - Abstract: A simple 1-D model has been developed for the velocity of flyers in vacuum generated by laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a dynamic release layer (DRL). It is an extension of a laser ablation model for metal flyer plates based on the Gurney model of explosive output for driving metal fragments. The model has been extended to the bilayer system of a DRL overlain with a transfer layer. The suitability of the model has been checked with experimental velocity data obtained from shadowgraphy. The experiments used bilayer samples of triazene polymer/aluminium, ablated from the backside through the substrate at reduced pressure (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mbar). The results suggest that the Gurney energy approach provides the basis of a viable, physically relevant, algebraic model for LIFT, but other loss mechanisms still need be incorporated, particularly thermal loss into the fused silica substrate.

  9. Softverski model estimatora radijalne brzine ciljeva / Software model of a radial velocity estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan S. Ivković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je softverski modelovan novi blok u delu za obradu signala softverskog radarskog prijemnika, koji je nazvan estimator radijalne brzine. Detaljno je opisan način procene Doplerove frekvencije na osnovu MUSIC algoritma i ukratko prikazan način rada pri merenju. Svi parametri pri merenju klatera i detekcije simuliranih i realnih ciljeva dati su tabelarno, a rezultati grafički. Na osnovu analize prikazanih rezultata može se zaključiti da se pomoću projektovanog estimatora radijalne brzine može precizno proceniti Doplerov pomak u reflektovanom signalu od pokretnog cilja, a samim tim može se precizno odrediti njegova brzina. / In all analyses the MUSIC method has given better results than the FFT method. The MUSIC method proved to be better at estimation precision as well as at resolving two adjacent Doppler frequencies. On the basis of the obtained results, the designed estimator of radial velocity can be said to estimate Doppler frequency in the reflected signal from a moving target precisely, and, consequently, the target velocity. It is thus possible to improve the performances of the current radar as far as a precise estimation of velocity of detected moving targets is concerned.

  10. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  11. Magnetic Field Fluctuations Due to Diel Vertical Migrations of Zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2016-12-01

    Dean et al. (2016) have indicated that at high zooplankton concentrations, diel vertical migrations (DVM) cause velocity fluctuations and a respective increase of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). In this work, we used a 3D non-hydrostatic computational fluid dynamics model with Lagrangian particle injections (a proxy for migrating organisms) via a discrete phase model to simulate the effect of turbulence generation by DVM. We tested a range of organism concentrations from 1000 to 10,000 organisms/m3. The simulation at an extreme concentration of zooplankton showed an increase in dissipation rate of TKE by two to three orders of magnitude during DVM over background turbulence, 10-8 W kg-1. At lower concentrations (migration times averaged over 11 months of observations (though interpretation of the current velocity measurements is complicated by physical factors such as tides, Florida current meandering, etc.). The deviations in the velocity profiles can in principle be explained by the increase in turbulent mixing during vertical migration periods. In addition, seawater is an electric conductor. Water movements in the magnetic field of the Earth induce electrical currents and, as a result, secondary magnetic fluctuations. The velocity fluctuations produced by DVM are, therefore, supposed to have a magnetic signature. In order to test this hypothesis, we have applied a magnetohydrodnamics add-on module to the hydrodynamic model. The model results indicate that DVM of an extreme concentration of zooplankton may create fluctuations of the total magnetic field on the order of 1 nT, which are comparable to the magnetic signature of surface or internal waves. These are relatively small magnetic fluctuations, compared to the Earth's magnetic field, but are well within the range of modern magnetometers. Dean, C., A. Soloviev, A. Hirons, T. Frank, J. Wood, 2016: Biomixing due to diel vertical migrations of zooplankton. Ocean Modelling 98, 51-64.

  12. Velocity centroids and the structure of interstellar turbulence: I. Analytical study

    CERN Document Server

    Levrier, F

    2004-01-01

    We present an analytical study of the statistical properties of integrated emission and velocity centroids for a slightly compressible turbulent slab model, to retrieve the underlying statistics of three-dimensional density and velocity fluctuations. Under the assumptions that the density and velocity fields are homogeneous and isotropic, we derive the expressions of the antenna temperature for an optically thin spectral line observation, and of its successive moments with respect to the line of sight velocity component, focusing on the zeroth (intensity or integrated emission I) and first (non-normalized velocity centroid C) moments. The ratio of the latter to the former is the normalized centroid C_0, whose expression can be linearized for small density fluctuations. To describe the statistics of I, C and C_0, we derive expansions of their autocorrelation functions in powers of density fluctuations and perform a lowest-order real-space calculation of their scaling behaviour, assuming that the density and ve...

  13. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-11-17

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune's symmetry axis - that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected.

  14. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    OpenAIRE

    Britt Michelsen; Severin Strobl; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Thorsten Pöschel

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barc...

  15. A molecular model of proton neutralization at solid surface: the intermediate velocity region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Nedeljkovic, L.D. (Faculty of Physics, Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)); Janev, R.K. (Inst. of Physics, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Miskovic, Z.L. (Boris Kidric Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1991-06-01

    The proton neutralization (into ground hydrogen state) at solid surface is treated in the normal emergence geometry. For the intermediate proton velocity region (between v{approx equal}1 and 4 a.u.) a new, molecular-type dynamic model of the process is proposed. Evaluation of the electron transition amplitude is based on an elaboration of the Demkov-Ostrovsky method. The calculation showed that the electron transitions have a nonresonant character. Comparison with experiments leads to the conclusion that the electron capture into ground state is almost sufficient to explain the experiment data. (orig.).

  16. Modelling the transverse distribution of velocity and suspended sediment in tidal estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijts, K. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water which has a free connection with the open sea and within which sea water is measurably diluted with fresh water derived from land drainage. Examples are the Western Scheldt River Estuary and the Chesapeake Bay. Within these environments complex patterns of velocity and suspended sediments are observed in the transversal plane (across-estuary and vertical), and sediments are trapped laterally (across-estuary). The transverse structure of velocity is relevant to the transport of salt, sediment, contaminants, oxygen and other material. High sediment concentrations affect water quality, ecology and wildlife, and may cause siltation of navigation channels and harbors. This work aims at a fundamental understanding of the transverse distributions of estuarine velocity and suspended sediment. The thesis provides two-dimensional (cross-sectional) analytical models to identify the effect of individual forcing mechanisms on the transverse distribution of velocity and suspended sediment in tidally-dominated estuaries. The models are based on the shallow water equations and sediment mass balance. Considered are the residual and the semi-diurnal tidal components of the along-estuary, across-estuary and vertical velocity and of the suspended sediment concentration. The models apply to partially to well-mixed tidal estuaries, relatively uniform along-channel conditions and weakly to moderately nonlinear flow. Horizontal density gradients are prescribed based on numerical or observational data. The analytical flows are decomposed into components induced by individual mechanisms. Considered are tides, horizontal residual density gradients, river discharge, stokes return flow, wind, the earth’s rotation, tidal variations in the across-channel density gradient and channel curvature. In addition, two tidally rectified along-channel residual flow mechanisms are considered, which result from net advection of along-channel tidal

  17. S-wave velocity self-adaptive prediction based on a variable dry rock frame equivalent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng-Ying, Yang; Xing-Yao, Yin; Bo, Liu

    2014-08-01

    Seismic velocities are important reservoir parameters in seismic exploration. The Gassmann theory has been widely used to predict velocities of fluid-saturated isotropic reservoirs at low frequency. According to Gassmann theory, dry rock frame moduli are essential input parameters for estimating reservoir velocities. A variable dry rock frame equivalent model called VDEM based on the differential effective medium (DEM) theory is constructed in this paper to obtain the dry rock frame moduli. We decouple the DEM equations by introducing variable parameters, then simplify these decoupled equations to get the equivalent dry rock fame model. The predicted dry rock frame moduli by the VDEM are in good agreement with the laboratory data. The VDEM is also utilized to predict S-wave velocity combined with Gassmann theory. A self-adaptive inversion method is applied to fit the variable parameters with the constraint of P-wave velocity from well logging data. The S-wave velocity is estimated from these inversed parameters. A comparison between the self-adaptive method and the Xu-White model on S-wave velocity estimation is made. The results corroborate that the self-adaptive method is flexible and effective for S-wave velocity prediction.

  18. Daily fluctuations in teachers' well-being: a diary study using the Job Demands-Resources model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbula, Silvia

    2010-10-01

    The study tests the dynamic nature of the Job Demands-Resources model with regard to both motivational and health impairment processes. It does so by examining whether daily fluctuations in co-workers' support (i.e., a typical job resource) and daily fluctuations in work/family conflict (i.e., a typical job demand) predict day-levels of job satisfaction and mental health through work engagement and exhaustion, respectively. A total of 61 schoolteachers completed a general questionnaire and a daily survey over a period of five consecutive work days. Multilevel analyses provided evidence for both the above processes. Consistently with the hypotheses, our results showed that day-level work engagement mediated the impact of day-level co-workers' support on day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health, after general levels of work engagement and outcome variables had been controlled for. Moreover, day-level exhaustion mediated the relationship between day-level work/family conflict and day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health after general levels of exhaustion and outcome variables had been controlled for. These findings provide new insights into the dynamic psychological processes that determine daily fluctuations in employee well-being. Such insights may be transformed into job redesign strategies and other interventions designed to enhance work-related psychological well-being on a daily level.

  19. Statistical properties of fluctuations of time series representing the appearance of words in nationwide blog data and their applications: An example of observations and the modelling of fluctuation scalings of nonstationary time series

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Hayafumi; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the non-trivial empirical statistical properties of fluctuations of a typical non-steady time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, we investigated approximately five billion Japanese blogs over a period of six years and analyse some corresponding mathematical models. First, we introduce a solvable non-steady extension of the random diffusion model, which can be deduced by modelling the behaviour of heterogeneous random bloggers. Next, we deduce theoretical expressions for both the temporal and ensemble fluctuation scalings of this model, and demonstrate that these expressions can reproduce all empirical scalings over eight orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we show that the model can reproduce other statistical properties of time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, such as functional forms of the probability density and correlations in the total number of blogs. As an application, we quantify the abnormality of special nationwide events by measuring the fluctuati...

  20. Vibrationally-Fluidized Granular Flows: Impact and Bulk Velocity Measurements Compared with Discrete Element and Continuum Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Kamyar

    A new laser displacement probe was developed to measure the impact velocities of particles within vibrationally-fluidized beds. The sensor output was also used to measure bulk flow velocity along the probe window and to provide a measure of the media packing. The displacement signals from the laser sensors were analyzed to obtain the probability distribution functions of the impact velocity of the particles. The impact velocity was affected by the orientation of the laser probe relative to the bulk flow velocity, and the density and elastic properties of the granular media. The impact velocities of the particles were largely independent of their bulk flow speed and packing density. Both the local impact and bulk flow velocities within a tub vibratory finisher were predicted using discrete element modelling (DEM) and compared to the measured values for spherical steel media. It was observed that the impact and bulk flow velocities were relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the contact coefficients of friction and restitution. It was concluded that the predicted impact and bulk flow velocities were dependent on the number of layers in the model. Consequently, the final DE model mimicked the key aspects of the experimental setup, including the submerged laser sensor. The DE method predictions of both impact velocity and bulk flow velocity were in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements, with maximum differences of 20% and 30%, respectively. Discrete element modeling of granular flows is effective, but requires large numerical models. In an effort to reduce computational effort, this work presents a finite element (FE) continuum model of a vibrationally-fluidized granular flow. The constitutive equations governing the continuum model were calibrated using the discrete element method (DEM). The bulk flow behavior of the equivalent continuum media was then studied using both Lagrangian and Eulerian FE formulations. The bulk flow velocities predicted