WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelled so42 deposition

  1. Long-term response in episodic acidification to declining SO42deposition in two streams in Nova Scotia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laudon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Trends in anthropogenically driven episodic acidification associated with extended winter snow melt/rain episodes between 1983 and 1998 were investigated for two streams in Nova Scotia, Canada. The anthropogenic contribution to Acid Neutralization Capacity (ANC was analysed using the Boreal Dilution Model (Bishop et al., 2000 modified by applying a sea-salt correction to all input hydrochemistry. The anthropogenic contribution to episodic ANC decline was statistically significant and strongly correlated with the decline in acid deposition, which decreased by approximately 50% during the period of record. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the BDM can be applied to surface waters with sea-salt contributions although the correction increases model uncertainty. Results of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of reduced emissions in North America in the last decades in decreasing the severity of episodic acidification in the Atlantic region of Canada. Keywords: episodic acidification, acidification recovery, Nova Scotia, snowmelt, winter

  2. An aqueous thermodynamic model for the Pb 2+-Na +-K +-Ca 2+-Mg 2+-H +-Cl --SO 42--H 2O system to high concentration: application to WIPP brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Onishi, Lisa M.; Foster, Nancy S.; Rustad, James R.; Rai, Dhanpat; Mason, Marvin J.

    2000-11-01

    The development of an aqueous thermodynamic model for the Pb 2+-Na +-K +-Ca 2+-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O system is presented, which is valid to high ionic strengths at 25°C. The model is based on the equations of Pitzer and has been parameterized from existing solubility, osmotic, electromotive force (emf), and spectroscopic data. To accurately represent the aqueous thermodynamics of Pb 2+ in concentrated chloride containing solutions required the inclusion of four Pb chloride species (i.e., PbCl +, PbCl 2(aq), PbCl 3-, and PbCl 42-) along with the necessary Pitzer ion interaction parameters for these species with the major electrolyte ions. The reliability of the final equilibrium model is tested against experimental solubility data on PbCl 2(c) and PbSO 4(c) in high ionic strength Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) brines obtained as part of this study. On an overall basis the model accurately predicted the aqueous speciation, based on comparisons with our UV-Vis spectroscopy measurements, as well as the observed solubility. The model also proved satisfactory in predicting the observed solid phase assemblages, with the possible exception of those found in solutions high in KCl.

  3. Atmospheric Deposition Modeling Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on model results for dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen and base cation species. Components include deposition velocities, dry...

  4. Assessing the potential of inorganic anions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-and PO43-) to increase the bioaccessibility of emitted palladium in the environment: Experimental studies with soils and a Pd model substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Poprizki, Jana; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Leopold, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Palladium (Pd) emitted from vehicles equipped with exhaust catalytic converters has been accumulating at a greater rate relative to other platinum group elements (PGE) in the last 10-20 years. Little is known, however, regarding the various environmental factors and conditions which are likely to modulate the chemical behavior and bioaccessibility of this element post-emission. To meet data needs, soils and a Pd model substance were treated with solutions containing common anions (Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- und PO 4 3- ) to shed light on the geochemical behavior of emitted Pd under ambient conditions. As part of this, the particle surface chemistry of treated residues (insoluble phase) and solutions (soluble phase) was examined using XPS to assess the chemical transformation of Pd in the presence of inorganic anions. The results show that Pd is the most soluble in the presence of anionic species, followed by rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt). Pd in field-collected samples was found to be considerably more soluble than the metallic Pd in the model substance, Pd black, when treated with anionic species. The results also demonstrate that the solubility of Pd black is strongly dependent on solution pH, concentration and the duration of reaction. The outer 3-4 atomic layers of metallic Pd was determined via XPS to be partially oxidized when treated with anion solutions, with the degree being dependent on anion type. The concentration of dissolved O 2 in solution was found to have little impact on the transformation of metallic Pd. Given the ubiquitous nature of the anions examined, we can expect that Pd will become more bioaccessible post-emission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation and characterization of Zn/Ce/SO42--doped titania nano-materials with antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuzheng; Xue, Xiangxin; Yang, He; Luan, Che

    2014-02-01

    SO42--doped Zn/Ce/TiO2 nano-materials (Zn/Ce/SO42-/TiO2) were prepared by a sol-gel method. The structures of Zn/Ce/SO42-/TiO2 nano-materials were characterized by Transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray photoelectron (PL) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Gram-negative Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC6538) as model organisms, antibacterial activities of nano-materials were tested using inhibition zone method and shaking flask method under visible light irradiation and in the dark. The results show that the materials crystal structure and elemental composition are changed after SO42- doped. Zn/Ce/SO42-/TiO2 exhibit predominant antibacterial activity in the dark and visible light irradiation. The action mechanism of Zn/Ce/SO42-/TiO2 is discussed.

  6. Stratiform chromite deposit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Stratiform chromite deposits are of great economic importance, yet their origin and evolution remain highly debated. Layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld, Great Dyke, Kemi, and Stillwater Complexes, provide opportunities for studying magmatic differentiation processes and assimilation within the crust, as well as related ore-deposit formation. Chromite-rich seams within layered intrusions host the majority of the world's chromium reserves and may contain significant platinum-group-element (PGE) mineralization. This model of stratiform chromite deposits is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. The model focuses on features that may be common to all stratiform chromite deposits as a way to gain insight into the processes that gave rise to their emplacement and to the significant economic resources contained in them.

  7. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  8. NURE uranium deposit model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program has sponsored uranium deposit model studies by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and numerous subcontractors. This paper deals only with models from the following six reports prepared by Samuel S. Adams and Associates: GJBX-1(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Roll-Type Uranium Deposits in Continental Sandstones; GJBX-2(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uraniferous Humate Deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico; GJBX-3(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uranium Deposits of the Quartz-Pebble Conglomerate Type; GJBX-4(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits in Mixed Fluvial-Shallow Marine Sedimentary Sequences, South Texas; GJBX-5(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Veinlike Uranium Deposits of the Lower to Middle Proterozoic Unconformity and Strata-Related Types; GJBX-6(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits of the Salt Wash Type, Colorado Plateau Province. A unique feature of these models is the development of recognition criteria in a systematic fashion, with a method for quantifying the various items. The recognition-criteria networks are used in this paper to illustrate the various types of deposits

  9. Synthesis of tributyl citrate using SO42-/Zr-MCM-41 as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhifeng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-containing mesoporous molecular sieve SO42-/Zr-MCM-41 was synthesized for catalyst in synthesis of tributyl citrate. The structure was characterized by XRD, N2 Ad/De isotherms and FT-IR. The results indicated that the solid acids show good catalytic performance and are reusable. Under optimum conditions and using SO42-/Zr-MCM-41 as catalyst, the conversion of citric acid was 95%. After easy separation of the products from the solid acid catalyst, it could be reused three times and gave a conversion of citric acid not less than 92%. The structure of tributyl citrate was characterized by FT-IR and 1H-NMR.

  10. Crystal structure of NH4[La(SO42(H2O

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    Meriem Benslimane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal building units in the crystal structure of ammonium aquabis(sulfatolanthanate(III are slightly distorted SO4 tetrahedra, LaO9 polyhedra in the form of distorted tricapped trigonal prisms, and NH4+ ions. The La3+ cation is coordinated by eight O atoms from six different sulfate tetrahedra, two of which are bidentate coordinating and four monodentate, as well as one O atom from a water molecule; each sulfate anion bridges three La3+ cations. These bridging modes result in the formation of a three-dimensional anionic [La(SO42(H2O]− framework that is stabilized by O—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions. The disordered ammonium cations are situated in the cavities of this framework and are hydrogen-bonded to six surrounding O atoms.

  11. Elastic Properties and Structural Studies on Boro-Vanadate Glasses Containing Sulphate (SO42-) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. Sudhakar; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-12-01

    Elastic properties of xLi2SO4-16 Li2O-(84-x) [0.7 B2O3-0.3 V2O5] where (5≤x≥30) glasses have been prepared by melt quenching method and structural investigations were carried out using ultrasonic pulse echo overlap technique at a frequency of 10 MHz and at 300 K. The molar volume increases and the density decreases with the increase of Li2SO4 concentration due to the incorporation of SO42- ions into the modified macromolecular network. The addition of Li2SO4 content leads to loose packing structure which is attributed to volume increasing effect and the reduction in the vibrations of borate and vanadate lattices. Increase in Li24SO results in decreasing cross link density which in turn decreases elastic moduli. The results are discussed in view of its network structure. The structural groups [VOO3/2]0 and [BO3/2]0 modify preferentially. This preference in modification is decided by the electronegativity (χ) of the structural groups.

  12. Modelling asphaltene deposition in turbulent pipeline flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskin, D.; Ratulowski, J.; Akbarzadeh, K.; Pan, S. [Schlumberg DBR Technology Center (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Asphaltene deposition is one of the important problems of oil production that requires accurate predictive modeling. A model of asphaltene deposition in a turbulent pipe flow is introduced in this paper. A Couette device is employed to perform experiments. There are two major modules in this model. (1) A model of particle size distribution evolution along a pipe - the concept of 'critical particle size' is introduced. Only particles smaller than the critical particle size may deposit. (2) A model of particle transport to the wall. The major mechanism of particle transport to the wall is the Brownian motion. The model developed contains three major tuning parameters that are determined experimentally using a Couette device: particle-particle collision efficiency, particle-wall sticking efficiency, and particle critical size. Performance of the deposition model for a pipeline with the coefficients obtained using a laboratory Couette device is also illustrated in this paper.

  13. Dry deposition parameterization of sulfur oxides in a chemistry and general circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.; Roelofs, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    A dry deposition scheme, originally developed to calculate the deposition velocities for the trace gases O3, NO2, NO, and HNO3 in the chemistry and general circulation European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM), is extended to sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate (SO42-). In order to reduce some of the

  14. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  15. Process Parameters Optimization of Potential SO42-/ZnO Acid Catalyst for Heterogeneous Transesterification of Vegetable Oil to Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the possible renewable energy resources, diesel fuels derived from triglycerides of vegetable oils and animal fats have shown potential as substitutes for petroleum-based diesel fuels. The biodiesel could be produced from vegetable oils over homogeneous catalyst, heterogeneous catalyst, or enzymatic catalyst. In this study, the synthesized SO42-/ZnO catalyst was explored to be used in the heterogeneous biodiesel production by using the vegetable oils and methanol. The study began with the preparation of SO42-/ZnO catalyst followed by the transesterification reaction between vegetable oil with methanol. The independent variables (reaction time and the weight ratio of catalyst/oil were optimized to obtain the optimum biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester yield. The results of this study showed that the acid catalyst SO42-/ZnO was potential to be used as catalyst for biodiesel production through heterogeneous transesterification of vegetable oils. Optimum operating condition for this catalytic reaction was the weight ratio of catalyst/oil of 8:1 and reaction time of 2.6 h with respect to 75.5% yield of methyl ester products. The biodiesel product was also characterized to identify the respected fatty acid methyl ester components. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. (Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 23rd October 2012, Revised: 25th November 2012, Accepted: 25th November 2012[How to Cite: I. Istadi, Didi D. Anggoro, Luqman Buchori, Inshani Utami, Roikhatus Solikhah, (2012. Process Parameters Optimization of Potential SO42-/ZnO Acid Catalyst for Heterogeneous Transesterification of Vegetable Oil to Biodiesel. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(2: 150-157. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4064.150-157][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4064.150-157 ] | View in 

  16. Removal of SO42− from Li2CO3 by Recrystallization in Na2CO3 Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Li2CO3 with high purity is an important raw material for the fabrication of lithium rechargeable batteries. This paper reports a facile recrystallization way to produce Li2CO3 with high purity from commercial Li2CO3 containing 0.8 wt % of SO42− by the treatment of the commercial Li2CO3 in Na2CO3 solution. The increase of temperature from 30 °C to 90 °C favored the recrystallization of Li2CO3 in Na2CO3 solution and promoted the removal of SO42− adsorbed or doped on/in the commercial Li2CO3. The content of SO42− in Li2CO3 decreased to 0.08 wt % after the treatment of the commercial Li2CO3 in 1.0 mol·L−1 Na2CO3 solution at 90 °C for 10.0 h.

  17. Stratiform chromite deposit model: Chapter E in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    A new descriptive stratiform chromite deposit model was prepared which will provide a framework for understanding the characteristics of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. Previous stratiform chromite deposit models developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been referred to as Bushveld chromium, because the Bushveld Complex in South Africa is the only stratified, mafic-ultramafic intrusion presently mined for chromite and is the most intensely researched. As part of the on-going effort by the USGS Mineral Resources Program to update existing deposit models for the upcoming national mineral resource assessment, this revised stratiform chromite deposit model includes new data on the geological, mineralogical, geophysical, and geochemical attributes of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. This model will be a valuable tool in future chromite resource and environmental assessments and supplement previously published models used for mineral resource evaluation.

  18. Model boiler studies on deposition and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, P.V.; McVey, E.G.

    1977-09-01

    Deposit formation was studied in a model boiler, with sea-water injections to simulate the in-leakage which could occur from sea-water cooled condensers. When All Volatile Treatment (AVT) was used for chemistry control the deposits consisted of the sea-water salts and corrosion products. With sodium phosphate added to the boiler water, the deposits also contained the phosphates derived from the sea-water salts. The deposits were formed in layers of differing compositions. There was no significant corrosion of the Fe-Ni-Cr alloy boiler tube under deposits, either on the open area of the tube or in crevices. However, carbon steel that formed a crevice around the tube was corroded severely when the boiler water did not contain phosphate. The observed corrosion of carbon steel was caused by the presence of acidic, highly concentrated chloride solution produced from the sea-water within the crevice. Results of theoretical calculations of the composition of the concentrated solution are presented. (author)

  19. Respiratory trace deposition models. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.C.

    1980-03-01

    Respiratory tract characteristics of four mammalian species (human, dog, rat and Syrian hamster) were studied, using replica lung casts. An in situ casting techniques was developed for making the casts. Based on an idealized branch model, over 38,000 records of airway segment diameters, lengths, branching angles and gravity angles were obtained from measurements of two humans, two Beagle dogs, two rats and one Syrian hamster. From examination of the trimmed casts and morphometric data, it appeared that the structure of the human airway is closer to a dichotomous structure, whereas for dog, rat and hamster, it is monopodial. Flow velocity in the trachea and major bronchi in living Beagle dogs was measured using an implanted, subminiaturized, heated film anemometer. A physical model was developed to simulate the regional deposition characteristics proposed by the Task Group on Lung Dynamics of the ICRP. Various simulation modules for the nasopharyngeal (NP), tracheobronchial (TB) and pulmonary (P) compartments were designed and tested. Three types of monodisperse aerosols were developed for animal inhalation studies. Fifty Syrian hamsters and 50 rats were exposed to five different sizes of monodisperse fused aluminosilicate particles labeled with 169 Yb. Anatomical lung models were developed for four species (human, Beagle dog, rat and Syrian hamster) that were based on detailed morphometric measurements of replica lung casts. Emphasis was placed on developing a lobar typical-path lung model and on developing a modeling technique which could be applied to various mammalian species. A set of particle deposition equations for deposition caused by inertial impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion were developed. Theoretical models of particle deposition were developed based on these equations and on the anatomical lung models

  20. A geostatical model for USA uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence exists which suggests that the frequency distributions of both grade and size of metal deposits may be well approximated by lognormal distribution functions. Using data on presently viable deposits and a simplified function which links production cost to deposit grade and size, a bivariate lognormal deposit grade/size distribution may be calibrated for a given geological environment. Exploration is introduced by assuming that the proportion discovered of the potential uranium reserve available at or below a given production can be represented by a fraction of the average deposit size and the limit exploration expenditure. As output, the model derives estimates of total reserves linked to maximum production costs and to exploration expenditure where the latter may be expressed either as expenditure per lb of mineral discovered or as a given percentage of operating profit. Reserve/price functions have been derived for the USA based on USAEC data. Tentative conclusions which may be drawn from the results are: (1) Assuming that a similar proportion of profits continues to be allocated to exploration in the future, then the USA should be able to meet its own national demand for uranium up to the end of the century (say 2 M tons U) at prices up to US$35/lb U 3 O 8 (1.1.75$ values). (2) If instead of all exploration being funded from a fixed maximum proportion of mining company profits, consumers were to fund additional exploration separately, then it is possible that the total unit cost of uranium to the consumers would thereby be reduced. It should be stressed that these conclusions are tentative and are only as reliable as the input data and assumptions of the model. In particular no account is taken of commercial or political forces which could artificially restrict supplies or raise prices. The model should be regarded as a first attempt and is offered as a basis for discussion leading to further development. (author)

  1. Preparation of Biodiesel through Transesterification of Animal Oil and AlcoholUnder the Catalysis of SO42- / TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Yan Pang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel was obtained through transesterification of animal oil and ethanol under the catalysis of SO42- / TiO2 We have inspected the activation of SO42- / TiO2prepared under different dipping vitriol concentration,baking activation temperature. The optimum conditions to prepare SO42- / TiO2are; dipping vitriol concentration of TiCl4 hydrolysis product is 1.5 mol / L, baking activation temperature for this catalyst takes 500°C. It can guarantee the catalyst has a smaller size and a higher load of vitriol. With animal oil as raw materials, ethanol as transesterifying agent and SO42- / TiO2as catalyst, the influence of reaction time, mass ratio of ethanol to oil and the dosage of catalyst were investigated. Optimum condition to obtain biodiesel was studied through orthogonal experiment, and it is listed as follow: mass ratio of ethanol to oil is 1.5:1.0, dosage of catalyst is 30 g SO42- / TiO2versus per 100 g animal oil, and reaction time is 8.0 h when reaction temperature is controlled as 80°C. The yield of biodiesel is 0.796 g/g under the above condition. SO42- / TiO2can be used as an effective catalyst during transesterification of animal oil and ethanol, and it can be reused

  2. Theoretical modelling of carbon deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.R.; Norfolk, D.J.; Skinner, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Work based on capsule experiments in the BNL Gamma Facility, aimed at elucidating the chemistry involved in the formation of carbonaceous deposit on CAGR fuel pin surfaces is described. Using a data-base derived from capsule experiments together with literature values for the kinetics of the fundamental reactions, a chemical model of the gas-phase processes has been developed. This model successfully reproduces the capsule results, whilst preliminary application to the WAGR coolant circuit indicates the likely concentration profiles of various radical species within the fuel channels. (author)

  3. Modelling of stomatal conductance and ozone deposition flux of Norway Spruce using deposition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, M.; Chroust, P.; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Czerný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor; Taufarová, Klára

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 12, 2-3 (2009), s. 75-81 ISSN 1335-339X R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1B7/189/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : ozone concentration * ozone deposition * stomatal conductance * deposition velocity * resistance model * tropo-spheric ozone Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  4. Gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling on polybenzimidazole and cellulose acetate hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Si Cong

    2013-11-08

    We have examined the gypsum (CaSO42H2O) scaling phenomena on membranes with different physicochemical properties in forward osmosis (FO) processes. Three hollow fiber membranes made of (1) cellulose acetate (CA), (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI)/polyethersulfone (PES) and (3) PBI-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were studied. For the first time in FO processes, we have found that surface ionic interactions dominate gypsum scaling on the membrane surface. A 70% flux reduction was observed on negatively charged CA and PBI membrane surfaces, due to strong attractive forces. The PBI membrane surface also showed a slightly positive charge at a low pH value of 3 and exhibited a 30% flux reduction. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements confirmed a strong repulsive force between gypsum and PBI at a pH value of 3. The newly developed PBI-POSS/PAN membrane had ridge morphology and a contact angle of 51.42 14.85 after the addition of hydrophilic POSS nanoparticles and 3 min thermal treatment at 95 C. Minimal scaling and an only 1.3% flux reduction were observed at a pH value of 3. Such a ridge structure may reduce scaling by not providing a locally flat surface to the crystallite at a pH value of 3; thus, gypsum would be easily washed away from the surface. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  5. A predictive model for dimensional errors in fused deposition modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the effect of deposition angle (a) and layer thickness (L) on the dimensional performance of FDM parts using a predictive model based on the geometrical description of the FDM filament profile. An experimental validation over the whole a range from 0° to 177° at 3° steps and two...... values of L (0.254 mm, 0.330 mm) was produced by comparing predicted values with external face-to-face measurements. After removing outliers, the results show that the developed two-parameter model can serve as tool for modeling the FDM dimensional behavior in a wide range of deposition angles....

  6. A predictive model for dimensional errors in fused deposition modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, A.

    2015-01-01

    values of L (0.254 mm, 0.330 mm) was produced by comparing predicted values with external face-to-face measurements. After removing outliers, the results show that the developed two-parameter model can serve as tool for modeling the FDM dimensional behavior in a wide range of deposition angles....

  7. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  8. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Dornfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08–0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12–0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21–0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology. (paper)

  9. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Dornfeld, David

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08-0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12-0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21-0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology.

  10. Carbonate rock depositional models: A microfacies approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzi, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonate rocks contain more than 50% by weight carbonate minerals such as calcite, dolomite, and siderite. Understanding how these rocks form can lead to more efficient methods of petroleum exploration. Micofacies analysis techniques can be used as a method of predicting models of sedimentation for carbonate rocks. Micofacies in carbonate rocks can be seen clearly only in thin sections under a microscope. This section analysis of carbonate rocks is a tool that can be used to understand depositional environments, diagenetic evolution of carbonate rocks, and the formation of porosity and permeability in carbonate rocks. The use of micofacies analysis techniques is applied to understanding the origin and formation of carbonate ramps, carbonate platforms, and carbonate slopes and basins. This book will be of interest to students and professionals concerned with the disciplines of sedimentary petrology, sedimentology, petroleum geology, and palentology.

  11. Dry deposition models for radionuclides dispersed in air: a new approach for deposition velocity evaluation schema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.; Cervone, A.; De Rosa, F.; Lombardo, C.; Casamirra, M.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of a National Research Program funded by the Italian Minister of Economic Development, the Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models (DEIM) of Palermo University and ENEA Research Centre of Bologna, Italy are performing several research activities to study physical models and mathematical approaches aimed at investigating dry deposition mechanisms of radioactive pollutants. On the basis of such studies, a new approach to evaluate the dry deposition velocity for particles is proposed. Comparisons with some literature experimental data show that the proposed dry deposition scheme can capture the main phenomena involved in the dry deposition process successfully.

  12. COMPARING OF DEPOSIT MODEL AND LIFE INSURANCE MODEL IN MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA ATANASOVA-PACHEMSKA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of the continuous decline of the interest rates for bank deposits, and at a time when uncertainty about the future is increasing, physical and legal persons have doubts how to secure their future or how and where to invest their funds and thus to “fertilize” and increase their savings. Individuals usually choose to put their savings in the bank for a certain period, and for that period to receive certain interest, or decide to invest their savings in different types of life insurance and thus to "take care" of their life, their future and the future of their families. In mathematics are developed many models that relate to the compounding and the insurance. This paper is a comparison of the deposit model and the model of life insurance

  13. A new approach for modeling dry deposition velocity of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dry deposition process is recognized as an important pathway among the various removal processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. In this field, there are several models reported in the literature useful to predict the dry deposition velocity of particles of different diameters but many of them are not capable of representing dry deposition phenomena for several categories of pollutants and deposition surfaces. Moreover, their applications is valid for specific conditions and if the data in that application meet all of the assumptions required of the data used to define the model. In this paper a new dry deposition velocity model based on an electrical analogy schema is proposed to overcome the above issues. The dry deposition velocity is evaluated by assuming that the resistances that affect the particle flux in the Quasi-Laminar Sub-layers can be combined to take into account local features of the mutual influence of inertial impact processes and the turbulent one. Comparisons with the experimental data from literature indicate that the proposed model allows to capture with good agreement the main dry deposition phenomena for the examined environmental conditions and deposition surfaces to be determined. The proposed approach could be easily implemented within atmospheric dispersion modeling codes and efficiently addressing different deposition surfaces for several particle pollution.

  14. Particle Tracking and Deposition from CFD Simulations using a Viscoelastic Particle Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Losurdo, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present dissertation the mathematical modelling of particle deposition is studied and the solution algorithms for particle tracking, deposition and deposit growth are developed. Particle deposition is modelled according to mechanical impact and contact mechanics taking into account the

  15. A Review of Variable Slicing in Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiyapara, Hitesh Hirjibhai; Pande, Sarang

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a literature survey in the field of fused deposition of plastic wires especially in the field of slicing and deposition using extrusion of thermoplastic wires. Various researchers working in the field of computation of deposition path have used their algorithms for variable slicing. In the study, a flowchart has also been proposed for the slicing and deposition process. The algorithm already been developed by previous researcher will be used to be implemented on the fused deposition modelling machine. To demonstrate the capabilities of the fused deposition modeling machine a case study has been taken. It uses a manipulated G-code to be fed to the fused deposition modeling machine. Two types of slicing strategies, namely uniform slicing and variable slicing have been evaluated. In the uniform slicing, the slice thickness has been used for deposition is varying from 0.1 to 0.4 mm. In the variable slicing, thickness has been varied from 0.1 in the polar region to 0.4 in the equatorial region Time required and the number of slices required to deposit a hemisphere of 20 mm diameter have been compared with that using the variable slicing.

  16. Long-term trends of sulfur deposition in East Asia during 1981-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Masatoshi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Morino, Yu; Uno, Itsushi; Kurokawa, Jun-ichi; Hara, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    We used a chemical transport model to investigate the long-term trends of sulfur deposition in East Asia during 1981-2005. The model reproduced the observed spatial distributions in East Asia of the rate of wet deposition of non-seasalt sulfate (nss-SO42-), volume-weighted mean concentrations of nss-SO42- in precipitation, precipitation, and concentrations in air of gaseous sulfur dioxide and particulate nss-SO42-. The model also reproduced well observed seasonal variations and long-term trends of wet deposition of nss-SO42- in Japan from 1988 to 2005. The increasing rate of wet deposition of nss-SO42- in Japan during 1991-2005 was demonstrated with 99.9% significance for both observed and modeled data. The annual rate of total (wet + dry) sulfur deposition in Japan increased from 15.6 Gmol S y-1 in 1981-1985 to 23.9 Gmol S y-1 in 2001-2005 in response to both increasing contributions from Chinese emissions and the eruption of Miyakejima volcano in 2000. During that 25-year period, approximately 2.1% of the sulfur from Chinese emissions was deposited in Japan. Over the same period, the rate of deposition of sulfur in East Asia increased gradually from 14.2 mmol S m-2 y-1 to 24.0 mmol S m-2 y-1, and the contribution of emissions from China to total sulfur deposition in East Asia increased from 65% to 77%. The contribution of Miyakejima volcano was 3% during 2001-2005. The increase in the sulfur deposition rate was remarkably high on the North China Plain, around Guangzhou, and south of Chongqing. The rate of increase in East Asia was greatest in winter, although the rate of sulfur deposition was highest in summer. Sulfur flux from China to Japan increased by a factor of 2.5 at altitudes of 0-3000 m from 1981 to 2005.

  17. Uranium deposits of Gabon and Oklo reactors. Metallogenic model for rich deposits of the lower proterozoic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    1986-05-01

    The geology of the Franceville basin (Gabon) is examined: stratigraphy, tectonics and geodynamics. The mobile zone of the Ogooue is specially studied: lithology, metamorphism and tectonics, isotopic geochronologic data are given. The different uranium deposits are described. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of Oklo natural nuclear reactor. A metallogenic model is proposed evidencing conditions required for deposit genesis. Tectonics, microstructures sedimentology, organic matter, diagenesis and uraniferous mineralizations are examined [fr

  18. Development of a Parafin Wax deposition Unit for Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Greta; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Pedersen, David Bue

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade Additive Manufacturing (AM) witnessed a big development in terms of technologies, processes and possibilities. However of materials and their use still represents a big challenge. In fact availability of materials is rather limited if compared to conventional manufacturing. This project illustrates the redesign of an extrusion unit for the deposition of paraffin wax in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) instead of the conventional polymeric materials. Among the benefits a...

  19. Experimental Research and Modeling of Particle Deposition in Ventilation Ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The model to predict particle deposition velocity on rough walls in fully developed turbulent duct flows has been developed in previous studies. For particle deposition model boundary conditions, it is assumed that the concentration of the particle is zero on the surface and the resuspension velocity is constant. However, the resuspension velocity may not be constant with the increase in mass of the deposited dust. To analyze the behavior of resuspension in air flow, a set of experiments were designed and conducted. Results showed that there was a linear relationship between the mass of resuspension and deposited dust. Also, the particle deposition model was improved by adding a resuspension item to the equation, and the steady-state equation was developed into a time-varying equation. The analysis results are presented in this paper.

  20. Simulating ozone dry deposition at a boreal forest with a multi-layer canopy deposition model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Rannik, Ullar; Zhou, Luxi; Gierens, Rosa; Taipale, Ditte; Mammarella, Ivan; Boy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A multi-layer ozone (O3) dry deposition model has been implemented into SOSAA (a model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to improve the representation of O3 concentration and flux within and above the forest canopy in the planetary boundary layer. We

  1. A stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, S A; Toride, N

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of retained colloids in porous media have frequently been observed to be hyper-exponential or non-monotonic with transport depth under unfavorable attachment conditions, whereas filtration theory predicts an exponential profile. In this work we present a stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition that allows various hypotheses for such deviations to be tested. The model is based on the conventional advective dispersion equation that accounts for first-order kinetic deposition and release of colloids. One or two stochastic parameters can be considered in this model, including the deposition coefficient, the release coefficient, and the average pore water velocity. In the case of one stochastic parameter, the probability density function (PDF) is characterized using log-normal, bimodal log-normal, or a simple two species/region formulation. When two stochastic parameters are considered, then a joint log-normal PDF is employed. Simulation results indicated that variations in the deposition coefficient and the average pore water velocity can both produce hyper-exponential deposition profiles. Bimodal formulations for the PDF were also able to produce hyper-exponential profiles, but with much lower variances in the deposition coefficient. The shape of the deposition profile was found to be very sensitive to the correlation of deposition and release coefficients, and to the correlation of pore water velocity and deposition coefficient. Application of the developed stochastic model to a particular set of colloid transport and deposition data indicated that chemical heterogeneity of the colloid population could not fully explain the observed behavior. Alternative interpretations were therefore proposed based on variability of the pore size and the water velocity distributions.

  2. Polymer Matrix Composites using Fused Deposition Modeling Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing technology that allows fabrication of complex three-dimensional geometries layer-by-layer. The goal of...

  3. Immission-load-related dynamics of S-SO42− in precipitation and in lysimetric solutions penetrating through beech ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukla Ján

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a 23-year study of sulphate sulphur dynamics in beech ecosystems exposed to different immission loads. The amounts of S-SO42− in precipitation water entering the ecosystems were: the Kremnické vrchy Mts, a clear-cut area 519 kg ha−1 (24.7 kg ha−1 per year, a beech forest 476 kg ha−1 (22.7 kg ha−1 per year; the Štiavnické vrchy Mts an open place 401 kg ha−1 (24.6 kg ha−1 per year, a beech forest 324 kg ha−1 (19.1 kg ha−1 per year. The average SO42− concentrations in lysimetric solutions penetrating through surface humus to a depth of Cambisol 10 and 25 cm were increased as follows: in the Kremnické vrchy Mts from 12.71 to 16.17 mg l−1 and in the Štiavnické vrchy Mts from 18.73 to 28.80 mg l−1. The S-SO4−2 amounts penetrating the individual soil layers in the Kremnické vrchy Mts were as follows: in case of surface humus on clear-cut area 459 kg ha−1 (20.9 kg ha−1 per year, in beech forest 433 kg ha−1 (19.7 kg ha−1 per year; below 10 cm organo-mineral layer of the mentioned plots penetrated 169–171 kg ha−1 (7.7–7.8 kg ha−1 per year, and below 25 cm mineral layer 155–255 kg ha−1 (7.1−11.6 kg ha−1 per year – a higher amount was found on clear-cut area with an episodic lateral flow of soil solutions. In beech forest of the Štiavnické vrchy Mts penetrated below surface humus 424 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (18.9 kg ha−1 per year, below 10 cm mineral layer 458 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (19.9 kg ha−1 per year, and below 25 cm mineral layer as much as 599 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (26.0 kg ha−1 per year. This fact was caused by frequent lateral flow of soil solutions. The results indicate that the assumption about lower immission load of the beech ecosystem in the Kremnické vrchy Mts is wrong, at least in the case of S-SO42−. The testing has revealed that the studied beech ecosystems differ very significantly in sulphur amounts penetrating under 0.10 m and 0.25 m. The

  4. Examining Asphaltene Solubility on Deposition in Model Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Jiun; He, Peng; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Mathew, Nevin Thunduvila; Fatt, Yap Yit; Chai, John C; Goharzadeh, Afshin; Vargas, Francisco M; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-08-30

    Asphaltenes are known to cause severe flow assurance problems in the near-wellbore region of oil reservoirs. Understanding the mechanism of asphaltene deposition in porous media is of great significance for the development of accurate numerical simulators and effective chemical remediation treatments. Here, we present a study of the dynamics of asphaltene deposition in porous media using microfluidic devices. A model oil containing 5 wt % dissolved asphaltenes was mixed with n-heptane, a known asphaltene precipitant, and flowed through a representative porous media microfluidic chip. Asphaltene deposition was recorded and analyzed as a function of solubility, which was directly correlated to particle size and Péclet number. In particular, pore-scale visualization and velocity profiles, as well as three stages of deposition, were identified and examined to determine the important convection-diffusion effects on deposition.

  5. Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Monitoring of radionuclide contents in rainwater is a useful way to keep a check on any change in the external radiation dose caused by the deposited material. Thus analuses of 3 H, 89 Sr and 90 Sr as well as 137 Cs and other gamma radionuclide contents in deposition were continued both nationwide and in the vicinities of the nuclear power stations at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. The deposition of 90 Sr and 137 Cs was lower than in previous years, being only a small fraction of the highest deposition values measured in 1983. The tritium concentrations were also lower than in 1982. The total annual deposition of tritium at different sampling stations varied from 1.7 kBq/m 2 to 2.9 kBq/m 2

  6. Modeling free convective gravitational effects in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Annen, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a combined fluid-mechanics, mass-transport, and chemistry model describing CVD in an open-tube atmospheric-pressure flow reactor is developed. The model allows gas-phase reactions to proceed to equilibrium and accounts for finite reaction rates at the surface of the deposition substrate. This model is a useful intermediate step toward a model employing fully rate-limited chemistry. The model is used to predict the effects of free convection on flow patterns, temperature and species-concentration profiles, and local deposition rates for silicon deposited by silane pyrolysis. These results are discussed in terms of implications for CVD of silicon and other compounds, microgravity studies, and techniques for testing and validating the model.

  7. Modelling topographic potential for erosion and deposition using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helena Mitasova; Louis R. Iverson

    1996-01-01

    Modelling of erosion and deposition in complex terrain within a geographical information system (GIS) requires a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM), reliable estimation of topographic parameters, and formulation of erosion models adequate for digital representation of spatially distributed parameters. Regularized spline with tension was integrated within a...

  8. Asian Dust Observed During the KORUS Air Quality Mission Creates Significant Super-Micron NO3-, NH4+, and SO42- Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, E. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    The KORUS mission was a collaborative effort between the Korean Institute of Environmental Research and NASA. KORUS provided a comprehensive assessment of air quality in Korea during early 2016. The intensive sampling campaign was timed to assess local photochemistry during increasing solar insolation and biogenic emissions; after the April peak in outflow of pollution and dust from central China. Chinese outflow is well characterized by Silica-Calcium rich dust. Despite the effort to avoid the period with strongest dust outflow, Ca2+ was well represented in all bulk (particle diameters up to 4.5 micron) aerosol filter samples 1.5ug/m3) we see marked increases in super-micron concentration of NH4+, SO42-, and NO3-, m = 1.113 ug/m3 , 2.621 ug/m3 , 4.413 ug/m3, with the super-micron contribution to total concentration averaging 47%, 45%, and 81% respectively. In contrast, low dust days (Ca2+ industrial centers in eastern China approached equivalence balance between Ca2++ NH4+ and SO42-+NO3-. In contrast dusty samples that did not pass over these industrial centers during transport to the West Sea and Korea maintained excess cations, dominantly Ca2+. This suggests that dust can act as an important carrier of Chinese pollution to Korea when this saturated dust reaches the peninsula.

  9. Podiform chromite deposits--database and grade and tonnage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Moring, Barry C.; Galloway, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromite ((Mg, Fe++)(Cr, Al, Fe+++)2O4) is the only source for the metallic element chromium, which is used in the metallurgical, chemical, and refractory industries. Podiform chromite deposits are small magmatic chromite bodies formed in the ultramafic section of an ophiolite complex in the oceanic crust. These deposits have been found in midoceanic ridge, off-ridge, and suprasubduction tectonic settings. Most podiform chromite deposits are found in dunite or peridotite near the contact of the cumulate and tectonite zones in ophiolites. We have identified 1,124 individual podiform chromite deposits, based on a 100-meter spatial rule, and have compiled them in a database. Of these, 619 deposits have been used to create three new grade and tonnage models for podiform chromite deposits. The major podiform chromite model has a median tonnage of 11,000 metric tons and a mean grade of 45 percent Cr2O3. The minor podiform chromite model has a median tonnage of 100 metric tons and a mean grade of 43 percent Cr2O3. The banded podiform chromite model has a median tonnage of 650 metric tons and a mean grade of 42 percent Cr2O3. Observed frequency distributions are also given for grades of rhodium, iridium, ruthenium, palladium, and platinum. In resource assessment applications, both major and minor podiform chromite models may be used for any ophiolite complex regardless of its tectonic setting or ophiolite zone. Expected sizes of undiscovered podiform chromite deposits, with respect to degree of deformation or ore-forming process, may determine which model is appropriate. The banded podiform chromite model may be applicable for ophiolites in both suprasubduction and midoceanic ridge settings.

  10. Variable fused deposition modelling - concept design and tool path generation

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Hadley Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Current Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) techniques use fixed diameter nozzles to deposit a filament of plastic layer by layer. The consequence is that the same small nozzle, essential for fine details, is also used to fill in relatively large volumes. In practice a Pareto-optimal nozzle diameter is chosen that attempts to maximise resolution while minimising build time. This paper introduces a concept for adapting an additive manufacturing system, which exploits a variable diameter nozzle fo...

  11. Development of a Parafin Wax deposition Unit for Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Greta; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Pedersen, David Bue

    2014-01-01

    . This project illustrates the redesign of an extrusion unit for the deposition of paraffin wax in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) instead of the conventional polymeric materials. Among the benefits and brought by the use of paraffin wax in such system are: the possibility to make highly complex and precise...... the technology and opening to new challenges. The design presented in this paper represents a step towards the development of a multi material deposition unit, able to selectively depose specific materials on demand in the same product, according to needs. In order to achieve that, waxes and respectivedesigns...... extruder principles of modularity and reconfigurability are also taken into account in order to ease up a subsequent integration with a more complex system....

  12. Numerical Modelling of Suspended Transport and Deposition of Highway Deposited Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Bach, Christine

    Good data for calibration and validation of numerical models are of high importance. In the natural environment data can be hard to archive and the stochastic nature have governing influence on the data archived. Hence for modelling of suspended transport and deposition of particles, originating...... from the highway surfaces, in highway detention ponds, four experiments are carried out. To simplify the complexity of a real pond and for easy control and measurement the sediment transports where carried out in two rectangular channels....

  13. RETADD: a Regional Trajectory And Diffusion-Deposition model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C. L.; Murphy, B. D.; Nappo, Jr., C. J.

    1978-06-01

    The Regional Trajectory and Diffusion-Deposition Model (RETADD) is based upon a version of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory's Regional-Continental Scale Transport, Diffusion, and Deposition Model. The FORTRAN IV computer model uses a trajectory analysis technique for estimating the transport and long-range diffusion of material emitted from a point source. The wind trajectory portion of the code uses observed upper air winds to compute the transport of the material. Ground level concentrations and depositions are computed by using the Gaussian plume equation for wind trajectories projected forward in time. Options are included to specify an upper bound for the mixed layer and a chemical decomposition rate for the effluent. The limitations to the technique are discussed, the equations and model are described, and listings of the program, input, and output are included.

  14. Surface growth of two kinds of particles deposition models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wang; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1993-10-01

    The surface kinetics with diffusion of two kinds of particles (A and C) deposition models, randomlike and ballisticlike depositing on a (1 + 1)-dimensional substrate, has been studied in this paper. The scaling behaviour of the surface width for these two models is obtained for various deposition probability P of particle C (the probability of particle A, being 1 - P). We found that both models have a scaling behaviour: the surface width growth only depends on the time, W ∼ t α(p) for the early stage and W ∼ t β(P) for the intermediate time, as well as W ∼ L z for the later time with different exponents α(P) and β(P) and z for two models. In addition, there is a phase transition when the saturation surface widths are scaled to the deposition probability P for both models W(t = ∞) ∼ P γ : before and after the transition the scaling exponent γ is different. This transition is interpreted as that there are different morphologic structures when the depositing probability for one kind of particle, particle C, is larger than a critical value P c . (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Magnetospheric ion deposition on Titan's ionosphere in hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, I.; Johnson, R. E.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Kallio, E. J.; Jarvinen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid modelling allows tracking ion particle in self-consist electromagnetic fields. Titan is a specific case where ion gyromotion plays a significant role in the interaction with the ambient plasma flow. We present hybrid simulation results from a medium-strength magnetospheric flow case. The water-group ions are shown to dominate the energy deposition by particles into Titan's ionosphere, while incident protons and pickup ions deposit about a total of a third of the water-group energy. Neutral collisions for the incident ions were taken into account via stopping cross sections. We show that Titan's neutral exosphere reduces the flux and energy deposit of especially lighter flow ions into Titan's atmosphere. Distribution of impacts and energy deposit by incident watergroup ions onto Titan's exobase.

  16. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  17. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  18. Nickel-cobalt laterites: a deposit model: Chapter H in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Erin; Anderson, Eric J.; Gray, Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are supergene enrichments of Ni±Co that form from intense chemical and mechanical weathering of ultramafic parent rocks. These regolith deposits typically form within 26 degrees of the equator, although there are a few exceptions. They form in active continental margins and stable cratonic settings. It takes as little as one million years for a laterite profile to develop. Three subtypes of Ni-Co laterite deposits are classified according to the dominant Ni-bearing mineralogy, which include hydrous magnesium (Mg)-silicate, smectite, and oxide. These minerals form in weathering horizons that begin with the unweathered protolith at the base, saprolite next, a smectite transition zone only in profiles where drainage is very poor, followed by limonite, and then capped with ferricrete at the top. The saprolite contains Ni-rich hydrous Mg-silicates, the Ni-rich clays occur in the transition horizon, and Ni-rich goethite occurs in the limonite. Although these subtypes of deposits are the more widely used terms for classification of Ni-Co laterite deposits, most deposits have economic concentrations of Ni in more than one horizon. Because of their complex mineralogy and heterogeneous concentrations, mining of these metallurgically complex deposits can be challenging. Deposits range in size from 2.5 to about 400 million tonnes, with Ni and Co grades of 0.66–2.4 percent (median 1.3) and 0.01–0.15 percent (median 0.08), respectively. Modern techniques of ore delineation and mineralogical identification are being developed to aid in streamlining the Ni-Co laterite mining process, and low-temperature and low-pressure ore processing techniques are being tested that will treat the entire weathered profile. There is evidence that the production of Ni and Co from laterites is more energy intensive than that of sulfide ores, reflecting the environmental impact of producing a Ni-Co laterite deposit. Tailings may include high levels of

  19. Deposition parameterizations for the Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesely, Marvin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Doskey, Paul V. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shannon, J. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Improved algorithms have been developed to simulate the dry and wet deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) with the Industrial Source Complex version 3 (ISC3) model system. The dry deposition velocities (concentrations divided by downward flux at a specified height) of the gaseous HAPs are modeled with algorithms adapted from existing dry deposition modules. The dry deposition velocities are described in a conventional resistance scheme, for which micrometeorological formulas are applied to describe the aerodynamic resistances above the surface. Pathways to uptake at the ground and in vegetative canopies are depicted with several resistances that are affected by variations in air temperature, humidity, solar irradiance, and soil moisture. The role of soil moisture variations in affecting the uptake of gases through vegetative plant leaf stomata is assessed with the relative available soil moisture, which is estimated with a rudimentary budget of soil moisture content. Some of the procedures and equations are simplified to be commensurate with the type and extent of information on atmospheric and surface conditions available to the ISC3 model system user. For example, standardized land use types and seasonal categories provide sets of resistances to uptake by various components of the surface. To describe the dry deposition of the large number of gaseous organic HAPS, a new technique based on laboratory study results and theoretical considerations has been developed providing a means of evaluating the role of lipid solubility in uptake by the waxy outer cuticle of vegetative plant leaves.

  20. Thermal Modeling of Direct Digital Melt-Deposition Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. P.; Lambrakos, S. G.

    2011-02-01

    Additive manufacturing involves creating three-dimensional (3D) objects by depositing materials layer-by-layer. The freeform nature of the method permits the production of components with complex geometry. Deposition processes provide one more capability, which is the addition of multiple materials in a discrete manner to create "heterogeneous" objects with locally controlled composition and microstructure. The result is direct digital manufacturing (DDM) by which dissimilar materials are added voxel-by-voxel (a voxel is volumetric pixel) following a predetermined tool-path. A typical example is functionally gradient material such as a gear with a tough core and a wear-resistant surface. The inherent complexity of DDM processes is such that process modeling based on direct physics-based theory is difficult, especially due to a lack of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties and particularly when dealing with melt-deposition processes. In order to overcome this difficulty, an inverse problem approach is proposed for the development of thermal models that can represent multi-material, direct digital melt deposition. This approach is based on the construction of a numerical-algorithmic framework for modeling anisotropic diffusivity such as that which would occur during energy deposition within a heterogeneous workpiece. This framework consists of path-weighted integral formulations of heat diffusion according to spatial variations in material composition and requires consideration of parameter sensitivity issues.

  1. Alternate slicing and deposition strategies for fused deposition modelling of light curved parts

    OpenAIRE

    B. Huang; S. Singamneni

    2012-01-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM), as one of the additive manufacturing (AM) techniques, has been widely used in the manufacturing industry from the 1990s. It is relatively cheaper than other AM methods and there are other advantages such as being able to process a variety of other polymers. Currently, FDM is more likely to be suitable for direct production of the terminal-use parts, in some cases challenging traditional process such as injection molding. Research evidences indicate that change...

  2. Modeling airflow and particle transport/deposition in pulmonary airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Zheng

    2008-11-30

    A review of research papers is presented, pertinent to computer modeling of airflow as well as nano- and micron-size particle deposition in pulmonary airway replicas. The key modeling steps are outlined, including construction of suitable airway geometries, mathematical description of the air-particle transport phenomena and computer simulation of micron and nanoparticle depositions. Specifically, diffusion-dominated nanomaterial deposits on airway surfaces much more uniformly than micron particles of the same material. This may imply different toxicity effects. Due to impaction and secondary flows, micron particles tend to accumulate around the carinal ridges and to form "hot spots", i.e., locally high concentrations which may lead to tumor developments. Inhaled particles in the size range of 20nm< or =dp< or =3microm may readily reach the deeper lung region. Concerning inhaled therapeutic particles, optimal parameters for mechanical drug-aerosol targeting of predetermined lung areas can be computed, given representative pulmonary airways.

  3. 3D Modelling of Transport, Deposition and Resuspension of Highway Deposited Sediments in wet Detention Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    2010-01-01

    concrete channel with width of 0.8m and a water depth of approximately 0.8m and in circular flume experiments in order to reproduce near-bed specific processes such as resuspension and consolidation. With a fairly good agreement with measurements, modelling of hydrodynamics, transport of dissolved...... pollutants and particles in wet detention ponds is possible with application of a three dimensional RANS model and the advection/dispersion equation taken physical phenomena like wind, waves, deposition, erosion and consolidation of the bottom sediment into account....

  4. Development of a distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoshi Hirabayashi; Charles N. Kroll; David J. Nowak

    2012-01-01

    A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling systemwas developed with a geographic information system (GIS) to enhance the functionality of i-Tree Eco (i-Tree, 2011). With the developed system, temperature, leaf area index (LAI) and air pollutant concentration in a spatially distributed form can be estimated, and based on these and other input variables, dry...

  5. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J.H.; Frohn, L.M.; Frydendall, J.; Geels, C.; Hansen, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model), has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry) of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The MM5v2 model is used as a meteorological driver. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 131 I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles

  6. Occurrence model for volcanogenic beryllium deposits: Chapter F in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Lindsey, David A.; Seal, Robert R.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.

    2012-01-01

    Current global and domestic mineral resources of beryllium (Be) for industrial uses are dominated by ores produced from deposits of the volcanogenic Be type. Beryllium deposits of this type can form where hydrothermal fluids interact with fluorine and lithophile-element (uranium, thorium, rubidium, lithium, beryllium, cesium, tantalum, rare earth elements, and tin) enriched volcanic rocks that contain a highly reactive lithic component, such as carbonate clasts. Volcanic and hypabyssal high-silica biotite-bearing topaz rhyolite constitutes the most well-recognized igneous suite associated with such Be deposits. The exemplar setting is an extensional tectonic environment, such as that characterized by the Basin and Range Province, where younger topaz-bearing igneous rock sequences overlie older dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone sequences. Mined deposits and related mineralized rocks at Spor Mountain, Utah, make up a unique economic deposit of volcanogenic Be having extensive production and proven and probable reserves. Proven reserves in Utah, as reported by the U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Information Center, total about 15,900 tons of Be that are present in the mineral bertrandite (Be4Si2O7(OH)2). At the type locality for volcanogenic Be, Spor Mountain, the tuffaceous breccias and stratified tuffs that host the Be ore formed as a result of explosive volcanism that brought carbonate and other lithic fragments to the surface through vent structures that cut the underlying dolomitic Paleozoic sedimentary rock sequences. The tuffaceous sediments and lithic clasts are thought to make up phreatomagmatic base surge deposits. Hydrothermal fluids leached Be from volcanic glass in the tuff and redeposited the Be as bertrandite upon reaction of the hydrothermal fluid with carbonate clasts in lithic-rich sections of tuff. The localization of the deposits in tuff above fluorite-mineralized faults in carbonate rocks, together with isotopic evidence for the

  7. A new simulation model for electrochemical metal deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmickler, W.; Poetting, K.; Mariscal, M.

    2006-01-01

    A new atomistic simulation model for electrochemical systems is presented. It combines microcanonical molecular dynamics for the electrode with stochastic dynamics for the solution, and allows the simulation of electrochemical deposition and dissolution for specific electrode potentials. As first applications the deposition of silver and platinum on Au(1 1 1) have been studied; both flat surfaces and surfaces with islands have been considered. The two systems behave quite differently: Ag on Au(1 1 1) grows layer by layer, while Pt forms a surface alloy on Au(1 1 1), which is followed by three-dimensional growth

  8. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brandt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model, has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of  137Cs, 134Cs and 131I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles and that the precipitation rates are

  9. Modeling of flame assisted chemical vapor deposition of silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, M.; Cavallotti, C.; Raffa, E. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    The simulation of a flame assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) process is here proposed with reference to the growth of silicon thin films through the silane/chlorosilanes/hydrogen/chlorine route. The goal is to design a reactor able to deposit micromorphous or multicrystalline films at the high growth rates necessary for photovoltaic applications. In fact, since FACVD processes can operate in atmospheric conditions and in auto-thermal mode, they present significant energetic advantages with respect to the plasma assisted technology used today. This work is in particular devoted to illustrate the multi-hierarchical modeling procedure adopted to determine the process optimal operating conditions and to design the deposition chamber. Different burner geometries (single, porous or multiple nozzles burner) were investigated in order to exploit the advantages of the two classical stagnation flow and Bunsen stretched flames. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Modeling of thermophoretic deposition of aerosols in nuclear reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol released in postulated or real nuclear reactor accidents can deposit on containment surfaces via motion induced by temperature gradients in addition to the motion due to diffusion and gravity. The deposition due to temperature gradients is known as thermophoretic deposition, and it is currently modeled in codes such as CONTAIN in direct analogy with heat transfer, but there have been questions about such analogies. This paper focuses on a numerical solution of the particle continuity equation in laminar flow condition characteristics of natural convection. First, the thermophoretic deposition rate is calculated as a function of the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers, the thermophoretic coefficient K, and the temperature difference between the atmosphere and the wall. Then, the cases of diffusion alone and a boundary-layer approximation (due to Batchelor and Shen) to the full continuity equation are considered. It is noted that an analogy with heat transfer does not hold, but for the circumstances considered in this paper, the deposition rates from the diffusion solution and the boundary-layer approximation can be added to provide reasonably good agreement (maximum deviation 30%) with the full solution of the particle continuity equation. Finally, correlations useful for implementation in the reactor source term codes are provided

  11. Modeling transport and deposition of the Mekong River sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zuo; He, Ruoying; Liu, J. Paul; Warner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    A Coupled Wave–Ocean–SedimentTransport Model was used to hindcast coastal circulation and fine sedimenttransport on the Mekong shelf in southeastern Asian in 2005. Comparisons with limited observations showed that the model simulation captured the regional patterns and temporal variability of surface wave, sea level, and suspended sediment concentration reasonably well. Significant seasonality in sedimenttransport was revealed. In summer, a large amount of fluvial sediments was delivered and deposited near the MekongRiver mouth. In the following winter, strong ocean mixing, and coastal current lead to resuspension and southwestward dispersal of a small fraction of previously deposited sediments. Model sensitivity experiments (with reduced physics) were performed to investigate the impact of tides, waves, and remotely forced ambient currents on the transport and dispersal of the fluvial sediment. Strong wave mixing and downwelling-favorable coastal current associated with the more energetic northeast monsoon in the winter season are the main factors controlling the southwestward along-shelf transport.

  12. Experimental Study of Aerosol Deposition in a Realistic Lung Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František LÍZAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhalation route for administration of medicaments is becoming more and more popular in recent years. The reason is non-invasiveness of the method and instantaneous absorption of drugs to the blood circulation. It is necessary to deliver exact amount of drug to the specific segment because of occurrence of diverse diseases in different segments of lungs. The aim of our work is to contribute to better understanding of transport and deposition of aerosolized drugs in lungs and hence to more effective treatment of respiratory diseases due to the targeted drug delivery. We provided measurements of aerosol deposition in segmented realistic model of lungs without a mouth cavity. Monodisperse particles marked with fluorescein were supplied to the model. The model was then disassembled to segments and each segment was rinsed with isopropanol, whereby fluorescent samples were created. Each sample was analysed by fluorometer and an amount of aerosol deposited in the segment was calculated. Experiences obtained by this study were used for creation of a new model with the mouth cavity. This model will be used for future studies with porous and fiber aerosols.

  13. Deposit model for heavy-mineral sands in coastal environments: Chapter L in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Shah, Anjana K.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model of heavy-mineral sands, which are sedimentary deposits of dense minerals that accumulate with sand, silt, and clay in coastal environments, locally forming economic concentrations of the heavy minerals. This deposit type is the main source of titanium feedstock for the titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigments industry, through recovery of the minerals ilmenite (Fe2+TiO3), rutile (TiO2), and leucoxene (an alteration product of ilmenite). Heavy-mineral sands are also the principal source of zircon (ZrSiO4) and its zirconium oxide; zircon is often recovered as a coproduct. Other heavy minerals produced as coproducts from some deposits are sillimanite/kyanite, staurolite, monazite, and garnet. Monazite [(Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4] is a source of rare earth elements as well as thorium, which is used in thorium-based nuclear power under development in India and elsewhere.

  14. Modelling annual pasture dynamics: Application to stomatal ozone deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Ignacio; Bermejo, Victoria; Elvira, Susana; Sanz, Javier; Gimeno, Benjamín S.; Alonso, Rocío

    2010-07-01

    Modelling ozone (O 3) deposition for impact risk assessment is still poorly developed for herbaceous vegetation, particularly for Mediterranean annual pastures. High inter-annual climatic variability in the Mediterranean area makes it difficult to develop models characterizing gas exchange behaviour and air pollutant absorption suitable for risk assessment. This paper presents a new model to estimate stomatal conductance (g s) of Trifolium subterraneum, a characteristic species of dehesa pastures. The MEDPAS (MEDiterranean PAStures) model couples 3 modules estimating soil water content (SWC), vegetation growth and gs. The gs module is a reparameterized version of the stomatal component of the EMEP DO 3SE O 3 deposition model. The MEDPAS model was applied to two contrasting years representing typical dry and humid springs respectively and with different O 3 exposures. The MEDPAS model reproduced realistically the gs seasonal and inter-annual variations observed in the field. SWC was identified as the major driver of differences across years. Despite the higher O 3 exposure in the dry year, meteorological conditions favoured 2.1 times higher gs and 56 day longer growing season in the humid year compared to the dry year. This resulted in higher ozone fluxes absorbed by T. subterraneum in the humid year. High inter-family variability was found in gas exchange rates, therefore limiting the relevance of single species O 3 deposition flux modelling for dehesa pastures. Stomatal conductance dynamics at the canopy level need to be considered for more accurate O 3 flux modelling for present and future climate scenarios in the Mediterranean area.

  15. A deposit model for magmatic iron-titanium-oxide deposits related to Proterozoic massif anorthosite plutonic suites: Chapter K in Mineral Deposit Models for Resource Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Fey, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive model for magmatic iron-titanium-oxide (Fe-Ti-oxide) deposits hosted by Proterozoic age massif-type anorthosite and related rock types presents their geological, mineralogical, geochemical, and geoenvironmental attributes. Although these Proterozoic rocks are found worldwide, the majority of known deposits are found within exposed rocks of the Grenville Province, stretching from southwestern United States through eastern Canada; its extension into Norway is termed the Rogaland Anorthosite Province. This type of Fe-Ti-oxide deposit dominated by ilmenite rarely contains more than 300 million tons of ore, with between 10- to 45-percent titanium dioxide (TiO2), 32- to 45-percent iron oxide (FeO), and less than 0.2-percent vanadium (V).

  16. Modeling study of deposition locations in the 291-Z plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The TEMPEST (Trent and Eyler 1991) and PART5 computer codes were used to predict the probable locations of particle deposition in the suction-side plenum of the 291-Z building in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site, the exhaust fan building for the 234-5Z, 236-Z, and 232-Z buildings in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. The Tempest code provided velocity fields for the airflow through the plenum. These velocity fields were then used with TEMPEST to provide modeling of near-floor particle concentrations without particle sticking (100% resuspension). The same velocity fields were also used with PART5 to provide modeling of particle deposition with sticking (0% resuspension). Some of the parameters whose importance was tested were particle size, point of injection and exhaust fan configuration

  17. Short communication: fused deposition models from CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, J R; Shepherd, D E T; Hukins, D W L

    2004-06-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) is a new method for rapid prototyping, a technique that produces models of objects from computer files. The most commonly used rapid prototyping technique for medical applications is stereolithography, but FDM has several potential advantages. This paper is concerned with the accuracy of an FDM model of a sheep lumbar vertebra using data from a CT scan. The model and the original vertebra were compared by making measurements with vernier callipers and by laser scanning. Visually, the model reproduced the features of the original object; this conclusion was supported by a comparison of the laser scans. Discrepancies in measurements were comparable with those of models produced using other rapid prototyping techniques, demonstrating that FDM is a viable method for making models for clinical use.

  18. Accuracy of cuticular resistance parameterizations in ammonia dry deposition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Frederik; Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Fléchard, Chris; Wichink Kruit, Roy; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of total reactive nitrogen (Nr) exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is a crucial part of modern air quality models. However, bi-directional exchange of ammonia (NH3), the dominant Nr species in agricultural landscapes, still poses a major source of uncertainty in these models, where especially the treatment of non-stomatal pathways (e.g. exchange with wet leaf surfaces or the ground layer) can be challenging. While complex dynamic leaf surface chemistry models have been shown to successfully reproduce measured ammonia fluxes on the field scale, computational restraints and the lack of necessary input data have so far limited their application in larger scale simulations. A variety of different approaches to modelling dry deposition to leaf surfaces with simplified steady-state parameterizations have therefore arisen in the recent literature. We present a performance assessment of selected cuticular resistance parameterizations by comparing them with ammonia deposition measurements by means of eddy covariance (EC) and the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) at a number of semi-natural and grassland sites in Europe. First results indicate that using a state-of-the-art uni-directional approach tends to overestimate and using a bi-directional cuticular compensation point approach tends to underestimate cuticular resistance in some cases, consequently leading to systematic errors in the resulting flux estimates. Using the uni-directional model, situations where low ratios of total atmospheric acids to NH3 concentration occur lead to fairly high minimum cuticular resistances, limiting predicted downward fluxes in conditions usually favouring deposition. On the other hand, the bi-directional model used here features a seasonal cycle of external leaf surface emission potentials that can lead to comparably low effective resistance estimates under warm and wet conditions, when in practice an expected increase in the compensation point due to

  19. The Manufacture of Honeycomb Cores using Fused Deposition Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Dave; Ward, Carwyn; Herrmann, Guido; Etches, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich panels are used in many industries, for the advantageous properties of high stiffness, good strength to weight ratio, and impact resistance. Modern manufacturing methods are dominated by manual layup; secondary structure panels often contain multiple core components, complex geometries, and tight placement tolerances. This paper compares cores manufactured using Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) with conventional Nomex core. FDM is a process of creating complex components from extrude...

  20. Testing of Materials for Rapid Prototyping Fused Deposition Modelling Technology

    OpenAIRE

    L. Novakova-Marcincinova; J. Novak-Marcincin

    2012-01-01

    Paper presents knowledge about types of test in area of materials properties of selected methods of rapid prototyping technologies. In today used rapid prototyping technologies for production of models and final parts are used materials in initial state as solid, liquid or powder material structure. In solid state are used various forms such as pellets, wire or laminates. Basic range materials include paper, nylon, wax, resins, metals and ceramics. In Fused Deposition Mod...

  1. An analytical kinetic model for chemical-vapor deposition of pureB layers from diborane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical model is established to describe the deposition kinetics and the deposition chamber characteristics that determine the deposition rates of pure boron (PureB-) layers grown by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) from diborane (B2H6) as gas source on a non-rotating silicon

  2. Development of a distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Satoshi; Kroll, Charles N.; Nowak, David J.

    2012-01-01

    A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling system was developed with a geographic information system (GIS) to enhance the functionality of i-Tree Eco (i-Tree, 2011). With the developed system, temperature, leaf area index (LAI) and air pollutant concentration in a spatially distributed form can be estimated, and based on these and other input variables, dry deposition of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10) to trees can be spatially quantified. Employing nationally available road network, traffic volume, air pollutant emission/measurement and meteorological data, the developed system provides a framework for the U.S. city managers to identify spatial patterns of urban forest and locate potential areas for future urban forest planting and protection to improve air quality. To exhibit the usability of the framework, a case study was performed for July and August of 2005 in Baltimore, MD. - Highlights: ► A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling system was developed. ► The developed system enhances the functionality of i-Tree Eco. ► The developed system employs nationally available input datasets. ► The developed system is transferable to any U.S. city. ► Future planting and protection spots were visually identified in a case study. - Employing nationally available datasets and a GIS, this study will provide urban forest managers in U.S. cities a framework to quantify and visualize urban forest structure and its air pollution removal effect.

  3. Comparative effects of simulated acid rain of different ratios of SO42- to NO3- on fine root in subtropical plantation of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Wenrui; Meng, Miaojing; Fu, Zhiyuan; Xu, Linhao; Zha, Yan; Yue, Jianmin; Zhang, Shuifeng; Zhang, Jinchi

    2018-03-15

    The influence of acid rain on forest trees includes direct effects on foliage as well as indirect soil-mediated effects that cause a reduction in fine-root growth. In addition, the concentration of NO 3 - in acid rain increases with the rapidly growing of nitrogen deposition. In this study, we investigated the impact of simulated acid rain with different SO 4 2- /NO 3 - (S/N) ratios, which were 5:1 (S), 1:1 (SN) and 1:5 (N), on fine-root growth from March 2015 to February 2016. Results showed that fine roots were more sensitive to the effects of acid rain than soils in the short-term. Both soil pH and fine root biomass (FRB) significantly decreased as acid rain pH decreased, and also decreased with the percentage of NO 3 - increased in acid rain. Acid rain pH significantly influenced soil total carbon and available potassium in summer. Higher acidity level (pH=2.5), especially of the N treatments, had the strongest inhibitory impact on soil microbial activity after summer. The structural equation modelling results showed that acid rain S/N ratio and pH had stronger direct effects on FRB than indirect effects via changed soil and fine root properties. Fine-root element contents and antioxidant enzymes activities were significantly affected by acid rain S/N ratio and pH during most seasons. Fine-root Al ion content, Ca/Al, Mg/Al ratios and catalase activity were used as better indicators than soil parameters for evaluating the effects of different acid rain S/N ratios and pH on forests. Our results suggest that the ratio of SO 4 2- to NO 3 - in acid rain is an important factor which could affect fine-root growth in subtropical forests of China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Electrophoretic deposition: a quantitative model for particle deposition and binder formation from alcohol-based suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, De E.; Duval, J.F.L.; Meulenkamp, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated electrophoretic deposition from a suspension containing positively charged particles, isopropanol, water, and Mg(NO3)2, with the aim of describing the deposition rates of the particles and Mg(OH)2, which is formed due to chemical reactions at the electrode, in terms of quantitative

  5. Nanoimprint Lithography on curved surfaces prepared by fused deposition modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köpplmayr, Thomas; Häusler, Lukas; Bergmair, Iris; Mühlberger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing technology commonly used for modelling, prototyping and production applications. The achievable surface roughness is one of its most limiting aspects. It is however of great interest to create well-defined (nanosized) patterns on the surface for functional applications such as optical effects, electronics or bio-medical devices. We used UV-curable polymers of different viscosities and flexible stamps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to perform Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) on FDM-printed curved parts. Substrates with different roughness and curvature were prepared using a commercially available 3D printer. The nanoimprint results were characterized by optical light microscopy, profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our experiments show promising results in creating well-defined microstructures on the 3D-printed parts. (paper)

  6. Comparison of Aerodynamic Resistance Parameterizations and Implications for Dry Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen deposition data used to support the secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards and critical loads research derives from both measurements and modeling. Data sets with spatial coverage sufficient for regional scale deposition assessments are currently generated fro...

  7. Modelling gaseous dry deposition in AURAMS: a unified regional air-quality modelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Moran, M.D.; Makar, P.A.; Brook, J.R.; Gong, S.

    2002-01-01

    An upgraded parameterization scheme for gaseous dry-deposition velocities has been developed for a new regional air-quality model with a 91-species gas-phase chemistry mechanism, of which 48 species are ''transported'' species. The well-known resistance analogy to dry deposition is adopted in the present scheme, with both O 3 and SO 2 taken as base species. Stomatal resistances are calculated for all dry-depositing species using a ''sunlit/shaded big-leaf'' canopy stomatal resistance submodel. Dry-ground, wet-ground, dry-cuticle, and wet-cuticle resistances for O 3 and SO 2 , and parameters for calculating canopy stomatal resistance and aerodynamic resistance for these two base species are given as input parameters for each of the 15 land-use categories and/or five seasonal categories considered by the scheme. Dry-ground, wet-ground, dry-cuticle, and wet-cuticle resistances for the other 29 model species for which dry deposition is considered to be a significant process are scaled to the resistances of O 3 and SO 2 based on published measurements of their dry deposition and/or their aqueous solubility and oxidizing capacity. Mesophyll resistances are treated as dependent only on chemical species. Field experimental data have then been used to evaluate the scheme's performance for O 3 and SO 2 . Example sets of modelled dry-deposition velocities have also been calculated for all 31 dry-deposited species and 15 land-use categories for different environmental conditions. This new scheme incorporates updated information on dry-deposition measurements and is able to predict deposition velocities for 31 gaseous species for different land-use types, seasons, and meteorological conditions. (author)

  8. Interlaboratory model comparisons of atmospheric concentrations with and without deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, C.D.; Cooper, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    To calculate the dose to the regional and U.S. populations, the pollutant concentration both with and without deposition and the amount of material deposited on the ground and watersheds around such a facility must be known. The following report (Article 50) of this document contains some initial estimates of population exposure from atmospheric effluents. The expertise of laboratories supported by U.S. Department of Energy funds ensures that the latest methods and data are available. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) performed regional calculations (out to distances of the order of 200 km from a hypothetical fuel reprocessing plant). The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) performed U.S. scale calculations, and ARL also did the global calculations. Data from a winter and summer period were used to make comparisons of calculations by LLL, ARL, and PNL to determine which model should be used for the final calculations and to determine if a 200-km square area centered on the site would be large enough for dose calculations via the water and food pathways

  9. New developments in fused deposition modeling of ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Shor, L.; Guceri, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    of a novel extrusion system, based on the FDM technology. The new set-up, consisting of a mini-extruder mounted on a high-precision positioning system, is fed with bulk material in granulated form, instead that with the more common filament. Findings - Previous research showed that the applications of new...... materials with specific characteristics in a commercial FDM system are limited by the use of intermediate precursors, i.e. a filament. The new design described in this paper overcomes the problem thanks to the new feeding system. Research limitations/implications - The work presented in this paper is only......Purpose - To shift from rapid prototyping (RP) to agile fabrication by broadening the material selection, e.g. using ceramics, hence improving the properties (e.g. mechanical properties) of fused deposition modeling (FDM) products. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents the development...

  10. Design and Analysis of a Fused Deposition Modelling Manufactured Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Claudiu; Tabacu, Stefan; Oltean, Alexandru

    2017-10-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology was investigated in order to produce a part designed to support a test load without permanent deformation. A topology optimization script was developed in order to define the final shape of the part. The solver used for the numerical analysis is LS-Dyna (implicit formulation). The algorithm follows the element removal based on the stress state and it can be very simply implemented. This solution of developing a custom code was adopted because plastic strain state was monitored and this is not yet implemented in other topology optimization applications. The results of the traction test were assembled and investigated in order to outline some of the typical parameters used for mechanical characterization. As a general overview of the results it was found that the parts manufactured using a 45°/45° stacking configuration are stronger that the ones manufactured using 0°/90° stacking configuration.

  11. New developments in fused deposition modeling of ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Shor, L.; Guceri, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To shift from rapid prototyping (RP) to agile fabrication by broadening the material selection, e.g. using ceramics, hence improving the properties (e.g. mechanical properties) of fused deposition modeling (FDM) products. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents the development...... of a novel extrusion system, based on the FDM technology. The new set-up, consisting of a mini-extruder mounted on a high-precision positioning system, is fed with bulk material in granulated form, instead that with the more common filament. Findings - Previous research showed that the applications of new...... materials with specific characteristics in a commercial FDM system are limited by the use of intermediate precursors, i.e. a filament. The new design described in this paper overcomes the problem thanks to the new feeding system. Research limitations/implications - The work presented in this paper is only...

  12. Emission of SO2 and SO42- from copper smelter and its influence on the level of total s in soil and moss in Bor and the surroundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šerbula Snežana M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bor and the surroundings (Eastern Serbia have been known for exploitation and processing of sulphide copper ores for more than 100 years. Emissions of waste gases and particulate matter rich in heavy metals are characteristic for pyrometallurgical production of copper. Long-term measurement results (2005-2008 indicate an increased sulphur dioxide level in the urban-industrial zone of Bor since it is closest to the copper smelter which is a dominant source of air pollution in the studied area. Average annual sulphur dioxide concentrations at four measuring sites in the urban-industrial zone exceeded the maximum allowable value of 50 μg/m3. However the maximum allowable value of the total atmospheric depositions (200 mg/m2/day on an annual basis exceeded only at two of 15 measuring sites in the urban-industrial and rural zone. The highest annual deposition rate of sulphates from deposition was detected in the urban-industrial zone. Since the maximum permitted value for sulphates is not defined by the Serbian Regulations, the extent of the pollution cannot be discussed. Since the environment can continuously be polluted through the wet and dry deposition, biomonitoring by moss was conducted, which revealed significantly higher concentrations of total sulphur in moss in the urban-industrial zone, compared to the background zone. The obtained results confirm the reliability of moss as a bioindicator of ambient pollution. Higher total S concentration in soil samples was noted at the rural site (Ostrelj located in the close vicinity of two tailing ponds. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46010, br. 33038 i br. 172037

  13. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Dan L.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Grade and tonnage models are useful in quantitative mineral-resource assessments. The models and database presented in this report are an update of earlier publications about volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. These VMS deposits include what were formerly classified as kuroko, Cyprus, and Besshi deposits. The update was necessary because of new information about some deposits, changes in information in some deposits, such as grades, tonnages, or ages, revised locations of some deposits, and reclassification of subtypes. In this report we have added new VMS deposits and removed a few incorrectly classified deposits. This global compilation of VMS deposits contains 1,090 deposits; however, it was not our intent to include every known deposit in the world. The data was recently used for mineral-deposit density models (Mosier and others, 2007; Singer, 2008). In this paper, 867 deposits were used to construct revised grade and tonnage models. Our new models are based on a reclassification of deposits based on host lithologies: Felsic, Bimodal-Mafic, and Mafic volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types vary significantly, and (2) deposits of different types occur in distinct geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models combine the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features and demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed deposit models allow geologists to deduce possible mineral-deposit types in a given geologic environment and economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources. Thus, mineral-deposit models play a central role in presenting geoscience

  14. Cenozoic unconformities and depositional supersequences of North Atlantic continental margins: testing the Vail model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poag, C. Wylie; Ward, Lauck W.

    1987-01-01

    Integrated outcrop, borehole, and seismic reflection stratigraphy from the U.S. and Irish margins of the North Atlantic basin reveals a framework of Cenozoic depositional supersequences and interregional unconformities that resembles the Vail depositional model. Paleo-bathymetric and paleoceanographic analyses of associated microfossil assemblages indicate a genetic link between the depositional framework and the relative position of sea level.

  15. Vegetation succession as affected by decreasing nitrogen deposition, soil characteristics and site management: A modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Dobben, van H.F.; Berendse, F.

    2009-01-01

    After many years of increasing nitrogen deposition, the deposition rates are now decreasing. A major question is whether this will result in the expected positive effects on plant species diversity. Long-term experiments that investigate the effects of decreasing deposition are not available. Model

  16. Dynamic scaling in a ballistic deposition model for a binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, H.F.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    2000-04-01

    A ballistic deposition model for the kinetic of surface growth for two species is introduced as a description of the evolution of a surface under vapor deposition. We used a tunable parameter P to control the deposition of the particles such that one type is deposited with probability P while the other is deposited with 1 - P. Simulations in 2 + 1 dimensions using local surface diffusion lead to the formation of a rough surface whose dynamical evolution is not that of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. Also, when surface diffusion becomes dominant, the model moves away from the Edwards-Wilkinson universality. (author)

  17. Modeling of magnetic properties of iron thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering using Preisach model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendjerad Adel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron thin films were deposited on glass substrates using RF magnetron sputtering and their optimal deposition conditions were determined. The structure properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD and their magnetic hysteresis loops were obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM at room temperature. In this situation, the magnetic field is either parallel or perpendicular to the substrate plane. The main contribution of this work is to characterize the thin layers and present a mathematical model that can get best fit of the characteristics B(H. By using Preisach model, good agreement was obtained between theoretical and experimental results in both cases.

  18. 3D modeling of surface quarries and deposits of mined materials and the monitoring of slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Maňas

    2007-01-01

    The application of computer technology by simulating opencast mining and deposits of raw materials. The mathematic principles of three-dimensional probabilistic models of raw materials deposits and a familiarization with the user interface software GEOLOGICKY MODEL. The principles of the simulation of opencast mines, generation intersections with models of raw materials deposits, computation of mining materials with the quality scaling,and the design of advanced mining with the software BANSK...

  19. One-pot synthesis of polyhydropyridine derivatives via Hantzsch four component condensation in water medium: Use of a recyclable Lewis acid [Ce(SO42.4H2O] catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Mosaddegh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of polyhydroquinoline derivatives using Ce(SO42.4H2O as mild and heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst via the Hantzsch reaction in very short reaction time is reported. A mixture of an appropriate aldehyde, dimedone, ethyl acetoacetate and malononitrile in the presence of the Ce(SO42.4H2O at reflux conditions in water based media resulted in good to excellent yields of the corresponding products. The catalyst can be used as selective for some aromatic aldehydes in the reaction conditions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i3.16

  20. Modelled transport and deposition of sulphur over Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zunckel, M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available province, and the remote site at Ben MacDhui. and plant physiology to infer the deposition velocity. As a result, the inferred deposition velocity takes daily and seasonal meteorological and plant physiological vari- ations into account. On summer days over...

  1. Modelling atmospheric deposition flux of Cadmium and Lead in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherin, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    According to WHO, air pollution is responsible for more than 3.7 million premature deaths each year (OMS, 2014). Moreover, among these deaths, more than 70 within urban areas. Consequently, the health and environmental impacts of pollutants within these urban areas are of great concern in air quality studies. The deposition fluxes of air pollutants, which can be significant near sources of pollution, have rarely been modeled within urban areas. Historically, atmospheric deposition studies have focused mostly on remote areas to assess the potential impacts on ecosystems of acid deposition and nitrogen loading. Therefore, current atmospheric deposition models may not be suitable to simulate deposition fluxes in urban areas, which include complex surface geometries and diverse land use types. Atmospheric dry deposition is typically modeled using an average roughness length, which depends on land use. This classical roughness-length approach cannot account for the spatial variability of dry deposition in complex settings such as urban areas. Urban canopy models have been developed to parameterize momentum and heat transfer. We extend this approach here to mass transfer, and a new dry deposition model based on the urban canyon concept is presented. It uses a local mixing-length parameterization of turbulence within the canopy, and a description of the urban canopy via key parameters to provide spatially distributed dry deposition fluxes. This approach provides spatially distributed dry deposition fluxes depending on surfaces (streets, walls, roofs) and flow regimes (recirculation and ventilation) within the urban area. (author) [fr

  2. Geology and Mineralogy of Uranium Deposits from Mount Isa, Australia: Implications for Albitite Uranium Deposit Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Wilson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New geological, bulk chemical and mineralogical (QEMSCAN and FEG-EPMA data are presented for albitite-type uranium deposits of the Mount Isa region of Queensland, Australia. Early albitisation of interbedded metabasalt and metasiltstone predated intense deformation along D2 high strain (mylonite zones. The early sodic alteration paragenetic stage includes albite, riebeckite, aegirine, apatite, zircon and magnetite. This paragenetic stage was overprinted by potassic microveins, containing K-feldspar, biotite, coffinite, brannerite, rare uraninite, ilmenite and rutile. An unusual U-Zr phase has also been identified which exhibits continuous solid solution with a uranium silicate possibly coffinite or nenadkevite. Calcite, epidote and sulphide veinlets represent the latest stage of mineralisation. This transition from ductile deformation and sodic alteration to vein-controlled uranium is mirrored in other examples of the deposit type. The association of uranium with F-rich minerals and a suite of high field strength elements; phosphorous and zirconium is interpreted to be indicative of a magmatic rather than metamorphic or basinal fluid source. No large intrusions of appropriate age outcrop near the deposits; but we suggest a relationship with B- and Be-rich pegmatites and quartz-tourmaline veins.

  3. Laser Energy Deposition Model for the ICF3D Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.; Byers, Jack A.

    1996-11-01

    We have built a laser deposition module for the new ICF physics design code, ICF3D(``3D Unstructured Mesh ALE Hydrodynamics with the Upwind Discontinuous Finite Element Method,'' D. S. Kershaw, M. K. Prasad and M. J. Shaw,'' LLNL Report UCRL-JC-122104, (1995)), being developed at LLNL. The code uses a 3D unstructured grid on which hydrodynamic quantities are represented in terms of discontinuous linear finite elements (hexahedrons, prisms, tetrahedrons or pyramids). Because of the complex mesh geometry and (in general) non-uniform index of refraction (i.e., plasma density), the geometrical-optical ray-tracing problem is quite complicated. To solve it we have developed a grid-cell-face-crossing detection algorithm, an integrator for the ray equations of motion and a path-length calculator that are encapsulated in a C++ class that is used to create ray-bundle objects. Additional classes are being developed for inverse-bremsstrahlung and resonance-absorption heating models. A quasi-optical technique will be used to include diffractive effects. We use the ICF3D Python shell, a very flexible interface that allows command-line invocation of member functions.

  4. Plasticized protein for 3D printing by fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunier, Laurent; Leroy, Eric; Della Valle, Guy; Lourdin, Denis

    2016-10-01

    The developments of Additive Manufacturing (AM) by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) now target new 3D printable materials, leading to novel properties like those given by biopolymers such as proteins: degradability, biocompatibility and edibility. Plasticized materials from zein, a storage protein issued from corn, present interesting thermomechanical and rheological properties, possibly matching with AM-FDM specifications. Thus commercial zein plasticized with 20% glycerol has a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 42°C, after storage at intermediate relative humidity (RH=59%). Its principal mechanical relaxation at Tα ≈ 50°C leads to a drop of the elastic modulus from about 1.1 GPa, at ambient temperature, to 0.6 MPa at Tα+100°C. These values are in the same range as values obtained in the case of standard polymers for AM-FDM processing, as PLA and ABS, although relaxation mechanisms are likely different in these materials. Such results lead to the setting up of zein-based compositions printable by AM-FDM and allow processing bioresorbable printed parts, with designed 3D geometry and structure.

  5. Interdiffusion of Polycarbonate in Fused Deposition Modeling Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppala, Jonathan; Forster, Aaron; Satija, Sushil; Jones, Ronald; Migler, Kalman

    2015-03-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM), a now common and inexpensive additive manufacturing method, produces 3D objects by extruding molten polymer layer-by-layer. Compared to traditional polymer processing methods (injection, vacuum, and blow molding), FDM parts have inferior mechanical properties, surface finish, and dimensional stability. From a polymer processing point of view the polymer-polymer weld between each layer limits the mechanical strength of the final part. Unlike traditional processing methods, where the polymer is uniformly melted and entangled, FDM welds are typically weaker due to the short time available for polymer interdiffusion and entanglement. To emulate the FDM process thin film bilayers of polycarbonate/d-polycarbonate were annealed using scaled times and temperatures accessible in FDM. Shift factors from Time-Temperature Superposition, measured by small amplitude oscillatory shear, were used to calculate reasonable annealing times (min) at temperatures below the actual extrusion temperature. The extent of interdiffusion was then measured using neutron reflectivity. Analogous specimens were prepared to characterize the mechanical properties. FDM build parameters were then related to interdiffusion between welded layers and mechanical properties. Understating the relationship between build parameters, interdiffusion, and mechanical strength will allow FDM users to print stronger parts in an intelligent manner rather than using trial-and-error and build parameter lock-in.

  6. A New Occurrence Model for National Assessment of Undiscovered Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Koski, Randolph; Morgan, Lisa A.; Mosier, Dan; Piatak, Nadine M.; Ridley, Ian; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Slack, John F.; Thurston, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits are very significant current and historical resources of Cu-Pb-Zn-Au-Ag, are active exploration targets in several areas of the United States and potentially have significant environmental effects. This new USGS VMS deposit model provides a comprehensive review of deposit occurrence and ore genesis, and fully integrates recent advances in the understanding of active seafloor VMS-forming environments, and integrates consideration of geoenvironmental consequences of mining VMS deposits. Because VMS deposits exhibit a broad range of geological and geochemical characteristics, a suitable classification system is required to incorporate these variations into the mineral deposit model. We classify VMS deposits based on compositional variations in volcanic and sedimentary host rocks. The advantage of the classification method is that it provides a closer linkage between tectonic setting and lithostratigraphic assemblages, and an increased predictive capability during field-based studies.

  7. Computational model for microstructure and effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits in utility boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Soon-Cheol

    The ash deposits formed in pulverized-coal fired power plants reduce heat transfer rate to furnace wall, super heater tubes, and other heat transfer surfaces. The thermal properties that influence strongly on this heat transfer depend mainly on the microstructure of the ash deposit. This dissertation examines three issues associated with the ash deposits in utility boilers: (1) the three-dimensional model for characterization of the ash deposit microstructures from the sample ash deposits, (2) the computational model for effective thermal conductivity of sintered packed beds with low conductive stagnant fluids, and (3) the application of thermal resistor network model for the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits in utility boilers. The SEM image analysis was conducted on two sample ash deposits to characterize three-dimensional microstructure of the ash deposit with several structural parameters using stereology. A ballistic deposition model was adopted to simulate the deposit structure defined by the structural parameters. The inputs for the deposition model were chosen from the predicted and measured physical parameters, such as the size distribution, the probability of the particle rolling, and the degree of the particle sintering. The difference between the microstructure of the sample deposits and the simulated deposits was investigated and compared quantitatively based on the structural parameters defined. Both the sample and the simulated deposits agree in terms of the structural parameters. The computational model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of sintered packed beds with low conductive stagnant fluid was built and the heat conduction through the contact area among sintered particles is the dominant mode of heat transfer. A thermal resistor network is used to model the heat conduction among the sintered particles and the thermal resistance among the contacting particles is estimated from both the contact area and the contact

  8. A discussion of remote sensing geologic image model of a uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Rui

    1998-12-01

    Based on the geologic study on the uranium deposit, the items about remote sensing images of the mineral deposit were discussed, such as the best choice of temporal, the best compose of band, the image characteristics and image model. It is considered that the mineral deposit was controlled by the line, ring and arc through the interpretation of color-composite images. The geologic image model of the mineral deposit is annular fault block controlled by northeast and northwest structures. It is recommended that much attentions should be paid to mineralized regions being similar with this image model in long-range forecast

  9. Computational Modelling of a Tangentially Fired Boiler With Deposit Formation Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Modliński Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Any complete CFD model of pulverised coal-fired boiler needs to consider ash deposition phenomena. Wall boundary conditions (temperature and emissivity) should be temporally corrected to account for the effects of deposit growth on the combustion conditions. At present voluminous publications concerning ash related problems are available. The current paper presents development of an engineering tool integrating deposit formation models with the CFD code. It was then applied to two tangentiall...

  10. Geological modeling of a stratified deposit with CAD-Based solid model automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Eser

    Full Text Available Abstract The planning stages of mining activities require many comprehensive and detailed analyses. Determining the correct orebody model is the first stage and one of the most important. Three-dimensional solid modeling is one of the significant methods that can examine the position and shape of the ore deposit. Although there are many different types of mining software for determining a solid model, many users try to build geological models in the computer without knowing how these software packages work. As researchers on the subject, we wanted to answer the question "How would we do it". For this purpose, a system was developed for generating solid models using data obtained from boreholes. Obtaining this model in an AutoCAD environment will be important for geologists and engineers. Developed programs were first tested with virtual borehole data belonging to a virtual deposit. Then the real borehole data of a cement raw material site were successfully applied. This article allows readers not only to see a clear example of the programming approach to layered deposits but also to produce more complicated software in this context. Our study serves as a window to understanding the geological modeling process.

  11. Modeling and mapping of atmospheric mercury deposition in adirondack park, new york.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue; Driscoll, Charles T; Huang, Jiaoyan; Holsen, Thomas M; Blackwell, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondacks of New York State, USA is a region that is sensitive to atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition. In this study, we estimated atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks using a new scheme that combined numerical modeling and limited experimental data. The majority of the land cover in the Adirondacks is forested with 47% of the total area deciduous, 20% coniferous and 10% mixed. We used litterfall plus throughfall deposition as the total atmospheric Hg deposition to coniferous and deciduous forests during the leaf-on period, and wet Hg deposition plus modeled atmospheric dry Hg deposition as the total Hg deposition to the deciduous forest during the leaf-off period and for the non-forested areas year-around. To estimate atmospheric dry Hg deposition we used the Big Leaf model. The average atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks was estimated as 17.4 [Formula: see text]g m[Formula: see text] yr[Formula: see text] with a range of -3.7-46.0 [Formula: see text]g m[Formula: see text] yr[Formula: see text]. Atmospheric Hg dry deposition (370 kg yr[Formula: see text]) was found to be more important than wet deposition (210 kg yr[Formula: see text]) to the entire Adirondacks (2.4 million ha). The spatial pattern showed a large variation in atmospheric Hg deposition with scattered areas in the eastern Adirondacks having total Hg deposition greater than 30 μg m(-2) yr(-1), while the southwestern and the northern areas received Hg deposition ranging from 25-30 μg m(-2) yr(-1).

  12. The OML-SprayDrift model for predicting pesticide drift and deposition from ground boom sprayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfstrøm, Per; Bruus, Marianne; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    In order to predict the exposure of hedgerows and other neighboring biotopes to pesticides from field-spray applications, an existing Gaussian atmospheric dispersion and deposition model was developed to model the changes in droplet size due to evaporation affecting the deposition velocity. The G...

  13. Rheological characterization of plasticized corn proteins for fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunier, Laurent; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Della Valle, Guy; Lourdin, Denis; Marion, Didier; Leroy, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) of tailored natural biopolymer-based objects by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) opens new perspectives for applications such as biomedical temporary devices, or pharmaceutical tablets. This exploits the biocompatibility, resorbability and edibility properties of biopolymers. When adequately plasticized, zeins, storage proteins from endosperm of maize kernels, displayed thermomechanical properties possibly matching FDM processing requirements at a convenient temperature Tprinting=130°C. Indeed, with 20% glycerol added (Tg=42°C), plasticized zeins present a high modulus, E'>1GPa, at ambient conditions, which drops below 0.6 MPa at the processing temperature T=130°C, before flowing in the molten state. The rheological characterization shows that the processing window is limited by a progressive increase of viscosity linked to proteins aggregation and crosslinking by S-S bonding between cysteine amino acid residues, which can lead to gelation. However, for short residence time typical of FDM, the viscosity of plasticized zeins is comparable to the one of standard polymers, like ABS or PLA in their FDM processing conditions: indeed, in presence of glycerol, the molten zeins show a shear-thinning behavior with |η*|≈3kPa.s at 1s-1, decreasing to |η*|≈0.3kPa.s at 100s-1, at 130°C. Moreover, zeins presenting both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, amphiphilic plasticizers can be used supplementary to tune their rheological behavior. With 20% oleic acid added to the previous composition, the viscosity is divided down to a ratio about 1/2 at 100s-1 at 130°C, below the value of a standard polymer as PLA at its printing temperature. These results show the possible enhancement of the printability of zein-based materials in the molten state, by combining polar and amphiphilic plasticizers.

  14. A deposit model for carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits: Chapter J in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Seal, Robert R.; McCafferty, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. A wide variety of other commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks including niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other elements enriched in these deposits include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium. Carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits are presented together in this report because of the spatial, and potentially genetic, association between carbonatite and alkaline rocks. Although these rock types occur together at many locations, carbonatite and peralkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits are not generally found together.

  15. Modelling loans and deposits during electoral years i n Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae - Marius JULA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effect of electoral years on loans and deposits for population in Romania. Using monthly data regarding the total loans and deposits, we identify the significance of the electoral timing on population´s behavior regarding financial decisions. We estimate that there are small changes in population´s affinity for increase in the indebtedness or for savings. We use dummy variables for electoral periods, and when these are econometrically significant there is an evidence of the influence of the electoral timings in population´s financial decisions.

  16. A deposit model for magmatic iron-titanium-oxide deposits related to Proterozoic massif anorthosite plutonic suites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Fey, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive model for magmatic iron-titanium-oxide (Fe-Ti-oxide) deposits hosted by Proterozoic age massif-type anorthosite and related rock types presents their geological, mineralogical, geochemical, and geoenvironmental attributes. Although these Proterozoic rocks are found worldwide, the majority of known deposits are found within exposed rocks of the Grenville Province, stretching from southwestern United States through eastern Canada; its extension into Norway is termed the Rogaland Anorthosite Province. This type of Fe-Ti-oxide deposit dominated by ilmenite rarely contains more than 300 million tons of ore, with between 10- to 45-percent titanium dioxide (TiO2), 32- to 45-percent iron oxide (FeO), and less than 0.2-percent vanadium (V). The origin of these typically discordant ore deposits remains as enigmatic as the magmatic evolution of their host rocks. The deposits clearly have a magmatic origin, hosted by an age-constrained unique suite of rocks that likely are the consequence of a particular combination of tectonic circumstances, rather than any a priori temporal control. Principal ore minerals are ilmenite and hemo-ilmenite (ilmenite with extensive hematite exsolution lamellae); occurrences of titanomagnetite, magnetite, and apatite that are related to this deposit type are currently of less economic importance. Ore-mineral paragenesis is somewhat obscured by complicated solid solution and oxidation behavior within the Fe-Ti-oxide system. Anorthosite suites hosting these deposits require an extensive history of voluminous plagioclase crystallization to develop plagioclase-melt diapirs with entrained Fe-Ti-rich melt rising from the base of the lithosphere to mid- and upper-crustal levels. Timing and style of oxide mineralization are related to magmatic and dynamic evolution of these diapiric systems and to development and movement of oxide cumulates and related melts. Active mines have developed large open pits with extensive waste-rock piles, but

  17. Accessing the Impact of Sea-Salt Emissions on Aerosol Chemical Formation and Deposition Over Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q.; Wang, X.; Liu, Y.; Wu, D.; Chan, P. W.; Fan, S.; Feng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) emissions have a significant impact on aerosol pollution and haze formation in the coastal areas. In this study, Models-3/CMAQ modeling system was utilized to access the impact of SSA emissions on aerosol chemical formation and deposition over Pearl River Delta (PRD), China in July 2006. More SSAs were transported inland from the open-ocean under the southeast wind in summertime. Two experiments (with and without SSA emissions in the CMAQ model) were set up to compare the modeling results with each other. The results showed that the increase of sulfate concentrations were more attributable to the primary emissions of coarse SO42- particles in SSA, while the increase of nitrate concentrations were more attributable to secondary chemical formations, known as the mechanisms of chloride depletion in SSA. In the coastal areas, 17.62 % of SO42-, 26.6% of NO3- and 38.2% of PM10 were attributed to SSA emissions, while those portions were less than 1% in the inland areas. The increases of PM10 and its components due to SSA emissions resulted in higher deposition fluxes over PRD, particularly in the coastal areas, except for the wet deposition of nitrate. Nitrate was more sensitive to SSA emissions in chemical formations than sulfate and dry deposition of aerosol was also more sensitive than that for wet deposition. Process analysis of sulfate and nitrate was applied to find out the difference of physical and chemical mechanisms between Guangzhou (the inland areas) and Zhuhai (the coastal areas). The negative contributions of dry deposition process to both sulfate and nitrate concentrations increased if SSA emissions were taken into account in the model, especially for Zhuhai. The negative contributions of cloud process also increased due to cloud scavenging and wet deposition process. In the coastal area, the gas-to-particle conversions became more active with high contributions of aerosol process to nitrate concentrations.

  18. A Mathematical Model for Non-monotonic Deposition Profiles in Deep Bed Filtration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    . The numerical modeling results highly agree with the experimental observations, which proves the ability of the model to catch a non-monotonic deposition profile in practice. An additional equation describing a mobile population behaving differently from the injected population seems to be a sufficient...... by advection and diffusion/dispersion. The proposed model is able to produce a nonmonotonic deposition profile. A set of methods for estimating the modeling parameters is provided in the case of minimal particle release. The estimation can be easily performed with available experimental information...... condition for producing non-monotonic deposition profiles. The described physics by the additional equation may be different in different experimental settings....

  19. 3D modeling of surface quarries and deposits of mined materials and the monitoring of slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Maňas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of computer technology by simulating opencast mining and deposits of raw materials. The mathematic principles of three-dimensional probabilistic models of raw materials deposits and a familiarization with the user interface software GEOLOGICKY MODEL. The principles of the simulation of opencast mines, generation intersections with models of raw materials deposits, computation of mining materials with the quality scaling,and the design of advanced mining with the software BANSKY MODEL.The monitoring the potential of dynamic movements’ of unstable slopes with the automatic total station and a following interpretation in general time intervals by means of the software MONITORING.

  20. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 5. Evaluation of regional acidic deposition models (Part 1) and selected applications of RADM (Part 2). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, R.L.; Barchet, W.R.; Clark, T.L.; Seilkop, S.K.; Roth, P.M.

    1990-09-01

    The State-of-Science/Technology report describes the scientific community's current knowledge regarding the evaluation of regional acidic deposition models. The report summarizes this knowledge by describing the process, as well as the history, of evaluating acidic deposition models and by providing the results obtained from the recent evaluations of such models. The concepts of model evaluation, in general, are discussed in early sections of the report, but particular emphasis is placed on Eulerian-style evaluations. The two Eulerian models covered are the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM), which was developed for the United States, and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM), developed for Canada. The results of evaluating several versions of RADM and ADOM have provided model evaluators with the most current assessment of how reliably these models can address several key issues posed by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). That is, how well can the models predict the change in regional acidic deposition that would result from changes in precursor emissions; the influence of sources in one region on acidic deposition in other sensitive receptor regions; the levels of acidic deposition at certain sensitive receptor regions; and the acidic deposition due to emissions transported across geographical/political boundaries, including the United States-Canadian border

  1. Modeling Dry Deposition of Aerosol Particles on Rough Surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussein, T.; Smolík, Jiří; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2012), s. 44-59 ISSN 0278-6826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol particles * dry deposition * transport Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.780, year: 2012

  2. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendel, J.; Studer, E.; Zavaleta, P.; Hadida, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H 2 PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on > plates and acts against it for > plates. (author)

  3. 3D Numerical Modelling of Transport, Deposition and Resuspension of Highway Deposited Sediments in Wet Detention Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    2009-01-01

    concrete channel with width of 0.8 m and a water depth of approximately 0.8 m and in circular flume experiments in order to reproduce near-bed specific processes such as resuspension and consolidation. With good agreement with measurements, modelling of hydrodynamics, transport of dissolved pollutants...... and particles in wet detention ponds is possible with application of a three dimensional RANS model and the advection/dispersion equation taken physical phenomena like wind, waves, deposition, erosion and consolidation of the bottom sediment into account....

  4. An Evaluation of Ozone Dry Deposition in Global Scale Chemistry Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardacre, C.; Wild, O.; Emberson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric oxidants to the Earth's surface or vegetation is important as both a major removal pathway governing their atmospheric abundance and as a key input of oxidants and nutrients to sensitive vegetation surfaces. By linking the atmosphere and biosphere, dry deposition processes contribute to wider climate and Earth system feedbacks which need to be adequately quantified for a full understanding of Earth system responses. In addition, they have immediate policy-relevant implications for air quality, ecosystem health and crop productivity that need to be assessed on local, regional and global scales. In this study we use results from the recent Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) model intercomparison to explore how dry deposition of ozone varies across 15 current atmospheric chemistry and transport models. While most models take a similar, resistances-based approach to parameterising dry deposition, there are substantial differences across the models in the magnitude and variability of the annual and monthly ozone deposition fluxes which contribute to the differences in modelled surface ozone and in the global tropospheric ozone budget. We find that the range in global ozone deposition flux over the HTAP model ensemble spans about 30% with deposition to ocean, grass land and tropical forests being particularly variable. Further, we compare modelled dry deposition of ozone to measurements made at a variety of locations in Europe and North America, noting differences of up to a factor of two but no clear systematic bias over the sites examined. We extend this analysis by running sensitivity studies to determine the importance of key parameters in the ozone dry deposition process, including soil moisture and leaf area index. This study provides an important first step towards quantifying the uncertainty in ozone dry deposition and permitting a more thorough, observation-based evaluation of this important process.

  5. Dependence of ECH deposition profile on the modeling of incident wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritz, A.H.; Hsuan, H.; Matsuda, K.

    1986-06-01

    The ray tracing code, TORAY, is used to investigate the importance of modeling assumptions utilized in describing Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH). In particular, we examine the dependence of the ECH deposition profile on the antenna pattern. We demonstrate that different assumptions for representing the incident wave energy by a finite number of rays lead to significantly different results for the energy deposition profile

  6. Concurrent Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Interaction Forces Improves Particle Deposition Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chao; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2016-04-19

    It is widely believed that media surface roughness enhances particle deposition-numerous, but inconsistent, examples of this effect have been reported. Here, a new mathematical framework describing the effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough spherical collectors in absence of an energy barrier was developed and validated. In addition to quantifying DLVO force, the model includes improved descriptions of flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation functions. This work demonstrates that hydrodynamic effects can significantly alter particle deposition relative to expectations when only the DLVO force is considered. Moreover, the combined effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough, spherical media are not additive, but synergistic. Notably, the developed model's particle deposition predictions are in closer agreement with experimental observations than those from current models, demonstrating the importance of inclusion of roughness impacts in particle deposition description/simulation. Consideration of hydrodynamic contributions to particle deposition may help to explain discrepancies between model-based expectations and experimental outcomes and improve descriptions of particle deposition during physicochemical filtration in systems with nonsmooth collector surfaces.

  7. New Functions to Model Measured Deposition and Resuspension Rates of Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, P.; Moser, A.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    New functions to model deposition and resuspension rates based on experimental data are introduced. Deposition and resuspension are presented in dependence on the surface orientation as well as on the turbulent kinetic energy of the air. Moreover, the development of the dust building up on the su...

  8. A modified SINTACS method for groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk assessment in highly anthropized regions based on NO3-and SO42-concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busico, Gianluigi; Kazakis, Nerantzis; Colombani, Nicolò; Mastrocicco, Micòl; Voudouris, Konstantinos; Tedesco, Dario

    2017-12-31

    Groundwater vulnerability and risk assessment are worldwide tools in supporting groundwater protection and land planning. In this study, we used three of these different methodologies applied to the Campanian Plain located in southern Italy: SINTACS, AVI and LOS. However, their capability to describe the observed chemical pollution of the area has resulted quite poor. For such a reason, a modified SINTACS method has been then implemented in the area in order to get a more reliable view of groundwater vulnerability. NO 3 - and SO 4 2- from more than 400 monitoring wells were used for specific vulnerability assessment. Land use was chosen as key parameter to infer the risk of groundwater pollution in our area. The new methodology seems to show a higher correlation with observed NO 3 - concentrations and a more reliable identification of aquifer's pollution hot spots. The main sources of NO 3 - were found in sub-urban areas, where vulnerability and risk are higher than in other areas. Otherwise due to reducing conditions triggered by the presence of elevated sedimentary organic matter and peat, concentrations below agricultural areas were lower than in sub-urban areas. The SO 4 2- specific vulnerability map showed a positive correlation with observed concentrations, due to geogenic and anthropogenic SO 4 2- sources present in the area. The combination of both NO 3 - and SO 4 2- derived risk maps becomes essential to improve the conceptual model of aquifer pollution in this severely anthropized area. The application of this new and original approach shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of each of the described previous methods and clearly showed how anthropogenic activities have to be taken into account in the assessment process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A model to explain joint patterns found in ignimbrite deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2018-03-01

    The study of fracture systems is of paramount importance for economic applications, such as CO2 storage in rock successions, geothermal and hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation, and also for a better knowledge of seismogenic fault formation. Understanding the origin of joints can be useful for tectonic studies and for a geotechnical characterisation of rock masses. Here, we illustrate a joint pattern discovered in ignimbrite deposits of South America, which can be confused with conjugate tectonic joint sets but which have another origin. The pattern is probably common, but recognisable only in plan view and before tectonic deformation obscures and overprints it. Key sites have been mostly studied by field surveys in Bolivia and Chile. The pattern is represented by hundreds-of-meters up to kilometre-long swarms of master joints, which show circular to semi-circular geometries and intersections that have "X" and "Y" patterns. Inside each swarm, joints are systematic, rectilinear or curvilinear in plan view, and as much as 900 m long. In section view, they are from sub-vertical to vertical and do not affect the underlying deposits. Joints with different orientation mostly interrupt each other, suggesting they have the same age. This joint architecture is here interpreted as resulting from differential contraction after emplacement of the ignimbrite deposit above a complex topography. The set of the joint pattern that has suitable orientation with respect to tectonic stresses may act to nucleate faults.

  10. Predictive models for deposit accumulation and corrosion on secondary side of steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Samuel; Moroney, Velvet; Marks, Chuck; Kreider, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Experience demonstrates that deposit accumulation in steam generators (SGs) can lead to corrosion of tubes. To minimize the probability of this corrosion, utilities employ a variety of deposit control strategies. However, these processes can involve significant costs and potentially affect outage critical paths. Since there has been no model that quantifies tube degradation as a function of deposit accumulation, utilities have had to make decisions regarding deposit control strategies without a reliable quantitative basis. The objective of this study is to develop methods that utilities can use to quantify benefits of SG deposit control strategies with regard to rates of secondary-side tube corrosion. Two different methodologies are employed in this work. The first methodology is empirical and is involved an attempt to correlate degradation rates with deposit accumulation as indicated by sludge pile height. Because there has been relatively little tube degradation in currently operating steam generators, this correlation is developed using data for Alloy 600MA SG tubes. To increase the number of units that could be used for defect/deposit correlations, a method to relate the sludge pile deposit mass and the number of tubes with non-zero sludge height is developed. The second methodology is theoretical and is based on the use of calculated differences in temperature and chemistry to predict the effect of deposits on corrosion rates. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are developed to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of conditions that are present within porous deposits formed at the top of tube sheet. This paper will discuss the development and application of the predictive models for deposit accumulation and corrosion on the secondary side of steam generators. (authors)

  11. DESIGNING THE DEPOSITS MANAGEMENT MODEL IN FUNCTION OF BANKING ACTIVITIES OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticijan Peruško

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to improve the banks deposits’ management process that will ultimately result in the collection of deposits at lowest costs. In order to achieve the aforementioned purpose, the authors have derived model using statistical and mathematical methods. Statistical method of double logarithmic regression was applied in order to determine the relations between the costs and amount of funds collected from each deposit product, while in the process of deposit assortment optimization nonlinear programming was applied, as the correlation between costs and the amount of collected funds from the sale of deposits products is nonlinear what is shown in the selected regression model too. In order to present the usefulness and wide possibilities of its use, the deposits management model was employed on the example of one large bank that operates in the Croatian banking market. The model is applicable both to the retail sector and corporate sector deposits. Information derived from the model application help banks management in making appropriate decisions regarding planning and managing the sales of deposits and, along with other existing instruments, complements the database of banks management information system.

  12. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  13. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis

  14. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K.; Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G.; Gehr, P.

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Computational Modelling of a Tangentially Fired Boiler With Deposit Formation Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modliński Norbert J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any complete CFD model of pulverised coal-fired boiler needs to consider ash deposition phenomena. Wall boundary conditions (temperature and emissivity should be temporally corrected to account for the effects of deposit growth on the combustion conditions. At present voluminous publications concerning ash related problems are available. The current paper presents development of an engineering tool integrating deposit formation models with the CFD code. It was then applied to two tangentially-fired boilers. The developed numerical tool was validated by comparing it with boiler evaporator power variation based on the on-line diagnostic system with the results from the full CFD simulation.

  16. Dynamic Modeling for the Design and Cyclic Operation of an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Curtisha; Adomaitis, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory-scale atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor system model is derived for alumina deposition using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Model components describing the precursor thermophysical properties, reactor-scale gas-phase dynamics and surface reaction kinetics derived from absolute reaction rate theory are integrated to simulate the complete reactor system. Limit-cycle solutions defining continuous cyclic ALD reactor operation are computed with a fixed point algorithm ...

  17. Sulfur deposition simulations over China, Japan, and Korea: a model intercomparison study for abating sulfur emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Hee; Chang, Lim-Seok; Meng, Fan; Kajino, Mizuo; Ueda, Hiromasa; Zhang, Yuanhang; Son, Hye-Young; Lee, Jong-Jae; He, Youjiang; Xu, Jun; Sato, Keiichi; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Han, Zhiwei; Duan, Lei; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Suk-Jo; Song, Chang-Keun; Ban, Soo-Jin; Shim, Shang-Gyoo; Sunwoo, Young; Lee, Tae-Young

    2012-11-01

    In response to increasing trends in sulfur deposition in Northeast Asia, three countries in the region (China, Japan, and Korea) agreed to devise abatement strategies. The concepts of critical loads and source-receptor (S-R) relationships provide guidance for formulating such strategies. Based on the Long-range Transboundary Air Pollutants in Northeast Asia (LTP) project, this study analyzes sulfur deposition data in order to optimize acidic loads over the three countries. The three groups involved in this study carried out a full year (2002) of sulfur deposition modeling over the geographic region spanning the three countries, using three air quality models: MM5-CMAQ, MM5-RAQM, and RAMS-CADM, employed by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean modeling groups, respectively. Each model employed its own meteorological numerical model and model parameters. Only the emission rates for SO(2) and NO(x) obtained from the LTP project were the common parameter used in the three models. Three models revealed some bias from dry to wet deposition, particularly the latter because of the bias in annual precipitation. This finding points to the need for further sensitivity tests of the wet removal rates in association with underlying cloud-precipitation physics and parameterizations. Despite this bias, the annual total (dry plus wet) sulfur deposition predicted by the models were surprisingly very similar. The ensemble average annual total deposition was 7,203.6 ± 370 kt S with a minimal mean fractional error (MFE) of 8.95 ± 5.24 % and a pattern correlation (PC) of 0.89-0.93 between the models. This exercise revealed that despite rather poor error scores in comparison with observations, these consistent total deposition values across the three models, based on LTP group's input data assumptions, suggest a plausible S-R relationship that can be applied to the next task of designing cost-effective emission abatement strategies.

  18. Modeling atmospheric nitrogen deposition and transport in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeder, Scott A; Lynch, James A; Grimm, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen has been identified as a major factor in the decline of water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Reports have indicated that atmospheric deposition may account for 25 to 80% of the total nitrogen load entering the bay. However, uncertainties exist regarding the accuracy of the atmospheric deposition inputs, nitrogen retention coefficients, and in-stream nutrient uptake rates used in these studies. This project was designed to reassess the potential inputs of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the bay through the use of a high-resolution wet deposition model, improved wet and dry deposition and nutrient retention estimates, existing soils and land use data, and geographic information systems software. Model results indicate that the methods used in previous studies may overestimate the contribution of atmospheric nitrate and ammonium deposition to the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW). Wet and dry atmospheric nitrate and ammonium nitrogen deposition estimates to the CBW ranged from 52.7 to 141.9 and 41.9 to 60.1 million kg/yr, respectively, between 1984 and 1996. Dry and total atmospheric deposition loads to the watershed are substantially less than previous estimates. Estimates of the percent contribution of atmospherically deposited nitrogen to the Chesapeake Bay represent between 20 and 32% of the total nitrate and ammonium nitrogen load to the watershed from all nitrogen sources. While these estimates are lower than many other published estimates, regression analysis of model parameters, nitrogen retention coefficients, output, and measured in-stream nitrogen loads indicate that the calculated nitrogen loads may still be too high.

  19. European and Mediterranean mercury modelling: Local and long-range contributions to the deposition flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Sprovieri, Francesca; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that is known to have adverse effects on human health, and most human exposure to toxic methylmercury is through fish consumption. Soluble Hg compounds in the marine environment can be methylated in the water column and enter the base of the food chain. Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg enters marine ecosystems. The atmospheric chemistry of Hg has been simulated over Europe and the Mediterranean for the year 2009, using the WRF/Chem model and employing two different gas phase Hg oxidation mechanisms. The contributions to the marine deposition flux from dry deposition, synoptic scale wet deposition and convective wet deposition have been determined. The Hg deposition fluxes resulting from transcontinental transport and local/regional emission sources has been determined using both Br/BrO and O3/OH atmospheric oxidation mechanisms. The two mechanisms give significantly different annual deposition fluxes (129 Mg and 266 Mg respectively) over the modelling domain. Dry deposition is more significant using the O3/OH mechanism, while proportionally convective wet deposition is enhanced using the Br/BrO mechanism. The simulations using the Br/BrO oxidation compared best with observed Hg fluxes in precipitation. Local/regional Hg emissions have the most impact within the model domain during the summer. A comparison of simulations using the 2005 and 2010 AMAP/UNEP Hg emission inventories show that although there is a decrease of 33% in anthropogenic emissions between the two reference years, the total simulated deposition in the regions diminishes by only 12%. Simulations using the 2010 inventory reproduce observations somewhat better than those using the 2005 inventory for 2009.

  20. A dynamic compartment model for assessing the transfer of radionuclide deposited onto flooded rice-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Han-Soo; Choi, Heui-Ju; Kang, Hee-Seok; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Young-Ho; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic compartment model has been studied to estimate the transfer of radionuclides deposited onto flooded rice-fields after an accidental release. In the model, a surface water compartment and a direct shoot-base absorption from the surface water to the rice-plant, which are major features discriminating the present model from the existing model, has been introduced to account for the flooded condition of rice-fields. The model has been applied to the deposition experiments of 137 Cs on rice-fields that were performed at three different times to simulate the deposition before transplanting (May 2) and during the growth of the rice (June 1 and August 12), respectively. In the case of the deposition of May 2, the root-uptake is the most predominant process for transferring 137 Cs to the rice-body and grain. When the radionuclide is applied just after transplanting (June 1), the activity of the body is controlled by the shoot-base absorption and the activity of the grain by the root-uptake. The deposition just before ear-emergence (August 12) shows that the shoot-base absorption contributes entirely to the increase of both the activities of the body and grain. The model prediction agrees within one or two factors with the experimental results obtained for a respective deposition experiment

  1. A fragment-cloud model for asteroid breakup and atmospheric energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien F.; Register, Paul J.; Mathias, Donovan L.

    2017-10-01

    As asteroids break up during atmospheric entry, they deposit energy that can be seen in flares of light and, if substantial enough, can produce damaging blast waves. Analytic models of asteroid breakup and energy deposition processes are needed in order to assess potential airburst hazards, and to enable inferences about asteroid properties or breakup physics to be made from comparisons with observed meteors. This paper presents a fragment-cloud model (FCM) that is able to represent a broad range of breakup behaviors and the resulting variations in energy deposition in ways that make it a useful tool for both applications. Sensitivity studies are performed to investigate how variations the model's fragmentation parameters affect the energy deposition results for asteroids 20-500 m in diameter. The model is also used to match observational data from the Chelyabinsk meteor and infer potential asteroid properties and representative modeling parameter ranges. Results illustrate how the model's fragmentation parameters can introduce different energy deposition features, and how much they affect the overall energy deposition rates, magnitudes, and altitudes that would drive ground damage for risk assessment applications.

  2. Study on particle deposition in vertical square ventilation duct flows by different models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinping; Li Angui

    2008-01-01

    A proper representation of the air flow in a ventilation duct is crucial for adequate prediction of the deposition velocity of particles. In this paper, the mean turbulent air flow fields are predicted by two different numerical models (the Reynolds stress transport model (RSM) and the realizable k-εmodel). Contours of mean streamwise velocity deduced from the k-ε model are compared with those obtained from the Reynolds stress transport model. Dimensionless deposition velocities of particles in downward and upward ventilation duct flows are also compared based on the flow fields presented by the two different numerical models. Trajectories of the particles are tracked using a one way coupling Lagrangian eddy-particle interaction model. Thousands of individual particles are released in the represented flow, and dimensionless deposition velocities are evaluated for the vertical walls in fully developed smooth vertical downward and upward square duct flows generated by the RSM and realizable k-ε model. The effects of particle diameter, dimensionless relaxation time, flow direction and air speed in vertical upward and downward square duct flows on the particle deposition velocities are discussed. The effects of lift and gravity on the particle deposition velocities are evaluated in vertical flows presented by the RSM. It is shown that the particle deposition velocities based on the RSM and realizable k-εmodel have subtle differences. The flow direction and the lift force significantly affect the particle deposition velocities in vertical duct flows. The simulation results are compared with earlier experimental data and the numerical results for fully developed duct flows. It is shown that the deposition velocities predicted are in agreement with the experimental data and the numerical results

  3. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-28

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  4. Subalpine Pyrenees received higher nitrogen deposition than predicted by EMEP and CHIMERE chemistry-transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Marion; Lamaze, Thierry; Couvidat, Florian; Pornon, André

    2015-08-01

    Deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere is expected to be the third greatest driver of biodiversity loss by the year 2100. Chemistry-transport models are essential tools to estimate spatially explicit N deposition but the reliability of their predictions remained to be validated in mountains. We measured N deposition and air concentration over the subalpine Pyrenees. N deposition was found to range from 797 to 1,463 mg N m-2 year-1. These values were higher than expected from model predictions, especially for nitrate, which exceeded the estimations of EMEP by a factor of 2.6 and CHIMERE by 3.6. Our observations also displayed a reversed reduced-to-oxidized ratio in N deposition compared with model predictions. The results highlight that the subalpine Pyrenees are exposed to higher levels of N deposition than expected according to standard predictions and that these levels exceed currently recognized critical loads for most high-elevation habitats. Our study reveals a need to improve the evaluation of N deposition in mountains which are home to a substantial and original part of the world’s biodiversity.

  5. Modelling of deposited black carbon with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere. If they consider only linear processes, they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. Backward simulations are very efficient if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources, and they are well suited to establish source-receptor (s-r) relationships for measurements of various trace substances in air. However, not only the air concentrations are of interest, but also the s-r relationships for deposition are important for interpreting measurement data. E.g., deposition of dust is measured regularly in ice cores, partly also as a proxy to understand changes in aridity in dust source regions. Contamination of snow by black carbon (BC) aerosols has recently become a hot topic because of the potential impact of BC on the snow albedo. To interpret such deposition measurements and study the sources of the deposited substance, it would be convenient to have a model that is capable of efficient s-r relationship calculations for such types of measurements. We present here the implementation of such an algorithm into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and test the new scheme by comparisons with results from forward simulations as well as comparisons with measurements. As an application, we analyse source regions for elemental carbon (EC) measured in snow over the years 2014-2016 in the Russian Arctic. Simulations using an annual constant black carbon inventory based on ECLIPSE V5 and GFED (Global Fire Emission Database), have been performed. The meteorological data used in the simulation are 3 hourly operational data from the European Centre of Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) on a 1 degree grid resolution and 138 vertical levels. The model is able to capture very well the measured concentrations. Gas flaring and residential

  6. Sediment-hosted gold deposits of the world: database and grade and tonnage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Vladimir I.; Mosier, Dan L.; Bliss, James D.; Moring, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    All sediment-hosted gold deposits (as a single population) share one characteristic—they all have disseminated micron-sized invisible gold in sedimentary rocks. Sediment-hosted gold deposits are recognized in the Great Basin province of the western United States and in China along with a few recognized deposits in Indonesia, Iran, and Malaysia. Three new grade and tonnage models for sediment-hosted gold deposits are presented in this paper: (1) a general sediment-hosted gold type model, (2) a Carlin subtype model, and (3) a Chinese subtype model. These models are based on grade and tonnage data from a database compilation of 118 sediment-hosted gold deposits including a total of 123 global deposits. The new general grade and tonnage model for sediment-hosted gold deposits (n=118) has a median tonnage of 5.7 million metric tonnes (Mt) and a gold grade of 2.9 grams per tonne (g/t). This new grade and tonnage model is remarkable in that the estimated parameters of the resulting grade and tonnage distributions are comparable to the previous model of Mosier and others (1992). A notable change is in the reporting of silver in more than 10 percent of deposits; moreover, the previous model had not considered deposits in China. From this general grade and tonnage model, two significantly different subtypes of sediment-hosted gold deposits are differentiated: Carlin and Chinese. The Carlin subtype includes 88 deposits in the western United States, Indonesia, Iran, and Malaysia, with median tonnage and grade of 7.1 Mt and 2.0 g/t Au, respectively. The silver grade is 0.78 g/t Ag for the 10th percentile of deposits. The Chinese subtype represents 30 deposits in China, with a median tonnage of 3.9 Mt and medium grade of 4.6 g/t Au. Important differences are recognized in the mineralogy and alteration of the two sediment-hosted gold subtypes such as: increased sulfide minerals in the Chinese subtype and decalcification alteration dominant in the Carlin type. We therefore

  7. Accuracy of medical models made by consumer-grade fused deposition modelling printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropolis, Christian; Kozan, Daniel; Sigurdson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing using fused deposition modelling (FDM) has become widely available with the development of consumer-grade three-dimensional printers. To be useful in maxillofacial surgery, models created by these printers must accurately reproduce the craniofacial skeleton. To determine the accuracy of consumer-grade FDM printers in the production of medical models compared with industrial selective laser sintering (SLS) printers. Computed tomography images of a dry skull were manipulated using OsiriX (OsiriX, Switzerland) and ZBrush (Pixologic, USA) software. Models were fabricated using a consumer-grade FDM printer at 100 μm, 250 μm and 500 μm layer heights and an industrial SLS printer. Seven linear measurements were made on the models and compared with the corresponding dry skull measurements using an electronic caliper. A dimensional error of 0.30% was observed for the SLS models and 0.44%, 0.52% and 1.1% for the 100 μm, 250 μm and 500 μm FDM models, respectively. Consumer-grade FDM printers can produce medical models with sufficient dimensional accuracy for use in maxillofacial surgery. With this technology, surgeons can independently produce low-cost maxillofacial models in an office setting.

  8. Accuracy of medical models made by consumer-grade fused deposition modelling printers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropolis, Christian; Kozan, Daniel; Sigurdson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Additive manufacturing using fused deposition modelling (FDM) has become widely available with the development of consumer-grade three-dimensional printers. To be useful in maxillofacial surgery, models created by these printers must accurately reproduce the craniofacial skeleton. OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of consumer-grade FDM printers in the production of medical models compared with industrial selective laser sintering (SLS) printers. METHODS: Computed tomography images of a dry skull were manipulated using OsiriX (OsiriX, Switzerland) and ZBrush (Pixologic, USA) software. Models were fabricated using a consumer-grade FDM printer at 100 μm, 250 μm and 500 μm layer heights and an industrial SLS printer. Seven linear measurements were made on the models and compared with the corresponding dry skull measurements using an electronic caliper. RESULTS: A dimensional error of 0.30% was observed for the SLS models and 0.44%, 0.52% and 1.1% for the 100 μm, 250 μm and 500 μm FDM models, respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumer-grade FDM printers can produce medical models with sufficient dimensional accuracy for use in maxillofacial surgery. With this technology, surgeons can independently produce low-cost maxillofacial models in an office setting. PMID:26090349

  9. Integrative evaluation of data derived from biomonitoring and models indicating atmospheric deposition of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Stefan; Schröder, Winfried

    2017-05-01

    Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals (HM) can be determined by use of numeric models, technical devices and biomonitors. Mainly focussing on Germany, this paper aims at evaluating data from deposition modelling and biomonitoring programmes. The model LOTOS-EUROS (LE) yielded data on HM deposition at a spatial resolution of 25 km by 25 km throughout Europe. The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) provided model calculations on 50 km by 50 km grids. Corresponding data on HM concentration in moss, leaves and needles and soil were derived from the European Moss Survey (EMS), the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) and the International Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (iCP Forests). The modelled HM deposition and respective concentrations in moss (EMS), leaves and needles (ESB, iCP Forests) and soil (iCP Forests) were investigated for their statistical relationships. Regression equations were applied on geostatistical surface estimations of HM concentration in moss and then the residuals were interpolated by use of kriging interpolation. Both maps were summed up to a map of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) deposition across Germany. Biomonitoring data were strongly correlated to LE than to EMEP. For HM concentrations in moss, the highest correlations were found for the association between geostatistical surface estimations of HM concentration in moss and deposition (LE).

  10. Reactive physical vapor deposition of TixAlyN: Integrated plasma-surface modeling characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Da; Schaeffer, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    Reactive physical vapor deposition (RPVD) has been widely applied in the microelectronic industry for producing thin films. Fundamental understanding of RPVD mechanisms is needed for successful process development due to the high sensitivity of film properties on process conditions. An integrated plasma equipment-target nitridation modeling infrastructure for RPVD has therefore been developed to provide mechanistic insights and assist optimal process design. The target nitridation model computes target nitride coverage based on self-consistently derived plasma characteristics from the plasma equipment model; target sputter yields needed in the plasma equipment model are also self-consistently derived taking into account the yield-suppressing effect from nitridation. The integrated modeling infrastructure has been applied to investigating RPVD processing with a Ti 0.8 Al 0.2 compound target and an Ar/N 2 gas supply. It has been found that the process produces athermal metal neutrals as the primary deposition precursor. The metal stoichiometry in the deposited film is close to the target composition due to the predominance of athermal species in the flux that reaches the substrate. Correlations between process parameters (N 2 flow, target power), plasma characteristics, surface conditions, and deposition kinetics have been studied with the model. The deposition process is characterized by two regimes when the N 2 flow rate is varied. When N 2 is dilute relative to argon, target nitride coverage increases rapidly with increasing N 2 flow. The sputter yield and deposition rate consequently decrease. For less dilute N 2 mixtures, the sputter yield and deposition rate are stable due to the saturation of target nitridation. With increasing target power, the electron density increases nearly linearly while the variation of N generation is much smaller. Target nitridation and its suppression of the sputter yield saturate at high N 2 flow rendering these parameters

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  12. Iron deposition is independent of cellular inflammation in a cerebral model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rachel; Rohr, Aaron M; Wang, Wen-Tung; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Berman, Nancy E J; Lynch, Sharon G; LeVine, Steven M

    2011-06-23

    Perivenular inflammation is a common early pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent hypothesis stated that CNS inflammation is induced by perivenular iron deposits that occur in response to altered blood flow in MS subjects. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, an animal model was developed, called cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cEAE), which presents with CNS perivascular iron deposits. This model was used to investigate the relationship of iron deposition to inflammation. In order to generate cEAE, mice were given an encephalitogen injection followed by a stereotactic intracerebral injection of TNF-α and IFN-γ. Control animals received encephalitogen followed by an intracerebral injection of saline, or no encephalitogen plus an intracerebral injection of saline or cytokines. Laser Doppler was used to measure cerebral blood flow. MRI and iron histochemistry were used to localize iron deposits. Additional histological procedures were used to localize inflammatory cell infiltrates, microgliosis and astrogliosis. Doppler analysis revealed that cEAE mice had a reduction in cerebral blood flow compared to controls. MRI revealed T2 hypointense areas in cEAE animals that spatially correlated with iron deposition around vessels and at some sites of inflammation as detected by iron histochemistry. Vessels with associated iron deposits were distributed across both hemispheres. Mice with cEAE had more iron-labeled vessels compared to controls, but these vessels were not commonly associated with inflammatory cell infiltrates. Some iron-laden vessels had associated microgliosis that was above the background microglial response, and iron deposits were observed within reactive microglia. Vessels with associated astrogliosis were more commonly observed without colocalization of iron deposits. The findings indicate that iron deposition around vessels can occur independently of inflammation providing evidence against the hypothesis that iron

  13. Iron deposition is independent of cellular inflammation in a cerebral model of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Phil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perivenular inflammation is a common early pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS. A recent hypothesis stated that CNS inflammation is induced by perivenular iron deposits that occur in response to altered blood flow in MS subjects. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, an animal model was developed, called cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cEAE, which presents with CNS perivascular iron deposits. This model was used to investigate the relationship of iron deposition to inflammation. Methods In order to generate cEAE, mice were given an encephalitogen injection followed by a stereotactic intracerebral injection of TNF-α and IFN-γ. Control animals received encephalitogen followed by an intracerebral injection of saline, or no encephalitogen plus an intracerebral injection of saline or cytokines. Laser Doppler was used to measure cerebral blood flow. MRI and iron histochemistry were used to localize iron deposits. Additional histological procedures were used to localize inflammatory cell infiltrates, microgliosis and astrogliosis. Results Doppler analysis revealed that cEAE mice had a reduction in cerebral blood flow compared to controls. MRI revealed T2 hypointense areas in cEAE animals that spatially correlated with iron deposition around vessels and at some sites of inflammation as detected by iron histochemistry. Vessels with associated iron deposits were distributed across both hemispheres. Mice with cEAE had more iron-labeled vessels compared to controls, but these vessels were not commonly associated with inflammatory cell infiltrates. Some iron-laden vessels had associated microgliosis that was above the background microglial response, and iron deposits were observed within reactive microglia. Vessels with associated astrogliosis were more commonly observed without colocalization of iron deposits. Conclusion The findings indicate that iron deposition around vessels can occur independently of

  14. Meso-scale modeling of air pollution transport/chemistry/deposition and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Transport/chemistry/deposition model for atmospheric trace chemical species is now regarded as an important tool for an understanding of the effects of various human activities, such as fuel combustion and deforestation, on human health, eco-system, and climate and for planning of appropriate control of emission sources. Several 'comprehensive' models have been proposed such as RADM (Chang, et al., 1987), STEM-II (Carmichael, et al., 1986), and CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality model, e.g., EPA website, 2003); the 'comprehensive' models include not only gas/aerosol phase chemistry but also aqueous phase chemistry in cloud/rain water in addition to the processes of advection, diffusion, wet deposition (mass transfer between aqueous and gas/aerosol phases), and dry deposition. The target of the development of the 'comprehensive' model will be that the model can correctly reproduce mass balance of various chemical species in the atmosphere with keeping adequate accuracy for calculated concentration distributions of chemical species. For the purpose, one of the important problems is a reliable wet deposition modeling, and here, we introduce two types of methods of 'cloud-resolving' and 'non-cloud-resolving' modeling for the wet deposition of pollutants. (author)

  15. A Generic Model for the Resuspension of Multilayer Aerosol Deposits by Turbulent Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friess, H.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    2001-01-01

    An idealized lattice structure is considered of multilayer aerosol deposits, where every particle at the deposit surface is associated with a resuspension rate constant depending on a statistically distributed particle parameter and on flow conditions. The response of this generic model is represented by a set of integrodifferential equations. As a first application of the general formalism, the behavior of Fromentin's multilayer model is analyzed, and the model parameters are adapted to experimental data. In addition, improved relations between model parameters and physical input parameters are proposed. As a second application, a method is proposed for building multilayer models by using resuspension rate constants of existing monolayer models. The method is illustrated by a sample of monolayer data resulting from the model of Reeks, Reed, and Hall. Also discussed is the error to be expected if a monolayer resuspension model, which works well for thin aerosol deposits, is applied to thick deposits under the classical monolayer assumption that all deposited particles interact with the fluid at all times

  16. Linking nitrogen deposition to nitrate concentrations in groundwater below nature areas : modelling approach and data requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, L.T.C.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Wieggers, H.J.J.; Vries, de W.; Pul, van W.A.J.; Hoek, van den K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the most suitable model and required model improvements to link atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other elements in the Netherlands to measurements of nitrogen and other elements in the upper groundwater. The deterministic model SMARTml was found to be the most suitable

  17. The giant Jiaodong gold province: The key to a unified model for orogenic gold deposits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Groves

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the term orogenic gold deposit has been widely accepted for all gold-only lode-gold deposits, with the exception of Carlin-type deposits and rare intrusion-related gold systems, there has been continuing debate on their genesis. Early syngenetic models and hydrothermal models dominated by meteoric fluids are now clearly unacceptable. Magmatic-hydrothermal models fail to explain the genesis of orogenic gold deposits because of the lack of consistent spatially – associated granitic intrusions and inconsistent temporal relationships. The most plausible, and widely accepted, models involve metamorphic fluids, but the source of these fluids is hotly debated. Sources within deeper segments of the supracrustal successions hosting the deposits, the underlying continental crust, and subducted oceanic lithosphere and its overlying sediment wedge all have their proponents. The orogenic gold deposits of the giant Jiaodong gold province of China, in the delaminated North China Craton, contain ca. 120 Ma gold deposits in Precambrian crust that was metamorphosed over 2000 million years prior to gold mineralization. The only realistic source of fluid and gold is a subducted oceanic slab with its overlying sulfide-rich sedimentary package, or the associated mantle wedge. This could be viewed as an exception to a general metamorphic model where orogenic gold has been derived during greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphism of supracrustal rocks: basaltic rocks in the Precambrian and sedimentary rocks in the Phanerozoic. Alternatively, if a holistic view is taken, Jiaodong can be considered the key orogenic gold province for a unified model in which gold is derived from late-orogenic metamorphic devolatilization of stalled subduction slabs and oceanic sediments throughout Earth history. The latter model satisfies all geological, geochronological, isotopic and geochemical constraints but the precise mechanisms of auriferous fluid release, like many

  18. Modelling and optimization of film thickness variation for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Ewan; Gibson, Des; Lin, Li; Fu, Xiuhua

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a method for modelling film thickness variation across the deposition area within plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. The model enables identification and optimization of film thickness uniformity sensitivities to electrode configuration, temperature, deposition system design and gas flow distribution. PECVD deposition utilizes a co-planar 300mm diameter electrodes with separate RF power matching to each electrode. The system has capability to adjust electrode separation and electrode temperature as parameters to optimize uniformity. Vacuum is achieved using dry pumping with real time control of butterfly valve position for active pressure control. Comparison between theory and experiment is provided for PECVD of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) deposition onto flat and curved substrate geometries. The process utilizes butane reactive feedstock with an argon carrier gas. Radiofrequency plasma is used. Deposited film thickness sensitivities to electrode geometry, plasma power density, pressure and gas flow distribution are demonstrated. Use of modelling to optimise film thickness uniformity is demonstrated. Results show DLC uniformity of 0.30% over a 200 mm flat zone diameter within overall electrode diameter of 300mm. Thickness uniformity of 0.75% is demonstrated over a 200mm diameter for a non-conformal substrate geometry. Use of the modelling method for PECVD using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) feedstock is demonstrated, specifically for deposition of silica films using metal-organic tetraethoxy-silane. Excellent agreement between experimental and theory is demonstrated for conformal and non-conformal geometries. The model is used to explore scalability of PECVD processes and trade-off against film thickness uniformity. Application to MEMS, optical coatings and thin film photovoltaics is discussed.

  19. Development of a dust deposition forecast model for a mine tailings impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael

    Wind erosion, transport and deposition of particulate matter can have significant impacts on the environment. It is observed that about 40% of the global land area and 30% of the earth's population lives in semiarid environments which are especially susceptible to wind erosion and airborne transport of contaminants. With the increased desertification caused by land use changes, anthropogenic activities and projected climate change impacts windblown dust will likely become more significant. An important anthropogenic source of windblown dust in this region is associated with mining operations including tailings impoundments. Tailings are especially susceptible to erosion due to their fine grain composition, lack of vegetative coverage and high height compared to the surrounding topography. This study is focused on emissions, dispersion and deposition of windblown dust from the Iron King mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site. The tailings impoundment is heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic and is located directly adjacent to the town of Dewey-Humboldt. The study includes in situ field measurements, computational fluid dynamic modeling and the development of a windblown dust deposition forecasting model that predicts deposition patterns of dust originating from the tailings impoundment. Two instrumented eddy flux towers were setup on the tailings impoundment to monitor the aeolian and meteorological conditions. The in situ observations were used in conjunction with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate the transport of windblown dust from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The CFD model simulations include gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport was used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. The CFD simulations were used to estimate deposition of tailings dust and identify topographic mechanisms

  20. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to the Oceans: Observation- and Model-Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (Nr) burden of the atmosphere has been increased by a factor of 3-4 by anthropogenic activity since the Industrial Revolution. This has led to large increases in the deposition of nitrate and ammonium to the surface waters of the open ocean, particularly downwind of major human population centres, such as those in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. In oligotrophic waters, this deposition has the potential to significantly impact marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce effective models of reactive nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition (including deposition to the land surface). Over land, N deposition models can be assessed using comparisons to regional monitoring networks of precipitation chemistry (notably those located in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia). No similar datasets exist which would allow observation - model comparisons of wet deposition for the open oceans, because long-term wet deposition records are available for only a handful of remote island sites and rain collection over the open ocean itself is logistically very difficult. In this work we attempt instead to use ~2800 observations of aerosol nitrate and ammonium concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995 - 2012, to assess the performance of modelled N deposition fields over the remote ocean. This database is non-uniformly distributed in time and space. We selected three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific) where we considered the density and distribution of observational data is sufficient to provide effective comparison to the model ensemble. Our presentation will focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic region, which has the best data coverage of the three. We will compare dry deposition fluxes calculated from the observed nitrate

  1. Modelling study of regional deposition of inhaled aerosols with special reference to effects of ventilation asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, W.; Egan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the mathematical modelling of aerosol transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols in the lung. Two mathematical models are considered, one assumes the lung to be completely symmetrical, the second incorporates a measure of ventilation inhomogeneity. Both models include the influence of effective axial dispersion. The asymmetrical model is used in the simulations of the radio-bolus inhalation experiments performed by Stahlhofen et al [J. Aerosol Sci. 17, 33], which involved the injection of a bolus at a pre-defined volume towards the end of an inspiration. The impact of the simulation results on regional deposition estimates are discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Modeling and simulation of NiO dissolution and Ni deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Suk Woo; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Lim, Tae Hoon [Korea Institute of Science & Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Dissolution of NiO cathode into the electrolyte matrix is an important phenomena limiting the lifetime of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The dissolved nickel diffuses into the matrix and is reduced by dissolved hydrogen leading to the formation of metallic nickel films in the pores of the matrix. The growth of Ni films in the electrolyte matrix during the continuous cell operation results eventually in shorting between cathode and anode. Various mathematical and empirical models have been developed to describe the NiO dissolution and Ni deposition processes, and these models have some success in estimating the lifetime of MCFC by correlating the amount of Ni deposited in the matrix with shorting time. Since the exact mechanism of Ni deposition was not well understood, deposition reaction was assumed to be very fast in most of the models and the Ni deposition region was limited around a point in the matrix. In fact, formation of Ni films takes place in a rather broad region in the matrix, the location and thickness of the film depending on operating conditions as well as matrix properties. In this study, we assumed simple reaction kinetics for Ni deposition and developed a mathematical model to get the distribution of nickel in the matrix.

  3. Thermal analysis of fused deposition modeling process using infrared thermography imaging and finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2017-05-01

    After years of development, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) has become the most popular technique in commercial 3D printing due to its cost effectiveness and easy-to-operate fabrication process. Mechanical strength and dimensional accuracy are two of the most important factors for reliability of FDM products. However, the solid-liquid-solid state changes of material in the FDM process make it difficult to monitor and model. In this paper, an experimental model was developed to apply cost-effective infrared thermography imaging method to acquire temperature history of filaments at the interface and their corresponding cooling mechanism. A three-dimensional finite element model was constructed to simulate the same process using element "birth and death" feature and validated with the thermal response from the experimental model. In 6 of 9 experimental conditions, a maximum of 13% difference existed between the experimental and numerical models. This work suggests that numerical modeling of FDM process is reliable and can facilitate better understanding of bead spreading and road-to-road bonding mechanics during fabrication.

  4. Distributed Modeling of soil erosion and deposition affected by buffer strips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    bodies. Buffer zones can be efficient in terms of retaining sediment and phosphorus transported by water erosion. This study aimed at parameterizing a spatial distributed erosion model to evaluate the effect of different buffer zone properties and dimension. It was our hypothesis that the placement...... and dimension of buffer zones in the landscape can be optimized by means of spatially distributed erosion and deposition modeling. During the period from 1998 to 2000 field campaigns were done on a range of agricultural land in Denmark. On 21 slope units and adjacent buffer zones, rill erosion and deposition...... was surveyed during the runoff season. In addition, organic carbon and phosphorous contents as well as bulk density were determined in soils of eroding and depositional sites. General buffer zone properties were recorded. Here we present results from scenario analyses comparing measured sediment deposition...

  5. Modeling of stable and metastable structures of Co, Cr, or Fe deposited on Ag(100) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canzian, A. [Grupo de Caracterizacion y Modelacion de Materiales, UTN, FRGP, H. Yrigoyen 288, (B1617FRP) Gral. Pacheco (Argentina); Bozzolo, G., E-mail: guille_bozzolo@yahoo.co [Loyola University of Maryland, 4501 N. Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin (Argentina)

    2011-01-31

    Atomistic modeling of the deposition of Co, Cr, or Fe on a Ag(100) substrate is performed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith method for alloys, in order to describe the similarities and differences between the three cases. An atom-by-atom description of the deposition process explains the growth patterns from an early stage, establishing a criterion for the determination of the ensuing growth modes.

  6. Evaluation of the various biokinetic models of liberation from characteristic deposition fraction of brazilian population sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Arlene A. dos; Cardoso, Joaquim C.S.; Lourenco, Maria Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The Publication 66 of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP, 1994) presented the Human Respiratory tract Model that simulates the deposition and translocation of radioactive material in the air that penetrates in the body by inhalation. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the variation in fractional activity absorbed into blood when physiological and morphological parameters from Brazilian population are applied in the deposition model. The clearance model was implemented in the software Excel (version 2000) using a system of differential equations to solve simultaneous process of translocation and absorption of material deposited. After implementation were applied in the model fractional deposition calculated by deposition model using physiological and morphological parameters from Brazilian population. The results show that the variation in the clearance model depends on the material dissolution. For materials of rapid absorption, the variations calculated are not significant. Materials of moderate and slow absorption, presented variation greater than 20% in fractional activity absorbed into blood, depending on levels of exercise. (author)

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD Apparatus: Simulations and Approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Geiser

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We are motivated to compute delicate chemical vapor deposition (CVD processes. Such processes are used to deposit thin films of metallic or ceramic materials, such as SiC or a mixture of SiC and TiC. For practical simulations and for studying the characteristics in the deposition area, we have to deal with delicate multiscale models. We propose a multiscale model based on two different software packages. The large scales are simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD software based on the transportreaction model (or macroscopic model, and the small scales are simulated with ordinary differential equations (ODE software based on the reactive precursor gas model (or microscopic model. Our contribution is to upscale the correlation of the underlying microscale species to the macroscopic model and reformulate the fast reaction model. We obtain a computable model and apply a standard CFD software code without losing the information of the fast processes. For the multiscale model, we present numerical results of a real-life deposition process.

  8. Tracing contaminant pathways in sandy heterogeneous glaciofluvial sediments using a sedimentary depositional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, E.K.; Anderson, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Heterogeneous sedimentary deposits present complications for tracking contaminant movement by causing a complex advective flow field. Connected areas of high conductivity produce so-called fast paths that control movement of solutes. Identifying potential fast paths and describing the variation in hydraulic properties was attempted through simulating the deposition of a glaciofluvial deposit (outwash). Glaciofluvial deposits usually consist of several depositional facies, each of which has different physical characteristics, depositional structures and hydraulic properties. Therefore, it is unlikely that the property of stationarity (a constant mean hydraulic conductivity and a mono-modal probability distribution) holds for an entire glaciofluvial sequence. However, the process of dividing an outwash sequence into geologic facies presumably identifies units of material with similar physical characteristics. It is proposed that patterns of geologic facies determined by field observation can be quantified by mathematical simulation of sediment deposition. Subsequently, the simulated sediment distributions can be used to define the distribution of hydrogeologic parameters and locate possible fast paths. To test this hypothesis, a hypothetical glacial outwash deposit based on geologic facies descriptions contained in the literature was simulated using a sedimentary depositional model, SEDSIM, to produce a three-dimensional description of sediment grain size distributions. Grain size distributions were then used to estimate the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity. Subsequently a finite-difference flow model and linked particle tracking algorithm were used to trace conservative transport pathways. This represents a first step in describing the spatial heterogeneity of hydrogeologic characteristics for glaciofluvial and other braided stream environments. (Author) (39 refs., 7 figs.)

  9. A dermal model for spray painters. Part I: subjective exposure modelling of spray paint deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, D H; Semple, S; Marquart, J; Cherrie, J W

    2001-01-01

    The discriminative power of existing dermal exposure models is limited. Most models only allow occupational hygienists to rank workers between and within workplaces according to broad bands of dermal exposure. No allowance is made for the work practices of different individuals. In this study a process-based, structured approach has been used to estimate dermal exposure from overspray generated by a spray painting process. Factors for spray technique, object shape and workers' individual work practices involved in the processes of droplet formation and deposition were incorporated into the model. The model was applied to predict dermal exposure of airless spray painters and the results were compared with exposure data. The predicted levels of exposure showed reasonable rank correlation with the measured exposure, although the model tended to over-predict the actual level of exposure. It was concluded that a structured, process-based approach has the potential to produce reliable estimates of dermal exposure. The reliability of exposure models of this type should be explored further and the relationship between the determinants of exposure should be validated by additional field studies.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  11. Low-Volatility Model Demonstrates Humidity Affects Environmental Toxin Deposition on Plastics at a Molecular Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankett, Jeanne M; Collin, William R; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan; Duhaime, Melissa

    2016-02-02

    Despite the ever-increasing prevalence of plastic debris and endocrine disrupting toxins in aquatic ecosystems, few studies describe their interactions in freshwater environments. We present a model system to investigate the deposition/desorption behaviors of low-volatility lake ecosystem toxins on microplastics in situ and in real time. Molecular interactions of gas-phase nonylphenols (NPs) with the surfaces of two common plastics, poly(styrene) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), were studied using quartz crystal microbalance and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. NP point sources were generated under two model environments: plastic on land and plastic on a freshwater surface. We found the headspace above calm water provides an excellent environment for NP deposition and demonstrate significant NP deposition on plastic within minutes at relevant concentrations. Further, NP deposits and orders differently on both plastics under humid versus dry environments. We attributed the unique deposition behaviors to surface energy changes from increased water content during the humid deposition. Lastly, nanograms of NP remained on microplastic surfaces hours after initial NP introduction and agitating conditions, illustrating feasibility for plastic-bound NPs to interact with biota and surrounding matter. Our model studies reveal important interactions between low-volatility environmental toxins and microplastics and hold potential to correlate the environmental fate of endocrine disrupting toxins in the Great Lakes with molecular behaviors.

  12. Predictive modeling capabilities from incident powder and laser to mechanical properties for laser directed energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yung C.; Bailey, Neil; Katinas, Christopher; Tan, Wenda

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of vertically integrated comprehensive predictive modeling capabilities for directed energy deposition processes, which have been developed at Purdue University. The overall predictive models consist of vertically integrated several modules, including powder flow model, molten pool model, microstructure prediction model and residual stress model, which can be used for predicting mechanical properties of additively manufactured parts by directed energy deposition processes with blown powder as well as other additive manufacturing processes. Critical governing equations of each model and how various modules are connected are illustrated. Various illustrative results along with corresponding experimental validation results are presented to illustrate the capabilities and fidelity of the models. The good correlations with experimental results prove the integrated models can be used to design the metal additive manufacturing processes and predict the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties.

  13. Mineral-deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; McCauley, Andrew D.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2017-06-20

    Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites comprise a compositionally defined subset of granitic pegmatites. The major minerals are quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite; typical accessory minerals include biotite, garnet, tourmaline, and apatite. The principal lithium ore minerals are spodumene, petalite, and lepidolite; cesium mostly comes from pollucite; and tantalum mostly comes from columbite-tantalite. Tin ore as cassiterite and beryllium ore as beryl also occur in LCT pegmatites, as do a number of gemstones and high-value museum specimens of rare minerals. Individual crystals in LCT pegmatites can be enormous: the largest spodumene was 14 meters long, the largest beryl was 18 meters long, and the largest potassium feldspar was 49 meters long.Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites account for about one-fourth of the world’s lithium production, most of the tantalum production, and all of the cesium production. Giant deposits include Tanco in Canada, Greenbushes in Australia, and Bikita in Zimbabwe. The largest lithium pegmatite in the United States, at King’s Mountain, North Carolina, is no longer being mined although large reserves of lithium remain. Depending on size and attitude of the pegmatite, a variety of mining techniques are used, including artisanal surface mining, open-pit surface mining, small underground workings, and large underground operations using room-and-pillar design. In favorable circumstances, what would otherwise be gangue minerals (quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite) can be mined along with lithium and (or) tantalum as coproducts.Most LCT pegmatites are hosted in metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in the upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatite intrusions generally are emplaced late during orogeny, with emplacement being controlled by pre-existing structures. Typically, they crop out near evolved, peraluminous granites and leucogranites from which they are inferred to be

  14. Modeling dry deposition of reactive nitrogen in China with RAMS-CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Skorokhod, Andrei; Kou, Xingxia

    2017-10-01

    China has the world highest production of reactive nitrogen (Nr), and the Nr consumption increased sharply during the last decade. However, the potential environmental influence of dry nitrogen (N) deposition in China remains uncertain due to that the long-term measurement or remote sensing of various N species are difficult. This requires a better understanding of dry N deposition over China in its various forms and including magnitude and distribution features. Thus, the air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ was applied to simulate dry deposition of Nr over China from 2010 to 2014. The model results were then analyzed to investigate the long-term spatial and temporal distributions of major inorganic nitrogen (N) components (10 species) and selected organic N components (5 species). Comparisons between modeled and observed deposition rates and surface mass concentrations showed generally good agreement. Model results indicated a total dry N deposition budget of 9.31 Tg N yr-1 in China, including 4.29 Tg N yr-1 as NOy and 4.43 Tg N yr-1 as NH3. NOy was the main component of dry N deposition in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area (0.31 Tg N yr-1), the Yangtze River Delta (0.29 Tg N yr-1), and the Pearl River Delta (0.09 Tg N yr-1), where the major megacity clusters of China are located. NH3 was the main component of dry N deposition in Shandong province (0.24 Tg N yr-1), Northeast China (0.46 Tg N yr-1), the Sichuan Basin (0.48 Tg N yr-1), and central China (0.95 Tg N yr-1), where the major agricultural regions are located. The highest values of the deposition flux for NH3 occurred in Shandong province (19.40 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (17.20 kg N ha-1 yr-1). The seasonal variation of total dry N deposition was obvious in the east part of China, and was higher in July and lower in January. The spatio-temporal variations and major sources of dry N deposition were strongly heterogeneous, implying that the comprehensive pollution control strategies should be

  15. A MECHANISTIC MODEL FOR PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN DIESEL PARTICLUATE FILTERS USING THE LATTICE-BOLTZMANN TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Mark L.; Rector, David R.; Muntean, George G.; Maupin, Gary D.

    2004-08-01

    Cordierite diesel particulate filters (DPFs) offer one of the most promising aftertreatment technologies to meet the quickly approaching EPA 2007 heavy-duty emissions regulations. A critical, yet poorly understood, component of particulate filter modeling is the representation of soot deposition. The structure and distribution of soot deposits upon and within the ceramic substrate directly influence many of the macroscopic phenomenon of interest, including filtration efficiency, back pressure, and filter regeneration. Intrinsic soot cake properties such as packing density and permeability coefficients remain inadequately characterized. The work reported in this paper involves subgrid modeling techniques which may prove useful in resolving these inadequacies. The technique involves the use of a lattice Boltzmann modeling approach. This approach resolves length scales which are orders of magnitude below those typical of a standard computational fluid dynamics (CFD) representation of an aftertreatment device. Individual soot particles are introduced and tracked as they move through the flow field and are deposited on the filter substrate or previously deposited particles. Electron micrographs of actual soot deposits were taken and compared to the model predictions. Descriptions of the modeling technique and the development of the computational domain are provided. Preliminary results are presented, along with some comparisons with experimental observations.

  16. Kinetic growth of random-like and ballistic-like deposition models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wang; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1993-03-01

    The pattern structure and the scaling behaviour of the surface width for two deposition models of two kinds of particles, particle-A with a probability 1-P and particle-C with a probability P, depositing on a (1+1)-dimensional substrate are studied. For model I, a random-like deposition model, the pattern has a compact structure, and the surface width growth only depends on the time, W ∼ t 1/2 for the early stage and W ∼ t β(P) for the intermediate time where β is a function of P, as well as W ∼ P -γ for the later time. For model II, a ballistic-like deposition model, the pattern and scaling behaviour are similar to the ballistic deposition. The scaling of the surface width is W ∼ t β(P) for the early stage of growth, and W ∼ L α for later stage. The exponent β is of function of P while α is independent of P. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Modeling of asphaltene particle deposition from turbulent oil flow in tubing: Model validation and a parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Kor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of asphaltenes on the inner wall of oil wells and pipelines causes flow blockage and significant production loss in these conduits. The major underlying mechanism(s for the deposition of asphaltene particles from the oil stream are still under investigation as an active research topic in the literature. In this work, a new deposition model considering both diffusional and inertial transport of asphaltene toward the tubing surface was developed. Model predictions were compared and verified with two sound experimental data available in the literature to evaluate the model's performance. A parametric study was done using the validated model in order to investigate the effect of the asphaltene particle size, flow velocity and oil viscosity on the magnitude of asphaltene deposition rate. Results of the study revealed that increasing the oil velocity causes more drag force on wall's inner surface; consequently, particles tend to transport away from the surface and the rate of asphaltene deposition is decreased. In addition, the developed model predicts that at low fluid velocity (∼0.7 m/s, the less viscous oil is more prone to asphaltene deposition problem.

  18. Comparing i-Tree modeled ozone deposition with field measurements in a periurban Mediterranean forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Morani; D. Nowak; S. Hirabayashi; G. Guidolotti; M. Medori; V. Muzzini; S. Fares; G. Scarascia Mugnozza; C. Calfapietra

    2014-01-01

    Ozone flux estimates from the i-Tree model were compared with ozone flux measurements using the Eddy Covariance technique in a periurban Mediterranean forest near Rome (Castelporziano). For the first time i-Tree model outputs were compared with field measurements in relation to dry deposition estimates. Results showed generally a...

  19. Fogwater deposition modeling for terrestrial ecosystems: A review of developments and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katata, Genki

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in modeling fogwater (and low cloud water) deposition over terrestrial ecosystems during fogwater droplet interception by vegetative surfaces is reviewed. Several types of models and parameterizations for fogwater deposition are discussed with comparing assumptions, input parameter requirements, and modeled processes. The relationships among deposition velocity of fogwater (Vd) in model results, wind speed, and plant species structures associated with literature values are gathered for model validation. Quantitative comparisons between model results and observations in forest environments revealed differences as large as 2 orders of magnitude, which are likely caused by uncertainties in measurement techniques over heterogeneous landscapes. Results from the literature review show that Vd values ranged from 2.1 to 8.0 cm s-1 for short vegetation, whereas Vd = 7.7-92 cm s-1 and 0-20 cm s-1 for forests measured by throughfall-based methods and the eddy covariance method, respectively. This review also discusses the current understanding of the impacts of fogwater deposition on atmosphere-land interactions and over complex terrain based on results from numerical studies. Lastly, future research priorities in innovative modeling and observational approaches for model validation are outlined.

  20. Modeling film uniformity and symmetry in ionized metal physical vapor deposition with cylindrical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junqing; Yang Lin; Yoon, Jae Hong; Cho, Tong Yul; Tao Guoqing

    2008-01-01

    Severe asymmetry of the metal deposits on the trench sidewalls occurs near the wafer edge during low pressure ionized metal physical vapor deposition of Cu seed layer for microprocessor interconnects. To investigate this process and mitigate the asymmetry, an analytical view factor model based on the analogy between metal sputtering and diffuse thermal radiation was constructed to investigate deposition uniformity and symmetry for cylindrical target sputtering in low pressure (below 0.1 Pa) ionized Cu physical vapor deposition. The model predictions indicate that as the distance from the cylindrical target to wafer increases, the metal film thickness becomes more uniform across the wafer and the asymmetry of the metal deposits at the wafer edge increases significantly. These trends are similar to those for planar targets. To minimize the asymmetry, the height of the cylindrical target should be kept at a minimum. For cylindrical targets, the outward-facing sidewall of the trench could receive more direct Cu fluxes than the inward-facing one when the target to wafer distance is short. The predictions also indicate that increasing the diameter of the cylindrical target could significantly reduce the asymmetry in metal deposits at the wafer edge and make the film thickness more uniform across the wafer

  1. Comparison of methods for evaluation of aerosol deposition in the model of human lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It seems to be very convenient to receive a medicine by inhalation instead of injection. Unfortunately transport of particles and targeted delivery of a drug in human respiratory airways is very complicated task. Therefore we carried out experiments and tested different methods for evaluation of particle deposition in a model of human lungs. The model included respiratory airways from oral cavity to 7th generation of branching. Particles were dispersed by TSI Small-scale Powder Disperser 3433 and delivered to the model. The model was disassembled into segments after the deposition of the particles and local deposition was measured. Two methods were used to analyse the samples, fluorescence spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The first method was based on measuring the intensity of luminescence, which represented the particle deposition. The second method used the optical microscope with phase-contrast objective. A dispersion of isopropanol and particles was filtrated using a vacuum filtration unit, a filter was placed on glass slide and made transparent. The particles on the filter were counted manually and the deposition was calculated afterwards. The results of the methods were compared and both methods proved to be useful.

  2. Regional deposition of thoron progeny in models of the human tracheobronchial tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.M.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Yeh, Hsu-Chi

    1995-12-01

    Models of the human tracheobronchial tree have been used to determine total and regional aerosol deposition of inhaled particles. Particle sizes measured in these studies have all been > 40 nm in diameter. The deposition of aerosols < 40 nm in diameter has not been measured. Particles in the ultrafine aerosol size range include some combustion aerosols and indoor radon progeny. Also, the influence of reduced lung size and airflow rates on particle deposition in young children has not been determined. With their smaller lung size and smaller minute volumes, children may be at increased risk from ultrafine pollutants. In order to accurately determine dose of inhaled aerosols, the effects of particle size, minute volume, and age at exposure must be quantified. The purpose of this study was to determine the deposition efficiency of ultrafine aerosols smaller than 40 nm in diameter in models of the human tracheobronchia tree. This study demonstrates that the deposition efficiency of aerosols in the model of the child`s tracheobronchial tree may be slightly higher than in the adult models.

  3. Application of Physiographic Soil Erosion–Deposition Model in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    69

    2. Ching-Nuo Chen. 3. International Master Program in Soil and Water Engineering, National Pingtung ... technique because of the lack of suitable dam sites, high cost of dam construction, and strict. 29 environmental .... Ziegler et al. 76. (2001) successfully applied the KINEOS2 model to simulate field and road rainfall in. 77.

  4. Application of Physiographic Soil Erosion–Deposition Model in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    69

    University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan;. 5. Correspondence:; Tel.: (ext .... In recent years, several numerical models considering rainfall runoff and sediment. 75 transport to simulate soil .... cells or river cells. The. 116 physiographic and hydrological data of each cell were obtained through GIS analysis.

  5. Magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper deposits related to picrite and (or) tholeiitic basalt dike-sill complexes-A preliminary deposit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Chandler, Val W.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (?) platinum-group elements (PGEs), account for approximately 60 percent of the world's Ni production and are active exploration targets in the United States and elsewhere. On the basis of their principal metal production, magmatic sulfide deposits in mafic rocks can be divided into two major types: those that are sulfide-rich, typically with 10 to 90 percent sulfide minerals, and have economic value primarily because of their Ni and Cu contents; and those that are sulfide-poor, typically with 0.5 to 5 percent sulfide minerals, and are exploited principally for PGE. Because the purpose of this deposit model is to facilitate the assessment for undiscovered, potentially economic magmatic Ni-Cu?PGE sulfide deposits in the United States, it addresses only those deposits of economic significance that are likely to occur in the United States on the basis of known geology. Thus, this model focuses on deposits hosted by small- to medium-sized mafic and (or) ultramafic dikes and sills that are related to picrite and tholeiitic basalt magmatic systems generally emplaced in continental settings as a component of large igneous provinces (LIPs). World-class examples (those containing greater than 1 million tons Ni) of this deposit type include deposits at Noril'sk-Talnakh (Russia), Jinchuan (China), Pechenga (Russia), Voisey's Bay (Canada), and Kabanga (Tanzania). In the United States, this deposit type is represented by the Eagle deposit in northern Michigan, currently under development by Kennecott Minerals.

  6. A model for human calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease: crystallization kinetics in a gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, N S; Mandel, G S

    1984-01-01

    A model for the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in cartilage observed in human CPPD crystal deposition disease has been developed using diffusion of calcium and pyrophosphate ions through a denatured collagen matrix environment at physiologic pH. This model system uses biological grade gelatin and has allowed for the study of crystal deposition over a wide range of calcium and pyrophosphate concentrations, including physiologic levels. The model has reproducibly formed the two crystallographic dimorphs observed clinically: triclinic and monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. In addition, amorphous calcium pyrophosphate has been identified, and is the first species to form in the crystallization process and transforms to orthorhombic calcium pyrophosphate tetrahydrate. This in turn dissolves with a very localized increase in available pyrophosphate leading to the formation of triclinic and monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. The denatured collagen matrix has allowed for the formation of the two in vivo crystals at pyrophosphate concentrations lower than previously reported in solution studies.

  7. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...... prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes...

  8. 3D Printing of Intracranial Aneurysms Using Fused Deposition Modeling Offers Highly Accurate Replications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, A M J; Spallek, J; Brehmer, L; Buhk, J-H; Krause, D; Fiehler, J; Kemmling, A

    2016-01-01

    As part of a multicenter cooperation (Aneurysm-Like Synthetic bodies for Testing Endovascular devices in 3D Reality) with focus on implementation of additive manufacturing in neuroradiologic practice, we systematically assessed the technical feasibility and accuracy of several additive manufacturing techniques. We evaluated the method of fused deposition modeling for the production of aneurysm models replicating patient-specific anatomy. 3D rotational angiographic data from 10 aneurysms were processed to obtain volumetric models suitable for fused deposition modeling. A hollow aneurysm model with connectors for silicone tubes was fabricated by using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Support material was dissolved, and surfaces were finished by using NanoSeal. The resulting models were filled with iodinated contrast media. 3D rotational angiography of the models was acquired, and aneurysm geometry was compared with the original patient data. Reproduction of hollow aneurysm models was technically feasible in 8 of 10 cases, with aneurysm sizes ranging from 41 to 2928 mm(3) (aneurysm diameter, 3-19 mm). A high level of anatomic accuracy was observed, with a mean Dice index of 93.6% ± 2.4%. Obstructions were encountered in vessel segments of modeling is a promising technique, which allows rapid and precise replication of cerebral aneurysms. The porosity of the models can be overcome by surface finishing. Models produced with fused deposition modeling may serve as educational and research tools and could be used to individualize treatment planning. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Modeling the Sulfate Deposition to the Greenland Ice Sheet From the Laki Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, L.; Robock, A.; Stenchikov, G.; Thordarson, T.; Gao, C.

    2005-12-01

    Using the state of the art Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) modelE general circulation model, simulations were conducted of the chemistry and transport of aerosols resulting from the 1783-84 Laki (64°N) flood lava eruption. A set of 3 ensemble simulations from different initial conditions were conducted by injecting our estimate of the SO2 gas into the atmosphere by the 10 episodes of the eruption and allowing the sulfur chemistry model to convert this gas into sulfate aerosol. The SO2 gas and sulfate aerosol is transported by the model and wet and dry deposition is calculated over each grid box during the simulation. We compare the resulting sulfate deposition to the Greenland Ice Sheet in the model to 23 ice core measurements and find very good agreement. The model simulation deposits a range of 169 to over 300 kg/km2 over interior Greenland with much higher values along the coastal areas. This compares to a range of 62 to 324 kg/km2 for the 23 ice core measurements with an average value of 158 kg/km2. This comparison is one important model validation tool. Modeling and observations show fairly large spatial variations in the deposition of sulfate across the Greenland Ice Sheet for the Laki eruption, but the patterns are similar to those we modeled for the 1912 Katmai and 1991 Pinatubo eruptions. Estimates of sulfate loading based on single ice cores can show significant differences, so ideally several ice cores should be combined in reconstructing the sulfate loading of past volcanic eruptions, taking into account the characteristic spatial variations in the deposition pattern.

  10. Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    lung airways are not feasible due to the large number of airways, complexity of the lung geometry, and lack of data on pleural pressure distribution...modeling each airway as a cylindrical tube and the lung as a dichotomous branching network of airways, representative, typical-path, dichotomous and...pressure between the atmosphere and pleural pressure in the lung cavity during inhalation. While inhalation is initiated by the expansion of the lung

  11. Distribution and Orientation of Carbon Fibers in Polylactic Acid Parts Produced by Fused Deposition Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; W. Gutmann, Ingomar; Koch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the understanding of the fiber orientation by investigations in respect to the inner configuration of a polylactic acid matrix reinforced with short carbon fibers after a fused deposition modeling extrusion process. The final parts were analyzed by X-ray, tomography......, and magnetic resonance imaging allowing a resolved orientation of the fibers and distribution within the part. The research contributes to the understanding of the fiber orientation and fiber reinforcement of fused deposition modeling parts in additive manufacturing....

  12. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik, E-mail: soumik.banerjee@wsu.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  13. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  14. Observation- and model-based estimates of particulate dry nitrogen deposition to the oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Baker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic nitrogen (N emissions to the atmosphere have increased significantly the deposition of nitrate (NO3− and ammonium (NH4+ to the surface waters of the open ocean, with potential impacts on marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of the impacts of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce and validate models of nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition. In this work,  ∼  2900 observations of aerosol NO3− and NH4+ concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995–2012, are used to assess the performance of modelled N concentration and deposition fields over the remote ocean. Three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific were selected, in which the density and distribution of observational data were considered sufficient to provide effective comparison to model products. All of these study regions are affected by transport and deposition of mineral dust, which alters the deposition of N, due to uptake of nitrogen oxides (NOx on mineral surfaces. Assessment of the impacts of atmospheric N deposition on the ocean requires atmospheric chemical transport models to report deposition fluxes; however, these fluxes cannot be measured over the ocean. Modelling studies such as the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, which only report deposition flux, are therefore very difficult to validate for dry deposition. Here, the available observational data were averaged over a 5° × 5° grid and compared to ACCMIP dry deposition fluxes (ModDep of oxidised N (NOy and reduced N (NHx and to the following parameters from the Tracer Model 4 of the Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (TM4: ModDep for NOy, NHx and particulate NO3− and NH4+, and surface-level particulate NO3− and NH4+ concentrations. As a model ensemble, ACCMIP can be

  15. Characterization, modeling and simulation of fused deposition modeling fabricated part surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Mohammad; Jain, Prashant K.

    2017-12-01

    Surface roughness is generally used for characterization, modeling and simulation of fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part surfaces. But the average surface roughness is not able to provide the insight of surface characteristics with sharp peaks and deep valleys. It deals in the average sense for all types of surfaces, including FDM fabricated surfaces with distinct surface profile features. The present research work shows that kurtosis and skewness can be used for characterization, modeling and simulation of FDM surfaces because these roughness parameters have the ability to characterize a surface with sharp peaks and deep valleys. It can be critical in certain application areas in tribology and biomedicine, where the surface profile plays an important role. Thus, in this study along with surface roughness, skewness and kurtosis are considered to show a novel strategy to provide new transferable knowledge about FDM fabricated part surfaces. The results suggest that the surface roughness, skewness and kurtosis are significantly different at 0° and in the range (0°, 30°], [30°, 90°] of build orientation.

  16. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  17. CFD Modeling of Sodium-Oxide Deposition in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Compact Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatli, Emre; Ferroni, Paolo; Mazzoccoli, Jason

    2015-09-02

    The possible use of compact heat exchangers (HXs) in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) employing a Brayton cycle is promising due to their high power density and resulting small volume in comparison with conventional shell-and-tube HXs. However, the small diameter of their channels makes them more susceptible to plugging due to Na2O deposition during accident conditions. Although cold traps are designed to reduce oxygen impurity levels in the sodium coolant, their failure, in conjunction with accidental air ingress into the sodium boundary, could result in coolant oxygen levels that are above the saturation limit in the cooler parts of the HX channels. This can result in Na2O crystallization and the formation of solid deposits on cooled channel surfaces, limiting or even blocking coolant flow. The development of analysis tools capable of modeling the formation of these deposits in the presence of sodium flow will allow designers of SFRs to properly size the HX channels so that, in the scenario mentioned above, the reactor operator has sufficient time to detect and react to the affected HX. Until now, analytical methodologies to predict the formation of these deposits have been developed, but never implemented in a high-fidelity computational tool suited to modern reactor design techniques. This paper summarizes the challenges and the current status in the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology to predict deposit formation, with particular emphasis on sensitivity studies on some parameters affecting deposition.

  18. New models of droplet deposition and entrainment for prediction of CHF in cylindrical rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibin, E-mail: hb-zhang@xjtu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom); Hewitt, G.F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • New models of droplet deposition and entrainment in rod bundles is developed. • A new phenomenological model to predict the CHF in rod bundles is described. • The present model is well able to predict CHF in rod bundles. - Abstract: In this paper, we present a new set of model of droplet deposition and entrainment in cylindrical rod bundles based on the previously proposed model for annuli (effectively a “one-rod” bundle) (2016a). These models make it possible to evaluate the differences of the rates of droplet deposition and entrainment for the respective rods and for the outer tube by taking into account the geometrical characteristics of the rod bundles. Using these models, a phenomenological model to predict the CHF (critical heat flux) for upward annular flow in vertical rod bundles is described. The performance of the model is tested against the experimental data of Becker et al. (1964) for CHF in 3-rod and 7-rod bundles. These data include tests in which only the rods were heated and data for simultaneous uniform and non-uniform heating of the rods and the outer tube. It was shown that the predicted CHFs by the present model agree well with the experimental data and with the experimental observation that dryout occurred first on the outer rods in 7-rod bundles. It is expected that the methodology used will be generally applicable in the prediction of CHF in rod bundles.

  19. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  20. Simulation of nitrogen deposition in the North China Plain by the FRAME model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition in the North China Plain (NCP at high resolution, 5 × 5 km2, was conducted for the first time by the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME model. The total N deposition budget was 1481 Gg in this region, with 77 % from reduced N and 23 % from oxidized N, and the annual deposition rate (47 kg N ha−1 was much higher than previously reported values for other parts of the world such as the UK (13 kg N ha−1, Poland (7.3 kg N ha−1 and EU27 (8.6 kg N ha−1. The exported N component (1981 Gg was much higher than the imported N component (584 Gg, suggesting that the NCP is an important net emission source of N pollutants. Contributions of N deposition budgets from the seven provinces in this region were proportional to their area ratios. The calculated spatial distributions of N deposition displayed high rates of reduced N deposition in the south and of oxidized N deposition in the eastern part. The N deposition exceeded an upper limit of 30 kg N ha−1 for natural ecosystems over more than 90 % of the region, resulting in terrestrial ecosystem deterioration, impaired air quality and coastal eutrophication not only in the NCP itself but also in surrounding areas including the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.

  1. A COMPARISON OF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF PLASTIC PARTS PRODUCED BY A FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING DEVICE

    OpenAIRE

    Juraj Beniak; Peter Križan; Miloš Matúš

    2015-01-01

    Rapid Prototyping systems are nowadays increasingly used in many areas of industry, not only for producing design models but also for producing parts for final use. We need to know the properties of these parts. When we talk about the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technique and FDM devices, there are many possible settings for devices and models which could influence the properties of a final part. In addition, devices based on the same principle may use different operational software for c...

  2. Atmospheric Breakup and Energy Deposition Modeling for Asteroid Impact Risk Assessmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, L.; Mathias, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Asteroid Threat Assessment Project (ATAP) team at NASA Ames Research Center is developing physics-based models to assess the risk posed by potential asteroid strikes on Earth. As part of this effort, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric energy deposition of asteroids with a range of compositional properties and entry conditions. The resulting energy deposition profiles are used to estimate airburst altitudes and blast overpressure damage on the ground. The model approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with the release of aggregate clouds of debris. A wide range of potential breakup behaviors can be assessed by varying the number and masses of fragments produced, the fraction of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the durability of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can also be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes and remaining debris mass to represent a variety of structural types, from rubble piles to coherent monoliths. The model is able to reproduce key energy deposition features, such as multiple flares, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of loosely bound conglomerations followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of energy deposition to potential variations in asteroid structure, while also maintaining a level of fidelity appropriate for the large numbers of cases needed for statistical risk assessment.

  3. Acid deposition modelling and the interpretation of the United Kingdom secondary precipitation network data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, S. E.; Atkins, D. H. F.; Derwent, R. G.

    Acid deposition modelling calculations have been compared against the data obtained during the first year's operation of the United Kingdom Secondary Precipitation Network. The model adopted employed a single level trajectory approach to describe the coupled atmospheric chemistry and deposition of SO x NO y and NH x species. For the precipitation sulphate concentrations, the model results over the 47 network sites correlated well with the observations. When corrections were applied within the model calculations for background deposition and for dry deposition into the bulk collector, then the model results overestimated the precipitation sulphate observations by about 27%. For the precipitation nitrate concentrations, again the model results correlated well with the observations. Over the whole network, the model underestimated the observations by about 6% and no significant background correction was required for background sources. For the precipitation ammonium concentrations, good agreement with the observations could only be obtained if an additional ammonia source over and above that from animal manure was included in the model. One possibility investigated was exhalation from agricultural soils with an emission rate of 50-100 kg NH x ha -1 a -1. The model was able to reproduce the main features of the distributions of NO 2 and NH 3 in terms of gradients across the U.K. and in the location of the respective maxima. However, in both cases, severe underestimation by the model was apparent. The source of this underestimation was found to involve the assumption of complete vertical mixing in the model and the neglect of nocturnal stable layers.

  4. Evaluation of DUSTRAN Software System for Modeling Chloride Deposition on Steel Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Tracy T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rutz, Frederick C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-29

    The degradation of steel by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) when exposed to atmospheric conditions for decades is a significant challenge in the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. SCC can occur when corrosive contaminants such as chlorides are deposited on a susceptible material in a tensile stress state. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has identified chloride-induced SCC as a potential cause for concern in stainless steel used nuclear fuel (UNF) canisters in dry storage. The modeling of contaminant deposition is the first step in predictive multiscale modeling of SCC that is essential to develop mitigation strategies, prioritize inspection, and ensure the integrity and performance of canisters, pipelines, and structural materials. A multiscale simulation approach can be developed to determine the likelihood that a canister would undergo SCC in a certain period of time. This study investigates the potential of DUSTRAN, a dust dispersion modeling system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, to model the deposition of chloride contaminants from sea salt aerosols on a steel canister. Results from DUSTRAN simulations run with historical meteorological data were compared against measured chloride data at a coastal site in Maine. DUSTRAN’s CALPUFF model tended to simulate concentrations higher than those measured; however, the closest estimations were within the same order of magnitude as the measured values. The decrease in discrepancies between measured and simulated values as the level of abstraction in wind speed decreased suggest that the model is very sensitive to wind speed. However, the influence of other parameters such as the distinction between open-ocean and surf-zone sources needs to be explored further. Deposition values predicted by the DUSTRAN system were not in agreement with concentration values and suggest that the deposition calculations may not fully represent physical processes. Overall, results indicate that with parameter

  5. 3D Hatching : Linear halftoning for dual extrusion fused deposition modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Tim; Doubrovski, E.L.; Verlinden, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents halftoning techniques to manufacture 3D objects with the appearance of full grayscale imagery for Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) printers. While droplet-based dithering is a common halftoning technique, this is not applicable to FDM printing, since FDM builds up objects by

  6. Dry Lung as a Physical Model in Studies of Aerosol Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Victor N; Kanev, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    A new physical model was developed to evaluate the deposition of micro- and nanoaerosol particles (NAPs) into the lungs as a function of size and charges. The model was manufactured of a dry, inflated swine lung produced by Nasco company (Fort Atkinson, WI). The dry lung was cut into two lobes and a conductive tube was glued into the bronchial tube. The upper 1-2-mm-thick layer of the lung lobe was removed with a razor blade to expose the alveoli. The lobe was further enclosed into a plastic bag and placed within a metalized plastic box. The probability of aerosol deposition was calculated by comparing the size distribution of NAPs passed through the lung with that of control, where aerosol passed through a box bypassing the lung. Using this new lung model, it was demonstrated that charged NAPs are deposited inside the lung substantially more efficiently than neutral ones. It was also demonstrated that deposition of neutral NAPs well fits prediction of the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model developed by the Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA).

  7. Modelling the impact of climate change and atmospheric N deposition on French forests biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetto, Simon; Belyazid, Salim; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Nicolas, Manuel; Alard, Didier; Corcket, Emmanuel; Gaudio, Noémie; Sverdrup, Harald; Probst, Anne

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic coupled biogeochemical-ecological model was used to simulate the effects of nitrogen deposition and climate change on plant communities at three forest sites in France. The three sites had different forest covers (sessile oak, Norway spruce and silver fir), three nitrogen loads ranging from relatively low to high, different climatic regions and different soil types. Both the availability of vegetation time series and the environmental niches of the understory species allowed to evaluate the model for predicting the composition of the three plant communities. The calibration of the environmental niches was successful, with a model performance consistently reasonably high throughout the three sites. The model simulations of two climatic and two deposition scenarios showed that climate change may entirely compromise the eventual recovery from eutrophication of the simulated plant communities in response to the reductions in nitrogen deposition. The interplay between climate and deposition was strongly governed by site characteristics and histories in the long term, while forest management remained the main driver of change in the short term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparisons of measured and modelled ozone deposition to forests in northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touvinen, J. P.; Simpson, D.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a new dry deposition module, developedfor the European-scale mapping and modelling of ozone flux to vegetation, was tested against micrometeorological ozone and water vapour flux measurements. The measurement data are for twoconiferous (Scots pine in Finland, Norway spruce...

  9. Fused Deposition Modeling 3D Printing for (Bio)analytical Device Fabrication : Procedures, Materials, and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salentijn, Gert Ij; Oomen, Pieter E; Grajewski, Maciej; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the use of fused deposition modeling (FDM) in a (bio)analytical/lab-on-a-chip research laboratory is described. First, the specifications of this 3D printing method that are important for the fabrication of (micro)devices were characterized for a benchtop FDM 3D printer. These include

  10. The APO(*)E3-Leiden mouse as an animal model for basal laminar deposit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kliffen, M.; Lutgens, E.; Daemen, M. J.; de Muinck, E. D.; Mooy, C. M.; de Jong, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the APO(*)E3-Leiden mouse as an animal model for age related maculopathy (ARM) related extracellular deposits. Eyes were obtained from APO(*)E3-Leiden transgenic mice on a high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet (n=12) or on a normal mouse chow (n=6), for 9 months. As controls, eyes were

  11. The APO(*)E3-Leiden mouse as an animal model for basal laminar deposit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kliffen (Mike); E. Lutgens; M.J. Daemen (Mat); E.D. de Muinck; C.M. Mooy (Cornelia); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To investigate the APO(*)E3-Leiden mouse as an animal model for age related maculopathy (ARM) related extracellular deposits. METHODS: Eyes were obtained from APO(*)E3-Leiden transgenic mice on a high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet (n=12) or on a normal mouse chow

  12. Experimental Validation of Plastic Mandible Models Produced by a ?Low-Cost? 3-Dimensional Fused Deposition Modeling Printer

    OpenAIRE

    Maschio, Federico; Pandya, Mirali; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) plastic (ABS) models generated using a low-cost 3D fused deposition modelling printer. Material/Methods Two human dry mandibles were scanned with a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Accuitomo device. Preprocessing consisted of 3D reconstruction with Maxilim software and STL file repair with Netfabb software. Then, the data were used to print 2 plastic replicas with a low-cost 3D fused deposition mo...

  13. Modeling of gas-phase chemistry in the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprac, A.J.; Edgar, T.F.; Trachtenberg, I. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    The relative contribution of gas-phase chemistry to deposition processes is an important issue both from the standpoint of operation and modeling of these processes. In polysilicon deposition from thermally activated silane in a cold wall rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) system, the relative contribution of gas-phase chemistry to the overall deposition rate was examined by a mass-balance model. Evaluating the process at conditions examined experimentally, the model indicated that gas-phase reactions may be neglected to good accuracy in predicting polysilicon deposition rate. The model also provided estimates of the level of gas-phase generated SiH[sub 2] associated with deposition on the cold-process chamber walls.

  14. A simple model to estimate deposition based on a statistical reassessment of global fallout data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálsson, S E; Howard, B J; Bergan, T D; Paatero, J; Isaksson, M; Nielsen, S P

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. Monitoring of the resulting global fallout was carried out globally by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory and the UK Atomic Energy Research Establishment as well as at national level by some countries. A correlation was identified between fallout deposition and precipitation and an uneven distribution with latitude. In this study, the available data from 1954 to 1976 for (90)Sr and (137)Cs were reanalysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and logarithmically transformed values of the monthly deposition density as the response variable. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to explore the relationship of different variables to the response variable and quantify the explanatory power that could be achieved. The explanatory variables which consistently explained most of the variability were precipitation at each site, latitude and change with time and a simple linear model was produced with similar explanatory power as the GAM. The estimates improved as the temporal resolution of the precipitation data increased. A good log-log fit could be obtained if a bias of about 1-6 mm precipitation per month was added, this could be interpreted as dry deposition which is not otherwise accounted for in the model. The deposition rate could then be explained as a simple non-linear power function of the precipitation rate (r(0.2-0.6) depending on latitude band). A similar non-linear power function relationship has been the outcome of some studies linking wash-out and rain-out coefficients with rain intensity. Our results showed that the precipitation rate was an important parameter, not just the total amount. The simple model presented here allows the recreation of the deposition history at a site, allowing comparison with time series of activity concentrations for different environmental compartments, which is important for model validation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental studies were conducted to determine the effect of asphaltene deposition on the permeability reduction and porosity reduction of carbonate, sandstone and dolomite rock samples using an Iranian bottom hole live oil sample which is close to reservoir conditions, whereas in the majority of previous work, a mixture of recombined oil (a mixture of dead oil and associated gas was injected into a core sample which is far from reservoir conditions. The effect of the oil injection rate on asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction was studied. The experimental results showed that an increase in the oil injection flow rate can result in an increase in asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction. Also, it can be observed that at lower injection flow rates, a monotonic decrease in permeability of the rock samples can be attained upon increasing the injection flow rate, while at higher injection rates, after a decrease in rock permeability, an increasing trend is observed before a steady-state condition can be reached. The experimental results also showed that the rock type can affect the amount of asphaltene deposition, and the asphaltene deposition has different mechanisms in sandstone and carbonate core samples. It can be seen that the adsorption and plugging mechanisms have a more important role in asphaltene deposition in carbonate core samples than sandstone core samples. From the results, it can be observed that the pore volumes of the injected crude oil are higher for sandstone cores compared with the carbonate cores. Also, it can be inferred that three depositional types may take place during the crude oil injection, i.e., continuous deposition for low-permeability cores, slow, steady plugging for high-permeability cores and steady deposition for medium-permeability cores. It can be seen from the experimental results that damage to the core samples was found to increase when the production pressures were

  16. A COMPARISON OF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF PLASTIC PARTS PRODUCED BY A FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Beniak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Prototyping systems are nowadays increasingly used in many areas of industry, not only for producing design models but also for producing parts for final use. We need to know the properties of these parts. When we talk about the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and FDM devices, there are many possible settings for devices and models which could influence the properties of a final part. In addition, devices based on the same principle may use different operational software for calculating the tool path, and this may have a major impact. The aim of this paper is to show the tensile strength value for parts produced from different materials on the Fused Deposition Modeling device when the horizontal orientation of the specimens is changed.

  17. Deposition and removal of fugitive dust in the arid southwestern United States: measurements and model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etyemezian, Vic; Ahonen, Sean; Nikolic, Djordje; Gillies, John; Kuhns, Hampden; Gillette, Dale; Veranth, John

    2004-09-01

    This work was motivated by the need to better reconcile emission factors for fugitive dust with the amount of geologic material found on ambient filter samples. The deposition of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10), generated by travel over an unpaved road, over the first 100 m of transport downwind of the road was examined at Ft. Bliss, near El Paso, TX. The field conditions, typical for warm days in the arid southwestern United States, represented sparsely vegetated terrain under neutral to unstable atmospheric conditions. Emission fluxes of PM10 dust were obtained from towers downwind of the unpaved road at 7, 50, and 100 m. The horizontal flux measurements at the 7 m and 100 m towers indicated that PM10 deposition to the vegetation and ground was too small to measure. The data indicated, with 95% confidence, that the loss of PM10 between the source of emission at the unpaved road, represented by the 7 m tower, and a point 100 m downwind was less than 9.5%. A Gaussian model was used to simulate the plume. Values of the vertical standard deviation sigma(z) and the deposition velocity Vd were similar to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ISC3 model. For the field conditions, the model predicted that removal of PM10 unpaved road dust by deposition over the distance between the point of emission and 100 m downwind would be less than 5%. However, the model results also indicated that particles larger than 10 microm (aerodynamic diameter) would deposit more appreciably. The model was consistent with changes observed in size distributions between 7 m and 100 m downwind, which were measured with optical particle counters. The Gaussian model predictions were also compared with another study conducted over rough terrain and stable atmospheric conditions. Under such conditions, measured PM10 removal rates over 95 m of downwind transport were reported to be between 86% and 89%, whereas the Gaussian model predicted

  18. A predictive model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprac, A.J.; Trachtenberg, I.; Edgar, T.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon from thermally activated silane in a cold wall, single-wafer rapid thermal system was studied by experimentation at a variety of low pressure conditions, including very high temperatures. The effect of diluent gas on polysilicon deposition rates was examined using hydrogen, helium, and krypton. A mass-transfer model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system was developed. This model was used to produce an empirical rate expression for silicon deposition from silane by regressing kinetic parameters to fit experimental data. The resulting model provided accurate predictions over widely varying conditions in the experimental data.

  19. A Corrected Formulation of the Multilayer Model (MLM) for Inferring Gaseous Dry Deposition to Vegetated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Rick D.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Hicks, Bruce B.

    2014-01-01

    The Multilayer Model (MLM) has been used for many years to infer dry deposition fluxes from measured trace species concentrations and standard meteorological measurements for national networks in the U.S., including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet). MLM utilizes a resistance analogy to calculate deposition velocities appropriate for whole vegetative canopies, while employing a multilayer integration to account for vertically varying meteorology, canopy morphology and radiative transfer within the canopy. However, the MLM formulation, as it was originally presented and as it has been subsequently employed, contains a non-physical representation related to the leaf-level quasi-laminar boundary layer resistance that affects the calculation of the total canopy resistance. In this note, the non-physical representation of the canopy resistance as originally formulated in MLM is discussed and a revised, physically consistent, formulation is suggested as a replacement. The revised canopy resistance formulation reduces estimates of HNO3 deposition velocities by as much as 38% during mid-day as compared to values generated by the original formulation. Inferred deposition velocities for SO2 and O3 are not significantly altered by the change in formulation (less than 3%). Inferred deposition loadings of oxidized and total nitrogen from CASTNet data may be reduced by 10-20% and 5-10%, respectively, for the Eastern U. S. when employing the revised formulation of MLM as compared to the original formulation.

  20. Reactive flow models of the Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag deposit, Red Dog district, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Christian; Garven, Grant; Kelley, Karen D.; Leach, David L.

    2008-09-01

    The Red Dog ore deposit district in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska is host to several high-grade, shale-hosted Zn + Pb deposits. Due to the complex history and deformation of these ore deposits, the geological and hydrological conditions at the time of formation are poorly understood. Using geological observations and fluid inclusion data as constraints, numerical heat and fluid flow simulations of the Anarraaq ore deposit environment and coupled reactive flow simulations of a section of the ore body were conducted to gain more insight into the conditions of ore body formation. Results suggest that the ore body and associated base metal zonation may have formed by the mixing of oxidized, saline, metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids (<200°C) with reducing, HS-rich pore fluids within radiolarite-rich host rocks. Sphalerite and galena concentrations and base metal sulfide distribution are primarily controlled by the nature of the pore fluids, i.e., the extent and duration of the HS- source. Forward modeling results also predict the distribution of pyrite and quartz in agreement with field observations and indicate a reaction front moving from the initial mixing interface into the radiolarite rocks. Heuristic mass calculations suggest that ore grades and base metal accumulation comparable to those found in the field (18% Zn, 5% Pb) are predicted to be reached after about 0.3 My for initial conditions (30 ppm Zn, 3 ppm Pb; 20% deposition efficiency).

  1. Field Measurements and Modeling of Dust Transport and Deposition on a Hawaiian Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M.; Stock, J. D.; Cerovski-Darriau, C.; Bishaw, K.; Bedford, D.

    2017-12-01

    The western slopes of Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano are mantled by fine-grained soils that record volcanic airfall and eolian deposition. Where exposed, strong winds transport this sediment across west Hawaii, affecting tourism and local communities by decreasing air and water quality. Operations on US Army's Ke'amuku Maneuver Area (KMA) have the potential to increase dust flux from these deposits. To understand regional dust transport and composition, the USGS established 18 ground monitoring sites and sampling locations surrounding KMA. For over three years, each station measured vertical and horizontal dust flux while co-located anemometers measured wind speed and direction. We use these datasets to develop a model for dust supply and transport to assess whether KMA is a net dust sink or source. We find that horizontal dust flux rates are most highly correlated with entrainment threshold wind speeds of 8 m/s. Using a dust model that partitions measured horizontal dust flux into inward- and outward-directed components, we predict that KMA is currently a net dust sink. Geochemical analysis of dust samples illustrates that organics and pedogenic carbonate make up to 70% of their mass. Measured vertical dust deposition rates of 0.005 mm/m2/yr are similar to deposition rates of 0.004 mm/m2/yr predicted from the divergence of dust across KMA's boundary. These rates are low compared to pre-historic rates of 0.2-0.3 mm/yr estimated from radiocarbon dating of buried soils. Therefore, KMA's soils record persistent deposition both over past millennia and at present at rates that imply infrequent, large dust storms. Such events led to soil-mantled topography in an otherwise rocky Pleistocene volcanic landscape. A substantial portion of fine-grained soils in other leeward Hawaiian Island landscapes may have formed from similar eolian deposition, and not direct weathering of parent rock.

  2. Two depositional models for Pliocene coastal plain fluvial systems, Goliad Formation, south Texas Gulf Coastal plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, H.D.; Galloway, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Goliad Formation consists of four depositional systems-the Realitos and Mathis bed-load fluvial systems in the southwest and the Cuero and Eagle Lake mixed-load fluvial systems in the northeast. Five facies are recognized in the Realitos and Mathis bed-load fluvial systems: (1) primary channel-fill facies, (2) chaotic flood channel-fill facies, (3) complex splay facies, (4) flood plain facies, and (5) playa facies. A model for Realitos-Mathis depositional environments shows arid-climate braided stream complexes with extremely coarse sediment load, highly variable discharge, and marked channel instability. Broad, shallow, straight to slightly sinuous primary channels were flanked by wide flood channels. Flood channels passed laterally into broad, low-relief flood plains. Small playas occupied topographic lows near large channel axes. Three facies are recognized in the Cuero and Eagle Lake mixed-load fluvial systems: (1) channel-fill facies, (2) crevasse splay facies, and (3) flood plain facies. A model for Cuero-Eagle Lake depositional environments shows coarse-grained meander belts in a semi-arid climate. Slightly to moderately sinuous meandering streams were flanked by low, poorly developed natural levees. Crevasse splays were common, but tended to be broad and ill-defined. Extensive, low-relief flood plains occupied interaxial areas. The model proposed for the Realitos and Mathis fluvial systems may aid in recognition of analogous ancient depositional systems. In addition, since facies characteristics exercise broad controls on Goliad uranium mineralization, the proposed depositional models aid in defining target zones for Goliad uranium exploration

  3. Impacts of climate and emission changes on nitrogen deposition in Europe: a multi-model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate and emissions changes on the deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr over Europe was studied using four offline regional chemistry transport models (CTMs driven by the same global projection of future climate over the period 2000–2050. Anthropogenic emissions for the years 2005 and 2050 were used for simulations of both present and future periods in order to isolate the impact of climate change, hemispheric boundary conditions and emissions, and to assess the robustness of the results across the different models. The results from these four CTMs clearly show that the main driver of future N-deposition changes is the specified emission change. Under the specified emission scenario for 2050, emissions of oxidised nitrogen were reduced substantially, whereas emissions of NH3 increase to some extent, and these changes are largely reflected in the modelled concentrations and depositions. The lack of sulfur and oxidised nitrogen in the future atmosphere results in a much larger fraction of NHx being present in the form of gaseous ammonia. Predictions for wet and total deposition were broadly consistent, although the three fine-scale models resolve European emission areas and changes better than the hemispheric-scale model. The biggest difference in the models is for predictions of individual N compounds. One model (EMEP was used to explore changes in critical loads, also in conjunction with speculative climate-induced increases in NH3 emissions. These calculations suggest that the area of ecosystems that exceeds critical loads is reduced from 64% for year 2005 emissions levels to 50% for currently estimated 2050 levels. A possible climate-induced increase in NH3 emissions could worsen the situation, with areas exceeded increasing again to 57% (for a 30% NH3 emission increase.

  4. Inverse modeling of the Chernobyl source term using atmospheric concentration and deposition measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Evangeliou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of an inverse modeling study for the determination of the source term of the radionuclides 134Cs, 137Cs and 131I released after the Chernobyl accident. The accident occurred on 26 April 1986 in the Former Soviet Union and released about 1019 Bq of radioactive materials that were transported as far away as the USA and Japan. Thereafter, several attempts to assess the magnitude of the emissions were made that were based on the knowledge of the core inventory and the levels of the spent fuel. More recently, when modeling tools were further developed, inverse modeling techniques were applied to the Chernobyl case for source term quantification. However, because radioactivity is a sensitive topic for the public and attracts a lot of attention, high-quality measurements, which are essential for inverse modeling, were not made available except for a few sparse activity concentration measurements far from the source and far from the main direction of the radioactive fallout. For the first time, we apply Bayesian inversion of the Chernobyl source term using not only activity concentrations but also deposition measurements from the most recent public data set. These observations refer to a data rescue attempt that started more than 10 years ago, with a final goal to provide available measurements to anyone interested. In regards to our inverse modeling results, emissions of 134Cs were estimated to be 80 PBq or 30–50 % higher than what was previously published. From the released amount of 134Cs, about 70 PBq were deposited all over Europe. Similar to 134Cs, emissions of 137Cs were estimated as 86 PBq, on the same order as previously reported results. Finally, 131I emissions of 1365 PBq were found, which are about 10 % less than the prior total releases. The inversion pushes the injection heights of the three radionuclides to higher altitudes (up to about 3 km than previously assumed (≈ 2.2 km in order

  5. Inverse modeling of the Chernobyl source term using atmospheric concentration and deposition measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Hamburger, Thomas; Cozic, Anne; Balkanski, Yves; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the results of an inverse modeling study for the determination of the source term of the radionuclides 134Cs, 137Cs and 131I released after the Chernobyl accident. The accident occurred on 26 April 1986 in the Former Soviet Union and released about 1019 Bq of radioactive materials that were transported as far away as the USA and Japan. Thereafter, several attempts to assess the magnitude of the emissions were made that were based on the knowledge of the core inventory and the levels of the spent fuel. More recently, when modeling tools were further developed, inverse modeling techniques were applied to the Chernobyl case for source term quantification. However, because radioactivity is a sensitive topic for the public and attracts a lot of attention, high-quality measurements, which are essential for inverse modeling, were not made available except for a few sparse activity concentration measurements far from the source and far from the main direction of the radioactive fallout. For the first time, we apply Bayesian inversion of the Chernobyl source term using not only activity concentrations but also deposition measurements from the most recent public data set. These observations refer to a data rescue attempt that started more than 10 years ago, with a final goal to provide available measurements to anyone interested. In regards to our inverse modeling results, emissions of 134Cs were estimated to be 80 PBq or 30-50 % higher than what was previously published. From the released amount of 134Cs, about 70 PBq were deposited all over Europe. Similar to 134Cs, emissions of 137Cs were estimated as 86 PBq, on the same order as previously reported results. Finally, 131I emissions of 1365 PBq were found, which are about 10 % less than the prior total releases. The inversion pushes the injection heights of the three radionuclides to higher altitudes (up to about 3 km) than previously assumed (≈ 2.2 km) in order to better match both concentration

  6. Modelling stomatal ozone flux and deposition to grassland communities across Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, M.R. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ma512@york.ac.uk; Bueker, P. [Stockholm Environment Institute at York, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Emberson, L.D. [Stockholm Environment Institute at York, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Terry, A.C. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Toet, S. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Regional scale modelling of both ozone deposition and the risk of ozone impacts is poorly developed for grassland communities. This paper presents new predictions of stomatal ozone flux to grasslands at five different locations in Europe, using a mechanistic model of canopy development for productive grasslands to generate time series of leaf area index and soil water potential as inputs to the stomatal component of the DO{sub 3}SE ozone deposition model. The parameterisation of both models was based on Lolium perenne, a dominant species of productive pasture in Europe. The modelled seasonal time course of stomatal ozone flux to both the whole canopy and to upper leaves showed large differences between climatic zones, which depended on the timing of the start of the growing season, the effect of soil water potential, and the frequency of hay cuts. Values of modelled accumulated flux indices and the AOT40 index showed a five-fold difference between locations, but the locations with the highest flux differed depending on the index used; the period contributing to the accumulation of AOT40 did not always coincide with the modelled period of active ozone canopy uptake. Use of a fixed seasonal profile of leaf area index in the flux model produced very different estimates of annual accumulated total canopy and leaf ozone flux when compared with the flux model linked to a simulation of canopy growth. Regional scale model estimates of both the risks of ozone impacts and of total ozone deposition will be inaccurate unless the effects of climate and management in modifying grass canopy growth are incorporated. - Modelled stomatal flux of ozone to productive grasslands in Europe shows different spatial and temporal variation to AOT40, and is modified by management and soil water status.

  7. MESOI Version 2.0: an interactive mesoscale Lagrangian puff dispersion model with deposition and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Glantz, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    MESOI Version 2.0 is an interactive Lagrangian puff model for estimating the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of effluents released to the atmosphere. The model is capable of treating simultaneous releases from as many as four release points, which may be elevated or at ground-level. The puffs are advected by a horizontal wind field that is defined in three dimensions. The wind field may be adjusted for expected topographic effects. The concentration distribution within the puffs is initially assumed to be Gaussian in the horizontal and vertical. However, the vertical concentration distribution is modified by assuming reflection at the ground and the top of the atmospheric mixing layer. Material is deposited on the surface using a source depletion, dry deposition model and a washout coefficient model. The model also treats the decay of a primary effluent species and the ingrowth and decay of a single daughter species using a first order decay process. This report is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the theoretical and mathematical bases upon which MESOI Version 2.0 is based. The second part contains the MESOI computer code. The programs were written in the ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and were developed on a VAX 11/780 computer. 43 references, 14 figures, 13 tables

  8. MESOI Version 2. 0: an interactive mesoscale Lagrangian puff dispersion model with deposition and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Glantz, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    MESOI Version 2.0 is an interactive Lagrangian puff model for estimating the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of effluents released to the atmosphere. The model is capable of treating simultaneous releases from as many as four release points, which may be elevated or at ground-level. The puffs are advected by a horizontal wind field that is defined in three dimensions. The wind field may be adjusted for expected topographic effects. The concentration distribution within the puffs is initially assumed to be Gaussian in the horizontal and vertical. However, the vertical concentration distribution is modified by assuming reflection at the ground and the top of the atmospheric mixing layer. Material is deposited on the surface using a source depletion, dry deposition model and a washout coefficient model. The model also treats the decay of a primary effluent species and the ingrowth and decay of a single daughter species using a first order decay process. This report is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the theoretical and mathematical bases upon which MESOI Version 2.0 is based. The second part contains the MESOI computer code. The programs were written in the ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and were developed on a VAX 11/780 computer. 43 references, 14 figures, 13 tables.

  9. The metallogenic model of sandstone-type uranium deposits in interlayer oxidation zone in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daisheng; Wang Ruiying; Li Shengxiang; Zhang Kefang

    1997-08-01

    On the basis of comprehensive analysis on various sedimentary environmental criteria, the authors establish a depositional facies model of wet fan formed by alluvial fan's fast pouring into lake for the ore-bearing rocks, and point out favourable horizons and facies for the formation of uranium mineralizations. Deep researches are also done to uranium mineralization characteristics in interlayer oxidation zone, zonation features of ore bodies and spatial distribution regularities of uranium mineralizations. Three sets of data on ore-formation ages (19 Ma, 12 Ma, 1.0 Ma) are obtained with U-Pb isotope method. Various ore-controlling factors of the sandstone-type uranium mineralizations are expounded in detail. Ore-formation mechanism and metallogenic model of sandstone-type uranium deposit in the basin are summarized. Finally, the authors propose some detailed suggestions for the delimitation of prospective areas and future work in the basin, and emphasize that the southwest margin of the basin, especially the area between deposit No.511 and deposit No.512 should be a key prospecting area in the future. (4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.)

  10. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition and temperature on long-term DOC trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, K; Rowe, E C; Evans, C D; Monteith, D T; E I Vanguelova; Wade, A J; J M Clark

    2017-02-01

    It is increasingly recognised that widespread and substantial increases in Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in remote surface, and soil, waters in recent decades are linked to declining acid deposition. Effects of rising pH and declining ionic strength on DOC solubility have been proposed as potential dominant mechanisms. However, since DOC in these systems is derived mainly from recently-fixed carbon, and since organic matter decomposition rates are considered sensitive to temperature, uncertainty persists over the extent to which other drivers that could influence DOC production. Such potential drivers include fertilisation by nitrogen (N) and global warming. We therefore ran the dynamic soil chemistry model MADOC for a range of UK soils, for which time series data are available, to consider the likely relative importance of decreased deposition of sulphate and chloride, accumulation of reactive N, and higher temperatures, on soil DOC production in different soils. Modelled patterns of DOC change generally agreed favourably with measurements collated over 10-20years, but differed markedly between sites. While the acidifying effect of sulphur deposition appeared to be the predominant control on the observed soil water DOC trends in all the soils considered other than a blanket peat, the model suggested that over the long term, the effects of nitrogen deposition on N-limited soils may have been sufficient to raise the "acid recovery DOC baseline" significantly. In contrast, reductions in non-marine chloride deposition and effects of long term warming appeared to have been relatively unimportant. The suggestion that future DOC concentrations might exceed preindustrial levels as a consequence of nitrogen pollution has important implications for drinking water catchment management and the setting and pursuit of appropriate restoration targets, but findings still require validation from reliable centennial-scale proxy records, such as those being developed

  11. Cloud diagnosis impact on deposition modelling applied to the Fukushima accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011 resulted in the release of several hundred PBq of activity into the environment. Most of the radioactivity was released in a time period of about 40 days. Radioactivity was dispersed in the atmosphere and the ocean and subsequently traces of radionuclides were detected all over Japan. At the Fukushima airport for instance, a deposit as large as 36 kBq/m2 of Cs-137 was measured resulting of an atmospheric deposition of the plume. Both dry and wet deposition were probably involved since a raining event occurred on the 15th of March when the plume was passing nearby. The accident scenario have given rise to a number of scientific investigations. Atmospheric deposition, for example, was studied by utilizing atmospheric transport models. In atmospheric transport models, some parameters, such as cloud diagnosis, are derived from meteorological data. This cloud diagnosis is a key issue for wet deposition modelling since it allows to distinguish between two processes: in-cloud scavenging which corresponds to the collection of radioactive particles into the cloud and below-cloud scavenging consequent to the removal of radioactive material due to the falling drops. Several parametrizations of cloud diagnosis exist in the literature, using different input data: relative humidity, liquid water content, also. All these diagnosis return a large range of cloud base heights and cloud top heights. In this study, computed cloud diagnostics are compared to the observations at the Fukushima airport. Atmospheric dispersion simulations at Japan scale are then performed utilizing the most reliable ones. Impact on results are discussed.

  12. Subsidence estimation of breakwater built on loosely deposited sandy seabed foundation: Elastic model or elasto-plastic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Shen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In offshore area, newly deposited Quaternary loose seabed soils are widely distributed. There are a great number of offshore structures has been built on them in the past, or will be built on them in the future due to the fact that there would be no very dense seabed soil foundation could be chosen at planed sites sometimes. However, loosely deposited seabed foundation would bring great risk to the service ability of offshore structures after construction. Currently, the understanding on wave-induced liquefaction mechanism in loose seabed foundation has been greatly improved; however, the recognition on the consolidation characteristics and settlement estimation of loose seabed foundation under offshore structures is still limited. In this study, taking a semi-coupled numerical model FSSI-CAS 2D as the tool, the consolidation and settlement of loosely deposited sandy seabed foundation under an offshore breakwater is investigated. The advanced soil constitutive model Pastor-Zienkiewics Mark III (PZIII is used to describe the quasi-static behavior of loose sandy seabed soil. The computational results show that PZIII model is capable of being used for settlement estimation problem of loosely deposited sandy seabed foundation. For loose sandy seabed foundation, elastic deformation is the dominant component in consolidation process. It is suggested that general elastic model is acceptable for subsidence estimation of offshore structures on loose seabed foundation; however, Young's modulus E must be dependent on the confining effective stress, rather than a constant in computation.

  13. Modelling impacts of temperature, and acidifying and eutrophying deposition on DOC trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Kasia; Rowe, Ed; Evans, Chris; Monteith, Don; Vanguelova, Elena; Wade, Andrew; Clark, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in large parts of the northern hemisphere have risen over the past three decades, raising concern about enhanced contributions of carbon to the atmosphere and seas and oceans. The effect of declining acid deposition has been identified as a key control on DOC trends in soil and surface waters, since pH and ionic strength affect sorption and desorption of DOC. However, since DOC is derived mainly from recently-fixed carbon, and organic matter decomposition rates are considered sensitive to temperature, uncertainty persists regarding the extent to the relative importance of different drivers that affect these upward trends. We ran the dynamic model MADOC (Model of Acidity and Soil Organic Carbon) for a range of UK soils (podzols, gleysols and peatland), for which the time-series were available, to consider the likely relative importance of decreased deposition of sulphate and chloride, accumulation of reactive N, and higher temperatures, on DOC production in different soils. Modelled patterns of DOC change generally agreed favourably with measurements collated over 10-20 years, but differed markedly between sites. While the acidifying effect of sulphur deposition appeared to be the predominant control on the observed soil water DOC trends in all the soils considered other than a blanket peat, the model suggested that over the long term, the effects of nitrogen deposition on N-limited soils may have been sufficient to elevate the DOC recovery trajectory significantly. The second most influential cause of rising DOC in the model simulations was N deposition in ecosystems that are N-limited and respond with stimulated plant growth. Although non-marine chloride deposition made some contribution to acidification and recovery, it was not amongst the main drivers of DOC change. Warming had almost no effect on modelled historic DOC trends, but may prove to be a significant driver of DOC in future via its influence

  14. 3D geological modeling for mineral resource assessment of the Tongshan Cu deposit, Heilongjiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongwen Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional geological modeling (3DGM assists geologists to quantitatively study in three-dimensional (3D space structures that define temporal and spatial relationships between geological objects. The 3D property model can also be used to infer or deduce causes of geological objects. 3DGM technology provides technical support for extraction of diverse geoscience information, 3D modeling, and quantitative calculation of mineral resources. Based on metallogenic concepts and an ore deposit model, 3DGM technology is applied to analyze geological characteristics of the Tongshan Cu deposit in order to define a metallogenic model and develop a virtual borehole technology; a BP neural network and a 3D interpolation technique were combined to integrate multiple geoscience information in a 3D environment. The results indicate: (1 on basis of the concept of magmatic-hydrothermal Cu polymetallic mineralization and a porphyry Cu deposit model, a spatial relational database of multiple geoscience information for mineralization in the study area (geology, geophysics, geochemistry, borehole, and cross-section data was established, and 3D metallogenic geological objects including mineralization stratum, granodiorite, alteration rock, and magnetic anomaly were constructed; (2 on basis of the 3D ore deposit model, 23,800 effective surveys from 94 boreholes and 21 sections were applied to establish 3D orebody models with a kriging interpolation method; (3 combined 23,800 surveys involving 21 sections, using VC++ and OpenGL platform, virtual borehole and virtual section with BP network, and an improved inverse distance interpolation (IDW method were used to predict and delineate mineralization potential targets (Cu-grade of cell not less than 0.1%; (4 comparison of 3D ore bodies, metallogenic geological objects of mineralization, and potential targets of mineralization models in the study area, delineated the 3D spatial and temporal relationship and causal

  15. Models of WO x films growth during pulsed laser deposition at elevated pressures of reactive gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedovets, A. G.; Fominski, V. Y.; Nevolin, V. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, D. V.; Soloviev, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The films of tungsten oxides were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of W target in a reactive gas atmosphere (air of laboratory humidity). Optical analysis and ion signal measurements for the laser plume allowed to recognise a threshold gas pressure that suppresses the deposition of non-scattered atomic flux from the plume. When the pressure exceeds about 40 Pa, the films grow due to the deposition of species that could be formed in collisions of W atoms with reactive molecules (e.g., O2). Kinetic Monte Carlo method was used for modelling film growth. Comparison of the model structures with the experimentally prepared films has shown that the growth mechanism of ballistic deposition at a pressure of 40 Pa could be changed on the diffusion limited aggregation at a pressure of ~100 Pa. Thus, a cauliflower structure of the film transformed to a web-like structure. For good correlation of experimental and model structures of WO x , a dimension of structural elements in the model should coincide with W-O cluster size.

  16. Validating modelled data on major and trace element deposition in southern Germany using Sphagnum moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Zaccone, Claudio

    2017-10-01

    Sphagnum mosses were collected from four ombrotrophic bogs in two regions of southern Germany: Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern, OB) and the Northern Black Forest (Nordschwarzwald, NBF). Surfaces of Sphagnum carpets were marked with plastic mesh and, one year later, plant matter was harvested and productivity determined. Major and trace element concentrations (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Th, Ti, Tl, U, V, Zn) were determined in acid digests using sector field ICP-MS. Up to 12 samples (40 × 40 cm) were collected per site, and 6-10 sites investigated per bog. Variation in element accumulation rates within a bog is mostly the result of the annual production rate of the Sphagnum mosses which masks not only the impact of site effects, such as microtopography and the presence of dwarf trees, but also local and regional conditions, including land use in the surrounding area, topography, etc. The difference in productivity between peat bogs results in distinctly higher element accumulation rates at the NBF bogs compared to those from OB for all studied elements. The comparison with the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP; wet-only and total deposition) and Modelling of Air Pollutants and Ecosystem Impact (MAPESI; total deposition) data shows that accumulation rates obtained using Sphagnum are in the same range of published values for direct measurements of atmospheric deposition of As, Cd, Cu, Co, Pb, and V in both regions. The accordance is very dependent on how atmospheric deposition rates were obtained, as different models to calculate the deposition rates may yield different fluxes even for the same region. In future studies of atmospheric deposition of trace metals, both Sphagnum moss and deposition collectors have to be used on the same peat bog and results compared. Antimony, however, shows considerable discrepancy, because it is either under-estimated by Sphagnum moss or over-estimated by both atmospheric deposition

  17. National implementation of the UNECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution (effects). Pt. 1. Deposition loads: methods, modelling and mapping results, trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauger, Thomas [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Braunschweig (DE). Inst. of Agroecology (FAL-AOE); Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Navigation; Haenel, Hans-Dieter; Roesemann, Claus [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Braunschweig (DE). Inst. of Agroecology (FAL-AOE)] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    The report on the implementation of the UNECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution Pt.1, deposition loads (methods, modeling and mapping results, trends) includes the following chapters: Introduction, deposition on air pollutants used for the input for critical loads in exceeding calculations, methods applied for mapping total deposition loads, mapping wet deposition, wet deposition mapping results, mapping dry deposition, dry deposition mapping results, cloud and fog mapping results, total deposition mapping results, modeling the air concentration of acidifying components and heavy metals, agricultural emissions of acidifying and eutrophying species.

  18. Critique of the use of deposition velocity in modeling indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Weschler, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Among the potential fates of indoor air pollutants are a variety of physical and chemical interactions with indoor surfaces. In deterministic mathematical models of indoor air quality, these interactions are usually represented as a first-order loss process, with the loss rate coefficient given as the product of the surface-to-volume ratio of the room times a deposition velocity. In this paper, the validity of this representation of surface-loss mechanisms is critically evaluated. From a theoretical perspective, the idea of a deposition velocity is consistent with the following representation of an indoor air environment. Pollutants are well-mixed throughout a core region which is separated from room surfaces by boundary layers. Pollutants migrate through the boundary layers by a combination of diffusion (random motion resulting from collisions with surrounding gas molecules), advection (transport by net motion of the fluid), and, in some cases, other transport mechanisms. The rate of pollutant loss to a surface is governed by a combination of the rate of transport through the boundary layer and the rate of reaction at the surface. The deposition velocity expresses the pollutant flux density (mass or moles deposited per area per time) to the surface divided by the pollutant concentration in the core region. This concept has substantial value to the extent that the flux density is proportional to core concentration. Published results from experimental and modeling studies of fine particles, radon decay products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides are used as illustrations of both the strengths and weaknesses of deposition velocity as a parameter to indicate the rate of indoor air pollutant loss on surfaces. 66 refs., 5 tabs

  19. In-cloud scavenging and deposition of sulfates and nitrates: Case studies and parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, N.-H.; Saxena, V. K.

    Scavenging of sulfates and nitrates—two most common ions leading the cloudwater acidity—was investigated during field studies atop a site in Mt. Mitchell (35°44'05″N, 82°17'15″W) State Park where the highest peak (2038 m MSL) of the eastern U.S. is located. Experiments were conducted during the growing seasons (15 May-30 September) of 1986 and 1987 using an instrumented meteorological tower (16.5 m tall) and a passive cloudwater collector. A cloud episode that occurred on 12 October 1987, was also comprehensively investigated. Clouds were frequently observed in which the Fraser fir and red spruce stands stayed immersed 28% and 41% of the time during the 1986 and 1987 seasons, respectively. Rate of cloudwater deposition on the forest canopy was determined using an inferential cloud deposition model. It was found by analysing nine short duration (lasting 8 h or less) and 16 long duration cloud events that the ionic concentration (SO 42- and NO 3-) is inversely proportional to the rate ( Ic) of cloudwater deposition (in mm h -1) and can be expressed by the following relationship: [SO 42-] = aIc- b or [NO 3-] = aIc- b. Theoretical arguments leading to these relationships are presented. The b values for predicting NO 32- concentration are found in the range of 0.14-1.24 (mean = 0.48) for short duration and 0.062-0.63 (mean = 0.27) for long duration cloud events, respectively. The corresponding b values for predicting NO 3- concentrations are 0.19-1.16 (mean = 0.49) and 0.072-0.59 (mean = 0.27), respectively. When the b parameter was between 0.2 and 0.6, the correlation coefficients between measured and predicted ionic concentrations were found to exceed 0.7. The parameter a is shown to represent the maximum ionic flux for a given cloud event. The ratio of the a parameter for SO 42- to NO 3- varied between 1.75 and 6.95, indicating that the SO 42- contributes to the total ionic concentration substantially more than the NO 3- leading to the conclusion that the

  20. Modeling and control of diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waard, H.; De Koning, W. L.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper a study is made of the heat transfer inside cylindrical resistance diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces, aimed at developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived which also covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. It is shown that currently used temperature controllers are highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  1. Towards a CFD-based mechanistic deposit formation model for straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Baxter, L.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of FLUENTe in the analysis of grate-fired biomass boilers. A short description of the concept used to model fuel conversion on the grate and the coupling to the CFD code is offered. The development and implementation of a CFD-based deposition model is presented...... resistance changes. The model is applied to the straw-fired Masnedø boiler. Results are in good qualitative agreement with both measurements and observations at the plants. q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  3. Estimation of aerial deposition and foliar uptake of xenobiotics: Assessment of current models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.; Droppo, J.G.; Van Voris, P.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews existing mathematical and/or computer simulation models that estimate xenobiotic deposition to and transport through (both curricular and stomatal) vegetative surfaces. The report evaluates the potential for coupling the best of those models to the existing Uptake, Translocation, Accumulation, and Biodegradation model to be used for future xenobiotic exposure assessments. Here xenobiotic compounds are defined as airborne contaminants, both organic and gaseous pollutants, that are introduced into the environment by man. Specifically this document provides a detailed review of the state-of-the-art models that addressed aerial deposition of particles and gases to foliage; foliar and cuticular transport, metabolism, and uptake of organic xenobiotics; and stomatal transport of gaseous and volatile organic xenobiotic pollutants. Where detailed information was available, parameters for each model are provided on a chemical by chemical as well as species by species basis. Sufficient detail is provided on each model to assess the potential for adapting or coupling the model to the existing UTAB plant exposure model. 126 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Sediment Deposition Risk Analysis and PLSR Model Research for Cascade Reservoirs Upstream of the Yellow River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to effectively identify and eliminate the multiple correlation influence among the independent factors by least-squares regression. Focusing on this insufficiency, the sediment deposition risk of cascade reservoirs and fitting model of sediment flux into the reservoir are studied. The partial least-squares regression (PLSR method is adopted for modeling analysis; the model fitting is organically combined with the non-model-style data content analysis, so as to realize the regression model, data structure simplification, and multiple correlations analysis among factors; meanwhile the accuracy of the model is ensured through cross validity check. The modeling analysis of sediment flux into the cascade reservoirs of Long-Liu section upstream of the Yellow River indicates that partial least-squares regression can effectively overcome the multiple correlation influence among factors, and the isolated factor variables have better ability to explain the physical cause of measured results.

  5. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension Firing. Part 1: Model Verification by Use of Entrained Flow Reactor Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Two models for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass have been developed. Both models describe deposit buildup by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermophoresis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles, and reaction. The models...... stronger influence of this parameter. Model #2 was able to provide a reasonable description of the influence of temperature on the deposit buildup rates observed in the EFR experiments. A parametric study was conducted to examine the influence of some physical parameters, including ash concentration...... used to describe the deposit formation rates and deposit chemistry observed in a series of entrained flow reactor (EFR) experiments using straw and wood as fuels. It was found that model #1 was not able to describe the observed influence of temperature on the deposit buildup rates, predicting a much...

  6. Proceedings for a Workshop on Deposit Modeling, Mineral Resource Assessment, and Their Role in Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskey, Joseph A.; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    The world's use of nonfuel mineral resources continues to increase to support a growing population and increasing standards of living. The ability to meet this increasing demand is affected especially by concerns about possible environmental degradation associated with minerals production and by competing land uses. What information does the world need to support global minerals development in a sustainable way?Informed planning and decisions concerning sustainability and future mineral resource supply require a long–term perspective and an integrated approach to resource, land use, economic, and environmental management worldwide. Such perspective and approach require unbiased information on the global distribution of identified and especially undiscovered resources, the economic and political factors influencing their development, and the potential environmental consequences of their exploitation.The U.S. Geological Survey and the former Deposit Modeling Program of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) sponsored a workshop on "Deposit Modeling, Mineral Resource Assessment, and Their Role in Sustainable Development" at the 31st International Geological Congress (IGC) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on August 18–19, 2000. The purpose of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in mineral deposit modeling and resource assessment and to examine the role of global assessments of nonfuel mineral resources in sustainable development.The workshop addressed questions such as the following: Which of the available mineral deposit models and assessment methods are best suited for predicting the locations, deposit types, and amounts of undiscovered nonfuel mineral resources remaining in the world? What is the availability of global geologic, mineral deposit, and mineral exploration information? How can mineral resource assessments be used to address economic and

  7. Magma Emplacement Rates and Porphyry Copper Deposits: Thermal Modelling of the Yerington Batholith, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpa, Anne; Annen, Catherine; Dilles, John H.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Blundy, Jon D.

    2017-04-01

    Many porphyry copper deposits are associated with granitoid plutons. Their genesis is attributed to the degassing of pluton-forming intermediate to silicic magma chambers. These plutons are commonly envisioned as resulting from the slow cooling and crystallization of large magma chambers. Most of the models combine the formation of ore deposits and the cooling of a magma chamber. However, they do not consider neither how typically hundreds of cubic kilometres of magma were emplaced into the upper crust, nor the prolonged growth of plutons involving simultaneous cooling and crystallization together with the release of exsolved volatiles, which may contribute to ore formation. We use numerical simulations of thermal evolution due to pluton growth to investigate the links between pluton construction, magma accumulation, solidification, volatile exsolution, volatile release and porphyry copper formation. The Jurassic Yerington batholith in western Nevada, USA, is used as a case study because it is associated with economic porphyry copper deposits, it shows an exceptional exposure revealing the geometry of the intrusion, and petrological and geochronological analysis have shed light on its emplacement style and duration. Our conductive heat flow model simulates the growth of the ˜1000 km3 batholith emplaced at 2-8 km crustal depth by step-wise intrusions of vertically stacked sills. Different emplacement rates and repose times of no melt injection between the three main Yerington intrusions were tested. Our numerical simulations show that to comply with the conceptual model linking porphyry copper deposits with the presence of large, highly molten magma chambers, magmas must be emplaced at a high rate of several cm/yr. In plutonic records, such high rates are uncommon. It follows that either the current conceptual model is incorrect or that porphyry copper deposits are only produced by the rare, rapidly emplaced plutons. The fact that many granitoid plutons are barren

  8. Modeling potential tsunami sources for deposits near Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Selle, S.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    In regions with little seismic data and short historical records of earthquakes, we can use preserved tsunami deposits and tsunami modeling to infer if, when and where tsunamigenic earthquakes have occurred. The Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone in the region offshore of Unalaska Island is one such region where the historical and paleo-seismicity is poorly understood. This section of the subduction zone is not thought to have ruptured historically in a large earthquake, leading some to designate the region as a seismic gap. By modeling various historical and synthetic earthquake sources, we investigate whether or not tsunamis that left deposits near Unalaska Island were generated by earthquakes rupturing through Unalaska Gap. Preliminary field investigations near the eastern end of Unalaska Island have identified paleotsunami deposits well above sea level, suggesting that multiple tsunamis in the last 5,000 years have flooded low-lying areas over 1 km inland. Other indicators of tsunami inundation, such as a breached cobble beach berm and driftwood logs stranded far inland, were tentatively attributed to the March 9, 1957 tsunami, which had reported runup of 13 to 22 meters on Umnak and Unimak Islands, to the west and east of Unalaska. In order to determine if tsunami inundation could have reached the runup markers observed on Unalaska, we modeled the 1957 tsunami using GeoCLAW, a numerical model that simulates tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation. The published rupture orientation and slip distribution for the MW 8.6, 1957 earthquake (Johnson et al., 1994) was used as the tsunami source, which delineates a 1200 km long rupture zone along the Aleutian trench from Delarof Island to Unimak Island. Model results indicate that runup and inundation from this particular source are too low to account for the runup markers observed in the field, because slip is concentrated in the western half of the rupture zone, far from Unalaska. To ascertain if any realistic

  9. Modeling of Temperature Field Evolution During Multilayered Direct Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, DongYun; Feng, Zhe; Wang, ChengJie; Liu, Zhen; Dong, DongDong; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Rui

    2017-06-01

    It is of great importance to thoroughly explore the evolving temperature fields of direct laser metal deposition (abbreviated as LMD) in vertical thin wall manufacturing. It is helpful to control the temperature gradient, and even to adjust to forming microstructures and accumulation of residual stress. In this paper, a comprehensive three-dimensional transient model is developed for evolving temperature fields. The manufactured material is DS superalloy Rene80. The laser-powder interaction during the powder flowing process is simulated first, and its possible effect on the temperature field of the melting pool is analyzed. Then a 3D numerical simulation for the evolving temperature field is carried out based on considering transport phenomena during LMD such as the change in phase, powder injection and liquid flow. The applied deposition parameters are derived from experimental investigation with optimized vertical wall manufacturing. The simulated results explain why a balance between heat input and dissipation could form inside the vertical thin wall. These reconstruct the instability at an early phase of the building process without any temperature control unit and exhibit the influence of parameters such as laser power, deposition velocity and laser beam deposition pattern. The simulation results of temperature evolution are consistent with experimental investigation.

  10. A Bioeconomic Model of Cattle Stocking on Rangeland Threatened by Invasive Plants and Nitrogen Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    David Finnoff; Aaron Strong; John Tschirhart

    2008-01-01

    Across western North America, invasive plant species and elevated levels of nitrogen are threatening the productivity of rangelands. A bioeconomic model of stocking cattle on these rangelands is used to show that optimal stocking depends on the competition between native grasses and the invaders. However, nitrogen deposition is important in determining the ultimate rangeland species composition. Endogenous changes in plant successional thresholds are due to the interplay of nitrogen depositio...

  11. Investigation of Properties of Nanocomposite Polyimide Samples Obtained by Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, I. V.; Vaganov, G. V.; Yudin, V. E.; Ivan'kova, E. M.; Popova, E. N.; Elokhovskii, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Nanomodified polyimide samples were obtained by fused deposition modeling (FDM) using an experimental setup for 3D printing of highly heat-resistant plastics. The mechanical properties and structure of these samples were studied by viscosimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. A comparative estimation of the mechanical properties of laboratory samples obtained from a nanocomposite based on heat-resistant polyetherimide by FDM and injection molding is presented.

  12. 3D Hatching: Linear halftoning for dual extrusion fused deposition modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, Tim; Doubrovski, E.L.; Verlinden, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents halftoning techniques to manufacture 3D objects with the appearance of full grayscale imagery for Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) printers. While droplet-based dithering is a common halftoning technique, this is not applicable to FDM printing, since FDM builds up objects by extruding material in semi-continuous paths. A set of three methods is presented which apply a linear halftoning principle called 'hatching' to horizontal, vertical and diagonal surfaces. These methods a...

  13. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  14. FALL3D: A computational model for transport and deposition of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2009-06-01

    FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic ashes and lapilli. The model solves the advection-diffusion-sedimentation (ADS) equation on a structured terrain-following grid using a second-order finite differences (FD) explicit scheme. Different parameterizations for the eddy diffusivity tensor and for the particle terminal settling velocities can be used. The code, written in FORTRAN 90, is available in both serial and parallel versions for Windows and Unix/Linux/Mac X operating systems (OS). A series of pre- and post-process utility programs and OS-dependent scripts to launch them are also included in the FALL3D distribution package. Although the model has been designed to forecast volcanic ash concentration in the atmosphere and ash loading at ground, it can also be used to model the transport of any kind of airborne solid particles. The model inputs are meteorological data, topography, grain-size distribution, shape and density of particles, and mass rate of particle injected into the atmosphere. Optionally, FALL3D can be coupled with the output of the meteorological processor CALMET, a diagnostic model which generates 3-D time-dependent zero-divergence wind fields from mesoscale forecasts incorporating local terrain effects. The FALL3D model can be a tool for short-term ash deposition forecasting and for volcanic fallout hazard assessment. As an example, an application to the 22 July 1998 Etna eruption is also presented.

  15. Modelling hydrologic impacts of light absorbing aerosol deposition on snow at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Felix N.; Burkhart, John F.; Pietikäinen, Joni-Pekka

    2018-01-01

    Light absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) originating from atmospheric deposition enhance snowmelt by increasing the absorption of shortwave radiation. The consequences are a shortening of the snow duration due to increased snowmelt and, at the catchment scale, a temporal shift in the discharge generation during the spring melt season. In this study, we present a newly developed snow algorithm for application in hydrological models that allows for an additional class of input variable: the deposition mass flux of various species of light absorbing aerosols. To show the sensitivity of different model parameters, we first use the model as a 1-D point model forced with representative synthetic data and investigate the impact of parameters and variables specific to the algorithm determining the effect of LAISI. We then demonstrate the significance of the radiative forcing by simulating the effect of black carbon (BC) deposited on snow of a remote southern Norwegian catchment over a 6-year period, from September 2006 to August 2012. Our simulations suggest a significant impact of BC in snow on the hydrological cycle. Results show an average increase in discharge of 2.5, 9.9, and 21.4 %, depending on the applied model scenario, over a 2-month period during the spring melt season compared to simulations where radiative forcing from LAISI is not considered. The increase in discharge is followed by a decrease in discharge due to a faster decrease in the catchment's snow-covered fraction and a trend towards earlier melt in the scenarios where radiative forcing from LAISI is applied. Using a reasonable estimate of critical model parameters, the model simulates realistic BC mixing ratios in surface snow with a strong annual cycle, showing increasing surface BC mixing ratios during spring melt as a consequence of melt amplification. However, we further identify large uncertainties in the representation of the surface BC mixing ratio during snowmelt and the subsequent

  16. Coherent responses of sulphate concentration in Norwegian lakes: relationships with sulphur deposition and climate indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Dillon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The coherence or synchrony in the trends in SO42– concentration in a set of 100 lakes in Norway that have a long-term chemical record was evaluated. Using a statistical technique that compares patterns or trends that are not uni-directional, the lakes were grouped into 18 subsets or clusters, each with between 2 and 11 lakes that had similar trends. These temporal trends were strongly correlated with several climate indices, notably the Arctic Oscillation Index (AOI measured in the autumn, and the annual North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI. Because these clusters of lakes were spatially dispersed, they could not be compared directly with trends in wet S deposition, because S deposition varied substantially between lakes within each cluster. However, the average trend in SO42– concentration was evaluated in each of 10 regions of Norway that were defined previously on the basis of pollution load, meteorological variables and biogeography. Although these regions did not match the statistically-selected clusters of lakes with equal trends very closely, there were similar, strong correlations between climate indices (the AOI and NAOI and the 10 average SO42– trends, although there were even stronger relationships with average wet S deposition in the regions. When subsets of lakes with coherent SO42– trends were selected from within each of the 10 regions, both wet S deposition and the climate indices were strongly correlated with those SO42– trends. Hence, lakes in Norway respond to changes in wet S deposition and are influenced by large-scale, i.e. global, climate signals. Future evaluation of recovery of lakes affected by acid deposition must therefore consider the confounding effects of climate and potential climate change. Keywords: recovery, acid deposition, coherence, sulphate, climate change

  17. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFilippis Kelly

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the Aβ peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular Aβ deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice harboring two CAA Aβ mutations (Dutch E693Q and Iowa D694N that mimic the prevalent cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition observed in those patients, and the Swedish mutations (K670N/M671L to increase Aβ production. In these Tg-SwDI mice, we have reported predominant fibrillar Aβ along microvessels in the thalamic region and diffuse plaques in cortical region. Concurrently, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes have been detected primarily in association with fibrillar cerebral microvascular Aβ in this model. Here we show that three native complement components in classical and alternative complement pathways, C1q, C3, and C4, are elevated in Tg-SwDI mice in regions rich in fibrillar microvascular Aβ. Immunohistochemical staining of all three proteins was increased in thalamus, hippocampus, and subiculum, but not frontal cortex. Western blot analysis showed significant increases of all three proteins in the thalamic region (with hippocampus as well as the cortical region, except C3 that was below detection level in cortex. Also, in the thalamic region (with hippocampus, C1q and C3 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated. These complement proteins appeared to be expressed largely by activated microglial cells associated with the fibrillar microvascular Aβ deposits. Our findings demonstrate that Tg-SwDI mice exhibit elevated complement protein expression in response to fibrillar vascular Aβ deposition that is

  18. Palaeomagnetic dating method accounting for post-depositional remanence and its application to geomagnetic field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A.; Suttie, N.

    2016-12-01

    Sedimentary palaeomagnetic data may exhibit some degree of smoothing of the recorded field due to the gradual processes by which the magnetic signal is `locked-in' over time. Here we present a new Bayesian method to construct age-depth models based on palaeomagnetic data, taking into account and correcting for potential lock-in delay. The age-depth model is built on the widely used "Bacon" dating software by Blaauw and Christen (2011, Bayesian Analysis 6, 457-474) and is designed to combine both radiocarbon and palaeomagnetic measurements. To our knowledge, this is the first palaeomagnetic dating method that addresses the potential problems related post-depositional remanent magnetisation acquisition in age-depth modelling. Age-depth models, including site specific lock-in depth and lock-in filter function, produced with this method are shown to be consistent with independent results based on radiocarbon wiggle match dated sediment sections. Besides its primary use as a dating tool, our new method can also be used specifically to identify the most likely lock-in parameters for a specific record. We explore the potential to use these results to construct high-resolution geomagnetic field models based on sedimentary palaeomagnetic data, adjusting for smoothing induced by post-depositional remanent magnetisation acquisition. Potentially, this technique could enable reconstructions of Holocene geomagnetic field with the same amplitude of variability observed in archaeomagnetic field models for the past three millennia.

  19. Toward an integrated genetic model for vent-distal SEDEX deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, D. F.

    2018-04-01

    Although genetic models have been proposed for vent-proximal SEDEX deposits, an equivalent model for vent-distal deposits has not yet appeared. In view of this, it is the object of this paper to present a preliminary integrated vent-distal genetic model through exploration of four major components: (i) nature of the ore-forming fluid, (ii) role of density of the unconsolidated host sediments, (iii) dynamics of sulfate reduction and (iv) depositional environment. Two sub-groups of SEDEX Pb-Zn deposits, vent-proximal and vent-distal, are widely recognized today. Of the two, the latter is by far the largest in terms of metal content with each of the 13 largest containing in excess of 7.5 M (Zn+Pb) metal. In contrast, only one vent-proximal deposit (Sullivan) falls within this size range. Vent-proximal deposits are characteristically underlain by local networks of sulfide-filled veins (commonly regarded as feeder veins) surrounded by a discordant complex of host rock alteration. These attributes are missing in vent-distal deposits, which has led to the widespread view that vent-distal ore-forming fluids have migrated unknown distances away from their vent sites. Because of the characteristic fine grain size of ore minerals, critical fluid inclusion data are lacking for vent-distal ore-stage sulfides. Consequently, hypothetical fluids such as those which formed MVT deposits (120 °C, 20% NaCl equiv.) are considered to represent vent-distal fluids as well. Such high-salinity fluids are capable of carrying significant concentrations of Pb and Zn as chloride complexes while the relatively low temperatures preclude high Cu contents. Densities of such metalliferous brines result in bottom-hugging fluids that collect in shallow saucer-shaped depressions (collector basins). Lateral metal zoning in several deposits reveals the direction from which the brines came. Relative densities of the ore-forming fluid and sediment determine whether the ore-forming fluid stabilizes on top

  20. Toward an integrated genetic model for vent-distal SEDEX deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, D. F.

    2017-07-01

    Although genetic models have been proposed for vent-proximal SEDEX deposits, an equivalent model for vent-distal deposits has not yet appeared. In view of this, it is the object of this paper to present a preliminary integrated vent-distal genetic model through exploration of four major components: (i) nature of the ore-forming fluid, (ii) role of density of the unconsolidated host sediments, (iii) dynamics of sulfate reduction and (iv) depositional environment. Two sub-groups of SEDEX Pb-Zn deposits, vent-proximal and vent-distal, are widely recognized today. Of the two, the latter is by far the largest in terms of metal content with each of the 13 largest containing in excess of 7.5 M (Zn+Pb) metal. In contrast, only one vent-proximal deposit (Sullivan) falls within this size range. Vent-proximal deposits are characteristically underlain by local networks of sulfide-filled veins (commonly regarded as feeder veins) surrounded by a discordant complex of host rock alteration. These attributes are missing in vent-distal deposits, which has led to the widespread view that vent-distal ore-forming fluids have migrated unknown distances away from their vent sites. Because of the characteristic fine grain size of ore minerals, critical fluid inclusion data are lacking for vent-distal ore-stage sulfides. Consequently, hypothetical fluids such as those which formed MVT deposits (120 °C, 20% NaCl equiv.) are considered to represent vent-distal fluids as well. Such high-salinity fluids are capable of carrying significant concentrations of Pb and Zn as chloride complexes while the relatively low temperatures preclude high Cu contents. Densities of such metalliferous brines result in bottom-hugging fluids that collect in shallow saucer-shaped depressions (collector basins). Lateral metal zoning in several deposits reveals the direction from which the brines came. Relative densities of the ore-forming fluid and sediment determine whether the ore-forming fluid stabilizes on top

  1. FALL3D: A Computational Model for Trans-port and Deposition of Volcanic Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2008-01-01

    FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of 8 volcanic ash. The model solves the advection-diffusion-sedimentation (ADS) equa- 9 tion on a structured terrain-following grid using a second-order Finite Differences 10 (FD) explicit scheme. Different parameterizations for the eddy diffusivity tensor 11 and for the particle terminal settling velocities can be used. The code, written 12 in FORTRAN 90, is available in both serial and parallel ver...

  2. INFLUENCE OF PROCESS PARAMETERS ON DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF PARTS MANUFACTURED USING FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Górski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental study – part of research of additive technology using thermoplastics as a build material, namely Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM. Aim of the study was to identify the relation between basic parameter of the FDM process – model orientation during manufacturing – and a dimensional accuracy and repeatability of obtained products. A set of samples was prepared – they were manufactured with variable process parameters and they were measured using 3D scanner. Significant differences in accuracy of products of the same geometry, but manufactured with different set of process parameters were observed.

  3. Modeling the formation and deposition of frazil ice beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombosch, Andreas; Jenkins, Adrian

    1995-04-01

    Large areas of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf are underlain by layers of marine ice, which form when supercooled seawater circulating beneath the ice shelf freezes. The freezing process initially produces a suspension of disc-shaped frazil ice crystals, and these are subs quently deposited onto the ice shelf base in areas where the flow of water is slack enough. This has been modeled assuming that the freezing takes place within buoyant plumes of Ice Shelf Water ascending the ice shelf base from source regions near the grounding lines of the major inlet glaciers. The deposition of the majority of the suspended frazil ice is found to occur in spatially discrete bursts, where peak rates of accumulation at the ice shelf base exceed 1 m yr-1 of solid ice. There is a good correlation between the location of the zones of crystal deposition and the position of the upstream limits of the marine ice layers. The high rates of localized accumulation account for the rapid buildup observed in the layer thickness, which then gradually declines as the marine ice is carried downstream with the flow of the ice shelf. Model results also suggest an origin for the ice platelets observed at depth in the water column near the Filchner Ice Shelf.

  4. TSUNAMI DEPOSITS AT QUEEN’S BEACH, OAHU, HAWAII – INITIALRESULTS AND WAVE MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Barbara Keating

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Photographs taken immediately after the 1946 Aleutian Tsunami inundated Queen’s Beach, southeastern Oahu, show the major highway around the island was inundated and the road bed was destroyed. That road bed remains visible today, in an undeveloped coastline that shows like change in sedimentary deposits between 1946 and today (based on photographic evidence. Tsunami catalog records however indicate that the beach was repeatedly inundated by tsunami in 1946, 1952, 1957, and 1960. Tsunami runup was reported to have reached between 3 and 11 m elevation. Eyewitness accounts however indicate inundations of up to 20 m in Kealakipapa Valley (Makapu’u Lookout during 1946 and photographic evidence indicated inundation reached 9 m in 1957. The inundation of Kealakipapa Valley has been successfully modeled using a 10-m tsunami wave model.A comparison of the modern beach deposits to those near the remains of the destroyed highway demonstrate that the sedimentary deposits within the two areas have very different rock characteristics. We conclude the modern beach is dominated by the rounding of rocks (mostly coral by wave activity. However, in the area that has experienced prior tsunami inundations, the rocks are characterized by fracturing and a high component of basaltic material. We conclude the area near the destroyed highway reflects past tsunami inundations combined with inevitable anthropogenic alteration.

  5. Application of fused deposition modeling rapid prototyping system to the development of microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengzi; Masood, Syed; Iovenitti, Pio; Harvey, Erol C.

    2001-11-01

    Conventional methods of producing micro-scale components for BioMEMS applications such as microfluidic devices are limited to relatively simple geometries and are inefficient for prototype production. Rapid prototyping techniques may be applied to overcome these limitations. Fused Deposition Modelling is one such rapid prototyping process, which can build parts using layer by layer deposition technique with layers as low as 0.178 mm thick and using a select group of thermoplastic building materials. This paper presents the potential of Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) system, available at IRIS, in building prototypes of scaled microchannels for experimental study and verification of fluid flow in microfluidic devices. The scope and application of FDM system as a powerful and flexible rapid prototyping device is described. Microchannels of different geometries are produced in ABS material on the FDM3000 rapid prototyping system and a methodology is presented for experimental study of the mixing of fluids in microchannels in conjunction with the theoretical analysis using FlumeCAD system.

  6. TiOx deposited by magnetron sputtering: a joint modelling and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, R.; Moskovkin, P.; Pflug, A.; Lucas, S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a 3D multiscale simulation approach to model magnetron reactive sputter deposition of TiOx⩽2 at various O2 inlets and its validation against experimental results. The simulation first involves the transport of sputtered material in a vacuum chamber by means of a three-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. Second, the film growth at different positions on a 3D substrate is simulated using a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method. When simulating the transport of species in the chamber, wall chemistry reactions are taken into account in order to get the proper content of the reactive species in the volume. Angular and energy distributions of particles are extracted from DSMC and used for film growth modelling by kMC. Along with the simulation, experimental deposition of TiOx coatings on silicon samples placed at different positions on a curved sample holder was performed. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulated ones. For a given coater, the plasma phase hysteresis behaviour, film composition and film morphology are predicted. The used methodology can be applied to any coater and any films. This paves the way to the elaboration of a virtual coater allowing a user to predict composition and morphology of films deposited in silico.

  7. Sediment depositions upstream of open check dams: new elements from small scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Le Guern, Jules; Carbonari, Costanza; Recking, Alain

    2015-04-01

    numbers that the flows tend to adopt? New small scale model experiments have been undertaken focusing on depositions processes and their related hydraulics. Accurate photogrammetric measurements allowed us to better describe the deposition processes3. Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LS-PIV) was performed to determine surface velocity fields in highly active channels with low grain submersion4. We will present preliminary results of our experiments showing the new elements we observed in massive deposit dynamics. REFERENCES 1.Armanini, A., Dellagiacoma, F. & Ferrari, L. From the check dam to the development of functional check dams. Fluvial Hydraulics of Mountain Regions 37, 331-344 (1991). 2.Piton, G. & Recking, A. Design of sediment traps with open check dams: a review, part I: hydraulic and deposition processes. (Accepted by the) Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 1-23 (2015). 3.Le Guern, J. Ms Thesis: Modélisation physique des plages de depot : analyse de la dynamique de remplissage.(2014) . 4.Carbonari, C. Ms Thesis: Small scale experiments of deposition processes occuring in sediment traps, LS-PIV measurments and geomorphological descriptions. (in preparation).

  8. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  9. Application of Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) Method of 3D Printing in Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingjunjiao; Gholizadeh, Hamideh; Lu, Jun; Bunt, Craig; Seyfoddin, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging manufacturing technology for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Fused deposition modelling (FDM) is a low cost extrusion-based 3D printing technique that can deposit materials layer-by-layer to create solid geometries. This review article aims to provide an overview of FDM based 3D printing application in developing new drug delivery systems. The principle methodology, suitable polymers and important parameters in FDM technology and its applications in fabrication of personalised tablets and drug delivery devices are discussed in this review. FDM based 3D printing is a novel and versatile manufacturing technique for creating customised drug delivery devices that contain accurate dose of medicine( s) and provide controlled drug released profiles. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Reactive ballistic deposition of nanostructured model materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, David W; Hahn, Nathan T; May, R Alan; Berglund, Sean P; Lin, Yong-Mao; Stevenson, Keith J; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D; Mullins, C Buddie

    2012-03-20

    Porous, high surface area materials have critical roles in applications including catalysis, photochemistry, and energy storage. In these fields, researchers have demonstrated that the nanometer-scale structure modifies mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of the material, greatly influencing its behavior and performance. Such complex chemical systems can involve several distinct processes occurring in series or parallel. Understanding the influence of size and structure on the properties of these materials requires techniques for producing clean, simple model systems. In the fields of photoelectrochemistry and lithium storage, for example, researchers need to evaluate the effects of changing the electrode structure of a single material or producing electrodes of many different candidate materials while maintaining a distinctly favorable morphology. In this Account, we introduce our studies of the formation and characterization of high surface area, porous thin films synthesized by a process called reactive ballistic deposition (RBD). RBD is a simple method that provides control of the morphology, porosity, and surface area of thin films by manipulating the angle at which a metal-vapor flux impinges on the substrate during deposition. This approach is largely independent of the identity of the deposited material and relies upon limited surface diffusion during synthesis, which enables the formation of kinetically trapped structures. Here, we review our results for the deposition of films from a number of semiconductive materials that are important for applications such as photoelectrochemical water oxidation and lithium ion storage. The use of RBD has enabled us to systematically control individual aspects of both the structure and composition of thin film electrodes in order to probe the effects of each on the performance of the material. We have evaluated the performance of several materials for potential use in these applications and have identified

  11. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers. Part 2: Model Verification by Use of Full Scale Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    A model for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass has been developed. The model describes deposit build-up by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermoforesis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles and reaction. The model...... of some physical parameters related to the description of surface capture are suggested. Based on these examinations of the model ability to describe observed deposit formation rates, the proposed model can be regarded as a promising tool for description of deposit formation in full-scale biomass...... describes particle sticking or rebound by a combination of the description of (visco)elsatic particles impacting a solid surface and particle capture by a viscous surface. The model is used to predict deposit formation rates measured during tests conducted with probes in full-scale suspension-fired biomass...

  12. Design and Analysis of Fused Deposition Modeling 3D Printer Nozzle for Color Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanling Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM has been one of the most widely used rapid prototyping (RP technologies leading to the increase in market attention. Obviously it is desirable to print 3D objects; however, existing FDM printers are restricted to printing only monochrome objects because of the entry-level nozzle structure, and literature on the topic is also sparse. In this paper, the CAD model of the nozzle is established first by UG (Unigraphics NX software to show the structure of fused deposition modeling 3D printer nozzle for color mixing. Second, the flow channel model of the nozzle is extracted and simplified. Then, the CAD and finite element model are established by UG and ICEM CFD software, respectively, to prepare for the simulation. The flow field is simulated by Fluent software. The nozzle’s suitable temperature at different extrusion speeds is obtained, and the reason for the blockage at the intersection of the heating block is revealed. Finally, test verification of the nozzle is performed, which can produce mixed-color artifacts stably.

  13. Literature review of models for estimating soil erosion and deposition from wind stresses on uranium-mill-tailings covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon-suppression cover applied to uranium-mill tailings. The mechanics of wind erosion, as well as of soil deposition, are discussed in this report. Several wind erosion models are reviewed to determine if they can be used to estimate the erosion of soil from a mill-tailings cover. One model, developed by W.S. Chepil, contains the most-important factors that describe variables that influence wind erosion. Particular features of other models are also discussed, as well as the application of Chepil's model to a particular tailings pile. For this particular tailings pile, the estimated erosion was almost one inch per year for an unprotected tailings soil surface. Wide variability in the deposition velocity and lack of adequate deposition models preclude reliable estimates of the rate at which airborne particles are deposited.

  14. Literature review of models for estimating soil erosion and deposition from wind stresses on uranium-mill-tailings covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon-suppression cover applied to uranium-mill tailings. The mechanics of wind erosion, as well as of soil deposition, are discussed in this report. Several wind erosion models are reviewed to determine if they can be used to estimate the erosion of soil from a mill-tailings cover. One model, developed by W.S. Chepil, contains the most-important factors that describe variables that influence wind erosion. Particular features of other models are also discussed, as well as the application of Chepil's model to a particular tailings pile. For this particular tailings pile, the estimated erosion was almost one inch per year for an unprotected tailings soil surface. Wide variability in the deposition velocity and lack of adequate deposition models preclude reliable estimates of the rate at which airborne particles are deposited

  15. Modelling of marine base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exert a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70%, 78%, 75% and 48% for Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+, respectively, over the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Mårtensson et al. (2003 for ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986 for fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998 for coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μm size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model annual mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values (R = 0.8 for Na+ and Mg2+, whereas for Ca2+ the correlation is poor (R < 0.3. Base cation concentrations are also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the

  16. The use of sediment deposition maps as auxiliary data for hydraulic model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    One aspect of the French disaster mitigation setup is the statutory Risk Prevention Plans (PPR, Plans de Prévention des Risques); i.e. spatial identification of potential disasters and mitigation measures. The maps are categorised into three zones depicting increasing disaster severity and potential mitigation measures (RTM, 1999). Taking the example of the city of Barcelonnette, in South France (French Alps), floods have been the most frequent occurring natural hazard (Flageollet et al., 1996). Consequently, a case is put forward for the need for accurate flood extent delineation to support the decision making process. For this study, the Barcelonnette case study was considered, whereby the last devastating flooding was in June 1957 (Weber, 1994). Contrary to the recent advances in the proliferation of data to support flood inundation studies (Bates, 2012; Bates, 2004; Di Baldassarre and Uhlenbrook, 2012; Schumann et al., 2009), constraints are faced when analysing flood inundation events that occurred before the 1970's. In absence of frequent flooding, the analysis of historical flood extents may play an important role in shaping the awareness of local stakeholders and support land-use and urban planning. This study is part of a probabilistic flood mapping (e.g. Di Baldassarre et al., 2010, Horrit, 2006) of the valley carried out in a Monte-Carlo framework, while taking into account the peak flow and the parametric uncertainty. The simulations were carried out using the sub-grid channel model extension of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model (Bates et al, 2010; Neal et al., 2012). Sediment deposition maps (Lecarpentier, 1963) were used to analyse the model performance, additionally the graduation of the sediment deposition sizes showed the flood propagation and was used to analyse the model runs. However, there still remains the challenge of quantifying the uncertainty in the sediment deposition map and the actual flood extent.

  17. Modelling deposition and air concentration of reduced nitrogen in Poland and sensitivity to variability in annual meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Maciej; Dore, Anthony J; Błaś, Marek; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2011-04-01

    The relative contribution of reduced nitrogen to acid and eutrophic deposition in Europe has increased recently as a result of European policies which have been successful in reducing SO(2) and NO(x) emissions but have had smaller impacts on ammonia (NH(3)) emissions. In this paper the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used to calculate the spatial patterns of annual average ammonia and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) air concentrations and reduced nitrogen (NH(x)) dry and wet deposition with a 5 km × 5 km grid for years 2002-2005. The modelled air concentrations of NH(3) and dry deposition of NH(x) show similar spatial patterns for all years considered. The largest year to year changes were found for wet deposition, which vary considerably with precipitation amount. The FRAME modelled air concentrations and wet deposition are in reasonable agreement with available measurements (Pearson's correlation coefficients above 0.6 for years 2002-2005), and with spatial patterns of concentrations and deposition of NH(x) reported with the EMEP results, but show larger spatial gradients. The error statistics show that the FRAME model results are in better agreement with measurements if compared with EMEP estimates. The differences in deposition budgets calculated with FRAME and EMEP do not exceed 17% for wet and 6% for dry deposition, with FRAME estimates higher than for EMEP wet deposition for modelled period and lower or equal for dry deposition. The FRAME estimates of wet deposition budget are lower than the measurement-based values reported by the Chief Inspectorate of Environmental Protection of Poland, with the differences by approximately 3%. Up to 93% of dry and 53% of wet deposition of NH(x) in Poland originates from national sources. Over the western part of Poland and mountainous areas in the south, transboundary transport can contribute over 80% of total (dry + wet) NH(x) deposition. The spatial pattern of the relative contribution of

  18. A dynamical model on deposit and loan of banking: A bifurcation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarti, Novriana; Hasmi, Abrari Noor

    2015-09-01

    A dynamical model, which is one of sophisticated techniques using mathematical equations, can determine the observed state, for example bank profits, for all future times based on the current state. It will also show small changes in the state of the system create either small or big changes in the future depending on the model. In this research we develop a dynamical system of the form: d/D d t =f (D ,L ,rD,rL,r ), d/L d t =g (D ,L ,rD,rL,r ), Here D and rD are the volume of deposit and its rate, L and rL are the volume of loan and its rate, and r is the interbank market rate. There are parameters required in this model which give connections between two variables or between two derivative functions. In this paper we simulate the model for several parameters values. We do bifurcation analysis on the dynamics of the system in order to identify the appropriate parameters that control the stability behaviour of the system. The result shows that the system will have a limit cycle for small value of interest rate of loan, so the deposit and loan volumes are fluctuating and oscillating extremely. If the interest rate of loan is too high, the loan volume will be decreasing and vanish and the system will converge to its carrying capacity.

  19. Comprehensive impedance model of cobalt deposition in sulfate solutions accounting for homogeneous reactions and adsorptive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Pritzker, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive physicochemical model for cobalt deposition onto a cobalt rotating disk electrode in sulfate-borate (pH 3) solutions is derived and statistically fit to experimental EIS spectra obtained over a range of CoSO 4 concentrations, overpotentials and rotation speeds. The model accounts for H + and water reduction, homogeneous reactions and mass transport within the boundary layer. Based on a thermodynamic analysis, the species CoSO 4(aq) , B(OH) 3(aq) , B 3 O 3 (OH) 4 - , H + and OH - and two homogeneous reactions (B(OH) 3(aq) hydrolysis and water dissociation) are included in the model. Kinetic and transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the sum-of-squares error between the model and experimental measurements using a simplex method. The electrode response is affected most strongly by parameters associated with the first step of Co(II) reduction, reflecting its control of the rate of Co deposition, and is moderately sensitive to the parameters for H + reduction and the Co(II) diffusion coefficient. Water reduction is found not to occur to any significant extent under the conditions studied. These trends are consistent with that obtained by fitting equivalent electrical circuits to the experimental spectra. The simplest circuit that best fits the data consists of two RQ elements (resistor-constant phase element) in parallel or series with the solution resistance.

  20. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of Filtration Models for Non-Fickian transport and Hyperexponential deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    filtration coefficients and the CTRW equation expressed in Laplace space, are selected to simulate eight experiments. These experiments involve both porous media and colloid-medium interactions of different heterogeneity degrees. The uncertainty of elliptic equation predictions with distributed filtration......Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are carried out to investigate the predictive accuracy of the filtration models for describing non-Fickian transport and hyperexponential deposition. Five different modeling approaches, involving the elliptic equation with different types of distributed...... coefficients is larger than that with a single filtration coefficient. The uncertainties of model predictions from the elliptic equation and CTRW equation in Laplace space are minimal for solute transport. Higher uncertainties of parameter estimation and model outputs are observed in the cases with the porous...

  1. An automatic system using mobile-agent software to model the calculation process of a chemical vapor deposition film deposition simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Fukui, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Masamoto; Funatsu, Kimito; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    We have developed an automatic modeling system for calculation processes of the simulator to reproduce experimental results of chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in order to decrease the calculation cost of the simulator. Replacing the simulator by the mathematical models proposed by the system will contribute towards decreasing the calculation costs for predicting the experimental results. The system consists of a mobile agent and two software resources in computer networks, that is, generalized modeling software and a simulator reproducing cross-sections of the deposited films on the substrates with the micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. The mobile agent autonomously creates appropriate models by moving to and then operating the software resources. The models are calculated by partial least squares regression (PLS), quadratic PLS (QPLS) and error back propagation (BP) methods using artificial neural networks (ANN) and expresses by mathematical formulas to reproduce the calculated results of the simulator. The models show good reproducibility and predictability both for uniformity and filling properties of the films calculated by the simulator. The models using the BP method yield the best performance. The filling property data are more suitable to modeling than film uniformity.

  2. A generic Froude scale model study of massive bedload deposition in a debris basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2017-04-01

    Sediment trapping structures, such as gravel deposition basins, are regularly implemented in mountainous context for flood hazard mitigation. These structures should ultimately trap gravels when their excess may aggravate the downstream flood hazard, while, the remaining time, allowing a suitable background sediment continuity. Such optimized designs require a sufficient knowledge of the flow features and geomorphic processes implied in gravel trapping. A generic Froude scale model of a 10%-steep, bedload deposition basin, with a slit dam and without outlet structure, is presented in this work. Accurate photogrammetry and large scale particle image velocimetry (LS-PIV) were combined to study the geomorphic patterns and to reconstruct the flows. The emergence of self induced cycles of braided and channelized flows, with intense grain size sorting, is described. It sheds light on the similarity of bedload trapping with alluvial fan formation or fluvial delta development. The deposition slope, a key parameter in the structure design, is more precisely studied. The measurements are correctly estimated by a new simple equation, which is developed from prior works dedicated to steep slope stream hydraulics and bedload transport. The analysis demonstrates additionally that, despite the steepness of the studied conditions, most flows are subcritical due to roughness adjustment. We finally highlight that morphologically-active flows, i.e., with dimensionless shear stress higher than the threshold for motion, have Froude number ≈ 1; i.e., that a critical flow hypothesis seems reasonable, as a first approximation, to describe flows over massive bedload depositions. This new dataset, with complete geomorphic and flow measurements, in diverse conditions, may be used as reference to try and test numerical approaches of the phenomena.

  3. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Whitwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS. While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified and PAOS (n = 42 subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+ status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified

  4. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Weigand, Stephen D; Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Machulda, Mary M; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS). While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified) and PAOS (n = 42) subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+) status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified PPA subjects.

  5. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.; Moore, T. R.; Bubier, J.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C) balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to explore impacts of long-term nitrogen (N) fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behaviour. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to factors that can be related to differences in vegetation distribution (e.g. shrubs vs. graminoid vegetation) and to high tolerance of vascular plants to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8-year response of GEP and NEE to N input was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthetic capacity (GEPmax) to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum-dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m-2 yr-1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modelling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  6. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modeling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.; Moore, T. R.; Bubier, J. L.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.

    2014-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C) balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to analyze impacts of long-term nitrogen (N) fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behavior. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to high tolerance of Sphagnum to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8 year response of GEP and NEE to N was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthesis capacity to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m-2 yr-1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modeling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone Based on Fused Deposition Modeling for Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK fabricated by fused deposition modeling for medical applications was evaluated in terms of mechanical strength and in vitro cytotoxicity in this study. Orthogonal experiments were firstly designed to investigate the significant factors on tensile strength. Nozzle temperature, platform temperature, and the filament diameter were tightly controlled for improved mechanical strength performance. These sensitive parameters affected the interlayer bonding and solid condition in the samples. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometry analysis was secondly conducted to compare the functional groups in PEEK granules, filaments, and printed parts. In vitro cytotoxicity test was carried out at last, and no toxic substances were introduced during the printing process.

  8. Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition. An in vitro study using a gelatin matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, N S; Mandel, G S; Carroll, D J; Halverson, P B

    1984-07-01

    Deposition of crystalline triclinic (t) and monoclinic (m) calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) in fibrocartilage and articular cartilage is the hallmark of chondrocalcinosis. Using biologic grade gelatin to model this crystal growth process, t-CPPD, m-CPPD, amorphous calcium pyrophosphate, orthorhombic calcium pyrophosphate tetrahydrate (o-CPPT), and 3 mixed calcium/sodium pyrophosphate salts were grown at physiologic pH. Amorphous and o-CPPT appeared to be kinetic precursor crystals in the formation of t-CPPD and m-CPPD. Optimal concentration ranges for the different crystals were determined.

  9. Increasing dimension of structures by 4D printing shape memory polymers via fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, G. F.; Damanpack, A. R.; Bodaghi, M.; Liao, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this paper is to introduce a 4D printing method to program shape memory polymers (SMPs) during fabrication process. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) as a filament-based printing method is employed to program SMPs during depositing the material. This method is implemented to fabricate complicated polymeric structures by self-bending features without need of any post-programming. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate feasibility of one-dimensional (1D)-to 2D and 2D-to-3D self-bending. It is shown that 3D printed plate structures can transform into masonry-inspired 3D curved shell structures by simply heating. Good reliability of SMP programming during printing process is also demonstrated. A 3D macroscopic constitutive model is established to simulate thermo-mechanical features of the printed SMPs. Governing equations are also derived to simulate programming mechanism during printing process and shape change of self-bending structures. In this respect, a finite element formulation is developed considering von-Kármán geometric nonlinearity and solved by implementing iterative Newton-Raphson scheme. The accuracy of the computational approach is checked with experimental results. It is demonstrated that the theoretical model is able to replicate the main characteristics observed in the experiments. This research is likely to advance the state of the art FDM 4D printing, and provide pertinent results and computational tool that are instrumental in design of smart materials and structures with self-bending features.

  10. 3D modelling of the Plavitsa Au -Cu polymetallic deposit, Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovski, Igor; Serafimovski, Dalibor

    2015-01-01

    The latest exploration and study of the high sulfidation epithermal deposit of Plavitsa displayed significant progress in understanding the geology and definition of the particular ore body. The results from boreholes made by Genesis Resources International DOOEL Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, in 2011, 2012 and 2013 were: 51 m interval with 3.9 g/t Au in oxidation zone, 65 m interval with 3.1 g/t Au in oxidation zone, 51 m interval with 3.7 g/t Au, 2.8% Cu and 16 g/t Ag in sulfide zone. For this 3D model all 195 boreholes made by the Genesis Re- sources International were used. The boreholes were made in the period of 2011-2013, with total length of 47295.8 m of which 74 boreholes were performed by diamond core method and total length of 23908.3 m while the other 121 boreholes were performed by rotary circulation (RC) with total length of 23387.5 m. Using professional ArcGIS software were prepared 3D models of the ore body for gold and copper, at respective resolution of 30 m and 10 m, for each element, which have defined mineralization extent from 1305 m to 600 m of the hypsometric level. These models should improve our understanding of the ore mineralization and complement the geological data of the Plavitsa ore deposit. (author)

  11. Characterization and modeling of tungsten nanoparticles generated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landstroem, L.; Kokavecz, J.; Lu, J.; Heszler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten nanoparticles were generated by photolytical (UV) laser-activated chemical vapor deposition from WF 6 /H 2 /Ar gas mixture. Emission spectroscopy of thermal radiation allowed temperature determination of the nanoparticles while varying the laser fluence. A model including known cooling mechanisms was used to calculate the laser-induced temperature as a function of time and laser fluence, where the only fitting parameter was the absorption efficiency of the particles, obtained from measured temperatures. Size decrease of the particles due to evaporation was modeled at different laser fluences, and connected to size-distribution measurements from transmission electron microscopy micrographs, where a maximum geometric mean diameter (for the experimental conditions used) of 10 nm was observed at a laser fluence of ∼120 mJ/cm2. Measurements and the model calculations showed that the laser-excited particles reached the melting temperature of tungsten at ∼95 mJ/cm2. Above ∼130 mJ/cm2, very high rates of evaporation of W atoms were found, resulting in a decrease in size of the deposited particles. Crystalline, metastable β-W nanoparticles were found above ∼100 mJ/cm2 by both electron and x-ray diffraction. Below fluences of ∼100 mJ/cm2, i.e., corresponding to the value necessary for melting, amorphous nanoparticles were obtained

  12. Iron ore deposits model using geoelectrical resistivity method with dipole-dipole array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octova Adree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining industry is an industry with very high risk (losses. In order that mining activities can be run well, then the potential of the Earth’s resources must be known for sure. one of the Earth’s resources of high economic value is the iron ore. Iron ore is rarely found in a free state in nature, it is usually associated with other minerals and exposed randomly. With these properties, iron ore needs to be modeled before doing mining activities in order to avoid large losses. Iron ore deposits can be modeled with geoelectrical resistivity method. Dipole-dipole array will produce good imaging both vertically and laterally. From the measurement results of geoelectrical resistivity with dipole-dipole array will be obtained the value of measuring the current and potential difference. This value will generate into 2D and 3D model of the cross section of the iron ore deposits. One of the areas in West Sumatra has the potential for iron ore. Five lines were applied in this area. The result of cross section got the iron minerals associated with quartzite at 30 meters depth below the surface.

  13. A comprehensive mathematical model of microscopic dose deposition in photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang-Hsin Wang, Ken; Mitra, Soumya; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen ( 3 O 2 ) consumption and transport and microscopic photodynamic dose deposition during photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vivo. Previously published models have been improved by considering perfused vessels as a time-dependent 3 O 2 source and linking the 3 O 2 concentration in the vessel to that within the tissue through the Hill equation. The time-dependent photochemical 3 O 2 consumption rate incorporates sensitizer photobleaching effects and an experimentally determined initially nonuniform photosensitizer distribution. The axial transport of 3 O 2 is provided for in the capillaries and in the surrounding tissue. A self-sensitized singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 )-mediated bleaching mechanism and the measured, initially nonuniform distribution of meso-tetrahydroxyphenyl chlorin at 3 h after intravascular administration were used to demonstrate the capabilities of the model. Time-evolved distributions of 3 O 2 concentration were obtained by numerically solving two-dimensional diffusion-with-reaction equations both in the capillary and the adjacent tissue. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin- 3 O 2 saturation (SO 2 ) within the vessels, irreversible sensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, and the microscopic distributions of 3 O 2 , sensitizer concentration, and 1 O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. The simulations reveal severe axial gradients in 3 O 2 and in photodynamic dose deposition in response to a wide range of clinically relevant treatment parameters. Thus, unlike former Krogh cylinder-based models, which assume a constant 3 O 2 concentration at the vessel, this new model identifies conditions in which 3 O 2 depletion and minimal deposition of reacting 1 O 2 exist near the end of axial segments of

  14. Feature scale modeling for etching and deposition processes in semiconductor manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyka, W.

    2000-04-01

    Simulation of etching and deposition processes as well as three-dimensional geometry generation are important issues in state of the art TCAD applications. Three-dimensional effects are gaining importance for semiconductor devices and for their interconnects. Therefore a strictly physically based simulation of their topography is required. Accurate investigation of single etching and deposition processes has become equally important as process integration. Within this context several aspects of three-dimensional topography simulation have been covered by this thesis and new and interesting results have been achieved in various areas. The algorithmic core of the cell-based structuring element surface propagation method has been optimized and has been eliminated from its position as factor which predominantly determines the required CPU time. In parallel with investigated optimization techniques and required by various process models, the implementation of the surface normal calculation and the special handling of voids and unconnected parts of the geometry has been completed in three dimensions. A process-step-based solid modeling tool which incorporates layout data as well as aerial image simulation has been supplied. It can be coupled with the topography simulation and includes simple geometrically based models for CMP and oxidation. In the presented combination, the tool makes use of the design information stored in the layout file, combines it with the manufacturing recipe, and hence is extremely helpful for the automatic generation of three-dimensional structures. Its usefulness has been proven with several interconnect examples. Regarding topography models, resist development not only turned out to be very helpful for predicting exposed and etched resist profiles within a rigorous lithography simulation, but, by means of benchmark examples, also demonstrated the extraordinary stability of the proposed cellular surface movement algorithm. With respect to

  15. Numerical modeling of an alloy droplet deposition with non-equilibrium solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanuj, Vimal

    Droplet deposition is a process of extensive relevance to the microfabrication industry. Various bonding and film deposition methods utilize single or multiple droplet impingements on a substrate with subsequent splat formation through simultaneous spreading and solidification. Splat morphology and solidification characteristics play vital roles in determining the final outcome. Experimental methods have limited reach in studying such phenomena owing to the extremely small time and length scales involved. Fundamental understanding of the governing principles of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase change provide effective means of studying such processes through computational techniques. The present study aims at numerically modeling and analyzing the phenomenon of splat formation and phase change in an alloy droplet deposition process. Phase change in alloys occurs non-isothermally and its formulation poses mathematical challenges. A highly non-linear flow field in conjunction with multiple interfaces and convection-diffusion governed phase transition are some of the highlighting features involved in the numerical formulation. Moreover, the non-equilibrium solidification behavior in eutectic systems is of prime concern. The peculiar phenomenon requires special treatments in terms of modeling solid phase species diffusion, liquid phase enrichment during solute partitioning and isothermal eutectic transformation. The flow field is solved using a two-step projection algorithm coupled with enhanced interface modeling schemes. The free surface tracking and reconstruction is achieved through two approaches: VOF-PLIC and CLSVOF to achieve optimum interface accuracy with minimal computational resources. The energy equation is written in terms of enthalpy with an additional source term to account for the phase change. The solidification phenomenon is modeled using a coupled temperature-solute scheme that reflects the microscopic effects arising due to dendritic growth

  16. A kinetics model for MOCVD deposition of AlN film based on Grove theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kaiwen; Dai, Xianying; Miao, Dongming; Wu, Shujing; Zhao, Tianlong; Hao, Yue

    2017-11-01

    Based on Grove theory, a kinetic model for MOCVD deposition of AlN film was proposed and built in this paper. Physical and chemical processes, e.g., gas phase transport, surface adsorption, surface chemical reactions, as well as the gas phase reactions in boundary layer were analyzed in the kinetic model. Based on this model, the effects of substrate temperature and chamber pressure on the growth rate of AlN film were investigated, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Meanwhile, the dependences of AlN growth rate and temperature, pressure for three types of reaction pathways were also analyzed. The simulated results provide an important insight into the optimizing of AlN growth with appropriate temperature and pressure in experiment.

  17. Finite element modeling of deposition of ceramic material during SLM additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three dimensional model for material deposition in Selective Laser Melting (SLM with application to Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic ceramic is presented. As the material is transparent to laser, dopants are added to increase the heat absorption efficiency. Based on Beer-Lambert law, a volumetric heat source model taking into account the material absorption is derived. The Level Set method with multiphase homogenization is used to track the shape of deposed bead and the thermodynamic is coupled to calculate the melting-solidification path. The shrinkage during consolidation from powder to compact medium is modeled by a compressible Newtonian constitutive law. A semi-implicit formulation of surface tension is used, which permits a stable resolution to capture the gas-liquid interface. The formation of droplets is obtained and slight waves of melt pool are observed. The influence of different process parameters on temperature distribution, melt pool profiles and bead shapes is discussed.

  18. Modelling the ecosystem effects of nitrogen deposition: Model of Ecosystem Retention and Loss of Inorganic Nitrogen (MERLIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Cosby

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A catchment-scale mass-balance model of linked carbon and nitrogen cycling in ecosystems has been developed for simulating leaching losses of inorganic nitrogen. The model (MERLIN considers linked biotic and abiotic processes affecting the cycling and storage of nitrogen. The model is aggregated in space and time and contains compartments intended to be observable and/or interpretable at the plot or catchment scale. The structure of the model includes the inorganic soil, a plant compartment and two soil organic compartments. Fluxes in and out of the ecosystem and between compartments are regulated by atmospheric deposition, hydrological discharge, plant uptake, litter production, wood production, microbial immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification. Nitrogen fluxes are controlled by carbon productivity, the C:N ratios of organic compartments and inorganic nitrogen in soil solution. Inputs required are: 1 temporal sequences of carbon fluxes and pools- 2 time series of hydrological discharge through the soils, 3 historical and current external sources of inorganic nitrogen; 4 current amounts of nitrogen in the plant and soil organic compartments; 5 constants specifying the nitrogen uptake and immobilization characteristics of the plant and soil organic compartments; and 6 soil characteristics such as depth, porosity, bulk density, and anion/cation exchange constants. Outputs include: 1 concentrations and fluxes of NO3 and NH4 in soil solution and runoff; 2 total nitrogen contents of the organic and inorganic compartments; 3 C:N ratios of the aggregated plant and soil organic compartments; and 4 rates of nitrogen uptake and immobilization and nitrogen mineralization. The behaviour of the model is assessed for a combination of land-use change and nitrogen deposition scenarios in a series of speculative simulations. The results of the simulations are in broad agreement with observed and hypothesized behaviour of nitrogen

  19. Modeling wet deposition and concentration of inorganics over Northeast Asia with MRI-PM/c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kajino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a regional-scale simulation over Northeast Asia for the year 2006 using an aerosol chemical transport model, with time-varying lateral and upper boundary concentrations of gaseous species predicted by a global stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry-climate model. The present one-way nested global-through-regional-scale model is named the Meteorological Research Institute–Passive-tracers Model system for atmospheric Chemistry (MRI-PM/c. We evaluated the model's performance with respect to the major anthropogenic and natural inorganic components, SO42−, NH4+, NO3, Na+ and Ca2+ in the air, rain and snow measured at the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET stations. Statistical analysis showed that approximately 40–50 % and 70–80 % of simulated concentration and wet deposition of SO42−, NH4+, NO3and Ca2+ are within factors of 2 and 5 of the observations, respectively. The prediction of the sea-salt originated component Na+ was not successful at near-coastal stations (where the distance from the coast ranged from 150 to 700 m, because the model grid resolution (Δx=60 km is too coarse to resolve it. The simulated Na+ in precipitation was significantly underestimated by up to a factor of 30.

  20. Phenomenological modelling of CHF in annular flow in annuli using new models of droplet deposition and entrainment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibin, E-mail: hb-zhang@xjtu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom); Hewitt, G.F., E-mail: g.hewitt@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A phenomenological model to predict the CHF for flows in annuli is described. • New correlations of droplet entrainment and deposition are used. • The present model has good predictive capability in predicting CHF in annuli. - Abstract: In this paper, we present a phenomenological model to predict the CHF (critical heat flux) for upward annular flow in heated vertical annuli. In present model, a new set of correlations of droplet deposition and entrainment in annuli was used which were verified by comparison with the data of Moeck (1970) for developing liquid films in adiabatic annuli. In the results presented here, these new correlations have been used to predict 2249 independent data on critical heat flux (CHF) obtained both regarding internal heating of the rod as well as simultaneous heating of the rod and the outer tube in six heated vertical annuli under various mass flow rate, pressure and inlet quality and where the conditions were such that (as is most common) the CHF condition occurred in the annular flow regime. The comparisons between the calculated and measured CHFs showed that the present model has good predictive capability in predicting CHF.

  1. Modeled subalpine plant community response to climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, T.C.; Belyazid, S.; Sullivan, T.J.; Sverdrup, H.; Bowman, W.D.; Porter, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate potential long-term effects of climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on subalpine ecosystems, the coupled biogeochemical and vegetation community competition model ForSAFE-Veg was applied to a site at the Loch Vale watershed of Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Changes in climate and N deposition since 1900 resulted in pronounced changes in simulated plant species cover as compared with ambient and estimated future community composition. The estimated critical load (CL) of N deposition to protect against an average future (2010–2100) change in biodiversity of 10% was between 1.9 and 3.5 kg N ha −1  yr −1 . Results suggest that the CL has been exceeded and vegetation at the study site has already undergone a change of more than 10% as a result of N deposition. Future increases in air temperature are forecast to cause further changes in plant community composition, exacerbating changes in response to N deposition alone. - Highlights: • A novel calibration step was introduced for modeling biodiversity with ForSAFE-Veg. • Modeled increases in tree cover are consistent with empirical studies. • Reductions in N deposition decreased future graminoid percent cover. • Critical loads of N to protect biodiversity should consider climate change effects. - Subalpine plant biodiversity in Rocky Mountain National Park has already been impacted by N deposition and climate change and is expected to experience significant future effects

  2. Modelling photochemical oxidant formation, transport, deposition and exposure of terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, D; Cape, J N; Coyle, M; Smith, R I; Hjellbrekke, A G; Simpson, D; Derwent, R G; Johnson, C E

    1999-01-01

    The chemical processes responsible for production of photochemical oxidants within the troposphere have been the subject of laboratory and field study throughout the last three decades. During the same period, models to simulate the atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition of ozone (O(3)) from individual urban sources and from regions have been developed. The models differ greatly in the complexity of chemical schemes, in the underlying meteorology and in spatial and temporal resolution. Input information from land use, spatial and temporally disaggregated emission inventories and meteorology have all improved considerably in recent years and are not fully implemented in current models. The development of control strategies in both North America and Europe to close the gaps between current exceedances of environmental limits, guide values, critical levels or loads and full compliance with these limits provides the focus for policy makers and the support agencies for the research. The models represent the only method of testing a range of control options in advance of implementation. This paper describes currently applied models of photochemical oxidant production and transport at global and regional scales and their ability to simulate individual episodes as well as photochemical oxidant climatology. The success of current models in quantifying the exposure of terrestrial surfaces and the population to potentially damaging O(3) concentrations (and dose) is examined. The analysis shows the degree to which the underlying processes and their application within the models limit the quality of the model products.

  3. [3D printing personalized implant manufactured via fused deposition modeling: an accuracy research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of personalized implant fabricated via 3D printing and fused deposition modeling technique (FDM) and to compare the results with a real tooth. Six prepared extracted orthodontic teeth (in vivo) were scanned via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to obtain 3D data and to build the data models by using Mimics 15.0 software. The extracted orthodontic teeth (in vitro) and the personalized implants designed via 3D printing and FDM were scanned via CBCT to obtain data and to build the data models at the same parameters. The 3D deviations were compared among the in vivo teeth data models, in vitro teeth data models, and printing personalized implant data models by using the Geomagic studio software. The average deviations of high and low areas between date models of in vivo teeth and personalized implants were 0.19 mm and -0.16 mm, respectively, and the average deviations between in vitro and in vivo teeth were 0.14 mm and -0.07 mm, respectively. The independent t test showed that no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). 1) The personalized dental implants were manufactured via 3D printing and FDM with a high degree of precision. 2) Errors between the data models of in vitro and in vivo teeth were observed at the same CBCT parameters.

  4. Control of remediation of uranium deposit Straz with use of numerical modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Muzak, J.; Smetana, R.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical mining of uranium on the deposit Straz has caused large contamination of groundwater of cretaceous collectors in Straz block of Northbohemian cretaceous table. The low cenomanian aquifer where the uranium deposit is placed is mainly afflicted. In the cenomanian collector there is now more than 4.8 mil. t dissolved solids mainly SO 4 2- , Al, Fe, NH 4 + etc. The total salinity reaches up to 80 g/l. The upper laying turonian collector is drinking water reservoir for larger region. Its contamination is weaker than in cenomanian collector. Use of complex 3D Transport - Reaction Model can be divided into two separate parts. First modelling step is a quantification of overflow between individual mesh elements calculated out of calibrated mixed-hybrid flow model. Two different types of mathematical models are used to accomplish the task: Flow model based on a primary formulation of finite element method, which calculates spatial distribution of piezometric head and flow velocity vectors in selected points of area considered (finite element mesh nodes). This model exactly describes hydraulic situation in area studied; Flow model based on mixed-hybrid formulation of finite element method. This model strictly complies with exact water balance at inter-element faces. In the second part transport-reaction model based on finite volume method is used for calculations using pre-calculated advective velocity field in the area considered. The finite-element mesh covering about 40 km 2 consists of about 16,000 spatial elements. In the leaching fields area the length of the triangular edge is 100-150 meters, vertically the horizon is split into 9-13 layers. The geological boundary-lines were constructed from a database containing information about almost 10 thousand wells. Permeability parameters are defined on the bases of hydrogeological model calculations (calibration) and their vertical distribution is defined more precisely using the GTIS (Geotechnological

  5. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition, nutrient cycling and soil weathering on the sustainability of nine forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salm, C. van der; Vries, W.de; Olsson, M.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the impact of acid deposition on the long-term sustainability of nine oak, pine and spruce stands on sandy to loamy sandy parent material in Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands, a dynamic soil acidification model (ReSAM) was applied. Two deposition scenarios For the period 1990-2090 were...... is predicted for northern Sweden as deposition levels are below critical loads. Soil chemistry at the recently replanted Swedish sites is dominated by changes in N cycling instead of by deposition. The CL scenario leads, especially after 2010, to a stronger decline in Al concentration compared with the BAU...... scenario, which is mainly caused by a reduction of the acid input. Up to 2010, a considerable acid input to the soil system is maintained as N supply is larger than the consumption of N by the trees. Despite the reduction of the deposition of S and N to critical loads, the readily available cation pools...

  6. Model predictions of long-lived storage of organic carbon in river deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Torres

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The mass of carbon stored as organic matter in terrestrial systems is sufficiently large to play an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of CO2 and O2. Field measurements of radiocarbon-depleted particulate organic carbon (POC in rivers suggest that terrestrial organic matter persists in surface environments over millennial (or greater timescales, but the exact mechanisms behind these long storage times remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we developed a numerical model for the radiocarbon content of riverine POC that accounts for both the duration of sediment storage in river deposits and the effects of POC cycling. We specifically target rivers because sediment transport influences the maximum amount of time organic matter can persist in the terrestrial realm and river catchment areas are large relative to the spatial scale of variability in biogeochemical processes.Our results show that rivers preferentially erode young deposits, which, at steady state, requires that the oldest river deposits are stored for longer than expected for a well-mixed sedimentary reservoir. This geometric relationship can be described by an exponentially tempered power-law distribution of sediment storage durations, which allows for significant aging of biospheric POC. While OC cycling partially limits the effects of sediment storage, the consistency between our model predictions and a compilation of field data highlights the important role of storage in setting the radiocarbon content of riverine POC. The results of this study imply that the controls on the terrestrial OC cycle are not limited to the factors that affect rates of primary productivity and respiration but also include the dynamics of terrestrial sedimentary systems.

  7. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  8. Accounting for Field-Scale Dry Deposition in Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Modelling of NH3 Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Häni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A controlled ammonia (NH3 release experiment was performed at a grassland site. The aim was to quantify the effect of dry deposition between the source and the receptors (NH3 measurement locations on emission rate estimates by means of inverse dispersion modelling. NH3 was released for three hours at a constant rate of Q = 6.29 mg s−1 from a grid of 36 orifices spread over an area of 250 m2. The increase in line-integrated NH3 concentration was measured with open-path optical miniDOAS devices at different locations downwind of the artificial source. Using a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS dispersion model (bLSmodelR, the fraction of the modelled release rate to the emitted NH3 ( Q bLS / Q was calculated from the measurements of the individual instruments. Q bLS / Q was found to be systematically lower than 1, on average between 0.69 and 0.91, depending on the location of the receptor. We hypothesized that NH3 dry deposition to grass and soil surfaces was the main factor responsible for the observed depletion of NH3 between source and receptor. A dry deposition algorithm based on a deposition velocity approach was included in the bLS modelling. Model deposition velocities were evaluated from a ‘big-leaf’ canopy resistance analogy. Canopy resistances (generally termed R c that provided Q bLS / Q = 1 ranged from 75 to 290 s m−1, showing that surface removal of NH3 by dry deposition can plausibly explain the original underestimation of Q bLS / Q . The inclusion of a dry deposition process in dispersion modelling is crucial for emission estimates, which are based on concentration measurements of depositing tracers downwind of homogeneous area sources or heterogeneously-distributed hot spots, such as, e.g., urine patches on pastures in the case of NH3.

  9. Model study on acidifying wet deposition in East Asia during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwei; Ueda, Hiromasa; Sakurai, Tatsuya

    A regional air quality model (RAQM) has been developed and applied together with an aerosol model to investigate the states and characteristics of wet deposition in East Asia in December 2001. Model simulation is performed with monthly based emission inventory [Streets, D.G., Bond, T.C., Carmichael, G.R., Fernandes, S.D., Fu, Q., He, D., Klimont, Z., Nelson, S. M., Tsai, N.Y., Wang, M.Q., Woo, J.-H., Yarber, K.F., 2003. An inventory of gaseous and primary emissions in Asia in the year 2000. Journal of Geophysical Research 108(D21), 8809] and meteorological fields derived from MM5. Model results are compared with extensive monitoring data including relevant gaseous species and ions in precipitation. The validation demonstrates that this model system is able to represent most of the major physical and chemical processes involved in acid deposition and reproduces concentrations reasonably well, within a factor of 2 of observations in general. The study shows that the regions with pH less than 4.5 are mainly located in southwestern China, parts of the Yangtze Delta, the Yellow Sea and the Korean peninsula, indicating wide regions of acid precipitation in East Asia in wintertime. Japan islands mainly exhibit pH values of 4.5-5.0, whereas over wide areas of northern China, pH values are relatively high (⩾5.0) due to neutralization by alkaline materials such as calcium-laden particles and ammonia, which are more abundant in northern China than that in southern China. While acid rain over most of China is still characterized by sulfur-induced type, considerable areas of eastern China and the western Pacific Rim are found to be more affected by nitric acid than sulfuric acid in acidification of precipitation, which is supposed to result from a combined effect of variations in photochemistry and emission, suggesting the increasing importance of NO x emission in these regions.

  10. Combining electrospinning and fused deposition modeling for the fabrication of a hybrid vascular graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centola, M; Rainer, A; Trombetta, M; Spadaccio, C; Genovese, J A; De Porcellinis, S

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering of blood vessels is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine with a broad spectrum of potential applications. However, many hurdles for tissue-engineered vascular grafts, such as poor mechanical properties, thrombogenicity and cell over-growth inside the construct, need to be overcome prior to the clinical application. To surmount these shortcomings, we developed a poly-l-lactide (PLLA)/poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffold releasing heparin by a combination of electrospinning and fused deposition modeling technique. PLLA/heparin scaffolds were produced by electrospinning in tubular shape and then fused deposition modeling was used to armor the tube with a single coil of PCL on the outer layer to improve mechanical properties. Scaffolds were then seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and assayed in terms of morphology, mechanical tensile strength, cell viability and differentiation. This particular scaffold design allowed the generation of both a drug delivery system amenable to surmount thrombogenic issues and a microenvironment able to induce endothelial differentiation. At the same time, the PCL external coiling improved mechanical resistance of the microfibrous scaffold. By the combination of two notable techniques in biofabrication-electrospinning and FDM-and exploiting the biological effects of heparin, we developed an ad hoc differentiating device for hMSCs seeding, able to induce differentiation into vascular endothelium.

  11. Estuarine Sediment Deposition during Wetland Restoration: A GIS and Remote Sensing Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Michelle; Kuss, Amber; Kentron, Tyler; Remar, Alex; Choksi, Vivek; Skiles, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of the industrial salt flats in the San Francisco Bay, California is an ongoing wetland rehabilitation project. Remote sensing maps of suspended sediment concentration, and other GIS predictor variables were used to model sediment deposition within these recently restored ponds. Suspended sediment concentrations were calibrated to reflectance values from Landsat TM 5 and ASTER using three statistical techniques -- linear regression, multivariate regression, and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), to map suspended sediment concentrations. Multivariate and ANN regressions using ASTER proved to be the most accurate methods, yielding r2 values of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. Predictor variables such as sediment grain size and tidal frequency were used in the Marsh Sedimentation (MARSED) model for predicting deposition rates for three years. MARSED results for a fully restored pond show a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 66.8 mm (applied to a pond breached in November 2010 and indicated that the recently breached pond will reach equilibrium levels after 60 months of tidal inundation.

  12. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  13. A stochastic model of solid state thin film deposition: Application to chalcopyrite growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Lovelett

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Developing high fidelity quantitative models of solid state reaction systems can be challenging, especially in deposition systems where, in addition to the multiple competing processes occurring simultaneously, the solid interacts with its atmosphere. In this work, we develop a model for the growth of a thin solid film where species from the atmosphere adsorb, diffuse, and react with the film. The model is mesoscale and describes an entire film with thickness on the order of microns. Because it is stochastic, the model allows us to examine inhomogeneities and agglomerations that would be impossible to characterize with deterministic methods. We demonstrate the modeling approach with the example of chalcopyrite Cu(InGa(SeS2 thin film growth via precursor reaction, which is a common industrial method for fabricating thin film photovoltaic modules. The model is used to understand how and why through-film variation in the composition of Cu(InGa(SeS2 thin films arises and persists. We believe that the model will be valuable as an effective quantitative description of many other materials systems used in semiconductors, energy storage, and other fast-growing industries.

  14. Regional air-quality and acid-deposition modeling and the role for visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.H.; Dennis, R.L.

    1991-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses air quality and deposition models to advance the scientific understanding of basic physical and chemical processes related to air pollution, and to assess the effectiveness of alternative emissions control strategies. The paper provides a brief technical description of several regional scale atmospheric models, their current use within EPA, and related data analysis issues. Spatial analysis is a key component in the evaluation and interpretation of the model predictions. Thus, the authors highlight several types of analysis enhancements focusing on those related to issues of spatial scale, user access to models and analysis tools, and consolidation of air quality modeling and graphical analysis capabilities. They discuss their initial experience with a Geographical Information System (GIS) pilot project that generated the initial concepts for the design of an integrated modeling and analysis environment. And finally, they present current plans to evolve this modeling/visualization approach to a distributed, heterogeneous computing environment which enables any research scientist or policy analyst to use high performance visualization techniques from his/her desktop

  15. Parametrisation of the orographic enhancement of precipitation and deposition in a long-term, long-range transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Lee

    Full Text Available Orographic enhancement of wet deposition arising from the 'seeder-feeder' effect is, by necessity, highly parametrised in long-range transport models of acid deposition that are long-term (i.e. annual average and spatially resolved at tens of kilometres. Here, we describe a mechanistic approach to the incorporation of these mechanisms into such a model. The model formulation required the following: precipitation rate by direction and quantification of the fractions that are orographic and non-orographic; treatment of the fast oxidation of sulfur dioxide in clouds; the directionality of the seeder-feeder process; and a quantitative basis for increasing wet deposition factors to account for the seeder-feeder process. The directionality of non-orographic precipitation was determined from meteorological data at 47 sites across the UK. Orographic precipitation varies on a much finer scale than can be interpolated from measurements, and thus a modelling approach was adopted. The directionality of the seeder-feeder effect was taken from measurements. The enhancement factor of the orographic component of precipitation, assumed to represent feeder-rain, was determined from a review of measurements. Fast oxidation of sulfur dioxide is an observed phenomenon in cap-cloud, but limited in duration. An adjustment was made to the sulfur dioxide oxidation rate in the model in locations where cap-cloud was assumed to be present. The results from the model were compared with UK deposition budgets and enhanced wet deposition maps. The revised parametrisation underestimated the UK wet deposition budgets of oxidised N and S, but spatial patterns of deposition were improved for much of the UK. It was concluded that this was a satisfactory outcome given the constraints of the statistical approach of weighting of deposition at receptors utilising straight line trajectories. The sensitivity of the model to directional constraints of seeder-feeder enhancement

  16. Parametrisation of the orographic enhancement of precipitation and deposition in a long-term, long-range transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Lee

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Orographic enhancement of wet deposition arising from the 'seeder-feeder' effect is, by necessity, highly parametrised in long-range transport models of acid deposition that are long-term (i.e. annual average and spatially resolved at tens of kilometres. Here, we describe a mechanistic approach to the incorporation of these mechanisms into such a model. The model formulation required the following: precipitation rate by direction and quantification of the fractions that are orographic and non-orographic; treatment of the fast oxidation of sulfur dioxide in clouds; the directionality of the seeder-feeder process; and a quantitative basis for increasing wet deposition factors to account for the seeder-feeder process. The directionality of non-orographic precipitation was determined from meteorological data at 47 sites across the UK. Orographic precipitation varies on a much finer scale than can be interpolated from measurements, and thus a modelling approach was adopted. The directionality of the seeder-feeder effect was taken from measurements. The enhancement factor of the orographic component of precipitation, assumed to represent feeder-rain, was determined from a review of measurements. Fast oxidation of sulfur dioxide is an observed phenomenon in cap-cloud, but limited in duration. An adjustment was made to the sulfur dioxide oxidation rate in the model in locations where cap-cloud was assumed to be present. The results from the model were compared with UK deposition budgets and enhanced wet deposition maps. The revised parametrisation underestimated the UK wet deposition budgets of oxidised N and S, but spatial patterns of deposition were improved for much of the UK. It was concluded that this was a satisfactory outcome given the constraints of the statistical approach of weighting of deposition at receptors utilising straight line trajectories. The sensitivity of the model to directional constraints of seeder-feeder enhancement was tested

  17. Experimental Validation of Plastic Mandible Models Produced by a “Low-Cost” 3-Dimensional Fused Deposition Modeling Printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Federico; Pandya, Mirali; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) plastic (ABS) models generated using a low-cost 3D fused deposition modelling printer. Material/Methods Two human dry mandibles were scanned with a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Accuitomo device. Preprocessing consisted of 3D reconstruction with Maxilim software and STL file repair with Netfabb software. Then, the data were used to print 2 plastic replicas with a low-cost 3D fused deposition modeling printer (Up plus 2®). Two independent observers performed the identification of 26 anatomic landmarks on the 4 mandibles (2 dry and 2 replicas) with a 3D measuring arm. Each observer repeated the identifications 20 times. The comparison between the dry and plastic mandibles was based on 13 distances: 8 distances less than 12 mm and 5 distances greater than 12 mm. Results The mean absolute difference (MAD) was 0.37 mm, and the mean dimensional error (MDE) was 3.76%. The MDE decreased to 0.93% for distances greater than 12 mm. Conclusions Plastic models generated using the low-cost 3D printer UPplus2® provide dimensional accuracies comparable to other well-established rapid prototyping technologies. Validated low-cost 3D printers could represent a step toward the better accessibility of rapid prototyping technologies in the medical field. PMID:27003456

  18. Experimental Validation of Plastic Mandible Models Produced by a "Low-Cost" 3-Dimensional Fused Deposition Modeling Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Federico; Pandya, Mirali; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-03-22

    The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) plastic (ABS) models generated using a low-cost 3D fused deposition modelling printer. Two human dry mandibles were scanned with a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Accuitomo device. Preprocessing consisted of 3D reconstruction with Maxilim software and STL file repair with Netfabb software. Then, the data were used to print 2 plastic replicas with a low-cost 3D fused deposition modeling printer (Up plus 2®). Two independent observers performed the identification of 26 anatomic landmarks on the 4 mandibles (2 dry and 2 replicas) with a 3D measuring arm. Each observer repeated the identifications 20 times. The comparison between the dry and plastic mandibles was based on 13 distances: 8 distances less than 12 mm and 5 distances greater than 12 mm. The mean absolute difference (MAD) was 0.37 mm, and the mean dimensional error (MDE) was 3.76%. The MDE decreased to 0.93% for distances greater than 12 mm. Plastic models generated using the low-cost 3D printer UPplus2® provide dimensional accuracies comparable to other well-established rapid prototyping technologies. Validated low-cost 3D printers could represent a step toward the better accessibility of rapid prototyping technologies in the medical field.

  19. Meteorological modeling of arrival and deposition of fallout at intermediate distances downwind of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederwall, R.T.; Peterson, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion model is used to calculate the arrival and deposition of fallout from 13 selected nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the 1950s. Results are used to extend NTS fallout patterns to intermediate downwind distances (300 to 1200 km). The radioactive cloud is represented in the model by a population of Lagrangian marker particles, with concentrations calculated on an Eulerian grid. Use of marker particles, with fall velocities dependent on particle size, provides a realistic simulation of fallout as the debris cloud travels downwind. The three-dimensional wind field is derived from observed data, adjusted for mass consistency. Terrain is represented in the grid, which extends up to 1200 km downwind of NTS and has 32-km horizontal resolution and 1-km vertical resolution. Ground deposition is calculated by a deposition-velocity approach. Source terms and relationships between deposition and exposure rate are based on work by Hicks. Uncertainty in particle size and vertical distributions within the debris cloud (and stem) allow for some model tuning to better match measured ground-deposition values. Particle trajectories representing different sizes and starting heights above ground zero are used to guide source specification. An hourly time history of the modeled fallout pattern as the debris cloud moves downwind provides estimates of fallout arrival times. Results for event HARRY illustrate the methodology. The composite deposition pattern for all 13 tests is characterized by two lobes extending out to the north-northeast and east-northeast, respectively, at intermediate distances from NTS. Arrival estimates, along with modeled deposition values, augment measured deposition data in the development of data bases at the county level

  20. Modeling transport and deposition of contaminants to ecosystems of concern: a case study for the Laurentian Great Lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Mackay, Don

    2004-01-01

    Transfer efficiency (TE) is introduced as a model output that can be used to characterize the relative ability of chemicals to be transported in the environment and deposited to specific target ecosystems. We illustrate this concept by applying the Berkeley-Trent North American contaminant fate model (BETR North America) to identify organic chemicals with properties that result in efficient atmospheric transport and deposition to the Laurentian Great Lakes. By systematically applying the model to hypothetical organic chemicals that span a wide range of environmental partitioning properties, we identify combinations of properties that favor efficient transport and deposition to the Lakes. Five classes of chemicals are identified based on dominant transport and deposition pathways, and specific examples of chemicals in each class are identified and discussed. The role of vegetation in scavenging chemicals from the atmosphere is assessed, and found to have a negligible influence on transfer efficiency to the Great Lakes. Results indicate chemicals with octanol-water (K ow ) and air-water (K aw ) partition coefficients in the range of 10 5 -10 7 and 10 -4 -10 -1 combine efficient transport and deposition to the Great Lakes with potential for biaccumulation in the aquatic food web once they are deposited. A method of estimating the time scale for atmospheric transport and deposition process is suggested, and the effects of degrading reactions in the atmosphere and meteorological conditions on transport efficiency of different classes of chemicals are discussed. In total, this approach provides a method of identifying chemicals that are subject to long-range transport and deposition to specific target ecosystems as a result of their partitioning and persistence characteristics. Supported by an appropriate contaminant fate model, the approach can be applied to any target ecosystem of concern. - Transfer Efficiency is defined as a model-based measure of sources of POPs to

  1. Modelling and tracer studies of atmospheric dispersion and deposition in regions of complex topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norden, C.E.

    1981-11-01

    An indium tracer aerosol generating apparatus based on an alcohol/oxygen burner, and an analytical procedure by which filter samples containing tracer material could be analysed quantitatively by means of neutron activation analysis, were developed for use in atmospheric dispersion and deposition studies. A number of series of atmospheric dispersion experiments were conducted in the Richards Bay and Koeberg- Cape Town areas. The results are given, comparing the airbone tracer concentrations measured at ground level with values predicted by means of a numerical model, utilising two to three schemes, varying in sophistication, for calculating the dispersion coefficients. Recommendations are given regarding a dispersion model and dispersion coefficients for regular use in the Koeberg area, and ways for estimating plume trajectories

  2. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watney, W.L.

    1994-12-01

    Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestone result from complex interactions among paleotopography (deposition, concurrent structural deformation), sea level, and diagenesis. Analysis of reservoirs and surface and near-surface analogs has led to developing a {open_quotes}strandline grainstone model{close_quotes} in which relative sea-level stabilized during regressions, resulting in accumulation of multiple grainstone buildups along depositional strike. Resulting stratigraphy in these carbonate units are generally predictable correlating to inferred topographic elevation along the shelf. This model is a valuable predictive tool for (1) locating favorable reservoirs for exploration, and (2) anticipating internal properties of the reservoir for field development. Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestones are developed in both oolitic and bioclastic grainstones, however, re-analysis of oomoldic reservoirs provides the greatest opportunity for developing bypassed oil. A new technique, the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett crossplot (formation resistivity vs. porosity) and its use in an integrated petrophysical characterization, has been developed to evaluate extractable oil remaining in these reservoirs. The manual method in combination with 3-D visualization and modeling can help to target production limiting heterogeneities in these complex reservoirs and moreover compute critical parameters for the field such as bulk volume water. Application of this technique indicates that from 6-9 million barrels of Lansing-Kansas City oil remain behind pipe in the Victory-Northeast Lemon Fields. Petroleum geologists are challenged to quantify inferred processes to aid in developing rationale geologically consistent models of sedimentation so that acceptable levels of prediction can be obtained.

  3. Model for transfer of cesium and strontium to domestic animal products as a consequence of accidental deposition on ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suolanen, V.

    1994-02-01

    In the study the contamination of domestic animal products (milk, beef, pork) and grain is predicted applying a compartment model approach to simulate the dynamic behaviour of radionuclides in the biosphere after an accidental atmospheric deposition. Further, the radionuclide intakes into human body by consumption of the contaminated domestic animal products and the arising internal doses, are studied. The contamination of domestic animal products and grain are predicted by considering three representative deposition cases. The considered deposition timepoints are: spring (1st of May), summer (1st of July) and autumn (1st of September). The nuclides considered are 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 90 Sr. (18 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.)

  4. Modelling nitrogen saturation and carbon accumulation in heathland soils under elevated nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, C.D.; Caporn, S.J.M.; Carroll, J.A.; Pilkington, M.G.; Wilson, D.B.; Ray, N.; Cresswell, N.

    2006-01-01

    A simple model of nitrogen (N) saturation, based on an extension of the biogeochemical model MAGIC, has been tested at two long-running heathland N manipulation experiments. The model simulates N immobilisation as a function of organic soil C/N ratio, but permits a proportion of immobilised N to be accompanied by accumulation of soil carbon (C), slowing the rate of C/N ratio change and subsequent N saturation. The model successfully reproduced observed treatment effects on soil C and N, and inorganic N leaching, for both sites. At the C-rich upland site, N addition led to relatively small reductions in soil C/N, low inorganic N leaching, and a substantial increase in organic soil C. At the C-poor lowland site, soil C/N ratio decreases and N leaching increases were much more dramatic, and soil C accumulation predicted to be smaller. The study suggests that (i) a simple model can effectively simulate observed changes in soil and leachate N; (ii) previous model predictions based on a constant soil C pool may overpredict future N leaching; (iii) N saturation may develop most rapidly in dry, organic-poor, high-decomposition systems; and (iv) N deposition may lead to significantly enhanced soil C sequestration, particularly in wet, nutrient-poor, organic-rich systems. - Enhanced carbon sequestration may slow the rate of nitrogen saturation in heathlands

  5. 3D CFD Modeling of Local Scouring, Bed Armoring and Sediment Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely T. Török

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D numerical models are increasingly used to simulate flow, sediment transport and morphological changes of rivers. For the simulation of bedload transport, the numerical flow model is generally coupled with an empirical sediment transport model. The application range of the most widely used empirical models is, however, often limited in terms of hydraulic and sedimentological features and therefore the numerical model can hardly be applied to complex situations where different kinds of morphological processes take place at the same time, such as local scouring, bed armoring and aggradation of finer particles. As a possible solution method for this issue, we present the combined application of two bedload transport formulas that widens the application range and thus gives more appropriate simulation results. An example of this technique is presented in the paper by combining two bedload transport formulas. For model validation, the results of a laboratory experiment, where bed armoring, local scouring and local sediment deposition processes occurred, were used. The results showed that the combined application method can improve the reliability of the numerical simulations.

  6. Modelling the response of soil and runoff chemistry to forest harvesting in a low deposition area (Kangasvaara, eastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kämäri

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple dynamic soil model developed to analyse the effects of atmospheric deposition and nutrient cycling on terrestrial ecosystems, SMART 2, was applied to the Kangasvaara catchment in eastern Finland. Given the historical deposition and forest growth patterns and reasonable values for the input parameters, SMART 2 was calibrated successfully to reproduce present-day soil and Kangasvaara catchment on the soil and runoff water chemistry under a future deposition scenario (GRP scenario. These impacts were also compared to the effects of further reducing the deposition of sulphur and nitrate under the maximum feasible reduction (MFR scenario. The model demonstrates the consequences of breaking the nutrient cycle, and predicts that final cutting results in increased leaching of inorganic nitrogen and base cations from the cut part of the catchment for about 10 years. The resulting concentrations in the stream will depend on the ability of the buffer zones surrounding the stream to capture and utilize these nutrients.

  7. New simple deposition model based on reassessment of global fallout data 1954 - 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Bergan, T.D. [Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning, Toensberg (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Ikaeheimonen, T.K. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Isaksson, M. [Univ. of Gothenburg. Dept. of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgren Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nielsen, Sven P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute. Observation Services, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. This testing is the major cause of distribution of man-made radionuclides over the globe and constitutes a background that needs to be considered when effects of other sources are estimated. The main radionuclides of long term (after the first months) concern are generally assumed to be {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. It has been known for a long time that the deposition density of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr is approximately proportional to the amount of precipitation. But the use of this proportional relationship raised some questions such as (a) over how large area can it be assumed that the concentration in precipitation is the same at any given time; (b) how does this agree with the observed latitude dependency of deposition density and (c) are the any other parameters that could be of use in a simple model describing global fallout? These issues were amongst those taken up in the NKS-B EcoDoses activity. The preliminary results for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr showed for each that the measured concentration had been similar at many European and N-American sites at any given time and that the change with time had been similar. These finding were followed up in a more thorough study in this (DepEstimates) activity. Global data (including the US EML and UK AERE data sets) from 1954 - 1976 for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were analysed testing how well different potential explanatory variables could describe the deposition density. The best fit was obtained by not assuming the traditional proportional relationship, but instead a non-linear power function. The predictions obtained using this new model may not be significantly different from those obtained using the traditional model, when using a limited data set such as from one country as a test in this report showed. But for larger data sets and understanding of underlying processes the new model should be an improvement. (Author)

  8. Depositional Model for a Beaver Pond Complex in a Piedmont Stream Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachide, S. P.; Diemer, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) often construct closely-spaced ponds on suitable sections of streams. Over time avulsive processes form an intricate network of shallow anabranching streams that connect a multitude of ponds, referred to here as a beaver pond complex (BPC). According to Polvi and Wohl (2012), BPCs evolve through four stages. Their model, resulting from the study of an alpine stream dominated by meltwater, focused on changes in valley planform, increased channel complexity, and the effects of floodplain sediment storage during the growth of a BPC. A revised depositional model for a multi-generation BPC is presented here, based on data collected at Mill Creek, in the Piedmont of North Carolina. The field data, comprising geolocated maps, cores and probes, were collected between March 2011 and October 2014 and were supplemented by 12 aerial images of the field area taken from January 1993 to October 2014. The revised BPC depositional model comprises several stages of development that include initial beaver occupation, followed by an interval of fast-paced pond creation and increasing channel complexity, a stage of slowing growth of the BPC, followed by cycles of dam breaching and repair, and an abandonment phase. An additional stage may include later reoccupation of an abandoned BPC to produce a multi-generation BPC. The areas affected by, and durations of, these stages are likely dictated by several variables including: geologic controls, local climate, hydrologic regime, beaver population size, and resource availability. Rare large precipitation events that led to the breaching of dams were likely the most impactful variable in the evolution of the Mill Creek BPC. Field observations indicate that beaching events affected the Mill Creek BPC more frequently than could be inferred from the 12 aerial images of the site. Therefore, aerial imagery should be used in conjunction with field-based investigations in order to more accurately

  9. New simple deposition model based on reassessment of global fallout data 1954 - 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.; Bergan, T.D.; Howard, B.J.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Isaksson, M.; Nielsen, Sven P.; Paatero, J.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. This testing is the major cause of distribution of man-made radionuclides over the globe and constitutes a background that needs to be considered when effects of other sources are estimated. The main radionuclides of long term (after the first months) concern are generally assumed to be 137 Cs and 90 Sr. It has been known for a long time that the deposition density of 137 Cs and 90 Sr is approximately proportional to the amount of precipitation. But the use of this proportional relationship raised some questions such as (a) over how large area can it be assumed that the concentration in precipitation is the same at any given time; (b) how does this agree with the observed latitude dependency of deposition density and (c) are the any other parameters that could be of use in a simple model describing global fallout? These issues were amongst those taken up in the NKS-B EcoDoses activity. The preliminary results for 137 Cs and 90 Sr showed for each that the measured concentration had been similar at many European and N-American sites at any given time and that the change with time had been similar. These finding were followed up in a more thorough study in this (DepEstimates) activity. Global data (including the US EML and UK AERE data sets) from 1954 - 1976 for 90 Sr and 137 Cs were analysed testing how well different potential explanatory variables could describe the deposition density. The best fit was obtained by not assuming the traditional proportional relationship, but instead a non-linear power function. The predictions obtained using this new model may not be significantly different from those obtained using the traditional model, when using a limited data set such as from one country as a test in this report showed. But for larger data sets and understanding of underlying processes the new model should be an improvement. (Author)

  10. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  11. Modeling transport and deposition of contaminants to ecosystems of concern: a case study for the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Mackay, Don

    2004-01-01

    Transfer efficiency (TE) is introduced as a model output that can be used to characterize the relative ability of chemicals to be transported in the environment and deposited to specific target ecosystems. We illustrate this concept by applying the Berkeley-Trent North American contaminant fate model (BETR North America) to identify organic chemicals with properties that result in efficient atmospheric transport and deposition to the Laurentian Great Lakes. By systematically applying the model to hypothetical organic chemicals that span a wide range of environmental partitioning properties, we identify combinations of properties that favor efficient transport and deposition to the Lakes. Five classes of chemicals are identified based on dominant transport and deposition pathways, and specific examples of chemicals in each class are identified and discussed. The role of vegetation in scavenging chemicals from the atmosphere is assessed, and found to have a negligible influence on transfer efficiency to the Great Lakes. Results indicate chemicals with octanol-water (K(ow)) and air-water (K(aw)) partition coefficients in the range of 10(5)-10(7) and 10(-4)-10(-1) combine efficient transport and deposition to the Great Lakes with potential for biaccumulation in the aquatic food web once they are deposited. A method of estimating the time scale for atmospheric transport and deposition process is suggested, and the effects of degrading reactions in the atmosphere and meteorological conditions on transport efficiency of different classes of chemicals are discussed. In total, this approach provides a method of identifying chemicals that are subject to long-range transport and deposition to specific target ecosystems as a result of their partitioning and persistence characteristics. Supported by an appropriate contaminant fate model, the approach can be applied to any target ecosystem of concern.

  12. Development Of Advanced Sandwich Core Topologies Using Fused Deposition Modeling And Electroforming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Steven M.

    New weight efficient materials are needed to enhance the performance of vehicle systems allowing increased speed, maneuverability and fuel economy. This work leveraged a multi-length-scale composite approach combined with hybrid material methodology to create new state-of-the-art additive manufactured sandwich core material. The goal of the research was to generate a new material to expands material space for strength versus density. Fused-Deposition-Modeling (FDM) was used to remove geometric manufacturing constraints, and electrodepositing was used to generate a high specific-strength, bio-inspired hybrid material. Microtension samples (3mm x 1mm with 250mum x 250mum gage) were used to investigate the electrodeposited coatings in the transverse (TD) and growth (GD) directions. Three bath chemistries were tested: copper, traditional nickel sulfamate (TNS) nickel, and nickel deposited with a platinum anode (NDPA). NDPA shows tensile strength exceeding 1600 MPa, significantly beyond the literature reported values of 60MPa. This strengthening was linked to grain size refinement into the sub-30nm range, in addition to grain texture refinement resulting in only 17% of the slip systems for nickel being active. Anisotropy was observed in nickel deposits, which was linked to texture evolution inside of the coating. Microsample testing guided the selection of 15mum layer of copper deposition followed by a 250 mum NDPA layer. Classical formulas for structural collapse were used to guide an experimental parametric study to establish a weight/volume efficient strut topology. Length, diameter and thickness were all investigated to determine the optimal column topology. The most optimal topology exists when Eulerian buckling, shell micro buckling and yielding failure modes all exist in a single geometric topology. Three macro-scale sandwich topologies (pyramidal, tetrahedral, and strut-reinforced-tetrahedral (SRT) were investigated with respect to strength-per-unit-weight. The

  13. Statistical modelling of Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) deposits in wastewater pump sumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Eva; Post, Johan; Duinmeijer, Alex; Langeveld, Jeroen; Clemens, François

    2018-05-15

    The accumulation of FOG (Fat, Oil and Grease) deposits in sewer pumping stations results in an increase in maintenance costs, malfunctioning of pumps and, a potential increase of wastewater spills in receiving open water bodies. It is thought that a variety of parameters (e.g. geometry of the pump sump, pump operation, socioeconomic parameters of the catchment) influences the built-up of FOG. Based on a database containing data of 126 pumping stations located in five Dutch municipalities a statistical model was built. It is shown that 3 parameters are most significant in explaining the occurrence of FOG deposits: mean income of the population in a catchment, the amount of energy (kinetic and potential) per m 3 per day and the density of restaurants, bars and hotels in a catchment. Further it is shown that there are significant differences between municipalities that can be traced back to the local 'design paradigm'. For example, in Amsterdam, the design philosophy of discharging in the pump sump under the water surface (and hence maintaining a low level of turbulence in the pump sump) results in an increase of the probability of the formation of FOG. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Translocation of cesium in plants after foliar deposition - Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.; Voigt, G.; Mueller, H.

    1991-01-01

    The translocation of cesium from the foliage to the edible parts as function of the time period between deposition and harvest has been determined for cereals, potatoes, green beans and carrots. From the results the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. The maximum of the cesium translocation is 40 to 50 and 70 to 90 days before harvest for cereals and potatoes respectively. For green beans a maximum was observed after deposition 15 days before harvest; 2. The variations of the translocation factors are less if the translocation is normalized to the yield; 3. The translocation factors are in good agreement with those of other investigators. The agreement between the experimental series is better for a normalization of the translocation factor on the yield; 4. For cereals and potatoes the translocation can be described with gaussian functions which are consistent with the physiological development of cereals and potatoes. Although the approach in ECOSYS tends to over predict slightly the translocation for barley and potatoes there is a good overall agreement between the experiments and this model; 5. According to the investigations available the translocation of cesium can be predicted within a factor of 3 for cereals and a factor of 4 for potatoes. Sources of the uncertainties besides the biological variability and the inherent experimental error are differences in the development of the plants due to weather conditions, farm management and plant diseases. (9 refs., 5 figs.)

  15. Model for cobalt 60/58 deposition on primary coolant piping in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A first principles model for deposition of radioactive metals into the corrosion films of primary coolant piping is proposed. It is shown that the predominant mechanism is the inclusion of the radioactive species such as Cobalt 60 into the spinel structure of the corrosion film during the act of active corrosion. This deposition can occupy only a defined fraction of the available plus 2 valence sites of the spinel. For cobalt ions, this ratio is roughly 4.6 x 10 -3 of the total iron sites. Since no distinction is made between Cobalt 60, Cobalt 58, and Cobalt 59 in this process, the radioactivity associated with this inclusion is a function of the ratio of the radioactive species to the nonradioactive species in the water causing the corrosion of the pipe metal. The other controlling parameter is the corrosion rate of the pipe material. This can be a function of time, for example, and it shown that freshly descaled metal when exposed to the cobalt containing water can incorporate as much as 10 x 10 -3 cobalt ions per iron atom in the initial corrosion period. This has implications for the problem of decontaminating nuclear reactor piping. Equations and selected observations are presented without reference to any specifically identified reactor or utility, so as to protect any proprietary interest

  16. CuFeO2 formation using fused deposition modeling 3D printing and sintering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salea, A.; Dasaesamoh, A.; Prathumwan, R.; Kongkaew, T.; Subannajui, K.

    2017-09-01

    CuFeO2 is a metal oxide mineral material which is called delafossite. It can potentially be used as a chemical catalyst, and gas sensing material. There are methods to fabricate CuFeO2 such as chemical synthesis, sintering, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition. In our work, CuFeO2 is prepared by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing. The composite filament which composed of Cu and Fe elements is printed in three dimensions, and then sintered and annealed at high temperature to obtain CuFeO2. Suitable polymer blend and maximum percent volume of metal powder are studied. When percent volume of metal powder is increased, melt flow rate of polymer blend is also increased. The most suitable printing condition is reported and the properties of CuFeO2 are observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Dynamic Scanning Calorimeter, X-ray diffraction. As a new method to produce semiconductor, this technique has a potential to allow any scientist or students to design and print a catalyst or sensing material by the most conventional 3D printing machine which is commonly used around the world.

  17. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths (λz ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that λz decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005 (VF05. We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (zdiss between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial λz ≤ 2π H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height. We also confirm that zdiss increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial λz. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net λz profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and λz spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial λz ≥ 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause.

  18. Some Causative Factors in Bank Deposit Supply Model in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined some of the factors that influence the commercial bank deposit supply behaviour in Nigeria. Specifically, we examined the impact of deposit interest rate, foreign exchange rate, Treasury bill rate and Growth rate of Gross Domestic Product on the deposit output behaviour of commercial banks.

  19. Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole - modelling of three scale tests for validation of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Three model shear tests of very high quality simulating a horizontal rock shear through a KBS-3V deposition hole in the centre of a canister were performed 1986. The tests simulated a deposition hole in the scale 1:10 with reference density of the buffer, very stiff confinement simulating the rock, and a solid bar of copper simulating the canister. The three tests were almost identical with exception of the rate of shear, which was varied between 0.031 and 160 mm/s, i.e. with a factor of more than 5000, and the density of the bentonite, which differed slightly. The tests were very well documented. Shear force, shear rate, total stress in the bentonite, strain in the copper and the movement of the top of the simulated canister were measured continuously during the shear. After finished shear the equipment was dismantled and careful sampling of the bentonite with measurement of water ratio and density were made. The deformed copper 'canister' was also carefully measured after the test. The tests have been modelled with the finite element code Abaqus with the same models and techniques that were used for the full scale cases in the Swedish safety assessment SR-Site. The results have been compared with the measured results, which has yielded very valuable information about the relevancy of the material models and the modelling technique. An elastic-plastic material model was used for the bentonite where the stress-strain relations have been derived from laboratory tests. The material model is also described in another article to this conference. The material model is made a function of both the density and the strain rate at shear. Since the shear is fast and takes place under undrained conditions, the density is not changed during the tests. However, strain rate varies largely with both the location of the elements and time. This can be taken into account in Abaqus by making the material model a function of the strain

  20. An improved parameterisation of ozone dry deposition to the ocean and its impact in a global climate-chemistry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Ashok K.; Galbally, Ian E.; Woodhouse, Matthew T.; Thatcher, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    Schemes used to parameterise ozone dry deposition velocity at the oceanic surface mainly differ in terms of how the dominant term of surface resistance is parameterised. We examine three such schemes and test them in a global climate-chemistry model that incorporates meteorological nudging and monthly-varying reactive-gas emissions. The default scheme invokes the commonly used assumption that the water surface resistance is constant. The other two schemes, named the one-layer and two-layer reactivity schemes, include the simultaneous influence on the water surface resistance of ozone solubility in water, waterside molecular diffusion and turbulent transfer, and a first-order chemical reaction of ozone with dissolved iodide. Unlike the one-layer scheme, the two-layer scheme can indirectly control the degree of interaction between chemical reaction and turbulent transfer through the specification of a surface reactive layer thickness. A comparison is made of the modelled deposition velocity dependencies on sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed with recently reported cruise-based observations. The default scheme overestimates the observed deposition velocities by a factor of 2-4 when the chemical reaction is slow (e.g. under colder SSTs in the Southern Ocean). The default scheme has almost no temperature, wind speed, or latitudinal variations in contrast with the observations. The one-layer scheme provides noticeably better variations, but it overestimates deposition velocity by a factor of 2-3 due to an enhancement of the interaction between chemical reaction and turbulent transfer. The two-layer scheme with a surface reactive layer thickness specification of 2.5 µm, which is approximately equal to the reaction-diffusive length scale of the ozone-iodide reaction, is able to simulate the field measurements most closely with respect to absolute values as well as SST and wind-speed dependence. The annual global oceanic deposition of ozone determined using this

  1. Plasma and process characterization of high power magnetron physical vapor deposition with integrated plasma equipment--feature profile model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Da; Stout, Phillip J.; Ventzek, Peter L.G.

    2003-01-01

    High power magnetron physical vapor deposition (HPM-PVD) has recently emerged for metal deposition into deep submicron features in state of the art integrated circuit fabrication. However, the plasma characteristics and process mechanism are not well known. An integrated plasma equipment-feature profile modeling infrastructure has therefore been developed for HPM-PVD deposition, and it has been applied to simulating copper seed deposition with an Ar background gas for damascene metalization. The equipment scale model is based on the hybrid plasma equipment model [M. Grapperhaus et al., J. Appl. Phys. 83, 35 (1998); J. Lu and M. J. Kushner, ibid., 89, 878 (2001)], which couples a three-dimensional Monte Carlo sputtering module within a two-dimensional fluid model. The plasma kinetics of thermalized, athermal, and ionized metals and the contributions of these species in feature deposition are resolved. A Monte Carlo technique is used to derive the angular distribution of athermal metals. Simulations show that in typical HPM-PVD processing, Ar + is the dominant ionized species driving sputtering. Athermal metal neutrals are the dominant deposition precursors due to the operation at high target power and low pressure. The angular distribution of athermals is off axis and more focused than thermal neutrals. The athermal characteristics favor sufficient and uniform deposition on the sidewall of the feature, which is the critical area in small feature filling. In addition, athermals lead to a thick bottom coverage. An appreciable fraction (∼10%) of the metals incident to the wafer are ionized. The ionized metals also contribute to bottom deposition in the absence of sputtering. We have studied the impact of process and equipment parameters on HPM-PVD. Simulations show that target power impacts both plasma ionization and target sputtering. The Ar + ion density increases nearly linearly with target power, different from the behavior of typical ionized PVD processing. The

  2. Source-receptor matrix calculation for deposited mass with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDM) are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere LPDMs typically consider only linear processes, i.e., processes that do not depend on the concentration of the simulated tracer such as non-linear chemical reactions. This linearity means that they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. The only difference between such simulations is the sign of the wind components used for transporting the particles. In the case where the number of (potential) source elements is larger than the number of receptors, running the model backward from the receptors is computationally more efficient than running it forward from the sources (if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources). To interpret the wet deposition of acidifying compounds or the contamination of snow by the albedo reducing BC, the s-r relationship of the deposited material would be very important to understand. To date, backward calculations for deposition quantities have not been possible. We present an extension of the LPDM FLEXPART that allows such calculations and test its performance for both dry and wet deposition. We show a comparison between model results in forward and backward mode as well as modeled vs. measured concentration of black carbon at high latitudes. Both analysis prove that the model approach is working well in backward mode and also gives a very good agreement with deposition measurements.

  3. A dermal model for spray painters, part I : subjective exposure modelling of spray paint deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Semple, S.; Marquart, J.; Cherrie, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    The discriminative power of existing dermal exposure models is limited. Most models only allow occupational hygienists to rank workers between and within workplaces according to broad bands of dermal exposure. No allowance is made for the work practices of different individuals. In this study a

  4. Reservoir modelling of heterolithic tidal deposits : Sensitivity analysis of an object-based stochastic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, C.R.; Donselaar, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Object-based stochastic modelling techniques are routinely employed to generate multiple realisations of the spatial distribution of sediment properties in settings where data density is insufficient to construct a unique deterministic facies architecture model. Challenge is to limit the wide range

  5. Analytic observations for the d=1+ 1 bridge site (or single-step) deposition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.W.; Kang, H.C.

    1991-01-01

    Some exact results for a reversible version of the d=1+1 bridge site (or single-step) deposition model are presented. Exact steady-state properties are determined directly for finite systems with various mean slopes. These show explicitly how the asymptotic growth velocity and fluctuations are quenched as the slope approaches its maximum allowed value. Next, exact hierarchial equations for the dynamics are presented. For the special case of ''equilibrium growth,'' these are analyzed exactly at the pair-correlation level directly for an infinite system. This provided further insight into asymptotic scaling behavior. Finally, the above hierarchy is compared with one generated from a discrete form of the Kardar--Parisi--Zhang equations. Some differences are described

  6. Energy deposition model based on electron scattering cross section data from water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A; Oiler, J C [Centra de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gorfinkiel, J D [Department of Physiscs and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Limao-Vieira, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Maira-Vidal, A; Borge, M J G; Tengblad, O [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid, Spam (Spain); Huerga, C; Tellez, M [Hospital Universitario La Paz, paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientifIcas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: g.garcia@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2008-10-01

    A complete set of electrons scattering cross sections by water molecules over a broad energy range, from the me V to the Me V ranges, is presented in this study. These data have been obtained by combining experiments and calculations and cover most relevant processes, both elastic and inelastic, which can take place in the considered energy range. A new Monte Carlo simulation programme has been developed using as input parameter these cross sectional data as well as experimental energy loss spectra. The simulation procedure has been applied to obtain electron tracks and energy deposition plots in water when irradiated by a Ru-106 plaque as those used for brachytherapy of ocular tumours. Finally, the low energy electron tracks provided by the present model have been compared with those obtained with other codes available in the literature.

  7. A multi-model study of the hemispheric transport and deposition of oxidised nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, M.G.; Pringle, K.J.; Dentener, F.J.; Cuvelier, C.; Marmer, E.; Fiore, A.M.; Horowitz, L.W.; Keating, T.J.; Zuber, A.; Atherton, C.S.; Bergmann, D.J.; Diehl, T.; Duncan, B.N.; Doherty, R. M.; MacKenzie, I.A.; Hess, P.; Jacob, D.J.; Park, R.; Jonson, J.E.; Wind, P.; Kaminski, J.W.; Lupu, A.; Mancini, E.; Pitari, G.; Prather, M.J.; Schroeder, S.; Schultz, M.G.; Shindell, D.T.; Shindell, D.T.; Szopa, S.; Wild, O.

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen chemistry-transport models are used to quantify, for the first time, the export of oxidised nitrogen (NOy) to and from four regions (Europe, North America, South Asia, and East Asia), and to estimate the uncertainty in the results. Between 12 and 24% of the NOx emitted is exported from each region annually. The strongest impact of each source region on a foreign region is: Europe on East Asia, North America on Europe, South Asia on East Asia, and East Asia on North America. Europe exports the most NOy, and East Asia the least. East Asia receives the most NOy from the other regions. Between 8 and 15% of NOx emitted in each region is transported over distances larger than 1000 km, with 3-10% ultimately deposited over the foreign regions. (authors)

  8. Scenario and parameter studies on global deposition of radioactivity using the computer model GLODEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, C.S.

    1984-08-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code was utilized to determine biological impact to humans on a global scale using up-to-date estimates of biological risk. These risk factors use varied biological damage models for assessing effects. All the doses reported are the unsheltered, unweathered, smooth terrain, external gamma dose. We assume the unperturbed atmosphere in determining injection and deposition. Effects due to ''nuclear winter'' may invalidate this assumption. The calculations also include scenarios that attempt to assess the impact of the changing nature of the nuclear stockpile. In particular, the shift from larger to smaller yield nuclear devices significantly changes the injection pattern into the atmosphere, and hence significantly affects the radiation doses that ensue. We have also looked at injections into the equatorial atmosphere. In total, we report here the results for 8 scenarios. 10 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs

  9. Additive Manufacturing of PLA and CF/PLA Binding Layer Specimens via Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhang; Gao, Shiyou; Dong, Rongmei; Ding, Xuebing; Duan, Xiaoxi

    2018-02-01

    As one of the most popular additive manufacturing techniques, fused deposition modeling (FDM) is successfully applied in aerospace, automotive, architecture, and other fields to fabricate thermoplastic parts. Unfortunately, as a result of the limited nature of the mechanical properties and mass in raw materials, there is a pressing need to improve mechanical properties and reduce weight for FDM parts. Therefore, this paper presents an experiment of a special polylactic acid (PLA) and carbon fiber (CF)/PLA-laminated experimental specimen fabricated using the FDM process. The mechanical properties and mass analysis of the new composites for the PLA and CF/PLA binding layer specimen are investigated experimentally. Through the experimental analysis, one can conclude that the mass of laminated specimen is lighter than the CF/PLA specimen, and the tensile and flexural mechanical properties are higher than the pure PLA specimen.

  10. Evaluating Ammonia Deposition Rates for Deciduous Forest using Measurements and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Geels, Camilla; Hertel, Ole

    -agricultural areas (Skjøth et al. 2011, ACPD). New atmospheric NH3 flux measurements for Lille Bøgeskov have been conducted throughout 2011 and these data are presented and discussed in relation to the 2010 data of atmospheric NH3. Future studies aim to improve the description of dry deposition of NH3 for vegetative...... atmospheric mean concentrations of NH3 agreed well within the range of 0.56-0.68 g NH3-N m-3, however, observed emission fluxes of up to app. 0.8 g NH3-N m-2 s-1 after leaf fall were not represented by DAMOS because the model system does not consider vegetative and soil NH3 emissions from non...

  11. Additive Manufacturing of PLA and CF/PLA Binding Layer Specimens via Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhang; Gao, Shiyou; Dong, Rongmei; Ding, Xuebing; Duan, Xiaoxi

    2018-01-01

    As one of the most popular additive manufacturing techniques, fused deposition modeling (FDM) is successfully applied in aerospace, automotive, architecture, and other fields to fabricate thermoplastic parts. Unfortunately, as a result of the limited nature of the mechanical properties and mass in raw materials, there is a pressing need to improve mechanical properties and reduce weight for FDM parts. Therefore, this paper presents an experiment of a special polylactic acid (PLA) and carbon fiber (CF)/PLA-laminated experimental specimen fabricated using the FDM process. The mechanical properties and mass analysis of the new composites for the PLA and CF/PLA binding layer specimen are investigated experimentally. Through the experimental analysis, one can conclude that the mass of laminated specimen is lighter than the CF/PLA specimen, and the tensile and flexural mechanical properties are higher than the pure PLA specimen.

  12. Mechanical Properties Optimization of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone via Fused Deposition Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the common selective laser sintering (SLS manufacturing method, fused deposition modeling (FDM seems to be an economical and efficient three-dimensional (3D printing method for high temperature polymer materials in medical applications. In this work, a customized FDM system was developed for polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK materials printing. The effects of printing speed, layer thickness, printing temperature and filling ratio on tensile properties were analyzed by the orthogonal test of four factors and three levels. Optimal tensile properties of the PEEK specimens were observed at a printing speed of 60 mm/s, layer thickness of 0.2 mm, temperature of 370 °C and filling ratio of 40%. Furthermore, the impact and bending tests were conducted under optimized conditions and the results demonstrated that the printed PEEK specimens have appropriate mechanical properties.

  13. Growth kinetics and morphology of a ballistic deposition model that incorporates surface diffusion for two species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, H.F.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1998-08-01

    We introduce a ballistic deposition model for two kinds of particles (active and inactive) in (2+1) dimensions upon introducing the surface diffusion for the inactive particles. A morphological structural transition is found as the probability of being the inactive particle increases. This transition is well defined by the change in the behavior of the surface width when it is plotted versus time and probability. The exponents α and β calculated for different values of probability show the same behavior. The presence of both types of particles issues three different processes that control the growing surface: overhanging, nonlocal growth and diffusion. It finally leads to a morphological structural transition where the universality changes away from that of Kardar-Parisi-Zhang, in (2+1) dimensions, but not into Edwards-Wilkinson's. (author)

  14. Investigation of dimensional variation in parts manufactured by fused deposition modeling using Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Hasan Masood, Syed; Lal Bhowmik, Jahar

    2018-02-01

    In the additive manufacturing (AM) market, the question is raised by industry and AM users on how reproducible and repeatable the fused deposition modeling (FDM) process is in providing good dimensional accuracy. This paper aims to investigate and evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of the FDM process through a systematic approach to answer this frequently asked question. A case study based on the statistical gage repeatability and reproducibility (gage R&R) technique is proposed to investigate the dimensional variations in the printed parts of the FDM process. After running the simulation and analysis of the data, the FDM process capability is evaluated, which would help the industry for better understanding the performance of FDM technology.

  15. Characterization and Optimization of Mechanical Properties of ABS Parts Manufactured by the Fused Deposition Modelling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While fused deposition modelling (FDM is one of the most used additive manufacturing (AM techniques today due to its ability to manufacture very complex geometries, the major research issues have been to balance ability to produce aesthetically appealing looking products with functionality. In this study, five important process parameters such as layer thickness, part orientation, raster angle, raster width, and air gap have been considered to study their effects on tensile strength of test specimen, using design of experiment (DOE. Using group method of data handling (GMDH, mathematical models relating the response with the process parameters have been developed. Using differential evolution (DE, optimal process parameters have been found to achieve good strength simultaneously for the response. The optimization of the mathematical model realized results in maximized tensile strength. Consequently, the additive manufacturing part produced is improved by optimizing the process parameters. The predicted models obtained show good correlation with the measured values and can be used to generalize prediction for process conditions outside the current study. Results obtained are very promising and hence the approach presented in this paper has practical applications for design and manufacture of parts using additive manufacturing technologies.

  16. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  17. The Sophia Anatomical Infant Nose-Throat (Saint) model: a valuable tool to study aerosol deposition in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, H. M.; de Jongste, J. C.; Fokkens, W. J.; Robben, S. G.; Wouters, K.; Tiddens, H. A.

    2001-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the variables that influence lung deposition of inhaled aerosols in children. A model of the upper airways of an infant could be a useful tool to study these variables in vitro. The objective of this study was to construct an anatomically correct model of the upper

  18. The usual suspects-influence of physicochemical properties on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration of nine model compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo Nielsen, Jesper; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Nielsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical properties of nine model compounds on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration was evaluated. Static diffusion cells mounted with human skin were used as the experimental model, and experiments were carried out in accordance with Organization for Ec...

  19. Modelling of soil acidity and nitrogen availability in natural ecosystems in response to changes in acid deposition and hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, J.; Reinds, G.J.; Vries, de W.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in vegetation are often caused by changes in abiotic site factors. The SMART2 model has been developed to evaluate the effects of changes in ion inputs by atmospheric deposition and seepage on these site factors. Linkage with the Multiple Stress Model for Vegetation (MOVE) enables evaluation

  20. In-vitro evaluation of Polylactic acid (PLA) manufactured by fused deposition modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Matthias C; Möst, Tobias; Bergauer, Bastian; Rietzel, Dominik; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Cifuentes, Sandra C; Wilmowsky, Cornelius von

    2017-01-01

    With additive manufacturing (AM) individual and biocompatible implants can be generated by using suitable materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological effects of polylactic acid (PLA) manufactured by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) on osteoblasts in vitro according to European Norm / International Organization for Standardization 10,993-5. Human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19) were seeded onto PLA samples produced by FDM and investigated for cell viability by fluorescence staining after 24 h. Cell proliferation was measured after 1, 3, 7 and 10 days by cell-counting and cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. For control, we used titanium samples and polystyrene (PS). Cell viability showed higher viability on PLA (95,3% ± 2.1%) than in control (91,7% ±2,7%). Cell proliferation was highest in the control group (polystyrene) and higher on PLA samples compared to the titanium samples. Scanning electron microscopy revealed homogenous covering of sample surface with regularly spread cells on PLA as well as on titanium. The manufacturing of PLA discs from polylactic acid using FDM was successful. The in vitro investigation with human fetal osteoblasts showed no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, FDM does not seem to alter biocompatibility of PLA. Nonetheless osteoblasts showed reduced growth on PLA compared to the polystyrene control within the cell experiments. This could be attributed to surface roughness and possible release of residual monomers. Those influences could be investigated in further studies and thus lead to improvement in the additive manufacturing process. In addition, further research focused on the effect of PLA on bone growth should follow. In summary, PLA processed in Fused Deposition Modelling seems to be an attractive material and method for reconstructive surgery because of their biocompatibility and the possibility to produce individually shaped scaffolds.

  1. Erosion, Transportation, and Deposition on Outer Solar System Satellites: Landform Evolution Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Mass movement and landform degradation reduces topographic relief by moving surface materials to a lower gravitational potential. In addition to the obvious role of gravity, abrasive mechanical erosion plays a role, often in combination with the lowering of cohesion, which allows disaggregation of the relief-forming material. The identification of specific landform types associated with mass movement and landform degradation provides information about local sediment particle size and abundance and transportation processes. Generally, mass movements can be classified in terms of the particle sizes of the transported material and the speed the material moved during transport. Most degradation on outer planet satellites appears consistent with sliding or slumping, impact erosion, and regolith evolution. Some satellites, such as Callisto and perhaps Hyperion and Iapetus, have an appearance that implies that some additional process is at work, most likely sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting. A variant on this process is thermally driven frost segregation as seen on all three icy Galilean satellites and perhaps elsewhere. Titan is unique among outer planet satellites in that Aeolian and fluvial processes also operate to erode, transport, and deposit material. We will evaluate the sequence and extent of various landform-modifying erosional and volatile redistribution processes that have shaped these icy satellites using a 3-D model that simulates the following surface and subsurface processes: 1) sublimation and re-condensation of volatiles; 2) development of refractory lag deposits; 3) disaggregation and downward sloughing of surficial material; 4) radiative heating/cooling of the surface (including reflection, emission, and shadowing by other surface elements); 5) thermal diffusion; and 6) vapor diffusion. The model will provide explicit simulations of landform development and thusly predicts the topographic and volatile evolution of the surface

  2. Influence of the Flexible Liposomes on the Skin Deposition of a Hydrophilic Model Drug, Carboxyfluorescein: Dependency on Their Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Badran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effect of different flexible liposomes containing sodium cholate, Tween 80, or cineol on skin deposition of carboxyfluorescein (CF. Size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, and stability of the prepared vesicles were evaluated. The influence of these systems on the skin deposition of CF utilizing rat skin as membrane model was investigated. Results showed that all of the investigated liposomes had almost spherical shapes with low polydispersity (PDI < 0.3 and particles size range from 83 to 175 nm. All liposomal formulations exhibited negative zeta potential, good drug entrapment efficiency, and stability. In vitro skin deposition data showed that flexible liposomes gave significant deposition of CF on the skin compared to conventional liposomes and drug solutions. This study revealed that flexible liposomes, containing cineole, were able to deliver higher amount of CF suggesting that the hydrophilic drugs delivery to the skin was strictly correlated to the vesicle composition.

  3. Multi-model comparison of the volcanic sulfate deposition from the 1815 eruption of Mt. Tambora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Marshall

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of Mt. Tambora in 1815 was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 500 years. The eruption had significant climatic impacts, leading to the 1816 year without a summer, and remains a valuable event from which to understand the climatic effects of large stratospheric volcanic sulfur dioxide injections. The eruption also resulted in one of the strongest and most easily identifiable volcanic sulfate signals in polar ice cores, which are widely used to reconstruct the timing and atmospheric sulfate loading of past eruptions. As part of the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP, five state-of-the-art global aerosol models simulated this eruption. We analyse both simulated background (no Tambora and volcanic (with Tambora sulfate deposition to polar regions and compare to ice core records. The models simulate overall similar patterns of background sulfate deposition, although there are differences in regional details and magnitude. However, the volcanic sulfate deposition varies considerably between the models with differences in timing, spatial pattern and magnitude. Mean simulated deposited sulfate on Antarctica ranges from 19 to 264 kg km−2 and on Greenland from 31 to 194 kg km−2, as compared to the mean ice-core-derived estimates of roughly 50 kg km−2 for both Greenland and Antarctica. The ratio of the hemispheric atmospheric sulfate aerosol burden after the eruption to the average ice sheet deposited sulfate varies between models by up to a factor of 15. Sources of this inter-model variability include differences in both the formation and the transport of sulfate aerosol. Our results suggest that deriving relationships between sulfate deposited on ice sheets and atmospheric sulfate burdens from model simulations may be associated with greater uncertainties than previously thought.

  4. TLR4 mutation reduces microglial activation, increases Aβ deposits and exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Min

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are accompanied by activated microglia. The role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of AD remains controversial: either clearing Aβ deposits by phagocytosis or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic substances. Microglia can be activated via toll-like receptors (TLRs, a class of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune system. We previously demonstrated that an AD mouse model homozygous for a loss-of-function mutation of TLR4 had increases in Aβ deposits and buffer-soluble Aβ in the brain as compared with a TLR4 wild-type AD mouse model at 14-16 months of age. However, it is unknown if TLR4 signaling is involved in initiation of Aβ deposition as well as activation and recruitment of microglia at the early stage of AD. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 signaling and microglial activation in early stages using 5-month-old AD mouse models when Aβ deposits start. Methods Microglial activation and amyloid deposition in the brain were determined by immunohistochemistry in the AD models. Levels of cerebral soluble Aβ were determined by ELISA. mRNA levels of cytokines and chemokines in the brain and Aβ-stimulated monocytes were quantified by real-time PCR. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze. Results While no difference was found in cerebral Aβ load between AD mouse models at 5 months with and without TLR4 mutation, microglial activation in a TLR4 mutant AD model (TLR4M Tg was less than that in a TLR4 wild-type AD model (TLR4W Tg. At 9 months, TLR4M Tg mice had increased Aβ deposition and soluble Aβ42 in the brain, which were associated with decrements in cognitive functions and expression levels of IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 in the hippocampus compared to TLR4W Tg mice. TLR4 mutation diminished Aβ-induced IL-1β, CCL3, and CCL4 expression in monocytes. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of TLR4

  5. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation Historical and Projected Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching 1300 mg(N) m2 yr1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, 3050 larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  6. Which measurement strategies to improve spatial erosion and deposition patterns modelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineux, Nathalie; Maugnard, Alexandre; Swerts, Gilles; Bielders, Charles; Degré, Aurore

    2014-05-01

    . Coupled with unmanned aerial system, they should allow us to test the model performances and improve our knowledge of the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition.

  7. Melt flow behaviour of poly-epsilon-caprolactone in fused deposition modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanath, H S; Chua, C K; Leong, K F; Shah, K D

    2008-07-01

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) is an extrusion based Rapid prototyping (RP) technique which can be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds. The present work focuses on the study of the melt flow behaviour (MFB) of Poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) as a representative biomaterial, on the FDM. The MFB significantly affects the quality of the scaffold which depends not only on the pressure gradient, its velocity, and the temperature gradients but also physical properties like the melt temperature and rheology. The MFB is studied using two methods: mathematical modelling and finite element analysis (FEA) using Ansys(R). The MFB is studied using accurate channel geometry by varying filament velocity at the entry and by varying nozzle diameters and angles at the exit. The comparative results of both mathematical modelling and FEA suggest that the pressure drop and the velocities of the melt flow depend on the flow channel parameters. One inference of particular interest is the temperature gradient of the PCL melt, which shows that it liquefies within 35% of the channel length. These results are invaluable to better understand the MFB of biomaterials that affects the quality of the scaffold built via FDM and can also be used to predict the MFB of other biomaterials.

  8. Geophysical modeling in gold deposit through DC Resistivity and Induced Polarization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Ore mining fundamentally depends on the definition of its tenor and volume, something extremely complex in disseminated mineralization, as in the case of certain types of deposits of gold and sulfites. This article proposes the use of electrical tomography for definition of a geophysical signature in terms of electrical resistivity and chargeability, in an outcrop of mineralized quartz lode at the end of an inactive gold mine. One of the targets was to analyze the continuity of the mineralized body, the occurrence of new outcrops and the applicability of the method as an auxiliary tool in mineral extraction. Three parallel lines of electrical tomography in a dipole-dipole arrangement, being orthogonal to the orientation of the gold lode, were installed in an area outside the mine. The results allowed the geophysical characterization of the mineralized zone by high resistivity (above 1000Ω.m and high chargeability (above 30mV/V. The results of the 2D inversion models were interpolated in 3D visualization models, which allowed definition of the contour surfaces for the physical parameters measured, and the morphological pattern modeling of the mineralization. The data reveal the existence of a new lode in subsurface, localized 30m to the south of the lode outcrop. The versatility of the acquisition and data processing indicate the application potential of electrical tomography as a criterion for sampling and tenor definition in ore extraction activities, since it is objective and low cost.

  9. The computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in Northern Xinjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang; Qin Mingkuan; Zhao Ruiquan; Tang Shenghuang; Wang Baoqun; Lin Shuangxing

    2001-01-01

    The process of establishment of the model includes following steps: (1) Systematically studying a known typical in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit--Deposit No. 512 in Yili basin, analyzing its controlling factors and establishing its metallogenetic model; (2) Establishing the metallogenetic models of this type of uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area on the basis of comparison study on the deposit No. 512 with the same type uranium deposits in the world; (3) Creating the computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in northern Xinjiang; (4) Determining the standards of giving a evaluation-mark for each controlling factor of in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area; (5) Evaluating uranium potential and prospect of the unknown objective target

  10. Laboratory model study of newly deposited dredger fills using improved multiple-vacuum preloading technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjin Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Problems continue to be encountered concerning the traditional vacuum preloading method in field during the treatment of newly deposited dredger fills. In this paper, an improved multiple-vacuum preloading method was developed to consolidate newly dredger fills that are hydraulically placed in seawater for land reclamation in Lingang Industrial Zone of Tianjin City, China. With this multiple-vacuum preloading method, the newly deposited dredger fills could be treated effectively by adopting a novel moisture separator and a rapid improvement technique without sand cushion. A series of model tests was conducted in the laboratory for comparing the results from the multiple-vacuum preloading method and the traditional one. Ten piezometers and settlement plates were installed to measure the variations in excess pore water pressures and moisture content, and vane shear strength was measured at different positions. The testing results indicate that water discharge–time curves obtained by the traditional vacuum preloading method can be divided into three phases: rapid growth phase, slow growth phase, and steady phase. According to the process of fluid flow concentrated along tiny ripples and building of larger channels inside soils during the whole vacuum loading process, the fluctuations of pore water pressure during each loading step are divided into three phases: steady phase, rapid dissipation phase, and slow dissipation phase. An optimal loading pattern which could have a best treatment effect was proposed for calculating the water discharge and pore water pressure of soil using the improved multiple-vacuum preloading method. For the newly deposited dredger fills at Lingang Industrial Zone of Tianjin City, the best loading step was 20 kPa and the loading of 40–50 kPa produced the highest drainage consolidation. The measured moisture content and vane shear strength were discussed in terms of the effect of reinforcement, both of which indicate

  11. Physical and mathematical modeling of transient infiltration through shallow layered pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Emilia; Greco, Roberto; Guida, Andrea; Olivares, Lucio; Picarelli, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    , small scale physical models of layered slopes, with various geometry and inclination, have been subjected to rainfalls of various intensities. During the infiltration processes and the following water redistribution phases, soil moisture and matric potential have been measured at various locations by means of TDR probes and tensiometers, respectively. The interpretation of the experimental results has been aided by a 2D mathematical model based on the integration of Richards' equation with the finite differences method. The obtained results indicate that a layer of dry pumices may induce lateral redistribution of water through the overlying ashes. In steep sloping deposits, this may favor the establishment of downslope directed subsurface runoff, which drains part of the infiltrating water towards the toe of the slope. In real slopes, depending on local morphology, such a downslope flow may have a beneficial effect on slope stability, as some water is drained out of the slope, or may even contribute to the establishment of triggering conditions, as it can result in flow concentration leading to local failure.

  12. Error analysis: How precise is fused deposition modeling in fabrication of bone models in comparison to the parent bones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Reddy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid prototyping (RP is used widely in dental and faciomaxillary surgery with anecdotal uses in orthopedics. The purview of RP in orthopedics is vast. However, there is no error analysis reported in the literature on bone models generated using office-based RP. This study evaluates the accuracy of fused deposition modeling (FDM using standard tessellation language (STL files and errors generated during the fabrication of bone models. Materials and Methods: Nine dry bones were selected and were computed tomography (CT scanned. STL files were procured from the CT scans and three-dimensional (3D models of the bones were printed using our in-house FDM based 3D printer using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS filament. Measurements were made on the bone and 3D models according to data collection procedures for forensic skeletal material. Statistical analysis was performed to establish interobserver co-relation for measurements on dry bones and the 3D bone models. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13.0 software to analyze the collected data. Results: The inter-observer reliability was established using intra-class coefficient for both the dry bones and the 3D models. The mean of absolute difference is 0.4 that is very minimal. The 3D models are comparable to the dry bones. Conclusions: STL file dependent FDM using ABS material produces near-anatomical 3D models. The high 3D accuracy hold a promise in the clinical scenario for preoperative planning, mock surgery, and choice of implants and prostheses, especially in complicated acetabular trauma and complex hip surgeries.

  13. Analyzing the Deposition of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Model Rough Mineral Surfaces Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Kananizadeh, N.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Schubert, M.; Bartelt-Hunt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) is the most extensively manufactured engineered materials. nTiO2 from sunscreens was found to enter sediments after released into a lake. nTiO2 may also enter the subsurface via irrigation using effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Interaction of nTiO2 with soils and sediments will largely influence their fate, transport, and ecotoxicity. Measuring the interaction between nTiO2 and natural substrates (e.g. such as sands) is particularly challenging due to highly heterogeneous and rough natural sand surfaces. In this study, an engineered controllable rough surface known as three dimensional nanostructured sculptured columnar thin films (SCTFs) has been used to mimic surface roughness. SCTFs were fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD), a physical vapor deposition technique facilitated by electron beam evaporation. Interaction between nTiO2 and SCTF coated surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). In parallel, a Generalized Ellipsometry (GE) was coupled with the QCM-D to measure the deposition of nTiO2. We found that the typical QCM-D modeling approach, e.g. viscoelastic model, would largely overestimate the mass of deposited nTiO2, because the frequency drops due to particle deposition or water entrapment in rough areas were not differentiated. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to model QCM-D data for nTiO2 deposition on rough surfaces, which couples the viscoelastic model with a model of flow on the non-uniform surface.

  14. Modelling of the energy density deposition profiles of ultrashort laser pulses focused in optical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, F; Lavertu, P-L; Bigaouette, N; Moore, F; Brunette, I; Giguere, D; Kieffer, J-C; Olivie, G; Ozaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in dense optical media is investigated theoretically by solving numerically the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the maximum energy density deposition as a function of the pulse energy presents a well-defined threshold that increases with the pulse duration. As a consequence of plasma defocusing, the maximum energy density deposition is generally smaller and the size of the energy deposition zone is generally larger for shorter pulses. Nevertheless, significant values of the energy density deposition can be obtained near threshold, i.e., at lower energy than for longer pulses

  15. Modelling of hydro-thermo-mechanical effects in a fracture intersecting a nuclear waste deposition hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O.; Noorishad, J.; Tsang, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    The groundwater flow in a vertical fracture intersecting a hypothetical nuclear waste deposition hole was examined. After excavation and emplacement of the nuclear waste canister, the aperture of the radial fracture decreased close to the deposition hole. After swelling of the compacted bentonite buffer and when the rock mass has cooled to virgin temperature, the fracture aperture increased adjacent to the deposition hole wall. This causes a fluid flow velocity increase up to more than one order of magnitude adjacent to the deposition hole wall. The far field flow rate through the repository is slightly affected by the swelling of the bentonite buffer

  16. Effects of generation time on spray aerosol transport and deposition in models of the mouth-throat geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael; Das Choudhuri, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    For most newly developed spray aerosol inhalers, the generation time is a potentially important variable that can be fully controlled. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spray aerosol generation time on transport and deposition in a standard induction port (IP) and more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a representative system in which spray momentum was expected to significantly impact deposition. Sectional and total depositions in the IP and MT geometries were assessed at a constant CAG flow rate of 25 mg/sec for aerosol generation times of 1, 2, and 4 sec using both in vitro experiments and a previously developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Both the in vitro and numerical results indicated that extending the generation time of the spray aerosol, delivered at a constant mass flow rate, significantly reduced deposition in the IP and more realistic MT geometry. Specifically, increasing the generation time of the CAG system from 1 to 4 sec reduced the deposition fraction in the IP and MT geometries by approximately 60 and 33%, respectively. Furthermore, the CFD predictions of deposition fraction were found to be in good agreement with the in vitro results for all times considered in both the IP and MT geometries. The numerical results indicated that the reduction in deposition fraction over time was associated with temporal dissipation of what was termed the spray aerosol "burst effect." Based on these results, increasing the spray aerosol generation time, at a constant mass flow rate, may be an effective strategy for reducing deposition in the standard IP and in more realistic MT geometries.

  17. Advection diffusion model for particles deposition in Rayleigh-Benard turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresta, P.; Lippolis, A.; Verzicco, R.; Soldati, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian Particle Tracking are used to precisely investigate the turbulent thermally driven flow and particles dispersion in a closed, slender cylindrical domain. The numerical simulations are carried out for Rayleigh (Ra) and Prandtl numbers (Pr) equal to Ra = 2X10 8 and Pr = 0.7, considering three sets of particles with Stokes numbers, based on Kolmogorov scale, equal to St k 1.3, St k 0.65 and St k = 0.13. This data are used to calculate a priori the drift velocity and the turbulent diffusion coefficient for the Advection Diffusion model. These quantities are function of the Stokes, Froude, Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers only. One dimensional, time dependent, Advection- Diffusion Equation (ADE) is presented to predict particles deposition in Rayleigh-Benard flow in the cylindrical domain. This archetype configuration models flow and aerosol dynamics, produced in case of accident in the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) of a nuclear reactor. ADE results show a good agreement with DNS data for all the sets of particles investigated. (author)

  18. Modelling of Quench Limit for Steady State Heat Deposits in LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bocian, D; Siemko, A

    2008-01-01

    A quench, the transition of a conductor from the superconducting to the normal conducting state, occurs irreversibly in the accelerator magnets if one of the three parameters: temperature, magnetic field or current density exceeds a critical value. Energy deposited in the superconductor by the particle beams provokes quenches detrimental for the accelerator operation. In particular if particles impacting on the vacuum chamber and their secondary showers depose energy in the magnet coils. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) nominal beam intensity is 3.2 ldr 10^14 protons. A quench occurs if a fraction of the order of 10^7 protons per second is lost locally. A network model is used to simulate the thermodynamic behaviour of the magnets. The heat flow in the network model was validated with measurements performed in the CERN magnet test facility. A steady state heat flow was introduced in the coil by using the quench heaters implemented in the LHC magnets. The value of the heat source current is determined by the ne...

  19. Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D Printed Tablets for Intragastric Floating Delivery of Domperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xuyu; Chai, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jingjing; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yan; Cai, Weimin; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2017-06-06

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing to prepare intragastric floating sustained release (FSR) tablets. Domperidone (DOM), an insoluble weak base, was chosen as a model drug to investigate the potential of FSR in increasing its oral bioavailability and reducing its administration frequency. DOM was successfully loaded into hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) filaments using hot melt extrusion (HME). The filaments were then printed into hollow structured tablets through changing the shell numbers and the infill percentages. Physical characterization results indicated that the majority of DOM gradually turned into the amorphous form during the fabrication process. The optimized formulation (contain 10% DOM, with 2 shells and 0% infill) exhibited the sustained release characteristic and was able to float for about 10 h in vitro. Radiographic images showed that the BaSO 4 -labeled tablets were retained in the stomach of rabbits for more than 8 h. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies showed the relative bioavailability of the FSR tablets compared with reference commercial tablets was 222.49 ± 62.85%. All the results showed that FDM based 3D printing might be a promising way to fabricate hollow tablets for the purpose of intragastric floating drug delivery.

  20. Geometry modeling of single track cladding deposited by high power diode laser with rectangular beam spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaming; Qin, Xunpeng; Huang, Song; Hu, Zeqi; Ni, Mao

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the relationship between the process parameters and geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile for the single track cladding (STC) deposited by High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) with rectangle beam spot (RBS). To obtain the geometry parameters, namely cladding width Wc and height Hc of the sectional profile, a full factorial design (FFD) of experiment was used to conduct the experiments with a total of 27. The pre-placed powder technique has been employed during laser cladding. The influence of the process parameters including laser power, powder thickness and scanning speed on the Wc and Hc was analyzed in detail. A nonlinear fitting model was used to fit the relationship between the process parameters and geometry parameters. And a circular arc was adopted to describe the geometry profile of the cross-section of STC. The above models were confirmed by all the experiments. The results indicated that the geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile of STC can be described as the circular arc, and the other geometry parameters of the sectional profile can be calculated only using Wc and Hc. Meanwhile, the Wc and Hc can be predicted through the process parameters.

  1. Kinetic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and re-emission from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Richou, M.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the reactive-diffusive transport of hydrogen in porous graphite [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. (submitted for publication). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2007.08.013.]. The deposits found on the leading edge of the neutralizer of Tore Supra are multi-scale in nature, consisting of micropores with typical size lower than 2 nm (∼11%), mesopores (∼5%) and macropores with a typical size more than 50 nm [C. Martin, M. Richou, W. Sakaily, B. Pegourie, C. Brosset, P. Roubin, J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 1251]. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) has been used to study the hydrogen transport at meso-scales. Recombination rate and the diffusion coefficient calculated at the meso-scale was used as an input to scale up and analyze the hydrogen transport at macro-scale. A combination of KMC and MCD (Monte-Carlo diffusion) method was used at macro-scales. Flux dependence of hydrogen recycling has been studied. The retention and re-emission analysis of the model has been extended to study the chemical erosion process based on the Kueppers-Hopf cycle [M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186].

  2. PCL/PLA Polymer Composite Filament Fabrication using Full Factorial Design (DOE) for Fused Deposition Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, R. H. A.; Khairilhijra, K. Rd.; Wahab, M. S.; Sa’ude, N.; Ibrahim, M.; Marwah, O. M. F.; Yusof, M. S.; Rahman, M. N. A.; Ariffin, A. M. T.; Hassan, M. F.; Yunos, M. Z.; Adzila, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Polycaprolactone / Polylactice Acid (PCL/PLA) composite are used to fabricate filament wire with the specific diameter, which is in the range of 1.75 to 1.80 mm. Full factorial experimental design technique was used to study the main effects and the interaction effects between operational parameter which is (A) die temperature, (B) roller puller speed, (C) spindle speed and (D) inlet temperature. Besides that, there are two levels (-1 and +1) and the response are filament wire diameter. There are 16 numbers of runs and plus 8 centre points per blocks which makes the runs into 24 runs. From the experiment it shows that there are four factor that are significant effects on the filament wire diameter which is A, B, C and BC. The optimum parameter setting are also determined and there are 10 suggestions to achieve the target with different setting of parameter. The margin error for confirmation run is below than 15% when the parameter set at 6 Hz spindle speed, 4.99 rpm roller puller, 100.31 °C die temperature and 79.65 °C inlet temperature which can be noted that the confirmation run result is acceptable. The optimization parameter setting can use to continue in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM). Filament wire from PCL/PLA are succesfully fabricated with acceptable diameter size and ready to be used for Fused Depotion Modelling process (FDM).

  3. Mathematical model of drift deposition from a bifurcated cooling tower plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Jung, L.

    1978-01-01

    Cooling tower drift deposition modeling has been extended by including centrifugal force induced through plume bifurcation in a crosswind as a mechanism for drift droplet removal from the plume. The model, in its current state of development, is capable of predicting the trajectory of a single droplet from the stage of strong interaction with the vortex field soon after droplet emission at the tower top through the stage of droplet evaporation in an unsaturated atmosphere after droplet breakaway from the plume. The computer program developed from the mathematical formulation has been used to explore the dependency of the droplet trajectory on droplet size, vortex strength, point of droplet emission, drag coefficient, droplet efflux speed, and ambient conditions. A specific application to drift from a mechanical-draft cooling tower (for a wind speed twice the efflux speed, a relative humidity of 70 per cent, and an initial droplet radius of 100 μm) showed the droplet to follow a helical trajectory within the plume, with breakaway occurring at 2.5 tower diameters downwind and ground impact of the droplet (reduced through evaporation to 55 μm radius) at 11 tower diameters

  4. Effects of build parameters on linear wear loss in plastic part produced by fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Masood, Syed Hasan; Bhowmik, Jahar Lal

    2017-07-01

    Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is one of the prominent additive manufacturing technologies for producing polymer products. FDM is a complex additive manufacturing process that can be influenced by many process conditions. The industrial demands required from the FDM process are increasing with higher level product functionality and properties. The functionality and performance of FDM manufactured parts are greatly influenced by the combination of many various FDM process parameters. Designers and researchers always pay attention to study the effects of FDM process parameters on different product functionalities and properties such as mechanical strength, surface quality, dimensional accuracy, build time and material consumption. However, very limited studies have been carried out to investigate and optimize the effect of FDM build parameters on wear performance. This study focuses on the effect of different build parameters on micro-structural and wear performance of FDM specimens using definitive screening design based quadratic model. This would reduce the cost and effort of additive manufacturing engineer to have a systematic approachto make decision among the manufacturing parameters to achieve the desired product quality.

  5. Predictive modeling of slope deposits and comparisons of two small areas in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shary, Peter A.; Sharaya, Larisa S.; Mitusov, Andrew V.

    2017-08-01

    Methods for correct quantitative comparison of several terrains are important in the development and use of quantitative landscape evolution models, and they need to introduce specific modeling parameters. We introduce such parameters and compare two small terrains with respect to the link slope-valley for the description of slope deposits (colluvium) in them. We show that colluvium accumulation in small areas cannot be described by linear models and thus introduce non-linear models. Two small areas, Perdoel (0.29 ha) and Bornhöved (3.2 ha), are studied. Slope deposits in the both are mainly in dry valleys, with a total thickness Mtotal up to 2.0 m in Perdoel and up to 1.2 m in Bornhöved. Parent materials are mainly Pleistocene sands aged 30 kyr BP. Exponential models of multiple regression that use a 1-m LiDAR DEM (digital elevation model) explained 70-93% of spatial variability in Mtotal. Parameters DH12 and DV12 of horizontal and vertical distances are introduced that permit to characterize and compare conditions of colluvium formation for various terrains. The study areas differ 3.7 times by the parameter DH12 that describes a horizontal distance from thalwegs at which Mtotal diminishes 2.72 times. DH12 is greater in Bornhöved (29.7 m) than in Perdoel (8.12 m). We relate this difference in DH12 to the distinction between types of the link slope-valley: a regional type if catchment area of a region outside a given small area plays an important role, and a local type when accumulation of colluvium from valley banks within a small area is of more importance. We argue that the link slope-valley is regional in Perdoel and local in Bornhöved. Peaks of colluvium thickness were found on thalwegs of three studied valleys by both direct measurements in a trench, and model surfaces of Mtotal. A hypothesis on the formation mechanism of such peaks is discussed. The parameter DV12 describes a vertical distance from a peak of colluvium thickness along valley bottom at

  6. Geodynamical model of development the gold ore deposit Muruntau in Central Kyzylkums /Western Uzbekistan/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, I. P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in geology and sciences dealing with planets resulted in ever-growing information on the internal structure and composition of upper and lower mantle and its role in the development of mineral deposits. Thus, the analysis of geologic-geophysical velocity sections on DSS-MOVZ profiles, that cross Central Kyzylkum, has revealed a number of features, which are characteristic of the upper mantle rocks, related to morphology of bodies, their physical properties, consisting mainly in their contrasting values for contiquous blocks, and general increased velocity and density of the rocks they contain. Petrologic-geophysical analysis of the same profiles proved the previous conclusions, and besides it allowed us to create the geodinamical model of development of a complicated continental lithosphere within Central Kyzylkum Ore Magmatic Concenter (CKOMC). CKOMC is a part of Western Uzbekistan's territory, that has maximum concentration of gold ore deposits of different scale, including the gigantic one- Muruntau. There are two main factors, that condition the area of the concenter: 1.Obduction of crust of the ocean to continental one during the Upper Paleozoic collision of Kyrgiz-Kazakh and Karakum-Tadjik microcontinents; 2.Geochemical gold specialization of Turkestan paleo-ocean's lithosphere. As a result of obduction of doubled, and sometimes even trebled crust of the ocean to continental, the front of rock granitization shifted to the sphere of ocean sediments development, and granite-gneiss layer of the continental crust went down to granulite zone. The latter factor provoked mass penetration of fluids from the former granite-gneiss and sedimentary-metamorphic layers, which due to their uprush to the surface, formed fluid-hydrothermal system , enriched with gold, in the new upper crust. This, in its turn, conditioned the formation of numerous gold ore deposits of different facies and formations observed in Central Kyzylkums. Abrupt increase in the crust

  7. Global deposition and transport efficiencies of radioactive species with respect to modelling credibility after Fukushima (Japan, 2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Florou, Heleni; Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Cozic, Anne; Kritidis, Panayotis

    2015-01-01

    In this study we conduct a detailed comparison of the modelling response of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident with global and local observations. We use five different model versions characterized by different horizontal and vertical resolutions of the same General Circulation Model (GCM). Transport efficiencies of 137 Cs across the world are presented as an indication of the expected radioactive impact. Activity concentrations were well represented showing lower Normalized Mean Biases (NMBs) when the better resolved versions of the GCM were used. About 95% of the results using the zoom configuration over Europe (zEur) remained within a factor of 10 from the observations. Close to Japan, the model reproduced well 137 Cs concentrations using the zoom version over Asia (zAsia) showing high correlations, while more than 64% of the modelling results were found within a factor of two from the observations and more than 92% within a factor of 10. Labile and refractory rare radionuclides calculated indirectly showed larger deviations, with about 60% of the simulated concentrations within a factor of 10 from the observations. We estimate that around 23% of the released 137 Cs remained into Japan, while 76% deposited in the oceans. Around 163 TBq deposited over North America, among which 95 TBq over USA, 40 TBq over Canada and 5 TBq over Greenland). About 14 TBq deposited over Europe (mostly in the European part of Russia, Sweden and Norway) and 47 TBq over Asia (mostly in the Asian part of Russia, Philippines and South Korea), while traces were observed over Africa, Oceania and Antarctica. Since the radioactive plume followed a northward direction before its arrival to USA and then to Europe, a significant amount of about 69 TBq deposited in the Arctic, as well. These patterns of deposition are fully consistent with the most recent reports for the accident. - Highlights: • 5 versions of an Eulerian model were used to simulate the Fukushima

  8. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  9. Backtrack modeling to locate the origin of tar balls depositing along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Ciappa, A.; Vethamony, P.

    that the source oil for the TBs deposited on the Goa coast in August 2010 is the tanker wash, and the source for subsequent TBs deposited on the Gujarat coast during July 2012 and June 2013 and Goa coast in May 2013 is from Bombay High (BH) oil fields...

  10. Process-Based Model for Computation of Erosion and Deposition on Shrub-Protected Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Determination of erosion and deposition rates on riverbanks requires a detailed knowledge of the near-bank boundary shear stress field. Riverbanks typically are irregular in planiform geometry owing to the presence of vegetation on them, and the effects of vegetation-caused bank irregularity in reducing flow in the neighborhood of the toes of banks must be taken into account in calculating the appropriate boundary shear stress fields. Form drag on roots, stems, and branches of shrubs and trees that protrude into the flow must be carefully evaluated. Methods for calculating the boundary shear stress and sediment transport fields on and near vegetated banks have been developed over the past several years. More recently, the direct effects of roots, stems, and branches in reducing the shear stresses on banks have been investigated in conjunction with research on arroyo channels having nearly trapezoidal cross sections and banks covered with sandbar willow and tamarisk. A model for computing flow and sediment transport in such channels is presented and then used to demonstrate the relative importance of the various environmental factors and their interactions. The primary environmental factors include (1) the cross-sectional geometry of the flow, which controls the structure of the cross-sectional distribution of the streamwise-averaged boundary shear stress, (2) the micro topography of the bed and banks, which determines the local ratio of streamwise-averaged boundary shear stress to skin friction and, thus, the cross-sectional structure of the sediment transport field in the channel, and (3) the bed-sediment size distribution, which controls the importance of density stratification in the flow and, thereby, the vertical structure of the velocity field. The model demonstrates that woody vegetation on sloping banks affects the flow in several ways. First, it forces the high velocity core toward the center of the channel, increasing the streamwise-averaged boundary

  11. A coupled modelling effort to study the fate of contaminated sediments downstream of the Coles Hill deposit, Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Castro-Bolinaga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary results of a coupled modelling effort to study the fate of tailings (radioactive waste-by product downstream of the Coles Hill uranium deposit located in Virginia, USA. The implementation of the overall modelling process includes a one-dimensional hydraulic model to qualitatively characterize the sediment transport process under severe flooding conditions downstream of the potential mining site, a two-dimensional ANSYS Fluent model to simulate the release of tailings from a containment cell located partially above the local ground surface into the nearby streams, and a one-dimensional finite-volume sediment transport model to examine the propagation of a tailings sediment pulse in the river network located downstream. The findings of this investigation aim to assist in estimating the potential impacts that tailings would have if they were transported into rivers and reservoirs located downstream of the Coles Hill deposit that serve as municipal drinking water supplies.

  12. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  13. Predictions of dispersion and deposition of fallout from nuclear testing using the NOAA-HYSPLIT meteorological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Brian E; Beck, Harold L; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    The NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) was evaluated as a research tool to simulate the dispersion and deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear tests. Model-based estimates of fallout can be valuable for use in the reconstruction of past exposures from nuclear testing, particularly where little historical fallout monitoring data are available. The ability to make reliable predictions about fallout deposition could also have significant importance for nuclear events in the future. We evaluated the accuracy of the HYSPLIT-predicted geographic patterns of deposition by comparing those predictions against known deposition patterns following specific nuclear tests with an emphasis on nuclear weapons tests conducted in the Marshall Islands. We evaluated the ability of the computer code to quantitatively predict the proportion of fallout particles of specific sizes deposited at specific locations as well as their time of transport. In our simulations of fallout from past nuclear tests, historical meteorological data were used from a reanalysis conducted jointly by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We used a systematic approach in testing the HYSPLIT model by simulating the release of a range of particle sizes from a range of altitudes and evaluating the number and location of particles deposited. Our findings suggest that the quantity and quality of meteorological data are the most important factors for accurate fallout predictions and that, when satisfactory meteorological input data are used, HYSPLIT can produce relatively accurate deposition patterns and fallout arrival times. Furthermore, when no other measurement data are available, HYSPLIT can be used to indicate whether or not fallout might have occurred at a given location and provide, at minimum, crude quantitative estimates of the magnitude of the deposited activity. A variety of

  14. Sediment transport and deposition on a river-dominated tidal flat: An idealized model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Chen, Shih-Nan; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Ralston, David K.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D hydrodynamic model is used to investigate how different size classes of river-derived sediment are transported, exported and trapped on an idealized, river-dominated tidal flat. The model is composed of a river channel flanked by sloping tidal flats, a configuration motivated by the intertidal region of the Skagit River mouth in Washington State, United States. It is forced by mixed tides and a pulse of freshwater and sediment with various settling velocities. In this system, the river not only influences stratification but also contributes a significant cross-shore transport. As a result, the bottom stress is strongly ebb-dominated in the channel because of the seaward advance of strong river flow as the tidal flats drain during ebbs. Sediment deposition patterns and mass budgets are sensitive to settling velocity. The lateral sediment spreading scales with an advective distance (settling time multiplied by lateral flow speed), thereby confining the fast settling sediment classes in the channel. Residual sediment transport is landward on the flats, because of settling lag, but is strongly seaward in the channel. The seaward transport mainly occurs during big ebbs and is controlled by a length scale ratio Ld/XWL, where Ld is a cross-shore advective distance (settling time multiplied by river outlet velocity), and XWL is the immersed cross-shore length of the intertidal zone. Sediment trapping requires Ld/XWL stratification and reducing tidal range both favor sediment trapping, whereas varying channel geometries and asymmetry of tides has relatively small impacts. Implications of the modeling results on the south Skagit intertidal region are discussed.

  15. Influence of the Flexible Liposomes on the Skin Deposition of a Hydrophilic Model Drug, Carboxyfluorescein: Dependency on Their Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Mohamed; Shalaby, Khaled; Al-Omrani, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of different flexible liposomes containing sodium cholate, Tween 80, or cineol on skin deposition of carboxyfluorescein (CF). Size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, and stability of the prepared vesicles were evaluated. The influence of these systems on the skin deposition of CF utilizing rat skin as membrane model was investigated. Results showed that all of the investigated liposomes had almost spherical shapes with low polydispersity (PDI cineole, were able to deliver higher amount of CF suggesting that the hydrophilic drugs delivery to the skin was strictly correlated to the vesicle composition. PMID:22536120

  16. Outcrop - core correlation and seismic modeling of the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit, Fort McMurray area, northeast Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, F.J. [Alberta Geological Survey, Calgary, AB (Canada); Langenberg, C.W.; Cotterill, D.C.; Berhane, H. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    A joint study between the Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Calgary was conducted which involved a detailed facies analysis of cores and outcrops from the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in Alberta`s Steepbank area. A unified facies classification for the deposit was developed. Larger scale facies associations were also determined, as well as proxy sonic logs for outcrops used in seismic modeling. The cores which were displayed exhibited detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of 10 outcrops in the area. 7 refs.

  17. Filament Breakage Monitoring in Fused Deposition Modeling Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhensheng Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymers are being used in a wide range of Additive Manufacturing (AM applications and have been shown to have tremendous potential for producing complex, individually customized parts. In order to improve part quality, it is essential to identify and monitor the process malfunctions of polymer-based AM. The present work endeavored to develop an alternative method for filament breakage identification in the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM AM process. The Acoustic Emission (AE technique was applied due to the fact that it had the capability of detecting bursting and weak signals, especially from complex background noises. The mechanism of filament breakage was depicted thoroughly. The relationship between the process parameters and critical feed rate was obtained. In addition, the framework of filament breakage detection based on the instantaneous skewness and relative similarity of the AE raw waveform was illustrated. Afterwards, we conducted several filament breakage tests to validate their feasibility and effectiveness. Results revealed that the breakage could be successfully identified. Achievements of the present work could be further used to develop a comprehensive in situ FDM monitoring system with moderate cost.

  18. Filaments Production and Fused Deposition Modelling of ABS/Carbon Nanotubes Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sithiprumnea Dul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS/carbon nanotubes (CNT filaments at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt %, suitable for fused deposition modelling (FDM were obtained by using a completely solvent-free process based on direct melt compounding and extrusion. The optimal CNT content in the filaments for FDM was found to be 6 wt %; for this composite, a detailed investigation of the thermal, mechanical and electrical properties was performed. Presence of CNT in ABS filaments and 3D-printed parts resulted in a significant enhancement of the tensile modulus and strength, accompanied by a reduction of the elongation at break. As documented by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, the stiffening effect of CNTs in ABS is particularly pronounced at high temperatures. Besides, the presence of CNT in 3D-printed parts accounts for better creep and thermal dimensional stabilities of 3D-printed parts, accompanied by a reduction of the coefficient of thermal expansion. 3D-printed nanocomposite samples with 6 wt % of CNT exhibited a good electrical conductivity, even if lower than pristine composite filaments.

  19. Three-Dimensional (3D Printing of Polymer-Metal Hybrid Materials by Fused Deposition Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Fafenrot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM is a three-dimensional (3D printing technology that is usually performed with polymers that are molten in a printer nozzle and placed line by line on the printing bed or the previous layer, respectively. Nowadays, hybrid materials combining polymers with functional materials are also commercially available. Especially combinations of polymers with metal particles result in printed objects with interesting optical and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of objects printed with two of these metal-polymer blends were compared to common poly (lactide acid (PLA printed objects. Tensile tests and bending tests show that hybrid materials mostly containing bronze have significantly reduced mechanical properties. Tensile strengths of the 3D-printed objects were unexpectedly nearly identical with those of the original filaments, indicating sufficient quality of the printing process. Our investigations show that while FDM printing allows for producing objects with mechanical properties similar to the original materials, metal-polymer blends cannot be used for the rapid manufacturing of objects necessitating mechanical strength.

  20. Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing of Polymer-Metal Hybrid Materials by Fused Deposition Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafenrot, Susanna; Grimmelsmann, Nils; Wortmann, Martin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-10-19

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a three-dimensional (3D) printing technology that is usually performed with polymers that are molten in a printer nozzle and placed line by line on the printing bed or the previous layer, respectively. Nowadays, hybrid materials combining polymers with functional materials are also commercially available. Especially combinations of polymers with metal particles result in printed objects with interesting optical and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of objects printed with two of these metal-polymer blends were compared to common poly (lactide acid) (PLA) printed objects. Tensile tests and bending tests show that hybrid materials mostly containing bronze have significantly reduced mechanical properties. Tensile strengths of the 3D-printed objects were unexpectedly nearly identical with those of the original filaments, indicating sufficient quality of the printing process. Our investigations show that while FDM printing allows for producing objects with mechanical properties similar to the original materials, metal-polymer blends cannot be used for the rapid manufacturing of objects necessitating mechanical strength.

  1. Fused Deposition Modeling 3D Printing for (Bio)analytical Device Fabrication: Procedures, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salentijn, Gert Ij; Oomen, Pieter E; Grajewski, Maciej; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2017-07-05

    In this work, the use of fused deposition modeling (FDM) in a (bio)analytical/lab-on-a-chip research laboratory is described. First, the specifications of this 3D printing method that are important for the fabrication of (micro)devices were characterized for a benchtop FDM 3D printer. These include resolution, surface roughness, leakage, transparency, material deformation, and the possibilities for integration of other materials. Next, the autofluorescence, solvent compatibility, and biocompatibility of 12 representative FDM materials were tested and evaluated. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of FDM in a number of important applications. In particular, we consider the fabrication of fluidic channels, masters for polymer replication, and tools for the production of paper microfluidic devices. This work thus provides a guideline for (i) the use of FDM technology by addressing its possibilities and current limitations, (ii) material selection for FDM, based on solvent compatibility and biocompatibility, and (iii) application of FDM technology to (bio)analytical research by demonstrating a broad range of illustrative examples.

  2. Comparison of Ultem 9085 Used in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM with Polytherimide Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Cicala

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyetherimide (PEI blends modified by either polycarbonate (PC or polyethylene terephthalate glycol-modified (PETG were prepared. The latter modifier (PETG was an industrial grade widely used for fused deposition modelling (FDM printing. PEI blends were compared to Ultem 9085, which is the standard PEI grade for FDM printing in advanced applications. All the blends were thoroughly characterized in terms of their rheological, morphological, thermomechanical and tensile properties. Ultem 9085 showed improved rheology for processing over standard PEI. PEI/PC blends with 10 wt % of modifier developed here closely matched the viscosity behavior of Ultem 9085. On the other hand, the blends with low PC content (i.e., less than 20 wt % outperformed Ultem 9085 in terms of thermal and tensile properties. When PETG was added, similar tensile properties to Ultem 9085 were found. The immiscibility for PC contents higher than 20 wt % deteriorated the tensile properties, making it less attractive for applications, although melt viscosity decreased further for increasing PC contents.

  3. Filaments Production and Fused Deposition Modelling of ABS/Carbon Nanotubes Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, Sithiprumnea; Fambri, Luca; Pegoretti, Alessandro

    2018-01-18

    Composite acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS)/carbon nanotubes (CNT) filaments at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt %, suitable for fused deposition modelling (FDM) were obtained by using a completely solvent-free process based on direct melt compounding and extrusion. The optimal CNT content in the filaments for FDM was found to be 6 wt %; for this composite, a detailed investigation of the thermal, mechanical and electrical properties was performed. Presence of CNT in ABS filaments and 3D-printed parts resulted in a significant enhancement of the tensile modulus and strength, accompanied by a reduction of the elongation at break. As documented by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, the stiffening effect of CNTs in ABS is particularly pronounced at high temperatures. Besides, the presence of CNT in 3D-printed parts accounts for better creep and thermal dimensional stabilities of 3D-printed parts, accompanied by a reduction of the coefficient of thermal expansion). 3D-printed nanocomposite samples with 6 wt % of CNT exhibited a good electrical conductivity, even if lower than pristine composite filaments.

  4. Skin cell culture on an ear-shaped scaffold created by fused deposition modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, H; Azangwe, G; Shepherd, D E T

    2005-01-01

    Tissue engineering, where cells attach and grow on a scaffold, has the potential to produce replacement ears made from natural tissues and replace the need for rubber prosthetic ears. This study investigated the feasibility of using the rapid prototyping technique of Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) to produce an ear-shaped scaffold. A three-dimensional image of the ear was used to manufacture ear-shaped scaffolds from ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) plastic using FDM. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the scaffold (coated with fibronectin) to attach and grow in culture medium in an incubator for two weeks. Human keratinocytes were then seeded on to the fibroblast layer to attempt to produce a more realistic skin covering. The morphology of the cells were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The results show that a realistic ear-shaped scaffold can be made using FDM. Human fibroblasts were found to attach and grow. Human keratinocytes were successfully attached and grown on top of the fibroblasts and this resulted in a skin covering over the scaffold. This study shows that FDM has great potential as a manufacturing technique for ear-shaped scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  5. PATTERN DEVELOPMENT FOR MANUFACTURING APPLICATIONS WITH FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING – A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Garg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the suitability of fused deposition modelling (FDM, for the production of a pattern that can be used in direct manufacturing applications. In this work, the benchmark was identified and its best part orientation in a FDM machine was located through experimentation. Control charts and process capability histogram were drawn to assess the process capability of the FDM process. The micro hardness of the prepared sample was measured to check the suitability of the process for investment casting applications. Further dimensional accuracy of patterns was established by IT grades as per the ISO standard UNI EN 20286-I (1995. It was observed that the performance indices for all the dimensions in the present study are greater than 1. The study of photo micrographs using SEM gave an insight into the properties of the component (produced by FDM. This study highlights that the tolerance grades for ABS plastics are consistent with the permissible range of tolerance grades as per the ISO standard UNI EN 20286-I (1995 and DIN16901 standard.

  6. Numerical evaluation of ABS parts fabricated by fused deposition modeling and vapor smoothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Uk Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The automotive industry has focused to use polymer materials in order to increase energy efficiency. So, the industry pays attention to use 3D printing technologies using several polymers. Among several 3D printer technologies, fused deposition modeling (FDM is one of the popular 3D printing technologies due to an inexpensive extrusion machine and multi-material printing. FDM could use thermoplastics such as ABS, PLA, ULTEM so on. However, it has a problem related to the post-processing because FDM has relatively poor layer resolution. In this study, the mechanical properties of ABS parts fabricated by FDM were measured. The ABS parts were divided into one with vapor smoothing process and the other without the vapor smoothing process which is one of the post-processing methods. Using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and dilatometer, temperature-dependent storage modulus and CTE for ABS specimens were measured. Based on the measured thermo-mechanical properties of ABS parts, finite element analysis was performed for an automotive bumper made of ABS. Moreover, response surface methodology was applied to study relationships among design parameters of thickness of the bumper, ambient temperature, and application of the vapor smoothing process. In result, a design guideline for a ABS product could be provided without time-consuming experiments

  7. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000 ACCMIP time slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of approximately 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards a potential misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores, but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double their 2000 counterpart in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental-scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~ 30–50% larger than the values in any region currently (circa 2000. However, sulfur deposition rates in 2100 are in all regions lower than in 2000 in

  8. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, D.; Shindell, D. T.; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000 ACCMIP time slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of approximately 50 Tg(N) yr-1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr-1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr-1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards a potential misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores, but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double their 2000 counterpart in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N) m-2 yr-1 averaged over regional to continental-scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~ 30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (circa 2000). However, sulfur deposition rates in 2100 are in all regions lower than in 2000 in all the RCPs. The new

  9. Boiling of water in flow restricted areas modeled by colloidal silica deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefevre, Gregory; Coudert, Francois-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the effects of particle deposits on evaporation and boiling of water represents an important issue for EDF because it causes a severe reduction in efficiency particularly in steam generators of pressurized water reactor. These deposits are made of oxide metallic particles and the deposition process depends on multiple factors. Here we mimic deposits using a simple system made of hydrophilic silica particles. The present study reports experiments on evaporation or boiling of water confined in the pores of colloidal mono-dispersed silica micro-sphere deposits. The boiling of water confined in the pores of the colloidal crystal is studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, water adsorption through infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. By comparison of the results with silica deposits and alumina membranes with cylindrical pores, our study shows that the morphology of the pores contributes to the evaporation and boiling of water. The measurements suggest that particle resuspension and crust formation take place during drying at elevated temperature and are responsible for cracks formation within the deposit film. (authors)

  10. Modelling the effects of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen deposition on selected lakes and streams of the Central Alps (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic model MAGIC was calibrated and applied to selected sites in north-western Italy (3 rivers, 10 alpine lakes to predict the future response of surface water to different scenarios of atmospheric deposition of S and N compounds. Results at the study sites suggest that several factors other than atmospheric deposition may influence the long-term changes in surface water chemistry. At present the lumped approach of dynamic models such as MAGIC cannot represent all the processes occurring at the catchment scale. Climate warming in particular and its effects on surface water chemistry proved to be important in the study area. Furthermore the river catchments considered here showed clear signs of N saturation. This condition and the increasing concentrations of NO3 in river water were simulated using N dynamics recently included in MAGIC. The modelling performed in this study represents the first application of MAGIC to Italian sites. The results show that inclusion of other factors specific to the Mediterranean area, such as dust deposition and climate change, may improve the fit to observed data and the reliability of the model forecast. Despite these limitations, the model captured well the main trends in chemical data in both rivers and lakes. The outputs clearly demonstrate the benefits of achieving the emission reductions in both S and N compounds as agreed under the Gothenburg Protocol rather than making no further emission reductions. It was also clear that, besides the substantial reduction of SO4 deposition from the peak levels of the 1980s, N deposition must also be reduced in the near future to protect freshwaters from further acidification. Keywords: MAGIC, northern Italy, acidification, recovery, nitrogen saturation

  11. Models for financial crisis detection in Indonesia based on bank deposits, real exchange rate and terms of trade indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyanto; Zukhronah, Etik; Nur Aini, Anis

    2017-12-01

    Several times Indonesia has experienced to face a financial crisis, but the crisis occurred in 1997 had a tremendous impact on the economy and national stability. The impact of the crisis fall the exchange rate of rupiah against the dollar so it is needed the financial crisis detection system. Some data of bank deposits, real exchange rate and terms of trade indicators are used in this paper. Data taken from January 1990 until December 2016 are used to form the models with three state. Combination of volatility and Markov switching models are used to model the data. The result suggests that the appropriate model for bank deposit and terms of trade is SWARCH (3,1), and for real exchange rates is SWARCH (3,2).

  12. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose. (paper)

  13. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  14. Modeling Non-Fickian Transport and Hyperexponential Deposition for Deep Bed Filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    coefficients. For such cases the elliptic equation excels the advection dispersion equation in both fitting breakthrough curves and predicting deposition profiles related to natural or highly heterogeneous porous media. The deposition hyperexponentiality can be caused by the following three mechanisms...... influencing breakthrough curves and deposition profiles for the deep bed filtration systems. Results are compared with a large set of experimental observations. Our findings show that highly dispersed breakthrough curves, e.g. those with early arrivals and large ending tails, correspond to large dispersion...

  15. Fluid flow and reactive mass transport modeling of reducing mechanisms in the formation of unconformity-related uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Unconformity-related uranium deposits in sedimentary basins represent the most important and profitable deposits among other types of uranium deposits, however their origin is still not fully understood. To better understand their formation, and in particular to address possible reducing mechanisms in the precipitation of uraninite, we develop a highly conceptualized 2-D model that fully couples fluid flow and heat transfer with reactive mass transport. We consider a series of numerical scenarios and examine the effect of graphite zone and Fe-rich silicates as the carbon-based and the inorganic-based reducing agents on the ore genesis. Our numerical results reveal that both the reducing mechanisms can lead to the precipitation of uraninite below the unconformity interface away from the faulted zone. Physiochemical parameters such as oxygen fugacity and temperature play a significant role in localization of the uraninite. Localization of these deposits is in relation to the decrease of oxygen fugacity, generally resulting from the interaction of oxidized uranium-bearing fluids with the reductants. Uraninites precipitate simultaneously with hematite in the areas experiencing reduction of oxygen fugacity and having a temperature of 180-200°C and a pH of 2.5- 4.5. Wide-spread alteration halos in the basement and around the uranium deposit include hematite, Mg-chlorite, and muscovite associated with minor amounts of pyrite and K-feldspar alteration. These results have important geological and exploration implications. (author)

  16. 3D geostatistical modelling for identifying sinkhole disaster potential zones around the Verkhnekamskoye potash deposit (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, J. J.; Litaudon, J.; Filippov, L. O.; Lyubimova, T.; Maximovich, N.

    2017-07-01

    This work results from a cooperative scientific program between the Perm State University (Russia) and the University of Lorraine (France). Its objectives are to integrate modern 3D geomodeling in order to improve sustainable mining extraction, especially for predicting and avoiding the formation of sinkholes disaster potential zones. Systematic exploration drill holes performed in the Verkhnekamskoye potash deposit (Perm region, Russia) have been used to build a comprehensive 3D model for better understanding the spatial repartition of the ore quality (geometallurgy). A precise modelling of the mineralized layers allows an estimation of the in-situ ore reserves after interpolating by kriging the potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) contents at the node of a regular centred grid (over a million cells). Total resources in potassium vary according to the cut-off between 4.7Gt @ 16.1 % K2O; 0.32 % MgCl2 for a cut-off grade at 13.1% K2O and 2.06 Gt @ 18.2 % K2O; 0.32 % MgCl2 at a cut-off of 16.5% K2O. Most of reserves are located in the KPI, KPII and KPIII layers, the KPI being the richest, and KPIII the largest in terms of tonnage. A systematic study of the curvature calculated along the roof of the mineralized layers points out the location of potential main faults which play a major role in the formation of sinkhole during exploitation. A risk map is then derived from this attribute.

  17. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from ~18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size. Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  18. Investigating the influence of infill percentage on the mechanical properties of fused deposition modelled ABS parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Álvarez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a manufacturing process that is usually used for modeling and prototyping. One of the most popular printing techniques is fused deposition modeling (FDM, which is based on adding melted material layer by layer. Although FDM has several advantages with respect to other manufacturing materials, there are several problems that have to be faced. When setting the printing options, several parameters have to be taken into account, such as temperature, speed, infill percentage, etc. Selecting these parameters is often a great challenge for the user, and is generally solved by experience without considering the influence of variations in the parameters on the mechanical properties of the printed parts.This article analyzes the influence of the infill percentage on the mechanical properties of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene printed parts. In order to characterize this influence, test specimens for tensile strength and Charpy tests were printed with a Makerbot Replicator 2X printer, in which the infill percentage was varied but the rest of the printing parameters were kept constant. Three different results were analyzed for these tests: tensile strength, impact resistance, and effective printing time. Results showed that the maximum tensile force (1438N and tensile stress (34,57MPa were obtained by using 100% infill. The maximum impact resistance, 1,55J, was also obtained with 100% infill. In terms of effective printing time, results showed that printing with an infill range between 50% and 98% is not recommended, since the effective printing time is higher than with a 100% infill and the tensile strength and impact resistance are smaller. In addition, in comparing the results of our analysis with results from other authors, it can be concluded that the printer type and plastic roll significantly influence the mechanical properties of ABS parts.

  19. Low temperature fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing of thermolabile drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollamaram, Gayathri; Croker, Denise M; Walker, Gavin M; Goyanes, Alvaro; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2018-04-26

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) is the most commonly investigated 3D printing technology for the manufacture of personalized medicines, however, high temperatures associated with the process limit its wider application. The objective of this study was to print low-melting and thermolabile drugs by reducing the FDM printing temperature. Two immediate release polymers, Kollidon VA64 and Kollidon 12PF were investigated as potential candidates for low-temperature FDM printing. Ramipril was used as the model low melting temperature drug (109°C); to the authors' knowledge this is the lowest melting point drug investigated to date by FDM printing. Filaments loaded with 3% drug were obtained by hot melt extrusion at 70°C and ramipril printlets with a dose equivalent of 8.9 mg were printed at 90°C. HPLC analysis confirmed that the drug was stable with no signs of degradation and dissolution studies revealed that drug release from the printlets reached 100% within 20 to 30 mins. Variable temperature Raman and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy techniques were used to evaluate drug stability over the processing temperature range. These data indicated that ramipril did not undergo degradation below its melting point (which is above the processing temperature range: 70-90 °C) but it was transformed into the impurity diketopiperazine upon exposure to temperatures higher than its melting point. The use of the excipients Kollidon VA64 and Kollidon 12PF in FDM was further validated by printing with the drug 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA), which in previous work was reported to undergo degradation in FDM printing, but here it was found to be stable. This work demonstrates that the selection and use of new excipients can overcome one of the major disadvantages in FDM printing, drug degradation due thermal heating, making this technology suitable for drugs with lower melting temperatures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Performance evaluation of paper embossing tools produced by fused deposition modelling additive manufacturing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Delić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available From its beginnings, up to a few years ago, additive manufacturing technology was able to produce models or prototypes which have limited use, because of materials mechanical properties. With advancement and invention of new materials, this is changing. Now, it is possible to create 3D prints that can be used as final products or functional tools, using technology and materials with low environmental impact. The goal of this study was to examine opportunities for production of paper embossing tools by fused deposition modelling (FDM 3D printing. This study emphasises the use of environmentally friendly poly-lactic acid (PLA materials in FDM technology, contrary to the conventional method using metal alloys and acids. Embossing of line elements and letters using 3D printed embossing tools was done on six different types of paper. Embossing force was applied using SHIMADZU EZ-LX Compact Tabletop Testing Machine. Each type of paper was repeatedly embossed using different values of embossing force (in 250 N increments, starting at 1000 N to determine the optimal embossing force for each specific paper type. When determined, the optimal embossing force was used on ten samples for each paper type. Results of embossing were analysed and evaluated. The analysis consisted of investigating the effects of the applied embossing force and characteristics such as paper basis weight, paper structure, surface characteristic and fibre direction of the paper. Results show that paper characteristics determine the embossing force required for achieving a good embossing result. This means that with the right amount of embossing force, letters and borderlines can be equally well formed by the embossing process regardless of paper weight, surface characteristics, etc. Embossing tools produced in this manner can be used in case of the embossing elements that are not complex. The reason for this is the limitation of FDM technology and lack of precision needed for fine

  1. Stratigraphic model deposit Ofi Inf SDZ-2X A1, Jun in block in Orinoco Oil belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, E.; Sandoval, D.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the Stratigraphic model deposit O fi I nf SDZ-2X A1, Junin block in Orinoco Oil belt.This model was based on a chrono stratigraphic interpretation and was defined the correlation between the main and secondary surfaces. The wells of the study area pass through the Cambrian, Cretaceous and Miocene sediments. The last is more interesting for the study because of the stratigraphic and sand body surface presence

  2. Uranium metallogenic model related to CO2 and hydrocarbon in granite type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Guangxi; Chen Anfu; Cui Jianyong; Xu Yinhuan; Wang Chunhua; Xu Yan

    2001-01-01

    The report is concerned with the inseparable connections between the uranium migration, enrichment rule and the geochemical characteristics of CO 2 and hydrocarbon gas, as well as the relations between the deposit locations and the gas abnormal distribution in rocky body, which are based on the analysis of some data and phenomena in 11 typical deposits in 2 granite type uranium ore fields, including the observations of 250 rocky fluid inclusion sections and the analyzed data of which 2470 are in gas composition, 200 in uranium content, 50 in thermometry. All the conclusions are drawn from different angles for the first time and this new exploration and advancement fills up the blank of gas geochemistry study in uranium deposits or other metal deposits

  3. Modelling the erosion/deposition pattern of the Tore Supra Toroidal Pumped Limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotis, S.; Pégourié, B.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Gunn, J.; Marandet, Y.; Mellet, N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at understanding the main processes responsible for the erosion/deposition pattern observed on the surface of the Toroidal Pumped Limiter of Tore Supra, using the 3D local impurity transport code ERO. The influence of the plasma impurity content, CX-flux and surface temperature on the global carbon balance and erosion/deposition pattern is discussed. Main results are (1) that considering medium-range transport of C ions is mandatory for reproducing the main characteristics of the global C balance and erosion/deposition pattern, (2) that impurities and CX-atoms increase the erosion by a factor ⩽2 (without changing the net/gross erosion ratio), and (3) that chemical erosion is governed by the re-erosion of deposits, which depends strongly on the surface temperature

  4. Assessment of different polymers and drug loads for fused deposition modeling of drug loaded implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempin, Wiebke; Franz, Christian; Koster, Lynn-Christine; Schneider, Felix; Bogdahn, Malte; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne

    2017-06-01

    The 3D printing technique of fused deposition modeling® (FDM) has lately come into focus as a potential fabrication technique for pharmaceutical dosage forms and medical devices that allows the preparation of delivery systems with nearly any shape. This is particular promising for implants administered at application sites with a high anatomical variability where an individual shape adaption appears reasonable. In this work different polymers (Eudragit®RS, polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and ethyl cellulose (EC)) were evaluated with respect to their suitability for FDM of drug loaded implants and their drug release behaviour was evaluated. The fluorescent dye quinine was used as a model drug to visualize drug distribution in filaments and implants. Quinine loaded filaments were produced by solvent casting and subsequent hot melt extrusion (HME) and model implants were printed as hollow cylinders using a standard FDM printer. Parameters were found at which model implants (hollow cylinders, outer diameter 4-5mm, height 3mm) could be produced from all tested polymers. The drug release which was examined by incubation of the printed implants in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) pH 7.4 was highly dependent on the used polymer. The fastest relative drug release of approximately 76% in 51days was observed for PCL and the lowest for Eudragit®RS and EC with less than 5% of quinine release in 78 and 100days, respectively. For PCL further filaments were prepared with different quinine loads ranging from 2.5% to 25% and thermal analysis proved the presence of a solid dispersion of quinine in the polymer for all tested concentrations. Increasing the drug load also increased the overall percentage of drug released to the medium since nearly the same absolute amount of quinine remained trapped in PCL at the end of drug release studies. This knowledge is valuable for future developments of printed implants with a desired drug release profile that might be

  5. A diagnostic evaluation of modeled mercury wet depositions in Europe using atmospheric speciated high-resolution observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieser, J; De Simone, F; Gencarelli, C; Geyer, B; Hedgecock, I; Matthias, V; Travnikov, O; Weigelt, A

    2014-01-01

    This study is part of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS), a European FP7 project dedicated to the improvement and validation of mercury models to assist in establishing a global monitoring network and to support political decisions. One key question about the global mercury cycle is the efficiency of its removal out of the atmosphere into other environmental compartments. So far, the evaluation of modeled wet deposition of mercury was difficult because of a lack of long-term measurements of oxidized and elemental mercury. The oxidized mercury species gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particle-bound mercury (PBM) which are found in the atmosphere in typical concentrations of a few to a few tens pg/m(3) are the relevant components for the wet deposition of mercury. In this study, the first European long-term dataset of speciated mercury taken at Waldhof/Germany was used to evaluate deposition fields modeled with the chemistry transport model (CTM) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) and to analyze the influence of the governing parameters. The influence of the parameters precipitation and atmospheric concentration was evaluated using different input datasets for a variety of CMAQ simulations for the year 2009. It was found that on the basis of daily and weekly measurement data, the bias of modeled depositions could be explained by the bias of precipitation fields and atmospheric concentrations of GOM and PBM. A correction of the modeled wet deposition using observed daily precipitation increased the correlation, on average, from 0.17 to 0.78. An additional correction based on the daily average GOM and PBM concentration lead to a 50% decrease of the model error for all CMAQ scenarios. Monthly deposition measurements were found to have a too low temporal resolution to adequately analyze model deficiencies in wet deposition processes due to the nonlinear nature of the scavenging process. Moreover, the general overestimation of atmospheric GOM by the CTM

  6. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - I: Air pollution and deposition in a desert environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations and atmospheric dry deposition were monitored seasonally at the Salton Sea, southern California. Measurements of ozone (O 3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) were performed using passive samplers. Deposition rates of NO 3-, NH4+, Cl-, SO 42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ to creosote bush branches and nylon filters as surrogate surfaces were determined for one-week long exposure periods. Maximum O3 values were recorded in spring with 24-h average values of 108.8 ??g m-3. Concentrations of NO and NO2 were low and within ranges of the non-urban areas in California (0.4-5.6 and 3.3-16.2 ??g m-3 ranges, respectively). Concentrations of HNO3 (2.0-6.7 ??g m-3) and NH 3 (6.4-15.7 ??g m-3) were elevated and above the levels typical for remote locations in California. Deposition rates of Cl-, SO42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ were related to the influence of sea spray or to suspended soil particles, and no strong enrichments caused by ions originated by human activities were detected. Dry deposition rates of NO3- and NH4+ were similar to values registered in areas where symptoms of nitrogen saturation and changes in species composition have been described. Deposition of nitrogenous compounds might be contributing to eutrophication processes at the Salton Sea. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Christmas Island lagoonal lakes, models for the deposition of carbonate–evaporite–organic laminated sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Trichet , Jean; Défarge , Christian; Tribble , J.; Tribble , G.W.; Sansone , F.J.

    2001-01-01

    The atoll of Christmas Island (now known as Kiritimati) in the Kiribati Republic (Central Pacific) lies at about 2°N in the intertropical convergence zone. Much of the surface area of the atoll (ca. 360 km2) is occupied by numerous lakes in which carbonate, evaporite (calcium sulfate, halite) and organic layers are deposited. Observations suggest that deposition of these different laminae is controlled by climatic and biologic factors. It is thought that periodic climatic variations, such as ...

  8. Modelling of local carbon deposition on rough test limiter exposed to the edge plasma of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Shuyu; Sun Jizhong; Wang Dezhen; Kirschner, A.; Matveev, D.; Borodin, D.; Bjoerkas, C.

    2013-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo code called SURO has been developed to study the influence of surface roughness on the impurity deposition characteristic in fusion experiments. SURO uses the test particle approach to describe the impact of background plasma and the deposition of impurity particles on a sinusoidal surface. The local impact angle and dynamic change of surface roughness as well as surface concentrations of different species due to erosion and deposition are taken into account. Coupled with 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO, SURO was used to study the impact of surface roughness on 13 C deposition in 13 CH 4 injection experiments in TEXTOR. The simulations showed that the amount of net deposited 13 C species increases with surface roughness. Parameter studies with varying 12 C and 13 C fluxes were performed to gain insight into impurity deposition characteristic on the rough surface. Calculations of the exposure time needed for surface smoothing for TEXTOR and ITER were also carried out for different scenarios. (author)

  9. Joint analysis of deposition fluxes and atmospheric concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and sulphur compounds predicted by six chemistry transport models in the frame of the EURODELTAIII project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, M. G.; Bessagnet, B.; Cuvelier, C.; Theobald, M. R.; Tsyro, S.; Pirovano, G.; Aulinger, A.; Bieser, J.; Calori, G.; Ciarelli, G.; Manders, A.; Mircea, M.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Briganti, G.; Cappelletti, A.; Colette, A.; Couvidat, F.; D'Isidoro, M.; Kranenburg, R.; Meleux, F.; Menut, L.; Pay, M. T.; Rouïl, L.; Silibello, C.; Thunis, P.; Ung, A.

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the UNECE Task Force on Measurement and Modelling (TFMM) under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP), the EURODELTAIII project is evaluating how well air quality models are able to reproduce observed pollutant air concentrations and deposition fluxes in Europe. In this paper the sulphur and nitrogen deposition estimates of six state-of-the-art regional models (CAMx, CHIMERE, EMEP MSC-W, LOTOS-EUROS, MINNI and CMAQ) are evaluated and compared for four intensive EMEP measurement periods (25 Feb-26 Mar 2009; 17 Sep-15 Oct 2008; 8 Jan-4 Feb 2007 and 1-30 Jun 2006). For sulphur, this study shows the importance of including sea salt sulphate emissions for obtaining better model results; CMAQ, the only model considering these emissions in its formulation, was the only model able to reproduce the high measured values of wet deposition of sulphur at coastal sites. MINNI and LOTOS-EUROS underestimate sulphate wet deposition for all periods and have low wet deposition efficiency for sulphur. For reduced nitrogen, all the models underestimate both wet deposition and total air concentrations (ammonia plus ammonium) in the summer campaign, highlighting a potential lack of emissions (or incoming fluxes) in this period. In the rest of campaigns there is a general underestimation of wet deposition by all models (MINNI and CMAQ with the highest negative bias), with the exception of EMEP, which underestimates the least and even overestimates deposition in two campaigns. This model has higher scavenging deposition efficiency for the aerosol component, which seems to partly explain the different behaviour of the models. For oxidized nitrogen, CMAQ, CAMx and MINNI predict the lowest wet deposition and the highest total air concentrations (nitric acid plus nitrates). Comparison with observations indicates a general underestimation of wet oxidized nitrogen deposition by these models, as well as an overestimation of total air concentration for

  10. Synoptic evaluation of modelled and bioindicated atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in forests; Synoptische Auswertung modellierter atmosphaerischer Eintraege von Schwermetallen und deren Indikation durch Biomonitore in Waeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Stefan; Schroeder, Winfried [Vechta Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Landschaftsoekologie; Fries, Caroline [PlanWerk - Buero fuer oekologische Fachplanungen, Nidda (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Heavy metals (HM) concentrations in moss, leaves and needles and organic surface soil layers, derived from the European Moss Survey, the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) and the ICP Forests were compared with those from deposition modelling by use of LOTOS-EUROS (LE) and EMEP/MSCE-HM in terms of their spatial patterns and temporal trends. The total atmospheric deposition differs considerably between the two models. HM concentrations in biomonitors (moss, leaves, and needles) were found to be predominantly higher correlated to deposition modelled by LE compared to EMEP. For Cd, strongest correlations could be found between deposition data calculated by LE and concentrations in moss (Europe, geostatistically estimated) and in needles (Germany). Regarding Pb, the coefficients of correlation came out to be the highest for EMEP deposition and measured element concentrations in moss (Europe) as well as for LE deposition and needles from ICP Forests Level II (Germany) and, respectively, leaves from ESB (Germany).

  11. Size- and concentration-dependent deposition of fluorescent silica colloids in saturated sand columns: transport experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M F; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the size and concentration effects on the transport of silica colloids in columns of sandy aquifer material. Colloid transport experiments were performed with specifically developed fluorescent labeled silica colloids in columns of a repacked natural porous medium under hydro-geochemical conditions representative of sandy aquifers. Breakthrough curves and vertical deposition profiles of colloids were measured for various colloid concentrations and sizes. The results showed that for a given colloid concentration injected, deposition increased when increasing the size of the colloids. For a given colloid size, retention was also shown to be highly concentration-dependent with a non-monotonous pattern presenting low and high concentration specificities. Deposition increases when increasing both size and injected concentration, until a threshold concentration is reached, above which retention decreases, thus increasing colloid mobility. Results observed above the threshold concentration agree with a classical blocking mechanism typical of a high concentration regime. Results observed at lower colloid concentrations were not modeled with a classical blocking model and a depth- and time-dependent model with a second order kinetic law was necessary to correctly fit the experimental data in the entire range of colloid concentrations with a single set of parameters for each colloidal size. The colloid deposition mechanisms occuring at low concentrations were investigated through a pore structure analysis carried out with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and image analysis. The determined pore size distribution permitted estimation of the maximal retention capacity of the natural sand as well as some low flow zones. Altogether, these results stress the key role of the pore space geometry of the sand in controlling silica colloids deposition under hydro-geochemical conditions typical of sandy aquifers. Our results also showed originally that colloid

  12. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Faure, Pamela; Lafolie, François; Rodts, Stéphane; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Coussot, Philippe; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-15

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in addition to particle breakthrough curves (BTCs), for testing and improving colloid transport models. We show that concentrations could not be simply computed from MRI data when both deposited and suspended colloids contributed to the signal. We propose a generic method whereby these data can still be used to quantitatively appraise colloid transport models. It uses the modeled suspended and deposited particle concentrations to compute modeled MRI data that are compared to the experimental data. We tested this method by performing transport experiments with sorbing colloids in sand, and assessed for the first time the capacity of the model calibrated from BTCs to reproduce the MRI data. Interestingly, the dispersion coefficient and deposition rate calibrated from the BTC were respectively overestimated and underestimated compared with those calibrated from the MRI data, suggesting that these quantities, when determined from BTCs, need to be interpreted with care. In a broader perspective, we consider that combining MRI and modeling offers great potential for the quantitative analysis of complex MRI data recorded during transport experiments in complex environmentally relevant porous media, and can help improve our understanding of the fate of colloids and solutes, first in these media, and later in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The feasibility study on fabrication customized orthotic insole using fused deposition modelling (FDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwindran, M.; Ibrahim, M.; Raveverma, P.

    2017-04-01

    There are many important roles of the orthotic insoles, such as for the convenience purpose of diabetic patient's foot problem, and also to enhance athlete's performance in sports. Therefore, highly customised insoles were in demand, where it has to be fabricated by moulding plaster of Paris on the person's leg to customise the insole. The main purpose of the paper is to study the ability to implement additive manufacturing technology in the fabrication process of customised orthotics insole. The recent invention of flexible material (Filaflex) in Fused Deposition Modelling is the most significant reason that makes this fabrication process possible. By implementing a new approach to the 3D scanning of the foot, we produced the computer-aided drafting (CAD) drawing which was able to modify to desired shape and dimension. After the editing has been completed, the file was converted to Stereolithography format file (STL) as to enable it to be printed using Makerware or any other related software by sending command (G-code) to Flashforge 3D printer. The printed insole was tested its fit, form and function (also known as 3F). In the end, printed insole performs the function test which measures the plantar pressure of the foot compared with bare foot. The results show that the insole distributes pressure well throughout the foot surface, in which it reduced the peak pressure to half from 218KPa to 109KPa. Hence, it is concluded that the method proposed in this paper can produce a functional insole so that it can be the alternative way to make customised orthotic insoles.

  14. Deposits from Multiple Shallow Discrete Blasts with Variable Explosion Depths: Analog Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G.; Sonder, I.

    2014-12-01

    The reconstruction of eruptive processes from ejecta deposits is a vital element of volcano hazard assessment. Large-scale experiments provide an opportunity to test ejecta distribution and volume to energy and depth parameters for discrete blasts. Experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo Geohazards Field Station produced meter-scale craters with ejecta deposits. Repeated chemical explosions occurred in constructed strata of compacted aggregates (e.g. sands, gravels) with variable configurations. The experiments revealed that shallow blasts, low scaled depth ( 2x crater radius). Each experiment had between one and four explosions in the same horizontal positions (pad), with variable charge depth and energy. The extra-crater deposits were collected up to 18 m from the blast center. Ejecta produced by discrete explosions can be divided into three zones: proximal, medial and distal. The proximal deposits form a constructional feature around the crater. Medial ejecta forms a thin continuous blanket and distal ejecta consists of isolated clasts scattered beyond the medial blanket. A strong relationship between the shape of the jet produced by shallow blasts and the distribution of ejecta were reproduced through the multiple experiments. The jet shape is controlled by crater geometry and condition. Therefore, crater geometry and condition influences ejecta distribution. Blasts that interact with an existing crater have more vertically focused jets. The elevation of the crater rim, enhanced by proximal deposits, contributes to future depositional patterns by producing confined jets. Small discrete blasts frequently have >50% of their volume in the proximal zone. These experiments show that deposit distribution is sensitive to surface geometries in addition to the energy and depth of the blast.

  15. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation historical and projected changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, D.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-03-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr-1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr-1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr-1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N) m-2 yr-1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50 % larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  16. Determination of Operation Condition and Product Dimension Accuracy Optimization of Filament Deposition Modelling on Layer Manufacturing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Widyanto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Layer manufacturing process has proven as a process that can produce a high complexity mechanical part. Now, Improvement of LM methods continuously conduct that is aimed to increase precessions and efficiency of these processes. Pressure filament deposition modelling is a form of layer manufacturing process that is designed to produce a plastic part with controlling its semisolid phase. In this research, the equipment of filament depositor is designed and tested to make the product filament deposition. With operation condition observation, the optimal temperature and pressure of deposition process was determined. These experiments used PVC as crystalline material and  polypropylene as amorphous material. To optimize this process, the tensile strength and density test were conducted. The shape of tensile test specimens is based on ASTM 638 standard and made in 3 orientations deposition path, namely: in 0 degree, 45 degree and 90 degree from load force axis. To found the most accurate dimension, controlling the time delay, temperature of build part, feeding speed and variation deposition path was conducted. The results of experiments show that the filament deposition method can only be applied for amorphous material in which it has a semisolid phase. From the tensile strength test, the binding strength among filaments is 0.5 kg/mm2, 20% of the tensile strength of filament. And the density of a sample product, which used the filament diameter of 0.8 mm, is 0.7668 g/cm3. Accuracy of product dimension can be increased by: controlling time delay in location where the motion orientation of hopper filament is changed and controlling temperature of build part surface.

  17. The polar layered deposits on Mars: Inference from thermal inertia modeling and geologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    It is widely believed that the Martian polar layered deposits record climate variations over at least the last 10 to 100 m.y., but the details of the processes involved and their relative roles in layer formation and evolution remain obscure. Weathering of the Martian layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the thermal inertias, water vapor abundances, and geologic relationships observed in the Martian polar regions. The nonvolatile components of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particles upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. This scenario for the origin and evolution of the dark material within the polar layered deposits is consistent with the available imaging and thermal data. Further experimental measurements of the thermophysical properties of magnetite and maghemite under Martian conditions are needed to better test this hypothesis.

  18. Full title page pp iii Modeling erosion and overbank deposition during extreme flood conditions on the Carson River, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R. W. H.; Warwick, J. J.; James, A. I.; Miller, J. R.

    2004-09-01

    The Carson River in west-central Nevada is one of the most mercury contaminated fluvial systems in North America. Most of its mercury is affiliated with channel bank material and floodplain deposits, with the movement of mercury through this system being highly dependent on sediment transport processes, particularly during overbank flows. To simulate these extreme situations, a United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) hydrodynamic model (RIVMOD) was modified to include the 'divided channel approach' to estimate floodplain depths and velocities. The RIVMOD code was also augmented to allow dynamic width increases in the channel. Calibrated bank erosion functions, developed for the US EPA water quality model (WASP5), suggest that bank erosion is significantly greater at flows above bankfull discharge when compared to flows confined to the main channel. Verification of the bank erosion model matched observed width increases in 7 out of 10 reaches, with general trends matched in two of the remaining three reaches. Results also indicate that a single major flood event is responsible for nearly 87% of the total mass eroded during the period from 1991 to 1997. Overbank deposition was modeled using separate functions for coarse suspended sediment and washload material. Overbank deposition results are also in good agreement with observed values.

  19. The hydrological response to precipitations of a layered shallow sloping deposit: physical experiments and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Emilia; Greco, Roberto; Guida, Andrea; Olivares, Lucio; Picarelli, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    Although rainfall-induced landslides are frequent, so that they can be probably considered the most widespread natural hazards, fortunately the occurrence of an extreme rainfall event only rarely corresponds to the triggering of landslides. This is due to the fact that slopes, although often considered as separated systems in the stability analyses, are actually part of a larger, more complex hydrological system, with which continuously exchange water. Indeed, most of the slopes do not fail, and when they are subjected to heavy precipitation, effective draining mechanisms spontaneously develop, such as overland and subsurface runoff, and sometimes even new preferential flow paths originated by mechanical processes, such as piping erosion or deformation cracks. Hence, the triggering of a rainfall-induced landslide requires these dynamically evolving (non-linear) drainage processes to be incapable of releasing the excess of water (and pressure) accumulating within the slope. For the case of shallow sloping covers, the capability of the slope to effectively drain the infiltrating water depends on the hydraulic properties of the involved soils (hydraulic conductivity and water retention curves) and on the hydraulic boundary conditions (at the base of the cover, where it lays upon the bedrock, and at the foot of the slope), which are in turn strongly influenced by the initial moisture state (often indicated as a predisposing cause), owing to the non-linearity of the hydraulic processes. Such an already complex picture is furthermore complicated by heterogeneity. In this study, we focus our attention onto the effects of a layered soil cover with contrasting hydraulic properties on the infiltration and drainage processes in a shallow pyroclastic deposit. This is a typical situation along many pyroclastic-covered slopes of Campania (southern Italy), which present alternations of ashes (silty sands) and pumices (sands with gravel) deposited by volcanic eruptions, and where

  20. The rudist buildup depositional model, reservoir architecture and development strategy of the cretaceous Sarvak formation of Southwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the lithofacies, sedimentary facies, depositional models and reservoir architecture of the rudist-bearing Sar-3 zone of Cretaceous Sarvak in the Southwest of Iran by utilizing coring, thin section, XRD data of five coring wells and 3D seismic data. Research results include the following: According to lithofacies features and their association, the rudist-mound and tidal flat are the main microfacies in the Sar-3 depositional time. By investigating the regional tectonic setting and seismic interpretation, a depositional model was built for the Sar-3 zone, which highlights four key points: 1 The distribution of the rudist-buildup is controlled by the paleo-high. 2 The build-up outside of the wide colonize stage but reached the wave-base level in a short time by regression and formation uplift, and was destroyed by the high energy current, then forming the moundy allochthonous deposition after being dispersed and redeposited. 3 The tidal flat develops widely in the upper Sar-3, and the deposition thickness depends on the paleo-structure. The tidal channel develops in the valley and fringe of the Paleo-structure. 4 The exposure within the leaching effect by the meteoric water of the top of Sar-3 is the main controlling factor of the reservoir vertical architecture. The Sar-3 zone featured as the dualistic architecture consists of two regions: the lower is the rudist reef limestone reservoir and the upper is the tidal condense limestone interlayer. The thickness of each is controlled by the paleo-structure. The Paleo-high zone is the preferential development zone. Based on reservoir characteristics of the different zones, a targeted development strategy has been proposed. Keeping the trajectory in the middle of the oil-layer in the paleo-high, and in the paleo-low, make the trajectory crossing the oil-zone and then keep it in the lower.

  1. Use of regression‐based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Huggett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall‐season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall‐season surface‐water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface‐water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Data Set for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface‐water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface‐water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high‐elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high‐elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 μeq L−1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide

  2. Use of regression-based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D. W.; Nanus, L.; Huggett, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple-linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall-season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall-season surface-water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface-water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Dataset for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface-water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface-water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high-elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high-elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 µeq L-1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide development of

  3. Acidification in Three Lake District Tarns: Historical Iong term trends and modelled future behaviour under changing sulphate and nitrate deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Whitchead

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Three upland Lake District Tarns, Scoat, Greendale and Burnmoor, have been evaluated using MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater In Catchments to reconstruct past, present and future chemical behaviour. The modelled historical changes in acidity are compared with palaeoecological estimation of pH to demonstrate model validity. Chemistry as simulated for all anions and cations and two of the three lakes are shown to have undergone significant acidification. The effects of changing atmospheric pollution levels on lake chemistry is evaluated and 80-90% sulphur reduction levels are required to achieve zero alkalinity. The impacts of increased nitrogen deposition are assessed and are shown to further delay reversibility.

  4. Considerations on thermic and mechanic processes that appear when 3D printing using ABS fused deposition modelling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amza, Catalin Gheorghe; Niţoi, Dan Florin

    2018-02-01

    3D printers are of recent history, but with an extremely rapid evolution both in technology and hardware involved. At present excellent performances are reached in applications such as 3D printing of various Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic parts for house building using Fused Deposition Modelling technology. Nevertheless, the thermic and mechanic processes that appear when manufacturing such plastic components are quite complex. This aspect is very important, especially when one wants to optimize the manufacturing of parts with certain geometrical complexity. The Finite Element Analysis/Modelling (FEA/FEM) is among the few methods that can study the thermic transfer processes and shape modifications that can appear due to non-seamar behavior that takes place when the ABS plastic material is cooling down. The current papers present such an analysis when simulating the deposition of several strings of materials. A thermic analysis is made followed by a study of deformations that appear when the structure cools down.

  5. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  6. Discussion on geochemical characteristics, mechanism and prospecting model of gluey type sandstone uranium mineralization--taking Redwell uranium deposit as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinping

    1998-01-01

    Redwell uranium deposit hosted in the red clastic rock formation, is a typical example of gluey type uranium mineralization, which has not been reported so far in China. Based on the study of geochemical characteristics of Redwell deposit, the author discusses the genetic mechanism of this type deposits, and proposes the prospecting model of 4 in 1 of red bed-fault-oil gas-uranium source

  7. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Investigate Past Lead Atmospheric Deposition in Southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, C.; Monna, F.; Bichet, V.; Gauthier, E.; Richard, H.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to model atmospheric pollution lead fluxes using two different paleoenvironmental records, covering the last 2000 years, located in southern Greenland. Fifty five sediment samples from the Lake Igaliku sequence (61°00.403'N, 45°26.494'W) were analyzed for their Pb and Al contents, and for lead isotopic compositions. The second archive consists in a previously published dataset (Shotyk et al., 2003), including Zr and Pb concentrations, and lead isotopic compositions, obtained from a minerogenic peat deposit located 16 km northwest of Lake Igaliku (61°08.314'N, 45°33.703'W). As natural background concentrations are high and obliterate most of the airborne anthropogenic lead, it is not possible to isolate this anthropogenic contribution through time with classical methods (i.e. Pb is normalized to a lithogenic and conservative element). Moreover, the background 206Pb/207Pb ratio is rather noisy because of the wide geological heterogeneity of sediment sources, which further complicated unambiguous detection of the lead pollution. To overcome these difficulties, an inverse modeling approach based on assumptions about past lead inputs was applied. This method consists of simulating a range of anthropogenic fluxes to determine the best match between measured and simulated data, both for Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions. The model is validated by the coherence of the results obtained from the two independent datasets that must reflect a similar pollution history. Although notable 206Pb/207Pb ratio shifts suggest that the first signs of anthropogenic inputs may have occurred in the 15th century, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to significantly influence the sediment composition. Nevertheless we were able to estimate that anthropogenic lead fluxes did not exceed 2700 μg m-2 yr-1, a maximum value recorded during the 1960s. The comparison with other records from the North Atlantic Islands reveals a spatial gradient most likely due

  8. Modelling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoudias, T.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-01-01

    We modeled the global atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. The EMAC atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model was used, with circulation dynamics nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis data. We applied a resolution of approximately 0.5 degrees in latitude and longitude (T255). The model accounts for emissions and transport of the radioactive isotopes 131 I and 137 Cs, and removal processes through precipitation, particle sedimentation and dry deposition. In addition, we simulated the release of 133 Xe, a noble gas that can be regarded as a passive transport tracer of contaminated air. The source terms are based on Chino et al. (2011) and Stohl et al. (2012); especially the emission estimates of 131 I are associated with a high degree of uncertainty. The calculated concentrations have been compared to station observations by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO). We calculated that about 80% of the radioactivity from Fukushima which was released to the atmosphere deposited into the Pacific Ocean. In Japan a large inhabited land area was contaminated by more than 40 kBq m -2 . We also estimated the inhalation and 50-year dose by 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 131 I to which the people in Japan are exposed.

  9. Modelling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Christoudias

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the global atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. The EMAC atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model was used, with circulation dynamics nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis data. We applied a resolution of approximately 0.5 degrees in latitude and longitude (T255. The model accounts for emissions and transport of the radioactive isotopes 131I and 137Cs, and removal processes through precipitation, particle sedimentation and dry deposition. In addition, we simulated the release of 133Xe, a noble gas that can be regarded as a passive transport tracer of contaminated air. The source terms are based on Chino et al. (2011 and Stohl et al. (2012; especially the emission estimates of 131I are associated with a high degree of uncertainty. The calculated concentrations have been compared to station observations by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO. We calculated that about 80% of the radioactivity from Fukushima which was released to the atmosphere deposited into the Pacific Ocean. In Japan a large inhabited land area was contaminated by more than 40 kBq m-2. We also estimated the inhalation and 50-year dose by 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I to which the people in Japan are exposed.

  10. Statistical modelling of Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) deposits in wastewater pump sumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, E.M.; Post, J.A.B.; Duinmeijer, S.P.A.; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2018-01-01

    The accumulation of FOG (Fat, Oil and Grease) deposits in sewer pumping stations results in an increase in maintenance costs, malfunctioning of pumps and, a potential increase of wastewater spills in receiving open water bodies. It is thought that a variety of parameters (e.g. geometry of the

  11. Modelling land surface fluxes of CO2 in response to climate change and nitrogen deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Ambelas Skjøth, Carsten; Geels, Camilla

    Climate change, land use variations, and impacts of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition represent uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere as the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate...... climate feedback mechanisms of CO2 between changes in management, land use practise, and climate change....

  12. Modelling of Cohesive Sediment Transportation, Deposition and Resuspension in the Haringvliet Mouth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qinghua, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In the Dutch coastal zone, where the marine environment is characterized by shallow depths and highly energetic hydrodynamic conditions, the cohesive sediments, or mud, play an important role in the local morphology. For instance, mud deposits and high concentrations of suspended particulate matter

  13. Simple Mathematical Models of High Energy Ion Beam Assisted Deposition Concentration Profiles in Binary Thin Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, F.; Konvičková, S.; Jech, V.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2011), s. 8936-8942 ISSN 1533-4880 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : SILICON-NITRIDE FILMS * ENHANCED DEPOSITION * IBAD-PROCESS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.563, year: 2011

  14. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition and temperature on long-term DOC trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicka, Kasia; Rowe, E.C.; Evans, C.D.; Monteith, D.T.; Vanguelova, E.I.; Wade, A.J.; Clark, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that widespread and substantial increases in Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in remote surface, and soil, waters in recent decades are linked to declining acid deposition. Effects of rising pH and declining ionic strength on DOC solubility have been

  15. The use of a large-strain consolidation model to optimise multilift tailing deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Yao, Y.; Van Paassen, L.A.; Van Tol, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Thin-lift atmospheric fine drying (AFD) is a technique used to dewater mine and oil sand tailings, which utilises both self-weight consolidation and atmospheric evaporation. The disposed layers undergo a cyclic drying and rewetting process due to precipitation and deposition of additional lifts on

  16. Modelling Measured Deposition and Resuspension Rates of Particles in Animal Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, P.; Moser, A.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    on the surfaces is shown as a function of time. High contents of organic dust in animal buildings can affect the health of both people and animals. Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism to reduce the airborne particle concentration. As a basis to develop methods to eliminate dust related...

  17. BASIC Programming for the Integration of Money, Demand Deposits Creation, and the Hicksian-Keynesian Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, C. F. Joseph

    Money, banking, and macroeconomic textbooks traditionally present the topics of money, the creation of demand deposits by depository institutions, and the Hicksian-Keynesian Theory of Income and Interest separately, as if they were unrelated. This paper presents an integrated approach to those subjects using computer programs written in BASIC, the…

  18. Numerical modeling of the strand deposition flow in extrusion-based additive manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Serdeczny, Marcin P.; Pedersen, David B.

    2018-01-01

    -based additive manufacturing, as well as the surface roughness of the fabricated part. Under the assumptions of an isothermal Newtonian fluid and a creeping laminar flow, the deposition flow is controlled by two parameters: the gap distance between the extrusion nozzle and the substrate, and the velocity ratio...

  19. On the robustness of the geometrical model for cell wall deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diotallevi, F.; Mulder, B.M.; Grasman, J.

    2010-01-01

    All plant cells are provided with the necessary rigidity to withstand the turgor by an exterior cell wall. This wall is composed of long crystalline cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of other polysaccharides. The cellulose microfibrils are deposited by mobile membrane bound protein

  20. A global plasma model for reactive deposition of compound films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B. C.; Wu, Z. L.; Wu, B.; Li, Y. G.; Lei, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    A spatially averaged, time-dependent global plasma model has been developed to describe the reactive deposition of a TiAlSiN thin film by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharges in Ar/N2 mixture gas, based on the particle balance and the energy balance in the ionization region, and considering the formation and erosion of the compound at the target surface. The modeling results show that, with increasing the N2 partial pressure from 0% to 40% at a constant working pressure of 0.3 Pa, the electron temperature during the strongly ionized period increases from 4 to 7 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient, which represents the power fraction that effectively heats the electrons and maintains the discharge, increases from about 4% to 7%; with increasing the working pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa at a constant N2 partial pressure of 25%, the electron temperature decreases from 10 to 4 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient decreases from 8% to 5%. Using the modeled plasma parameters to evaluate the kinetic energy of arriving ions, the ion-to-neutral flux ratio of deposited species, and the substrate heating, the variations of process parameters that increase these values lead to an enhanced adatom mobility at the target surface and an increased input energy to the substrate, corresponding to the experimental observation of surface roughness reduction, the microstructure transition from the columnar structure to the dense featureless structure, and the enhancement of phase separation. At higher N2 partial pressure or lower working pressure, the modeling results demonstrate an increase in electron temperature, which shifts the discharge balance of Ti species from Ti+ to Ti2+ and results in a higher return fraction of Ti species, corresponding to the higher Al/Ti ratio of deposited films at these conditions. The modeling results are well correlated with the experimental observation of the composition variation and the microstructure

  1. Genetic and grade and tonnage models for sandstone-hosted roll-type uranium deposits, Texas Coastal Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan M.; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Tureck, Kathleen; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hannon, Mark

    2017-01-01

    with either (1) organic-rich debris adjacent to large long-lived fluvial channels and barrier–bar sequences or (2) extrinsic reductants entrained in formation water or discrete gas that migrated into host units via faults and along the flanks of salt domes and shale diapirs. The southwestern portion of the region, the Rio Grande embayment, contains all the necessary factors required for roll-type uranium deposits. However, the eastern portion of the region, the Houston embayment, is challenged by a humid environment and a lack of source rock and transmissive units, which may combine to preclude the deposition of economic deposits. A grade and tonnage model for the Texas Coastal Plain shows that the Texas deposits represent a lower tonnage subset of roll-type deposits that occur around the world, and required aggregation of production centers into deposits based on geologic interpretation for the purpose of conducting a quantitative mineral resource assessment.

  2. Geochemical modeling of orogenic gold deposit using PCANN hybrid method in the Alut, Kurdistan province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Mohammadjafar; Nasseri, Aynur

    2018-03-01

    In this paper stream sediments based geochemical exploration program with the aim of delineating potentially promising areas by a comprehensive stepwise optimization approach from univariate statistics, PCA, ANN, and fusion method PCANN were under taken for an orogenic gold deposit located in the Alut, Kurdistan province, NW of Iran. At first the data were preprocessed and then PCA were applied to determine the maximum variability directions of elements in the area. Subsequently the artificial neural network (ANN) was used for quick estimation of elemental concentration, as well as discriminating anomalous populations and intelligent determination of internal structure among the data. However, both the methods revealed constraints for modeling. To overcome the deficiency and shortcoming of each individual method a new methodology is presented by integration of both "PCA & ANN" referred as PCANN method. For integrating purpose, the detected PCs pertinent to ore mineralization selected and intruded to neural network structure, as a result different MLPs with various algorithms and structures were produced. The resulting PCANN maps suggest that the gold mineralization and its pathfinder elements (Au, Mo, W, Bi, Sb, Cu, Pb, Ag & As) are associated with metamorphic host rocks intruded by granite bodies in the Alut area. In addition, more concealed and distinct Au anomalies with higher intensity were detected, confirming the privileges of the method in evaluating susceptibility of the area in delineating new hidden potential zones. The proposed method demonstrates simpler network architecture, easy computational implementation, faster training speed, as well as no need to consider any primary assumption about the behavior of data and their probability distribution type, with more satisfactory predicting performance for generating gold potential map of the area. Comparing the results of three methods (PCA, ANN and PCANN), representing the higher efficiency and more

  3. Characterization of chemical contaminants generated by a desktop fused deposition modeling 3-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; LeBouf, Ryan F; Yi, Jinghai; Ham, Jason; Nurkewicz, Timothy; Schwegler-Berry, Diane E; Chen, Bean T; Wells, J Raymond; Duling, Matthew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Martin, Stephen B; Johnson, Alyson R; Virji, M Abbas

    2017-07-01

    Printing devices are known to emit chemicals into the indoor atmosphere. Understanding factors that influence release of chemical contaminants from printers is necessary to develop effective exposure assessment and control strategies. In this study, a desktop fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3-dimensional (3-D) printer using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) or polylactic acid (PLA) filaments and two monochrome laser printers were evaluated in a 0.5 m 3 chamber. During printing, chamber air was monitored for vapors using a real-time photoionization detector (results expressed as isobutylene equivalents) to measure total volatile organic compound (TVOC) concentrations, evacuated canisters to identify specific VOCs by off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, and liquid bubblers to identify carbonyl compounds by GC-MS. Airborne particles were collected on filters for off-line analysis using scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive x-ray detector to identify elemental constituents. For 3-D printing, TVOC emission rates were influenced by a printer malfunction, filament type, and to a lesser extent, by filament color; however, rates were not influenced by the number of printer nozzles used or the manufacturer's provided cover. TVOC emission rates were significantly lower for the 3-D printer (49-3552 µg h -1 ) compared to the laser printers (5782-7735 µg h -1 ). A total of 14 VOCs were identified during 3-D printing that were not present during laser printing. 3-D printed objects continued to off-gas styrene, indicating potential for continued exposure after the print job is completed. Carbonyl reaction products were likely formed from emissions of the 3-D printer, including 4-oxopentanal. Ultrafine particles generated by the 3-D printer using ABS and a laser printer contained chromium. Consideration of the factors that influenced the release of chemical contaminants (including known and suspected asthmagens such as styrene and

  4. Development of a rhesus monkey lung geometry model and application to particle deposition in comparison to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Rick; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Harkema, Jack; Carey, Stephan A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, Dallas; Kimbell, Julia S.; Miller, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 μm in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 μm for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model. PMID:23121298

  5. What do terrestrial biogeochemistry and chemical transport models tell us about the impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon and nitrogen cycling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, E. A.; Holland, E. A.

    2001-12-01

    Evaluation of the impact of increasing nitrogen deposition on terrestrial carbon uptake requires coupling of chemical transport models and terrestrial biogeochemistry models. Simulations with a series of models and coupling schemes combined with the measurements of nitrogen deposition p