WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling weed emergence

  1. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  2. Effects of three management strategies on the seedbank, emergence and the need for hand weeding in an organic arable cropping system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Kropff, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of three different weed management strategies on the required input of hand weeding in an arable organic farming system, the weed seedbank in the soil and the emerging weed seedling emergence were studied from 1996 to 2003. Strategies were based on population dynamic models and aimed for

  3. Quantifying the effect of crop spatial arrangement on weed suppression using functional-structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Jochem B; Bastiaans, Lammert

    2016-05-01

    Suppression of weed growth in a crop canopy can be enhanced by improving crop competitiveness. One way to achieve this is by modifying the crop planting pattern. In this study, we addressed the question to what extent a uniform planting pattern increases the ability of a crop to compete with weed plants for light compared to a random and a row planting pattern, and how this ability relates to crop and weed plant density as well as the relative time of emergence of the weed. To this end, we adopted the functional-structural plant modelling approach which allowed us to explicitly include the 3D spatial configuration of the crop-weed canopy and to simulate intra- and interspecific competition between individual plants for light. Based on results of simulated leaf area development, canopy photosynthesis and biomass growth of the crop, we conclude that differences between planting pattern were small, particularly if compared to the effects of relative time of emergence of the weed, weed density and crop density. Nevertheless, analysis of simulated weed biomass demonstrated that a uniform planting of the crop improved the weed-suppression ability of the crop canopy. Differences in weed suppressiveness between planting patterns were largest with weed emergence before crop emergence, when the suppressive effect of the crop was only marginal. With simultaneous emergence a uniform planting pattern was 8 and 15 % more competitive than a row and a random planting pattern, respectively. When weed emergence occurred after crop emergence, differences between crop planting patterns further decreased as crop canopy closure was reached early on regardless of planting pattern. We furthermore conclude that our modelling approach provides promising avenues to further explore crop-weed interactions and aid in the design of crop management strategies that aim at improving crop competitiveness with weeds.

  4. Reducing tillage intensity affects the cumulative emergence dynamics of annual grass weeds in winter cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, A; Melander, B; Jensen, P K

    2017-01-01

    Annual grass weeds such as Apera spica-venti and Vulpia myuros are promoted in non-inversion tillage systems and winter cereal-based crop rotations. Unsatisfactory weed control in these conditions is often associated with a poor understanding of the emergence pattern of these weed species. The ai...

  5. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Holst, Niels; Bøjer, Ole Mission

    2015-01-01

    , populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters...

  6. Descriptive and mechanistic models of crop–weed competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, L.; Storkey, J.

    2017-01-01

    Crop-weed competitive relations are an important element of agroecosystems. Quantifying and understanding them helps to design appropriate weed management at operational, tactical and strategic level. This chapter presents and discusses simple descriptive and more mechanistic models for crop-weed

  7. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, J; Holst, N; Bøjer, O Q; Bigongiali, F; Bocci, G; Colbach, N; Dorner, Z; Riemens, M M; Sartorato, I; Sønderskov, M; Verschwele, A

    2015-04-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed, populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters. These relationships were used to build a generic model, operating at the level of functional traits, to simulate the impact of increasing herbicide and fertiliser use on virtual weeds along gradients of seed weight and maximum height. The model generated 'fitness contours' (defined as population growth rates) within this trait space in different scenarios, onto which two sets of weed species, defined as common or declining in the UK, were mapped. The effect of increasing inputs on the weed flora was successfully simulated; 77% of common species were predicted to have stable or increasing populations under high fertiliser and herbicide use, in contrast with only 29% of the species that have declined. Future development of the WTDB will aim to increase the number of species covered, incorporate a wider range of traits and analyse intraspecific variability under contrasting management and environments.

  8. INFLUENCE OF CROPPING SYSTEM AND WEED MANAGEMENT PRACTICE ON EMERGENCE, GROWTH OF WEEDS, YIELD OF MAIZE (Zea mays L. AND COWPEA (Vigna unguiculata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ogar Takim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cropping system and weed management practice on weed seedling emergence, weed biomass production and yield of maize and cowpea were examined at Ilorin, in the southern Guinea savanna (9°29' N, 4°35' E and 307 m ASL of Nigeria. Weed emergence occurred throughout the 3-15 weeks after planting (WAP. Forty-three weed species belonging to 38 genera within 20 families were encountered. Fimbristylis littoralis Gaudet, Tridax procumbens L and Eleusine indica Gaertn were the most prevalent weed species. Cropping system and weed management practice significantly affected weed emergence. Significantly (p≤0.05 lower number of weeds emerged in the intercropped and herbicide treated plots while higher weed densities and weed biomass were recorded in the uncropped and unweeded control plots than in the other plots. While aggregate crop yields were significantly higher in the intercropped than in the sole plots, component crop yields were higher under the sole cropping than in the intercrop. The implication of the results on weed management is discussed.

  9. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Matloob, Amar; Mahajan, Gulshan; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Jha, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and weed management

  10. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagirath S. Chauhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and

  11. Evaluation of pre and post-emergence herbicides for weed management in lentil (lens culinaris medik.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Malik, S.R.; Munawwar, H.; Tahir, M.

    2014-01-01

    The weeds in lentil are one of the major constraints in obtaining maximum yield. The manual weed control is simply not feasible because it is time consuming and costly. The chemical weed control is the effective method of weed management.A field study was conducted to evaluate pre and post-emergence herbicides for weed control in lentil. The experiment comprised eight treatments including three herbicides, manual weeding and check (no weeding). The yield was higher in manual weeding but in herbicide treatments Isoproturon as pre-emergence at the rate 2kg/sup -1/ha produced statistically at par grain yield to that of manual weeding followed by Isoproturon after one month of planting at the rate 2kg ha. Both the treatments showed 193.9% and 109.2% yield increase, respectively, over the check. It indicates that Isoproturon at the rate 2 kg ha can be used pre or post-emergence in lentil fields to control the weeds without causing injury to lentil plants. (author)

  12. Demographic Modelling in Weed Biocontrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demographic matrix modeling of plant populations can be a powerful tool to identify key life stage transitions that contribute the most to population growth of an invasive plant and hence should be targeted for disruption. Therefore, this approach has the potential to guide the pre-release selection...

  13. Interactions between pre- and post-emergence weed harrowing in spring cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsæter, L.O.; Mangerud, K.; Rasmussen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    that pre- and post-emergence harrowing interact positively, that a combination gives more stable weed control effects than pre- and post-emergence weed harrowing used alone, and that a harrow type with bent tines is more aggressive and suitable on hard-packed soils than a harrow with strait tines...... harrowing used alone. Pre-emergence harrowing increased the average crop yield by 6.2%, post-emergence harrowing by 4.0% and the combined effect was 10%. Crop yield was mainly increased on hard-packed soils. Weed and crop responses varied strongly among experiments, but the efficacy of pre- and post...

  14. Evaluation of Selected Pre-Emergence Herbicides for Weed Control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pendimentalin had no significant effect on the plantlets across the rates tested. The best weed control was achieved with diuron applied at 25% and above, while the least weed control occurred on the control plot and these treated with 10% of atrazine and primextra Gold. However, there were no significant variations in the ...

  15. A Cost Model for Storage and Weeding Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gary S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a simple cost model to analyze trade-offs involved in considering storage and weeding as alternatives to new construction for academic libraries. References are provided, and the Palmour cost model is presented as an appendix. (RAA)

  16. The Role of Light in the Emergence of Weeds: Using Camelina microcarpa as an Example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz Royo-Esnal

    Full Text Available When modelling the emergence of weeds, two main factors are considered that condition this process: temperature and soil moisture. Optimum temperature is necessary for metabolic processes that generate energy for growth, while turgor pressure is necessary for root and shoot elongation which eventually leads to seedling emergence from the soil. Most emergence models do not usually consider light as a residual factor, but it could have an important role as it can alter directly or indirectly the dormancy and germination of seeds. In this paper, inclusion of light as an additional factor to photoperiod and radiation in emergence models is explored and compared with the classical hydrothermal time (HTT model using Camelina microcarpa as an example. HTT based on hourly estimates is also compared with that based on daily estimates. Results suggest that, although HTT based models are accurate enough for local applications, the precision of these models is improved when HTT is estimated hourly and solar radiation is included as a factor.

  17. Seawater: an alternative grassy weed control method for post emergence herbicides in tropical turfgrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.K.; Ismail, M.R.; Juraimi, A.S.; Hamdani, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Research was designed to reduce herbicide use by replacing post emergence herbicides with readily available sea water to control tropical turfgrass weeds. In studies evaluating the use of saline solutions for weed control, four salinity levels (0, 24, 48 and 72 dS m/sup -1/) were applied once to 30 grassy weed species, along with seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) (as a control) during December, 2007 to March, 2008. The results on injury ratings for salt tolerant weeds were categorized as highly susceptible, moderately susceptible and extremely tolerant. C. dactylon, E. indica, E. virescense, E. unioloides and I. globosa were very susceptible and found to be effectively controlled (100%) at 72 dS m/sup -1/ salinity treatment. However, two most serious weeds viz. wiry eragrostis (E. atrovirens) and lesser dropseed (S. diander), were found to be extremely tolerant, and were not controlled even at the highest salinity level of 72 dS m/sup -1/. P. vaginatum and E. atrovirens did not show significant decrease in shoot and root dry weight at highest salinity levels (72 dS m/sup -1/). The results indicate that sea water has excellent potential for sustainable control of several common grassy weeds in tropical turf. (author)

  18. Weed management through herbicide application in direct-seeded rice and yield modeling by artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D.; Singh, U.P.; Ray, K.; Das, A.

    2016-11-01

    In direct seeded rice (DSR) cultivation, weed is the major constraint mainly due to absence of puddling in field. The yield loss due to weed interference is huge, may be up to 100%. In this perspective, the present experiment was conducted to study the efficacy of selected herbicides, and to predict the rice yield using artificial neural network (ANN) models. The dry weight and density of weeds were recorded at different growth stages and consequently herbicidal efficacy was evaluated. Experimental results revealed that pre-emergence (PRE) herbicide effectively controlled the germination of grassy weeds. Application bispyribac-sodium as post-emergence (POST) following PRE herbicides (clomazone or pendimethalin) or as tank-mixture with clomazone effectively reduced the density and biomass accumulation of diverse weed flora in DSR. Herbicidal treatments improved the plant height, yield attributes and grain yield (2.7 to 5.5 times) over weedy check. The sensitivity of the best ANN model clearly depicts that the weed control index (WCI) of herbicides was most important than their weed control efficiency (WCE). Besides, the early control of weeds is a better prescription to improve rice yield. Differences in sensitivity values of WCI and WCE across the crop growth stages also suggest that at 15, 30 and 60 days after sowing, herbicides most effectively controlled sedges, broad leaves and grasses, respectively. Based on the grain yield and herbicidal WCE, it can be concluded that the combined application of pendimethalin or clomazone as PRE followed by bispyribac-sodium as POST or tank-mixture of clomazone + bispyribac sodium can effectively control different weed flushes throughout the crop growth period in DSR. (Author)

  19. Role of Weed Emergence Time for the Relative Seed Production in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Benvenuti

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Trials were carried out in 2000 and 2001 to investigate the effect of weed emergence time on weed seed production in a maize field. Datura stramonium L., Solanum nigrum L. and Abutilon theophrasti Medicus were selected for their importance as summer weeds. Emergence time was found to be crucial since delay would involve an unfavourable light environment determined by crop canopy elongation and resulting shade production. Only the early emergence of D. stramonium and A. theophrasti showed the capacity to exposing their leaves over the crop canopy. Generally the weed seed production under shade conditions decreased for the reduction of the fruit per plant since the number of seed per plant showed only a light reduction. However, while D. stramonium and A. theophrasti compete with the crop by increasing height, Solanum nigrum tends to adjust to shade without excessive reduction in number of seeds produced. Thus in D. stramonium and A. theophrasti late emergence reduced seed production to only 15%, while S. nigrum maintained 25% of the seed production level generally observed with greater light exposure. This environmental adaptation was confirmed by the less marked decrease in S. nigrum harvest index. Agroecological involvements are discussed.

  20. Weed emergence on long years’ not herbicide treated fields - duration of the after-effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a long-term field trial plots were not treated with herbicides for 12 years (from 1996 to 2007. Two different crop rotations with 50% or 66% of cereals in the rotation were tested. At the same time in each crop rotation two different plant protection strategies were established. Since autumn 2007 the former controls not sprayed with any herbicide have been treated with herbicides. The crop rotation was unified. In that long-term field trial plots always treated with herbicides exist also. Weeds were counted by number and species before herbicide treatments. The comparison of these two different plots (treated and untreated shows what after-effect exists on the formerly untreated plots even after eight years. The emergence of weeds is still higher. Also the different crop rotations are still perceptible. For the plant protection strategy with the lower herbicide amounts the differences blur now.

  1. Evaluation and Modeling of Camel Thorn (Alhagi Maurorum Weed Cutting by Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghipour Zade Mahani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of weed control and the limitations of mechanical methods in some places, in this research the water jet cutting for weed control was investigated. The cutting tests were performed on camel thorn weed in Shahid Bahonar university of Kerman. The water jet pressure of 90 bars was achieved with the aid of a suitable pump. The cutting time was studied in a completely randomized factorial design experiment (CRD with five replications. Factors of experiments are: stem diameter in 2 levels (smaller and larger than 5 mm, distance of spraying jet from weeds in 3 levels (10, 20 and 30 cm and two types of plant holders: blade and plate. The results showed that stem diameter and jet distance from the weed stem had significant effects on cutting time (at the 1%. The mean comparison of parameters showed that with increase of stem diameter the cutting time increased and any increase in jet distance from the weeds decreased the cutting time linearly with R2=0.96 and R2=0.99 for small and large diameter weeds, respectively. The minimum cutting time was measured at 30 cm of the jet from small diameter of stems. A multivariate linear regression model was also proposed for cutting weed parameters. It can be concluded that due to the flexibility of water jet cutting for restricted places, hydrodynamic control of weeds is proposed as a complementary method and sometimes a competing substitute method.

  2. Dynamics of Weeds in the Soil Seed Bank: A Hidden Markov Model to Estimate Life History Traits from Standing Plant Time Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Borgy

    Full Text Available Predicting the population dynamics of annual plants is a challenge due to their hidden seed banks in the field. However, such predictions are highly valuable for determining management strategies, specifically in agricultural landscapes. In agroecosystems, most weed seeds survive during unfavourable seasons and persist for several years in the seed bank. This causes difficulties in making accurate predictions of weed population dynamics and life history traits (LHT. Consequently, it is very difficult to identify management strategies that limit both weed populations and species diversity. In this article, we present a method of assessing weed population dynamics from both standing plant time series data and an unknown seed bank. We use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM to obtain estimates of over 3,080 botanical records for three major LHT: seed survival in the soil, plant establishment (including post-emergence mortality, and seed production of 18 common weed species. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches were complementarily used to estimate LHT values. The results showed that the LHT provided by the HMM enabled fairly accurate estimates of weed populations in different crops. There was a positive correlation between estimated germination rates and an index of the specialisation to the crop type (IndVal. The relationships between estimated LHTs and that between the estimated LHTs and the ecological characteristics of weeds provided insights into weed strategies. For example, a common strategy to cope with agricultural practices in several weeds was to produce less seeds and increase germination rates. This knowledge, especially of LHT for each type of crop, should provide valuable information for developing sustainable weed management strategies.

  3. Dynamics of Weeds in the Soil Seed Bank: A Hidden Markov Model to Estimate Life History Traits from Standing Plant Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgy, Benjamin; Reboud, Xavier; Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Régis; Gaba, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the population dynamics of annual plants is a challenge due to their hidden seed banks in the field. However, such predictions are highly valuable for determining management strategies, specifically in agricultural landscapes. In agroecosystems, most weed seeds survive during unfavourable seasons and persist for several years in the seed bank. This causes difficulties in making accurate predictions of weed population dynamics and life history traits (LHT). Consequently, it is very difficult to identify management strategies that limit both weed populations and species diversity. In this article, we present a method of assessing weed population dynamics from both standing plant time series data and an unknown seed bank. We use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain estimates of over 3,080 botanical records for three major LHT: seed survival in the soil, plant establishment (including post-emergence mortality), and seed production of 18 common weed species. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches were complementarily used to estimate LHT values. The results showed that the LHT provided by the HMM enabled fairly accurate estimates of weed populations in different crops. There was a positive correlation between estimated germination rates and an index of the specialisation to the crop type (IndVal). The relationships between estimated LHTs and that between the estimated LHTs and the ecological characteristics of weeds provided insights into weed strategies. For example, a common strategy to cope with agricultural practices in several weeds was to produce less seeds and increase germination rates. This knowledge, especially of LHT for each type of crop, should provide valuable information for developing sustainable weed management strategies.

  4. Designing, modeling and controlling a novel autonomous laser weeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Andersson, Kim Johan; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2009-01-01

      Abstract: in this paper, the process of designing and developing a novel laser weeding test setup is explained. The main purpose of designing this system was to simulate the dynamic field conditions of a mobile vehicle capable of targeting weeds. This system consists of a rig containing three...

  5. The future for weed control and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Dale L; Beckie, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    This review is both a retrospective (what have we missed?) and prospective (where are we going?) examination of weed control and technology, particularly as it applies to herbicide-resistant weed management (RWM). Major obstacles to RWM are discussed, including lack of diversity in weed management, unwillingness of many weed researchers to conduct real integrated weed management research or growers to accept recommendations, influence or role of agrichemical marketing and governmental policy and lack of multidisciplinary research. We then look ahead to new technologies that are needed for future weed control in general and RWM in particular, in areas such as non-chemical and chemical weed management, novel herbicides, site-specific weed management, drones for monitoring large areas, wider application of 'omics' and simulation model development. Finally, we discuss implementation strategies for integrated weed management to achieve RWM, development of RWM for developing countries, a new classification of herbicides based on mode of metabolism to facilitate greater stewardship and greater global exchange of information to focus efforts on areas that maximize progress in weed control and RWM. There is little doubt that new or emerging technologies will provide novel tools for RMW in the future, but will they arrive in time? © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Pest Management Science © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Designing, modeling and controlling a novel autonomous laser weeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Andersson, Kim Johan; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2009-01-01

      Abstract: in this paper, the process of designing and developing a novel laser weeding test setup is explained. The main purpose of designing this system was to simulate the dynamic field conditions of a mobile vehicle capable of targeting weeds. This system consists of a rig containing three...... conveyor belts fully controlled by a Siemens PLC controller (programmable logic controller), a stereo vision system consisting of two cameras, a 2-axis laser beam deflection unit and a laser source. The main challenge in this project was to accurately estimate and reconstruct the weed growth center using...

  7. Selecting, weeding, and weighting biased climate model ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. S.; Picton, J.; Huerta, G.; Nosedal Sanchez, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the Bayesian formulation, the "log-likelihood" is a test statistic for selecting, weeding, or weighting climate model ensembles with observational data. This statistic has the potential to synthesize the physical and data constraints on quantities of interest. One of the thorny issues for formulating the log-likelihood is how one should account for biases. While in the past we have included a generic discrepancy term, not all biases affect predictions of quantities of interest. We make use of a 165-member ensemble CAM3.1/slab ocean climate models with different parameter settings to think through the issues that are involved with predicting each model's sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing given what can be observed from the base state. In particular we use multivariate empirical orthogonal functions to decompose the differences that exist among this ensemble to discover what fields and regions matter to the model's sensitivity. We find that the differences that matter are a small fraction of the total discrepancy. Moreover, weighting members of the ensemble using this knowledge does a relatively poor job of adjusting the ensemble mean toward the known answer. This points out the shortcomings of using weights to correct for biases in climate model ensembles created by a selection process that does not emphasize the priorities of your log-likelihood.

  8. How weeds emerge: a taxonomic and trait-based examination using United States data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Adam; Conner, Jeffrey K; Culley, Theresa; Baucom, Regina S

    2014-05-01

    Weeds can cause great economic and ecological harm to ecosystems. Despite their importance, comparisons of the taxonomy and traits of successful weeds often focus on a few specific comparisons - for example, introduced versus native weeds. We used publicly available inventories of US plant species to make comprehensive comparisons of the factors that underlie weediness. We quantitatively examined taxonomy to determine if certain genera are overrepresented by introduced, weedy or herbicide-resistant species, and we compared phenotypic traits of weeds to those of nonweeds, whether introduced or native. We uncovered genera that have more weeds and introduced species than expected by chance and plant families that have more herbicide-resistant species than expected by chance. Certain traits, generally related to fast reproduction, were more likely to be associated with weedy plants regardless of species' origins. We also found stress tolerance traits associated with either native or introduced weeds compared with native or introduced nonweeds. Weeds and introduced species have significantly smaller genomes than nonweeds and native species. These results support trends for weedy plants reported from other floras, suggest that native and introduced weeds have different stress adaptations, and provide a comprehensive survey of trends across weeds within the USA. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Tillage and planting date effects on weed dormancy, emergence, and early growth in organic corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed management is a major constraint to adoption of reduced-tillage practices for organic grain production. Tillage, cover crop management, and crop planting date are all factors that influence the periodicity and growth potential of important weed species in these systems. Therefore, we assessed...

  10. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Weed Plants Using Low-Cost Photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensing advances in plant phenotyping are of vital importance in basic and applied plant research. Plant phenotyping enables the modeling of complex shapes, which is useful, for example, in decision-making for agronomic management. In this sense, 3D processing algorithms for plant modeling is expanding rapidly with the emergence of new sensors and techniques designed to morphologically characterize. However, there are still some technical aspects to be improved, such as an accurate reconstruction of end-details. This study adapted low-cost techniques, Structure from Motion (SfM and MultiView Stereo (MVS, to create 3D models for reconstructing plants of three weed species with contrasting shape and plant structures. Plant reconstruction was developed by applying SfM algorithms to an input set of digital images acquired sequentially following a track that was concentric and equidistant with respect to the plant axis and using three different angles, from a perpendicular to top view, which guaranteed the necessary overlap between images to obtain high precision 3D models. With this information, a dense point cloud was created using MVS, from which a 3D polygon mesh representing every plants’ shape and geometry was generated. These 3D models were validated with ground truth values (e.g., plant height, leaf area (LA and plant dry biomass using regression methods. The results showed, in general, a good consistency in the correlation equations between the estimated values in the models and the actual values measured in the weed plants. Indeed, 3D modeling using SfM algorithms proved to be a valuable methodology for weed phenotyping, since it accurately estimated the actual values of plant height and LA. Additionally, image processing using the SfM method was relatively fast. Consequently, our results indicate the potential of this budget system for plant reconstruction at high detail, which may be usable in several scenarios, including outdoor

  11. Modelling the effects of climate change on weed population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    García de León Hernández, David

    2014-01-01

    As the human population continues to increase –it will have surpassed 9 billion people by 2050- food supply must rise in order to sustain people. Climate change represents a threat in the provision of sufficient, secure and nutritious nourishment for everyone. Possible consequences of climate change include a reduction in global agro-ecosystem production, with Spain as one of the most affected countries in Europe. Accordingly, little is known about the possible effects on weed ...

  12. Diversifying cereal-based rotations to improve weed control. Evaluation with the AlomySys model quantifying the effect of cropping systems on a grass weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colbach Nathalie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Simplified rotations often select weed flora consisting of one or several dominant species. In rotations consisting mainly of winter cereals, one of the most frequent weeds in Atlantic European countries is blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.. In order to reduce environmental impacts and avoid the selection of herbicide-resistant populations, alternative weed management strategies are necessary. The objective of the present study was to develop a methodology for using a weed dynamics model called ALOMYSYS for evaluating prospective diversified crop rotations based on expert opinion. These prospective rotations were developed for a particular region aiming at reducing herbicide use while keeping weed infestation similar to that in current cropping systems. The prospective systems were also evaluated economically by calculating costs and margins for the farmer. The simulations showed that the more diverse the rotation, the better blackgrass was controlled and the less herbicides (rates and frequencies were necessary. Optimal herbicide spraying conditions and mouldboard ploughing were also less essential in diverse rotations. It was though essential to reason herbicide programs over the whole rotation and not simply as function of the preceding crop. The economic evaluation identified the interest of spring or winter pea either replacing or preceding oilseed rape (OSR in OSR/wheat/barley rotations.

  13. Distribuição mensal da emergência de seis ervas daninhas em solos com e sem cultivos Monthly emergence of six weeds in cultived and undisturbed soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio G. Blanco

    1994-01-01

    cultivation management favored lhe emergence of these species. Eleusine indica and Eragrostis pilosa sbowed an emergence model with a peak in January and lack of soil disturbance increased the seedling emergence. lnterruption of plant growth by all management methods reduced lhe weed population in lhe next season.

  14. Modelling Soil Water Retention for Weed Seed Germination Sensitivity to Water Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. John Bullied

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil water retention is important for the study of water availability to germinating weed seeds. Six soil water retention models (Campbell, Brooks-Corey, four- and five-parameter van Genuchten, Tani, and Russo with residual soil water parameter derivations were evaluated to describe water retention for weed seed germination at minimum threshold soil water potential for three hillslope positions. The Campbell, Brooks-Corey, and four-parameter van Genuchten model with modified or estimated forms of the residual parameter had superior but similar data fit. The Campbell model underestimated water retention at a potential less than −0.5 MPa for the upper hillslope that could result in underestimating seed germination. The Tani and Russo models overestimated water retention at a potential less than −0.1 MPa for all hillslope positions. Model selection and residual parameter specification are important for weed seed germination by representing water retention at the level of minimum threshold water potential for germination. Weed seed germination models driven by the hydrothermal soil environment rely on the best-fitting soil water retention model to produce dynamic predictions of seed germination.

  15. Optimization of foramsulfuron doses for post-emergence weed control in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannacci, E.

    2016-11-01

    Four field experiments were carried out from 2011 to 2014 in order to evaluate the effects of foramsulfuron, applied at the recommended (60.8 g a.i./ha) and reduced doses (1/3 and 2/3), on the efficacy against several of the most important weeds in maize. For each “year-weed” combination, dose-response curves were applied to estimate the dose of foramsulfuron required to obtain 90% and 95% weed control (ED90 and ED95). Foramsulfuron phytotoxicity on maize and crop yield were assessed. Foramsulfuron at 1/3 of the recommended dose (20.3 g a.i./ha) provided 95% efficacy against redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv.), wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis L.) and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.). Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv.) were satisfactorily controlled (95% weed efficacy) with ED95 ranged from 20 to 50 g/ha of foramsulfuron (about from 1/3 to 5/6 of the recommended dose) depending on growth stage. The recommended dose was effective against pale smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium L.) at 2-4 true leaves (12-14 BBCH scale), but this dose did not kill plants larger than 2-4 true leaves. The ranking among weed species based on their susceptibility to foramsulfuron was: redroot pigweed = green foxtail = wild mustard = black nightshade > velvetleaf = common lambsquarters = barnyardgrass > pale smartweed. Dose of foramsulfuron can be reduced below recommended dose depending on weed species and growth stage. Foramsulfuron showed a good crop selectivity and had no negative effect on maize yield. (Author)

  16. Can simulation models help design rice cultivars that are more competitive against weeds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, L.; Kropff, M.J.; Kempuchetty, N.; Rajan, A.; Migo, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    Differences in competitive ability between rice cultivars IR8 and Mahsuri, grown in well-fertilised irrigated conditions, were analysed by means of a mechanistic simulation model (INTERCOM) for crop-weed interaction. The analysis revealed that the greater competitive ability of Mahsuri was due

  17. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    importantly, weed density and time of emergence relative to the crop. Practices that (1) reduce the density of weeds, (2) maximise occupation of space or uptake of resources by the crop or (3) establish an early-season size advantage of the crop over the weeds will minimise the competitive effects of weeds...... an early-season competitive advantage to the crop and (3) maximising resource capture by the crop using competitive species, competitive cultivars, high sowing densities, optimal spatial arrangement, intercropping complimentary species or transplanting.......Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...

  18. Growth stage of Phalaris minor Retz. and wheat determines weed control and crop tolerance of four post-emergence herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia Rasool

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phalaris minor Retz. has evolved multiple herbicide resistance in wheat growing areas in northwestern India. An understanding of the effect of growth stage on herbicide tolerance of wheat and control of P. minor will help in selecting the most appropriate herbicide for different situations. The weed control and crop safety of four commonly used wheat herbicides (sulfosulfuron, pinoxaden, fenoxaprop plus metribuzin and mesosulfuron plus iodosulfuron, each applied at four different wheat growth stages was investigated in field studies for two years. P. minor plants were at 1, 2-3, 3-4 and 7-8 leaf stages when the herbicides were applied at Zadok 12-Z12, Z13, Z21 and Z23 stages of wheat, respectively. Sulfosulfuron application at Z12 and Z13 wheat stages (before first irrigation, provided >80% control of P. minor and produced wheat grain yield (4.5-4.7 t/ha similar to the weed-free check (4.9 t/ha in both years. Pinoxaden, fenoxaprop plus metribuzin and mesosulfuron plus iodosulfuron application at Z12 and Z13 wheat stages recorded significantly lower wheat grain yield (3.62-3.95 t/ha due to poor weed control, crop toxicity or both. All the four herbicides were equally effective on P. minor when applied at Z21 wheat stage. At Z23 wheat stage, pinoxaden gave >90% control of P. minor and the highest wheat grain yield (4.82 t/ha. The results are expected to allow changes in the current recommendation of the timing of post-emergence herbicides for the management of P. minor in wheat.

  19. Detection of bird nests during mechanical weeding by incremental background modeling and visual saliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole; Karstoft, Henrik

    2015-03-02

    Mechanical weeding is an important tool in organic farming. However, the use of mechanical weeding in conventional agriculture is increasing, due to public demands to lower the use of pesticides and an increased number of pesticide-resistant weeds. Ground nesting birds are highly susceptible to farming operations, like mechanical weeding, which may destroy the nests and reduce the survival of chicks and incubating females. This problem has limited focus within agricultural engineering. However, when the number of machines increases, destruction of nests will have an impact on various species. It is therefore necessary to explore and develop new technology in order to avoid these negative ethical consequences. This paper presents a vision-based approach to automated ground nest detection. The algorithm is based on the fusion of visual saliency, which mimics human attention, and incremental background modeling, which enables foreground detection with moving cameras. The algorithm achieves a good detection rate, as it detects 28 of 30 nests at an average distance of 3.8 m, with a true positive rate of 0.75.

  20. Comparison of four modeling tools for the prediction of potential distribution for non-indigenous weeds in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarey, Roger; Newton, Leslie; Hong, Seung C.; Takeuchi, Yu; Christie, Dave; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Kohl, Lisa; Damus, Martin; Higgins, Steven I.; Miller, Leah; Castro, Karen; West, Amanda; Hastings, John; Cook, Gericke; Kartesz, John; Koop, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    This study compares four models for predicting the potential distribution of non-indigenous weed species in the conterminous U.S. The comparison focused on evaluating modeling tools and protocols as currently used for weed risk assessment or for predicting the potential distribution of invasive weeds. We used six weed species (three highly invasive and three less invasive non-indigenous species) that have been established in the U.S. for more than 75 years. The experiment involved providing non-U. S. location data to users familiar with one of the four evaluated techniques, who then developed predictive models that were applied to the United States without knowing the identity of the species or its U.S. distribution. We compared a simple GIS climate matching technique known as Proto3, a simple climate matching tool CLIMEX Match Climates, the correlative model MaxEnt, and a process model known as the Thornley Transport Resistance (TTR) model. Two experienced users ran each modeling tool except TTR, which had one user. Models were trained with global species distribution data excluding any U.S. data, and then were evaluated using the current known U.S. distribution. The influence of weed species identity and modeling tool on prevalence and sensitivity effects was compared using a generalized linear mixed model. Each modeling tool itself had a low statistical significance, while weed species alone accounted for 69.1 and 48.5% of the variance for prevalence and sensitivity, respectively. These results suggest that simple modeling tools might perform as well as complex ones in the case of predicting potential distribution for a weed not yet present in the United States. Considerations of model accuracy should also be balanced with those of reproducibility and ease of use. More important than the choice of modeling tool is the construction of robust protocols and testing both new and experienced users under blind test conditions that approximate operational conditions.

  1. Amostragem do banco de semente e flora emergente de plantas daninhas Sampling of weed seedbank and emerged populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elemar Voll

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi determinar o número de amostras necessárias para estimar com precisão aceitável a quantidade de sementes no solo e a flora de plantas daninhas emergentes, em áreas experimentais e de lavoura, para auxiliar na tomada de decisão das estratégias de manejo das plantas daninhas. A amostragem do solo para quantificação do banco de sementes foi feita com trado tubular de 5,0 cm de diâmetro, na profundidade de 0 a 10 cm. A flora emergente foi contada por meio de um gabarito de ferro nas dimensões de 0,5x0,5 m, de forma aleatória na área. O número de amostras necessário foi estimado em razão da média de sementes da amostra, para uma determinada precisão (CV = 20% ou 40%. Foi estimado que, nas áreas experimentais, para médias de 10 a 20 sementes/amostra de solo (500 a 1.000 sementes/m² e coeficiente de variação de 20%, são necessárias entre 40 e 90 amostras, respectivamente; com 40% (menor precisão, entre 10 e 20 amostras. Considerando o mesmo intervalo em áreas de lavoura, representativas de glebas homogêneas, o tamanho de amostragem necessária é cerca de três vezes maior. Levantamentos da flora daninha emergente apresentam menor associação dos dados (média e variância entre si, portanto, são menos apropriados para decisões de manejo.The objective of this research was to determine the number of soil samples needed to estimate with reasonable precision level the amount of seeds in the soil and the emerged weeds, in a seedbank of experimental and cropland areas, in order to help management decisions. Sampling the soil seedbank was carried out by using a tubular soil sampler core of 5 cm diameter, from 0 to 10 cm soil depth. Emerged weeds were scouted by placing iron quadrats (0.5x0.5 m, randomly. The number of samples required was estimated as a function of the average seeds per sample, given a required precision (CV = 20% or 40%. For the small plots, means between 10 and 20 seeds

  2. Using simulation models to investigate the cumulative effects of sowing rate, sowing date and cultivar choice on weed competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Izzadora K S; Storkey, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing pressure on crop production from the evolution of herbicide resistance, farmers are increasingly adopting Integrated Weed Management (IWM) strategies to augment their weed control. These include measures to increase the competitiveness of the crop canopy such as increased sowing rate and the use of more competitive cultivars. While there are data on the relative impact of these non-chemical weed control methods assessed in isolation, there is uncertainty about their combined contribution, which may be hindering their adoption. In this article, the INTERCOM simulation model of crop/weed competition was used to examine the combined impact of crop density, sowing date and cultivar choice on the outcomes of competition between wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) and Alopecurus myosuroides . Alopecurus myosuroides is a problematic weed of cereal crops in North-Western Europe and the primary target for IWM in the UK because it has evolved resistance to a range of herbicides. The model was parameterised for two cultivars with contrasting competitive ability, and simulations run across 10 years at different crop densities and two sowing dates. The results suggest that sowing date, sowing density and cultivar choice largely work in a complementary fashion, allowing enhanced competitive ability against weeds when used in combination. However, the relative benefit of choosing a more competitive cultivar decreases at later sowing dates and higher crop densities. Modeling approaches could be further employed to examine the effectiveness of IWM, reducing the need for more expensive and cumbersome long-term in situ experimentation.

  3. Library Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jess A.; Manch, Steven B.

    1971-01-01

    Weeding is essential to the efficient operation of medical libraries and should be conducted in spite of certain barriers that exist. The mechanics of weeding are simple, and the criteria are widely known. A questionnaire survey of ninety-four medical school libraries reveals that weeding is most often shared by professional staff members, that weeding is done primarily when space is needed, and that librarians when weeding do not as a rule seek the advice or assistance of users or the Library Committee. PMID:5128703

  4. Prediction of the competitive effects of weeds on crop yields based on the relative leaf area of weeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, L. A. P.; Christensen, Svend; Cloutier, D.

    1996-01-01

    L.) and in 11 experiments in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Most data sets were heller described by a model based on the relative leaf area of the weed than by a hyperbolic model based on weed density. This leaf area model accounted for (part of) the effect of different emerging times of the S....... alba whereas the density model did not. A parameter that allows the maximum yield loss to be smaller than 100% was mostly not needed to describe the effects of weed competition. The parameter that denotes the competitiveness of the weed species with respect to the crop decreased the later the relative...... leaf area of the mustard was determined. This decrease could be estimated from the differences in relative growth rate of the leaf area of crop and S. alba. However, the accuracy of this estimation was poor. The parameter value of the leaf area model varied considerably between sites and years...

  5. INTEGRATED WEED CONTROL IN MAIZE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latré, J; Dewitte, K; Derycke, V; De Roo, B; Haesaert, G

    2015-01-01

    Integrated pest management has been implemented as a general practice by EU legislation. As weed control actually is the most important crop protection measure in maize for Western Europe, the new legislation will have its impact. The question is of course which systems can be successfully implemented in practice with respect to labour efficiency and economical parameters. During 3 successive growing seasons (2007, 2008, 2009) weed control in maize was evaluated, the main focus was put on different techniques of integrated weed control and was compared with chemical weed control. Additionally, during 4 successive growing seasons (2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014) two objects based on integrated weed control and two objects based on mechanical weed control were compared to about twenty different objects of conventional chemical weed control. One of the objects based on mechanical weed control consisted of treatment with the flex-tine harrow before and after emergence in combination with chemical weed control at a reduced rate in 3-4 leave stage. The second one consisted of broadcast mechanical treatments before and after emergence followed by a final in-row application of herbicides and an inter-row cultivation at 6-7(8) leave stage. All trials were conducted on the Experimental farm of Bottelare HoGent-UGent on a sandy loam soil. Maize was growing in 1/3 crop rotation. The effect on weed growth as well as the economic impact of the different applications was evaluated. Combining chemical and mechanical weed control is a possible option in conventional farming but the disadvantages must be taken into account. A better planned weed control based on the real present weed-population in combination with a carefully thought-out choice of herbicides should also be considered as an IPM--approach.

  6. On weed competition and population dynamics : considerations for crop rotations & organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: organic farming, weeds, weed management, weed ecology, weed diversity, matrix population model, elasticity analysis, neighbourhood model, survey, crop row spacing, mechanical hoe, harrow, Polygonum convolvulus ,

  7. Physical model of a floating trash boom to control aquatic weeds at the TVA Widows Creek Fossil Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopping, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Widows Creek Fossil plant seasonally encounters adverse accumulations of aquatic weeds at the intakes of the condenser cooling water pumps. To reduce the accumulations, a floating trash boom has been proposed for the intakes. To evaluate the hydraulic feasibility of a boom, a physical model of the intakes has been built at the TVA Engineering Laboratory. The model was used to determine the boom alignment and depth of skimming needed to successfully deflect weeds away from the intakes and provide self-cleaning

  8. Emergência de plantas daninhas em solo coberto com palha de cana-de-açúcar Weed emergence in soil covered with sugarcane harvest straw residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Correia

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da cobertura do solo, com 0, 5, 10 e 15 t ha-1 de palha de cana-de-açúcar da variedade SP 79 2233, sobre a emergência de seis espécies de plantas daninhas (Brachiaria decumbens, Digitaria horizontalis, Sida spinosa, Ipomoea grandifolia, Ipomoea hederifolia e Ipomoea quamoclit, foi conduzido um experimento em casa de vegetação do Departamento de Fitossanidade da Universidade Estadual Paulista, campus de Jaboticabal, SP. Cada unidade experimental foi constituída por um vaso plástico com 21,50 cm de diâmetro e capacidade para quatro litros de solo. Foram semeados 0,112 g de sementes de D. horizontalis, 2,12 g sementes de I. quamoclit e 50 sementes das demais espécies, por vaso. Foram contabilizadas as plântulas emersas aos 6 e 32 dias após a semeadura (DAS sob a palha e aos 30, 60 e 90 dias após a remoção da palha (DARP. Constatou-se que a cobertura do solo com 5, 10 e 15 t ha-1 de palha de cana inibiu a emergência de plântulas das espécies B. decumbens e S. spinosa, sendo o mesmo observado para D. horizontalis submetida a 10 e 15 t ha-1 de palha. No entanto, para I. grandifolia e I. hederifolia o número de plantas emersas não diferiu entre as quantidades de palha. Por outro lado, a presença da cobertura morta com palha de cana incrementou a emergência de plântulas de I. quamoclit. Não foram verificados, após a remoção da palha, fluxos expressivos na emergência de plântulas das espécies estudadas.An experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions to study the effects of soil coverage with sugarcane harvest straw residue (0, 5, 10 and 15 ton ha-1 on the emergence of six weed species (Brachiaria decumbens, Digitaria horizontalis, Sida spinosa, Ipomoea grandifolia, Ipomoea hederifolia and Ipomoea quamoclit at the Department of Phytosanitation of Universidade Estadual Paulista, Jaboticabal-SP, Brazil. Each experimental unit consisted of one plastic pot (diameter = 21.50 cm; total

  9. Emergence and dry matter of weeds in papaya crop (Carica papaya)

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, I.S.; Peixoto, M.F.S.P.; Carvalho, J.E.B.; Sampaio, L.S.V.; Ledo, C.A.S.; Peixoto, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    O objetivo deste experimento foi avaliar o "banco" de sementes de plantas daninhas através do método da emergência de plântulas, na cultura do mamoeiro, em que se empregaram diferentes sistemas de manejo. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com três repetições e seis tratamentos: capina em área total; herbicida nas linhas + grade nas entrelinhas; subsolagem cruzada antes do plantio + capina em área total; subsolagem cruzada antes do plantio + herbicida nas linhas e feijão ...

  10. A Class of Parameter Estimation Methods for Nonlinear Muskingum Model Using Hybrid Invasive Weed Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijia Ouyang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear Muskingum models are important tools in hydrological forecasting. In this paper, we have come up with a class of new discretization schemes including a parameter θ to approximate the nonlinear Muskingum model based on general trapezoid formulas. The accuracy of these schemes is second order, if θ≠1/3, but interestingly when θ=1/3, the accuracy of the presented scheme gets improved to third order. Then, the present schemes are transformed into an unconstrained optimization problem which can be solved by a hybrid invasive weed optimization (HIWO algorithm. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the present methods. The numerical results substantiate the fact that the presented methods have better precision in estimating the parameters of nonlinear Muskingum models.

  11. Oilseed Meal Effects on the Emergence and Survival of Crop and Weed Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Rothlisberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM remaining after extracting oil may have use as bioherbicides or organic fertilizers. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that hydrolyze into biologically active compounds that may inhibit various pests. Jatropha curcas SM contains curcin, a phytoxin. A 14-day greenhouse study determined that Sinapis alba (white mustard, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, Camelina sativa, and Jatropha curcas applied to soil at varying application rates [0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5% (w/w] and incubation times (1, 7, and 14 d prior to planting affected seed emergence and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench], johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense, and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus. With each species, emergence and survival was most decreased by 2.5% SM application applied at 1 and 7 d incubations. White mustard SM incubated for 1 d applied at low and high rates had similar negative effects on johnsongrass seedlings. Redroot pigweed seedling survival was generally most decreased by all 2.5% SM applications. Based on significant effects determined by ANOVA, results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM application should be considered before land-applying SMs in cropping systems.

  12. Site-specific weed control technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...... describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... two decades, though barriers prevent their breakthrough. Most important among these is the lack of a truly robust weed recognition method, owing to mutual shading among plants and limitations in the capacity of highly accurate spraying and weeding apparatuses.   Another barrier is the lack...

  13. Assessing non-chemical weeding strategies through mechanistic modelling of blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.) dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colbach, N.; Kurstjens, D.A.G.; Munier-Jolain, N.M.; Dalbiès, A.; Doré, T.

    2010-01-01

    Because of environmental and health safety issues, it is necessary to develop strategies that do not rely on herbicides to manage weeds. Introducing temporary grassland into annual crop rotations and mechanical weeding are the two main features that are frequently used in integrated and organic

  14. Quantifying the effect of crop spatial arrangement on weed suppression using functional-structural plant modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Jochem B.; Bastiaans, Lammert

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of weed growth in a crop canopy can be enhanced by improving crop competitiveness. One way to achieve this is by modifying the crop planting pattern. In this study, we addressed the question to what extent a uniform planting pattern increases the ability of a crop to compete with weed

  15. Effect of stale seedbed preparations and subsequent weed control in lettuce (cv. Iceboll) on weed densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Weide, van der R.Y.; Bleeker, P.O.; Lotz, L.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of stale seedbed preparations and several weed control methods on the emergence of weeds in lettuce were studied. The specific goal was to evaluate the use of a stale seedbed in combination with chemical or mechanical weed control methods in the field. Depending on location and year,

  16. SEEDBANK AND SEEDLING EMERGENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF WEEDS IN RICEFIELD SOILS OF THE MUDA GRANARY AREA IN NORTH-WEST PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Tlie experiment was conducted in the glasshouse of UPM from March 2003 to June 2004 to determine the soil seedbank in the ricefields ot'Muda rice granary area in Peninsular Malaysia. Six soil cores of 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm depth were sampled from each of 24 fields. All samples from each individual field were bulked and placed in plastic trays of 38 x 25 x 10 cm. Soil was moistened as required and emergence of weed seedlings were recorded over period of one year. After one year, remaining seeds were separated, removed and identified. The total seed bank was estimated at 1136.48 million/ha of whic h 62.35% (708.60 million seedlings ha"1 germinated within 12 months and 37.65% (427.88 million seeds ha"1 remained ungerminated. Total of 20 taxa were recognized. Based on importance value (I.V. the five most dominant species in terms of emerged seedling were Fimbristylis miliacea, Leplochloa chinensis, LitJwigia hyssopifolia, Cyperus difformii and C. iria. Of the remaining seeds the five dominant species with decreasing trend in ranking were F. miliacea, Scirpus lateriflonis, Monochoria vagina/is, L. hyssopifolia and L. chinensis. Ranking of total seed reserves (seedlings+ remaining seeds were similar to emerged seedling indi cating that emerged seedlings reflect the actual weed flora in the Muda area. Among the dominant species F. miliacea accounted for 58.07% of emerged seedlings, 79.31% of remaining seeds and 66.07% of total seed bank. Total seedling emergence of all species was higher in the first observation in April 2003 and cumulative seedling emergence showed no clear peaks.

  17. The red queen in the corn: agricultural weeds as models of rapid adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueira, C C; Olsen, K M; Caicedo, A L

    2013-04-01

    Weeds are among the greatest pests of agriculture, causing billions of dollars in crop losses each year. As crop field management practices have changed over the past 12 000 years, weeds have adapted in turn to evade human removal. This evolutionary change can be startlingly rapid, making weeds an appealing system to study evolutionary processes that occur over short periods of time. An understanding of how weeds originate and adapt is needed for successful management; however, relatively little emphasis has been placed on genetically characterizing these systems. Here, we review the current literature on agricultural weed origins and their mechanisms of adaptation. Where possible, we have included examples that have been genetically well characterized. Evidence for three possible, non-mutually exclusive weed origins (from wild species, crop-wild hybrids or directly from crops) is discussed with respect to what is known about the microevolutionary signatures that result from these processes. We also discuss what is known about the genetic basis of adaptive traits in weeds and the range of genetic mechanisms that are responsible. With a better understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying adaptation in weedy species, we can address the more general process of adaptive evolution and what can be expected as we continue to apply selective pressures in agroecosystems around the world.

  18. Weeding Your Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Offers guidelines for weeding as part of school library collection development. Highlights include developing a weeding policy; and the CREW (Continuous Review Evaluation and Weeding) method, including reasons for weeding, scheduling, and guidelines for fiction and for nonfiction. (LRW)

  19. Weed Control in Soybean (Glycine max)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipkemoi, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Weed Compete for limited growth factors with crop plants. This result in loss of crop vigour and hence reduces crop yields. A study was conducted in 1997 and 2001 to evaluate the use of herbicides and hand hoeing for weed control in soybeans. Crop establishment was by hand planting. The herbicides were applied using CP3 Knap sack sprayer calibrated to deliver a spray volume of 150l/ha. Hand weeding treatment were done as appropriate. The trial layout was randomised complete block design with four replications in both years. The tested herbicides did not satisfactorily control the weeds present at the experimental site in both years. Hand weeding on the other hand gave good control of the weeds which were reflected in high soybean yields. In these trials yields were negatively correlated with the number of weeds present. The tested herbicides alone appeared to be inadequate in controlling weeds in soybean. Compared with the weed-free treatment a single application of soil-applied or post-emergence herbicides did not control a broad spectrum of weeds and reduced soybean yields. It can also be inferred that soybean yield losses are minimised if they are kept weed free for at most 6 weeks after emergence

  20. Green Weeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniman, Sarah; McColl, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Gone are the days of tiptoeing to the dumpsters with boxes of weeded books in tow. Lots of libraries are now taking advantage of the many low-cost services and solutions that promise to help extend the lives of collection discards. Some of these options can be very profitable. Some create goodwill within the local community. Some may seem more…

  1. A comparative study between nonlinear regression and artificial neural network approaches for modelling wild oat (Avena fatua) field emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-linear regression techniques are used widely to fit weed field emergence patterns to soil microclimatic indices using S-type functions. Artificial neural networks present interesting and alternative features for such modeling purposes. In this work, a univariate hydrothermal-time based Weibull m...

  2. Screening of post emergence herbicides for weed control in cotton (GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM) and their effect on yield and yield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, N.; Khan, M.B.; Khan, M.A.; Hameed, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Response of varying herbicides at different levels: round up 490 G/L at the rate of 4.7 L ha/sup -1/ and 1.5 L ha/sup -1/ (Glyphosat) and Gramaxone 20 EC (Paraquat) at the rate of 2.5 L ha/sup -1/ against untreated (control, were investigated to cotton cultivar CIM-473 under field conditions during Kharif 2002 at Agronomic Research Area. Central Cotton Research Institute, Multan. Significant control of weeds and increase in yield and yield contributing factors were observed. It was indicated that maximum yield and weed control were obtained by using Round up (Glyphosate) at the rate of 4.7 L ha/sup -1/ as compared to other treatments including untreated (control). Average boll weight was not significant among treatments but significant against control. Maximum net profit was obtained from Round up 490 G/L when treated at the rate of 4.7 L ha/sup -1/ than all other treatments. (author)

  3. Herbicidal control of parthenium weed in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.; Khan, M.A.; Hashim, S.

    2014-01-01

    Two years experiments were conducted using randomized complete block (RCB) design, having eight treatments, replicated four times to find their impact on maize, parthenium and associated weeds. The treatments consisted of 6 herbicides, viz., Aatrax (atrazine) at the rate 1.0, Buctril super (bromoxynil+MCPA) 60 EC at the rate 0.80, Dual gold (s-metolachlor) 960 EC at the rate 1.92, Sencor extra (metribuzin) at the rate 2.0, Primextra gold 720 SC (atrazine+s-metolachlor), at the rate 1.50 Stomp (pendimethalin) 330 EC at the rate 1.50 kg. a.i. ha/sub -1/, hand weeding and a control. Data showed that weed density was significantly influenced by application of various herbicides in maize. Fresh weed biomass (g m/sup -2/) was reduced in plots where Primextra gold and Dual gold were sprayed followed by hand weeding. Weed mortality (%) was significantly influenced by application of different herbicides, whereas year effect remained similar for weed mortality. Higher weed mortality was observed in Primextra gold treated plots, followed by hand weeding and Dual gold which were statistically at par. Long stature maize plants were recorded in hand weeding and Primextra gold treated plots, whereas short stature plants were found in control plots. Number of grains ear-1 was significantly increased by application of herbicides and higher numbers of grains were recorded in Primextra gold and hand weeded plots. Thousand grain weight was significantly increased by herbicides and hand weeding. Application of herbicides significantly influenced biological and grain yields of maize. The effect of year was found non-significant for both grain and biological yields. Control plots resulted in lower grain and biological yield. Overall results indicated that application of Primextra gold as pre-emergence could provide good control of parthenium weed and associated weeds in maize. (author)

  4. The Comprehensive Emergent Literacy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Rohde

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The early skills of Emergent Literacy include the knowledge and abilities related to the alphabet, phonological awareness, symbolic representation, and communication. However, existing models of emergent literacy focus on discrete skills and miss the perspective of the surrounding environment. Early literacy skills, including their relationship to one another, and the substantial impact of the setting and context, are critical in ensuring that children gain all of the preliminary skills and awareness they will need to become successful readers and writers. Research findings over the last few decades have led to a fuller understanding of all that emergent literacy includes, resulting in a need for a new, more comprehensive model. A new model, described in this article, strives to explain how emergent literacy can be viewed as an interactive process of skills and context rather than a linear series of individual components. Early literacy learning opportunities are more likely to happen when teachers have a solid knowledge base of emergent literacy and child development. Research has shown that preschool teachers with limited knowledge about literacy development are significantly less able to provide such experiences for children. Teachers will be better able to facilitate all of the components of emergent literacy if they have access to, and understanding of, a model that describes the components, their interactions, and the importance of environmental factors in supporting children.

  5. LEVANTAMENTO DA FLORA EMERGENTE DE PLANTAS DANINHAS EM SISTEMAS DE COBERTURA DO SOLO SURVEY OF THE WEED EMERGING FLORA IN SOIL COVER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bernon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a flora emergente de plântulas e plantas daninhas em vários sistemas de cobertura do solo e manejo com: a culturas de cobertura em plantio direto (feijão-de-porco; braquiária; milheto; mucuna cinza; aveia; mucuna rajada; trigo sarraceno; crotalária e b sistemas de cultivo (cultivo mínimo; retirada da cobertura; plantio direto no mato; plantio convencional. A avaliação da flora emergente demonstrou que, dentre as culturas de cobertura, os tratamentos com milheto e braquiária apresentaram baixa incidência de monocotiledôneas (0,66 pl/m², diferenciando-se, entretanto, apenas do plantio convencional (50,33 pl/m². A ocorrência de dicotiledôneas foi inibida quando em presença de crotalária, trigo sarraceno e milheto (1,00; 1,00; 1,33 pl/m², respectivamente, que se diferenciaram dentre as culturas de cobertura, apenas da aveia (18,66 pl/m². Houve uma elevada população de plantas residuais de milheto (130,66 pl/m², estatisticamente superior ao residual das culturas de braquiária, mucuna cinza, mucuna rajada (1,00; 0,00; 0,33 pl/m², respectivamente. Concluiu-se que a cobertura total do solo foi a proporcionada pela braquiária, com eficiente controle de plantas daninhas. O milheto e a crotalária controlaram muito bem as espécies mono e dicotiledôneas, estabelecendo uma boa cobertura do solo. Contudo, a emergência de plântulas de milheto, após o cultivo desta cultura, pode dificultar o manejo para implantação da cultura subseqüente.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Sistemas; plantas daninhas; manejo; flora.

    The emerging flora of seedlings and weeds in several soil cover systems was studied through: a cover crops under no-tillage (pigpeas; brachiaria; pearl millet; gray mucuna; oats; striped mucuna; saracen wheat; crotalaria and

  6. The mathematical method of studying the reproduction structure of weeds and its application to Bromus sterilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Hansen, P.K.; Christensen, S.; Qi, G.Z.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the structure of weed reproduction incorporating the application of a mathematical model. This mathematical methodology enables the construction, testing and application of distribution models for the analysis of the structure of weed reproduction and weed ecology. The

  7. Testing an Invasive Weed Prediction Model for Leafy Spurge using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is a noxious invasive weed that infests over 1.2 million hectares of land in North America. One of the fundamental needs in leafy spurge management is cost-effective, large-scale, and long-term documentation and monitoring of plant populations. Leafy spurge is a g...

  8. Weed suppression ability of spring barley varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend

    1995-01-01

    Three years of experiments with spring barley showed significant differences in weed suppression ability among varieties. Weed dry matter in the most suppressive variety, Ida, was 48% lower than the mean weed dry matter of all varieties, whereas it was 31% higher in the least suppressive variety......, Grit. Ranking varietal responses to weed competition in terms of grain yield loss corresponded well to ranking weed dry matter produced in crop weed mixtures. There was no correspondence between the varietal grain yields in pure stands and their competitiveness, suggesting that breeding to optimize...... interception model was developed to describe the light interception profiles of the varieties. A study of the estimated parameters showed significant correlation between weed dry matter, rate of canopy height development and the light interception profile. However, when estimates were standardized to eliminate...

  9. Influence of Land use Intensity and Weed Management Practice on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of land use intensity and weed management practice on weed seedling emergence, growth and characterization of weed species were examined at Ilorin, in the southern Guinea savanna of Nigeria. The study was conducted on three pieces of land with known cropping history, laid out as randomized complete ...

  10. Robotic weeding and automated weed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.; Søgaard, H.T.; Jørgensen, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of decreasing herbicide usage has so far focused on reducing the herbicide dosage or replacing chemical weed control by hoeing and harrowing. The conventional weed control strategy is to apply the same dose of herbicide or the same intensity of hoeing and harrowing in the whole field....... The strategy may be changed in the coming years because experiments in Germany, USA, Australia, and Denmark have shown that site-specific weed management can reduce herbicide usage significantly. One of the promising technologies for site specific weed management is robotic weeding. This paper reviews...... the state-of-the-art of automated weed measurement methods and the research projects concerning autonomous platform and information system for crop and weed monitoring and robotic weeding....

  11. SHIFTING WEED COMPOSITIONS AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION IN SWEET CORN FIELD TREATED WITH ORGANIC COMPOSTS AND CHEMICAL WEED CONTROLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marulak Simarmata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to study the shift of weed compositions in sweet corn field treated with organic compost and chemical weed controls and to compare the effect of treatment combinations on weed growth, weed biomass and sweet corn biomass. The research was conducted in Bengkulu, Indonesia, from April to July 2014. Results showed that the number of weed species decreased after the trials from 14 to 13. There was a shift in weed compositions because 5 species of weeds did not emerge after the trials, but 4 new species were found. Chemical weed control used a herbiside mixture of atrazine and mesotrione applied during postemergence was the most effective method to control weeds, which was observed on decreased weed emergence and weed biomass down to 22.33 and 25.00 percent of control, respectively. Subsequently, biomass production of sweet corn increased up to 195.64 percent at the same trials. Biomass of weeds and sweet corn were also affected by the organic composts. Weed biomass was inhibited by treatment of composted empty fruith bunches of oil palm, whereas significantly increased of sweet corn biomass were observed in the plots of organic manure.

  12. Weed supression by smother crops and selective herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a smother crop is thought to suppress weed density and to add other beneficial effects in sustainable agricultural systems. Weed suppression ought to be considered an essential component of integrated weed management. However, very little is known about the effects of green manure plants on weeds. This study evaluated the influence of three green manure species on weed suppression and selectivity of herbicides. A field experiment was designed to determine the effect of the green manure species Crotalaria juncea, Arachis pintoi and pigeon pea on the weeds Brachiaria decumbens, guineagrass and hairy beggarticks, and on the natural weed infestation in the inter rows area of an avocado orchard. The weed species were suppressed differently by each green manure species. Soil samples collected from the field experiment presented a residual effect, of at least 30 d, in suppressing weed seed bank recruitment; this residual effect was caused by the residues of the green manure present in the soil. When the green manure was incorporated into the top 5 cm of soil or left on the surface, in a greenhouse experiment, the emergence of weed seeds was significantly inhibited, depending on the species, and on the amount and depth of green manure incorporation. Greenhouse experiments indicate that pre-emergence herbicides cause lower phytotoxicity than post-emergence Arachis pintoi. Smother crops using green manure species, when well established in an area, provide additional weed control to the cropping system and are effective and valuable tools in integrated weed management.

  13. Avaliação de herbicidas de pós-emergência na cultura da batata Evaluation of herbicides on post emergent weed control in potato crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Zagonel

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi instalado na Fazenda Escola da UEPG, Ponta Grossa-PR, em solo Latossolo Vermelho Escuro de textura média argilosa, tendo como objetivo avaliar a eficiência e a seletividade do herbicida propaquizafop no controle pós-emergente de plantas daninhas na cultura da batata. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com seis tratamentos: propaquizafop (100, 125 e 150 g i.a./ha; fluazifop-p-butil (188 g i.a./ha; testemunha capinada e testemunha sem capina, em quatro repetições. O plantio foi realizado em 26 de outubro com a cultivar Elvira, usando-se o espaçamento de 0,70 x 0,35 m. As plantas daninhas presentes foram: Brachiaria plantaginea (capim-papuã, Digitaria horizontalis (capim-milhã e Eleusine indica (capim pé-de-galinha. As avaliações foram efetuadas aos 15, 30 e 45 dias após a aplicação dos tratamento. Observou-se que a aplicação de herbicidas pós-emergentes após a amontoa, permite controle adequado de plantas daninhas desde a emergência até a colheita; o herbicida propaquizafop mostrou-se eficiente no controle sobre capim-papuã e capim pé-de-galinha nas doses de 100, 125 e 150 g i.a./ha e sobre capim-milhã nas doses de 125 e 150 g i.a./ha. As perdas na produção causadas pela competição com plantas daninha foram da ordem de 57,4 %. Não foram observados efeitos fitotóxicos nas plantas de batata que pudessem ser atribuídos aos tratamentos aplicados.The presented field experiment was conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil, on Dark Red Latossoil, to evaluate the efficiency and selectivity of herbicides on post emergence weed control in potato crops. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with six treatments and four replications: propaquizafop (100, 125 and 150 g a.i/ha; fluazifop-p-butil (188 g a.i/ha, weed free and weedy. Planting was conducted on October 26, using the cultivar Elvira. Potato plants were spaced 0.70 x 0.35 m. The

  14. Weed control in rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Sushil K; Singh, Chandra P; Singh, Kamla

    2002-12-01

    Abstract: Field investigations were carried out during 1999 and 2000 to identify effective chemical/ cultural methods of weed control in rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp). The treatments comprised pre-emergence applications of oxyfluorfen (0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 kg AI ha(-1)) and pendimethalin (0.50, 0.75 and 1.00kg AI ha(-1)), successive hand weeding, hoeing and mulching using spent of lemon grass (at 5 tonnes ha(-1)) 45 days after planting (DAP), three hand-weedings 30, 60 and 90 DAP, weed-free (frequent manual weeding) and weedy control. Broad-leaf weeds were more predominant than grass and sedge weeds, accounting for 85.8% weed density and 93.0% weed dry weight in 1999 and 77.2% weed density and 93.9% weed dry weight in 2000. Unrestricted weed growth significantly reduced geranium oil yield, by 61.6% and 70.6% in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Pre-emergence application of pendimethalin (0.75-1.00 kgAI ha(-1)) or oxyfluorfen (0.25 kg AI ha(-1)), successive hand-weeding, hoeing and mulching and three hand-weedings were highly effective in reducing weed density and dry weight and gave oil yield comparable to the weed-free check. Application of oxyfluorfen (0.15 or 0.20 kg AI ha(-1)) and pendimethalin (0.50 kg AI ha(-1)) were less effective in controlling the weed species in geranium. None of the herbicides impaired the quality of rose-scented geranium oil measured in terms of citronellol and geraniol content.

  15. Bioherbicides: Current knowledge on weed control mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi

    2018-04-17

    Weed control is a challenging event during crop cultivation. Integrated management, including the application of bioherbicides, is an emerging method for weed control in sustainable agriculture. Plant extracts, allelochemicals and some microbes are utilized as bioherbicides to control weed populations. Bioherbicides based on plants and microbes inhibit the germination and growth of weeds; however,few studies conducted in weed physiology. This review ascribes the current knowledge of the physiological changes in weeds that occur during the exposure to bioherbicides. Plant extracts or metabolites are absorbed by weed seeds, which initiates damage to the cell membrane, DNA, mitosis, amylase activity and other biochemical processes and delays or inhibits seed germination. The growth of weeds is also retarded due to low rates of root-cell division, nutrient uptake, photosynthetic pigment synthesis, and plant growth hormone synthesis, while the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress-mediated hormones increase, including irregular antioxidant activity. However, lytic enzymes and toxic substances secreted from microbes degrade the weed seed coat and utilize the endosperm for survival, which inhibits seed germination. The microbes grow through the intercellular spaces to reach the root core, and the deposition of toxins in the cells affects cell division and cellular functions. Some of the metabolites of deleterious microbes cause disease, necrosis and chlorosis,which inhibit the germination and growth of weed seeds by suppressing photosynthesis and gibberellin activities and enhancing ROS, abscisic acid and ethylene. This review explains the effects of bioherbicides (derived from plants and microbes) on weed-plant physiology to elucidate their modes of action. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of Plant Canopy Hierarchies and Consequences for Water Use: Insights From Field Experiments and Individual Based Modeling of Weed-Crop Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A. G.; McDonald, A. J.; Riha, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    In an agricultural landscape, water use is tightly linked to the dynamics of canopy development. When weeds are present, the plant community may develop leaf area faster than crop monocultures and several hierarchies of plants may be formed. The position of each individual plant within these hierarchies depends on the spatial arrangement of the plants, the initial sizes, and the availability of resources as determined by management, soil properties, weather, and competition. Together, these factors establish a highly dynamic system with nonlinear responses to the availability of resources (e.g. soil water) that is reflected in high levels of site and regional variability in crop yield losses due to weed interference. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual based model of plant competition to evaluate dynamic outcomes of crop-weed interactions and implications for water use. The model simulates the growth of individual plants using the light interception algorithms of the forest model MAESTRA, and estimates photosynthesis through the Farquhar-vonCaemmerer method. Transpiration and photosynthesis are coupled through stomatal conductance. Maximum stomatal conductance is determined by the photosynthetic demand for CO2, but under water stress, actual transpiration per plant is used to estimate stomatal conductance and then the actual rate of photosynthesis. We also used a novel approach to estimate profile water uptake, scaling the root zone of influence (volume of soil exploited by each individual plant) to plant biomass. Additive field experiments with maize in monoculture and in combination with high-density stands of a common annual weed species (A. theophrasti M.) were established to test model performance. Despite exceptionally dry conditions in the field in some years, we found no evidence that the maize-weed mixtures had less total soil water or different rates of water extraction through the profile than the maize monocrop. Furthermore, time series

  17. Ecologically sustainable weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade, and gre......Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade...... strategies with multiple complementary tactics, developing crop genotypes for enhanced weed suppression, and tailoring management strategies to better accommodate variability in weed spatial distributions. In all three cases, proof-of-concept has long been demonstrated and considerable scientific innovations...

  18. Modeling of Kerena Emergency Condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Rafał; Schmidt, Holger; Mull, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; Ganzmann, Ingo; Herbst, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept equipped with several passive safety systems. For the experimental verification of performance of the systems and for codes validation, the Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA) was built in Karlstein, Germany. The emergency condenser (EC) system transfers heat from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) to the core flooding pool in case of water level decrease in the RPV. EC is composed of a large number of slightly inclined tubes. During accident conditions, steam enters into the tubes and condenses due to the contact of the tubes with cold water at the secondary side. The condensed water flows then back to the RPV due to gravity. In this paper two approaches for modeling of condensation in slightly inclined tubes are compared and verified against experiments. The first approach is based on the flow regime map. Depending on the regime, heat transfer coefficient is calculated according to specific semi-empirical correlation. The second approach uses a general, fully-empirical correlation. The models are developed with utilization of the object-oriented Modelica language and the open-source OpenModelica environment. The results are compared with data obtained during a large scale integral test, simulating loss of coolant accident performed at Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA). The comparison shows a good agreement.Due to the modularity of models, both of them may be used in the future in systems incorporating condensation in horizontal or slightly inclined tubes. Depending on his preferences, the modeller may choose one-equation based approach or more sophisticated model composed of several exchangeable semi-empirical correlations.

  19. Modeling of Kerena Emergency Condenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryk Rafał

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept equipped with several passive safety systems. For the experimental verification of performance of the systems and for codes validation, the Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA was built in Karlstein, Germany. The emergency condenser (EC system transfers heat from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV to the core flooding pool in case of water level decrease in the RPV. EC is composed of a large number of slightly inclined tubes. During accident conditions, steam enters into the tubes and condenses due to the contact of the tubes with cold water at the secondary side. The condensed water flows then back to the RPV due to gravity. In this paper two approaches for modeling of condensation in slightly inclined tubes are compared and verified against experiments. The first approach is based on the flow regime map. Depending on the regime, heat transfer coefficient is calculated according to specific semi-empirical correlation. The second approach uses a general, fully-empirical correlation. The models are developed with utilization of the object-oriented Modelica language and the open-source OpenModelica environment. The results are compared with data obtained during a large scale integral test, simulating loss of coolant accident performed at Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA. The comparison shows a good agreement.Due to the modularity of models, both of them may be used in the future in systems incorporating condensation in horizontal or slightly inclined tubes. Depending on his preferences, the modeller may choose one-equation based approach or more sophisticated model composed of several exchangeable semi-empirical correlations.

  20. Horny Goat Weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horny goat weed is an herb. The leaves are used to make medicine. As many as 15 horny goat weed species are known as “yin yang huo” in Chinese medicine. Horny goat weed is used for weak back and knees, joint ...

  1. Ecologically sustainable weed management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne; Childs, Dylan; Christensen, Svend; Cousens, Roger; Eizenberg, Hanan; Heijting, Sanne; Loddo, Donato; Merotto, Aldo; Renton, Michael; Riemens, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade, and

  2. Weed exterminator and method of exterminating weed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tempel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of exterminating weed, which method comprises the steps of: providing an extermination chamber (14, 14a, 14b, 14c) having at least one open side (14d), placing the open side (14d) over weed to be exterminated; substantially closing off the edge of the open side of

  3. Socio-economic impacts and determinants of parasitic weed infestation in rainfed rice systems of sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'cho, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: rice; weed; weed management practices, adoption, impact, parasitic weeds; Rhamphicarpa fistulosa; Striga asiatica; Striga hermonthica, double hurdle model; multivariate probit, productivity, stochastic frontier analysis, data envelopment

  4. Dynamics of weed populations : spatial pattern formation and implications for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling studies were carried out to analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of annual weed populations and to identify the key factors that determine the long-term herbicide use of weed control programmes. Three different weed control programmes were studied.

    In the first weed

  5. ANN Model for Predicting the Impact of Submerged Aquatic Weeds Existence on the Hydraulic Performance of Branched Open Channel System Accompanied by Water Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdeen, Mostafa A. M.; Abdin, Alla E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of hydraulic structures in a branched open channel system urges the need for considering the gradually varied flow criterion in evaluating the different hydraulic characteristics in this type of open channel system. Computations of hydraulic characteristics such as flow rates and water surface profiles in branched open channel system with hydraulic structures require tremendous numerical effort especially when the flow cannot be assumed uniform. In addition, the existence of submerged aquatic weeds in this branched open channel system adds to the complexity of the evaluation of the different hydraulic characteristics for this system. However, this existence of aquatic weeds can not be neglected since it is very common in Egyptian open channel systems. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been widely utilized in the past decade in civil engineering applications for the simulation and prediction of the different physical phenomena and has proven its capabilities in the different fields. The present study aims towards introducing the use of ANN technique to model and predict the impact of submerged aquatic weeds existence on the hydraulic performance of branched open channel system. Specifically the current paper investigates a branched open channel system that consists of main channel supplies water to two branch channels that are infested by submerged aquatic weeds and have water structures such as clear over fall weirs and sluice gates. The results of this study showed that ANN technique was capable, with small computational effort and high accuracy, of predicting the impact of different infestation percentage for submerged aquatic weeds on the hydraulic performance of branched open channel system with two different hydraulic structures

  6. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  7. Weed control in young coffee plantations through post emergence herbicide application onto total area Controle de plantas daninhas em cafezais recém-implantados, com herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência em área total

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Ronchi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the efficiency of several herbicides under field conditions, by post-emergence application onto the entire area, their effect on the control of weeds in young coffee plantations and commercial coffee and bean intercropping system, as well as on both crops. Seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Red Catuaí with four to six leaf pairs were transplanted to the field and treated according to conventional agronomic practices. A bean and coffee intercropping system was established by sowing three lines of beans in the coffee inter-rows. At the time the herbicides were sprayed, the coffee plants had six to ten leaf pairs; the bean plants, three leaflets; and the weeds were at an early development stage. Fluazifop-p-butyl and clethodim were selective for coffee plants and controlled only Brachiaria plantaginea and Digitaria horizontalis efficiently. Broad-leaved weeds (Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Coronopus didymus, Emilia sonchifolia, Galinsoga parviflora, Ipomoea grandifolia, Lepidium virginicum, and Raphanus raphanistrum were controlled with high efficiency by sole applications of fomesafen, flazasulfuron, and oxyfluorfen, except B. pilosa, C. didymus, and R. raphanistrum for oxyfluorfen. Sequential applications in seven-day intervals of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl, or clethodim, and two commercial mixtures of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl simultaneously controlled both types of weed. Cyperus rotundus was only controlled by flazasulfuron. Except for fluazifop-p-butyl and clethodim, all herbicide treatments caused only slight injuries on younger coffee leaves. However, further plant growth was not impaired and coffee plant height and stem diameter were therefore similar in the treatments, as evaluated four months later. Fomesafen, fluazifop-p-butyl, and clethodim, at sole or sequential application, and the commercial mixtures of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl were also highly selective for bean crop; thus

  8. Teenagers with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Sean P; Taddei, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    We report 2 cases of teenagers who were poisoned with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) and presented to the emergency department with a severe acute anticholinergic toxidrome after ingestion of several hundred seeds. The patients presented with visual hallucinations, disorientation, incomprehensible and nonsensical speech, and dilated sluggish pupils. Both patients required restraints for combativeness until adequate sedation with lorazepam and haloperidol was achieved. Jimson weed is found in southern Canada and the United States and can cause acute anticholinergic poisoning and death in humans and animals. The treatment of choice for anticholinergic poisoning is mainly supportive care and gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal. Jimson weed intoxication should be considered in cases of patients presenting with unexplained peripheral and central anticholinergic symptoms including delirium, agitation and seizures, especially among younger patients and partygoers. It is important that health care professionals recognize that Jimson weed is a toxic, indigenous, "wild" growing plant, subject to misuse and potentially serious intoxication requiring hospitalization.

  9. Interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência afetando o desenvolvimento e a produtividade do milho Interaction between burndown systems and post-emergence weed control affecting corn development and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Constantin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência na cultura do milho, híbrido AG 9010, em semeadura direta, em área com expressiva cobertura vegetal. Foram avaliados 10 tratamentos, compostos por um esquema fatorial (3 x 3 + 1. Os fatores eram constituídos por três sistemas de manejo (dessecação imediatamente antes da semeadura, dessecação 10 dias antes da semeadura e dessecação antecipada, sendo esta composta por duas aplicações de manejo: a primeira 24 dias antes da semeadura e a segunda na data da semeadura, três formas de controle das plantas daninhas após a emergência da cultura (nenhum controle, capina manual das parcelas e aplicação de herbicidas em pós-emergência e um tratamento adicional, constituído por uma testemunha absoluta (sem manejo e sem controle em pós-emergência. O manejo realizado na data da semeadura e sete dias antes reduziu significativamente a produtividade do milho. Já o manejo antecipado, além de reduzir o fluxo de emergência de plantas daninhas após emergência do milho, proporcionou ganhos de produtividade que variaram entre 696 e 1.867 kg ha-1.This work aimed to evaluate the interaction between burndown methods and systems of post-emergence weed control in corn, hybrid AG 9010, under no-tillage, in areas with expressive soil green cover. Ten treatments in a factorial scheme (3 x 3 + 1 were evaluated. Main factors were composed by three burndown systems (desiccation immediately before sowing; desiccation 7 days prior to crop sowing and anticipated desiccation, composed by two burndown herbicide applications, the first 24 days prior to sowing and the second immediately before sowing, three post-emergence weed control systems (no control, manual weeding and herbicide application and an additional treatment constituted by an absolute check (no burndown and no post-emergence weed control. Burndown either at sowing

  10. Emergent universe model with dissipative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, P. S.; Paul, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    Emergent universe model is presented in general theory of relativity with isotropic fluid in addition to viscosity. We obtain cosmological solutions that permit emergent universe scenario in the presence of bulk viscosity that are described by either Eckart theory or Truncated Israel Stewart (TIS) theory. The stability of the solutions are also studied. In this case, the emergent universe (EU) model is analyzed with observational data. In the presence of viscosity, one obtains emergent universe scenario, which however is not permitted in the absence of viscosity. The EU model is compatible with cosmological observations.

  11. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    on crops. Longer term management of crop–weed competition can be achieved through crop rotations, specifically crop sequences that reduce the weed seed bank, and therefore seedling density, and prevent proliferation of perennial weeds. Key ConceptsKey Concepts * Plant growth requires sunlight, water......Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...... and nutrients, which in turn are converted into biomass that captures additional resources. * In crop or weed monocultures, increasing density increases total production to a maximum that is determined by the resource status of the site, generally with a corresponding decrease in per plant mass. * In crop...

  12. Augmented multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of the phytotoxicities of benzoxazinone herbicides and related compounds on problematic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mirlaine R; Matias, Stella V B G; Macedo, Renato L G; Freitas, Matheus P; Venturin, Nelson

    2013-09-11

    Two of major weeds affecting cereal crops worldwide are Avena fatua L. (wild oat) and Lolium rigidum Gaud. (rigid ryegrass). Thus, development of new herbicides against these weeds is required; in line with this, benzoxazinones, their degradation products, and analogues have been shown to be important allelochemicals and natural herbicides. Despite earlier structure-activity studies demonstrating that hydrophobicity (log P) of aminophenoxazines correlates to phytotoxicity, our findings for a series of benzoxazinone derivatives do not show any relationship between phytotoxicity and log P nor with other two usual molecular descriptors. On the other hand, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis based on molecular graphs representing structural shape, atomic sizes, and colors to encode other atomic properties performed very accurately for the prediction of phytotoxicities of these compounds against wild oat and rigid ryegrass. Therefore, these QSAR models can be used to estimate the phytotoxicity of new congeners of benzoxazinone herbicides toward A. fatua L. and L. rigidum Gaud.

  13. Weed control technology for environmentally, economically and socially sustainable agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.R.; Srivastava, R.C.; Ghorai, A.K.; Singh, S.R.

    2001-04-01

    Studies were conducted through a series of experiments for five consecutive wet seasons with a variety of alternative biological weed control techniques by means of soil solarization. This is a method of heating soil surface by using transparent polyethylene sheets placed on soil surface to trap solar radiation. This raises soil temperature to a level lethal for many soil borne pathogens and weed seeds, thus killing weeds before crop emergence. The use of black low density polyethylene sheets reduces weed growth and increases rice yield

  14. Efficacy of various herbicides against weeds in wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weeds are one of the most important factors that impose a great threat to the crop yield. In order to alleviate the weeds infestation in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), the efficacy of various pre and post-emergence herbicides were tested during Rabi 2009 to 2010 at the Agronomic Research Area, University of Agriculture, ...

  15. Weed biocontrol in the EU: from serendipity to strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control of weeds is a globally-recognized approach to the management of the worst invasive plants in the world. Unfortunately, accidental introduction of agents account for most weed biocontrol in the EU, but do include a number of current or emerging successes. From the redistribution of...

  16. Evaluation of Different Weed Control Techniques in Soyabean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten weed control treatments consisting of wheel type weeder [3 and 6 weeks after planting (wap)]; hoe weeding (3 and 6 wap); Pre-emergence application of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] + prometryn [N, N'-bis (1-methylethyl)-6-(methylthio)-1,3,5-triazine-2 ...

  17. Competition of rapeseed ( Brassica napus L.) cultivars with weeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatments included two levels of weed (W0: weed free, and W1: weedy) as main plots and eight rapeseed cultivars (Modena, Okapi, Sarigol, Licord, Hyola308, Zarfam, RGS003andSLM046) as sub-plots. Ten plant samples were chosen from the middle part of each row and days from emergence to flowering, days from ...

  18. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  19. Interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência afetando o desenvolvimento e a produtividade da soja Interaction between burndown systems and post-emergence weed control affecting soybean development and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Oliveira Jr.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a interação entre sistemas de manejo e de controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência na cultura da soja, cv. BRS 154, em plantio direto em áreas com expressiva cobertura vegetal. Foram avaliados 13 tratamentos, compostos por um esquema fatorial (3x4+1. Os fatores eram constituídos por três sistemas de manejo (dessecação imediatamente antes da semeadura, dessecação 10 dias antes da semeadura e dessecação antecipada, sendo esta composta por duas aplicações de manejo, a primeira 24 dias antes da semeadura e a segunda na data da semeadura, quatro formas de controle das plantas daninhas após a emergência da cultura (nenhum controle, capina manual das parcelas, aplicação única e aplicação seqüencial de herbicidas e um tratamento adicional, constituído por uma testemunha absoluta (sem manejo e sem controle em pós-emergência. Embora a dessecação nos diferentes sistemas de manejo tenha sido eficiente, a antecipação da dessecação no manejo antecipado favoreceu a emergência e o desenvolvimento inicial da soja, proporcionando maiores ganhos de produtividade, nas condições de infestação apresentadas. O sistema de manejo afetou também o fluxo de emergência das plantas daninhas após a emergência da soja, com menos reinfestações no sistema de manejo antecipado, em função do controle dos fluxos iniciais proporcionado pela segunda aplicação deste sistema de manejo. O manejo realizado na data da semeadura e dez dias antes prejudicou o desenvolvimento da soja, resultando em menor produtividade. O manejo antecipado, quando comparado aos demais sistemas, proporcionou maior produtividade da soja.This work aimed to evaluate the interaction between burndown methods and systems of post-emergence weed control in soybeans, cv. BRS 154, under no-tillage, in areas with expressive soil green cover. Thirteen treatments in a factorial scheme (3x4 +1, were evaluated. Main factors were

  20. Effect of weeding on the growth, yield and yield contributing characters of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Akter, R.; Samad, M.A.; Zaman, F.; Islam, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Field Laboratory of Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh to assess the effect of weeding on growth, yield and yield contributing characters of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) cv. BINA mung- 4 during October 2011 to February 2012. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The trial comprised seven treatments namely, T1 = no weeding, T2 = one-stage weeding (Emergence-Flowering), T3 = one-stage weed...

  1. Weeding Library Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Stanley J.

    This work, based on two recent research projects in the weeding of library collections and the identification of core collections, provides a comprehensive summary of the literature and research on these topics. It also presents practical guidance in weeding for the professional librarian or for the library school student. The book is divided into…

  2. of different weed control methods on Weed infestation, growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinkexploitsint'l

    importance of integrated weed management in enhancing weed control compared with the use of single weed control ... comparable significantly taller soybeans plants with other herbicides treatments and two hoe- weedings except ... the soyabean plants to utilize more nutrient, moisture and sunlight for better performance.

  3. Watershed-Scale Modeling of Land-Use and Altered Environment Impacts on Aquatic Weed Growth in the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David; Potter, Christopher; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    model component. Plant response to the range of water quality factors, response times, and altered temperature and light regimes of the Delta have required gap-filling studies to provide model parameters. Delta-SWAT provides a tool for evaluating temporal and spatial effects of land-use and altered environments in the Delta and contributing watersheds on aquatic weed growth. Using Delta-SWAT for simulation modeling allows evaluation of historic and current conditions as well as consideration potential climate change and management practice outcomes. Delta-SWAT adds to the scientific understanding of dynamics in the Delta and enhances development of science-informed, management strategies and practices.

  4. The Effect of Relative Emergence Time and Density of Common Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. on Corn (Zea mays L. Grain and Biological Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    v Sarabi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To study the effect of competitive potential of corn (Zea mays, in competition with common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album an experiment was conducted in 2006, at the farm of Agricultural Faculty of Ferdowsi University. In this experiment the effect of relative emergence time of common lambsquarters on single Cross 704 corn yield was studied in different densitis of the weed. The experimental design was split plot based on randomized completed block design with three replications. The emergence time at 3 levels (emergence of the weed 14 days earlier, 7 days earlier and simultaneously with corn was considered as main plots and density of weed at 6 levels (0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 plants m-2 as sub plots. The results showed a decrease in grain and biological yield of corn, as the emergence time of corn delayed in comparison with the emergence time of weed. The maximum yield reduction of 100 and 99% was observed respectively, in the earliest emergence time of common lambsquarters compared to corn and in the highest density of weed (20 plants m-2 where the corn plants were fully shaded by the weed canopy and no ear was produced. The yield loss of corn was higher when the earlier emergence time of weed was occurred in higher weed densities. based on the results of this research it can be concluded that the decrease of competitive potential of corn with increasing the relative emergence time of common lambsquarters was led to significant yield loss of corn crop. While the increase in weed density resulted in corn yield reduction, there was no difference in yield loss in high weed densities. Keywords: Biomass, Competition, Weed interference model, Yield loss

  5. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  6. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  7. Weed flora, yield losses and weed control in cotton crop

    OpenAIRE

    Jabran, Khawar

    2016-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the most important fiber crop of world and provides fiber, oil, and animals meals. Weeds interfere with the growth activities of cotton plants and compete with it for resources. All kinds of weeds (grasses, sedges, and broadleaves) have been noted to infest cotton crop. Weeds can cause more than 30% decrease in cotton productivity. Several methods are available for weed control in cotton. Cultural control carries significance for weed control up to a certain extent....

  8. Weed ecology and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A global rise in herbicide resistant weed genotypes, coupled with a growing demand for food produced with minimal external synthetic inputs, is driving producer interest in reducing reliance on herbicides for weed management. An improved understanding of weed ecology can support the design of weed s...

  9. Numerical models and their role in emergency response: a perspective on dispersion modeling for emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenly, G.D.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    Numerical models on several levels of complexity should be available to the emergency response planner. They are a basic tool but must be used in conjunction with both measurements and experience. When these tools are used in a complimentary fashion they greatly enhance the capability of the consequence manager to respond in an emergency situation. Because each accident or incident develops it's own characteristics and requirements the system must be capable of a flexible response. Interaction and feedback between model results from a suite of models and measurements (including airborne measurements) serve the emergency response planner's spectrum of needs, ranging from planning exercises and emergency precalculations to a real-time emergency response

  10. Business Models in Emerging Online Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kelly; Playford, Corrie; Messinger, Paul R.; Niu, Run H.; Stroulia, Eleni

    Due to advances in technology and the rapid growth of online services, a significant number of new and inventive web-based service models and delivery methods have been introduced. Although online resources and services are having an impact on more traditional service delivery mechanisms, it is not yet clear how these emerging mechanisms for online service delivery will result in profitable business models. In this paper, we consider emerging business models for online services and their implications for how services are delivered, used, and paid for.We demonstrate the changing roles of user / consumer and provider / seller. We also discuss the applicability of different business models for various domains.

  11. Effect of Different Methods of Chemical Weed Control Irrigation Regimes on Weed Biomass and Safflower Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matinfar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of different weed control methods and moisture regimes on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, a field split plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with 4 replications was conducted in Takestan Iran, during growing seasons of 2007-8. Three irrigations regimes (normal irrigation, restricted irrigation at stem elongation and restricted irrigation at  flowering stage were assigned to the main plots and nine chemical weed control method (complete hand weeding, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha ad pre plant herbicide, estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide+ gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide and without hand weeding to sub- plots. At the end of growing period traits like number of head   per plant, number of seed per head, 1000 grain weight, percent of seed oil, yield of seed oil and grain yield were measured. Results indicated that treflan + gallant super treatment in restricted irrigation at stem elongation stage had the lowest dry weight of weeds. In this study maximum grain yield (2927 Kg/ha was achieved from hand weeding + usual irrigation treatments. In general treflan + gallant super treatment was the most effective treatment on safflower yield and weed control.

  12. THE EFFECT OF WINTER CATCH CROPS ON WEED INFESTATION IN SWEET CORN DEPENDING ON THE WEED CONTROL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out in east-central Poland (52°06’ N, 22°55’ E over 2008–2011 to study the effect of winter catch crops on the weed infestation, number, and fresh matter of weeds in sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. saccharata. The following winter catch crops were grown: hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth., white clover (Trifolium repens L., winter rye (Secale cereale L., Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L. and winter turnip rape (Brassica rapa var. typica Posp.. The catch crops were sown in early September and incorporated in early May. The effect of the catch crops was compared to the effect of FYM (30 t·ha-1 and control without organic manuring (NOM. Three methods of weed control were used: HW – hand weeding, twice during the growing period, GCM – the herbicide Guardian Complete Mix 664 SE, immediately after sowing of corn seeds, Z+T – a mixture of the herbicides Zeagran 340 SE and Titus 25 WG applied at the 3–4-leaf stage of sweet corn growth. Rye and turnip rape catch crops had least weeds in their fresh matter. Sweet corn following winter catch crops was less infested by weeds than corn following farmyard manure and non-manured corn. Least weeds and their lowest weight were found after SC, BRT and VV. LM and BRT reduced weed species numbers compared with FYM and NOM. The greatest weed species diversity, determined at the corn flowering stage, was determined after SC and FYM. The number and weight of weeds were significantly lower when chemically controlled compared with hand weeding. The best results were observed after a post-emergent application of the mixture Z+T. The weed species diversity on Z+T-treated plots was clearly lower compared with GCM and HW.

  13. Eficácia e seletividade de herbicidas do grupo das imidazolinonas aplicados em pós-emergência de plantas daninhas monocotiledôneas na cultura do girassol CL Efficacy and selectivity of herbicides from the imidazolinone group applied in post-emergence of monocotyledon weeds on CL sunflower culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Francischini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O controle das plantas daninhas, em geral, é realizado pelo uso de herbicidas, porém essa prática é limitada na cultura do girassol, por haver apenas dois produtos registrados para essa cultura (alachlor e trifluralin. Entretanto, o uso de novas tecnologias pode facilitar o controle das plantas daninhas com herbicidas que possuem amplo espectro de controle. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficácia e seletividade de herbicidas do grupo das imidazolinonas aplicados em pós-emergência de plantas daninhas monocotiledôneas na cultura do girassol Clearfield (CL. Para isso, foram instalados dois experimentos em campo. Os tratamentos e as respectivas doses em g ha-1 foram: trifluralin (1.800 aplicado em pré-emergência, fluazifop-p-butil (187 e imazapic+imazapyr nas doses de [36,75+12,25], [52,5+17,5], [12,25+36,75] e [17,5+52,5], aplicados em pós-emergência, além de duas testemunhas sem aplicação de herbicida, sendo uma sem capina e outra com capina. Foram realizadas avaliações de controle para Eleusine indica, Brachiaria plantaginea, Lolium multiflorum, Digitaria insularis, Cenchrus echinatus e Digitaria horizontalis, fitointoxicação do girassol Clearfield, estande e produtividade em kg ha-1. De acordo com os resultados, verificou-se que o uso do sistema CLmostrou-se uma ótima opção para áreas com infestação de plantas daninhas monocotiledôneas, pois possibilita a aplicação de herbicidas inibidores da enzima acetolactato sintase (ALS, obtendo excelente controle das plantas daninhas, além de não provocar injúrias visuais, mantendo o estande inicial, sem alterar a produtividade da cultura.Weed control is generally accomplished by the use of herbicides. However, this practice is limited in sunflower cultivation,since only two products are registered for the culture (alachlor and trifluralin.The use of new technologies can facilitate weed control with herbicides with broad spectrum control. Therefore, the

  14. [Spatial and temporal dynamics of the weed community in the Zoysia matrella lawn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Qi; Li, You-Han; Zeng, Ying; Xie, Xin-Ming

    2014-02-01

    The heterogeneity of species composition is one of the main attributes in weed community dynamics. Based on species frequency and power law, this paper studied the variations of weed community species composition and spatial heterogeneity in a Zoysia matrella lawn in Guangzhou at different time. The results showed that there were 43 weed species belonging to 19 families in the Z. matrella lawn from 2007 to 2009, in which Gramineae, Compositae, Cyperaceae and Rubiaceae had a comparative advantage. Perennial weeds accounted for the largest proportion of weeds and increased gradually in the three years. Weed communities distributed in higher heterogeneity than in a random model. Dominant weeds varied with season and displayed regularity in the order of 'dicotyledon-monocotyledon-dicotyledon weeds' and 'perennial-annual-perennial weeds'. The spatial heterogeneity of weed community in Z. matrella lawn was higher in summer than in winter. The diversity and evenness of weed community were higher in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. The number of weed species with high heterogeneity in summer was higher than in the other seasons. The spatial heterogeneity and diversity of weed community had no significant change in the three years, while the evenness of weed community had the tendency to decline gradually.

  15. The Politics of Weeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Hope N.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the literature that deals with the political ramifications of weeding material from academic library collections and the need to involve users and other libraries within the institution in the decision process. (14 references) (CLB)

  16. Robotic weed monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2011-01-01

    -farm operating console, the mobile robotic unit, and a field server for generating and storingmaps. The hypothesis is that it is possible to automate the planning and execution of theoperation of monitoring of the in-field weed density and species distribution. The developedplanning system includes the automatic...... of the weed monitoring operation.Key words: autonomous vehicles, farm management, mission planning, route planning,sampling....

  17. Aplicação de óleo fúsel isolado e em mistura com glifosato na pós-emergência tardia de plantas daninhas Fusel oil as herbicide at late weed postemergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.P.M. Azania

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado no Centro de Cana IAC, Ribeirão Preto, com o objetivo de avaliar a eficácia do óleo fúsel isolado e em mistura com glifosato, aplicado na pós-emergência tardia de plantas daninhas de uma comunidade natural. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados (DBC, com 13 tratamentos em quatro repetições, sendo 52 parcelas de 3 x 3 m cada. A aplicação dos tratamentos foi realizada em 22/3/2006, com equipamento costal pressurizado munido de barra com quatro pontas de pulverização Teejet 110.02 TT, regulado para volume de calda de 212 L ha-1. Avaliaram-se a porcentagem de controle aos 14, 21, 28, 35 e 42 dias após a aplicação do tratamento (DAA e a massa seca, aos 42 DAA. Para a maioria dos tratamentos somente não houve 100% de controle devido à presença de plantas daninhas dos gêneros Commelina e Cyperus spp., que, mesmo com partes amareladas, foram mais tolerantes à aplicação dos produtos. O controle obtido com óleo fúsel aplicado isoladamente não ultrapassou 20%, aos 42 DAA.This work was carried out at the Sugarcane Center (Centro de Cana IAC, Ribeirão Preto-SP, to evaluate the effectiveness of fusel oil alone and mixed with glyphosate applied at late weed post-emergence of a natural community. The experimental design was randomized blocks, with 13 treatments and 4 repetitions, totaling 52 plots 3x3m each. Application of the treatments was accomplished on 03/22/2006, with pressurized back sprayer. The control percentages were evaluated at 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days after treatment (DAA and weed dry matter was obtained by using a square 0.5 x 0.5 m sorted two times on the plots at 42 DAA. The less satisfactory results under the control at the end of the experiment were when fusel oil was applied alone. The lack of 100% control in the main treatments evaluated was due to the presence of the weeds Commelina and Cyperus spp., which were more tolerant to herbicide application. The control

  18. Weed Diversity Affects Soybean and Maize Yield in a Long Term Experiment in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Davis, Adam S; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L

    2017-01-01

    Managing production environments in ways that promote weed community diversity may enhance both crop production and the development of a more sustainable agriculture. This study analyzed data of productivity of maize (corn) and soybean in plots in the Main Cropping System Experiment (MCSE) at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) in Michigan, USA, from 1996 to 2011. We used models derived from population ecology to explore how weed diversity, temperature, and precipitation interact with crop yields. Using three types of models that considered internal and external (climate and weeds) factors, with additive or non-linear variants, we found that changes in weed diversity were associated with changes in rates of crop yield increase over time for both maize and soybeans. The intrinsic capacity for soybean yield increase in response to the environment was greater under more diverse weed communities. Soybean production risks were greatest in the least weed diverse systems, in which each weed species lost was associated with progressively greater crop yield losses. Managing for weed community diversity, while suppressing dominant, highly competitive weeds, may be a helpful strategy for supporting long term increases in soybean productivity. In maize, there was a negative and non-additive response of yields to the interaction between weed diversity and minimum air temperatures. When cold temperatures constrained potential maize productivity through limited resources, negative interactions with weed diversity became more pronounced. We suggest that: (1) maize was less competitive in cold years allowing higher weed diversity and the dominance of some weed species; or (2) that cold years resulted in increased weed richness and prevalence of competitive weeds, thus reducing crop yields. Therefore, we propose to control dominant weed species especially in the years of low yield and extreme minimum temperatures to improve maize yields

  19. Airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data integration for weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, János; Lehoczky, Éva; Fehér, János; Fórián, Tünde; Nagy, Attila; Bozsik, Éva; Gálya, Bernadett; Riczu, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture uses 70% of global available fresh water. However, ca. 50-70% of water used by cultivated plants, the rest of water transpirated by the weeds. Thus, to define the distribution of weeds is very important in precision agriculture and horticulture as well. To survey weeds on larger fields by traditional methods is often time consuming. Remote sensing instruments are useful to detect weeds in larger area. In our investigation a 3D airborne laser scanner (RIEGL LMS-Q680i) was used in agricultural field near Sopron to scouting weeds. Beside the airborne LiDAR, hyperspectral imaging system (AISA DUAL) and air photos helped to investigate weed coverage. The LiDAR survey was carried out at early April, 2012, before sprouting of cultivated plants. Thus, there could be detected emerging of weeds and direction of cultivation. However airborne LiDAR system was ideal to detect weeds, identification of weeds at species level was infeasible. Higher point density LiDAR - Terrestrial laser scanning - systems are appropriate to distinguish weed species. Based on the results, laser scanner is an effective tool to scouting of weeds. Appropriate weed detection and mapping systems could contribute to elaborate water and herbicide saving management technique. This publication was supported by the OTKA project K 105789.

  20. Dry Bean Morpho-Physiological Responses to Gradual Weed Biomass Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein GHAMARI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Field study was carried out in 2011 in west of Iran to assess responses of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. morpho-physiological traits to gradual weed biomass accumulation. The treatments consisted of two different periods of weed interference, which weeds either infested the plots or removed for an increasing duration of time (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 days after crop emergence. Relative dominance and relative importance of weed species fluctuated over the crop cycle. As the duration of weed interference was increased, a declining trend of crop growth rate (CGR was observed. When weeds were allowed to compete with crop throughout the crop cycle, maximum value of CGR was decreased from 25.57 g m-2 days in full season weed free treatment to 16.78 g m-2 days in full season weed infested treatment. Effect of treatments on leaf area index (LAI was significant. Weed removal increased LAI but it could not significantly affect this trait, at the early of growing season. Weed interference caused a significant reduction on number of branches. The minimum number of branches was registered in full season weed infested treatment (2.58 branches per plant, while the maximum one was observed in the full season weed free treatment (4.25 branches per plant. Weed competition severely reduced crop yield. At 10 and 20 days after crop emergence, weed infestation could not significantly affect the yield. A negative relationship between weeds’ dry matter accumulation and LAI as well as number of branches was observed which signify the vulnerability of these morpho-physiological traits to weed competition.

  1. Ensemble Risk Model of Emergency Admissions (ERMER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgarpour, Mohsen; Chaussalet, Thierry; Chahed, Salma

    2017-07-01

    About half of hospital readmissions can be avoided with preventive interventions. Developing decision support tools for identification of patients' emergency readmission risk is an important area of research. Because, it remains unclear how to design features and develop predictive models that can adjust continuously to a fast-changing healthcare system and population characteristics. The objective of this study was to develop a generic ensemble Bayesian risk model of emergency readmission. We produced a decision support tool that predicts risk of emergency readmission using England's Hospital Episode Statistics inpatient database. Firstly, we used a framework to develop an optimal set of features. Then, a combination of Bayes Point Machine (BPM) models for different cohorts was considered to create an optimised ensemble model, which is stronger than the individual generative and non-linear classifications. The developed Ensemble Risk Model of Emergency Admissions (ERMER) was trained and tested using three time-frames: 1999-2004, 2000-05 and 2004-09, each of which includes about 20% of patients in England during the trigger year. Comparisons are made for different time-frames, sub-populations, risk cut-offs, risk bands and top risk segments. The precision was 71.6-73.9%, the specificity was 88.3-91.7% and the sensitivity was 42.1-49.2% across different time-frames. Moreover, the Area Under the Curve was 75.9-77.1%. The decision support tool performed considerably better than the previous modelling approaches, and it was robust and stable with high precision. Moreover, the framework and the Bayesian model allow the model to continuously adjust it to new significant features, different population characteristics and changes in the system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aquatic weed control within an integrated water management framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querner, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    Aquatic weed control, carried out by the water boards in the Netherlands, is required to maintain sufficient discharge capacity of the surface water system. Weed control affects the conditions of both surface water and groundwater. The physically based model MOGROW was developed to simulate

  3. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant cropping systems in the United States. Part 7: Effects of weed management strategy (grower practices versus academic recommendations) on the weed soil seedbank over 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David J; Young, Bryan G; Owen, Micheal D K; Gage, Karla L; Matthews, Joseph L; Jordan, David L; Shaw, David R; Weller, Stephen C; Wilson, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Shifts in weed species composition and richness resulting from near-exclusive reliance on herbicides in glyphosate-resistant (GR) cropping systems has necessitated the implementation of alternative weed management tactics to reduce selection pressures of herbicides. We contrasted the response of the weed soil seedbank to effects of weed management strategy, comparing grower practices with academic recommendations for best management practices (BMPs) over 6 years and across five weed hardiness zones in the US Midwest at sites subject to GR cropping systems. Total weed population density and species richness varied according to cropping system, location and prior year's crop, but less so to weed management strategy. The seedbank population density for 11 of the 14 most frequent weed species was affected by weed management strategy either alone or in an interaction with hardiness zone or year, or both. In only 29% of comparisons was weed population density lower following academic recommendations, and this depended upon prior crop and cropping system. The population density of high-risk weed species was reduced by academic recommendations, but only in two of six years and under continuous GR maize. Overall, the weed population density was decreasing in field halves subject to the BMPs in the academic recommendations relative to grower practices. The soil seedbank is slow to respond to academic recommendations to mitigate glyphosate-resistant weeds, but represents a biological legacy that growers need to keep in mind even when management practices reduce emerged field weed population densities. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Weeds and Wildlife: Perceptions and Practices of Weed Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma H Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts of invasive plants or weeds on biodiversity have been well established yet their role in providing key habitats and resources for wildlife has been little understood. Weed removal thus has the potential to adversely affect wildlife but whether this is considered during weed management is poorly known. To determine the extent of this knowledge, we examined the perceptions of weed managers regarding wildlife and weed management in Victoria, Australia. We surveyed 81 weed managers of varying levels of experience from different types of organisations, including state and local government, community groups and private companies. We found 90% of managers had observed wildlife-weed interactions and that most (70% adjusted management programmes to accommodate wildlife. Despite this, few (19% had adopted the recommended practice of combining gradual weed removal with re-vegetation. While management programmes included monitoring of native vegetation, consideration of wildlife monitoring in weed management was rare. This highlights the need for management to better understand and respond to wildlife-weed relationships. If the improvement of wildlife habitat is included in the objectives of weed programmes, as it should be, then wildlife should also be incorporated in project monitoring. This would lead to a greater understanding of the role weeds and their management have in each situation and, ultimately, more informed decision making.

  5. Effect of Plowing Frequency and Weeding Methods on Weeds and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of repeated tillage and weed control methods on weed infestation and grain yield of wheat was evaluated at Arsi Negelle, southern Ethiopia, from 1993 to 1995 cropping ... Generally, four times plowing significantly reduced weed infestation and increased wheat grain yield with considerable economic benefit.

  6. Transdisciplinary weed research: new leverage on challenging weed problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, N.; Schut, M.; Graham, S.; Barney, J.N.; Childs, D.Z.; Christensen, S.B.; Cousens, R.D.; Davis, A.S.; Eizenberg, H.; Ervin, D.E.; Fernandez-Quintanilla, C.; Harrison, L.J.; Harsch, M.A.; Heijting, S.; Liebman, M.; Loddo, D.; Mirsky, S.B.; Riemens, M.; Neve, P.; Peltzer, D.A.; Renton, M.; Williams, M.; Recasens, J.; Sønderskov, M.

    2016-01-01

    Transdisciplinary weed research (TWR) is a promising path to more effective management of challenging weed problems. We define TWR as an integrated process of inquiry and action that addresses complex weed problems in the context of broader efforts to improve economic, environmental and social

  7. Effect of plant spacing and weeding frequency on weed infestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bean is an important food and cash crop in eastern Ethiopia. However, its yield is constrained by weeds. Therefore, this study was conducted in 2012 main cropping season at Haramaya and Hirna research fields, eastern Ethiopia, to determine the effect of plant spacing and weeding frequency on weeds, yield ...

  8. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  9. Non-chemical weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, Bo; Liebman, Matt; Davies, Adam S.

    2017-01-01

    Non-chemical weed management covers all management practices that influence weeds except herbicides. This chapter summarises the major achievements in European research, as well as work undertaken in North America. Research groups from both continents have interacted strongly on the topic over...... the years and shared common interests on the development of non-chemical tactics. The chapter encompasses preventive, cultural and direct weed control methods, explaining the basic principles and the integration of these tactics in weed management strategies for agricultural and horticultural crops...... and in some cases amenity areas as well. Preventive methods reduce weed germination, cultural methods improve crop competition and direct physical weed control reduces weed survival. Non-chemical weed management is mainly adopted in organic crop production, as conventional growers still perceive it as more...

  10. Weeding 101 (2nd ed.)

    OpenAIRE

    Maxted, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The most important thing to know about weeding is that it is OK to weed. Weeding (de-accessioning, unacquiring, deselecting, removing, discarding, trashing) library materials is not a crime against humanity. Sometimes it needs to be done in the dark of night but the doing is necessary to the health of every library collection except perhaps those that strive to be universally comprehensive and who are served by unlimited space and budgets. Weeding does not necessarily mean absolutely and p...

  11. Graph and Analytical Models for Emergency Evacuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Gelenbe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-Physical-Human Systems (CPHS combine sensing, communication and control to obtain desirable outcomes in physical environments for human beings, such as buildings or vehicles. A particularly important application area is emergency management. While recent work on the design and optimisation of emergency management schemes has relied essentially on discrete event simulation, which is challenged by the substantial amount of programming or reprogramming of the simulation tools and by the scalability and the computing time needed to obtain useful performance estimates, this paper proposes an approach that offers fast estimates based on graph models and probability models. We show that graph models can offer insight into the critical areas in an emergency evacuation and that they can suggest locations where sensor systems are particularly important and may require hardening. On the other hand, we also show that analytical models based on queueing theory can provide useful estimates of evacuation times and for routing optimisation. The results are illustrated with regard to the evacuation of a real-life building.

  12. Urban meteorological modelling for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Sorensen, Jens Havskov; Hoe, Steen Cordt; Amstrup, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    The main objectives of the current EU project 'Integrated Systems for Forecasting Urban Meteorology, Air Pollution and Population Exposure' (FUMAPEX) are the improvement of meteorological forecasts for urban areas, the connection of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to urban air pollution and population dose models, the building of improved urban air quality information and forecasting systems, and their application in cities in various European climates. In addition to the forecast of the worst air-pollution episodes in large cities, the potential use of improved weather forecasts for nuclear emergency management in urban areas, in case of hazardous releases from nuclear accidents or terror acts, is considered. Such use of NWP data is tested for the Copenhagen metropolitan area and the Oresund region. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) is running an experimental version of the HIRLAM NWP model over Zealand including the Copenhagen metropolitan area with a horizontal resolution of 1.4 km, thus approaching the city-scale. This involves 1-km resolution physiographic data with implications for the urban surface parameters, e.g. surface fluxes, roughness length and albedo. For the city of Copenhagen, the enhanced high-resolution NWP forecasting will be provided to demonstrate the improved dispersion forecasting capabilities of the Danish nuclear emergency preparedness decision-support system, the Accident Reporting and Guidance Operational System (ARGOS), used by the Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA). Recently, ARGOS has been extended with a capability of real-time calculation of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material from accidental releases. This is effectuated through on-line interfacing with the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA), which is run at DMI. For local-scale modelling of atmospheric dispersion, ARGOS utilises the Local-Scale Model Chain (LSMC), which makes use of high-resolution DMI

  13. Urban meteorological modelling for nuclear emergency preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Sørensen, Jens Havskov; Hoe, Steen Cordt; Amstrup, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    The main objectives of the current EU project "Integrated Systems for Forecasting Urban Meteorology, Air Pollution and Population Exposure" (FUMAPEX) are the improvement of meteorological forecasts for urban areas, the connection of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to urban air pollution and population dose models, the building of improved urban air quality information and forecasting systems, and their application in cities in various European climates. In addition to the forecast of the worst air-pollution episodes in large cities, the potential use of improved weather forecasts for nuclear emergency management in urban areas, in case of hazardous releases from nuclear accidents or terror acts, is considered. Such use of NWP data is tested for the Copenhagen metropolitan area and the Øresund region. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) is running an experimental version of the HIRLAM NWP model over Zealand including the Copenhagen metropolitan area with a horizontal resolution of 1.4km, thus approaching the city-scale. This involves 1-km resolution physiographic data with implications for the urban surface parameters, e.g. surface fluxes, roughness length and albedo. For the city of Copenhagen, the enhanced high-resolution NWP forecasting will be provided to demonstrate the improved dispersion forecasting capabilities of the Danish nuclear emergency preparedness decision-support system, the Accident Reporting and Guidance Operational System (ARGOS), used by the Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA). Recently, ARGOS has been extended with a capability of real-time calculation of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material from accidental releases. This is effectuated through on-line interfacing with the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA), which is run at DMI. For local-scale modelling of atmospheric dispersion, ARGOS utilises the Local-Scale Model Chain (LSMC), which makes use of high-resolution DMI

  14. Impact of mustard seed meal applications on direct-seeded cucurbits and weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic production systems can be a labor intensive and expensive process. Mustard seed meal (MSM) is phytotoxic and a potential pre-emergent and preplant-incorporated organic herbicide for controlling germinating and emerging weed seedlings: unfortunately, MSM may also adversely imp...

  15. Pelargonic acid for weed control in organic Vidalia sweet onion production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivation using a tine weeder is a proven means to manage weeds in organic Vidalia® sweet onion production. If the initial cultivation is delayed, emerged weeds are not controlled by the tine weeder. In these cases, herbicides derived from natural products could be used to control the emerged we...

  16. Responsibility modelling for civil emergency planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerville, Ian; Storer, Timothy; Lock, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to analysing and understanding civil emergency planning based on the notion of responsibility modelling combined with HAZOPS-style analysis of information requirements. Our goal is to represent complex contingency plans so that they can be more readily understood, so that inconsistencies can be highlighted and vulnerabilities discovered. In this paper, we outline the framework for contingency planning in the United Kingdom and introduce the notion of respons...

  17. Effectiveness of the Primextra Gold in controlling weeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of Primextra Gold herbicide in controlling weeds in cucumber was evaluated in this research. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Seven weed control treatments – 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25 and 1.5 kg a.i/pot – were applied pre-emergent for this study.

  18. Short communication: Evaluation of a model for predicting Avena fatua and Descurainia sophia seed emergence in winter rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Aboutalebian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Avena fatua and Descurainia sophia are two important annual weeds throughout winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L. production systems in the semiarid region of Iran. Timely and more accurate control of both species may be developed if there is a better understanding of its emergence patterns. Non-linear regression techniques are usually unable to accurately predict field emergence under such environmental conditions. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the emergence patterns of A. fatua and D. sophia and determine if emergence could be predicted using cumulative soil thermal time in degree days (CTT. In the present work, cumulative seedling emergence from a winter rapeseed field during 3 years data set was fitted to cumulative soil CTT using Weibull and Gompertz functions. The Weibull model provided a better fit, based on coefficient of determination (R2sqr, root mean square of error (RMSE and Akaike index (AICd, compared to the Gompertz model between 2013 and 2016 seasons for both species. Maximum emergence of A. fatua occured 70-119 days after sowing or after equals 329-426 °Cd, while in D. sophia it occurred 119-134 days after sowing rapeseed equals 373-470 °Cd. Both models can aid in the future study of A. fatua and D. sophia emergence and assist growers and agricultural professionals with planning timely and more accurate A. fatua and D. sophia control.

  19. Aplicação localizada de herbicidas em pós-emergência na cultura de soja Site-specific weed management applying post emergence herbicides in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Shiratsuchi

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o crescimento do interesse pela aplicação localizada de herbicidas, considerando a variabilidade espacial da comunidade das plantas daninhas, torna-se necessário o conhecimento da eficácia dessas aplicações, comparadas com as convencionais, em área total. O experimento foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar a eficácia de controle das plantas daninhas por meio da aplicação localizada de herbicidas em comparação com a aplicação convencional. Foram escolhidas quatro áreas de 0,5 ha, em duas das quais foi feito o mapeamento da densidade de infestação das plantas daninhas, antes e após a aplicação do herbicida, empregando o método de amostragens numa grade regular de 6 x 6 m, utilizando áreas amostrais de 0,25 m², sendo duas áreas usadas para pulverização convencional e duas áreas com mapeamento das plantas daninhas para a pulverização localizada. As avaliações das infestações das plantas daninhas foram feitas antes e após a aplicação localizada de herbicidas, nos mesmos locais, nas duas avaliações. Foram aplicadas duas doses da mistura formulada dos herbicidas fluazifop butil (125 g L-1 + fomesafen (250 g L-1, sendo a dose de 1,0 L ha-1 da mistura formulada para densidades de plantas daninhas abaixo de 50 plantas m², e a dose de 2,0 L ha-1, para densidades acima de 50 plantas m-2. A comparação da aplicação convencional a 2,0 L ha-1 com a aplicação localizada mostrou economia de herbicidas da ordem de 18 e 44% para as duas áreas estudadas, respectivamente. Foram detectados 55 e 77% das áreas livres de infestação, sendo verificadas nessas áreas densidades muito baixas. Portanto, a aplicação localizada de herbicida realizada neste experimento mostrou que grande economia de produtos é possível mantendo-se a eficácia de controle e, conseqüentemente, reduzindo o impacto ambiental da aplicação convencional com dose média e pulverização em área total.Current interest in site-specific weed

  20. Cruciferous weeds in oil seed rape – appearance and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenhagen, Günter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different cruciferous weeds were drilled in autumn 2011 and 2012 in a field near Münster. Beside common species like hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale Scop., shepherd`s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris, pennycress (Thlaspiarvense, tall hedge mustard (Sisymbrium loeselii and flixweed (Descurainia sophia, we tried to establish weeds that are not common on arable land in Germany until now. These were: Yellow rocket (Barbarea vulgaris, hoary cress (Lepidium draba and Turkish rocket (Bunias orientalis. In autumn 2011 emergence of the sown weeds was poor. In the second year of experiment we got good emergence of the named weeds excluding hoary cress (Lepidium draba. In autumn 2011 and 2012 different herbicidecombinations were applied across the stripes. The best results were achieved with Colzor Trio (clomazone + dimethachlor + napropamid which was applied in pre-emergence state, a spray sequence Butisan Gold (metazachlor + quinmerac + dimethenamid-P applied in pre-emergence followed by Salsa (ethametsulfuronmethyl + Trend (adjuvant in post-emergence and Clearfield-Vantiga (metazachlor + quinmerac + imazamox + Dash (adjuvant, also applied in post-emergence state of the weeds.

  1. Utilização de chama para controle de plantas daninhas emersas em ambiente aquático Using flame for control of emerged aquatic weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Marchi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Dois estudos foram conduzidos com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de chama no controle de Eichhornia crassipes, Brachiaria subquadripara, Pistia stratiotes e Salvinia auriculata. No primeiro estudo foram utilizadas diferentes doses de chama, representadas pela quantidade de gás consumida durante a aplicação, e, no segundo, usaramse duas aplicações de chama em intervalo de 14 dias, uma aplicação seqüencial (intervalo de sete dias e aplicação única. As diferentes doses, tanto no primeiro quanto no segundo, foram comparadas com plantas que não receberam nenhum tratamento térmico. Avaliações de injúria foram realizadas aos 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21 e 30 após a aplicação dos tratamentos, sendo realizadas também avaliações das biomassas secas das plantas aquáticas remanescentes em cada tratamento, ao final dos ensaios. No primeiro estudo foram observadas reduções significativas na produção da biomassa seca das espécies E. crassipes, B. subquadripara e P. stratiotes tratadas com as maiores doses referentes aos consumos de gás. Doses menores não diferiram estatisticamente da testemunha quanto à produção de biomassa seca, exceção feita para a espécie P. stratiotes. Todas as aplicações seqüenciais proporcionaram redução acima de 90% na produção da biomassa seca de E. crassipes e B. subquadripara. As aplicações seqüenciais e únicas proporcionaram reduções abaixo de 37% na produção da biomassa seca de S. auriculata. Os resultados demonstraram que existe a possibilidade de se utilizar o controle físico através da aplicação de chama como alternativa no manejo de plantas daninhas em ambientes aquáticos.Two trials were carried out to evaluate the effect of flame weeding on Eichhornia crassipes, Brachiaria subquadripara, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia auriculata. In the first trial, different doses of flame were applied, according to the amount of gas consumed during application. In the second

  2. Biotechnology in weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology can be used to enhance the management of weeds in several ways. Crops have been made resistant to herbicides by inserting transgenes that impart herbicide resistance into the plant genome. Glyphosate and glufosinate-resistant crops are commercialized in North America and crops made res...

  3. What Price Weeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelt, Harold J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at Columbia-Greene Community College's library to determine whether a book's previous non-use is indicative of future non-use; whether books are progressively less likely to be used with time; the circulation costs of weeding previously unused books; and the circulation rates of old and new books. (DMM)

  4. Panel Discussion: Weed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Stringfield

    2005-01-01

    Successful weed management must be an incorporation of techniques and ideas. Habitual practices of cleaning equipment, using the proper cover crop, spraying small amounts of herbicides early and more often, timing of applications, and the use of the correct mulch/resin are all important lines of attack in keeping the nursery free of competing vegetation. The methods...

  5. Gene Introgression in Weeds Depends on Initial Gene Location in the Crop:Brassica napus-Raphanus raphanistrumModel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk-Chauvat, Katarzyna; Delaunay, Sabrina; Vannier, Anne; François, Caroline; Thomas, Gwenaëlle; Eber, Frédérique; Lodé, Maryse; Gilet, Marie; Huteau, Virginie; Morice, Jérôme; Nègre, Sylvie; Falentin, Cyril; Coriton, Olivier; Darmency, Henri; Alrustom, Bachar; Jenczewski, Eric; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Chèvre, Anne-Marie

    2017-07-01

    The effect of gene location within a crop genome on its transfer to a weed genome remains an open question for gene flow assessment. To elucidate this question, we analyzed advanced generations of intergeneric hybrids, derived from an initial pollination of known oilseed rape varieties ( Brassica napus , AACC, 2 n  = 38) by a local population of wild radish ( Raphanus raphanistrum , RrRr, 2 n  = 18). After five generations of recurrent pollination, 307 G5 plants with a chromosome number similar to wild radish were genotyped using 105 B. napus specific markers well distributed along the chromosomes. They revealed that 49.8% of G5 plants carried at least one B. napus genomic region. According to the frequency of B. napus markers (0-28%), four classes were defined: Class 1 (near zero frequency), with 75 markers covering ∼70% of oilseed rape genome; Class 2 (low frequency), with 20 markers located on 11 genomic regions; Class 3 (high frequency), with eight markers on three genomic regions; and Class 4 (higher frequency), with two adjacent markers detected on A10. Therefore, some regions of the oilseed rape genome are more prone than others to be introgressed into wild radish. Inheritance and growth of plant progeny revealed that genomic regions of oilseed rape could be stably introduced into wild radish and variably impact the plant fitness (plant height and seed number). Our results pinpoint that novel technologies enabling the targeted insertion of transgenes should select genomic regions that are less likely to be introgressed into the weed genome, thereby reducing gene flow. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Why was resistance to shorter-acting pre-emergence herbicides slower to evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Gayle J; Powles, Stephen B; Walsh, Michael J; Renton, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Across several agricultural systems the evolution of herbicide resistance has occurred more rapidly to post-emergence than pre-emergence herbicides; however, the reasons for this are not clear. We used a new simulation model to investigate whether interactions between differences in order of application and weed cohorts affected could explain this historically observed difference between the herbicide groups. A 10 year delay in resistance evolution was predicted for a shorter-acting residual pre-emergence (cf. post-emergence), when all other parameters were identical. Differences in order of application between pre- and post-emergence herbicides had minimal effect on rates of resistance evolution when similar weed cohorts were affected. This modelling suggested that the historically observed lower levels of resistance to pre-emergence herbicides are most likely to be due to the smaller number of weed cohorts affected by many pre-emergence herbicides. The lower number of weed cohorts affected by pre-emergence herbicides necessitated the use of additional, effective control measures, thereby reducing resistance evolution. This study highlights the advantages of applying multiple control measures to each weed cohort. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Emergence of cooperativity in a model biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotrattanadumrong, Rachapun; Endres, Robert G.

    2017-06-01

    Evolution to multicellularity from an aggregate of cells involves altruistic cooperation between individual cells, which is in conflict with Darwinian evolution. How cooperation arises and how a cell community resolves such conflicts remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the spontaneous emergence of cell differentiation and the subsequent division of labour in evolving cellular metabolic networks. In spatially extended cell aggregates, our findings reveal that resource limitation can lead to the formation of subpopulations and cooperation of cells, and hence multicellular communities. A specific example of our model can explain the recently observed oscillatory growth in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

  8. Weed Identification and Control in Vegetable Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Peter A., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines weed control and identification in vegetable crops. Contents include: (1) Types of weeds; (2) Reducing losses caused by weeds, general control methods and home garden weed control; (3) How herbicides are used; (4) Specific weeds in vegetable plantings; and…

  9. RoboWeedSupport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrmann, Mads; Nyholm Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Information about the weed population in fields is important for determining the optimal herbicides for the fields. A system based on images is presented that can provide support in determining the species and density of the weeds. Firstly, plants are segmented from the soil. Plants that after...... the segmentation are divided in multiple parts are selected manually and a cost image is created by weighting pixels according to their relationship to plant. This relationship is based on the colours of pixels and the weighting of nearby pixels. This cost map is used to find the optimal route that connects...... the plant parts. By using a Support Vector Machine with 18 feature descriptors, suggestions on which plants are present in the images are given. The system is currently able to classify 11 plant species with a precision of 93.0%...

  10. Weeding with transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2003-05-01

    Transgenes promise to reduce insecticide and fungicide use but relatively little has been done to significantly reduce herbicide use through genetic engineering. Recently, three strategies for transgene utilization have been developed that have the potential to change this. These are the improvement of weed-specific biocontrol agents, enhancement of crop competition or allelopathic traits, and production of cover crops that will self-destruct near the time of planting. Failsafe risk mitigation technologies are needed for most of these strategies.

  11. WEED INTERFERENCE IN COTTON PLANTS GROWN WITH REDUCED SPACING IN THE SECOND HARVEST SEASON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHEL ALEX RAIMONDI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in row spacing may result in changes in crop and weed behavior and crop-weed competition. A study was performed to determine the periods of weed presence and weed control in cotton sown with 0.76 m spacing between planting rows. Cotton cultivar FM 993 was sown on 01/08/2010 with the aim of reaching a density of 190,000 seeds ha-1. Treatments with either weed presence or weed control during the first 0, 5, 10, 15, 22, 29, 36, 43, 50, 57, 64, 71, and 190 days of cultivation were established to determine the period prior to weed interference (PPI, total period of interference prevention (TPIP and critical period of weed control (CPWC. The weed species with high relative importance were Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Eleusine indica, Digitaria horizontalis, Alternanthera tenella, and Commelina benghalensis. Considering a maximum yield loss of 5%, the PPI was established 11 days after cotton emergence (DAE, the TPWC at 46 DAE, and the CPWC between 11 and 46 DAE, for a total duration of 35 days. Considering a maximum acceptable yield loss equal to the standard deviation for the weed-free treatment, the PPI was established at 6 DAE, the TPWC at 55 DAE, and the CPWC between 6 and 55 DAE for a total duration of 49 days.

  12. Plastic Super Models: aesthetics, architecture and the model of emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Ednie-Brown

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling is at the core of what architects do, rendering the discipline especially fragile and sensitive to shifts in the nature of models and modelling. A digitally-based, explorative architectural milieu has been actively modelling in tune with a socio-cultural paradigm related to the concept of emergence, presenting numerous challenges to a range of assumptions about the activity of architectural design. This paper explores how this milieu has acted to unsettle the cool containments of architectural composure by bringing affective activity emphatically to the foreground.

  13. Weed Identification Using An Automated Active Shape Matching (AASM) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swain, K C; Nørremark, Michael; Jørgensen, R N

    2011-01-01

    on the concept of ‘active shape modelling’ to identify weed and crop plants based on their morphology. The automated active shape matching system (AASM) technique consisted of, i) a Pixelink camera ii) an LTI (Lehrstuhlfuer technische informatik) image processing library, iii) a laptop pc with the Linux OS. A 2......-leaf growth stage model for Solanum nigrum L. (nightshade) is generated from 32 segmented training images in Matlab software environment. Using the AASM algorithm, the leaf model was aligned and placed at the centre of the target plant and a model deformation process carried out. The parameters used......Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works...

  14. Effect of tillage on the efficacy of CGA362622 on weed control in maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... residue present at time of application of pre-emergence herbicide usually intercepts herbicides (Banks and .... were significant differences in weed biomass between the. NT and P+H and P, throughout the period of the study, ... the Central Greek plains. Weed Technol. 18: 186-192. Ball DA, Miller SD (1990) ...

  15. Weeding Library Collections: Library Weeding Methods. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Stanly J.

    Weeding is one of the best ways to make long-term improvements to library collections, but it is also a difficult and sometimes painful task. In the tradition of previous editions, this book guides librarians in the process of methodical and efficient weeding. The book shows how to identify core collections versus the weedable items. The approach…

  16. Socio-economic impacts and determinants of parasitic weed infestation in rainfed rice systems of sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'cho, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: rice; weed; weed management practices, adoption, impact, parasitic weeds; Rhamphicarpa fistulosa; Striga asiatica; Striga hermonthica, double hurdle model; multivariate probit, productivity, stochastic frontier analysis, data

  17. New possibilities for weed control in conventional soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In field trials in was investigated, if the use of the in Germany new active ingredient imazamox enlarge the possibilities of post emergence weed control in soybeans. Furthermore new herbicide strategies were tested on efficacy and selectivity in soybeans. The use of imazamox was very selective and showed a relative broad spectrum of controlled weed species. However, efficacy of imazamox must be supported by a pre-emergence treatment and in most cases by a tank mix partner. For example cleavers (Galium aparine can not be controlled by imazamox. Tankmixtures of imazamox and bentazon indicated an antagonism. Efficacy to some weed species was reduced compared to solo application. The low dose concept – three applications of low doses at cotyledon stage of weeds led to some success. However, these strategies must be further investigated, before they can be recommended to commercial farming practice. All herbicide strategies tested showed some surviving weed species. This indicates that choice of herbicides, dose rates and application strategies must be done very careful and site specific.

  18. Modeling Emerging Solar Cell Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprong, Non

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and perovskite solar cells are emerging classes of solar cell that are promising for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels. Understanding fundamental physics of these materials is crucial for improving their energy conversion efficiencies and promoting them to practical applications. Current density-voltage (JV) curves; which are important indicators of OPV efficiency, have direct connections to many fundamental properties of solar cells. They can be described by the Shockley diode equation, resulting in fitting parameters; series and parallel resistance (Rs and Rp), diode saturation current ( J0) and ideality factor (n). However, the Shockley equation was developed specifically for inorganic p-n junction diodes, so it lacks physical meanings when it is applied to OPVs. Hence, the puRposes of this work are to understand the fundamental physics of OPVs and to develop new diode equations in the same form as the Shockley equation that are based on OPV physics. We develop a numerical drift-diffusion simulation model to study bilayer OPVs, which will be called the drift-diffusion for bilayer interface (DD-BI) model. The model solves Poisson, drift-diffusion and current-continuity equations self-consistently for charge densities and potential profiles of a bilayer device with an organic heterojunction interface described by the GWWF model. We also derive new diode equations that have JV curves consistent with the DD-BI model and thus will be called self-consistent diode (SCD) equations. Using the DD-BI and the SCD model allows us to understand working principles of bilayer OPVs and physical definitions of the Shockley parameters. Due to low carrier mobilities in OPVs, space charge accumulation is common especially near the interface and electrodes. Hence, quasi-Fermi levels (i.e. chemical potentials), which depend on charge densities, are modified around the interface, resulting in a splitting of quasi-Fermi levels that works as a driving

  19. Weeding the School Library Media Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Quarterly, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This document prepared by Calgary Board of Education, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, discusses a systematic approach to strengthening the library media collection. A statement of principle, what to weed, specific guides to weeding (by Dewey Decimal classification and type of material), what not to weed, procedures, and weeding follow-up are…

  20. 7 CFR 201.50 - Weed seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seed. 201.50 Section 201.50 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Purity Analysis in the Administration of the Act § 201.50 Weed seed. Seeds (including bulblets or tubers) of plants shall be considered weed seeds when recognized as weed seeds by the law or rules and...

  1. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  2. Applicator Training Manual for: Aquatic Weed Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, James W.

    The aquatic weeds discussed in this manual include algae, floating weeds, emersed weeds, and submerged weeds. Specific requirements for pesticide application are given for static water, limited flow, and moving water situations. Secondary effects of improper application rates and faulty application are described. Finally, techniques of limited…

  3. Disentangling the Effects of Tillage Timing and Weather on Weed Community Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Cordeau

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of tillage timing on weed community assembly was assessed at four locations in the Northeastern United States by tilling the soil every two weeks from April to September and quantifying the emerged weed community six weeks after each tillage event. Variance partitioning analysis was used to test the relative importance of tillage timing and weather on weed community assembly (106 weed species. At a regional scale, site (75.5% of the explained inertia—and to a lesser extent, timing—of tillage (18.3%, along with weather (18.1%, shaped weed communities. At a local scale, the timing of tillage explained approximately 50% of the weed community variability. The effect of tillage timing, after partitioning out the effect of weather variables, remained significant at all locations. Weather conditions, mainly growing degree days, but also precipitation occurring before tillage, were important factors and could improve our ability to predict the impact of tillage timing on weed community assemblages. Our findings illustrate the role of disturbance timing on weed communities, and can be used to improve the timing of weed control practices and to maximize their efficacy.

  4. How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sonia; Rogers, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder groups in south-eastern Australia collectively manage weeds and the measures they use to evaluate success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of three Landcare groups—Jerrawa Creek/Upper Lachlan, MacLaughlin River and Towamba Valley—as well as government staff external to the groups. The results reveal that for all three groups collective weed control is about supporting individual weed control efforts as well as proactively engaging landholders with the worst infestations. The groups were seen to be successful because they focused on the common challenge that weeds pose to all landholders, thereby removing the shame associated with having weeds, and because they organised community events that were as much about building and maintaining social relationships as improving weed control. Groups were positive about what they had achieved as collectives of landholders, but also saw an important role for government in providing funding, engaging with landholders who were unwilling to engage directly with the group, and controlling weeds on public lands.

  5. Performance and Economics of Growing Maize under Organic and Inorganic Fertilization and Weed Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Khan, M. A.; Jan, A. U.; Jan, D.; Sattar, S.; Saleem, A.; Marwat, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Weed competition and imbalanced fertilizers are important yield reducing factors in maize. To investigate the impact of weed management and combinations of fertilizers on yield and net income of maize, a field trial was conducted at National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad, Pakistan during summer 2014. Randomized complete block design with split-plot arrangement was used with three replications. Four weeds pressures viz. (1) hand weeding at 25 cm on both sides of each row of maize plants, (2) No hand weeding at 25 cm on both sides of maize rows, (3) application of Primextra gold (atrazine plus S-metolachlor) at the rate of 1.44 kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ as pre-emergence and (4) weedy check (control) were assigned to main plots. While different combinations of NPK were assigned to sub plots. Data revealed that dry weed biomass close to maize plants were significantly lower (140.4 kg ha/sup -1/) as compared to weeds 25 cm away from maize plants (153.2 kg ha/sup -1/). However, the application of atrazine plus S-metolachlor showed promising results by decreasing the weed biomass (53.6 kg ha/sup -1/) as compared to 155.6 kg ha/sup -1/ in control. Combination of fertilizers, also significantly affected the weed biomass. As compared to control, all the fertilizers (N, P and K) significantly increased weed biomass. Presence of weeds close to the crop rows, proved more harmful for grain yield of maize. Overall, application of herbicide in combination with NPK showed promising results in term of weed control and grain yield. Net income was higher when herbicide in combination with N, P or NP was used. (author)

  6. Weed Dynamics and Management in Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabran, Khawar; Mahmood, Khalid; Melander, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Wheat is among the most important cereal and food crops of world and is grown in almost all parts of the world. It is a staple for a large part of the world population. Any decline in wheat yield by biotic or abiotic factors may affect global food security adversely. Weeds are the most damaging...... pest of wheat causing in total 24% losses in wheat grain yield. In this chapter, we discuss the (i) weed flora in different wheat-growing regions of world; (ii) the yield losses caused by weeds in wheat; (iii) the preventive and cultural options for weed management; (iv) physical weed control; (v......) chemical weed control; and (vi) integrated weed management strategy in wheat. A critical analysis of recent literature indicated that broadleaved weeds are the most common group of weeds in wheat fields followed by grass weeds, while sedges were rarely noted in wheat fields. Across the globe, the most...

  7. Weed control methods effect on the hydraulic attributes of a Latosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Pires

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weed management plays a key role in the minimization of soil physical degradation processes such as compaction and hydric erosion. Different weed control managements can induce distinct changes in soil structure. One important soil physical attribute used for the analysis of modifications in soil structure is the soil water retention curve (SWRC. The objective of this work was to verify the use of physico-hydrical attributes to understand the effect of weed control managements on soil structure. Two soil layers (0–0.05 and 0.10–0.15 m and six weed control managements divided into two groups were analyzed: I. no soil disturbance and ground cover (no weed control, post-emergence herbicide, mechanical mower; and II. soil disturbance and no ground cover (hand-hoe weeding, rotary tiller, pre-emergence herbicide. An area of native forest was used as reference. The results showed that the volumetric water capacity derived from the SWRC can be an interesting tool to evaluate the impact of weed control managements on soil structure. Evaluations of the air-filled porosity variation for different pressure heads also presented interesting findings. Distinct results of the weed control managements were found for the different depths analyzed in relation to the forest.

  8. Weed clearance in Hudiara Nallah by chemical weed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Hudiara Nallah is a flood stream in West Punjab. It has a length of about 45km and breadth of nearly 25 metres. About 20 subsidiary drains join with the Nallah. These drains have a length of about 270km. The Nallah has a discharge capacity of 1248 cusecs. Most of the subsidiary drains start from ponds which are generally infected with Eichhornia plants. These plants enter into the subsidiary drains and finally into Hudiara Nallah. The plants float freely on the surface of water and multiply at a high rate. One plant of the weed propagates to 24 plants in a period of one month. The plants thus cover the whole drain in a few months. The weed also originates from seeds. Their heavy growth forms a mat-like surface. The weeds also choke bridges and sometimes cause damage to their structures. These obstruct the flow of water and decrease the carrying capacity of the drain. Their infestation thus causes floods and the very purpose of the drains gets lost. Thus the Nallah is heavily infested with Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth weed). Due to its fast propagation and heavy infestation it was not possible to clear the weed manually. The problem was, therefore, referred to the Chemistry Division of the Irrigation and Power Research Institute, Amritsar, by the Drainage Circle of the Irrigation Department in June 1978 when weed propagation was in full swing. A chemical treatment method of eradication was attempted

  9. Improving Emergency Management by Modeling Ant Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    neighboring cell than on the master plan, DNA .21 Johnson describes emergence as a means of self-organizing from the bottom-up. In emergent systems...carrying undesirable goods, such as bird poop, back to the nest. In the event poop makes it back to the nest, the poop is rejected near the entrance of the...by Army Ants,” 1124–5. 26 migrating to a colony raiding.98 A daily traffic jam is not indicative of organizational efficiency. Also, as the

  10. What?s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable ab...

  11. A System Dynamic Model of Leader Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Judge, 2004; Judge, Bono, Ilies, & Gerhardt, 2002; Eagly, Johanneses-Schmidt, & Van Engen , 2003; Taggar, Hackett, & Saha, 1999; Stogdill, 1948...System dynamics emerged from the study of electrical control systems, and when generalized found many useful applications in natural systems outside...of the electrical world (Forrester, 1992). Whereas correlations describe cause and effect relationships in a linear equation, system dynamics

  12. Integrated weed management in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwat, K.B.; Khan, M.A.; Nawab, K.; Khattak, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an experiment conducted on wheat at Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan during winter 2004-05. Randomized complete block design with split-split-plot arrangement was used where wheat line and broadcast sowing were kept in main plots. Seed rates (100 and 150 kg ha-1) were assigned as sub-plots, while four herbicides (Topik, Isoproturon, Puma super and Buctril super) and weed check were assigned to sub-sub-plots. Results revealed that higher biological yield was recorded in line sowing. However, higher wheat seed rate decreased weed biomass and increased biological yield. Herbicides proved to be effective in decreasing weed biomass and enhancing grain yield and its contributing traits. It was suggested that line sowing in combination with higher seeding rate and Buctril super should be used in an integrated weed management fashion. However further studies are required to investigate various ranges of seeding rate and herbicides doses. (author)

  13. Emerging Media Crisis Value Model: A Comparison of Relevant, Timely Message Strategies for Emergency Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Page

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication during an emergency or crisis event is essential for emergency responders, the community involved, and those watching on television as well as receiving information via social media from family members, friends or other community members. The evolution of communication during an emergency/crisis event now includes utilizing social media. To better understand this evolution the Emerging Media Crisis Value Model (EMCVM is used in comparing two emergency events; Hurricane Irene (2011, a natural disaster, and the theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado (2012, a man-made crisis. The EMCVM provides a foundation for future studies focusing on the use of social media, emergency responders at the local, state and national levels are better prepared to educate a community thus, counteracting public uncertainty, fear, while providing timely, accurate information.

  14. Weed suppression by green manure in an agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Garicoix Recalde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manure promotes efficient suppression of weeds, but green manure species can exhibit distinct behaviors, depending on the environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of soil mulching and weed suppression by spring/summer green manure species grown in the spring/summer season, at different growth stages and after management (cut, for 90 days during the cassava crop cycle. The study was carried out in the 2010/2011 season, in a system managed under agroecological principles. The treatments consisted of different green manure species and arrangements: Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia brasiliensis, Canavalia ensiformis, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum intercropped; Mucuna aterrima, Sorghum bicolor, a mixture of all the green manures in study and a control plot under fallow. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. The evaluations of the soil cover either by the green manures or weeds were performed at 45, 90 and 105 days after the emergence of the green manures. The cassava crop was planted under reduced tillage system at 11 days after the cut of the green manures. The percentage of soil covered by weeds and the dry matter produced were evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days after planting. The results showed that the green manures had a suppressive effect on weeds during their life cycle, as well as during the first months after its management (cut, composing the mulch.

  15. Tillage and residue burning affects weed populations and seed banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Sindel, B M; Jessop, R S

    2006-01-01

    An integrated weed management approach requires alternative management practices to herbicide use such as tillage, crop rotations and cultural controls to reduce soil weed seed banks. The objective of this study was to examine the value of different tillage practices and stubble burning to exhaust the seed bank of common weeds from the northern grain region of Australia. Five tillage and burning treatments were incorporated in a field experiment, at Armidale (30 degrees 30'S, 151 degrees 40'E), New South Wales, Australia in July 2004 in a randomized block design replicated four times. The trial was continued and treatments repeated in July 2005 with all the mature plants from the first year being allowed to shed seed in their respective treatment plots. The treatments were (i) no tillage (NT), (ii) chisel ploughing (CP), (iii) mould board ploughing (MBP), (iv) wheat straw burning with no tillage (SBNT) and (v) wheat straw burning with chisel ploughing (SBC). Soil samples were collected before applying treatments and before the weeds flowered to establish the seed bank status of the various weeds in the soil. Wheat was sown after the tillage treatments. Burning treatments were only initiated in the second year, one month prior to tillage treatments. The major weeds present in the seed bank before initiating the trial were Polygonum aviculare, Sonchus oleraceus and Avena fatua. Tillage promoted the germination of other weeds like Hibiscus trionum, Medicago sativa, Vicia sp. and Phalaris paradoxa later in the season in 2004 and Convolvulus erubescens emerged as a new weed in 2005. The MBP treatment in 2004 reduced the weed biomass to a significantly lower level of 55 g/m2 than the other treatments of CP (118 g/m2) and NT plots (196 g/m2) (P < 0.05). However, in 2005 SBC and MBP treatments were similar in reducing the weed biomass. In 2004, the grain yield trend of wheat was significantly different between CP and NT, and MBP and NT (P < 0.05) with maximum yield of 5898

  16. Wireless Emergency Alerts: Trust Model Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    responses about big events, received comments on messaging around Sandy, the Derecho – these comments were more about technical glitches with phones...We typically do an after-action program on any exercise or big event for which we stand up the emergency operations center (EOC); the Derecho was...county employee messaging – the OPA may help us craft messages, we are always looking to simplify language, ease understanding; Derecho messaging was

  17. Can global weed assemblages be used to predict future weeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Morin

    Full Text Available Predicting which plant taxa are more likely to become weeds in a region presents significant challenges to both researchers and government agencies. Often it is done in a qualitative or semi-quantitative way. In this study, we explored the potential of using the quantitative self-organising map (SOM approach to analyse global weed assemblages and estimate likelihoods of plant taxa becoming weeds before and after they have been moved to a new region. The SOM approach examines plant taxa associations by analysing where a taxon is recorded as a weed and what other taxa are recorded as weeds in those regions. The dataset analysed was extracted from a pre-existing, extensive worldwide database of plant taxa recorded as weeds or other related status and, following reformatting, included 187 regions and 6690 plant taxa. To assess the value of the SOM approach we selected Australia as a case study. We found that the key and most important limitation in using such analytical approach lies with the dataset used. The classification of a taxon as a weed in the literature is not often based on actual data that document the economic, environmental and/or social impact of the taxon, but mostly based on human perceptions that the taxon is troublesome or simply not wanted in a particular situation. The adoption of consistent and objective criteria that incorporate a standardized approach for impact assessment of plant taxa will be necessary to develop a new global database suitable to make predictions regarding weediness using methods like SOM. It may however, be more realistic to opt for a classification system that focuses on the invasive characteristics of plant taxa without any inference to impacts, which to be defined would require some level of research to avoid bias from human perceptions and value systems.

  18. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  19. A Model of Workflow Composition for Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Bin-ge, Cui; Feng, Zhang; Xue-hui, Xu; Shan-shan, Fu

    The common-used workflow technology is not flexible enough in dealing with concurrent emergency situations. The paper proposes a novel model for defining emergency plans, in which workflow segments appear as a constituent part. A formal abstraction, which contains four operations, is defined to compose workflow segments under constraint rule. The software system of the business process resources construction and composition is implemented and integrated into Emergency Plan Management Application System.

  20. A model national emergency plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a result, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request

  1. Estimating economic thresholds for site-specific weed control using manual weed counts and sensor technology: an example based on three winter wheat trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martina; Gutjahr, Christoph; Möhring, Jens; Weis, Martin; Sökefeld, Markus; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Precision experimental design uses the natural heterogeneity of agricultural fields and combines sensor technology with linear mixed models to estimate the effect of weeds, soil properties and herbicide on yield. These estimates can be used to derive economic thresholds. Three field trials are presented using the precision experimental design in winter wheat. Weed densities were determined by manual sampling and bi-spectral cameras, yield and soil properties were mapped. Galium aparine, other broad-leaved weeds and Alopecurus myosuroides reduced yield by 17.5, 1.2 and 12.4 kg ha(-1) plant(-1)  m(2) in one trial. The determined thresholds for site-specific weed control with independently applied herbicides were 4, 48 and 12 plants m(-2), respectively. Spring drought reduced yield effects of weeds considerably in one trial, since water became yield limiting. A negative herbicide effect on the crop was negligible, except in one trial, in which the herbicide mixture tended to reduce yield by 0.6 t ha(-1). Bi-spectral cameras for weed counting were of limited use and still need improvement. Nevertheless, large weed patches were correctly identified. The current paper presents a new approach to conducting field trials and deriving decision rules for weed control in farmers' fields. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Evacuation emergency response model coupling atmospheric release advisory capability output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.; Lawver, B.S.; Buckley, D.W.; Finn, S.P.; Swenson, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) sponsored project to develop a coupled set of models between those of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) system and candidate evacuation models is discussed herein. This report describes the ARAC system and discusses the rapid computer code developed and the coupling with ARAC output. The computer code is adapted to the use of color graphics as a means to display and convey the dynamics of an emergency evacuation. The model is applied to a specific case of an emergency evacuation of individuals surrounding the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, located approximately 25 miles southeast of Sacramento, California. The graphics available to the model user for the Rancho Seco example are displayed and noted in detail. Suggestions for future, potential improvements to the emergency evacuation model are presented

  3. Effect of sprayer output volume and adjuvants on efficacy of clove oil for weed control in organic Vidalia sweet onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timely cultivation with a tine weeder is the primary tool for successful weed control in organic Vidalia® sweet onion, but conditions frequently arise that delay the initial cultivation. Weeds that emerge during the delay are not effectively controlled by cultivation and herbicides derived from nat...

  4. Hydrothermal emergence model for ripgut brome (Bromus diandrus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model that describes the emergence of ripgut brome (Bromus diandrus) was developed using a two-season data set from a no-tilled field in northeastern Spain. The relationship between cumulative emergence and hydrothermal time (HTT) was described by a sigmoid growth function (Chapman equation). HTT ...

  5. Eco-distribution Mapping of Invasive Weed Limnocharis flava (L. Buchenau Using Geographical Information System: Implications for Containment and Integrated Weed Management for Ecosystem Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Abhilash

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Exotic weed invasion has been identified as one of the serious environmental problem impacting the structure, composition and function of biological diversity. They are aggressive colonizers, which have flexible habitat requirement and ability to outcompete native species. The present paper describes the distribution and autecology of an exotic weed Limnocharis flava (L. Buchenau (an emergent aquatic weed of ‘Limnocharitaceae’ in Kumarakom Grama Panchayat, one of the well known tourist spot of South India famous for its vast stretches of paddy fields, wetlands and backwaters. The mapping of L. flava in the entire study area has been done using Geographical Information System (Arc-info 8.3 version. The growth and distribution pattern of L. flava were studied quantitatively. Data on distribution, abundance, biomass, ecological associations and root zone nutrient quality of water and sediment samples were collected from different sampling points of Kumarakom. The study reflected that nutrients, water depth and land use patterns were the major factors responsible for the growth and proliferation of this exotic weed. The strategies for controlling L. flava invasion are discussed in detail. If early steps are not taken to eradicate this weed, it will become a problematic weed in the same way as other noxious aquatic weeds like Salvinia molesta D. Mitch and Eichhornia crassipes (C. Martius Solms-Laub.

  6. Effect of Cropping Practices on Weed Species Composition in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of rotation and weeding practices on weed species composition were evaluated in a groundnut (Arachis hypogaea, L.) crop in a three-year field experiment in Central Malawi under ridge-tillage practices. Weeding practices consisted of weeding twice including earthing-up, weeding once, and no weeding, ...

  7. Weed flora of University of Benin in terms of diversity and richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weeds are as important as man to himself and its environment. Weed flora in terms of diversity and richness of University of Benin, Ugbowo campus were determined from four habitable parts using two ecological models: Margalef species richness (d) and Shannon-Wiener diversity (H). Primary data were collected from an ...

  8. Using 7Be to document soil erosion on the weed plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo; Zhang Fengbao; Yang Mingyi

    2013-01-01

    Be tracing technology was applied to document soil erosion on the bare plot and weed plot, and compae soil erosion rate with the calculated rate. Results indicated that vegetation cover had obvious effect on the estimate of soil erosion rate on the weed plot using 7 Be measurement. Therefore, a factor of vegetation had been introduced into the Walling's model of converting 7 Be activity to soil erosion rate for estimating soil erosion rate on the weed slope surface. It was found that the soil erosion rates calculated by modified model were well close to the measured values on the weed plot, which illustrated that the modified model could be well used to estimate the rates of soil loss on the weed slope surface. These findings provide effective means for further study on the relationship between vegetation cover and soil erosion. (authors)

  9. Oil spill models for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgins, D.O.

    1997-01-01

    The need for, and the nature of an oil spill model, were discussed. Modern oil spill models were shown to provide rapid and accurate input of information about a marine spill, as well as to provide powerful visualization methods for displaying output data. Marine oil spill models are designed to answer five questions: (1) where will the oil go in 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours, (2) how fast will it move, (3) how big will the slick get, (4) how much will end up on shore and where, and (5) how do the oil properties change. The models are able to provide timely and accurate results by using reasonably complete algorithms for the physics and chemistry governing oil slick evolution that take advantage of computer visualization methods for displaying output data. These models have been made possible through new technologies which have increased access to environmental data on winds, currents and satellite imaging of slicks. Spill modelling is also evolving by taking advantage of the Internet for both acquisition of input data and dissemination of results. 5 figs

  10. Modelling of thermohydraulic emergency core cooling phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Andreani, M.; Lewis, M.J.

    1990-10-01

    The codes used in the early seventies for safety analysis and licensing were based either on the homogeneous model of two-phase flow or on the so-called separate-flow models, which are mixture models accounting, however, for the difference in average velocity between the two phases. In both cases the behavior of the mixture is prescribed a priori as a function of local parameters such as the mass flux and the quality. The modern best-estimate codes used for analyzing LWR LOCA's and transients are often based on a two-fluid or 6-equation formulation of the conservation equations. In this case the conservation equations are written separately for each phase; the mixture is allowed to evolve on its own, governed by the interfacial exchanges of mass, momentum and energy between the phases. It is generally agreed that such relatively sophisticated 6-equation formulations of two-phase flow are necessary for the correct modelling of a number of phenomena and situations arising in LWR accidental situations. They are in particular indispensible for the analysis of stratified or countercurrent flows and of situations in which large departures from thermal and velocity equilibrium exist. This report will be devoted to a discussion of the need for, the capacity and the limitations of the two-phase flow models (with emphasis on the 6-equation formulations) in modelling these two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena and/or different core cooling situations. 18 figs., 1 tab., 72 refs

  11. Modeling of weeds interference periods in bean Determinação de períodos de interferência das plantas daninhas na cultura do feijão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Parreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research objective was to determine the effects of spacing and seeding density of common bean to the period prior to weed interference (PPI and weed period prior to economic loss (WEEPPEL. The treatments consisted of periods of coexistence between culture and the weeds, with 0 to 10, 0 to 20, 0 to 30, 0 to 40, 0 to 50, 0 to 60, 0 to 70, and 0 to 80 days and a control maintained without weeds. In addition to the periods of coexistence, there were still studies with an inter-row of 0.45 and 0.60 m, 10 and 15 plants m-1. The experimental delineation used was randomized blocks with four repetitions per treatment. The grain productivity of the culture had a reduction of 63, 50, 42 and 57% when the coexistence with the weed plants was during the entire cycle of the culture for a row spacing of 0.45 m and a seeding density of 10 and 15 plants per meter; and a row spacing of 0.60m and a seeding density of 10 and 15 plants per meter, respectively. The PPI occurred in 23, 27, 13, and 19 days after crop emergence and WEEPPEL in 10, 9, 8, and 8 days, respectively.Objetivou-se com este trabalho determinar o período de convivência anterior à interferência das plantas daninhas (PAI e o período anterior ao dano no rendimento econômico (PADRE na cultura do feijão, em diferentes espaçamentos (0,45 e 0,60 m e densidade de plantas (10 e 15 plantas m-1. Os tratamentos foram constituídos de períodos de convivência entre a cultura e as plantas daninhas (0 a 10, 0 a 20, 0 a 30, 0 a 40, 0 a 50, 0 a 60, 0 a 70 e 0 a 80 dias, mais uma testemunha sem convívio com as plantas daninhas. Adotou-se o delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Os períodos anteriores à interferência (PAI da cultura foram de 23, 27, 13 e 19 dias após emergência, e os períodos anteriores ao dano no rendimento econômico (PADRE, de 10, 9, 8 e 8 dias, para os tratamentos com espaçamento de 0,45 m e densidades de semeadura de 10 e 15 plantas m-1 e

  12. What to do with weeded library materials

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Kernel

    1999-01-01

    The article brings a selection of opinions and recommendations from Slovenian librariansrup literature on weeding of library materials and on directing of weeded library materials. The data on one year's weeding of library materials in public libraries in Slovenia and in the Library Oton Župančičin Ljubljana, compared with normative rules for weeding could serve as a direction onhow much material should be forwarded by parent libraries as gift. The process of forwarding of library materials t...

  13. Emergent organization in a model market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Manchanda, Kaustubh; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2017-09-01

    We study the collective behaviour of interacting agents in a simple model of market economics that was originally introduced by Nørrelykke and Bak. A general theoretical framework for interacting traders on an arbitrary network is presented, with the interaction consisting of buying (namely consumption) and selling (namely production) of commodities. Extremal dynamics is introduced by having the agent with least profit in the market readjust prices, causing the market to self-organize. In addition to examining this model market on regular lattices in two-dimensions, we also study the cases of random complex networks both with and without community structures. Fluctuations in an activity signal exhibit properties that are characteristic of avalanches observed in models of self-organized criticality, and these can be described by power-law distributions when the system is in the critical state.

  14. Viruses in weeds in Dioscorea yam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    The presence of viruses in yam leaves and the presence of weeds in close proximity to yam fields have been shown to be associated with diminished tuber yield. But the precise role of weeds as alternative hosts of viruses infecting yam has not been systematically studied. Therefore, leaf samples of weeds were collected ...

  15. Managing weeds with a population dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    No-till cropping systems are increasing land productivity. A critical aspect of no-till is controlling weeds. Herbicides are a crucial tool for weed management, but weed resistance is decreasing control efficacy and increasing input costs. Scientists and producers are seeking a broader perspectiv...

  16. The Weeding of a Historical Society Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Cindy Steinhoff

    1992-01-01

    Describes a major deaccessioning (weeding) project begun in 1985 at the library of the Nebraska State Historical Society, including a brief history of the Society and the events leading to the decision to weed. Public controversy over the handling of the project, benefits of the weeding, and new acquisitions policies are also discussed. (MES)

  17. Prospects for site specific weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Rasmussen, Jesper; Pedersen, Søren Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Research on Site Specific Weed Management (SSWM) started in the late 80's. Since that moment, considerable research has been conducted on different aspects of SSWM, from fundamental studies on the spatial ecology of weeds to the applied development and testing of new technologies for weed detection...

  18. Quantitative Estimate of Weeds of Sugarcane ( Saccharum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Estimate of Weeds of Sugarcane ( Saccharum Officinarum L.) Crop in Ilorin, Southern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria. ... Simpson's diversity index, Sorensen similarity index and relative abundance were used to determine the weed community structure. A total of 51 weed species belonging to 40 genera within 16 ...

  19. International Universities: Misunderstandings and Emerging Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Internationalization has transformed higher education institutions and systems but there is much confusion as to what an international, binational, transnational, cosmopolitan, multinational, or global university actually means. There is no standardized model for an international university, nor should there be, but a deeper understanding of…

  20. Effects of hand weeding strip and nitrogen fertilizer on corn plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Martins, Dagoberto; Cardoso, Leonildo A; Carbonari, Caio Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate effects of different strip weed control associated with nitrogen fertilizer on corn applied after planting. The experiment was set and conducted in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil, and the hybrid planted was Dekalb 333-B. A completely randomized block design with four replications was used. Experimental plots were disposed as a factorial scheme 2 x 2 x 4, constituted by two types of weeding on row (with or without manual hoeing), two types of weeding on inter-row (with or without manual hoeing), and four nitrogen levels applied after planting (00, 60, 90, and 120 kg ha(-1)). Plots were composed by six rows with 5 m length. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied at 35 days after emergence (d.a.e). For weed community it was evaluated: weed density, dominancy, frequency, and relative importance. The main weed species were: Brachiaria plantiginea, Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Cyperus rotunds, Brachiaria decumbens, Euphorbia heterofila, Oxalis latifolia, Acanthospermum hispidum, Commelina benghalensis. It was evaluated corn height at 40 and 100 d.a.e., first ear insertion height at 100 d.a.e., and final grain yield at harvesting. Plants and first ear insertion height were affected when nitrogen fertilizer was not applied. Treatments without weed control showed that weed interfered negatively with plants height. There were no correlation between weeds and nitrogen fertilizer for all parameters evaluated. Parcels without weed showed the highest ear weights and final grain production. Treatments that received nitrogen fertilizer, independently of studied arrangement, provided higher yields.

  1. Chemical weed control in barley (hordeum vulgare)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.; Hassan, S.W.; Abid, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of two different pre-emergence herbicides i.e. Terbutryn (lgron-500FW) A, 1.01.25 kg a.t. ha/sup -1/ and Flurochloridone (Racer-25 CS) a 0.31, 0.37, 0.44, 0.50 and 0.56 Kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ on weeds and yield of barley wad studied under field conditions hb/sup -1/. All the herbicides significantly reduce the dry weight of weed Maximum reduction (70%) was observed in terbutryn a 1.0 Kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ Growth and yield parameters like number of spike lets per spike. Number of grams per spike. 1000-grain weight. Biological yield. Grain yield straw yield and harvest index showed significant response to various herbicides doses under study. Application of Flurochloridone (Racer-25 (CS) a 0.44 kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ and Terbutryn (lgran-500 FW) a 1.0 kg a.i). The data further revealed that in general all herbicide application treatments exhibited superior performance in respect of growth and yield over control. (author)

  2. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ansong

    Full Text Available Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63% having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  3. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  4. What’s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as ‘plants that grow where they are not wanted’. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people’s age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors’ overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks. PMID:26252004

  5. Controle de plantas daninhas em cana-de-açúcar (Saccharum officinarum com hexazinone e suas misturas com diuron, em pré-emergência Weed control in sugar cane with hexazinone and its mixtures with diuron in pre-emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Clement

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado no ano agrícola 1976/77 um experimento em solo arenoso na Usina Utinga/LeãoAL, no qual foram testados em pré-emergência os tratamentos: hexazinone em 4 doses; hexazinone + diuron em 3 doses; diurom + 2,4 D amina e ametrina + 2,4 D amina. Aos 47, 78 e 111 dias, efetuaram-se as avaliações de fitotoxicidade à cana-de-açúcar e controle à Digitaria sanguinalis , Colopogonio sp, Paspalum distichum e Wedellia paludosa. A interpretação dos dados obtidos mostrou que os tratamentos com hexazinone (954 g/ha e hexazinone (719 g/ha + diuron (2048 g/ha apresentaram diferença estatística em relação à produção quando comparadas à testemunha, além de serem eficientes no controle às plantas daninhas presentes no experimento. Nenhum tratamento prejudicou as qualidades tecnológicas da cana-de-açúcar.In the Agricultural year 1976/77, a field trial was performed on a sandy soil in "Usina Utinga Leão-Alagoas", where the following treatments were applied: hexazinone at 4 rates; hexazinone + diuron at 3 rates; diuron + 2,4 D (amine 720 and ametrine + 2,4 (amine 720, all in pre-emergence. Phytotoxity evaluation for sugar cane and control of Digitaria sanguinalis, Colopogonio sp, Paspalum distichum and Wedellia paludosa, were made 47, 78 and 111 days after the applications. The results obtained showed that the treatments with hexazinone (945 g/ha and hexazinone (719 g/ha + diuron (2048 g/ha presented statistic differences relating to yield, when compared to check, besides being effective in the weeds control. No treatment caused any alterations on tecnologic qualities of the sugar cane.

  6. Automated intelligent rotor tine cultivation and punch planting to improve the selectivity of mechanical intra-row weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Nielsen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    in sugar beet and carrot crops showed no synergistic effects between plant establishment procedures and selectivity of post-emergence weed harrowing. Even if punch planting and automated intelligent rotor tine cultivation were not combined, the results indicated that there was no reason to believe......There is much research on technical aspects related to sensor and mapping techniques, which enable so-called intelligent cultivators to target the intra-row spaces within crop rows. This study investigates (i) an expected advantage of an intelligent rotor tine cultivator (the cycloid hoe) in terms...... of crop-weed selectivity and (ii) an expected synergistic effect between punch planting and post-emergence weed harrowing, in terms of improved crop-weed selectivity. Selectivity is defined as the relationship between weed density decline and associated crop density decline 1 week after cultivation. Punch...

  7. Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard U. Willcockson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Felt problem: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students’ benefit. Our solution: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

  8. Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcockson, Irmgard U; Phelps, Cynthia L

    2010-01-15

    FELT PROBLEM: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit. OUR SOLUTION: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

  9. Weed mapping in early-season maize fields using object-based analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Peña

    Full Text Available The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1 classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2 discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3 generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r(2=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance.

  10. Weed mapping in early-season maize fields using object-based analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r(2)=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance.

  11. Stooped postures are modified by pretask walking in a simulated weed-pulling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D S; Copeland, J L; Hepburn, C G; Doan, J B

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal agricultural workers are hired in some sectors for intermittent manual weed removal, a stoop and grasp harvesting task likely similar to those associated with the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture. Evaluation of this task in an experimental situation would be useful for identifying and controlling musculoskeletal injury risks, presuming a valid experimental model of the task can be created. The purpose of the present study was to examine how a relevant work-related task, namely prolonged walking, altered the biomechanics of manual weed removal in a laboratory setting. Preliminary field assessments informed the development and analysis of a simulated manual weed removal with two separate conditions: not primed, where 11 participants (4 female, mean age 21.6 years) manually removed a simulated weed six times, and primed, where 23 participants (13 female, mean age 22.1 years) walked 1600 m prior to manually removing the same simulated weed six successive times. Segment end point markers and experimental motion capture were used to determine hip, knee, and ankle angles, as well as toe-target proximity, during weed removal. Significant differences between primed and not primed participants were found for angular displacement at the ankle (t(32) = 5.08, P weed, leading to decreased trunk flexion during the harvesting task. These findings suggest that priming can positively influence whole-body postures for manual weed removal.

  12. Weed Recognition Framework for Robotic Precision Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios; Nalpantidis, Lazaros

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel framework which applies known image features combined with advanced linear image representations for weed recognition. Our proposed weed recognition framework, is based on state-of-the-the art object/image categorization methods exploiting enhanced performance...... using advanced encoding and machine learning algorithms. The resulting system can be applied in a variety of environments, plantation or weed types. This results in a novel and generic weed control approach, that in our knowledge is unique among weed recognition methods and systems. For the experimental...... evaluation of our system, we introduce a challenging image dataset for weed recognition. We experimentally show that the proposed system achieves significant performance improvements in weed recognition in comparison with other known methods....

  13. Establishment and Early Growth of Willow at Different Levels of Weed Competition and Nitrogen Fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelfeldt, Stina; Lundkvist, Anneli; Forkman, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of weed competition and nitrogen fertilization on the early growth performance of willow, cuttings of the clone Tora (Salix schwerinii x S. viminalis) were planted in buckets together with model weeds (spring barley or white mustard) sown 15, 26, and 30 days after willow...... planting. The buckets were fertilized with 30 or 90 kg N ha−1. Willow with weeds sown after 15 days produced less biomass and smaller leaf area and had a lower maximum shoot height compared to willow planted without weeds and willow with weeds sown after 26 or 30 days. Fertilization with 90 kg N ha−1......, fertilization should be delayed....

  14. Weed control in conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the introduction of the selective herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), in the 1940’s, weed control in agricultural crops was primarily achieved through mechanical cultivation of the soil. Since that time, an increasing number of highly efficacious herbicide options, paired wi...

  15. Weed Control in White Bean with Various Halosulfuron Tankmixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four field trials were conducted over a three-year period (2011–2013 in southwestern Ontario to evaluate the level of weed control provided by various halosulfuron tankmixes applied preplant incorporated (PPI in white bean. Trifluralin, s-metolachlor, halosulfuron, and imazethapyr applied alone or in combination caused 4% or less visible injury 1 and 4 weeks after emergence (WAE in white bean. Trifluralin, s-metolachlor, halosulfuron, and imazethapyr applied PPI provided 80–96%, 84–95%, 83–100%, and 75–92% control of redroot pigweed; 19–28%, 30–40%, 97–99%, and 73–84% control of common ragweed; 94–96%, 63–82%, 96–100%, and 96–100% control of common lambsquarters; 14-15%, 12–35%, 100%, and 96–97% control of wild mustard; and 96–97%, 95–97%, 53–56%, and 80–82% control of green foxtail, respectively. The two- and three-way tankmixes of halosulfuron with trifluralin, s-metolachlor, or imazethapyr provided 85–100% control of redroot pigweed, 90–98% control of common ragweed, 97–100% control of common lambsquarters, 100% control of wild mustard, and 93–98% control of green foxtail. Weed density, weed biomass and white bean seed yields reflected the level of visible weed control.

  16. Roles that numerical models can play in emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Four points are presented with regard to a perspective on modeling for emergency preparedness. First, and probably foremost, modeling should be considered a tool, along with measurements and experience when used for emergency preparedness. The second point is that the potential for large errors associated with knowing the source term during an accident should not be used as a guide for determining the level of the model development and application. There are many other uses for models than estimating consequences, given the source term. These uses range from estimating the source term to bracketing the problem at hand. The third point is that several levels of model complexity should be considered when addressing emergency response. These levels can vary from the simple Gaussian calculation to the more complex three-dimensional transport and diffusion calculations where terrain and vertical and horizontal shears in the wind fields can be modeled. Lastly, proper interaction and feedback between model results and measurements enhances the capabilities of each if they were applied independently for emergency response purposes

  17. The effects of cover crop on weed control in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennan, H; Ngouajio, M; Isik, D; Kose, B; Kaya, E

    2006-01-01

    Leafy vegetables are not very competitive and weed interference can cause considerable yield losses in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Currently there are no pre or post emergence herbicides registered for weed control in these vegetables in Turkey. For this reason, alternative weed control strategies need to be developed. Cover crop residue could represent an alternative method of weed management in these crops. Field studies were conducted in 2004 at the Black Sea Agricultural Research Institute experimental field in Samsun, Turkey. The cover crop treatments consisted of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, Sorghum vulgare Pers., Vicia villosa L., Amaranthus cruentus L., Pisum sativum L. and the bare ground with no cover crop. All cover crops were seeded by hand and incorporated into the soil on 11 May, 2004. Each plot was 10 m2 (2 x 5 m) and arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. All cover crops were incorporated into the soil by discing on 1 September 2004 at flowering stage of the cover crops. Broadleaved weed species were dominant in the experimental area. Most cover crops established well and S. bicolor biomass was the highest. The number of weed species emerging in all treatments was different at 14 DAD (days after desiccation). Similar results were observed at 28 and 56 DAD. Treatments with Vicia villosa residues had fewer weed species and lower total weed densities than other treatments.

  18. Model Based Mission Assurance: Emerging Opportunities for Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John W.; DiVenti, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) in a Model Based Engineering framework has created new opportunities to improve effectiveness and efficiencies across the assurance functions. The MBSE environment supports not only system architecture development, but provides for support of Systems Safety, Reliability and Risk Analysis concurrently in the same framework. Linking to detailed design will further improve assurance capabilities to support failures avoidance and mitigation in flight systems. This also is leading new assurance functions including model assurance and management of uncertainty in the modeling environment. Further, the assurance cases, a structured hierarchal argument or model, are emerging as a basis for supporting a comprehensive viewpoint in which to support Model Based Mission Assurance (MBMA).

  19. Robust crop and weed segmentation under uncontrolled outdoor illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new machine vision for weed detection was developed from RGB color model images. Processes included in the algorithm for the detection were excessive green conversion, threshold value computation by statistical analysis, adaptive image segmentation by adjusting the threshold value, median filter, ...

  20. Weeds and ground-dwelling predators' response to two different weed management systems in glyphosate-tolerant cotton: A farm-scale study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban García-Ruiz

    Full Text Available The use of glyphosate, as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (GT cotton, supposes a big change in weed management programs with respect to a conventional regime. Thus, alterations in arable flora and arthropod fauna must be considered when evaluating their potential impacts. A 3-year farm-scale study was conducted in a 2-ha GT cotton crop, in southern Spain, to compare the effects of conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes on weed abundance and diversity and their consequences for ground-dwelling predators. Surveys reveal that weed density was relatively low within all treatments with a few dominant species, with significantly higher weed densities and modifications of the floristic composition in glyphosate-treated plots that led to an increase in the abundance of Portulaca oleracea and to a reduction in plant diversity. The activity-density of the main predatory arthropod taxa (spiders, ground beetles, rove beetles and earwigs varied among years, but no significant differences were obtained between conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes. However, significant differences between treatments were obtained for ground beetles species richness and diversity, being higher under the glyphosate herbicide regime, and a positive correlation with weed density could be established for both parameters. The implications of these findings to weed control in GT cotton are discussed.

  1. Weeds and ground-dwelling predators' response to two different weed management systems in glyphosate-tolerant cotton: A farm-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Esteban; Loureiro, Íñigo; Farinós, Gema P; Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Elena; Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Escorial, María Concepción; Ortego, Félix; Chueca, María Cristina; Castañera, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    The use of glyphosate, as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (GT) cotton, supposes a big change in weed management programs with respect to a conventional regime. Thus, alterations in arable flora and arthropod fauna must be considered when evaluating their potential impacts. A 3-year farm-scale study was conducted in a 2-ha GT cotton crop, in southern Spain, to compare the effects of conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes on weed abundance and diversity and their consequences for ground-dwelling predators. Surveys reveal that weed density was relatively low within all treatments with a few dominant species, with significantly higher weed densities and modifications of the floristic composition in glyphosate-treated plots that led to an increase in the abundance of Portulaca oleracea and to a reduction in plant diversity. The activity-density of the main predatory arthropod taxa (spiders, ground beetles, rove beetles and earwigs) varied among years, but no significant differences were obtained between conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes. However, significant differences between treatments were obtained for ground beetles species richness and diversity, being higher under the glyphosate herbicide regime, and a positive correlation with weed density could be established for both parameters. The implications of these findings to weed control in GT cotton are discussed.

  2. Weeds and ground-dwelling predators′ response to two different weed management systems in glyphosate-tolerant cotton: A farm-scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinós, Gema P.; Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Elena; Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Escorial, María Concepción; Ortego, Félix; Chueca, María Cristina; Castañera, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    The use of glyphosate, as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant (GT) cotton, supposes a big change in weed management programs with respect to a conventional regime. Thus, alterations in arable flora and arthropod fauna must be considered when evaluating their potential impacts. A 3-year farm-scale study was conducted in a 2-ha GT cotton crop, in southern Spain, to compare the effects of conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes on weed abundance and diversity and their consequences for ground-dwelling predators. Surveys reveal that weed density was relatively low within all treatments with a few dominant species, with significantly higher weed densities and modifications of the floristic composition in glyphosate-treated plots that led to an increase in the abundance of Portulaca oleracea and to a reduction in plant diversity. The activity-density of the main predatory arthropod taxa (spiders, ground beetles, rove beetles and earwigs) varied among years, but no significant differences were obtained between conventional and glyphosate herbicide regimes. However, significant differences between treatments were obtained for ground beetles species richness and diversity, being higher under the glyphosate herbicide regime, and a positive correlation with weed density could be established for both parameters. The implications of these findings to weed control in GT cotton are discussed. PMID:29351549

  3. Modeling the peak of emergence in systems: Design and katachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardier, Beth; Goranson, H T; Casas, Niccolo; Lundberg, Patric; Erioli, Alessio; Takaki, Ryuji; Nagy, Dénes; Ciavarra, Richard; Sanford, Larry D

    2017-12-01

    It is difficult to model emergence in biological systems using reductionist paradigms. A requirement for computational modeling is that individual entities can be recorded parametrically and related logically, but their transformation into whole systems cannot be captured this way. The problem stems from an inability to formally represent the implicit influences that inform emergent organization, such as context, shifts in causal agency or scale, and self-reference. This lack hampers biological systems modeling and its computational counterpart, indicating a need for new fundamental abstraction frameworks that support system-level characteristics. We develop an approach that formally captures these characteristics, focusing on the way they come together to enable transformation at the 'peak' of the emergent process. An example from virology is presented, in which two seemingly antagonistic systems - the herpes cold sore virus and its host - are capable of altering their basic biological objectives to achieve a new equilibrium. The usual barriers to modeling this process are overcome by incorporating mechanisms from practices centered on its emergent peak: design and katachi. In the Japanese science of form, katachi refers to the emergence of intrinsic structure from real situations, where an optimal balance between implicit influences is achieved. Design indicates how such optimization is guided by principles of flow. These practices leverage qualities of situated abstraction, which we understand through the intuitive method of physicist Kôdi Husimi. Early results indicate that this approach can capture the functional transformations of biological emergence, whilst being reasonably computable. Due to its geometric foundations and narrative-based extension to logic, the method will also generate speculative predictions. This research forms the foundations of a new biomedical modeling platform, which is discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Weed Mapping with Co-Kriging Using Soil Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, Torben; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Andreasen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Our aim is to build reliable weed maps to control weeds in patches. Weed sampling is time consuming but there are some shortcuts. If an intensively sampled variable (e.g. soil property) can be used to improve estimation of a sparsely sampled variable (e.g. weed distribution), one can reduce weed...

  5. Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Ian; Duke, Stephen O

    2018-05-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used and successful herbicide discovered to date, but its utility is now threatened by the occurrence of several glyphosate-resistant weed species. Glyphosate resistance first appeared in Lolium rigidum in an apple orchard in Australia in 1996, ironically the year that the first glyphosate-resistant crop (soybean) was introduced in the USA. Thirty-eight weed species have now evolved resistance to glyphosate, distributed across 37 countries and in 34 different crops and six non-crop situations. Although glyphosate-resistant weeds have been identified in orchards, vineyards, plantations, cereals, fallow and non-crop situations, it is the glyphosate-resistant weeds in glyphosate-resistant crop systems that dominate the area infested and growing economic impact. Glyphosate-resistant weeds present the greatest threat to sustained weed control in major agronomic crops because this herbicide is used to control weeds with resistance to herbicides with other sites of action, and no new herbicide sites of action have been introduced for over 30 years. Industry has responded by developing herbicide resistance traits in major crops that allow existing herbicides to be used in a new way. However, over reliance on these traits will result in multiple-resistance in weeds. Weed control in major crops is at a precarious point, where we must maintain the utility of the herbicides we have until we can transition to new weed management technologies. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Evaluating the potential for weed seed dispersal based on waterfowl consumption and seed viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jaime A; Webb, Elisabeth B; Pierce, Robert A; Bradley, Kevin W

    2017-12-01

    Migratory waterfowl have often been implicated in the movement of troublesome agronomic and wetland weed species. However, minimal research has been conducted to investigate the dispersal of agronomically important weed species by waterfowl. The two objectives for this project were to determine what weed species are being consumed by ducks and snow geese, and to determine the recovery rate and viability of 13 agronomic weed species after passage through a duck's digestive system. Seed recovered from digestive tracts of 526 ducks and geese harvested during a 2-year field study had 35 020 plants emerge. A greater variety of plant species emerged from ducks each year (47 and 31 species) compared to geese (11 and 3 species). Viable seed from 11 of 13 weed species fed to ducks in a controlled feeding study were recovered. Viability rate and gut retention times indicated potential dispersal up to 2900 km from the source depending on seed characteristics and variability in waterfowl dispersal distances. Study results confirm that waterfowl are consuming seeds from a variety of agronomically important weed species, including Palmer amaranth, which can remain viable after passage through digestive tracts and have potential to be dispersed over long distances by waterfowl. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. A Cascade-Based Emergency Model for Water Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water distribution network is important in the critical physical infrastructure systems. The paper studies the emergency resource strategies on water distribution network with the approach of complex network and cascading failures. The model of cascade-based emergency for water distribution network is built. The cascade-based model considers the network topology analysis and hydraulic analysis to provide a more realistic result. A load redistribution function with emergency recovery mechanisms is established. From the aspects of uniform distribution, node betweenness, and node pressure, six recovery strategies are given to reflect the network topology and the failure information, respectively. The recovery strategies are evaluated with the complex network indicators to describe the failure scale and failure velocity. The proposed method is applied by an illustrative example. The results showed that the recovery strategy considering the node pressure can enhance the network robustness effectively. Besides, this strategy can reduce the failure nodes and generate the least failure nodes per time.

  8. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  9. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  10. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lima

    Full Text Available Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors. Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  11. Emergence of heterogeneity in an agent-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan

    2002-01-01

    We study an interacting agent model of a game-theoretical economy. The agents play a minority-subsequently-majority game and they learn, using backpropagation networks, to obtain higher payoffs. We study the relevance of heterogeneity to performance, and how heterogeneity emerges.

  12. On distinguishing different models of a class of emergent Universe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Souvik Ghose

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... in early Universe in the standard Big-Bang cosmol- ogy as the present observations favour such an initial phase. The Big-Bang cosmology, despite its success, has always been a concern for many who remained scepti- cal about its initial singularity. Emergent Universe (EU) models were studied as early ...

  13. Natural crayfish clone as emerging model for various biological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2. Marmorkrebs: Natural crayfish clone as emerging model for various biological disciplines. Günter Vogt. Mini-review Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 377-382. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Epianthropochory in Mexican weed communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrans, H

    1999-04-01

    The diaspores of the 50 most important maize field weed species (agrestals) in a traditional maize-growing area of south-central Mexico (region of Puebla and Tlaxcala) were analyzed for morphological adaptations to long-distance dispersal. Adaptations to wind-dispersal were absent and to endozoochory were minimal. Most species had no visible adaptations and are presumably transported with mud. However, about one-quarter of the taxa, particularly the tall and dominant ones, relied at least partially on burrs with hooks or awns. The possible vectors for these exo- or epizoochorous species are discussed: the most likely regular dispersers are humans (epianthropochory). Interviews with farmers confirm this conclusion. Using humans as vectors allows the plant to transport relatively large seeds to favorable habitats (directed dispersal). The importance of this relatively rare dispersal adaptation in Mexican maize field weeds leads to questions on the origin and evolution of these agrestals.

  15. Selective Herbicides Reduce Weeding Costs in Two Mississippi Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. B. Smyly; T. H. Filer

    1979-01-01

    In tests conducted from 1974 to 1977, the preemergence herbicides, Treflan, Eptam, Dymid, and Dectun reduced weeds and weeding costs in seedling beds of loblolly, slash, and short leaf pine. Velpar and Roundup controlled weeds along riser lines.

  16. Precise tillage systems for enhanced non-chemical weed management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurstjens, D.A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Soil and residue manipulation can assist weed management by killing weeds mechanically, interfering in weed lifecycles, facilitating operations and enhancing crop establishment and growth. Current tillage systems often compromise these functions, resulting in heavy reliance on herbicides,

  17. Cervantes, The Sot-Weed Factor. The “Wild Writing” of John Barth, Contemporary Review of the Cervantinian Narrative Models: Romance, Novella, (Proto Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Encarnación Pérez Abellán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available By “wild writing” Cervantes understands the disharmonious composition of chivalric romance by the incongruous sequencing of its constituent elements. However, he also proposes a positive reading of the expression whenever the theme compositional heterogeneity brings together the principle of unity and coherence. The Quixote himself exemplifies the “wild writing” integrating formally the Italianate novella, short stories and an embryonic essay in order to become the new genre: the novel. Don Quixote is the starting point of The Sot-Weed Factor (John Barth 1960, as well as it is uniquely amalgamate the three narratives submodalities, as a conscious tribute to Cervantes, already installed Barth in postmodern novel.

  18. Integration of herbicides with manual weeding for controlling the weeds in rice under saline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, M A; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M M; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Karim, S M Rezaul; Kausar, H

    2015-11-01

    The pot experiment was conducted to select appropriate integrated weed management method in rice under different salinity levels (0, 4 and 8 dS m(-1)). All the parameters including rice and weed measured were significantly influenced by weed control treatments at all salinity levels. Treatments including weed-free condition, Pretilachlor @0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + hand weeding, Propanil + Thiobencarb @ 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) and 1.8 kg ai ha(-1)+ hand weeding performed better under all salinity levels. Pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding and propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) + 1.8 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding were comparable to weed-free yields, and were superior to other treatments under salinity condition. Considering all the parameters, pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT), propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) +1.8 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT) gave the most effective control of weeds in rice under saline environments.

  19. Weeding Is Not Just for Gardeners: A Case Study on Weeding a Reference Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Weeding a reference collection can be time consuming, a thankless job, and an endless task. It is a dusty job and can add to the librarian's workload. Weeding the collection can add to its currency and usability; plus it removes outdated materials. Periodically weeding allows librarians to remember what is in the collection and what can be removed…

  20. Effect of Weed Management on Weeds and Grain Yield of Haricot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weeds are one of the major constraints limiting haricot bean productivity and production. Field experiments were conducted on the effect of weed managements on weeds and grain yield of haricot bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L.) at Melkassa Agricultural Research Center from 2011 - 2013. The objective was to determine the ...

  1. Linking Farmer Weed Management Behavior with Weed Pressure: More than Just Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Kropff, M.J.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Renes, R.J.; Sukkel, W.; Weide, van der R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Most studies on weed population dynamics in farming systems have focused on the effects of different weed control strategies. Those studies usually assume that farmers, operating within a particular system, have a uniform management style. However, it is likely that weed management decision making

  2. Weed interference with peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) and spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) crops under different herbicide treatments: effects on biomass and essential oil yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkanis, Anestis; Lykas, Christos; Liava, Vasiliki; Bezou, Anna; Petropoulos, Spyridon; Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos

    2018-01-01

    'Minor crops' such as spearmint and peppermint are high added value crops, despite the fact that their production area is comparably small worldwide. The main limiting factor in mint commercial cultivation is weed competition. Thus, field experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of weed interference on growth, biomass and essential oil yield in peppermint and spearmint under different herbicide treatments. The application of pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen provided better control of annual weeds resulting in higher crop yield. Additionally, when treated with herbicides both crops were more competitive against annual weeds in the second year than in the first year. All pre-emergence herbicides increased biomass yield, since pendimethalin, linuron and oxyfluorfen reduced the density of annual weeds by 71-92%, 63-74% and 86-95%, respectively. Weed interference and herbicide application had no effect on essential oil content; however, a relatively strong impact on essential oil production per cultivated area unit was observed, mainly due to the adverse effect of weed interference on plant growth. Considering that pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen were effective against annual weeds in both spearmint and peppermint crops, these herbicides should be included in integrated weed management systems for better weed management in mint crops. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. AN INFORMATION SERVICE MODEL FOR REMOTE SENSING EMERGENCY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method on the semantic access environment, which can solve the problem about how to identify the correct natural disaster emergency knowledge and return to the demanders. The study data is natural disaster knowledge text set. Firstly, based on the remote sensing emergency knowledge database, we utilize the sematic network to extract the key words in the input documents dataset. Then, using the semantic analysis based on words segmentation and PLSA, to establish the sematic access environment to identify the requirement of users and match the emergency knowledge in the database. Finally, the user preference model was established, which could help the system to return the corresponding information to the different users. The results indicate that semantic analysis can dispose the natural disaster knowledge effectively, which will realize diversified information service, enhance the precision of information retrieval and satisfy the requirement of users.

  4. What to do with weeded library materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Kernel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The article brings a selection of opinions and recommendations from Slovenian librariansrup literature on weeding of library materials and on directing of weeded library materials. The data on one year's weeding of library materials in public libraries in Slovenia and in the Library Oton Župančičin Ljubljana, compared with normative rules for weeding could serve as a direction onhow much material should be forwarded by parent libraries as gift. The process of forwarding of library materials to other libraries as gift is presented on the case of the Library Oton Zupančič in Ljubljana.

  5. A STUDY ON WEED CONTROL IN SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TJITROSEMITO

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments on weed control in soybeans were carried out at BIOTROP, Bogor, Indonesia from February to June, 1989. The critical period for weed control was found to be between 20 - 40 days after planting of soybean (c. v. Wilis grown at a planting distance of 40 x 10 cm. It did not coincide with the fastest growth in terms of trifoliate leaf number. Further studies were suggested to understand the physiological growth of soybean related to weed control. Pendimethalin at 660- 1320 g a.e./ha applied one day after sowing did not cause any phytotoxic effect to soybean and had good weed control performance.

  6. What do farmers' weed control decisions imply about glyphosate resistance? Evidence from surveys of US corn fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Seth J; McFadden, Jonathan R; Smith, David J

    2018-05-01

    The first case of glyphosate-resistant weeds in the United States was documented in 1998, 2 years after the commercialization of genetically engineered herbicide-resistant (HR) corn and soybeans. Currently, over 15 glyphosate-resistant weed species affect US crop production areas. These weeds have the potential to reduce yields, increase costs, and lower farm profitability. The objective of our study is to develop a behavioral model of farmers' weed management decisions and use it to analyze weed resistance to glyphosate in US corn farms. On average, we find that weed control increased US corn yields by 3700 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 255 ha -1 ) in 2005 and 3500 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 575 ha -1 ) in 2010. If glyphosate resistant weeds were absent, glyphosate killed approximately 99% of weeds, on average, when applied at the label rate in HR production systems. Average control was dramatically lower in states where glyphosate resistance was widespread. We find that glyphosate resistance had a significant impact on weed control costs and corn yields of US farmers in 2005 and 2010. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Local Design & Global Dreams - Emerging Business Models creating the Emergent Electric Vehicle Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Andersen, Poul Houman; Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    Electric cars hold the potential to completely alter the interrelationship among actors in the automobile industry architecture. As such they may not only be able to alleviate environmental externalities but also revolutionise the automobile industry as such. This paper is concerned...... with the processes of industry creation for the electric car industry, which is a particular fascinating topic matter as it allows the analysis to provide an understanding of the processes of innovation and of some of its inventors in concert. In continuation of this, the aim of this paper is to describe and analyse...... which emergent business models and corresponding value capturing capabilities can be found in the emerging market for electric cars....

  8. A new method to evaluate the weed-suppressing effect of mulches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, B. W.; Ali, A.; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2013-01-01

    To suppress weeds in an apple (Malus sp.) orchard, we placed spruce (Picea spp.) bark mulch and cocoa (Theobroma cacao) husk mulch for 3 months in thicknesses of 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 cm. To assess the development of weed cover, an innovative use of log-logistic dose–response models was applied...... (ED50 and ED90) differed significantly within and between mulch types. In all except one instance, the cocoa mulch was superior in suppressing weeds. This method was useful for the evaluation, but further research is needed to give a more general conclusion about the suppression ability of the two...

  9. Fusion of pixel and object-based features for weed mapping using unmanned aerial vehicle imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junfeng; Liao, Wenzhi; Nuyttens, David; Lootens, Peter; Vangeyte, Jürgen; Pižurica, Aleksandra; He, Yong; Pieters, Jan G.

    2018-05-01

    The developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and advanced imaging sensors provide new opportunities for ultra-high resolution (e.g., less than a 10 cm ground sampling distance (GSD)) crop field monitoring and mapping in precision agriculture applications. In this study, we developed a strategy for inter- and intra-row weed detection in early season maize fields from aerial visual imagery. More specifically, the Hough transform algorithm (HT) was applied to the orthomosaicked images for inter-row weed detection. A semi-automatic Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed with Random Forests (RF) combined with feature selection techniques to classify soil, weeds and maize. Furthermore, the two binary weed masks generated from HT and OBIA were fused for accurate binary weed image. The developed RF classifier was evaluated by 5-fold cross validation, and it obtained an overall accuracy of 0.945, and Kappa value of 0.912. Finally, the relationship of detected weeds and their ground truth densities was quantified by a fitted linear model with a coefficient of determination of 0.895 and a root mean square error of 0.026. Besides, the importance of input features was evaluated, and it was found that the ratio of vegetation length and width was the most significant feature for the classification model. Overall, our approach can yield a satisfactory weed map, and we expect that the obtained accurate and timely weed map from UAV imagery will be applicable to realize site-specific weed management (SSWM) in early season crop fields for reducing spraying non-selective herbicides and costs.

  10. Crisis and emergency risk communication as an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Barbara; W Seeger, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model of communication known as crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC). The model is outlined as a merger of many traditional notions of health and risk communication with work in crisis and disaster communication. The specific kinds of communication activities that should be called for at various stages of disaster or crisis development are outlined. Although crises are by definition uncertain, equivocal, and often chaotic situations, the CERC model is presented as a tool health communicators can use to help manage these complex events.

  11. Combining spatial and spectral information to improve crop/weed discrimination algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L.; Jones, G.; Villette, S.; Paoli, J. N.; Gée, C.

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of herbicide spraying is an important key to environmentally and economically improve weed management. To achieve this, remote sensors such as imaging systems are commonly used to detect weed plants. We developed spatial algorithms that detect the crop rows to discriminate crop from weeds. These algorithms have been thoroughly tested and provide robust and accurate results without learning process but their detection is limited to inter-row areas. Crop/Weed discrimination using spectral information is able to detect intra-row weeds but generally needs a prior learning process. We propose a method based on spatial and spectral information to enhance the discrimination and overcome the limitations of both algorithms. The classification from the spatial algorithm is used to build the training set for the spectral discrimination method. With this approach we are able to improve the range of weed detection in the entire field (inter and intra-row). To test the efficiency of these algorithms, a relevant database of virtual images issued from SimAField model has been used and combined to LOPEX93 spectral database. The developed method based is evaluated and compared with the initial method in this paper and shows an important enhancement from 86% of weed detection to more than 95%.

  12. Ocean biogeochemistry modeled with emergent trait-based genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, V. J.; Stukel, M. R.; Brooks, M. T.; Burd, A.; Crump, B. C.; Moran, M. A.; Paul, J. H.; Satinsky, B. M.; Yager, P. L.; Zielinski, B. L.; Hood, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Marine ecosystem models have advanced to incorporate metabolic pathways discovered with genomic sequencing, but direct comparisons between models and “omics” data are lacking. We developed a model that directly simulates metagenomes and metatranscriptomes for comparison with observations. Model microbes were randomly assigned genes for specialized functions, and communities of 68 species were simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. Unfit organisms were replaced, and the model self-organized to develop community genomes and transcriptomes. Emergent communities from simulations that were initialized with different cohorts of randomly generated microbes all produced realistic vertical and horizontal ocean nutrient, genome, and transcriptome gradients. Thus, the library of gene functions available to the community, rather than the distribution of functions among specific organisms, drove community assembly and biogeochemical gradients in the model ocean.

  13. Modeling emergent border-crossing behaviors during pandemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eunice E.; Santos, Eugene; Korah, John; Thompson, Jeremy E.; Gu, Qi; Kim, Keum Joo; Li, Deqing; Russell, Jacob; Subramanian, Suresh; Zhang, Yuxi; Zhao, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Modeling real-world scenarios is a challenge for traditional social science researchers, as it is often hard to capture the intricacies and dynamisms of real-world situations without making simplistic assumptions. This imposes severe limitations on the capabilities of such models and frameworks. Complex population dynamics during natural disasters such as pandemics is an area where computational social science can provide useful insights and explanations. In this paper, we employ a novel intent-driven modeling paradigm for such real-world scenarios by causally mapping beliefs, goals, and actions of individuals and groups to overall behavior using a probabilistic representation called Bayesian Knowledge Bases (BKBs). To validate our framework we examine emergent behavior occurring near a national border during pandemics, specifically the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Mexico. The novelty of the work in this paper lies in representing the dynamism at multiple scales by including both coarse-grained (events at the national level) and finegrained (events at two separate border locations) information. This is especially useful for analysts in disaster management and first responder organizations who need to be able to understand both macro-level behavior and changes in the immediate vicinity, to help with planning, prevention, and mitigation. We demonstrate the capabilities of our framework in uncovering previously hidden connections and explanations by comparing independent models of the border locations with their fused model to identify emergent behaviors not found in either independent location models nor in a simple linear combination of those models.

  14. The effect of sowing strategy, row distance and mechanical weed control on weeds and yield in organic winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Ilse A.

    2002-01-01

    A series of field experiments were carried out in winter wheat grown under organic conditions in Denmark on fields with different weed pressure. The treatments were sowing strategy (normal sowing time, late sowing and false seedbed), row distance (12 cm and 24 cm row distance) and weed control method (untreated, mechanical weed control (weed harrowing at 12 cm supplemented with row hoeing at 24 cm), and herbicide weed control). Weed biomass was largest at the normal sowing time and was reduce...

  15. Ecological weed management by cover cropping : effects on weed growth in autumn and weed establishment in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.; Bastiaans, L.; Kropff, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cover crops grown in the period between two main crops have potential as an important component of a system-oriented ecological weed management strategy. In late summer and autumn, the cover crop can suppress growth and seed production of weeds, whereas the incorporation of cover crop residues in

  16. Períodos de interferência das plantas daninhas em algodoeiro de fibra colorida 'BRS Safira' Weeds interference periods in naturally colored cotton 'BRS Safira'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleibson Dionízio Cardoso

    2010-09-01

    , and crop kept with weeds during initial period after plant emergency. Both consisted, 0; 20; 40; 60; 80 e 120 days after crop emergency (DAE, the weed community was evaluated by two phytosociological indices (relative dominance and relative importance. Regression analysis was performed as the model of sigmoidal Boltzman, using data from productivity separately within each type of competition, to identify the critical periods of competition, considering 2; 5 and 10% reduction in yield. The community of weeds was composed by 21 species, standing out among them: Richardia grandiflora, Amaranthus deflexus, Eleusine indica, Merremia aegyptia, Eragrotis pilosa, Cenchrus echinatus and Waltheria indica. Considering 2; 5 and 10% reduction in yield fiber as acceptable, the critical period before weed interference were, respectively, 8; 14 and 20 DAE. The critical period of weed interference, for those same levels of losses, were respectively, 100; 82 and 60 days.

  17. Greenhouse and field evaluation of isoxaflutole for weed control in maize in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Zuo, Lan; Li, Wei; Guo, Wenlei; Liu, Weitang; Wang, Jinxin

    2017-10-04

    Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to provide a reference for pre-emergence (PRE) application of isoxaflutole on maize in China. In greenhouse study, the isoxaflutole PRE application at 30 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha -1 could effectively control large numbers of weeds, especially some large-seeded broadleaves, tested in this study. The tolerance results indicated 21 maize hybrids showed different responses to isoxaflutole under greenhouse conditions. In 2015 and 2016, field experiments were conducted to determine and compare the weed control efficacy and safety to Zhengdan 958 maize with 6 herbicide treatments. In both years, isoxaflutole PRE at 100 to 250 g a.i. ha -1 was sufficient to provide satisfactory full-season control of the dominant common broadleaf and grass weeds in the field. Temporary injury to maize was observed with isoxaflutole treatments of 125, 150, and 250 g a.i. ha -1 in both years, but plants recovered within 4 to 6 wk. To maximize maize yield and provide satisfactory weed control, a range of 100 to 150 g a.i. ha -1 of isoxaflutole is recommended, depending on the soil characteristics, weather, and weed species present at the experimental site. Based on the results, isoxaflutole PRE has good potential for weed control in maize in China.

  18. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Cseresnyés

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L. was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956 were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches.

  19. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Takács, T.; Füzy, A.; Végh, K.R.; Lehoczky, E.

    2016-11-01

    Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC) measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L.) was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956) were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches. (Author)

  20. Modelling the contact propagation of nosocomial infection in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaramillo, Cecilia; Taboada, Manel; Epelde, Francisco; Rexachs, Dolores; Luque Amat, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The nosocomial infection is a special kind of infection that is caused by microorganisms acquired inside a hospital. In the daily care process of an emergency department, the interactions between patients and sanitary staff create the environment for the transmission of such microorganisms. Rates of morbility and mortality due to nosocomial infections areimportant indicators of the quality of hospital work. In this research, we use Agent Based Modeling and Simulation tech...

  1. Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Henning, Daniel J; Strouse, Connie S; Chiu, David T; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2017-08-01

    Resident productivity, defined as new patients per hour, carries important implications for emergency department operations. In high-volume academic centers, essential staffing decisions can be made on the assumption that residents see patients at a static rate. However, it is unclear whether this model mirrors reality; previous studies have not rigorously examined whether productivity changes over time. We examine residents' productivity across shifts to determine whether it remained consistent. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an urban academic hospital with a 3-year emergency medicine training program in which residents acquire patients ad libitum throughout their shift. Time stamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged. A linear mixed model was constructed to predict productivity per shift hour. A total of 14,364 8- and 9-hour shifts were worked by 75 residents between July 1, 2010, and June 20, 2015. This comprised 6,127 (42.7%) postgraduate year (PGY) 1 shifts, 7,236 (50.4%) PGY-2 shifts, and 998 (6.9%) PGY-3 nonsupervisory shifts (Table 1). Overall, residents treated a mean of 10.1 patients per shift (SD 3.2), with most patients at Emergency Severity Index level 3 or more acute (93.8%). In the initial hour, residents treated a mean of 2.14 patients (SD 1.2), and every subsequent hour was associated with a significant decrease, with the largest in the second, third, and final hours. Emergency medicine resident productivity during a single shift follows a reliable pattern that decreases significantly hourly, a pattern preserved across PGY years and types of shifts. This suggests that resident productivity is a dynamic process, which should be considered in staffing decisions and studied further. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Handling Emergency Management in [an] Object Oriented Modeling Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokgoz, Berna Eren; Cakir, Volkan; Gheorghe, Adrian V.

    2010-01-01

    It has been understood that protection of a nation from extreme disasters is a challenging task. Impacts of extreme disasters on a nation's critical infrastructures, economy and society could be devastating. A protection plan itself would not be sufficient when a disaster strikes. Hence, there is a need for a holistic approach to establish more resilient infrastructures to withstand extreme disasters. A resilient infrastructure can be defined as a system or facility that is able to withstand damage, but if affected, can be readily and cost-effectively restored. The key issue to establish resilient infrastructures is to incorporate existing protection plans with comprehensive preparedness actions to respond, recover and restore as quickly as possible, and to minimize extreme disaster impacts. Although national organizations will respond to a disaster, extreme disasters need to be handled mostly by local emergency management departments. Since emergency management departments have to deal with complex systems, they have to have a manageable plan and efficient organizational structures to coordinate all these systems. A strong organizational structure is the key in responding fast before and during disasters, and recovering quickly after disasters. In this study, the entire emergency management is viewed as an enterprise and modelled through enterprise management approach. Managing an enterprise or a large complex system is a very challenging task. It is critical for an enterprise to respond to challenges in a timely manner with quick decision making. This study addresses the problem of handling emergency management at regional level in an object oriented modelling environment developed by use of TopEase software. Emergency Operation Plan of the City of Hampton, Virginia, has been incorporated into TopEase for analysis. The methodology used in this study has been supported by a case study on critical infrastructure resiliency in Hampton Roads.

  3. Effects of Planting Date, Time and Methods of Weed Control on Weed Density and Biomass in Cumin Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghorbani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two field experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of planting date, method and date of weed control on weed density and biomass in the experimental research field, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during 2006 and 2007. Treatments included planting date (30 December, 20 January and 30 February, weeding date (first true leaf, start of branching and beginning of flowering stages and weed control methods (hand weeding, fire treatment and control. The results showed that there were significant differences in the number of weeds between different sowing dates, weeding dates and control methods. The highest mean density and biomass of weeds were obtained on the planting date, 30 February, and when weed was controlled at the first leaf appearance stage with fire treatment. The most appropriate time for weed control was at the beginning of cumin flowering. Fire treatment reduced weed growth in the first half of growing season. However, hand weeding significantly reduced weed density and biomass in the second half of cumin growing season. The first planting date caused the lowest mean weed biomass and the highest cumin yield compared to later planting dates. Hand weeding treatment contained lower mean weed density and biomass compared to fire treatment, however, cumin yield was lower in hand weeding plots than fire treatment. Keywords: Cultural control, Cuminum cyminum, Fire, Hand weeding, Control time

  4. The weed composition in an orchard as a result of long-term foliar herbicide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licznar-Małańczuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The weed composition and the dominance of individual species occurring in an orchard were assessed at the Research Station of the Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland, during the first 10 years after orchard establishment. ‘Ligol’ apple trees were planted in the spring of 2004 (3.5 × 1.2 m. Foliar herbicides were applied in 1 m wide tree rows twice or three times per each vegetation period. In the inter-row spaces, perennial grass was maintained. Ten years of maintenance of herbicide fallow contributed to a change in the weed composition in the orchard. It changed as a result of different responses of the most important weed species to the foliar herbicides. Total suppression of Elymus repens was observed in the first year after planting the trees. Convolvulus arvensis, Cirsium arvense, and other perennial weeds, completely disappeared in the succeeding periods. The maintenance of herbicide fallow did not affect the abundance of Taraxacum officinale. The percentage of the soil surface covered by Trifolium repens and Epilobium adenocaulon, perennial weeds with considerable tolerance to post-emergence herbicides, increased during the fruit-bearing period of the trees. The abundance of these weeds was significantly reduced only in the rows with the stronger growing trees on the semi-dwarf P 2 rootstock. Stellaria media was the dominant annual weed. Senecio vulgaris, Poa annua, Capsella bursa-pastoris, and Lamium spp. were also frequently observed. A significant increase in the abundance of annual and perennial weeds was found in the tree rows as a result of improved water availability after a period of high precipitation.

  5. Reduction of weed pressure by establishing catch crops in maize-bean-intercropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Intercropping field experiments with maize and Phaseolus beans are conducted at the Thünen-Institute of Organic Farming (Schleswig-Holstein, SL, 740 mm, 8.7 °C from 2014-2016. As known from previous experiments, maize and beans have a very low competitiveness against weeds, due to their relative slow youth development. Therefore, the beans were sown subsequently to the mechanical weed control with harrow and hoe, at the 4-leaf development stage (BBCH 14 of maize. Hence a mechanical weed control after bean emergence is critical, a field experiment is conducted to find out whether the establishment of an additional catch crop can reduce weed pressure substantially. For this purpose two catch crop mixtures are evaluated in pure maize plots as well as in intercropping plots with scarlet runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus, cv. Preisgewinner or common runner beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, cv. Tarbais respectively. As control variants, plots without undersown crops were used. The undersown crop mixtures are composed of Italian ryegrass (cv. Gersimi, sowing density: 15 kg ha-1, which is combined with subterranean clover (cv. Seaton Park, sowing density: 30 kg ha-1 in US1 and with Chicory (cv. Puna II, sowing density 7.5 kg ha-1 in US2. The highest biomass (50 g DM m-2 was produced by US1 in all variants, while the biomass of US2 was significantly lower with 32 g DM m-2. As a result of a successful mechanical weed control as well as a good development of the main crops, the weed pressure in 2014 was generally low. Nevertheless, the results show that undersown crops can reduce weeds substantially. While the significantly highest weed biomass was recorded in the plots without undersown crops, it was reduced by 70% with US1 and by 80% with US2 on average respectively.

  6. An attempt to use functional diversity indices for the assessment of weed communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of changes in functional diversity of weeds in spring barley grown in the period 1990-2004 in crop rotation after potato with a 25% share of this cereal (potato - spring barley - field pea - winter triticale as well as in crop rotation with its 75% share (potato - spring barley - spring barley - spring barley in which barley was grown once and twice after the same barley crop. No weed control was used in the present experiment. Every year in the spring (at full emergence of barley and before harvest, the species composition and numbers of individual weed species were determined, as well as their weed biomass before harvest. On this basis, the selected functional diversity indices were calculated. Multidimensional techniques were used for dividing weeds into functional groups and for the determination of some of the indices. Potato/barley crop rotation with a 25% share of barley and growing spring barley once and twice after the same barley crop did not differentiate weed functional biodiversity. The weed functional diversity indices showed different variations over time. Higher variation was usually observed for the indices calculated for the summer communities compared to the spring ones. The strength and significance of the positive correlation between weed functional diversity and precipitation in the growing season and of the negative correlation with mean temperature for the period from April to August were dependent on the measure of diversity. The functional diversity indices showed high convergence. The FD and FAD indices proved to be interchangeable.

  7. WEED SURVEYING OF PHACELIA (PHACELIA TANACETIFOLIA L.) AND EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE WEED CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, E; Szabó, R

    2014-01-01

    The experiment was set up in an area of 9 ha that was split into 4 plots: in plot 1 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 2 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 3 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg; in plot 4 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg. After the weed surveying, the total weed coverage was established as follows: in plot 1 the total weed coverage was 11.34%, in plot 2 it was 12.3%, in plot 3 it was 18%, and in plot 4 the total weed coverage was 15%. Based on the weed survey, on the test area the following dicotyledon weeds belonging to the T4 Raunkiaer plant life-form category occupied the highest percentage: heal-all, black-bindweed, goosefoot. The proportion of the perennial dicotyledons: field bindweed (G3), tuberous pea (G1), white campion (H3) was negligible. In all four cases the weed control was executed using the same herbicide in the same doses and with regard to the weed species it showed the same level of efficiency. The smaller row spacing and higher seeding rate has a beneficial effect on the weed suppressing capacity of the crop, the crop's weed suppressing capacity is better and the development of the weeds becomes worse.

  8. Simulating changes in cropping practices in conventional and glyphosate-resistant maize. II. Weed impacts on crop production and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbach, Nathalie; Darmency, Henri; Fernier, Alice; Granger, Sylvie; Le Corre, Valérie; Messéan, Antoine

    2017-05-01

    Overreliance on the same herbicide mode of action leads to the spread of resistant weeds, which cancels the advantages of herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Here, the objective was to quantify, with simulations, the impact of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds on crop production and weed-related wild biodiversity in HT maize-based cropping systems differing in terms of management practices. We (1) simulated current conventional and probable HT cropping systems in two European regions, Aquitaine and Catalonia, with the weed dynamics model FLORSYS; (2) quantified how much the presence of GR weeds contributed to weed impacts on crop production and biodiversity; (3) determined the effect of cultural practices on the impact of GR weeds and (4) identified which species traits most influence weed-impact indicators. The simulation study showed that during the analysed 28 years, the advent of glyphosate resistance had little effect on plant biodiversity. Glyphosate-susceptible populations and species were replaced by GR ones. Including GR weeds only affected functional biodiversity (food offer for birds, bees and carabids) and weed harmfulness when weed effect was initially low; when weed effect was initially high, including GR weeds had little effect. The GR effect also depended on cultural practices, e.g. GR weeds were most detrimental for species equitability when maize was sown late. Species traits most harmful for crop production and most beneficial for biodiversity were identified, using RLQ analyses. None of the species presenting these traits belonged to a family for which glyphosate resistance was reported. An advice table was built; the effects of cultural practices on crop production and biodiversity were synthesized, explained, quantified and ranked, and the optimal choices for each management technique were identified.

  9. Contribution of allelopathy and competition to weed suppression by winter wheat, triticale and winter rye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Antje; Fomsgaard, Inge S.; Mathiassen, Solvejg Kopp

    of competitive traits, such as early vigour, crop height and leaf area index and presence of phytotoxic compounds of the group of benzoxazinoids to weed suppression. Four cultivars of each of the winter cereals wheat, triticale and rye were grown in field experiments at two locations. Soil samples were taken...... 2016. Competitive traits were measured throughout the growing season. Partial least squares regression with weed biomass as response variable was used for modelling. Competitive traits, as well as benzoxazinoid concentrations contributed significantly to the models on winter wheat, winter triticale...... and winter rye data and explained 63, 69 and 58% of the variance in weed biomass in the first two components, respectively. Consequently, it can be concluded that competitive, as well as allelopathic traits, contributed significantly to weed suppressive outcome in winter cereals. This knowledge...

  10. Effect of mechanical weeding on wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) populations in winter wheat crop (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunard, D; Bizoux, J P; Monty, A; Henriet, F; De Proft, M; Vancutsem, F; Mahy, G; Bodson, B

    2012-01-01

    Currently, economic, agronomic and environmental concerns lead to reduce the use of herbicides. Mechanical weeding can help to reach this objective. Dynamics and biology of wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) populations were assessed as well as dynamic of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) for four level of application of a weeder-harrow (0, 1, 2, 3 treatment(s)). After each treatment, an effect of mechanical weeding on wild chamomile density was observed. Density of wild chamomile decreased significantly with intensification of mechanical weeding. A third treatment allowed eliminating late emerged plants.

  11. Parthenium Weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) Research in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.), here after referred to as parthenium is an herbaceous invasive weed ... management is of high concern by the government, researchers and the farmers. Although there are ..... control of Parthenium has been exhausted in India with limited practical application due to the low ...

  12. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  13. Obsolescence, Weeding, and the Utilization of Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests an objective approach to weeding library materials and discusses ways of measuring obsolescence and of controlling variables to provide a true picture of aging. Weeding is shown to improve space utilization and the quality of a collection. (5 references) (MES)

  14. Weeding the Library Media Center Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Betty Jo

    These guidelines for weeding library media collections are addressed to elementary and secondary school library media centers and to community college and vocational school library resource centers in Iowa. The publication includes some philosophy about weeding, and specific guidelines are summarized in bold-faced type for ease of use. The…

  15. Weeded Books Inspire Student Art Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The rationale behind weeding books is to remove dated, obsolete, erroneous material and worn books in disrepair from the collection to make room for current titles. Students of Lakeview have discovered an innovative idea of creating an altered book from the weeded book by taking a hardcover book and changing the original cover by means of a…

  16. Weeds as important vegetables for farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz Garcia, G.S.; Price, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the multiple uses and cognitive importance of edible weeds in Northeast Thailand. Research methods included focus group discussions and freelistings. A total of 43 weeds consumed as vegetable were reported, including economic, naturalized, agricultural

  17. Weed detection in 3D images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piron, A.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Destain, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Machine vision has been successfully used for mechanical destruction of weeds between rows of crops. Knowledge of the position of the rows where crops should be growing and the assumption that plants growing outside such positions are weeds may be used in such systems. However for many horticultural

  18. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  19. Post-directed weed control in squash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season- long weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and ...

  20. Scythe (pelargonic acid) weed control in squash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season-long weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and y...

  1. Parthenium Weed ( Parthenium hysterophorus L.) Research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highly competitive, adaptable and allergenic weed Parthenium hysterophorus (Compositae) is an invasive annual weed believed to be introduced to Ethiopia in 1970s. Field surveys, plant biodiversity impacts, and analysis of secondary plant compounds in P. hysterophorus and its possible impact on human health ...

  2. Molecular biology approaches to weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global climate change appears to be favorable for invasive weed development and spread because invasive species in general are proficient at succeeding in new environments. To worsen matters, herbicide-resistant weeds have become a severe threat in modern agricultural systems due to the extensive us...

  3. A new emergency response model for MACCS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanin, D.I.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE sponsorship, as directed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) [Ch92] was modified to implement a series of improvements in its modeling of emergency response actions. The purpose of this effort has been to aid the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in its performance of the Level III analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) of K Reactor [Wo90]. To ensure its usefulness to WSRC, and facilitate the new model's eventual merger with other MACCS enhancements, close cooperation with WSRC and the MACCS development team at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was maintained throughout the project. These improvements are intended to allow a greater degree of flexibility in modeling the mitigative actions of evacuation and sheltering. The emergency response model in MACCS version 1.5.11.1 was developed to support NRC analyses of consequences from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. The NRC code imposes unnecessary constraints on DOE safety analyses, particularly for consequences to onsite worker populations, and it has therefore been revamped. The changes to the code have been implemented in a manner that preserves previous modeling capabilities and therefore prior analyses can be repeated with the new code

  4. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists.

  5. The Zipf Law revisited: An evolutionary model of emerging classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, L.B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schapiro, B. [TINA, Brandenburg (Germany); Perlovsky, L. [NRC, Wakefield, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Zipf`s Law is a remarkable rank-frequency relationship observed in linguistics (the frequencies of the use of words are approximately inversely proportional to their ranks in the decreasing frequency order) as well as in the behavior of many complex systems of surprisingly different nature. We suggest an evolutionary model of emerging classification of objects into classes corresponding to concepts and denoted by words. The evolution of the system is derived from two basic assumptions: first, the probability to recognize an object as belonging to a known class is proportional to the number of objects in this class already recognized, and, second, there exists a small probability to observe an object that requires creation of a new class ({open_quotes}mutation{close_quotes} that gives birth to a new {open_quotes}species{close_quotes}). It is shown that the populations of classes in such a system obey the Zipf Law provided that the rate of emergence of new classes is small. The model leads also to the emergence of a second-tier structure of {open_quotes}super-classes{close_quotes} - groups of classes with almost equal populations.

  6. Dissecting and modeling the emergent murine TEC compartment during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunk, Fabian; Michel, Chloé; Holland-Letz, Tim; Slynko, Alla; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Kyewski, Bruno; Pinto, Sheena

    2017-07-01

    The origin of the thymic epithelium, i.e. the cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) epithelial cells, from bipotent stem cells through TEC progenitors and lineage-specific progeny still remains poorly understood. We sought to obtain an unbiased view of the incipient emergence of TEC subsets by following embryonic TEC development based on co-expression of EpCAM, CD80 and MHC class II (MHCII) on non-hematopoietic (CD45 - ) thymic stromal cells in wild-type BL6 mice. Using a combination of ex vivo analysis, Re-aggregate Thymic Organ Culture (RTOC) reconstitution assays and mathematical modeling, we traced emergent lineage commitment in murine embryonic TECs. Both experimental and mathematical datasets supported the following developmental sequence: MHCII - CD80 - → MHCII lo CD80 - → MHCII hi CD80 - → MHCII hi CD80 hi TECs, whereby MHCII hi CD80 - and MHCII hi CD80 hi TECs bear features of cTECs and mTECs respectively. These emergent MHCII hi CD80 - cTECs directly generate mature MHCII hi CD80 hi mTECs in vivo and in vitro, thus supporting the asynchronous model of TEC lineage commitment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effect of Weed Interference on Yield and Agronomical Characteristics of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum gracum in Different Plant Density under Birjand Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baradaran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iran is among the countries with a climate appropriate for growing a wide range of herbs, and can be a great source of producing and exporting plants. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum gracum is one of the oldest plant and it is an annual herbaceous plant of the Fabaceae family (Fabaceae which are dry, brown or reddish-yellow to gray to over 5.3 mm. Seeds of this plant are used as a spice and its leaves are used as a vegetable. Among the most important factors in farming, it is important to use appropriate planting density. Therefore, if all the necessary conditions, including the right, but density is inappropriate, it will not get the optimum yield per unit area. The effective management of weeds increase the performance of weed management practices, reduce weed population and the costs associated with it over time. Weeds compete with crops for a variety of sources such as light, water and minerals. Given that the best time weeding the weeds and the most appropriate density of fenugreek is not much information available, this study aimed to determine the appropriate density of weed infested and fenugreek was used. Materials and Methods In order to determine the effects of weed interference and appropriate density of fenugreek, a field trial was conducted in research farm of Birjand Islamic Azad University during the spring of year 2011. The experiment was a factorial based on randomized complete block design. The treatments were fenugreek density at 10, 20 and 40 plants m-2 and weed interference in five levels included weed-free to maturity, 20, 40 and 60 days after emergence, and no weeding. Fenugreek seeds (spherical, brown of pure seed before planting desert of preparation and sterilization by benomyl and then do planting trees and irrigation was done immediately. Irrigation was applied every seven days. During the study, pests and diseases were completely controlled. Weed control was done manually in three stages. Traits such as

  8. Modeling and simulation of emergent behavior in transportation infrastructure restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Akhilesh; Corns, Steven; Shoberg, Thomas G.; Qin, Ruwen; Long, Suzanna K.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to create a methodology to model the emergent behavior during a disruption in the transportation system and that calculates economic losses due to such a disruption, and to understand how an extreme event affects the road transportation network. The chapter discusses a system dynamics approach which is used to model the transportation road infrastructure system to evaluate the different factors that render road segments inoperable and calculate economic consequences of such inoperability. System dynamics models have been integrated with business process simulation model to evaluate, design, and optimize the business process. The chapter also explains how different factors affect the road capacity. After identifying the various factors affecting the available road capacity, a causal loop diagram (CLD) is created to visually represent the causes leading to a change in the available road capacity and the effects on travel costs when the available road capacity changes.

  9. Effect of different input management on weed composition, diversity and density of corn field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surur Khoramdel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of input intensity on species diversity, composition and density of weeds in corn (Zea mays L., an experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during the year 2009. Treatments included low input, medium input and high input systems. Low input received 30 tonha-1or 30 tonha-1 compost, zero tillage and hand weeding (twice. Medium input was based on 15 tonha-1 manure, 150 kgha-1 urea as chemical fertilizer, twice tillage operations and 2, 4-D (1.5 Lha-1, at five leaves emergence as an herbicide and hand weeding (once. High input received 300 kgha-1 urea, four tillage operations and Paraquat (2 Lha-1, after planting and 2, 4-D (1.5 Lha-1, at five leaves emergence. Manure and compost were applied in the planting time. Weed samplings were done in three stages (early, mid and late growing season. Results indicated that the highest and the lowest weed species diversity and density were observed in low input based on manure and high input systems, respectively. The highest range of weed relative density was obtained for black nightshade (Solanum nigrum with 9.09-75.00%. The highest number of species was observed in low input based on manure. Also, management practices affected weed dry matter and diversity indices. The highest and the lowest amounts of weed dry matter were observed in low input based on manure and high input systems, respectively. In the first, second and the third stages of sampling, the maximum and the minimum amounts of Margalef index were observed in low input based on manure (with 5.3, 5.4 and 3.3, respectively and high input systems (with 0.8, 2.3 and 2.6, respectively. In the first, second and the third stages of sampling, the highest and the lowest values of Shannon index were observed in low input based on manure (with 0.6, 0.7 and 0.5 respectively and high input (with 0

  10. Response of wheat (triticum aestivum) to herbicidal weed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.Y.; Baig, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This study was carried out with a view to determining the response of wheat cv. Sandal to herbicidal weed control. The plant height was influenced by various herbicidal treatments. But maximum height was obtained by bromoxynil - MCPA (Buctil-M) fallowed by isoproturon (TolKan). Similarly maximum number of fertile tillers per plant, flag leaf area, ear length, yield (Kg/ha) and number of spikelet per ear were observed at bromoxynil-MCPA, Isoproturon (Tolkan), hand weeding and 2-4-D (DMA-6) treatments. But the number of grains per ear did not vary much in response to various herbicidal treatments. However, maximum 1000 grain weight and herbicidal activity index (HAI) were obtained by brombromoxynil-MCPA. The results show that post-emergence herbicides applied as low as 1.3 Kg ai/ha and supplemented with one hand weeding can give optimum crop yield and will there fore be an ideal recommendation to farmers with little experience in the use of herbicides. (author)

  11. Modelling the emergence of coordinated collective motion by minimizing dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quera, Vicenç; Beltran, Francesc S; Gimeno, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated collective motion (CCM) has been recently studied using agent-based simulations by applying three behavioural rules: repulsion, attraction and alignment. But these rules are so similar to the expected group behaviour that it can hardly be labelled emergent. We developed an agent-based model that produces CCM using a set of low-level dyadic interaction rules. The agents change their positions with regard to other agents in order to minimize their own dissatisfaction with their inter-individual distances. To test the emergence of CCM, several simulation experiments were performed. The results show that the agents were able to achieve CCM after a few thousand time steps, and that the bigger the area perceived by them, the more coordinated and cohesive the group motion became. An increased memory span and capacity to remember other agents' identities improved cohesion and coordination. The relationship with biological referents is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subspecialty Emergency Room as Alternative Model for Otolaryngologic Care: Implications for Emergency Health Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rosh K. V.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Lee, Daniel J.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Gliklich, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A dedicated otolaryngology emergency room (ER) represents a specialized surgical evaluation and treatment setting that may be an alternative triage pathway for acute otolaryngologic complaints. We aim to characterize practice patterns in this setting and to provide insight into the epidemiology of all-comer, urgent otolaryngologic complaints in the United States. Methods and Methods Electronic medical records were reviewed for all patients who registered for otolaryngologic care and received a diagnosis in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary ER between January 2011 and September 2013. Descriptive analysis was performed to characterize utilization and diagnostic patterns. Predictors of inpatient admission were identified using multivariable regression. Geocoding analysis was performed to characterize catchment area. Results A total of 12,234 patient visits were evaluated with a mean age of 44.7. Auditory and vestibular problems constituted the most frequent diagnoses (50.0%). The majority of patients were discharged home (92.3%). Forty-three percent of patients underwent a procedure in the ER; the most common procedure was diagnostic nasolaryngoscopy (52%). Predictors of inpatient admission were post-operative complaint (odds ratio [OR] 7.3, p<0.0001), arrival overnight (OR 3.3, p<0.0001), and laryngeal complaint (OR 2.4, p<0.0001). Patients travelled farther for evaluation of hearing loss (11 miles) and less for common diagnoses including impacted cerumen (7.1 miles) (p<0.0001). Conclusion In this report, we investigate practice patterns of a dedicated otolaryngology emergency room to explore an alternative to standard acute otolaryngologic health care delivery mechanisms. We identify key predictors of inpatient admission. This study has implications for emergency health care delivery models. PMID:25106951

  13. Mathematical and statistical modeling for emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Hyman, James

    2016-01-01

    The contributions by epidemic modeling experts describe how mathematical models and statistical forecasting are created to capture the most important aspects of an emerging epidemic.Readers will discover a broad range of approaches to address questions, such as Can we control Ebola via ring vaccination strategies? How quickly should we detect Ebola cases to ensure epidemic control? What is the likelihood that an Ebola epidemic in West Africa leads to secondary outbreaks in other parts of the world? When does it matter to incorporate the role of disease-induced mortality on epidemic models? What is the role of behavior changes on Ebola dynamics? How can we better understand the control of cholera or Ebola using optimal control theory? How should a population be structured in order to mimic the transmission dynamics of diseases such as chlamydia, Ebola, or cholera? How can we objectively determine the end of an epidemic? How can we use metapopulation models to understand the role of movement restrictions and mi...

  14. International Federation for Emergency Medicine Model Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Bandiera, Glen; Cameron, Peter; Halpern, Pinchas; Holliman, C James; Jouriles, Nicholas; Kilroy, Darren; Mulligan, Terrence; Singer, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programmes in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training programme. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions' educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  15. Effect of Cultural Practices in Night on Weed Density and Weed Dry Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Rashed Mohasel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the response of weed seeds to light, two experiments, at two different locations were conducted at Ferdowsi university of Mashhad in 2009. At the first experiment, field was ploughed in day and night. Weed density was evaluated 70 d after plough, with 1×1 quadrate. At the second experiment, at night treatment, ploughing, potato planting and weeding with cultivator were done at night. Weed sampling was done twice at 43 and 130 days after planting with 1×1 quadrate and weeds were identified and counted. Result showed pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L., crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis (L. scop, jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. and mallow (Hibiscus trionum L. did not observed at night plough, in contrast, night plough has no significance influence on common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.. Only common lambsquarters had similar appearance in two treatments, indicating insusceptibility of this weed to time of plough. Interestingly, at the second experiment, result was very similar. Potato yield was higher at night treatment, but not significant. This research showed that some cultural practice like plough, planting and weeding with cultivator in night can reduce weed density and weed dry matter. Keywords: Germination, Time of plough, Sustainable weeds management, Light

  16. Adapting weed management in rice to changing climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Meinke, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides some of the scientific background on how projected environmental conditions could affect weeds and weed management in rice in Africa. Elevated CO2 levels may have positive effects on rice competitiveness with C4 weeds, but these are generally outnumbered by C3 species in weed

  17. Competitive influence of Eleusine indica and other weeds on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Received 13 December, 2000; accepted 5 February, 2002) ABSTRACT Delayed weed removal is the primary cause of maize yield loss in smallholder agriculture. The slog for weed management could probably be reduced if the initial weed control removal is restricted to the in-row weeds, followed soon after by elimation of ...

  18. The changing role of agriculture and tomorrow's weed research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.; Kempenaar, C.; Weide, van der R.Y.

    2008-01-01

    With the changing position of agriculture in the world the challenges for weed management and weed science are changing as well. In this paper recent developments in weed science with respect to several aspects of weed management are discussed in relation to those changes. Developments in cultural

  19. Weed biomass and economic yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum) as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... 91 which has never been possible (Rao, 2000). Weed management is not accomplished by using cultural practices exclusively. Herbicides offer an additional tool to control weeds in conjunction with cultural practices. Jarwar et al. (1999) observed that chemical weed control is effective in controlling weeds.

  20. Influence of cowpea and melon populations on weed infestation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small farmers in the humid regions of tropical Africa spend 30–42% of their total farm labour input in controlling weeds. Chemical weed control is normally recommended but high cost of herbicides and environmental pollution are specific problems with chemical weed control. A three year bio-weed control system with three ...

  1. Seeding method and rate influence on weed suppression in aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High weed pressure is amongst the major constraints to the extensive adoption of aerobic rice system as a water-wise technique. Towards developing a sustainable weed management strategy, seeding method and rate may substantially contribute to weed suppression and reduce herbicide use and weeding cost. A trough ...

  2. Weed Garden: An Effective Tool for Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Leslie; Patton, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    A weed garden was constructed to quantify and improve identification skills among clientele. The garden was planted with over 100 weed species based on surveys on problematic weeds. The weed garden proved useful for introducing additional hands-on learning activities into traditional lecture-based seminars. Through seminar and field day attendee…

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans: an emerging model in biomedical and environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Maxwell C K; Williams, Phillip L; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N

    2008-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research.

  4. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-02-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development 'in a dish'. We also summarize some of the recently developed genetic tools that greatly facilitate the interrogation of gene function during hPSC differentiation. With the development of high-throughput screening technologies, hPSCs have the potential to revolutionize gene discovery in mammalian development.

  5. Infantile Spasms: A Critical Review of Emerging Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E

    2009-01-01

    Infantile spasms is a developmental epilepsy syndrome with unique clinical and EEG features, a specific pattern of pharmacological responsiveness, and poor outcome in terms of cognition and epilepsy. Despite the devastating nature of infantile spasms, little is known about its pathogenesis. Until recently, there has been no animal model available to investigate the pathophysiology of the syndrome or to generate and test novel therapies. Now, several promising animal models have emerged, spanning the etiological spectrum from genetic causes (e.g., Down syndrome or Aristaless-related homeobox [ARX] mutation) to acquired causes (e.g., endogenous and exogenous toxins or stress hormones with convulsant activity or blockade of neural activity). These new models are discussed in this review, with emphasis on the insights each can provide for understanding, treating, and preventing infantile spasms. PMID:19471616

  6. The crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata: an emergent animal model from emergent countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Eduardo D.

    2010-09-01

    Neohelice granulata (previously known as Chasmagnathus granulata and C. granulatus) is a burrowing semiterrestrial crab found in the intertidal zone of estuaries, salt marshes and mangroves of the South-western Atlantic Ocean. Beginning in the late 1989s, an explosion of publications appeared in international journals dealing with its ecology, physiology, toxicology and behavior. A bibliometric analysis using the Scopus database allowed detecting 309 papers that deal with this species during the period 1986-2009. The number of papers per year increased continuously, reaching a mean annual value of 22.6 during the last 5 years; a great majority of them were authored by researchers from Argentina and Brazil. Neohelice granulata has become now one of the most studied crab species, after Carcinus maenas, Callinectes sapidus, Scylla serrata and Cancer pagurus and C. magister, and it can be considered as an emergent animal model for biochemical, physiological and ecological research.

  7. [Monkey-pox, a model of emergent then reemergent disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, A J; Matton, T; Courbot-Georges, M C

    2004-01-01

    The recent emergence of monkey pox in the United States of America highlights the problem (known for other infectious agents) of dissemination of pathogens outside their endemic area, and of subsequent global threats of variable gravity according to agents. It is a real emergency since monkey pox had been confined to Africa for several decades, where small epidemics occurred from time to time, monkey pox is a "miniature smallpox" which, in Africa, evolves on an endemic (zoonotic) mode with, as reservoirs, several species of wild rodents (mainly squirrels) and some monkey species. It can be accidentally transmitted to man then develops as epidemics, sometimes leading to death. The virus was imported in 2003 in the United States of America, via Gambia rats and wild squirrels (all African species), and infected prairie dogs (which are now in fashion as pets), then crossed the species barrier to man. In the United States of America, screening campaigns, epidemiological investigations, and subsequent treatments led to a rapid control of the epidemic, which is a model of emergent disease for this country. Therapeutic and preventive measures directly applicable to monkey pox are discussed. They can also be applied against other pox virus infections (including smallpox). The risk of criminal introduction of pox viruses is discussed since it is, more than ever, a real worldwide threat.

  8. Information technology model for evaluating emergency medicine teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorbach, James; Ryan, James

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes work in progress to develop an Information Technology (IT) model and supporting information system for the evaluation of clinical teaching in the Emergency Medicine (EM) Department of North Shore University Hospital. In the academic hospital setting student physicians, i.e. residents, and faculty function daily in their dual roles as teachers and students respectively, and as health care providers. Databases exist that are used to evaluate both groups in either academic or clinical performance, but rarely has this information been integrated to analyze the relationship between academic performance and the ability to care for patients. The goal of the IT model is to improve the quality of teaching of EM physicians by enabling the development of integrable metrics for faculty and resident evaluation. The IT model will include (1) methods for tracking residents in order to develop experimental databases; (2) methods to integrate lecture evaluation, clinical performance, resident evaluation, and quality assurance databases; and (3) a patient flow system to monitor patient rooms and the waiting area in the Emergency Medicine Department, to record and display status of medical orders, and to collect data for analyses.

  9. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for medical student education in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Bandiera, Glen; Cameron, Peter; Halpern, Pinchas; Holliman, James; Jouriles, Nicholas; Kilroy, Darren; Mulligan, Terrence; Singer, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Currently, there is no internationally recognised, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for emergency medicine education. To address this, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine convened a committee of international experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a global curriculum for medical students in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed with a focus on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any medical school should be delivering to its students during their undergraduate years of training. The content is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but also for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within current educational structures. It is anticipated that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational milieu, the resources available and the goals of the institutions' educational leadership.

  10. The emergence of cooperation in tie strength models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bo; Yue, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a tie strength model to explain the emergence of cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma games, assuming that cooperators preferentially allocate their investments to friends with strong ties. Two types of prisoner's dilemma models are examined in this study: the traditional two-strategy model considering only cooperators and defectors; the expanded three-strategy model consisting cooperators, defectors and extortioners. The results show that tie strength model contributes to the promotion of cooperation in both types of prisoner's dilemma games. However, we point out that the influence of the investment preference is quite different in the two prisoner's dilemma game settings. In the two-strategy prisoner's dilemma game, only small preference contributes to the promotion of cooperation. Once this preference exceeds a critical value, cooperation will be prohibited. We explain this phenomenon by arguing that extremely strong investment preference undermines the ability of cooperative clusters to resist defectors. Moreover, we extend the analysis into the three-strategy case and discover that the catalytic effect of extortioners can eliminate this first up and then down trend in the two-strategy model. The equilibrium fraction of cooperators is always positively correlated to the level of investment preference in three-strategy models.

  11. Modeling of emergency heat removal system of the IRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza G, G.; Viais J, J.; Maioli, A.; Finnicum, D.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse is currently pursuing the pre-application licensing of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) on behalf of the IRIS Consortium. As part of this effort, an IRIS Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is being generated. The frontline system models have been developed based on the current system design information. To the extent practicable, AP1000 information was used to support the development of the models because of the degree of similarity between the non-safety active system functions of the two reactors as well as some passive safety functions. The AP1000 PRA is also the key source of failure rate information for IRIS. Standard modeling techniques were used to develop the fault tree models for the Emergency Heat Removal System (EHRS). The models include pumps, valves, heat exchangers, motive and control power, and actuation signals. Modeled failure modes include demand failures, run failures, standby failures and common cause failures, as appropriate. For the fluid support systems such as cooling water, the PRA analysts developed simplified system design diagrams based on system descriptions in the Safety Analysis report and the system P and IDs from the equivalent AP1000 systems. These PRA designs were reviewed by the system designers to ensure that they were consistent with the designers understanding of the intended design and operation of the system. The PRA designs were then used to develop the needed fault tree models. (Author)

  12. Emergence of inflationary perturbations in the CSL model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Gabriel; Bengochea, Gabriel R.

    2016-01-01

    The inflationary paradigm is the most successful model that explains the observed spectrum of primordial perturbations. However, the precise emergence of such inhomogeneities and the quantum-to-classical transition of the perturbations has not yet reached a consensus among the community. The continuous spontaneous localization model (CSL), in the cosmological context, might be used to provide a solution to the mentioned issues by considering a dynamical reduction of the wave function. The CSL model has been applied to the inflationary universe before and different conclusions have been obtained. In this letter, we use a different approach to implement the CSL model during inflation. In particular, in addition to accounting for the quantum-to-classical transition, we use the CSL model to generate the primordial perturbations, that is, the dynamical evolution provided by the CSL model is responsible for the transition from a homogeneous and isotropic initial state to a final one lacking such symmetries. Our approach leads to results that can be clearly distinguished from preceding works. Specifically, the scalar and tensor power spectra are not time-dependent, and one retains the amplification mechanism of the CSL model. Moreover, our framework depends only on one parameter (the CSL parameter) and its value is consistent with cosmological and laboratory observations. (orig.)

  13. Emergence of inflationary perturbations in the CSL model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Gabriel [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria-PabI, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bengochea, Gabriel R. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-15

    The inflationary paradigm is the most successful model that explains the observed spectrum of primordial perturbations. However, the precise emergence of such inhomogeneities and the quantum-to-classical transition of the perturbations has not yet reached a consensus among the community. The continuous spontaneous localization model (CSL), in the cosmological context, might be used to provide a solution to the mentioned issues by considering a dynamical reduction of the wave function. The CSL model has been applied to the inflationary universe before and different conclusions have been obtained. In this letter, we use a different approach to implement the CSL model during inflation. In particular, in addition to accounting for the quantum-to-classical transition, we use the CSL model to generate the primordial perturbations, that is, the dynamical evolution provided by the CSL model is responsible for the transition from a homogeneous and isotropic initial state to a final one lacking such symmetries. Our approach leads to results that can be clearly distinguished from preceding works. Specifically, the scalar and tensor power spectra are not time-dependent, and one retains the amplification mechanism of the CSL model. Moreover, our framework depends only on one parameter (the CSL parameter) and its value is consistent with cosmological and laboratory observations. (orig.)

  14. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Emerging Translational Model of Human Nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joe; Chi, Thomas; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kim, Man Su; Hirata, Taku; Romero, Michael F.; Dow, Julian A.T.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The limitations imposed by human clinical studies and mammalian models of nephrolithiasis have hampered the development of effective medical treatments and preventative measures for decades. The simple but elegant Drosophila melanogaster is emerging as a powerful translational model of human disease, including nephrolithiasis and may provide important information essential to our understanding of stone formation. We present the current state of research using D. melanogaster as a model of human nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods A comprehensive review of the English language literature was performed using PUBMED. When necessary, authoritative texts on relevant subtopics were consulted. Results The genetic composition, anatomic structure and physiologic function of Drosophila Malpighian tubules are remarkably similar to those of the human nephron. The direct effects of dietary manipulation, environmental alteration, and genetic variation on stone formation can be observed and quantified in a matter of days. Several Drosophila models of human nephrolithiasis, including genetically linked and environmentally induced stones, have been developed. A model of calcium oxalate stone formation is among the most recent fly models of human nephrolithiasis. Conclusions The ability to readily manipulate and quantify stone formation in D. melanogaster models of human nephrolithiasis presents the urologic community with a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of this enigmatic disease. PMID:23500641

  15. Using genetically modified tomato crop plants with purple leaves for absolute weed/crop classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lati, Ran N; Filin, Sagi; Aly, Radi; Lande, Tal; Levin, Ilan; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2014-07-01

    Weed/crop classification is considered the main problem in developing precise weed-management methodologies, because both crops and weeds share similar hues. Great effort has been invested in the development of classification models, most based on expensive sensors and complicated algorithms. However, satisfactory results are not consistently obtained due to imaging conditions in the field. We report on an innovative approach that combines advances in genetic engineering and robust image-processing methods to detect weeds and distinguish them from crop plants by manipulating the crop's leaf color. We demonstrate this on genetically modified tomato (germplasm AN-113) which expresses a purple leaf color. An autonomous weed/crop classification is performed using an invariant-hue transformation that is applied to images acquired by a standard consumer camera (visible wavelength) and handles variations in illumination intensities. The integration of these methodologies is simple and effective, and classification results were accurate and stable under a wide range of imaging conditions. Using this approach, we simplify the most complicated stage in image-based weed/crop classification models. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Soil solarization for weed control in carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARENCO RICARDO ANTONIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil solarization is a technique used for weed and plant disease control in regions with high levels of solar radiation. The effect of solarization (0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks upon weed populations, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. Brasília yield and nematode infestation in carrot roots was studied in São Luís (2º35' S; 44º10' W, MA, Brazil, using transparent polyethylene films (100 and 150 mm of thickness. The maximum temperature at 5 cm of depth was about 10ºC warmer in solarized soil than in control plots. In the study 20 weed types were recorded. Solarization reduced weed biomass and density in about 50% of weed species, including Cyperus spp., Chamaecrista nictans var. paraguariensis (Chod & Hassl. Irwin & Barneby, Marsypianthes chamaedrys (Vahl O. Kuntze, Mitracarpus sp., Mollugo verticillata L., Sebastiania corniculata M. Arg., and Spigelia anthelmia L. Approximately 40% of species in the weed flora were not affected by soil mulching. Furthermore, seed germination of Commelina benghalensis L. was increased by soil solarization. Marketable yield of carrots was greater in solarized soil than in the unsolarized one. It was concluded that solarization for nine weeks increases carrot yield and is effective for controlling more than half of the weed species recorded. Mulching was not effective for controlling root-knot nematodes in carrot.

  17. [Effects of weeding methods on weed community and its diversity in a citrus orchard in southwest Zhejiang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, He-Jin; Jin, Zong-Lai; Yang, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Fan

    2010-01-01

    By using the research methods of ecological community, the effects of different weed management strategies including chemical weeding, manual weeding, and their combination on the weed community and its diversity in a citrus chard of main orange producing region in Quzhou City, Zhejiang Province were studied from June 2005 to May 2008. In control plots, there were 75 species and 25 families of weeds; after chemical weeding, manual weeding, and their combination, there were 46 species and 17 families, 59 species and 20 families, and 51 species and 18 families of weeds, respectively. The Margalef's species richness index, Shannon's diversity index, and Shannon's evenness index were the lowest after chemical weeding, but the highest after manual weeding, suggesting that chemical weeding had the greatest effects on the weed diversity in the citrus orchard. It was suggested that to sufficiently control the weeds while to maintain the weed diversity in the orchard weeds in southwest Zhejiang, the combination of chemical and manual weeding would be the best management strategy.

  18. Biological weed control with soil fungi? Antagonistic effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veiga, R.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive weed growth represents one of the major threats to crop production especially when reliance on herbicides is reduced. Biological weed control is an alternative, environmentally-sound method that, combined with other weed control practices, can contribute to an effective weed management in

  19. Weed seeds on clothing: a global review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity including in areas of high conservation value. Unfortunately, people may be unintentionally introducing and dispersing weed seeds on their clothing when they visit these areas. To inform the management of these areas, we conducted a systematic quantitative literature review to determine the diversity and characteristics of species with seeds that can attach and be dispersed from clothing. Across 21 studies identified from systematic literature searches on this topic, seeds from 449 species have been recorded on clothing, more than double the diversity found in a previous review. Nearly all of them, 391 species, are listed weeds in one or more countries, with 58 classified as internationally-recognised environmental weeds. When our database was compared with weed lists from different countries and continents we found that clothing can carry the seeds of important regional weeds. A total of 287 of the species are listed as aliens in one or more countries in Europe, 156 are invasive species/noxious weeds in North America, 211 are naturalized alien plants in Australia, 97 are alien species in India, 33 are invasive species in China and 5 are declared weeds/invaders in South Africa. Seeds on the clothing of hikers can be carried to an average distance of 13 km, and where people travel in cars, trains, planes and boats, the seeds on their clothing can be carried much further. Factors that affect this type of seed dispersal include the type of clothing, the type of material the clothing is made from, the number and location of the seeds on plants, and seed traits such as adhesive and attachment structures. With increasing use of protected areas by tourists, including in remote regions, popular protected areas may be at great risk of biological invasions by weeds with seeds carried on clothing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included.

  1. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included.

  2. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included. PMID:7248594

  3. AXXE® (Pelargonic acid) and Racer® (Ammonium Nonanoate): Weed control comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although corn gluten meal has shown promise as an early-season pre-emergent organic herbicide in squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) production, any uncontrolled weeds can inflict serious yield reductions by the end of the growing season. Organic vegetable producers need additional organic herbicides that c...

  4. An early-killed rye cover crop has potential for weed management in edamame

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential role of fall-seeded cover crops for weed management in edamame is unknown. Field experiments were conducted over three edamame growing seasons to test the following objectives: 1) determine the extent to which cover crop residue management systems influence edamame emergence while sele...

  5. Effect of soil solarization on weed emergencee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of soil solarization over the reduction of the seed bank of annual weeds, a field experiment was carried out on clay soil conditions. The average maximum soil temperature was 44,79 C at 5 cm depth, while it reached 44, 48 C at 20 cm depth during 30 days in January. The average thermal gradient during the solarization between the solarized soil and the air was 14,8 C. Solarization was effective to control annual weeds up to 180 days post-solarization. Weed aerial biomass in solarized soil was significantly lower than in the control without solarization

  6. Image analysis as a non-destructive method to assess regrowth of weeds after repeated flame weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Kristoffersen, Palle; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Efficient non-chemical weed control like flame weeding often requires repeated treatments. In weed control experiments the effect of each treatment may be estimated by removing and weighing the remaining weed biomass after the treatment, but the method influences the weed plants ability to regrow...... picture of the long-term effect of repeated treatments. Image analysis was most useful for assessing the effect of repeated treatments when weed cover was relatively low (below 40%) and when plots contained relatively much withered plant material. However, when weed cover is close to 100%, dry weight...

  7. Semantic Information Modeling for Emerging Applications in Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qunzhi; Natarajan, Sreedhar; Simmhan, Yogesh; Prasanna, Viktor

    2012-04-16

    Smart Grid modernizes power grid by integrating digital and information technologies. Millions of smart meters, intelligent appliances and communication infrastructures are under deployment allowing advanced IT applications to be developed to secure and manage power grid operations. Demand response (DR) is one such emerging application to optimize electricity demand by curtailing/shifting power load when peak load occurs. Existing DR approaches are mostly based on static plans such as pricing policies and load shedding schedules. However, improvements to power management applications rely on data emanating from existing and new information sources with the growth of Smart Grid information space. In particular, dynamic DR algorithms depend on information from smart meters that report interval-based power consumption measurement, HVAC systems that monitor buildings heat and humidity, and even weather forecast services. In order for emerging Smart Grid applications to take advantage of the diverse data influx, extensible information integration is required. In this paper, we develop an integrated Smart Grid information model using Semantic Web techniques and present case studies of using semantic information for dynamic DR. We show the semantic model facilitates information integration and knowledge representation for developing the next generation Smart Grid applications.

  8. Modelling the emergence of rodent filial huddling from physiological huddling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stuart P.

    2017-11-01

    Huddling behaviour in neonatal rodents reduces the metabolic costs of physiological thermoregulation. However, animals continue to huddle into adulthood, at ambient temperatures where they are able to sustain a basal metabolism in isolation from the huddle. This `filial huddling' in older animals is known to be guided by olfactory rather than thermal cues. The present study aimed to test whether thermally rewarding contacts between young mice, experienced when thermogenesis in brown adipose fat tissue (BAT) is highest, could give rise to olfactory preferences that persist as filial huddling interactions in adults. To this end, a simple model was constructed to fit existing data on the development of mouse thermal physiology and behaviour. The form of the model that emerged yields a remarkable explanation for filial huddling; associative learning maintains huddling into adulthood via processes that reduce thermodynamic entropy from BAT metabolism and increase information about social ordering among littermates.

  9. Powder consolidation using cold spray process modeling and emerging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moridi, Atieh

    2017-01-01

    This book first presents different approaches to modeling of the cold spray process with the aim of extending current understanding of its fundamental principles and then describes emerging applications of cold spray. In the coverage of modeling, careful attention is devoted to the assessment of critical and erosion velocities. In order to reveal the phenomenological characteristics of interface bonding, severe, localized plastic deformation and material jet formation are studied. Detailed consideration is also given to the effect of macroscopic defects such as interparticle boundaries and subsequent splat boundary cracking on the mechanical behavior of cold spray coatings. The discussion of applications focuses in particular on the repair of damaged parts and additive manufacturing in various disciplines from aerospace to biomedical engineering. Key aspects include a systematic study of defect shape and the ability of cold spray to fill the defect, examination of the fatigue behavior of coatings for structur...

  10. Effect of weed management on weeds and grain yield of haricot bean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatments were s-metolachlor at the rate of 0.96 kg ha-1, glyphosate at the rate of 1.08 kg ha-1, integration of each herbicide with hand-weeding at 45 days after sowing, twice hand-weeding at 25 and 45 day after sowing and un-weeded check. Nicandra physalodes, Xanthium strumarium and Argemone ochroleuca were ...

  11. Variation in Weed Seed Fate Fed to Different Holstein Cattle Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Rahimi

    Full Text Available Weed seeds may maintain their viability when passing through the digestive tract of cattle and can be therefore dispersed by animal movement or the application of manure. Whether different cattle types of the same species can cause differential weed seed fate is largely unknown to us particularly under non-grazed systems similar to Holstein-Friesian dairy farming. We investigated the effect on the seed survival of four weed species in the digestive tracts of four groups of Holstein cattle: lactating cows, feedlot male calves, dry cows and growing heifers. The weed species used were Cuscuta campestris, Polygonum aviculare, Rumex crispus and Sorghum halepense. Cattle excretion was sampled for recovery and viability of seeds at four 24 hourly intervals after seed intake. The highest seed recovery occurred two days after seed intake in all cattle groups. Averaged over weed species, dry and lactating cows had the lowest and highest seed recovery of 36.4% and 74.4% respectively. No significant differences were observed in seed recovery of the four weed species when their seeds were fed to dry cows. Based on a power model fitted to seed viability data, the estimated time to 50% viability loss after seed intake, over all cattle groups ranged from 65 h (R. crispus to 76 h (P. aviculare. Recovered seeds from the dung of feedlot male calves showed the highest mortality among cattle groups. Significant correlation was found between seed viability and ruminal pH (r = 0.86; P<0.05. This study shows that management programs aiming to minimize weed infestation caused by livestock should account for the variation amongst cattle groups in seed persistence. Our findings can be used as a guideline for evaluating the potential risk of the spread of weeds via the application of cattle manure.

  12. The behavior of multiple independent managers and ecological traits interact to determine prevalence of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Shaun R; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2013-04-01

    Management of damaging invasive plants is often undertaken by multiple decision makers, each managing only a small part of the invader's population. As weeds can move between properties and re-infest eradicated sites from unmanaged sources, the dynamics of multiple decision makers plays a significant role in weed prevalence and invasion risk at the landscape scale. We used a spatially explicit agent-based simulation to determine how individual agent behavior, in concert with weed population ecology, determined weed prevalence. We compared two invasive grass species that differ in ecology, control methods, and costs: Nassella trichotoma (serrated tussock) and Eragrostis curvula (African love grass). The way decision makers reacted to the benefit of management had a large effect on the extent of a weed. If benefits of weed control outweighed the costs, and either net benefit was very large or all agents were very sensitive to net benefits, then agents tended to act synchronously, reducing the pool of infested agents available to spread the weed. As N. trichotoma was more damaging than E. curvula and had more effective control methods, agents chose to manage it more often, which resulted in lower prevalence of N. trichotoma. A relatively low number of agents who were intrinsically less motivated to control weeds led to increased prevalence of both species. This was particularly apparent when long-distance dispersal meant each infested agent increased the invasion risk for a large portion of the landscape. In this case, a small proportion of land mangers reluctant to control, regardless of costs and benefits, could lead to the whole landscape being infested, even when local control stopped new infestations. Social pressure was important, but only if it was independent of weed prevalence, suggesting that early access to information, and incentives to act on that information, may be crucial in stopping a weed from infesting large areas. The response of our model to both

  13. Weed suppression greatly increased by plant diversity in intensively managed grasslands: A continental-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Kirwan, Laura; Finn, John Anthony; Llurba, Rosa; Suter, Matthias; Collins, Rosemary P; Porqueddu, Claudio; Helgadóttir, Áslaug; Baadshaug, Ole H; Bélanger, Gilles; Black, Alistair; Brophy, Caroline; Čop, Jure; Dalmannsdóttir, Sigridur; Delgado, Ignacio; Elgersma, Anjo; Fothergill, Michael; Frankow-Lindberg, Bodil E; Ghesquiere, An; Golinski, Piotr; Grieu, Philippe; Gustavsson, Anne-Maj; Höglind, Mats; Huguenin-Elie, Olivier; Jørgensen, Marit; Kadziuliene, Zydre; Lunnan, Tor; Nykanen-Kurki, Paivi; Ribas, Angela; Taube, Friedhelm; Thumm, Ulrich; De Vliegher, Alex; Lüscher, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Grassland diversity can support sustainable intensification of grassland production through increased yields, reduced inputs and limited weed invasion. We report the effects of diversity on weed suppression from 3 years of a 31-site continental-scale field experiment.At each site, 15 grassland communities comprising four monocultures and 11 four-species mixtures based on a wide range of species' proportions were sown at two densities and managed by cutting. Forage species were selected according to two crossed functional traits, "method of nitrogen acquisition" and "pattern of temporal development".Across sites, years and sown densities, annual weed biomass in mixtures and monocultures was 0.5 and 2.0 t  DM ha -1 (7% and 33% of total biomass respectively). Over 95% of mixtures had weed biomass lower than the average of monocultures, and in two-thirds of cases, lower than in the most suppressive monoculture (transgressive suppression). Suppression was significantly transgressive for 58% of site-years. Transgressive suppression by mixtures was maintained across years, independent of site productivity.Based on models, average weed biomass in mixture over the whole experiment was 52% less (95% confidence interval: 30%-75%) than in the most suppressive monoculture. Transgressive suppression of weed biomass was significant at each year across all mixtures and for each mixture.Weed biomass was consistently low across all mixtures and years and was in some cases significantly but not largely different from that in the equiproportional mixture. The average variability (standard deviation) of annual weed biomass within a site was much lower for mixtures (0.42) than for monocultures (1.77). Synthesis and applications . Weed invasion can be diminished through a combination of forage species selected for complementarity and persistence traits in systems designed to reduce reliance on fertiliser nitrogen. In this study, effects of diversity on weed suppression were

  14. Pedestrians’ behavior in emergency evacuation: Modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Jie-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Jian-Lin; Wang, Qiu-Zhen; Zhang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    The social force model has been widely used to simulate pedestrian evacuation by analyzing attractive, repulsive, driving, and fluctuating forces among pedestrians. Many researchers have improved its limitations in simulating behaviors of large-scale population. This study modifies the well-accepted social force model by considering the impacts of interaction among companions and further develops a comprehensive model by combining that with a multi-exit utility function. Then numerical simulations of evacuations based on the comprehensive model are implemented in the waiting hall of the Wulin Square Subway Station in Hangzhou, China. The results provide safety thresholds of pedestrian density and panic levels in different operation situations. In spite of the operation situation and the panic level, a larger friend-group size results in lower evacuation efficiency. Our study makes important contributions to building a comprehensive multi-exit social force model and to applying it to actual scenarios, which produces data to facilitate decision making in contingency plans and emergency treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 71471163).

  15. Weeds in Organic Fertility-Building Leys: Aspects of Species Richness and Weed Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Döring

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Legume-based leys (perennial sod crops are an important component of fertility management in organic rotations in many parts of Europe. Despite their importance, however, relatively little is known about how these leys affect weed communities or how the specific composition of leys may contribute to weed management. To determine whether the choice of plant species in the ley affects weeds, we conducted replicated field trials at six locations in the UK over 24 months, measuring weed cover and biomass in plots sown with monocultures of 12 legume and 4 grass species, and in plots sown with a mixture of 10 legume species and 4 grass species. Additionally, we monitored weed communities in leys on 21 organic farms across the UK either sown with a mixture of the project species or the farmers’ own species mix. In total, 63 weed species were found on the farms, with the annuals Stellaria media, Sonchus arvensis, and Veronica persica being the most frequent species in the first year after establishment of the ley, while Stellaria media and the two perennials Ranunculus repens and Taraxacum officinale dominated the weed spectrum in the second year. Our study shows that organic leys constitute an important element of farm biodiversity. In both replicated and on-farm trials, weed cover and species richness were significantly lower in the second year than in the first, owing to lower presence of annual weeds in year two. In monocultures, meadow pea (Lathyrus pratensis was a poor competitor against weeds, and a significant increase in the proportion of weed biomass was observed over time, due to poor recovery of meadow pea after mowing. For red clover (Trifolium pratense, we observed the lowest proportion of weed biomass in total biomass among the tested legume species. Crop biomass and weed biomass were negatively correlated across species. Residuals from the linear regression between crop biomass and weed biomass indicated that at similar levels of crop

  16. A combined flamer-cultivator for weed control during the harvesting season of asparagus green spears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Martelloni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Weed competition during spears harvesting reduces asparagus yields. The application of herbicides during this period is illegal, and alternative non-chemical practices are needed. This research tested the effectiveness and efficiency of a custom-built combined flamer-cultivator to control weeds (both in the inter- and intra- spears production bands during the spears harvest season. It also analysed the effects of various liquefied petroleum gas (LPG doses on total asparagus yield, mean spear weight, and total number of marketable spears. In both years, the asparagus spears were generally not damaged by flame weeding using LPG doses of between 43 to 87 kg/ha. The same LPG doses were effective in controlling weeds, showing the same total marketable yields as the weed-free control. At high LPG doses (e.g. 130 and 260 kg/ha, yields decreased as a consequence of the damage caused to the spears, resulting in a lower number of marketable spears. Flaming did not affect the mean spear weight, and can be applied repeatedly during harvesting to maintain the weeds at a level that does not lead to a yield reduction. The repeated use of the combined flamer-cultivator (every seven days led to higher yields than plots where weed control was not conducted. The new machine can be used in a period when herbicides are not possible. Flaming could be introduced by asparagus producers as an alternative, or in addition to herbicides applied in the pre-emergence and post-harvest of spears.

  17. Integrated weed management for sustainable rice production: concepts, perspectives and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amartalingam Rajan

    2002-01-01

    Weed management has always been in some way integrated with cultural and biological methods, probably occurring more fortuitously than purposefully. Experience has shown that repeated use of any weed control technique especially in monocultures production systems results in rapid emergence of weeds more adapted to the new practice. In intensive high input farming systems, heavy selection pressure for herbicide tolerant weeds and the environmental impacts of these inputs are important tissues that require a good understanding of agroecosystem for successful integration of available options. Rice culture, in particular flooded rice culture has always employed integration through an evolution of management practices over the generations. However, a vast majority office farmers in Asia have yet to achieve the high returns realised by farmers elsewhere, where a near optimum combination of high inputs are being effectively integrated for maximum productivity. In addition to technological and management limitations, farmers in developing countries are faced with social, economic and policy constraints. On the other hand, farmers who had achieved considerable increases in productivity through labour replacing technologies, in particular direct seeding with the aid of herbicides, are now faced with issues related to environmental concerns due to high levels of these inputs. The issues facing weed scientists and farmers alike in managing weeds effectively and in a manner to ensure sustainability have become more challenging than ever before. In the last two decades, no issue has been discussed so. intensively as Sustainable Farming, Sustainable Agriculture or Alternative Agriculture within the broader global concept of Sustainable Development. To address these challenges a clear perspective of sustainable farming is essential. This paper addresses these concepts, perspectives and options for choices in weed management for sustainable rice production. (Author)

  18. Herbicide on Weed Composition, Diversity and Density in Silage Corn (cv. Sc 704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zafarian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of plant density, planting pattern and herbicide dosage of nicosulfuron, a field experiment was arranged in a factorial split plot treatments based on RCBD with three replications in Chenaran, Khorasan Razavi, in 2010. The experimental treatments consisted of a factorial plant density (100000, 120000 and 140000 plants ha-1 in the planting pattern (single and double row as main plot and herbicide dosage of nicousulforon in four levels (0, 1, 1/5 and 2, l.ha-1 as sub-plot. Samplings were made at in five stages (37days after the emergence of corn and it was repeated once per 20 days. The results indicated reducing the weed density and dry matter of weeds in the first stage after the herbicide treatment. Moreover, it was observed a significant interaction effect between plant density with planting pattern and between planting pattern with herbicides dosages during growth season on reducing weed density and dry matter. Also results indicated that in between of this experiment's treatments, nicosulfuron herbicide reduced weed density at the beginning of growth season and double row planting pattern suppressed weed density during growing season, and resulted in lowest Jacard similarity index (Sj of weed species. Results also indicated that with increasing of plant density and herbicide dosage especially in composition of double row planting pattern, according to Shannon- Wiener index, sensitive population such as common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L., buckhorn plantain (Plantago lanceolata L., prostrate knotweed (Polygonum aviculareL., black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L. and Johnson grass (Sorghum halepens L. was reduced in during growing season. Simpson dominance index, showed that some low populated weeds such as redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L. and Canada thistle (Circum arvensis L. persisted their growth up to the end of

  19. Effect of the foliar enrichment and herbicides on maize and associated weeds irrigated with drainage water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshdy M.H. Tagour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-year field experiment was conducted during summer seasons of 2013 and 2014, which were irrigated by drainage water which belong to salinity class (C3S1 to C4S2, to study the effect of the foliar enrichment namely (Anti-stress and weed management treatments (some pre and post-emergence herbicides and two-hand hoeing on maize growth, yield, yield components and chemical composition of maize grains and associated weeds (Portulaca oleracea, Amaranthus retroflexus and Echinochloa colonum. The results illustrated that application of the foliar enrichment enhanced the dry weight of weeds and increased maize growth characters, yield and yield components and total crude protein and total oil percentage of grain maize, as compared with untreated treatment. All weed management treatments caused a significant reduction in total dry weight of weeds at 60 and 80 days after sowing in both seasons. Two-hand hoeing treatment exerted the highest decrease in total dry weight of weeds followed by metribuzin, oxadiagyl, fluroxypyr and bentazon, respectively at 60 and 80 days after sowing compared with other weed management treatments. While, the highest values of maize growth, yield, yield components and maize grains' content of protein and oil was obtained with two-hand hoeing followed by metribuzin, oxadiagyl, fluroxypyr and bentazon, respectively. While, two hands hoeing produced the maximum values of leaf area, ear length, the weight of kernels plant−1, but applying of metribuzin treatment gave the highest values of total oil percentage of grain maize when the foliar enrichment was used.

  20. Utilization of cattail aquatic weed(Typha domingesis pers) for biogas energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashandete, Anthony Manoni

    2007-01-01

    Cattail, Typha domingesis Pers, an aquatic emergent weed had seriously impacted the ecosystem of the lake Jipe in Northern Tanzania creating ecological-environmental and economic problems including shrinkage of the lake and reduction of fish yield. Two anaerobic digestion trial were carried out one based different parts and blends of cattail weed at 5, 15, 30 and 60% total solids (TS) in 0.5 L anaerobic batch bioreactors at ambient temperature of 33±1(deg)C. Gut contents from cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) was used as anaerobic inoculum (starter seed). The results showed that highest methane yields were obtained at 5% TS for both unmixed and mixed cattail weeds parts. In the first trial methane yield at 5% TS from five different cattail weed parts namely; spikes, leaves, stems rhizomes and roots ranged from 150-447 CH 4 mL /gVS added. The highest and the lowest methane yields were obtained from leaves and spikes, respectively. In the second trial, methane yields at 5% TS from three different blends of cattail weed viz; spikes, leaves and stems (33.3%:33.3%:33.3%), rhizomes and roots (50%:50%), and whole cattail (spikes, leaves, stems, rhizomes and roots each 20%) ranged between 246 to 288 CH 4 mL /gVS added. The highest and lowest methane yields were obtained from spikes, leaves, and stems and whole cattail blends, respectively. The overall average methane content in the biogas produced at 5 to 60% TS in two trials ranged from 68-83%. It was concluded, that anaerobic digestion of cattail weed is feasible and could serve the dual roles for producing biogas, a clean renewable energy and reducing the weed as part of its management as well as reduction of methane emission. (author)

  1. Computational Models and Emergent Properties of Respiratory Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce G.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Computational models of the neural control system for breathing in mammals provide a theoretical and computational framework bringing together experimental data obtained from different animal preparations under various experimental conditions. Many of these models were developed in parallel and iteratively with experimental studies and provided predictions guiding new experiments. This data-driven modeling approach has advanced our understanding of respiratory network architecture and neural mechanisms underlying generation of the respiratory rhythm and pattern, including their functional reorganization under different physiological conditions. Models reviewed here vary in neurobiological details and computational complexity and span multiple spatiotemporal scales of respiratory control mechanisms. Recent models describe interacting populations of respiratory neurons spatially distributed within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes and rostral ventrolateral medulla that contain core circuits of the respiratory central pattern generator (CPG). Network interactions within these circuits along with intrinsic rhythmogenic properties of neurons form a hierarchy of multiple rhythm generation mechanisms. The functional expression of these mechanisms is controlled by input drives from other brainstem components, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus and pons, which regulate the dynamic behavior of the core circuitry. The emerging view is that the brainstem respiratory network has rhythmogenic capabilities at multiple levels of circuit organization. This allows flexible, state-dependent expression of different neural pattern-generation mechanisms under various physiological conditions, enabling a wide repertoire of respiratory behaviors. Some models consider control of the respiratory CPG by pulmonary feedback and network reconfiguration during defensive behaviors such as cough. Future directions in modeling of the respiratory CPG are considered. PMID:23687564

  2. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms-1 in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4°C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders.

  3. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Stenzel, Sirma [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA) in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms{sup -1} in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4 C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders. (orig.)

  4. Opportunities for biological weed control in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepens, P.C.; Müller-Schärer, H.; Kempenaar, C.

    2001-01-01

    The development and application of biological weed control offer greatopportunities not only for farmers, nature conservationists and othervegetation managers but also for institutions and companies that wish tosell plant protection services and products, and for the general publicthat demands safe

  5. Alien species in the Finnish weed flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. HYVÖNEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at assessing the invasion of alien weed species in Finland based on a review of their occurrence in the Finnish weed flora. The evaluation was conducted for the three phases of the invasion process, i.e. introduction, naturalization and invasion. The literature review revealed that 815 alien weed species occur in Finland of which 314 are regarded as naturalized. Based on their occurrence in different climate zones, the risk of naturalization of new harmful alien weed species was deemed low for those species not currently found in Finland, but higher for species occurring as casual aliens in Finland. In the latter group, 10 species of concern were detected. Exploration of the distribution patterns of naturalized species within Finland revealed species occupancy to be dependent on the residence time of the species. Established neophytes can be expected to extend their ranges and to increase occupation of agricultural habitats in the future.;

  6. Impact of fungicides on weed growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study has shown that fungicides influence the growth of weeds. The competition against crops will be substantially reduced. Bioassays in a climate chamber variation in temperature as well as different lightning phases and microplot trials under semi field levels were carried out to investigate the influence of fungicides on weed growth. Selected weed species (Alopecurus myosuroides, Viola arvensis, Galium aparine, Stellaria media, Lamium purpureum have been examined with different dose rates of fungicides (Adexar, Bravo 500, Diamant, Crupozin flüssig. Weed species showed a different sensitivity. There were leaf discoloration, contractions and growth inhibition. In some cases using common practise dose rates of fungicides more than 70% growth inhibition could be estimated 14 days after application in comparison to the untreated control. Effects were much stronger in bioassays than in semi field trials.

  7. Using Weeds and Wildflowers to Study Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Nancy

    1984-01-01

    Offers suggestions for activities in which local weeds and wildflowers are used to study a variety of topics. These topics include classification, ecological succession, and mapping. Also lists the types of experiments students can perform with these plants. (JN)

  8. WHITE BLISTER SPECIES (Albuginaceae ON WEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Vrandečić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate fungi inside the family Albuginaceae are widespread world wide and cause white rust or white blister disease. Mycopopulation of weeds has been researched within the project „The role of weeds in epidemiology of row-crop diseases“. The aim of this research was to identify white blister species occurring on weeds in Eastern Croatia. Weed plants with disease symptoms characteristic for white blister species have been collected since 2001 on location Slavonia and Baranja country. Determination of white blister species was based on morphological characters of pathogen and the host. Wilsoniana bliti was determined on Amaranthus retroflexus and Amaranthus hybridus leaves. Capsella bursa pastoris is a host for Albugo candida. Ambrosia artemisiifolia is a host for Pustula sp. and Cirsium arvense was found to be host for Pustula spinulosa. Wilsoniana portulaceae was determined on Portulaca oleracea.

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of different herbicides against a new weed Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Houtt. in wheat crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asghar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of different post emergence herbicides for the control of monocot weed the Japanese broom (Bromus japonicus in wheat crop. Five herbicides viz., metribuzin, isoproturon, metribuzin plus isoproturon, Atlantis and sulfosulfuron were used at their recommended doses in RCBD with three replications. The weedy check was kept as control where no herbicide was sprayed. All the herbicides were applied as post-emergence after second irrigation at 60 days after sowing the crop. The lowest weed counts per m2 (0.583 and highest percent of weed mortality (99.07% were observed where metribuzin plus isoproturon was used. This was followed by Atlantis with 3.26 weeds per m2 with 95.14% mortality of weeds. However, significantly higher 1000 grain weight was noted with Atlantis (29.50 g and metribuzin plus isoproturon (28.58 g. The treatments did not differ significantly with respect to 1000 grain weight. All the herbicide helped to increase the yield from 16 to 22%, but did not differ significantly with respect to yield gain. The highest yield (3759.40 kg ha-1 was produced by Atlantis followed by sulfosulfuron (3757.20 kg ha-1 . On the basis of cost benefit ratio sulfosulfuron (34.95 proved to be the best followed by metribuzin (16.78. Therefore, sulfosulfuron and metribuzin are recommended for the control of Bromus weed in wheat crop.

  10. Cleaning Cottages & Castles: Weeding Year-Round

    OpenAIRE

    Peterman, Dana; Woo, Christina

    2009-01-01

    All libraries confront the three Uh-Ohs of collections: overcrowding, out-of-date, out-of-scope. Instead of weeding in response to crises, we weed year-round. With little foreseeable growth in shelf space and a chronic need for more space, we are complementing collection growth with ongoing deselection. To formulate sustainable and acceptable solutions to librarians and constituents across disciplines, UCI Libraries use a combination of technology and disciplinary knowledge to iden...

  11. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Crop diversity prevents serious weed problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Weed management in organic crop production could benefit from more diversification of today’s cropping systems. However, the potential of diversification needs better documentation and solid suggestions for employment in practise must be identified.......Weed management in organic crop production could benefit from more diversification of today’s cropping systems. However, the potential of diversification needs better documentation and solid suggestions for employment in practise must be identified....

  13. Occurence, spread and possibilities of invasive weeds control in sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović Branko I.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Floristically rich and diverse weed comunity of sugar beet is in our country represented by 150 weed species. They are not all equaly significant in weediness of this crop. Only a limited number of them participate in weed comunity composition. These are: Abuthilon theophrasti Medic., Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L Scop., Convolvulus arvensis L., Cynodon dactylon (L Pers. Digitaria sanguinalis (L Scop., Hibiscus trionum L., Rubus caesius L. Echinochloa crus-gall L., Polygonum aviculare L., P. lapathifolium L., P. persicaria L., Setaria glauca (L P. B., S. viridis (L P. B., Solanum nigrum L. and Sorghum halepense (L Pers. In shooting period up to 4-8 weeks upon emergence, sugar beet is under the haviest harmfull inluence of weeds, especially invasive ones such as: Abuthilon theophrasti Medic. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., Cirsium arvense (L Scop., Iva xanthifolia L. Sorghum halepense (L Pers. and Xanthium strumarium L. Sugar beet growing requires intensive cultural practices, i.e. basic and additional tillage and cultivation. Due to the widening of weed problems, frequent herbicide use in several applications is needed in the longer time period.

  14. Spatial Quality Evaluation of Resampled Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-Imagery for Weed Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra-Serrano, Irene; Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco Javier; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-08-12

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) combined with different spectral range sensors are an emerging technology for providing early weed maps for optimizing herbicide applications. Considering that weeds, at very early phenological stages, are similar spectrally and in appearance, three major components are relevant: spatial resolution, type of sensor and classification algorithm. Resampling is a technique to create a new version of an image with a different width and/or height in pixels, and it has been used in satellite imagery with different spatial and temporal resolutions. In this paper, the efficiency of resampled-images (RS-images) created from real UAV-images (UAV-images; the UAVs were equipped with two types of sensors, i.e., visible and visible plus near-infrared spectra) captured at different altitudes is examined to test the quality of the RS-image output. The performance of the object-based-image-analysis (OBIA) implemented for the early weed mapping using different weed thresholds was also evaluated. Our results showed that resampling accurately extracted the spectral values from high spatial resolution UAV-images at an altitude of 30 m and the RS-image data at altitudes of 60 and 100 m, was able to provide accurate weed cover and herbicide application maps compared with UAV-images from real flights.

  15. Análise matemática e biológica dos modelos de estimativa de perdas de rendimento na cultura devido à interferência de plantas daninhas Mathematical and biological analysis of the models for estimating culture yield losses due to weed interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adati

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As plantas daninhas acarretam reduções no rendimento das culturas agrícolas. Os modelos matemáticos de estimativa de perda de rendimento na cultura devido à interferência dessas plantas podem ser instrumentos úteis à tomada de decisão de manejo. Se for possível prever as perdas de rendimento, será possível decidir se é viável ou não a aplicação de uma medida de controle. Há na literatura vários modelos matemáticos empíricos de regressão lineares, não-lineares e polinomiais usados para estimar as perdas de rendimento devido às plantas daninhas. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar uma análise dos modelos matemáticos presentes na literatura utilizados para estimar as perdas de rendimento que as plantas daninhas acarretam à cultura, considerando o ajuste matemático às observações e a descrição biológica do comportamento dessas perdas.The presence of weeds in any production system involving plants causes crop yield losses. Mathematical models for crop yield loss estimation due to the interference of weeds can be useful tools for decision-making management strategies. If it is possible to predict crop yield loss, it will be possible to decide whether it is viable to apply control measures. There are several empirical models in the literature used to estimate crop yield loss due to the presence of weeds, which are linear, non linear and polynomial. The goal of this work is to present an analysis of the existing mathematical models used to estimate crop yield loss due to weeds by considering both their mathematical fit and biological behavior.

  16. Calibrating emergent phenomena in stock markets with agent based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fievet, Lucas; Sornette, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Since the 2008 financial crisis, agent-based models (ABMs), which account for out-of-equilibrium dynamics, heterogeneous preferences, time horizons and strategies, have often been envisioned as the new frontier that could revolutionise and displace the more standard models and tools in economics. However, their adoption and generalisation is drastically hindered by the absence of general reliable operational calibration methods. Here, we start with a different calibration angle that qualifies an ABM for its ability to achieve abnormal trading performance with respect to the buy-and-hold strategy when fed with real financial data. Starting from the common definition of standard minority and majority agents with binary strategies, we prove their equivalence to optimal decision trees. This efficient representation allows us to exhaustively test all meaningful single agent models for their potential anomalous investment performance, which we apply to the NASDAQ Composite index over the last 20 years. We uncover large significant predictive power, with anomalous Sharpe ratio and directional accuracy, in particular during the dotcom bubble and crash and the 2008 financial crisis. A principal component analysis reveals transient convergence between the anomalous minority and majority models. A novel combination of the optimal single-agent models of both classes into a two-agents model leads to remarkable superior investment performance, especially during the periods of bubbles and crashes. Our design opens the field of ABMs to construct novel types of advanced warning systems of market crises, based on the emergent collective intelligence of ABMs built on carefully designed optimal decision trees that can be reversed engineered from real financial data.

  17. Calibrating emergent phenomena in stock markets with agent based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Since the 2008 financial crisis, agent-based models (ABMs), which account for out-of-equilibrium dynamics, heterogeneous preferences, time horizons and strategies, have often been envisioned as the new frontier that could revolutionise and displace the more standard models and tools in economics. However, their adoption and generalisation is drastically hindered by the absence of general reliable operational calibration methods. Here, we start with a different calibration angle that qualifies an ABM for its ability to achieve abnormal trading performance with respect to the buy-and-hold strategy when fed with real financial data. Starting from the common definition of standard minority and majority agents with binary strategies, we prove their equivalence to optimal decision trees. This efficient representation allows us to exhaustively test all meaningful single agent models for their potential anomalous investment performance, which we apply to the NASDAQ Composite index over the last 20 years. We uncover large significant predictive power, with anomalous Sharpe ratio and directional accuracy, in particular during the dotcom bubble and crash and the 2008 financial crisis. A principal component analysis reveals transient convergence between the anomalous minority and majority models. A novel combination of the optimal single-agent models of both classes into a two-agents model leads to remarkable superior investment performance, especially during the periods of bubbles and crashes. Our design opens the field of ABMs to construct novel types of advanced warning systems of market crises, based on the emergent collective intelligence of ABMs built on carefully designed optimal decision trees that can be reversed engineered from real financial data. PMID:29499049

  18. Effect of different integrated weed management methods on weed density and yield of sugar beet crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza koochaki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare different weed management methods in sugar beet, two experiments were conducted at mashhad for two years in 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Each experiment designed as a Complete Randomized Block with three replication. The treatments include: Metamitron(Goltix plus Phenmedipham (Betanal (Gol+Bet, Goltix plus Cultivation (Gol+Cu, Disk plus Betanal (Di+Bet, Disk plus Cultivation(Di+Cu, Cover Crop plus Betanal (Co+Bet, Cover Crop plus Cultivation (Co+Cu, Weeding (W and Betanal plus Weeding (Bet+W. Samplings were taken at three stages early season, after imposing the treatments and late season. Results showed that at early season in two experiments, density of weeds was lower in cover crop and disk treatment compared with other treats and the second sampling in first experiment, weeding and disk plus cultivation of treatments with 21.5 and 26.6 respectively plants per m2 and in second experiment year, weeding and application betanal plus weeding treatments, with 14 and 17.8 respectively plant in m2 showed the lowest. In the second experiment year, minimum and maximum sugar beet yield were obtained with cover crop plus betanal and weeding with 43 and 104 ton per hectare respectively. The lowest yield was obtained in check plots with 3.5ton per hectare. Maximum sugar contain (19.35% was obtained in betanal herbicide plus cultivation treatment and minimum (14.88% was obtained with hand weeding treatment. However maximum sugar beet yield was obtained with betanal plus weeding (17.85 ton per hectare and the minimum with cover crop plus betanal (7.5 ton per hectare. Key words: integrated weed management, cover crop, herbicide, cultivation, sugar beet.

  19. WEED MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL IN POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cleón de Castro Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This review shows instructions to potatoes' farmer about behavior of the weeds and how to manage them so as to minimize loss of productivity through the use of control strategies for potato crop. The prevention consists in adoption of practices that prevents entry of unwanted species of weeds in the planting site. The control reduces the infestation of these species, but this practice does not eradicate them completely. However, it needs to control the weeds before the area preparation for planting the tubers until complete closure of the soil by shoots of potatoes during the critical period. After covering the soil, the potato crop does not suffer negative interference caused by weeds. The cultural practices include a good plane for harvest, plant crop rotation, the planting of appropriate plants for covering the soil, the ideal space to the planting and the correct time to potato planting. The control must be efficient to reduce the number of weeds in the area to avoid economic losses to farmers. It is necessary to establish weed management strategies in order to maintain sustainable farming systems, preserving the environment and quality of life of the farmer.

  20. Weed detection using unmanned aircraft vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pflanz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to agricultural remote sensing technologies, which are based on images from satellites or manned aircrafts, photogrammetry at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles lead to higher spatial resolution, real-time processing and lower costs. Moreover multicopter aircrafts are suitable vehicles to perform precise path or stationary flights. In terms of vegetation photogrammetry this minimises motion blur and provide better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and through the recent increase in the availability of powerful batteries, microcontrollers and multispectral cameras, it can be expected in future that spatial mapping of weeds from low altitudes will be promoted. A small unmanned aircraft vehicle with a modified RGB camera was tested taking images from agricultural fields. A microcopter with six rotors was applied. The hexacopter in particular is GPS controlled and operates within predefined areas at given altitudes (from 5 to 10 m. Different scenarios of photogrammetrically weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. First experiences with microcopter showed a high potential for site-specific weed control. Images analyses with regards to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide applications to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  1. Emerging Models of Interprofessional Collaboration in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Teresa; Wujcik, Debra; Wujcik, Kari

    2017-11-01

    To present emerging models for oncology health professionals to consider when coordinating cancer care among professionals, beginning as early as initial professional education and training and continuing along the cancer continuum to include cancer treatment and psychosocial support. Journal articles indexed on the National Library of Medicine database and personal communications with oncology colleagues. Interprofessional collaboration is becoming increasingly important in the specialty of oncology. The complexity of new therapies and their associated side-effect profiles benefit from a collaborative, interprofessional approach to the care of the patient with cancer. Additionally, oncology patients can benefit from interprofessional collaboration across the complexities of the care continuum. Oncology nurses are often in roles that can facilitate interprofessional collaboration, optimizing the care of patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  3. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  4. Metal transport across biomembranes: emerging models for a distinct chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, José M; Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2012-04-20

    Transition metals are essential components of important biomolecules, and their homeostasis is central to many life processes. Transmembrane transporters are key elements controlling the distribution of metals in various compartments. However, due to their chemical properties, transition elements require transporters with different structural-functional characteristics from those of alkali and alkali earth ions. Emerging structural information and functional studies have revealed distinctive features of metal transport. Among these are the relevance of multifaceted events involving metal transfer among participating proteins, the importance of coordination geometry at transmembrane transport sites, and the presence of the largely irreversible steps associated with vectorial transport. Here, we discuss how these characteristics shape novel transition metal ion transport models.

  5. Emerge - A Python environment for the modeling of subsurface transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S.; Smai, F.; Sochala, P.

    2014-12-01

    The simulation of subsurface mass and energy transfers often relies on specific codes that were mainly developed using compiled languages which usually ensure computational efficiency at the expense of relatively long development times and relatively rigid software. Even if a very detailed, possibly graphical, user-interface is developed the core numerical aspects are rarely accessible and the smallest modification will always need a compilation step. Thus, user-defined physical laws or alternative numerical schemes may be relatively difficult to use. Over the last decade, Python has emerged as a popular and widely used language in the scientific community. There already exist several libraries for the pre and post-treatment of input and output files for reservoir simulators (e.g. pytough). Development times in Python are considerably reduced compared to compiled languages, and programs can be easily interfaced with libraries written in compiled languages with several comprehensive numerical libraries that provide sequential and parallel solvers (e.g. PETSc, Trilinos…). The core objective of the Emerge project is to explore the possibility to develop a modeling environment in full Python. Consequently, we are developing an open python package with the classes/objects necessary to express, discretize and solve the physical problems encountered in the modeling of subsurface transfers. We heavily relied on Python to have a convenient and concise way of manipulating potentially complex concepts with a few lines of code and a high level of abstraction. Our result aims to be a friendly numerical environment targeting both numerical engineers and physicist or geoscientists with the possibility to quickly specify and handle geometries, arbitrary meshes, spatially or temporally varying properties, PDE formulations, boundary conditions…

  6. An Emerging Theoretical Model of Music Therapy Student Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Abbey L; Hernandez-Ruiz, Eugenia; Jang, Sekyung; Kim, Borin; Joseph, Megan; Wells, Kori E

    2017-07-01

    Music therapy students negotiate a complex relationship with music and its use in clinical work throughout their education and training. This distinct, pervasive, and evolving relationship suggests a developmental process unique to music therapy. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to create a theoretical model of music therapy students' developmental process, beginning with a study within one large Midwestern university. Participants (N = 15) were music therapy students who completed one 60-minute intensive interview, followed by a 20-minute member check meeting. Recorded interviews were transcribed, analyzed, and coded using open and axial coding. The theoretical model that emerged was a six-step sequential developmental progression that included the following themes: (a) Personal Connection, (b) Turning Point, (c) Adjusting Relationship with Music, (d) Growth and Development, (e) Evolution, and (f) Empowerment. The first three steps are linear; development continues in a cyclical process among the last three steps. As the cycle continues, music therapy students continue to grow and develop their skills, leading to increased empowerment, and more specifically, increased self-efficacy and competence. Further exploration of the model is needed to inform educators' and other key stakeholders' understanding of student needs and concerns as they progress through music therapy degree programs. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Status of emergency spray modelling in the integral code ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumecocq, W.; Passalacqua, R.

    2001-01-01

    Containment spray systems are emergency systems that would be used in very low probability events which may lead to severe accidents in Light Water Reactors. In most cases, the primary function of the spray would be to remove heat and condense steam in order to reduce pressure and temperature in the containment building. Spray would also wash out fission products (aerosols and gaseous species) from the containment atmosphere. The efficiency of the spray system in the containment depressurization as well as in the removal of aerosols, during a severe accident, depends on the evolution of the spray droplet size distribution with the height in the containment, due to kinetic and thermal relaxation, gravitational agglomeration and mass transfer with the gas. A model has been developed taking into account all of these phenomena. This model has been implemented in the ASTEC code with a validation of the droplets relaxation against the CARAIDAS experiment (IPSN). Applications of this modelling to a PWR 900, during a severe accident, with special emphasis on the effect of spray on containment hydrogen distribution have been performed in multi-compartment configuration with the ASTEC V0.3 code. (author)

  8. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-06-07

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. PMID:25994672

  10. Detection of Corn and Weed Species by the Combination of Spectral, Shape and Textural Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenfang Lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate detection of weeds in farmland can help reduce pesticide use and protect the agricultural environment. To develop intelligent equipment for weed detection, this study used an imaging spectrometer system, which supports micro-scale plant feature analysis by acquiring high-resolution hyper spectral images of corn and a number of weed species in the laboratory. For the analysis, the object-oriented classification system with segmentation and decision tree algorithms was utilized on the hyper spectral images to extract shape and texture features of eight species of plant leaves, and then, the spectral identification characteristics of different species were determined through sensitive waveband selection and using vegetation indices calculated from the sensitive band data of the images. On the basis of the comparison and analysis of the combined characteristics of spectra, shape, and texture, it was determined that the spectral characteristics of the ratio vegetation index of R677/R710 and the normalized difference vegetation index, shape features of shape index, area, and length, as well as the texture feature of the entropy index could be used to build a discrimination model for corn and weed species. Results of the model evaluation showed that the Global Accuracy and the Kappa coefficient of the model were both over 95%. In addition, spectral and shape features can be regarded as the preferred characteristics to develop a device of weed identification from the view of accessibility to crop/weeds discriminant features, according to different roles of various features in classifying plants. Therefore, the results of this study provide valuable information for the portable device development of intelligent weed detection.

  11. Body circumferences: clinical implications emerging from a new geometric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Dympna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body volume expands with the positive energy balance associated with the development of adult human obesity and this "growth" is captured by two widely used clinical metrics, waist circumference and body mass index (BMI. Empirical correlations between circumferences, BMI, and related body compartments are frequently reported but fail to provide an important common conceptual foundation that can be related to key clinical observations. A two-phase program was designed to fill this important gap: a geometric model linking body volume with circumferences and BMI was developed and validated in cross-sectional cohorts; and the model was applied to the evaluation of longitudinally monitored subjects during periods of voluntary weight loss. Concepts emerging from the developed model were then used to examine the relations between the evaluated clinical measures and body composition. Methods Two groups of healthy adults (n = 494 and 1499 were included in the cross-sectional model development/testing phase and subjects in two previous weight loss studies were included in the longitudinal model evaluation phase. Five circumferences (arm, waist, hip, thigh, and calf; average of sum, C, height (H, BMI, body volume (V; underwater weighing, and the volumes of major body compartments (whole-body magnetic resonance imaging were measured. Results The evaluation of a humanoid geometric model based a cylinder confirmed that V derived from C and H was highly correlated with measured V [R2 both males and females, 0.97; p 0.5. The scaling of individual circumferences to V/H varied, with waist the highest (V/H~0.6 and calf the lowest (V/H~0.3, indicating that the largest and smallest between-subject "growth" with greater body volume occurs in the abdominal area and lower extremities, respectively. A stepwise linear regression model including all five circumferences2 showed that each contributed independently to V/H. These cross

  12. Level of threshold weed density does not affect the long-term frequency of weed control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Oijen, van M.

    1997-01-01

    Weed control thresholds are often presented as a means to reduce unnecessary control measures, thereby increasing the effectiveness of weed management. While the threshold is a useful tool for cost-effective application of control on a single-year base, its role over the longer term is more

  13. Weeds of onion fields and effects of some herbicides on weeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the treatments, oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen provided a better control than pendimethalin and tepraloxydim on weed coverage and density, but oxyfluorfen caused phytotoxicicity on onion even at reduced doses. Weed-free plots gave the highest yield (16.2a kg/m2) and were followed by oxadiazon (11.9b kg/m2), ...

  14. Factors affecting the population density of weeds and yield loss of them in wheat: a case study in Golestan province – Bandargaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Zaman Nekahi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the factors affecting the population density of weeds and yield loss of them in wheat, a non systematic survey experiment was conducted in 45 fields in the township of Bandar-gaz (Sarmahaleh village in 2012. Sampling of wheat and weeds were taken in two stages (Heading and Harvest maturity by randomized to the five points of each field using quadrate size 1m*1m. In this study all information about crop management including Land area , farmers experience , the seed bed preparation, sowing date , cultivar and site preparation of them, sowing ways , seed rate , weeds control ways , kind , amount and time of herbicide , fungicide use and wheat harvest time were collected during a growing season by preparing questionnaire and complete them with farmers. At the end of the growing season, the actual yield harvested by farmers’ ‬ recorded. Among the various parameters, Wheat plant and raceme density, farmer experience, Kind of variety and use of Tapic+Geranestar herbicide had significant effects on weed population. With increased wheat plant density, weed density decreased. Also there was less weed density in field of high experience farmer. Weed density was lesser in N8118 variety than N8019 variety and not use Tapic+granestar herbicide due to increased of weeds density. Among weed different species, Avena sp, Phalaris minor and Sinapis arvense had highest negative effect on wheat yield. Model study showed if wheat plant density was optimum and there were weeds, yield will be 2713kg/ha and if weeds remove yield will increase to 2877kg/ha (yield gap equal164kg/ha. Amaong weed, Phalaris minor (12 plant per m-2, Sinapis arvensis (3plant per m-2 and Avena sp (2 plant per m-2 with 65, 18 and 17% yield loss respectively, were the strongest competitor with wheat.

  15. Mechanical weed control in organic winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Pannacci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Three field experiments were carried out in organic winter wheat in three consecutive years (exp. 1, 2005-06; exp. 2, 2006- 07; exp. 3, 2007-08 in central Italy (42°57’ N - 12°22’ E, 165 m a.s.l. in order to evaluate the efficacy against weeds and the effects on winter wheat of two main mechanical weed control strategies: i spring tine harrowing used at three different application times (1 passage at T1, 2 passages at the time T1, 1 passage at T1 followed by 1 passage at T1 + 14 days in the crop sowed at narrow (traditional row spacing (0.15 m; and ii split-hoeing and finger-weeder, alone and combined at T1, in the crop sowed at wider row spacing (0.30 m. At the time T1 winter wheat was at tillering and weeds were at the cotyledons-2 true leaves growth stage. The experimental design was a randomized block with four replicates. Six weeks after mechanical treatments, weed ground cover (% was rated visually using the Braun-Blanquet coverabundance scale; weeds on three squares (0.6×0.5 m each one per plot were collected, counted, weighed, dried in oven at 105°C to determine weed density and weed above-ground dry biomass. At harvest, wheat ears density, grain yield, weight of 1000 seeds and hectolitre weight were recorded. Total weed flora was quite different in the three experiments. The main weed species were: Polygonum aviculare L. (exp. 1 and 2, Fallopia convolvulus (L. Á. Löve (exp. 1 and 3, Stachys annua (L. L. (exp. 1, Anagallis arvensis L. (exp. 2, Papaver rhoeas L. (exp.3, Veronica hederifolia L. (exp. 3. In the winter wheat sowed at narrow rows, 2 passages with spring-tine harrowing at the same time seems to be the best option in order to reconcile a good efficacy with the feasibility of treatment. In wider rows spacing the best weed control was obtained by split hoeing alone or combined with finger-weeder. The grain yield, on average 10% higher in narrow rows, the lower costs and the good selectivity of spring-tine harrowing

  16. Emergent Literacy and Learning to Write: A Predictive Model for Italian Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Giuliana; Bigozzi, Lucia; Gamannossi, Beatrice Accorti; Vezzani, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is twofold: (1) contribute to identifying a model for the variables that compose the emergent literacy construct and their relationships; (2) assess the predictive power of the emergent literacy model on early writing abilities in a transparent orthography language. We examined emergent literacy skills in 464 children…

  17. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemens, Marieen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them more precise and reduce crop losses. The latest developments in intrarow weeding techniques involve technologies that automatically detect and classify crop and weed plants and use this information to guide a weeding device. Several commercially available examples are presented.

  18. Discrimination of Crop and Weeds on Visible and Visible/Near-Infrared Spectrums Using Support Vector Machine, Artificial Neural Network and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Deng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are regarded as farmers' natural enemy. In order to avoid excessive pesticide residues, the destruction of ecological environment, and to guarantee the quality and safety of agricultural products, it is urgent to develop highly-efficient weed management methods. Amongst, weed discrimination is the key part. There have been a lot of researches on weed detection/discrimination using spectral measurement on plant leaf/canopy. However, as reported so far the spectral ranges from the researches were not consistent and no research was reported to determine more efficient wavelength range for weed classification. Some researchers adopted visible spectrum, some adopted near-infrared spectrum, the others adopted both visible and near-infrared spectrum. The purpose of this study was to compare the classifications of the spectral reflectance in range of 350 ~ 760 nm and in 350 ~ 2500 nm for crop/weed discrimination. Through spectral analysis of these data respectively using three kinds of modeling methods of Support Vector Machines (SVMs, Artificial Neural Network (ANN, and Decision Tree (DT, the results showed that the three classifiers could differentiate crop and weeds better in 350 ~ 760 nm wavelength range than in 350 ~ 2500 nm. Therefore, the visible wavelength range could be good enough to meet the requirement for crop/weed spectral discrimination, which might reduce the cost of weed detect sensors.

  19. Prioritising weed management activities in a data deficient environment: the Pilbara islands, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Cheryl; Passeretto, Kellie; Lohr, Michael; Keighery, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Along the Pilbara coast of Western Australia (WA) there are approximately 598 islands with a total area of around 500 km(2). Budget limitations and logistical complexities mean the management of these islands tends to be opportunistic. Until now there has been no review of the establishment and impacts of weeds on Pilbara islands or any attempt to prioritise island weed management. In many instances only weed occurrence has been documented, creating a data deficient environment for management decision making. The purpose of this research was to develop a database of weed occurrences on WA islands and to create a prioritisation process that will generate a ranked list of island-weed combinations using currently available data. Here, we describe a model using the pairwise comparison formulae in the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), four metrics describing the logistical difficulty of working on each island (island size, ruggedness, travel time, and tenure), and two well established measures of conservation value of an island (maximum representation and effective maximum rarity of eight features). We present the sensitivity of the island-weed rankings to changes in weights applied to each decision criteria using Kendall's tau statistics. We also present the top 20 ranked island-weed combinations for four modelling scenarios. Many conservation prioritisation tools exist. However, many of these tools require extrapolation to fill data gaps and require specific management objectives and dedicated budgets. To our knowledge, this study is one of a few attempts to prioritise conservation actions using data that are currently available in an environment where management may be opportunistic and spasmodic due to budgetary restrictions.

  20. The emergence of geometry: a two-dimensional toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Alfaro, Jorge; Puigdomenech, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We review the similarities between the effective chiral lagrangrian, relevant for low-energy strong interactions, and the Einstein-Hilbert action. We use these analogies to suggest a specific mechanism whereby gravitons would emerge as Goldstone bosons of a global SO(D) X GL(D) symmetry broken down to SO(D) by fermion condensation. We propose a two-dimensional toy model where a dynamical zwei-bein is generated from a topological theory without any pre-existing metric structure, the space being endowed only with an affine connection. A metric appears only after the symmetry breaking; thus the notion of distance is an induced effective one. In spite of several non-standard features this simple toy model appears to be renormalizable and at long distances is described by an effective lagrangian that corresponds to that of two-dimensional gravity (Liouville theory). The induced cosmological constant is related to the dynamical mass M acquired by the fermion fields in the breaking, which also acts as an infrared re...

  1. A workflow model to analyse pediatric emergency overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgaya, Hayfa; Ajmi, Ines; Gammoudi, Lotfi; Hammadi, Slim; Martinot, Alain; Beuscart, Régis; Renard, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The greatest source of delay in patient flow is the waiting time from the health care request, and especially the bed request to exit from the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) for hospital admission. It represents 70% of the time that these patients occupied in the PED waiting rooms. Our objective in this study is to identify tension indicators and bottlenecks that contribute to overcrowding. Patient flow mapping through the PED was carried out in a continuous 2 years period from January 2011 to December 2012. Our method is to use the collected real data, basing on accurate visits made in the PED of the Regional University Hospital Center (CHRU) of Lille (France), in order to construct an accurate and complete representation of the PED processes. The result of this representation is a Workflow model of the patient journey in the PED representing most faithfully possible the reality of the PED of CHRU of Lille. This model allowed us to identify sources of delay in patient flow and aspects of the PED activity that could be improved. It must be enough retailed to produce an analysis allowing to identify the dysfunctions of the PED and also to propose and to estimate prevention indicators of tensions. Our survey is integrated into the French National Research Agency project, titled: "Hospital: optimization, simulation and avoidance of strain" (ANR HOST).

  2. Modeling emergency evacuation for major hazard industrial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiadou, Paraskevi S.; Papazoglou, Ioannis A.; Kiranoudis, Chris T.; Markatos, Nikolaos C.

    2007-01-01

    A model providing the temporal and spatial distribution of the population under evacuation around a major hazard facility is developed. A discrete state stochastic Markov process simulates the movement of the evacuees. The area around the hazardous facility is divided into nodes connected among themselves with links representing the road system of the area. Transition from node-to-node is simulated as a random process where the probability of transition depends on the dynamically changed states of the destination and origin nodes and on the link between them. Solution of the Markov process provides the expected distribution of the evacuees in the nodes of the area as a function of time. A Monte Carlo solution of the model provides in addition a sample of actual trajectories of the evacuees. This information coupled with an accident analysis which provides the spatial and temporal distribution of the extreme phenomenon following an accident, determines a sample of the actual doses received by the evacuees. Both the average dose and the actual distribution of doses are then used as measures in evaluating alternative emergency response strategies. It is shown that in some cases the estimation of the health consequences by the average dose might be either too conservative or too non-conservative relative to the one corresponding to the distribution of the received dose and hence not a suitable measure to evaluate alternative evacuation strategies

  3. A stochastic optimization model for shift scheduling in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rifai, Omar; Garaix, Thierry; Augusto, Vincent; Xie, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive waiting time in Emergency Departments (ED) can be both a cause of frustration and more importantly, a health concern for patients. Waiting time arises when the demand for work goes beyond the facility's service capacity. ED service capacity mainly depends on human resources and on beds available for patients. In this paper, we focus on human resources organization in an ED and seek to best balance between service quality and working conditions. More specifically, we address the personnel scheduling problem in order to optimize the shift distribution among employees and minimize the total expected patients' waiting time. The problem is also characterized by a multi-stage re-entrant service process. With an appropriate approximation of patients' waiting times, we first propose a stochastic mixed-integer programming model that is solved by a sample average approximation (SAA) approach. The resulting personnel schedules are then evaluated using a discrete-event simulation model. Numerical experiments are then performed with data from a French hospital to compare different personnel scheduling strategies.

  4. Applying Neural Networks to Hyperspectral and Multispectral Field Data for Discrimination of Cruciferous Weeds in Winter Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Isabel de Castro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of detection of weeds in crops for site-specific weed control, on-ground spectral reflectance measurements are the first step to determine the potential of remote spectral data to classify weeds and crops. Field studies were conducted for four years at different locations in Spain. We aimed to distinguish cruciferous weeds in wheat and broad bean crops, using hyperspectral and multispectral readings in the visible and near-infrared spectrum. To identify differences in reflectance between cruciferous weeds, we applied three classification methods: stepwise discriminant (STEPDISC analysis and two neural networks, specifically, multilayer perceptron (MLP and radial basis function (RBF. Hyperspectral and multispectral signatures of cruciferous weeds, and wheat and broad bean crops can be classified using STEPDISC analysis, and MLP and RBF neural networks with different success, being the MLP model the most accurate with 100%, or higher than 98.1%, of classification performance for all the years. Classification accuracy from hyperspectral signatures was similar to that from multispectral and spectral indices, suggesting that little advantage would be obtained by using more expensive airborne hyperspectral imagery. Therefore, for next investigations, we recommend using multispectral remote imagery to explore whether they can potentially discriminate these weeds and crops.

  5. The weed seed bank assessment in two soil depths under various mineral fertilising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hunková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The field trial at the experimental station of Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra - Kolíňany (Slovak Republic, maize growing region, Haplic Luvisol and Stagni-Haplic Luvisol in 1997 year was established. Experiments were based on 14 ha area (424 x 432.2 m by long strips method. The impact of different mineral fertilisers on six model crops was observed: winter wheat, spring barley, sunflower, winter oilseed rape, maize and sugar beet. Weed infestation of winter wheat, spring barley, maize and sugar beet as well as weed seed bank composition since 2000 year till 2002 year were detected. Three variants of mineral fertilisation were applied: variant 1 – without fertilisers, variant 2 – N-P-K fertilisation, steady state soil nutrients balance, variant 3 – high doses of N-P-K fertilisers (positive soil nutrients balance. Soil weed seed bank was analysed once per year before crop germination (on February from depths 0–0.05 m and 0.20–0.25 m in five replicates. From the depth 0–0.05 m 26 weed species were found, from the depth 0.20–0.25 m 23 weed species, from late spring group mainly. Chenopodium album, Stellaria media and Amaranthus spp. (77.57 % from intact seeds in total were the most occurred weeds in both depths. The year, depth of soil sampling and fertilisation did not have statistically significant impact on weed seeds number in the soil.

  6. Assessing the impact of revegetation and weed control on urban sensitive bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Carla L; McKinney, Matthew; Mustin, Karen; Shanahan, Danielle F; Possingham, Hugh P

    2017-06-01

    Nature in cities is concentrated in urban green spaces, which are key areas for urban biodiversity and also important areas to connect people with nature. To conserve urban biodiversity within these natural refugia, habitat restoration such as weed control and revegetation is often implemented. These actions are expected to benefit biodiversity, although species known to be affected by urbanization may not be interacting with restoration in the ways we anticipate. In this study, we use a case study to explore how urban restoration activities impact different bird species. Birds were grouped into urban sensitivity categories and species abundance, and richness was then calculated using a hierarchical species community model for individual species responses, with "urban class" used as the hierarchical parameter. We highlight variable responses of birds to revegetation and weed control based on their level of urban sensitivity. Revegetation of open grassy areas delivers significant bird conservation outcomes, but the effects of weed control are neutral or in some cases negative. Specifically, the species most reliant on remnant vegetation in cities seem to remain stable or decline in abundance in areas with weed control, which we suspect is the result of a simplification of the understorey. The literature reports mixed benefits of weed control between taxa and between locations. We recommend, in our case study site, that weed control be implemented in concert with replanting of native vegetation to provide the understory structure preferred by urban sensitive birds. Understanding the impacts of revegetation and weed control on different bird species is important information for practitioners to make restoration decisions about the allocation of funds for conservation action. This new knowledge can be used both for threatened species and invasive species management.

  7. Variation in Weed Seed Fate Fed to Different Holstein Cattle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Salman; Mashhadi, Hamid Rahimian; Banadaky, Mehdi Dehghan; Mesgaran, Mohsen Beheshtian

    2016-01-01

    Weed seeds may maintain their viability when passing through the digestive tract of cattle and can be therefore dispersed by animal movement or the application of manure. Whether different cattle types of the same species can cause differential weed seed fate is largely unknown to us particularly under non-grazed systems similar to Holstein-Friesian dairy farming. We investigated the effect on the seed survival of four weed species in the digestive tracts of four groups of Holstein cattle: lactating cows, feedlot male calves, dry cows and growing heifers. The weed species used were Cuscuta campestris, Polygonum aviculare, Rumex crispus and Sorghum halepense. Cattle excretion was sampled for recovery and viability of seeds at four 24 hourly intervals after seed intake. The highest seed recovery occurred two days after seed intake in all cattle groups. Averaged over weed species, dry and lactating cows had the lowest and highest seed recovery of 36.4% and 74.4% respectively. No significant differences were observed in seed recovery of the four weed species when their seeds were fed to dry cows. Based on a power model fitted to seed viability data, the estimated time to 50% viability loss after seed intake, over all cattle groups ranged from 65 h (R. crispus) to 76 h (P. aviculare). Recovered seeds from the dung of feedlot male calves showed the highest mortality among cattle groups. Significant correlation was found between seed viability and ruminal pH (r = 0.86; Pweed infestation caused by livestock should account for the variation amongst cattle groups in seed persistence. Our findings can be used as a guideline for evaluating the potential risk of the spread of weeds via the application of cattle manure.

  8. Bio-herbicide effect of salt marsh tolerant Enterobacter sp. I-3 on weed seed germination and seedling growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishan, R.; Lee, I.J.

    2017-01-01

    Weeds are major challenges in crop cultivation and cause yield loss. The bacteria based bio-herbicides are emerging against chemical herbicides. This study was aimed to explore the bio-herbicide effect of salt marsh tolerant Enterobacter sp. I-3 on various weed species. The efficacy of I-3 bacterial isolates against weed growth was compared with I-4-5 bacterial strain. The bacterial strains, I-3 and I-4-5 inhibited the seed germination of Cyperus microiria Maxim. Enterobacter sp. I-3 showed higher weed control activity than I-4-5. It was confirmed with growth reduction of C. microiria Maxim. The seed germination of Digitaria sanguinalis L. weed was accelerated during the interaction of I-4-5 and it was drastically declined by I-3 bacterial culture. However, Alopecurus aequalis Sobol. seeds treated with either I-3 or I-4-5 bacterial culture showed no significant germination inhibition. The results of this study suggested that salt marsh tolerant Enterobacter sp. I-3 can be applied as bacterial herbicides to control weeds in agricultural fields. (author)

  9. Optical Sensing of Weed Infestations at Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Barroso

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kochia (Kochia scoparia L., Russian thistle (Salsola tragus L., and prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola L. are economically important weeds infesting dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum L. production systems in the western United States. Those weeds produce most of their seeds post-harvest. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of an optical sensor, installed for on-the-go measurement of grain protein concentration, to detect the presence of green plant matter in flowing grain and assess the potential usefulness of this information for mapping weeds at harvest. Spectra of the grain stream were recorded continuously at a rate of 0.33 Hz during harvest of two spring wheat fields of 1.9 and 5.4 ha. All readings were georeferenced using a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver with 1 m positional accuracy. Chlorophyll of green plant matter was detectable in the red (638–710 nm waveband. Maps of the chlorophyll signal from both fields showed an overall agreement of 78.1% with reference maps, one constructed prior to harvest and the other at harvest time, both based on visual evaluations of the three green weed species conducted by experts. Information on weed distributions at harvest may be useful for controlling post-harvest using variable rate technology for herbicide applications.

  10. Influence of plasma radiation on weed plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, A.R.; Gordeev, Yu.A.; Poddubnaya, O.V.

    2009-01-01

    Results of the long-term experimental researches realized in the Republic of Belarus of the influence of the preplanting radiation of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum) seeds by helium plasma on quantity of weed plants before crop harvesting were presented. Application of the presowing irradiation of wheat seeds by plasma radiations caused the severe reduction of weed quantity and their weight decrease. Quantity of weeds (biting knotweed (Polygonum hydropiper), winterweed (Stellaria media), frost-blite (Chenopodium album), field sow thistle (Sonchus arvensis), blind-worm (Capsella bursa pastoris), corn mayweed (Matricaria inodora), meadow pine (Equisetum arvense), field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) as well as total weed quantity and weight in plantings of spring wheat in the conditions of different backgrounds (biological (without chemical fertilizers (manure 30 t/ha); intensive (maximum fertilizer application – N90P90K90); moderate (N45P45K45); minimal (N30P30K30); control (no fertilizers)) were analysed. Schemes of arrangement devices for realization of plasma spectrum analysis were presented. Taking into consideration a long-term supervision of plasma influence on agricultural crops it was possible to make a conclusion about the possibility of application of new highly effective, economically and ecologically effective method which could be used both for the increasing of agricultural crops yields and for weed control

  11. Optical Sensing of Weed Infestations at Harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Judit; McCallum, John; Long, Dan

    2017-10-19

    Kochia ( Kochia scoparia L.), Russian thistle ( Salsola tragus L.), and prickly lettuce ( Lactuca serriola L.) are economically important weeds infesting dryland wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) production systems in the western United States. Those weeds produce most of their seeds post-harvest. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of an optical sensor, installed for on-the-go measurement of grain protein concentration, to detect the presence of green plant matter in flowing grain and assess the potential usefulness of this information for mapping weeds at harvest. Spectra of the grain stream were recorded continuously at a rate of 0.33 Hz during harvest of two spring wheat fields of 1.9 and 5.4 ha. All readings were georeferenced using a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver with 1 m positional accuracy. Chlorophyll of green plant matter was detectable in the red (638-710 nm) waveband. Maps of the chlorophyll signal from both fields showed an overall agreement of 78.1% with reference maps, one constructed prior to harvest and the other at harvest time, both based on visual evaluations of the three green weed species conducted by experts. Information on weed distributions at harvest may be useful for controlling post-harvest using variable rate technology for herbicide applications.

  12. Participatory development of weed management technologies in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissoh, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: permanent land use, weeds, indigenous knowledge, integrated crop and soil management, participatory learning, co-researchWeeds constitute a major constraint to agricultural production in the Republic of Benin. Agricultural intensification and the evolution towards permanent cropping

  13. Sequential applications of pelargonic acid for weed control in squash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control can be a constant challenge, especially when dealing with the limited herbicide options available to organic vegetable producers. Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide weed control throughout the production season. Although...

  14. LESS KNOWN USES OF WEEDS AS MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the author presents medicinal or otherwise useful weed species with details of family, vernacular name and its medicinal utility. Information on other general economic importance of medicinal weeds is also described here.

  15. Strip Tillage and Early-Season Broadleaf Weed Control in Seeded Onion (Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gegner-Kazmierczak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted in 2007 and 2008 near Oakes, North Dakota (ND, USA, to evaluate if strip tillage could be incorporated into a production system of seeded onion (Allium cepa to eliminate the standard use of a barley (Hordeum vulgare companion crop with conventional, full width tillage, yet support common early-season weed control programs. A split-factor design was used with tillage (conventional and strip tillage as the main plot and herbicide treatments (bromoxynil, DCPA, oxyfluorfen, and pendimethalin as sub-plots. Neither tillage nor herbicide treatments affected onion stand counts. Common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album densities were lower in strip tillage compared to conventional tillage up to three weeks after the post-emergence applied herbicides. In general, micro-rate post-emergence herbicide treatments provided greater early-season broadleaf weed control than pre-emergence herbicide treatments. Onion yield and grade did not differ among herbicide treatments because the mid-season herbicide application provided sufficient control/suppression of the early-season weed escapes that these initial weed escapes did not impact onion yield or bulb diameter. In 2007, onion in the strip tillage treatment were larger in diameter resulting in greater total and marketable yields compared to conventional tillage. Marketable onion yield was 82.1 Mg ha−1 in strip tillage and 64.9 Mg ha−1 in conventional tillage. Results indicate that strip tillage use in direct-seeded onion production was beneficial, especially when growing conditions were conducive to higher yields and that the use of strip tillage in onion may provide an alternative to using a companion crop as it did not interfere with either early-season weed management system.

  16. Germination ecology of Rhynchosia capitata: an emerging summer weed in Asia Ecologia da germinação de Rhynchosia capitata: planta daninha emergente durante o verão na Ásia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhynchosia capitata is becoming an increasing problem in summer crops, such as cotton, soybean, pearl millet and mungbean in many Asian countries. Laboratory and greenhouse studies have been conducted to determine the effects of several environmental factors on seed germination patterns and seedling emergence of R. capitata. We investigated whether the diverse ecological factors such as temperature, light, salinity, moisture stress, pH, and soil depth affected germination and seedling emergence of R. capitata. Germination increased as temperature increased from 25ºC and significantly reduced at 45ºC. Presence or absence of light did not influence germination. Germination of R. capitata was sensitive to increased salt and moisture stress, as well as to seed burial depth. Only 48% of seeds germinated at 150 mM salt concentration compared to 100% in control (distilled water. Similarly, 15% of seeds germinated at an osmotic potential of ‑0.8 MPa compared to 88% at ‑0.2 MPa. The optimum pH for seed germination of R. capitata was 7 (98% germination, but the seeds also germinated at lower level of pH 5 (85% and at higher level of pH 10 (75%. In seed burial trial, maximum seedling emergence of 93% occurred at 2 cm depth, and seedling did not emerge from a depth of 12 cm. The high germination ability of R. capitata under a wide range of ecological factors suggests that this species is likely to be the one to cause more problems in a near future, if not managed appropriately.A Rhynchosia capitata vem se tornando um problema crescente para culturas de verão como algodão, soja, milheto e feijão-mungo em muitos países asiáticos. Foram feitos estudos de laboratório e estufa para determinar os efeitos de vários fatores ambientais sobre os padrões de germinação das sementes e emergência das plântulas de R. capitata. Diversos fatores ecológicos, tais como, temperatura, luz, salinidade, estresse hídrico, pH e profundidade do solo foram

  17. An Ultrasonic System for Weed Detection in Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Site-specific weed management requires sensing of the actual weed infestation levels in agricultural fields to adapt the management accordingly. However, sophisticated sensor systems are not yet in wider practical use, since they are not easily available for the farmers and their handling as well as the management practice requires additional efforts. A new sensor-based weed detection method is presented in this paper and its applicability to cereal crops is evaluated. An ultrasonic distance sensor for the determination of plant heights was used for weed detection. It was hypothesised that the weed infested zones have a higher amount of biomass than non-infested areas and that this can be determined by plant height measurements. Ultrasonic distance measurements were taken in a winter wheat field infested by grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds. A total of 80 and 40 circular-shaped samples of different weed densities and compositions were assessed at two different dates. The sensor was pointed directly to the ground for height determination. In the following, weeds were counted and then removed from the sample locations. Grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds were separately removed. Differences between weed infested and weed-free measurements were determined. Dry-matter of weeds and crop was assessed and evaluated together with the sensor measurements. RGB images were taken prior and after weed removal to determine the coverage percentages of weeds and crop per sampling point. Image processing steps included EGI (excess green index computation and thresholding to separate plants and background. The relationship between ultrasonic readings and the corresponding coverage of the crop and weeds were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed a height difference between infested and non-infested sample locations. Density and biomass of weeds present in the sample influenced the ultrasonic readings. The possibilities of weed group

  18. An ultrasonic system for weed detection in cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Weis, Martin; Gerhards, Roland

    2012-12-13

    Site-specific weed management requires sensing of the actual weed infestation levels in agricultural fields to adapt the management accordingly. However, sophisticated sensor systems are not yet in wider practical use, since they are not easily available for the farmers and their handling as well as the management practice requires additional efforts. A new sensor-based weed detection method is presented in this paper and its applicability to cereal crops is evaluated. An ultrasonic distance sensor for the determination of plant heights was used for weed detection. It was hypothesised that the weed infested zones have a higher amount of biomass than non-infested areas and that this can be determined by plant height measurements. Ultrasonic distance measurements were taken in a winter wheat field infested by grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds. A total of 80 and 40 circular-shaped samples of different weed densities and compositions were assessed at two different dates. The sensor was pointed directly to the ground for height determination. In the following, weeds were counted and then removed from the sample locations. Grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds were separately removed. Differences between weed infested and weed-free measurements were determined. Dry-matter of weeds and crop was assessed and evaluated together with the sensor measurements. RGB images were taken prior and after weed removal to determine the coverage percentages of weeds and crop per sampling point. Image processing steps included EGI (excess green index) computation and thresholding to separate plants and background. The relationship between ultrasonic readings and the corresponding coverage of the crop and weeds were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed a height difference between infested and non-infested sample locations. Density and biomass of weeds present in the sample influenced the ultrasonic readings. The possibilities of weed group discrimination were

  19. Irrigation and weed control alter soil microbiology and nutrient availability in North Carolina Sandhill peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Liangju; Yuan, Yongge; Xu, Jing; Tu, Cong; Fisk, Connie; Zhang, Weijian; Chen, Xin; Ritchie, David; Hu, Shuijin

    2018-02-15

    Orchard management practices such as weed control and irrigation are primarily aimed at maximizing fruit yields and economic profits. However, the impact of these practices on soil fertility and soil microbiology is often overlooked. We conducted a two-factor experimental manipulation of weed control by herbicide and trickle irrigation in a nutrient-poor peach (Prunus persica L. cv. Contender) orchard near Jackson Springs, North Carolina. After three and eight years of treatments, an array of soil fertility parameters were examined, including soil pH, soil N, P and cation nutrients, microbial biomass and respiration, N mineralization, and presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Three general trends emerged: 1) irrigation significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity, 2) infection rate of mycorrhizal fungi within roots were significantly higher under irrigation than non-irrigation treatments, but no significant difference in the AMF community composition was detected among treatments, 3) weed control through herbicides reduced soil organic matter, microbial biomass and activity, and mineral nutrients, but had no significant impacts on root mycorrhizal infection and AMF communities. Weed-control treatments directly decreased availability of soil nutrients in year 8, especially soil extractable inorganic N. Weed control also appears to have altered the soil nutrients via changes in soil microbes and altered net N mineralization via changes in soil microbial biomass and activity. These results indicate that long-term weed control using herbicides reduces soil fertility through reducing organic C inputs, nutrient retention and soil microbes. Together, these findings highlight the need for alternative practices such as winter legume cover cropping that maintain and/or enhance organic inputs to sustain the soil fertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  1. 7 CFR 201.16 - Noxious-weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious-weed seeds. 201.16 Section 201.16 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.16 Noxious-weed seeds. (a) Except for those kinds of noxious-weed seeds shown in paragraph (b) of this section, the names of the kinds of noxious-weed seeds and the...

  2. Guidelines for management of noxious weeds at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.C.; Malady, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management Services is responsible for management and control of noxious weeds on the Hanford Site. Weed species and populations are prioritized and objective defined, according to potential site and regional impact. Population controls are implemented according to priority. An integrated approach is planned for noxious weed control in which several management options are considered and implemented separately or in coordination to best meet management objectives. Noxious weeds are inventories and monitored to provide information for planning and program review

  3. Fault diagnosis of nuclear power plant based on invasive weed optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Mengqiang; Yuan Can

    2015-01-01

    It is not completely accordant for fault reasons to match up corresponding symptoms of the marine nuclear power plant. A kind of fault diagnosis method was proposed, which is about invasive weed optimization algorithm combined with probability causal model. The probability causal model likelihood function was used as fitness function of the invasive weed optimization algorithm, after that the fault diagnosis of complex systems can be converted to optimization problem. The simulation results show that the method can not only be used for the process of diagnosis of uncertainty, but also for the purpose of multiple symptoms to multiple faults diagnose with high reliability and practicability. (authors)

  4. Analysis of the Emergence in Swarm Model Based on Largest Lyapunov Exponent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent behaviors of collective intelligence systems, exemplified by swarm model, have attracted broad interests in recent years. However, current research mostly stops at observational interpretations and qualitative descriptions of emergent phenomena and is essentially short of quantitative analysis and evaluation. In this paper, we conduct a quantitative study on the emergence of swarm model by using chaos analysis of complex dynamic systems. This helps to achieve a more exact understanding of emergent phenomena. In particular, we evaluate the emergent behaviors of swarm model quantitatively by using the chaos and stability analysis of swarm model based on largest Lyapunov exponent. It is concluded that swarm model is at the edge of chaos when emergence occurs, and whether chaotic or stable at the beginning, swarm model will converge to stability with the elapse of time along with interactions among agents.

  5. Checklist for the crop weeds of Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Egea, Juana; Mereles, Fátima; Peña-Chocarro, María Del Carmen; Céspedes, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Paraguay, a country whose economy is based mainly on agriculture and livestock for export, has experienced a major expansion in mechanized crops during the last few decades. Despite being heavily dependent on agriculture, Paraguay has very limited research on crop weeds, in spite of these having a high economic impact on production. This work aims to update and enhance the knowledgebase on the most common weeds affecting productive fields throughout the different ecoregions of Paraguay. We present here the first checklist of crop weeds for the country, which includes a total of 256 taxa (189 species, 10 subspecies, 54 varieties and 3 forms), with the most species-rich families being Poaceae and Asteraceae followed by Malvaceae, Amaranthaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. The list includes three new records for the country. Synonyms, distribution details within Paraguay, habit and a voucher specimen are provided for each taxon.

  6. PRODUCTION OF BIOG S FROM COW DUNG, WEEDS ND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-05-26

    May 26, 2017 ... Abstract. Biogas production was carried out using cow dung, weeds, orange peelings and corn cob. Four different set of experiments were set up to demonstrate the production of biogas by the anaerobic fermentation of weeds and domestic waste; to determine the ratios of cow dung to weeds, orange ...

  7. Image-based thresholds for weeds in maize fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Christensen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    in some parts of the field and if late germinating weeds do not affect yield, it may not be necessary the spray such places from an economic point of view. Consequently, it makes sense to develop weed control thresholds for patch spraying, based on weed cover early in the growing season. In Danish maize...

  8. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  9. Effect of fertilizer in controlling weeds under intercropping of pearl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... chemical fertilizers consumption, dry matter of weeds decreased. The least dry matter of weeds was obtained from the lack of fertilizer treatment (Table 5). These result showed that in the chemical fertilizer treatments, weeds as compared with crops produced the higher dry matter by absorbing nutrients ...

  10. Assessment of the impact of some common weed management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 5X5 Latin Square experiment was conducted in a farmer's field in the Ga East Municipality of the Greater Accra Region to evaluate the efficacies of different weed management systems and their effect on pineapple production. The different weed management systems evaluated were T1 - weedy check, T2- manual weed ...

  11. Weed profiles and management assessment for increased finger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, there is need to develop weed management strategies that are profitable. Research was conducted on-farm in three districts of eastern Uganda, to evaluate the agronomic and economic efficiency of one or two weedings, with row seeding as compared to broadcast sowing. Weedings were at two or four weeks after ...

  12. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them

  13. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  14. Continuing Weed Control Benefits Young Planted Black Walnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Krajicek; Robert D. Williams

    1971-01-01

    Cultivation, atrazine, and simazine were used for weed control 1, 2, and 3 years following planting of black walnut in Iowa and Indiana. In Iowa, 2 or more years of weed control resulted in the best seedling growth, but in Indiana 3 years proved best. Method of weed control had no significant effect on seedling growth in Iowa, but chemical control resulted in better...

  15. Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: organic farming, ecologically-based weed management, cover crops, green manure, allelopathy, Secale cereale, Brassica napus, Medicago sativa Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization. In organic farming systems, weed control is recognized as one of the

  16. Weed seed germination in winter cereals under contrasting tillage systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Grass weeds and Gallium aparine are major weed problems in North European arable cropping systems with high proportions of winter crops, especially winter wheat (Clarke et al., 2000; Melander et al., 2008). Problems are accentuated where inverting tillage is omitted, as weed seeds tend to accumul...

  17. 220 213 Effects of Weeds on the Profitabili

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-02

    Dec 2, 2008 ... Therefore, there is a need to reduce the cost of weeding through government support services so that the profit of farmers can be increased. This will make farmers enjoy the fruit of their labour better. Keywords: Weeds, Profitability, Millet, Groundnut, Mixed Cropping,. INTRODUCTION. A weed is a plant that ...

  18. Herbicide-resistant weeds: Management strategies and upcoming technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides have contributed to substantial increase in crop yields over the past seven decades. Over reliance on herbicides for weed control has led to rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Increased awareness of herbicide resistance and adoption of diversified weed control tactics by f...

  19. Focus on ecological weed management : what is hindering adoption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, L.; Paolini, R.; Baumann, D.T.

    2008-01-01

    Despite increased concerns regarding the heavy reliance of many cropping systems on chemical weed control, adoption of ecological weed management practices is only steadily progressing. For this reason, this paper reflects on both the possibilities and limitations of cultural weed control practices.

  20. Effect of the Critical Period of Weed Interference on Optimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field study was carried out at the National Root Crop Research Institute experimental farm to determine the critical period of weed interference and magnitude of yield loss caused by weed on turmeric in 2008 and 2009 cropping season. Turmeric was subjected to 13 weeding regimes using randomized complete block ...

  1. Conservation implications of weed management of lake reservoirs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of weeds around lake reservoirs is often implemented to reduce any possibility of siltation. However, machineries used in weed management have resulted in habitat degradation and geometrical multiplication of weeds by chopping rhizomes and scattering seeds. In general, the removal offers some feedbacks ...

  2. Evaluation of UAV imagery for mapping Silybum marianum weed patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive weed, milk thistle (Silybum marianum), has the tendency to grow in patches. In order to perform site-specific weed management, determining the spatial distribution of weeds is important for its eradication. Remote sensing has been used to perform species discrimination, and it offers pr...

  3. 7 CFR 361.6 - Noxious weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious weed seeds. 361.6 Section 361.6 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IMPORTATION OF SEED AND SCREENINGS UNDER THE FEDERAL SEED ACT § 361.6 Noxious weed... considered noxious weed seeds. (1) Seeds with no tolerances applicable to their introduction: Aeginetia spp...

  4. A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2009-01-01

    Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation. Many managers now...

  5. 7 CFR 201.52 - Noxious-weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious-weed seeds. 201.52 Section 201.52 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Purity Analysis in the Administration of the Act § 201.52 Noxious-weed seeds. (a) The determination of the number of seeds, bulblets, or tubers of individual noxious weeds present per unit weight...

  6. GWN-3189 B – A new selective herbicide based on Triallate for control of herbicide resistant grass weed in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlschlegel, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With substantial work on the formulation, Gowan offers a new herbicide (GWN-3189 B based on Triallate for use on winter wheat, winter barley, winter rye, winter triticale and spring barley. GWN-3189B will be applied from pre-emergence to early post-emergence of the crop and offers a broad spectrum against grass-weeds. GWN-3189 B is selective on all cereal species. As soil herbicide GWN-3189 B offers interesting alternatives in grass-weed resistance management. The efficacy on grass weed, especially on Alopecurus myosuroides (blackgrass, Apera spica venti (silky bentgrass and Lolium multiflorum (italian ryegrass is demonstrated with results of field trials performed in France, Great Britain and Germany.

  7. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twyla L. Salm

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of qualitative interviews. The field advisors primary concern was the level of professional competency achieved by practicum students. Related to competency were themes concerned with the field advisor's role in being accountable and protecting the reputation of his/her profession as well as the reputation of the professional program affiliated with the practicum student's professional education. The final theme – teacher-student relationship –emerged from the data, both as a stand-alone and global or umbrella theme. As an umbrella theme, teacher-student relationship permeated each of the other themes as the participants interpreted their experiences of the process of assessment through the mentor relationships. A theoretical model was derived from these findings and the description of the model is presented. Cet article décrit une étude de cas qualitative qui explore comment vingt-trois conseillers de stages, représentant trois professions de services sociaux comprenant l’éducation, les soins infirmiers et le travail social, ont vécu l’expérience du processus d’évaluation avec des étudiants qui ont des difficultés à acquérir les compétences minimales durant les stages. Cinq thèmes ont été identifiés lors de l’analyse des entrevues qualitatives. La préoccupation principale des conseillers de stages était le niveau de compétence professionnelle acquis par les stagiaires. Les thèmes liés à la compétence étaient le rôle des conseillers de stages dans leur responsabilité pour protéger la réputation de leur profession ainsi que la réputation d’un programme professionnel

  8. Mechanical weed control in organic winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Euro Pannacci; Francesco Tei; Marcello Guiducci

    2017-01-01

    Three field experiments were carried out in organic winter wheat in three consecutive years (exp. 1, 2005-06; exp. 2, 2006- 07; exp. 3, 2007-08) in central Italy (42°57’ N - 12°22’ E, 165 m a.s.l.) in order to evaluate the efficacy against weeds and the effects on winter wheat of two main mechanical weed control strategies: i) spring tine harrowing used at three different application times (1 passage at T1, 2 passages at the time T1, 1 passage at T1 followed by 1 passage at T1 + 14 days) in t...

  9. A bibliometric model for identifying emerging research topics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    Detecting emerging research topics is essential, not only for research agencies but also for individual researchers. Previous studies have created various bibliographic indicators for the identification of emerging research topics. However, as indicated by Rotolo et al. (Research Policy 44, 1827......, evaluation tests are conducted by demonstration of the proposed approach and comparison with previous studies. The strength of the present methodology lies in the fact that it is fully transparent, straightforward, and flexible.......–1843, 2015), the most serious problems are the lack of an acknowledged definition of emergence and incomplete elaboration of the linkages between the definitions that are used and the indicators that are created. With these issues in mind, this study first adjusts the definition of an emerging technology...

  10. Example of emergency response model evaluation of studies using the Mathew/Adpic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes model evaluation studies conducted for the MATHEW/ADPIC transport and diffusion models during the past ten years. These models support the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, an emergency response service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material. Field studies involving tracer releases used in these studies cover a broad range of meteorology, terrain and tracer release heights, the three most important aspects of estimating air concentration values resulting from airborne releases of toxic material. Results of these studies show that these models can estimate air concentration values within a factor of 2 20% to 50% of the time and a factor of 5 40% to 80% of the time. As the meterology and terrain become more complex and the release height of the tracer is increased, the accuracy of the model calculations degrades. This band of uncertainty appears to correctly represent the capability of these models at this time. A method for estimating angular uncertainty in the model calculations is described and used to suggest alternative methods for evaluating emergency response models

  11. Population dynamics of weeds in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) circle weeding area affected by herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, S.; Purba, E.; Yakub, E. N.

    2018-02-01

    Weed problems in oil palm field were mainly overcomed by herbicide application. The application certain herbicides may lead to rapid population dynamic of certain species due to their different response to herbicides. Some species may less susceptible to certain herbicide whereas other species more susceptible. The objective of this study was to determine the population dynamic of weed species in circle weeding of oil palm in Serdang Bedagai, North Sumatra. Six treatments using glyphosate singly and mixture compared with manual weeding were evaluated for weed control. The treatments were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Each treatment consisted of four circle weedings. The results showed that glyphosate 720 g a.i/ha + indaziflam 50 g a.i/hareduced seedbank and regrowth of weeds. Up to 12 weeks after application glyphosate 720 g a.i/ha + indaziflam 50 g a.i/ha is 29.46% total weeds dry weight compared to manual weeding. The effect of herbicide application on changes on the weed composition and weed seedbank are affected by the characteristic of herbicides and weed response to herbicide application.

  12. Cutting weeds with a CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    Stems of Chenopodium album. and Sinapis arvensis. and leaves of Lolium perenne. were cut with a CO2 laser or with a pair of scissors. Treatments were carried out on greenhouse-grown pot plants at three different growth stages and at two heights. Plant dry matter was measured 2 to 5 weeks after...... treatment. The relationship between dry weight and laser energy was analysed using a non-linear dose-response regression model. The regression parameters differed significantly between the weed species. At all growth stages and heights S. arvensis was more difficult to cut with a CO2 laser than C. album...

  13. Virus infection of a weed increases vector attraction to and vector fitness on the weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Pan, Huipeng; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Fang, Yong; Shi, Xiaobin; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Weeds are important in the ecology of field crops, and when crops are harvested, weeds often become the main hosts for plant viruses and their insect vectors. Few studies, however, have examined the relationships between plant viruses, vectors, and weeds. Here, we investigated how infection of the weed Datura stramonium L. by tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) affects the host preference and performance of the TYLCV vector, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Q. The results of a choice experiment indicated that B. tabaci Q preferentially settled and oviposited on TYLCV-infected plants rather than on healthy plants. In addition, B. tabaci Q performed better on TYLCV-infected plants than on healthy plants. These results demonstrate that TYLCV is indirectly mutualistic to B. tabaci Q. The mutually beneficial interaction between TYLCV and B. tabaci Q may help explain the concurrent outbreaks of TYLCV and B. tabaci Q in China. PMID:23872717

  14. Dynamics of the weed infestation with Senecio vulgaris after a single entry from seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söchting, Hans-Peter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to a short generation time associated with a high seed production and a quick germination, which is possible throughout the year, Senecio vulgaris is especially in horticultural crops one of the most important weed species. Like all ragwort species, also Senecio vulgaris contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids which are converted in the liver to harmful substances. For this reason an accidental consumption of this species should be avoided completely. Belonging to the Compositae, chemical control of this weed species in vegetable crops, particularly in lettuce, is difficult. Based on a field-grown model experiment the emergence behavior and growth of Senecio vulgaris in leafy lettuce was studied. The first step was the contamination of the trial plots with Senecio seeds. For this purpose Senecio plants were planted at three different densities (1, 2 and 10 plants m2 in the designated plots. All plots were covered with fleece in order to prevent an unregulated dispersal of seeds. After seed maturity the fleece was removed, plants were cut into small pieces and the plant material including the seeds was incorporated into the soil. Then different leafy lettuces crops (rocket, asia green, spinach, lamb´s lettuce were cultivated in a six-crop sequence over two years (three crop sopecies per year. The development of Senecio vulgaris and the resulting possible contamination of the lettuces with Senecio leaves was recorded. From the date of removing the fleece on seed-production a shedding of Senecio plants was prevented to avoid further contamination. Also the entry from outside the plots was excluded. Depending on the initial plant density, the 71, 55 and 216 Senecio plants m2 which emerged after the first sowing of lettuce dropped to 7, 9 and 16 plants m2 after the sixth sowing. Thus, the density of S. vulgaris plants rapidly decreased but there was still a significant potential of emerging seedlings potentially contaminating the lettuce crops after

  15. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS BY MEANS OF PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ravlić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is the use of live beneficial organisms and products of their metabolism in the pests control. Plant pathogens can be used for weed control in three different ways: as classical, conservation and augmentative (inoculative and inundated biological control. Inundated biological control involves the use of bioherbicides (mycoherbicides or artificial breeding of pathogens and application in specific stages of crops and weeds. Biological control of weeds can be used where chemical herbicides are not allowed, if resistant weed species are present or in the integrated pest management against weeds with reduced herbicides doses and other non-chemical measures, but it has certain limitations and disadvantages.

  16. Weed Mapping with Co-Kriging Using Soil Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, Torben; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Andreasen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Our aim is to build reliable weed maps to control weeds in patches. Weed sampling is time consuming but there are some shortcuts. If an intensively sampled variable (e.g. soil property) can be used to improve estimation of a sparsely sampled variable (e.g. weed distribution), one can reduce weed...... sampling. The geostatistical estimation method co-kriging uses two or more sampled variables, which are correlated, to improve the estimation of one of the variables at locations where it was not sampled. We did an experiment on a 2.1 ha winter wheat field to compare co-kriging using soil properties...

  17. Weeds of onion fields and effects of some herbicides on weeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-18

    Oct 18, 2010 ... Weed-free plots gave the highest yield (16.2a kg/m2) and were followed by oxadiazon. (11.9b kg/m2), oxyfluorfen .... onion plots of 2 x 3 m2 were separated by one meter buffer area. The onion seeds of “Aki” .... During experiments, weed numbers were counted as one m2 permanent quadrates per plot.

  18. Risk Assessment and Examination of Economic Aspects of Precision Weed Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Takács

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate plant production sustainability, the economical requirements, risks, and identify threshold levels to switching on, or off precision weed management techniques in Hungarian growing and sales conditions; taking into consideration that the implementation of precision technology can be justified also by its role in the reduction of environmental load, which would create a harmony between individual usefulness and social utility. A simulation model has been developed to investigate the return of extra investments, along with the risk of this return in relation to the soil type, weed coverage, and the sales price.

  19. Weed infestation of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. depending on the cover crop and weed control method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Gawęda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this 3-year field study was to evaluate the effect of some stubble crops and weed control methods on the species composition, number and air-dry weight of weeds in a spring barley crop grown in short-term monoculture. The study was conducted in the period 2009–2011 at the Uhrusk Experimental Farm, on mixed rendzina soil classified as very good rye soil complex. It included stubble crops which were ploughed under in each year (control treatment without cover crop, white mustard, lacy phacelia, a mixture of legumes – narrow-leaf lupin + field pea and 3 weed control methods used in spring barley crops (mechanical, mechanical and chemical, chemical weed control. Veronica persica was the weed species that occurred in greatest numbers in the spring barley crop sown after stubble crops. All cover crops reduced the numbers of Avena fatua which was the dominant species in the control treatment. Chemical as well as chemical and mechanical weed control significantly reduced the numbers of Avena fatua compared to the treatment where only double harrowing was used for weed control. The stubble crops did not reduce weed infestation of spring barley. Compared to the control treatment, the ploughing-in of white mustard and the mixture of legumes reduced the dry weight of weeds by 49.1 and 22.7%, respectively. Mechanical weed management proved to be less effective in reducing the number and dry weight of weeds compared to the other weed control methods. A significant negative correlation was found between the dry weight of weeds in the spring barley crop and the dry weight of the ploughed-in white mustard cover crop under the conditions of chemical weed control as well as in the case of the mixture of legumes when complete mechanical and chemical weed control was used.

  20. Organellar phylogenomics of an emerging model system: Sphagnum (peatmoss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Shaw, A; Devos, Nicolas; Liu, Yang; Cox, Cymon J; Goffinet, Bernard; Flatberg, Kjell Ivar; Shaw, Blanka

    2016-08-01

    Sphagnum-dominated peatlands contain approx. 30 % of the terrestrial carbon pool in the form of partially decomposed plant material (peat), and, as a consequence, Sphagnum is currently a focus of studies on biogeochemistry and control of global climate. Sphagnum species differ in ecologically important traits that scale up to impact ecosystem function, and sequencing of the genome from selected Sphagnum species is currently underway. As an emerging model system, these resources for Sphagnum will facilitate linking nucleotide variation to plant functional traits, and through those traits to ecosystem processes. A solid phylogenetic framework for Sphagnum is crucial to comparative analyses of species-specific traits, but relationships among major clades within Sphagnum have been recalcitrant to resolution because the genus underwent a rapid radiation. Herein a well-supported hypothesis for phylogenetic relationships among major clades within Sphagnum based on organellar genome sequences (plastid, mitochondrial) is provided. We obtained nucleotide sequences (273 753 nucleotides in total) from the two organellar genomes from 38 species (including three outgroups). Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using a variety of methods applied to nucleotide and amino acid sequences. The Sphagnum phylogeny was rooted with sequences from the related Sphagnopsida genera, Eosphagnum and Flatbergium Phylogenetic analyses of the data converge on the following subgeneric relationships: (Rigida (((Subsecunda) (Cuspidata)) ((Sphagnum) (Acutifolia))). All relationships were strongly supported. Species in the two major clades (i.e. Subsecunda + Cuspidata and Sphagnum + Acutifolia), which include >90 % of all Sphagnum species, differ in ecological niches and these differences correlate with other functional traits that impact biogeochemical cycling. Mitochondrial intron presence/absence are variable among species and genera of the Sphagnopsida. Two new nomenclatural combinations are made

  1. Weed hosts of cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennila, S; Prasad, Y G; Prabhakar, M; Agarwal, Meenu; Sreedevi, G; Bambawale, O M

    2013-03-01

    The exotic cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) invaded India during 2006, and caused widespread infestation across all nine cotton growing states. P. solenopsis also infested weeds that aided its faster spread and increased severity across cotton fields. Two year survey carried out to document host plants of P. solenopsis between 2008 and 2010 revealed 27, 83, 59 and 108 weeds belonging to 8, 18, 10 and 32 families serving as alternate hosts at North, Central, South and All India cotton growing zones, respectively. Plant species of four families viz., Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Malvaceae and Lamiaceae constituted almost 50% of the weed hosts. While 39 weed species supported P. solenopsis multiplication during the cotton season, 37 were hosts during off season. Higher number of weeds as off season hosts (17) outnumbering cotton season (13) at Central over other zones indicated the strong carryover of the pest aided by weeds between two cotton seasons. Six, two and seven weed hosts had the extreme severity of Grade 4 during cotton, off and cotton + off seasons, respectively. Higher number of weed hosts of P. solenopsis were located at roadside: South (12) > Central (8) > North (3) zones. Commonality of weed hosts was higher between C+S zones, while no weed host was common between N+S zones. Paper furnishes the wide range of weed hosts of P. solenopsis, discusses their significance, and formulated general and specific cultural management strategies for nationwide implementation to prevent its outbreaks.

  2. Weeds optimally grow in peat swamp after burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Susanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available After clearing land by burning the peat, then the weeds and undergrowth will flourish. Even sometimes, the weeds are eventually burned again. Weed is known as a destroyer plant that has to be controlled. Through proper treatment, the existing weeds in peatlands can be potentiallly exploited. The purpose of this study was to determine the calorific value of briquettes as one of peatland weeds utilization. The results showed that the calorific value ranged from 2,492 cal/g to 5,230 cal/g. The lowest calorific value was on ‘teki kecil’ grass (Scirpus grossus Lf, while the highest calorific value was observed for ‘bantalaki grass’ (Hymenachne amplexicaulis Nees. The high calorific value of the peat weeds are potential for biomass briquettes raw materials. The utilization and use of peat weed briquettes as a raw materials expected can reduce land degradation due to peat swamp burning

  3. Team-up Crop Diversification and Weed Management: PRODIVA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerowitt, B.; Melander, B.; Krawczyk, R.

    2015-01-01

    The research-network PRODIVA focuses on a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European arable cropping systems. The goal is to maintain diverse arable weed vegetation that is manageable in the long-term and could fulfil other necessary systemfunctions including...... in organic agriculture. Regional fields will be surveyed for weeds to safeguard the relevance of the experimental research. Current cropping practices and their influence on weed pressure and weed diversity will be identified. The project will involve relevant stakeholders from the participating countries...... the results. Neither are crop diversification methods restricted to Organic Farming, nor can IWM (Integrated Weed Management) be successfully implemented without respecting the role of weeds in agro-ecosystems. The project “PRODIVA - Crop diversification and weeds“ is supported within the ERA-net CORE Organic...

  4. INFLUENCE OF WEED CONTROL METHODS, POULTRY MANURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Mando Kaduna, in the Northern Guinea Savannah Zone of Nigeria, to determine the Influence of weed control methods, poultry manure and ... t /ha in Latin America, and 1.7 t/ha in India. Brazil currently stands out as one of the ..... for soil management for sustainable production of maize. In support of this, (Boateng et al., ...

  5. Weed Science and Technology. MP-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Harold P.; Lee, Gary A.

    This document is one in a series distributed by the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Wyoming-Laramie. It presents the principles and methods of weed control especially as it relates to the use of herbicides. The factors influencing the effectiveness of both foliar-applied and soil-applied herbicides are discussed. A listing of…

  6. ( Arachis hypogeae ) Yield Performance under different Weeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two–year field experiment was conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Ekiti State University, Ado – Ekiti, Nigeria, during 2008 and 2009 cropping seasons to determine the effects of different weeding regimes on soil chemical properties and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogeae). The experiment was laid out ...

  7. Weed Control Trials in Cottonwood Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Krinard

    1964-01-01

    Weed control in the first year is essential for establishing a cottonwood plantation, for the young trees can neither survive nor grow well if they must compete with other plants. Once the light and moisture conditions are established in its favor, cottonwood becomes the fastest growing tree in the South.

  8. Weed Control in Black Walnut Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin F. Bey; Robert D. Williams

    1976-01-01

    Weeds must be controlled for at least 3 years to successfully establish walnut plantations. Whether by cultivating or applying chemicals, a strip or spot 4 feet wide is sufficient the first 2 years, followed by a 6-foot spot or strip for the third and fourth years.

  9. Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate is the most widely used and successful herbicide discovered to date, but its utility is now threatened by the appearance of several glyphosate-resistant weed species. Glyphosate resistance first appeared in Lolium rigidum in an apple orchard in Australia in 1996, ironically the year that ...

  10. Mycorrhizal fungi suppress aggressive Agricultural weeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaudo, V.; Barberi, P.; Giovannetti, M.; van der Heijden, M.G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Plant growth responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are highly variable, ranging from mutualism in a wide range of plants, to antagonism in some non-mycorrhizal plant species and plants characteristic of disturbed environments. Many agricultural weeds are non mycorrhizal or originate from

  11. Parthenium weed ( Parthenium hysterophorus L.) research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parthenium is an exotic invasive weed that now occurs widely in Ethiopia. Surveys to determine the presence and distribution of pathogens associated with parthenium and further evaluation of the pathogens found as potential biocontrol agents were carried out in Ethiopia since 1998. Several fungal isolates of the genus ...

  12. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  14. A Simple Model to Teach Business Cycle Macroeconomics for Emerging Market and Developing Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The canonical neoclassical model is insufficient to understand business cycle fluctuations in emerging market and developing economies. The author reformulates the model proposed by Aguiar and Gopinath (2007) in a simple setting that can be used to teach business cycle macroeconomics for emerging market and developing economies at the…

  15. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salm, Twyla L.; Johner, Randy; Luhanga, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of…

  16. Libraries in a Bind: Practical Solutions and Human Responses to a Weeding Mandate

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, Alex D.; Scherlen, Allan; Mayberry, Christina; Marks, Kathy; Caforio, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Many university libraries are currently engaged in major weeding projects as they reduce their print book collections to make room for new space configurations to accommodate emerging library trends such as makerspaces and transitioning toward a predominately e‐book collection.To address such a deselection project effectively requires both practical solutions and tact in dealing with faculty who seriously value their collections of print books. Librarians from two universities will share prac...

  17. An evaluation of herbicides for post-emergence use in short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, D.J.

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the project was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a range of herbicides and mixtures of herbicides, with both contact and residual activity, for the post-emergence control of weeds in newly planted willow short rotation coppice (SRC). This report provides growers and advisers of short rotation coppice with important (but still limited) information on how to achieve improved weed control of problem weeds increasingly prevalent in SRC fields. This may provide guidance towards often-essential emergency treatments when the crop establishment is under considerable pressure and the potential safety, or otherwise, of certain weed-specific herbicides. (author)

  18. Chemical and Mechanical Weed Control Methods and Their Effects on Photosynthetic Pigments and Grain Yield of Kidney Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S Ghatari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the integrated management of weeds in red kidney bean, a split-plot experiment using randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted in 2013 in the Damavand County. In this experiment, the mechanical control treatments consisted of two levels (no cultivation and one cultivation asseigned to main plots and controlling chemical treatments consisted of six levels (non-application of herbicides, pre-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit with full dose of 1 liter per hectare, pre-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit a dose decreased 0.5 liters per hectare, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit dose reduced to 0.3 liters per hectare + 2 thousand citogate, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit with a reduced dose of 0.5 liters per hectare + 2 thousand citogate, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit full dose of 1 liter per hectar + 2 thousand citogate to subplots. The results showed that the effects of interaction between herbicide application and cultivation for traits of carotenoids, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll contents, density of weeds and their dry weights were significant at 1 %, and grain yield at the 5% probability levels. The highest bean seed yield with an average of 5461.6 kg.ha-1 and lowest weed dry weight with an average of 345.9 kg.ha-1 were related to pre-emergence herbicide and cultivation with a dose of 1 liter per hectare treatment. The difference between full and reduced doses of chemical weed control was non-significant. It could be concluded that integrated mechanical and chemical weed control not only may increase seed yield but also reduce, environmental hazards.

  19. 75 FR 57496 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rule To Require the Use of Certified Noxious-Weed-Free Forage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... supplementary rule that would require anyone bringing or anyone feeding or storing forage or straw on BLM... plans for noxious weeds. The proposed rules are intended to complement the existing regulatory framework... feeding, maintenance feeding, and emergency feeding on lands administered by the BLM. The stipulation...

  20. 76 FR 43706 - Final Supplementary Rules To Require the Use of Certified Noxious-Weed-Free Forage and Straw on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... that will require anyone using, feeding, or storing forage or straw on BLM-administered land in Idaho... noxious weeds. These supplementary rules are intended to complement the existing regulatory framework... supplemental feeding, maintenance feeding, and emergency feeding on lands administered by the BLM. The...

  1. Activity, Density, and Weed Seed Predation Potential of Ground Beetles in Annual Row Crops of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulation of weed seed banks in agricultural systems involves management of seed input from seed rain, and seed removal from mortality and germination. While seed rain, germination, and emergence are managed using a number of methods such as tillage and herbicides, management of seed mortality is f...

  2. RNAseq reveals weed-induced PIF3-like as a candidate target to manipulate weed stress response in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, David P; Hansen, Stephanie A; Moriles-Miller, Janet P; Pierik, Ronald; Yan, Changhui; Clay, David E; Scheffler, Brian; Clay, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Weeds reduce yield in soybeans (Glycine max) through incompletely defined mechanisms. The effects of weeds on the soybean transcriptome were evaluated in field conditions during four separate growing seasons. RNASeq data were collected from six biological samples of soybeans growing with or without weeds. Weed species and the methods to maintain weed-free controls varied between years to mitigate treatment effects, and to allow detection of general soybean weed responses. Soybean plants were not visibly nutrient- or water-stressed. We identified 55 consistently downregulated genes in weedy plots. Many of the downregulated genes were heat shock genes. Fourteen genes were consistently upregulated. Several transcription factors including a PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3-like gene (PIF3) were included among the upregulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated roles for increased oxidative stress and jasmonic acid signaling responses during weed stress. The relationship of this weed-induced PIF3 gene to genes involved in shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis provide evidence that this gene may be important in the response of soybean to weeds. These results suggest that the weed-induced PIF3 gene will be a target for manipulating weed tolerance in soybean. No claim to original US government works New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Design models as emergent features: An empirical study in communication and shared mental models in instructional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucca Botturi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an empirical study that investigated the instructional design process of three teams involved in the development of an e-learning unit. The teams declared they were using the same fast-prototyping design and development model, and were composed of the same roles (although with a different number of SMEs. Results indicate that the design and development model actually informs the activities of the group, but that it is interpreted and adapted by the team for the specific project. Thus, the actual practice model of each team can be regarded as an emergent feature. This analysis delivers insights concerning issues about team communication, shared understanding, individual perspectives and the implementation of prescriptive instructional design models.

  4. Simulating changes in cropping practises in conventional and glyphosate-tolerant maize. I. Effects on weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbach, Nathalie; Fernier, Alice; Le Corre, Valérie; Messéan, Antoine; Darmency, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops such as those tolerant to glyphosate simplify weed management and make it more efficient, at least at short-term. Overreliance on the same herbicide though leads to the spread of resistant weeds. Here, the objective was to evaluate, with simulations, the impact on the advent of glyphosate resistance in weeds of modifications in agricultural practises resulting from introducing HT maize into cropping systems. First, we included a single-gene herbicide resistance submodel in the existing multispecific FLORSYS model. Then, we (1) simulated current conventional and probable HT cropping systems in two European regions, Aquitaine and Catalonia, (2) compared these systems in terms of glyphosate resistance, (3) identified pertinent cultural practises influencing glyphosate resistance, and (4) investigated correlations between cultural practises and species traits, using RLQ analyses. The simulation study showed that, during the analysed 28 years, (1) glyphosate spraying only results in glyphosate resistance in weeds when combined with other cultural factors favouring weed infestation, particularly no till; (2) pre-sowing glyphosate applications select more for herbicide resistance than post-sowing applications on HT crops; and (3) glyphosate spraying selects more for species traits avoiding exposure to the herbicide (e.g. delayed early growth, small leaf area) or compensating for fitness costs (e.g. high harvest index) than for actual resistance to glyphosate, (4) actual resistance is most frequent in species that do not avoid glyphosate, either via plant size or timing, and/or in less competitive species, (5) in case of efficient weed control measures, actual resistance proliferates best in outcrossing species. An advice table was built, with the quantitative, synthetic ranking of the crop management effects in terms of glyphosate-resistance management, identifying the optimal choices for each management technique.

  5. Climate change impact research on arable weeds – data, methods and applications at various scale levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitsameter, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, a large number of studies have examined various aspects of possible consequences of climate change for the biology and damage potential of arable weeds. However, there are merely a few examples that have comprehensively investigated individual weed species or arable crop systems within a clearly delimited geographical area. In the frame of the research co-operation KLIFF (Climate change impact and adaptation research for Lower Saxony, we tested an approach that combines a number of methods to span several scale levels and types of environmental factors, which was intended to provide as accurate as possible an estimate of the potential distribution and performance of individual arable weed species under the predicted future climate conditions. This approach was put to practice for the species Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus retroflexus, Echinochloa crus-galli, Datura stramonium, Iva xanthiifolia and Setaria viridis. We combined projections of the potential future distribution of the individual weed species based on a correlative distribution modelling approach (regional scale level with pot experiments (local scale level on the vegetative and generative performance of these species under climatic conditions predicted for the end of the current century for Lower Saxony. A synopsis revealed that the results obtained from the different approaches corresponded to a large extent. For A. retroflexus, D. stramonium, E. crus-galli, and S. viridis, both approaches indicated a neutral or positive effect of the predicted future climate on their potential distribution and performance, whereas the opposite was found for I. xanthiifolia. Merely for A. theophrasti, results of the two methods did not fully concur. Altogether, our results highlight that investigating climate change impact on weeds by combining several methods to span several scale levels allows fitting various data sets to a comprehensive picture for a delimited region. It has

  6. Lopsided oat (Avena strigosa as a new summer annual cover crop for weed suppression in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust, Jochen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lopsided oat (Avena strigosa has been cultivated for many years, especially in Brazil, as a summer annual cover crop. Experiments were conducted in Stuttgart-Hohenheim in 2010 to estimate the capability of lopsided oat, yellow mustard (Sinapis alba, phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia and a cover crop mixture to suppress weeds and volunteer wheat. A pot experiment was conducted to analyze the emergence and growth of the different cover crop species. Twelve weeks after planting, lopsided oat produced 20.7 dt/ha of shoot- and 5.5 dt/ha of root dry matter. A field experiment was established in the summer after harvest of winter wheat. The soil was cultivated with a disc harrow and the cover crops were sown one day later. At four week intervals, the plant density and dry matter of cover crops, weeds and volunteer wheat were determined. Twelve weeks after planting, lopsided oat produced 17.8 dt/ha shoot- and 6.2 dt/ha root dry matter. In the lopsided oat plots, shoot dry matter of weeds and volunteer wheat were reduced by 98 % compared with control plots without cover crops. This was the highest weed reduction of all cover crops studied. The root dry matter of weeds and volunteer wheat was reduced by 55 % to 97 % in all cover crops, compared to the control plots. Lopsided oat reduced the plant density of weeds and volunteer wheat. While there were 54.5 plants/m² in the control plots, only 5.5 plants/m² were counted in the lopsided oat plots. The results showed that lopsided oat has a high potential for suppression of weeds and volunteer wheat in autumn. It also enlarges the number of cultivated cover crops in Central Europe.

  7. A Conceptual Framework of Business Model Emerging Resilience

    OpenAIRE

    Goumagias, Nikolaos; Fernandes, Kiran; Cabras, Ignazio; Li, Feng; Shao, Jianhua; Devlin, Sam; Hodge, Victoria; Cowling, Peter; Kudenko, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an environmentally driven conceptual framework of Business Model change. Business models acquired substantial momentum in academic literature during the past decade. Several studies focused on what exactly constitutes a Business Model (role model, recipe, architecture etc.) triggering a theoretical debate about the Business Model’s components and their corresponding dynamics and relationships. In this paper, we argue that for Business Models as cognitive structures,...

  8. Weed Biomass and Weed Species Diversity of Juvenile Citrus Trees Intercrop with some Arable Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Mojibade OLORUNMAIYE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out to evaluate the performances of eight crops in the intercrop of citrus with arable crops at the National Horticultural Research Institute (NIHORT Ibadan, Nigeria. Eight arable crops: maize, cucumber, sweet potato, Corchorus olitorius, large green, grain amaranth, Mucuna pruriens var. utilis, and groundnut were intercropped with young citrus trees in the early planting season of 2010 with sole citrus as control. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Data were collected on weed flora, weed density and weed dry weight. Results showed that the relative frequencies of weeds in all the plots were less than 4% at both 6 and 9WAP. Gomphrena celosoides, Oldenlandia corymbosa and Tridax procumbens were most preponderant in appearing in all the plots. Tridax procumbens had a consistent relative frequency (2.34% in all the plots except in citrus/maize plot (0.78% at 9 WAP. Significantly lower broadleaf weed densities were obtained in citrus/sweet potato, citrus/large green, control plot and citrus/cucumber (28.67, 45.00, 50.00 and 76.33 m-2 respectively than in citrus/groundnut plot (143.00 m-2. Similarly, significantly lower grass weed densities were produced in citrus/Mucuna and citrus/sweet potato (0.33 m-2 each plots than the control plot (11.33 m-2. Whereas citrus/corchorus plot produced significantly lower broadleaf weed dry weight (37.59 g m-2 than citrus/Mucuna plot (126.47 g m-2 at 3WAP, citrus/large green plot (16.15 g m-2 and citrus/groundnut plot (123.25 g m-2 followed the same trend at 6 WAP. Sedges dry weights were less than 7 g m-2 in all the plots compared with control plot.

  9. The economic role of the Emergency Department in the health care continuum: applying Michael Porter's five forces model to Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M

    2006-05-01

    Emergency Medicine plays a vital role in the health care continuum in the United States. Michael Porters' five forces model of industry analysis provides an insight into the economics of emergency care by showing how the forces of supplier power, buyer power, threat of substitution, barriers to entry, and internal rivalry affect Emergency Medicine. Illustrating these relationships provides a view into the complexities of the emergency care industry and offers opportunities for Emergency Departments, groups of physicians, and the individual emergency physician to maximize the relationship with other market players.

  10. The benefits of using quantile regression for analysing the effect of weeds on organic winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, M.; Makowski, D.; Jeuffroy, M.H.; Valantin-Morison, M.; David, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>In organic farming, weeds are one of the threats that limit crop yield. An early prediction of weed effect on yield loss and the size of late weed populations could help farmers and advisors to improve weed management. Numerous studies predicting the effect of weeds on yield have already been

  11. Weed infestation of onion in soil reduced cultivation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Błażej-Woźniak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment was conducted in the years 1998-2000 in GD Felin. The influence of no-tillage cultivation and conventional tillage with spring ploughing on weed infestation of onion was compared. In experiment four cover crop mulches (Sinapis alba L., Vicia sativa L., Phacelia tanacetifolia B., Avena sativa L. were applied. From annual weeds in weed infestation of onion in great number Matricaria chamomilla L., and Senecio vulgaris L. stepped out. and from perennial - Agropyron repens (L.P.B. Reduced soil cultivation system (no-tillage caused the significant growth of primary weed infestation of onion in comparison with conventional tillage. In all years of investigations the executed pre-sowing ploughing limited significantly the annual weeds' number in primary weed infestation. The applied mulches from cover plants limited in considerable degree the number of primary weed infestation. In all years of investigations the most weeds stepped out on control object. Among investigated cover crop mulches Vicia sativa L. and Avena sativa L. had a profitable effect on decrease of onion`s primary weed infestation. Soil cultivation system and cover crop mulches had no signi ficant residual influence on the secondary weed infestation of onion.

  12. Weed Identification Distribution and Mapping at Njoro and Katumani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwangi, H; Alembi, D.K

    1999-01-01

    The study was a response to the need from Katumani DFRC and Njoro (NPBC) Crop protection team request for support service in identification of weed spp. in their mandated areas. From their ongoing adaptive research they encountered ceratin weed spp. which were troublesome and they could not identify and their contact farmers had expressed concern over the weed constraint. A survey in the mentioned areas were carried out in the long/short rains 1997. In the fields, the sites were selected after every 10 km. The field selected was traversed and a quadrat measuring 1m 2 was placed randomly and weeds identified. General Position System (GPS) recorded the position. Two methods of identifying weeds thus on the spot in the field in situ and unidentified weed samples were carefully collected, labelled and preserved for identification in the laboratory of NARL herbarium. Weed distribution was determined using scale 1-4 where 1=1 plant/M 2 , 2=2-5 plants/m 2 , 3=6-20 plants/m 2 ,4=>20 plants m /2. The results show identified weeds in different categories; dominant, troublesome, indigenous and weed introduced within the ten years as percieved by farmers. Developed weed maps are presented for specific districts

  13. A non-chemical system for online weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-03-30

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%-91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide.

  14. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yao; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  15. A Model for a Level II Emergency Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-02

    uni t Kramer 6 4) Technologist on call: Radiology, Laboratory, Blood Bank. 5) Trained personnel available to take electrocardiograms on call and...and ICU /CCU on the second floor. Flight medicine which has some collateral roles with the emergency department is located in the south basement and...II I I I I 1 19 [21] ICU /CCU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 122 121 ICI.L’CCI I _I _I _I _I __I _I I I I I I IEl I I I I I I I 1 __ 12 [23

  16. Thiamethoxam as a seed treatment alters the physiological response of maize (Zea mays) seedlings to neighbouring weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Maha; Lee, Elizabeth; Lukens, Lewis; Swanton, Clarence

    2015-04-01

    Thiamethoxam is a broad-spectrum neonicotinoid insecticide that, when applied to seed, has been observed to enhance seedling vigour under environmental stress conditions. Stress created by the presence of neighbouring weeds is known to trigger the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) in maize seedling tissue. No previous work has explored the effect of thiamethoxam as a seed treatment on the physiological response of maize seedlings emerging in the presence of neighbouring weeds. Thiamethoxam was found to enhance seedling vigour and to overcome the expression of typical shade avoidance characteristics in the presence of neighbouring weeds. These results were attributed to maintenance of the total phenolics content, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and anthocyanin and lignin contents. These findings were also associated with the activation of scavenging genes, which reduced the accumulation of H2 O2 and the subsequent damage caused by lipid peroxidation in maize seedlings originating from treated seeds even when exposed to neighbouring weeds. These results suggest the possibility of exploring new chemistries and modes of action as novel seed treatments to upregulate free radical scavenging genes and to maintain the antioxidant system within plants. Such an approach may provide an opportunity to enhance crop competitiveness with weeds. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  18. Regional models - Emerging research tools for synoptic meteorologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Daniel; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    A number of regional-scale numerical weather prediction models are discussed together with their application to the study of the structure and the dynamics of mesoscale phenomena. Consideration is given to investigations of natural phenomena (such as midlatitude cyclones and related baroclinic disturbances; upper-level jet-front systems; surface frontal zones, squall lines, and rain bands; mesoscale convective systems; and severe-storm environments) in which two operational models and four research models are used for regional-model studies. It is shown that these models provide investigators with four-dimensional dynamically consistent data sets to supplement and extend those available from observations.

  19. Research on the support model of large equipment emergency spare parts under fuzzy demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianHua Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Aim at making a scheme for emergency spare parts the support problem when large equipment spare parts supply network faced with large-scale emergency events. Design/methodology/approach: In order to analyze the model, we establish the spare parts security model under network supply conditions to respond emergency in case of fuzzy demand. And in end of the paper, we adopt an improved genetic algorithms to solve the problem. Findings: Considering emergency spare parts support problem from three aspects including satisfaction of time, satisfaction of demand and emergency cost constraints, which makes decision-making process more accord with reality condition, we can get a more realistic solution for the decision makers. Originality/value: Considering the occurrence of emergency and adopting information entropy theory to order the weight of emergency maintenance station in priority sequence, this paper presented emergency response time and demand satisfaction function, which uses the time, demand satisfaction and the cost restrictor as main objective, we have constructed the spare parts support model under fuzzy demand to solve emergency events, having expanded the scope of solution.

  20. Modeling Polymorphemic Word Recognition: Exploring Differences Among Children With Early-Emerging and Late-Emerging Word Reading Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Devin M; Steacy, Laura M; Compton, Donald L; Gilbert, Jennifer K; Goodwin, Amanda P; Cho, Eunsoo; Lindstrom, Esther R; Collins, Alyson A

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive models of derived polymorphemic word recognition skill in developing readers, with an emphasis on children with reading difficulty (RD), have not been developed. The purpose of the present study was to model individual differences in polymorphemic word recognition ability at the item level among 5th-grade children (N = 173) oversampled for children with RD using item-response crossed random-effects models. We distinguish between two subtypes of RD children with word recognition problems, those with early-emerging RD and late-emerging RD. An extensive set of predictors representing item-specific knowledge, child-level characteristics, and word-level characteristics were used to predict item-level variance in polymorphemic word recognition. Results indicate that item-specific root word recognition and word familiarity; child-level RD status, morphological awareness, and orthographic choice; word-level frequency and root word family size; and the interactions between morphological awareness and RD status and root word recognition and root transparency predicted individual differences in polymorphemic word recognition item performance. Results are interpreted within a multisource individual difference model of polymorphemic word recognition skill spanning item-specific, child-level, and word-level knowledge. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  1. Impact of tembotrione and flufenacet plus isoxaflutole application timings, rates, and adjuvant type on weeds and yield of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Idziak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the steadily increasing cost of weed control in corn (Zea mays L. and possible negative impact of chemicals on environment the demand for less and more efficient herbicide use is rising. Field studies were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the Middle-West Poland in order to assessment the effective weed control. Treatments included herbicides tembotrione and flufenacet + isoxaflutole at recommended (88.0 and 36.0 + 7.5 g ha-1 and reduced rates (44 and 22 g ha-1; 19.2 + 4.0 or 9.6 + 2.0 g ha-1 with addition of methylated seed oil (MSO and ammonium nitrate (AMN adjuvants. Tembotrione was applied once at the stage of 3-5 maize leaves and flufenacet + isoxaflutole once at pre-emergence of maize. Mixtures of these herbicides were applied sequentially post-emergence, at 16-20-d intervals, after successive weed emergence. Results indicate that herbicide applied at reduced rates with adjuvants provided satisfactory weed control in maize. Application of reduced rates of tembotrione (44 and 22 g ha-1 and especially mixture of tembotrione with flufenacet + isoxaflutole and MSO + AMN adjuvants applied twice provided similar grain yield of maize as from treatments where tembotrione or flufenacet + isoxaflutole herbicides were applied only once at recommended rates (9.5, 9.7, and 10.0 t ha-1, respectively.

  2. Remote sensing water observation for supporting Lake Victoria weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Laneve, Giovanni; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico

    2009-05-01

    This paper aims to assess the suitability of remote sensing for enhancing the management of water body resources and for providing an inexpensive way to gather, on a wide area, weed infestation extent and optical parameter linked to the water body status. Remotely sensed satellite images and ancillary ground true data were used to produce land cover maps, trough classification techniques, and water compounds maps, applying radiative transfer models. The study proposed within the framework of the cooperation between Italian Foreign Affair Ministry (through the University of Rome) and Kenyan Authorities has been carried out on the Kenyan part of the Lake Victoria. This lake is one of the largest freshwater bodies of the world where, over the last few years environmental challenges and human impact have perturbed the ecological balance affecting the biodiversity. The objective of this research study is to define the thematic products, retrievable from satellite images, like weed abundance maps and water compound concentrations. These products, if provided with an appropriate time frequency, are useful to identify the preconditions for the occurrence of hazard events like abnormal macrophyte proliferation and to develop an up-to-date decision support system devoted to an apprised territory, environment and resource management.

  3. Modelling the effects of past and future climate on the risk of bluetongue emergence in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guis, Helene; Caminade, Cyril; Calvete, Carlos; Morse, Andrew P.; Tran, Annelise; Baylis, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases are among those most sensitive to climate because the ecology of vectors and the development rate of pathogens within them are highly dependent on environmental conditions. Bluetongue (BT), a recently emerged arboviral disease of ruminants in Europe, is often cited as an illustration of climate's impact on disease emergence, although no study has yet tested this association. Here, we develop a framework to quantitatively evaluate the effects of climate on BT's emergence in Europe by integrating high-resolution climate observations and model simulations within a mechanistic model of BT transmission risk. We demonstrate that a climate-driven model explains, in both space and time, many aspects of BT's recent emergence and spread, including the 2006 BT outbreak in northwest Europe which occurred in the year of highest projected risk since at least 1960. Furthermore, the model provides mechanistic insight into BT's emergence, suggesting that the drivers of emergence across Europe differ between the South and the North. Driven by simulated future climate from an ensemble of 11 regional climate models, the model projects increase in the future risk of BT emergence across most of Europe with uncertainty in rate but not in trend. The framework described here is adaptable and applicable to other diseases, where the link between climate and disease transmission risk can be quantified, permitting the evaluation of scale and uncertainty in climate change's impact on the future of such diseases. PMID:21697167

  4. Aplicação das inferências clássica e bayesiana na estimação dos parâmetros do modelo de densidade populacional de plantas daninhas Application of classic and bayesian inferences on the estimation of weed population density model parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Vismara

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A dinâmica da população de plantas daninhas pode ser representada por um sistema de equações que relaciona as densidades de sementes produzidas e de plântulas em áreas de cultivo. Os valores dos parâmetros dos modelos podem ser inferidos diretamente de experimentação e análise estatística ou extraídos da literatura. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo estimar os parâmetros do modelo de densidade populacional de plantas daninhas, a partir de um experimento conduzido na área experimental da Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, Sete Lagoas, MG, via os procedimentos de inferências clássica e Bayesiana.Dynamics of weed populations can be described as a system of equations relating the produced seed and seedling densities in crop areas. The model parameter values can be either directly inferred from experimentation and statistical analysis or obtained from the literature. The objective of this work was to estimate the weed population density model parameters based on experimental field data at Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, Sete Lagoas, MG, using classic and Bayesian inferences.

  5. Weeding the Astrophysical Garden: Ethyl Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, F. C.; Fortman, S. M.; Medvedev, I. R.; Neese, C. F.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that many, if not most, of the unidentified features in astrophysical spectra arise from relatively low lying excited vibrational and torsional states of a relatively small number of molecular species— the astrophysical weeds. It is also well known that the traditional quantum mechanical assignment and fitting of these excited state spectra is a formidable task, one that is made harder by the expected perturbations and interactions among these states. We have previously proposed an alternative fitting and analysis approach based on experimental, intensity calibrated spectra taken at many temperatures. In this paper we discuss the implementation of this approach and provide details in the context of one of these weeds, ethyl cyanide.

  6. Emergence of Influential Spreaders in Modified Rumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Meloni, Sandro; Gonçalves, Bruno; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-04-01

    The burst in the use of online social networks over the last decade has provided evidence that current rumor spreading models miss some fundamental ingredients in order to reproduce how information is disseminated. In particular, recent literature has revealed that these models fail to reproduce the fact that some nodes in a network have an influential role when it comes to spread a piece of information. In this work, we introduce two mechanisms with the aim of filling the gap between theoretical and experimental results. The first model introduces the assumption that spreaders are not always active whereas the second model considers the possibility that an ignorant is not interested in spreading the rumor. In both cases, results from numerical simulations show a higher adhesion to real data than classical rumor spreading models. Our results shed some light on the mechanisms underlying the spreading of information and ideas in large social systems and pave the way for more realistic diffusion models.

  7. Erich Weede: A nonconformist conflict researcher

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    The second winner of the Richardson Lifetime Achievement Award (in 2004) was Professor Erich Weede from the University of Bonn, Germany. The prize, which is sponsored by two sections of the European Consortium of Political Research (ECPR), goes tri-annually to a political scientist who made major contributions to peace and conflict research in the tradition of Lewis Frye Richardson (1881 1953), a British meteorologist and pioneering scientific analyst of international war. This essay summaris...

  8. On distinguishing different models of a class of emergent Universe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Souvik Ghose

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... Department of Physics, Surendra Institute of Engineering & Management, Siliguri 734 009, India. E-mail: mrsghose@gmail.com ... to study the viability of the model in late time. In this paper, we discuss the viability of all the ... different EU models from union2 data and study of the late-time behaviour of these ...

  9. Can Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Reduce the Growth of Agricultural Weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Rita S. L.; Jansa, Jan; Frossard, Emmanuel; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between −22 and −35%). In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species – Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum – and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum). Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize) enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field conditions. PMID

  10. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce the growth of agricultural weeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S L Veiga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between -22 and -35%. In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species--Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum--and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum. Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field

  11. Weeding Out in the Open: What Will the Neighbors Think?

    OpenAIRE

    DeMars, Michael; Roll, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Weeding is often an emotionally charged topic for both librarians and faculty. A healthy print collection needs weeding, but the campus community is often nervous and concerned about this practice. In preparing for a large scale monograph deselection project at California State University, Fullerton’s (CSUF) Pollak Library, library faculty and administration grappled with how to productively and efficiently involve the large CSUF teaching faculty in the weeding process. Library systems staff ...

  12. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce the growth of agricultural weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Rita S L; Jansa, Jan; Frossard, Emmanuel; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between -22 and -35%). In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species--Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum--and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum). Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize) enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field conditions.

  13. MODELLING OF DECISION MAKING OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE'S OPERATOR IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: lack of recommendation action algorithm of UAV operator in emergency situations; decomposition of the process of decision making (DM by UAV’s Operator in emergency situations; development of the structure of distributed decision support system (DDSS for remotely piloted aircraft; development of a database of local decision support system (DSS operators Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS; working-out of models DM by UAV’s Operator. Methods: Algoritm of actions of UAV operator by Wald criterion, Laplace criterion, Hurwitz criterion. Results: The program "UAV_AS" that gives to UAV operator recommendations on how to act in case of emergency. Discussion: The article deals with the problem of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV flights for decision of different tasks in emergency situation. Based on statistical data it was analyzing the types of emergencies for unmanned aircraft. Defined sequence of actions UAV operator and in case of emergencies.

  14. Discrimination of corn from monocotyledonous weeds with ultraviolet (UV) induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Bernard; Guillaume, Serge; Samson, Guy; Roger, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    In production agriculture, savings in herbicides can be achieved if weeds can be discriminated from crop, allowing the targeting of weed control to weed-infested areas only. Previous studies demonstrated the potential of ultraviolet (UV) induced fluorescence to discriminate corn from weeds and recently, robust models have been obtained for the discrimination between monocots (including corn) and dicots. Here, we developed a new approach to achieve robust discrimination of monocot weeds from corn. To this end, four corn hybrids (Elite 60T05, Monsanto DKC 26-78, Pioneer 39Y85 (RR), and Syngenta N2555 (Bt, LL)) and four monocot weeds (Digitaria ischaemum (Schreb.) I, Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv., Panicum capillare (L.), and Setaria glauca (L.) Beauv.) were grown either in a greenhouse or in a growth cabinet and UV (327 nm) induced fluorescence spectra (400 to 755 nm) were measured under controlled or uncontrolled ambient light intensity and temperature. This resulted in three contrasting data sets suitable for testing the robustness of discrimination models. In the blue-green region (400 to 550 nm), the shape of the spectra did not contain any useful information for discrimination. Therefore, the integral of the blue-green region (415 to 455 nm) was used as a normalizing factor for the red fluorescence intensity (670 to 755 nm). The shape of the normalized red fluorescence spectra did not contribute to the discrimination and in the end, only the integral of the normalized red fluorescence intensity was left as a single discriminant variable. Applying a threshold on this variable minimizing the classification error resulted in calibration errors ranging from 14.2% to 15.8%, but this threshold varied largely between data sets. Therefore, to achieve robustness, a model calibration scheme was developed based on the collection of a calibration data set from 75 corn plants. From this set, a new threshold can be estimated as the 85% quantile on the cumulative frequency

  15. Critical period of weed control in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, A

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7-49 days after seeding in off-season and 7-53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23-40 days in off-season and 21-43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21-43 days for better yield and higher economic return.

  16. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Problems and achievements of cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum L. weeds control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Barakova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Weed control in the cultivation of cotton is critical to the yield and quality of production. The influence of economically important weeds was studied. Chemical control is the most effective method of weed control in cotton but much of the information on it relates to primary weed infestation. Problems with primary weed infestation in cotton have been solved to a significant extent. The question of secondary weed infestation with annual and perennial graminaceous weeds during the period of cotton vegetation is also determined largely by the use of antigraminaceous herbicides. The data related to herbicides to effectively control secondary germinated broadleaf weeds in conventional technology for cotton growing are quite scarce, even globally. We are still seeking effective herbicides for control of these weeds in cotton crops. Studies on their influence on the sowing characteristics of cotton seed and the quality of cotton fiber are still insufficient. In the scientific literature there is not enough information on these questions. The combinations of herbicides, as well as their tank mixtures with fertilizers or plant growth regulators are more efficient than autonomous application. Often during their combined application higher synergistic effect on yield is produced. There is information about cotton cultivars resistant to glyphosate. These cultivars are GMO and they are banned within the European Union, including Bulgaria.

  18. Critical Period of Weed Control in Aerobic Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. P.; Juraimi, A. S.; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, A.

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7–49 days after seeding in off-season and 7–53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23–40 days in off-season and 21–43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21–43 days for better yield and higher economic return. PMID:22778701

  19. Integrated Weed Management Strategies for Control of Hydrilla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Linda S; Shearer, Judy F

    2009-01-01

    ...), and the fungal pathogen Mycoleptodiscus terrestris (Gerd.) Ostazeski, applied alone and in combination with one another, as an integrated weed management strategy against the nuisance aquatic plant, hydrilla...

  20. Performance Of Groundnut Arachis Hypogaea L. Varieties As Influenced By Weed Control Treatments In Kano State Of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Garko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out during 2012 rainy season at the Research Farm of Bayero University Kano 110 58 N 80 26E and 475m above sea level and National Horticultural Research Institute Bagauda sub-station Bebeji local Government area of Kano State 110 33N 80 23E and 481m above sea level to find out the performance of varieties and weed control treatments on growth and development of groundnut Arachis hypogaea L.. The experiment consisted of two groundnut varieties SAMNUT-22 and SAMNUT-23 and 12 weed control treatments Metolachlor at 2 levels of 1.0 and 2.0kg a.i. ha Fluazifop-p butyl at 2 levels of 1.0 and 1.5 kg a.i. ha at pre or post-emergence or combined with hoe weeding at 15 days after sowing or supplementary hoe weeding at 30 days after sowing while weed free check at 15 and 30 days after sowing and weedy check were included as control. The treatments were laid out using split plot design with variety assigned to the main and weed control to the sub plot. The result showed that SAMNUT-22 out yielded SAMNUT-23 and exhibited superior growth and yield components such as stand count canopy height number of branches leaf area index plant dry weight. The application of Metolaclor at 1.0 kg a.i. ha followed by Fluazifop-p butyl at 1.0 kg a.i. ha as well as Metolaclor at 1.0 or 2.0 kg a.i. ha followed by supplementary hoe weeding produced significantly higher number of pods per plant and pod yield per hactare. Leaf area index and number of pod per plant were significantly and positively correlated with pod weight. Thus SAMNUT-22 can be recommended for the two study areas. Similarly application of Metolaclor at 1.0 kg a.i. ha followed by Fluazifop-p butyl at 1.0 kg a.i. ha and Metolaclor at 1.0 or 2.0 kg a.i. ha followed by supplementary hoe weeding could be recommended for weed control in groundnut in the study area.