WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling vortical flows

  1. Modeling and computation of cavitation in vortical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Maksoud, M.; Haenel, D.; Lantermann, U.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of Euler-Lagrangian methods for cavitating two-phase flows. The Euler-Euler methods, widely used for simulations of cavitating flows in ship technology, perform well in regions of moderate flow changes but fail in zones of strong, vortical flow. Reasons are the strong approximations of cavitation models in the Euler concept. Alternatively, Euler-Lagrangian concepts enable more detailed formulations for transport, dynamics and acoustic of discrete vapor bubbles. Test calculations are performed to study the influence of different parameters in the equations of motion and in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for bubble dynamics. Results confirm that only Lagrangian models are able to describe correctly the bubble behavior in vortices, while Eulerian results deviate strongly. Lagrangian formulations enable additionally the determination of acoustic pressure of cavitation noise. Two-way coupling between the phases is required for large regions of the vapor phase. A new coupling concept between continuous fluid flow and discrete bubble phase is developed and demonstrated for flow through a nozzle. However, the iterative coupling between the phases via volume fractions is computationally expensive and should therefore be applied only in regions where Eulerian treatment fails. A corresponding local concept for combination with an Euler-Euler method is outlined and is in progress.

  2. Structure-Preserving Variational Multiscale Modeling of Turbulent Incompressible Flow with Subgrid Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John; Coley, Christopher; Aronson, Ryan; Nelson, Corey

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, a large eddy simulation methodology for turbulent incompressible flow will be presented which combines the best features of divergence-conforming discretizations and the residual-based variational multiscale approach to large eddy simulation. In this method, the resolved motion is represented using a divergence-conforming discretization, that is, a discretization that preserves the incompressibility constraint in a pointwise manner, and the unresolved fluid motion is explicitly modeled by subgrid vortices that lie within individual grid cells. The evolution of the subgrid vortices is governed by dynamical model equations driven by the residual of the resolved motion. Consequently, the subgrid vortices appropriately vanish for laminar flow and fully resolved turbulent flow. As the resolved velocity field and subgrid vortices are both divergence-free, the methodology conserves mass in a pointwise sense and admits discrete balance laws for energy, enstrophy, and helicity. Numerical results demonstrate the methodology yields improved results versus state-of-the-art eddy viscosity models in the context of transitional, wall-bounded, and rotational flow when a divergence-conforming B-spline discretization is utilized to represent the resolved motion.

  3. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  4. Transient cavitating vortical flows around a hydrofoil using k-ω partially averaged Navier-Stokes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianwu; Huang, Renfang; Ji, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For accurate simulations of wall-bounded turbulent cavitating flows, the present paper proposed a partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method derived from the k-ω turbulence model. Transient cavitating vortical flows around a NACA66 hydrofoil were simulated by using the k-ω PANS model with various filter parameters (fk = 0.2, 0.5 and 1, while fω = 1/fk) and a mass transfer cavitation model based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Compared with the available experimental data, the k-ω PANS model with fk = 0.2 can accurately reproduce the cavitation evolution with more complicated structures due to the reduction in the predicted eddy viscosity. Further analyses, using the vorticity transport equation, indicate that the transition of cavitation structure from two dimension to three dimension is associated with strong vortex-cavitation interaction, where vortex stretching and dilation may play a major role. Therefore, the k-ω PANS model with the filter parameter of fk = 0.2 is an effective method to numerically predict the transient cavitating vortical flows around hydrofoils. The results obtained in this paper are helpful to provide a physical insight into the mechanisms of cavitation shedding dynamics.

  5. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  6. Dynamic modeling of uteroplacental blood flow in IUGR indicates vortices and elevated pressure in the intervillous space - a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christian J.; Haeussner, Eva; Ruebelmann, Tanja; Koch, Franz V.; Schmitz, Christoph; Frank, Hans-Georg; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic placental disease is a concept that links intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and preeclampsia (PE) back to insufficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries. The rheological consequences of insufficient remodeling of uterine spiral arteries were hypothesized to mediate the considerably later manifestation of obstetric disease. However, the micro-rheology in the intervillous space (IVS) cannot be examined clinically and rheological animal models of the human IVS do not exist. Thus, an in silico approach was implemented to provide in vivo inaccessible data. The morphology of a spiral artery and the inflow region of the IVS were three-dimensionally reconstructed to provide a morphological stage for the simulations. Advanced high-end supercomputing resources were used to provide blood flow simulations at high spatial resolution. Our simulations revealed turbulent blood flow (high-velocity jets and vortices) combined with elevated blood pressure in the IVS and increased wall shear stress at the villous surface in conjunction with insufficient spiral artery remodeling only. Post-hoc histological analysis of uterine veins showed evidence of increased trophoblast shedding in an IUGR placenta. Our data support that rheological alteration in the IVS is a relevant mechanism linking ischemic placental disease to altered structural integrity and function of the placenta.

  7. Eroding dipoles and vorticity growth for Euler flows in {{{R}}}^{3}: the hairpin geometry as a model for finite-time blowup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Stephen; Gilbert, Andrew D.

    2018-02-01

    A theory of an eroding ‘hairpin’ vortex dipole structure in three-dimensions is developed, extending our previous study of an axisymmetric eroding dipole without swirl. The axisymmetric toroidal dipole was found to lead to maximal growth of vorticity, as {t}4/3. The hairpin is here similarly proposed as a model to produce large ‘self-stretching’ of vorticity, with the possibility of finite-time blow-up. We derive a system of partial differential equations of ‘generalized’ form, involving contour averaging of a locally two-dimensional Euler flow. We do not attempt here to solve the system exactly, but point out that non-existence of physically acceptable solutions would most probably be a result of the axial flow. Because of the axial flow the vorticity distribution within the dipole eddies is no longer of the simple Sadovskii type (vorticity constant over a cross-section) obtained in the axisymmetric problem. Thus the solution of the system depends upon the existence of a larger class of propagating two-dimensional dipoles. The hairpin model is obtained by formal asymptotic analysis. As in the axisymmetric problem a local transformation to ‘shrinking’ coordinates is introduced, but now in a self-similar form appropriate to the study of a possible finite-time singularity. We discuss some properties of the model, including a study of the helicity and a first step in iterating toward a solution from the Sadovskii structure. We also present examples of two-dimensional propagating dipoles not previously studied, which have a vorticity profile consistent with our model. Although no rigorous results can be given, and analysis of the system is only partial, the formal calculations are consistent with the possibility of a finite time blowup of vorticity at a point of vanishing circulation of the dipole eddies, but depending upon the existence of the necessary two-dimensional propagating dipole. Our results also suggest that conservation of kinetic energy as

  8. Indirect Combustion Noise: Noise Generation by Accelerated Vorticity in a Nozzle Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Kings

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The noise generation by accelerated vorticity waves in a nozzle flow was investigated in a model experiment. This noise generation mechanism belongs, besides entropy noise, to the indirect combustion noise phenomena. Vorticity as well as entropy fluctuations, originating from the highly turbulent combustion zone, are convected with the flow and produce noise during their acceleration in the outlet nozzle of the combustion chamber. In the model experiment, noise generation of accelerated vorticity fluctuations was achieved. The vorticity fluctuations in the tube flow were produced by injecting temporally additional air into the mean flow. As the next step, a parametric study was conducted to determine the major dependencies of the so called vortex noise. A quadratic dependency of the vortex noise on the injected air amount was found. In order to visualise and classify the artificially generated vorticity structures, planar velocity measurements have been conducted applying Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV.

  9. Lagrangian structures in time-periodic vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kostrykin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles are experimentally studied in an oscillating four-vortex velocity field. The oscillations occur due to a loss of stability of a steady flow and result in a regular reclosure of streamlines between the vortices of the same sign. The Eulerian velocity field is visualized by tracer displacements over a short time period. The obtained data on tracer motions during a number of oscillation periods show that the Lagrangian trajectories form quasi-regular structures. The destruction of these structures is determined by two characteristic time scales: the tracers are redistributed sufficiently fast between the vortices of the same sign and much more slowly transported into the vortices of opposite sign. The observed behavior of the Lagrangian trajectories is quantitatively reproduced in a new numerical experiment with two-dimensional model of the velocity field with a small number of spatial harmonics. A qualitative interpretation of phenomena observed on the basis of the theory of adiabatic chaos in the Hamiltonian systems is given. The Lagrangian trajectories are numerically simulated under varying flow parameters. It is shown that the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Lagrangian structures depend on the properties of temporal change in the streamlines topology and on the adiabatic parameter corresponding to the flow. The condition for the occurrence of traps (the regions where the Lagrangian particles reside for a long time is obtained.

  10. Vortices in rotating and stratified flows: aspect ratio and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In linear stratifications, vortices have a typical flat shape that appears to be not only a compromise between the rotation and the stratification of the background flow through their Coriolis parameter f and buoyancy frequency hbox{$ar{N}$} N̅ , but also involves the buoyancy frequency Nc within the vortices and their Rossby number Ro. We derive an analytical solution for the self-similar ellipsoidal shape of the vortices and the law for their aspect ratio. From this law, we show that long-lived vortices must necessary be either weakly stratified anticyclones or superstratified cyclones (which is less likely to occur. These predictions are experimentally and numerically verified and agree with published measurements for Jovian vortices and ocean meddies. This approach can be applied to a gaussian stratification to give good insights of the shape of vortices in protoplanetary disks and their sustainability.

  11. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model capable of mesoscopic vorticity computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that standard lattice Boltzmann (LB) models allow the strain-rate components to be computed mesoscopically (i.e., through the local particle distributions) and as such possess a second-order accuracy in strain rate. This is one of the appealing features of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) which is of only second-order accuracy in hydrodynamic velocity itself. However, no known LB model can provide the same quality for vorticity and pressure gradients. In this paper, we design a multiple-relaxation time LB model on a three-dimensional 27-discrete-velocity (D3Q27) lattice. A detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis is presented to illustrate all the necessary constraints in reproducing the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations. The remaining degrees of freedom are carefully analyzed to derive a model that accommodates mesoscopic computation of all the velocity and pressure gradients from the nonequilibrium moments. This way of vorticity calculation naturally ensures a second-order accuracy, which is also proven through an asymptotic analysis. We thus show, with enough degrees of freedom and appropriate modifications, the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be achieved in LBM. The resulting model is then validated in simulations of a three-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a uniform flow passing a fixed sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be realized even with single relaxation parameter.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann model capable of mesoscopic vorticity computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that standard lattice Boltzmann (LB) models allow the strain-rate components to be computed mesoscopically (i.e., through the local particle distributions) and as such possess a second-order accuracy in strain rate. This is one of the appealing features of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) which is of only second-order accuracy in hydrodynamic velocity itself. However, no known LB model can provide the same quality for vorticity and pressure gradients. In this paper, we design a multiple-relaxation time LB model on a three-dimensional 27-discrete-velocity (D3Q27) lattice. A detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis is presented to illustrate all the necessary constraints in reproducing the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations. The remaining degrees of freedom are carefully analyzed to derive a model that accommodates mesoscopic computation of all the velocity and pressure gradients from the nonequilibrium moments. This way of vorticity calculation naturally ensures a second-order accuracy, which is also proven through an asymptotic analysis. We thus show, with enough degrees of freedom and appropriate modifications, the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be achieved in LBM. The resulting model is then validated in simulations of a three-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a uniform flow passing a fixed sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be realized even with single relaxation parameter.

  14. Objective detection of vortices in massively-separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangzi; Hadjighasem, Alireza; Green, Melissa; Haller, George

    2015-11-01

    We study the formation and shedding of vortices in two vortex-dominated flows around a pitching panel in order to detect coherent structures objectively (i.e., in a frame invariant fashion) in massively-separated flow. We employ a recently developed objective definition and extraction technique for rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices. This methods renders material vortex boundaries as outermost convex level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), i.e., the trajectory integral of the normed deviation of the vorticity from its spatial mean. We also employ the derivative of the LAVD, the Instantaneous Vorticity Deviation (IVD), to uncover instantaneous Eulerian vortex boundaries in an objective fashion. These Eulerian vortex boundaries, therefore, remain the same in all possible rotating and translating unsteady frames. The multiple methods we use identify and track both leading edge and trailing edge vortices as they form and shed. This helps in describing the relationship between the vortex dynamics and the loss of lift during dynamic stall on a 2D flat plate undergoing a 45 degree pitch-up maneuver. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation results for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1.

  15. Flux flow of Abrikosov vortices in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.; Yang, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The theory of flux flow developed by Bardeen and Stephen (BS) is modified and extended to the high-field case. The Clem model and Wigner-Seitz circle-cell approximation for vortices are used in our approach. The distinct boundary of the normal core of a vortex in BS theory is removed and treated naturally. Several interesting results come out as a consequence. The Lorentz force is determined by the normal current rather than the supercurrent. But the supercurrent can sustain the magnetic-field distribution of flux quanta. From energy dissipation considerations, the Lorentz force is equal to viscosity force automatically without assumption as made in BS theory. An expression for the viscosity is also obtained

  16. Clustering of heavy particles in vortical flows: a selective review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heavy particles in a turbulent flow tend to leave regions of high vorticity and cluster into regions of high strain. The consequences of such clustering have been studied in a variety of situations over the past few decades, and this problem has seen several review papers already. Our objectives in this paper are three-fold.

  17. Visualization techniques for studying high angle of attack separated vortical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques can provide information on high angle of attack separated flows around slender aircraft configurations that may be unobtainable otherwise. At large angles of attack the flow field is dominated by vortical structures originating on the forebody wing extension, wing and forward control surfaces. Several techniques that are suitable for tracking vortices in subsonic wind tunnels are introduced. A discussion of visualization photographs and quantitative data obtained from visualization studies on vortex trajectory and breakdown position on both static and dynamic wind tunnel models is presented.

  18. STRUCTURES OF TURBULENT VORTICES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON FLOW PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsas Rimkus

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the many investigations that have been conducted on turbulent flows, the generation and development of turbulent vortices has not been investigated sufficiently yet. This prevents to understand well the processes involved in the flow. That is unfavorable for the further investigations. The developing vortex structures are interacting, and this needs to be estimated. Physical summing of velocities, formed by all structures, can be unfavorable for investigations, therefore they must be separated; otherwise bias errors can occur. The difficulty for investigations is that the widely employed Particle Image Velocity (PIV method, when a detailed picture of velocity field picture is necessary, can provide photos covering only a short interval of flow, which can’t include the largest flow structures, i.e. macro whirlpools. Consequently, action of these structures could not be investigated. Therefore, in this study it is tried to obtain the necessary data about the flow structure by analyzing the instantaneous velocity measurements by 3D means, which lasts for several minutes, therefore the existence and interaction of these structures become visible in measurement data. The investigations conducted in this way have been already discussed in the article, published earlier. Mostly the generation and development of bottom vortices was analyzed. In this article, the analysis of these turbulent velocity measurements is continued and the additional data about the structure of turbulent vortices is obtained.

  19. Quantification of disturbed coronary flow by disturbed vorticity index and relation with fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Miao; von Birgelen, Clemens; Li, Yingguang; Westra, Jelmer; Yang, Junqing; Holm, Niels R; Reiber, Johan H C; Wijns, William; Tu, Shengxian

    2018-02-16

    The relation between FFR and local coronary flow patterns is incompletely understood. We aimed at developing a novel hemodynamic index to quantify disturbed coronary flow, and to investigate its relationship with lesion-associated pressure-drop, and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstruction and computational fluid dynamics were applied to simulate pulsatile coronary flow. Disturbed vorticity index (DVI) was derived to quantify the stenosis-induced flow disturbance. The relation between DVI and pressure-drop was assessed in 9 virtual obstruction models. Furthermore, we evaluated the correlation between DVI, FFR, hyperemic flow velocity, and anatomic parameters in 84 intermediate lesions from 73 patients. In virtual models, DVI increased with increasing flow rate, stenosis severity, and lesion complexity. The correlation between DVI and pressure-drop across all models was excellent (determination coefficient R 2  = 0.85, p flow velocity (ρ = -0.27, p=0.015), lesion length (ρ = -0.36, p=0.001) and percent diameter stenosis (ρ = -0.40, p flow, was related to pressure-drop in virtual obstruction models and showed a strong inverse relation with FFR in intermediate lesions in vivo. It supports the prognostic value of FFR and may provide additional information about sources of energy loss when measuring FFR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vorticity amplification and its effects on flow separation from simplified landing gear wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Philip; Feltham, Graham; Ekmekci, Alis

    2015-11-01

    In the presence of weak streams of inbound vorticity, the stagnation region of bluff bodies have been shown to support mechanisms for the collection and amplification of said vorticity into large-scale, discrete vortex structures. For extremely low aspect ratio cylinders, such as those which represent simplified aircraft landing gear wheels, these discrete vortex structures tilt around the sides of the geometry, orientating their axes in the streamwise direction. Once the oncoming vorticity is collected and amplified into discrete vortices, they are shed from the stagnation region and this cycle repeats itself periodically. The present work investigates the effect of the vortex tilting and subsequent shedding on the behaviour of the outboard side flow separation region present on simplified landing gear wheels. Experiments were conducted in a recirculating-type water tunnel on a two-wheel landing gear model, with the upstream vorticity source being a 100 µm platinum wire. Hydrogen bubble visualisations were first used for qualitative understanding of the flow, accompanied by 2D-PIV for vortex identification and tracking of the growth and movement of the observed structures. Finally, the side separation bubble has been characterised using 3D velocity measurements (using V3V). The authors would like to thank Bombardier, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty and NSERC for their support for this project.

  1. Dynamics of vortices in complex wakes: Modeling, analysis, and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat

    The thesis develops singly-periodic mathematical models for complex laminar wakes which are formed behind vortex-shedding bluff bodies. These wake structures exhibit a variety of patterns as the bodies oscillate or are in close proximity of one another. The most well-known formation comprises two counter-rotating vortices in each shedding cycle and is popularly known as the von Karman vortex street. Of the more complex configurations, as a specific example, this thesis investigates one of the most commonly occurring wake arrangements, which consists of two pairs of vortices in each shedding period. The paired vortices are, in general, counter-rotating and belong to a more general definition of the 2P mode, which involves periodic release of four vortices into the flow. The 2P arrangement can, primarily, be sub-classed into two types: one with a symmetric orientation of the two vortex pairs about the streamwise direction in a periodic domain and the other in which the two vortex pairs per period are placed in a staggered geometry about the wake centerline. The thesis explores the governing dynamics of such wakes and characterizes the corresponding relative vortex motion. In general, for both the symmetric as well as the staggered four vortex periodic arrangements, the thesis develops two-dimensional potential flow models (consisting of an integrable Hamiltonian system of point vortices) that consider spatially periodic arrays of four vortices with their strengths being +/-Gamma1 and +/-Gamma2. Vortex formations observed in the experiments inspire the assumed spatial symmetry. The models demonstrate a number of dynamic modes that are classified using a bifurcation analysis of the phase space topology, consisting of level curves of the Hamiltonian. Despite the vortex strengths in each pair being unequal in magnitude, some initial conditions lead to relative equilibrium when the vortex configuration moves with invariant size and shape. The scaled comparisons of the

  2. The generation of sound by vorticity waves in swirling duct flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M. S.; Liu, J. T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Swirling flow in an axisymmetric duct can support vorticity waves propagating parallel to the axis of the duct. When the cross-sectional area of the duct changes a portion of the wave energy is scattered into secondary vorticity and sound waves. Thus the swirling flow in the jet pipe of an aeroengine provides a mechanism whereby disturbances produced by unsteady combustion or turbine blading can be propagated along the pipe and subsequently scattered into aerodynamic sound. In this paper a linearized model of this process is examined for low Mach number swirling flow in a duct of infinite extent. It is shown that the amplitude of the scattered acoustic pressure waves is proportional to the product of the characteristic swirl velocity and the perturbation velocity of the vorticity wave. The sound produced in this way may therefore be of more significance than that generated by vorticity fluctuations in the absence of swirl, for which the acoustic pressure is proportional to the square of the perturbation velocity. The results of the analysis are discussed in relation to the problem of excess jet noise.

  3. Influence of artificial tip perturbation on asymmetric vortices flow over a chined fuselage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted with the aim of understanding behavior of asymmetric vortices flow over a chined fuselage. The tests were carried out in a wind tunnel at Reynolds number of 1.87 × 105 under the conditions of high angles of attack and zero angle of sideslip. The results show that leeward vortices flow becomes asymmetric vortices flow when angle of attack increases over 20°. The asymmetric vortices flow is asymmetry of two forebody vortices owing to the increase of angle of attack but not asymmetry of vortex breakdown which appears when angle of attack is above 35°. Asymmetric vortices flow is sensitive to tip perturbation and is non-deterministic due to randomly distributed natural minute geometrical irregularities on the nose tip within machining tolerance. Deterministic asymmetric vortices flow can be obtained by attaching artificial tip perturbation which can trigger asymmetric vortices flow and decide asymmetric vortices flow pattern. Triggered by artificial tip perturbation, the vortex on the same side with perturbation is in a higher position, and the other vortex on the opposite side is in a lower position. Vortex suction on the lower vortex side is larger, which corresponds to a side force pointing to the lower vortex side.

  4. Local and Nonlocal Strain Rate Fields and Vorticity Alignment in Turbulent Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlington, Peter E.; Schumacher, Jörg; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Local and nonlocal contributions to the total strain rate tensor at any point in a flow are formulated from an expansion of the vorticity field in a local spherical neighborhood of radius R centered on x. The resulting exact expression allows the nonlocal (background) strain rate tensor to be obtained from the total strain rate tensor. In turbulent flows, where the vorticity naturally concentrates into relatively compact structures, this allows the local alignment of vorticity with the most e...

  5. Separation of cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Naghsh-Nilchi, Hamed; Di Carlo, Dino

    2018-01-01

    Label-free separation of viable cancer cells using vortical microfluidic flows has been introduced as a feasible cell collection method in oncological studies. Besides the clinical importance, the physics of particle interactions with the vortex that forms in a wall-confined geometry of a microchannel is a relatively new area of fluid dynamics. In our previous work [Haddadi and Di Carlo, J. Fluid. Mech. 811 , 436-467 (2017)], we have introduced distinct aspects of inertial flow of dilute suspensions over cavities in a microchannel such as breakdown of the separatrix and formation of stable limit cycle orbits for finite size polystyrene particles. In this work, we extend our experiments to address the engineering-physics of cancer cell entrapment in microfluidic cavities. We begin by studying the effects of the channel width and device height on the morphology of the vortex, which has not been discussed in our previous work. The stable limit cycle orbits of finite size cancer cells are then presented. We demonstrate effects of the separatrix breakdown and the limit cycle formation on the operation of the cancer cell separation platform. By studying the flow of dilute cell suspensions over the cavities, we further develop the notion of the cavity capacity and the relative rate of cell accumulation as optimization criteria which connect the device geometry with the flow. Finally, we discuss the proper placement of multiple cavities inside a microchannel for improved cell entrapment.

  6. Trailed vorticity modeling for aeroelastic wind turbine simulations in stand still

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Schreck, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Current fast aeroelastic wind turbine codes suitable for certification lack an induction model for standstill conditions. A trailed vorticity model previously used as addition to a blade element momentum theory based aerodynamic model in normal operation has been extended to allow computing...... the steady loading for the Phase VI blade in attached flow. The prediction of the dynamic force coefficient loops from the Phase VI experiment is improved by the trailed vorticity modeling in both attached flow and stall in most cases. The exception is the tangential force coefficient in stall, where...

  7. Turbulent flow over craters on Mars: Vorticity dynamics reveal aeolian excavation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William; Day, Mackenzie

    2017-10-01

    Impact craters are scattered across Mars. These craters exhibit geometric self-similarity over a spectrum of diameters, ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers. The late Noachian-early Hesperian boundary marks a dramatic shift in the role of mid-latitude craters, from depocenter sedimentary basins to aeolian source areas. At present day, many craters contain prominent layered sedimentary mounds with maximum elevations comparable to the rim height. The mounds are remnants of Noachian deposition and are surrounded by a radial moat. Large-eddy simulation has been used to model turbulent flows over synthetic craterlike geometries. Geometric attributes of the craters and the aloft flow have been carefully matched to resemble ambient conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer of Mars. Vorticity dynamics analysis within the crater basin reveals the presence of counterrotating helical vortices, verifying the efficacy of deflationary models put forth recently by Bennett and Bell [K. Bennett and J. Bell, Icarus 264, 331 (2016)], 10.1016/j.icarus.2015.09.041 and Day et al. [M. Day et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 43, 2473 (2016)], 10.1002/2016GL068011. We show how these helical counterrotating vortices spiral around the outer rim, gradually deflating the moat and carving the mound; excavation occurs faster on the upwind side, explaining the radial eccentricity of the mounds relative to the surrounding crater basin.

  8. Role of vortices in cavitation formation in the flow across a mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien; Liu, Jia-Shing; Lo, Chi-Wen; Hwang, Ned H

    2008-07-01

    Cavitation occurs during mechanical heart valve closure when the local pressure drops below vapor pressure. The formation of stable gas bubbles may result in gaseous emboli, and secondarily cause transient ischemic attacks or strokes. It is noted that instantaneous valve closure, occluder rebound and high-speed leakage flow generate vortices that promote low-pressure regions in favor of stable bubble formation; however, to date no studies have been conducted for the quantitative measurement and analysis of these vortices. A Björk-Shiley Monostrut (BSM) monoleaflet valve was placed in the mitral position of a pulsatile mock circulatory loop. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and pico coulomb (PCB) pressure measurements were applied. Flow field measurements were carried out at t = -5, -3, -1, -0.5, 0 (valve closure), 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1.19, 1.44, 1.69, 1.94, 2, 2.19, 2.54, 2.79, 3.04, 3.29, 3.54, 5 and 10 ms. The vortices were quantitatively analyzed using the Rankine vortex model. A single counter-clockwise vortex was The instantaneous formation of cavitation bubbles at mechanical heart valve (MHV) closure, which subsequently damage blood cells and valve integrity, is a well-known and widely studied phenomenon (1-4). Contributing factors seem to include the water-hammer, squeeze flow and Venturi effects, all of which are short-lived. Both, Dauzat et al. (5) and Sliwka et al. (6) have detected high-intensity transient signals (HITS) with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the carotid and cerebral arteries of MHV recipients, while Deklunder (7) observed clinical occurrences of cerebral gas emboli that were not seen with bioprosthetic valves. These detected over the major orifice, while a pair of counter-rotating vortices was found over the minor orifice. Velocity profiles were consistent with Rankine vortices. The vortex strength and magnitude of the pressure drop peaked shortly after initial occluder-housing impact and rapidly decreased after 0.5 ms, indicating viscous

  9. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element analysis of free surface flow using a velocity-vorticity formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, D.C.; Young, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the application of velocity-vorticity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional free surface flow using an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The velocity Poisson equations and the vorticity transport equations are solved using a finite element method to obtain the velocity and the vorticity fields in the interior region of the computational domain. The boundary-fitted coordinates system is adopted to solve the boundary equations for kinematic and dynamic conditions at the free surface using a finite difference method. The numerical model for the velocity-vorticity formulation is validated for a square cavity flow at Re=400 and 1000. The solitary wave reflected from a vertical wall is chosen as a test case for comparison and validation of the free surface flow model. Then the proposed numerical model is used to obtain flow results for the following free surface flow cases: (i) interaction between two opposite solitary waves, (ii) seiche phenomenon in a rectangular reservoir, and (iii) solitary wave through a submerged rectangular structure in a viscous fluid. The efficiency of the present numerical model for numerical treatment of free surface flows is discussed. Furthermore the advantage of this formulation with respect to primitive variables formulation is addressed from the computational point of view

  10. Improvement of a near wake model for trailing vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirrung, G R; Hansen, M H; Madsen, H A

    2014-01-01

    A near wake model, originally proposed by Beddoes, is further developed. The purpose of the model is to account for the radially dependent time constants of the fast aerodynamic response and to provide a tip loss correction. It is based on lifting line theory and models the downwash due to roughly the first 90 degrees of rotation. This restriction of the model to the near wake allows for using a computationally efficient indicial function algorithm. The aim of this study is to improve the accuracy of the downwash close to the root and tip of the blade and to decrease the sensitivity of the model to temporal discretization, both regarding numerical stability and quality of the results. The modified near wake model is coupled to an aerodynamics model, which consists of a blade element momentum model with dynamic inflow for the far wake and a 2D shed vorticity model that simulates the unsteady buildup of both lift and circulation in the attached flow region. The near wake model is validated against the test case of a finite wing with constant elliptical bound circulation. An unsteady simulation of the NREL 5 MW rotor shows the functionality of the coupled model

  11. Solitary magnetohydrodynamic vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silaev, I.I.; Skvortsov, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the analytical description of fluid flow by means of localized vortices which is traditional for hydrodynamics, oceanology, plasma physics. Recently it has been widely applied to different structure turbulence models. Considerable results involved have been presented where it was shown that in magnetohydrodynamics alongside with the well-known kinds of localized vortices (e.g. Hill's vortex), which are characterized by quite a weak decrease of disturbed velocity or magnetic field (as a power of the inverse distance from vortex center), the vortices with screening (or solitary vortices) may exist. All disturbed parameters either exponentially vanish or become identically zero in outer region in the latter case. (In a number of papers numerical simulations of such the vortices are presented). Solutions in a form of solitary vortices are of particular interest due to their uniformity and solitonlike behavior. On the basis of these properties one can believe for such structures to occur in real turbulent flows

  12. Analysis of vorticity dynamics for hump characteristics of a pump turbine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Deyou; Gong, Ruzhi; Wang, Hongjie; Han, Lei; Wei, Xianzhu; Qin, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Conventional parameters based on CFD methodology for the investigation on hump characteristics of a pump turbine cannot reflect the dynamic interaction mechanism between the runner and the fluid. This research presents a dynamic interaction mechanism of a pump turbine operating in the hump region. First, vorticity dynamic parameters were obtained based on the theory of vorticity dynamics. Second, 3-D unsteady flow simulations were performed in a full pump turbine model using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and numerical results have a good agreement with the experiments. Then, analysis was carried out to determine the relation between the vorticity dynamic parameters and hump characteristics. The results indicate that the theory of vorticity dynamics has an advantage in evaluating the dynamic performance of a pump turbine. The energy transfer between the runner and the fluid is through vorticity dynamic parameters-pressure and friction terms, in which the pressure term accounts for the most. Furthermore, vortex generation mainly results from the skin friction. Combining vorticity dynamic analysis with the method of Q-criterion indicates that hump characteristics are related to the reduction of the surface normal pressure work and vortex motion on the suction surfaces close to the leading edges in the runner, and the increase of skin friction work in the stay-guide vanes

  13. Time Accurate Euler Calculations of Vortical Flow over a Delta Wing in Rolling Motion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fritz, W

    2003-01-01

    .... An important component of the program were the Common Exercises (CE), which promoted the exchange of knowledge between the participating nations and aided the development of computational methods to predict vortical flows...

  14. Inferred of vorticity structures of flow that go around of a obstacle, by means of Euleriano tridimentional model; Inferencia de estructuras vorticosas del flujo que pasa alrededor de un obstaculo, mediante un modelo euleriano tridimensional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan Barrera, C.; Ramirez Leon, H. [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    More than 100 years ago. It was inferred the existence of secondary currents in open channels on the basis of the fact that the maximum velocity occurred just below the free surface indeed another one, the cyclic variation of the concentration of suspended sediment in the span wise direction of them. Gibson, estimated that the velocity of the secondary currents would be about 5% of mainstream velocity. In spite of their apparent weakness, the secondary currents play an essential role in the lateral transfer of momentum, energy heat and mass in a channel, and thus their distributions show variations in all three dimensions. In the same form, for the most part they are responsible of the bed patterns in high content sediment suspended flows. The importance of secondary flows is manifested on the fact of the introduction from vorticity concept. In this work, some results obtained with a 3-D Eulerian model to which has coupled the statistical vorticity equation, are shown. Correlations U{sub i}W{sub j} were modeled according to U{sub i}U{sub j} correlations using the fluid flow turbulence properties. Model is applied to a flow deformed by a three dimensional obstacle at the bottom. Simulation results of the vorticity show similarities with other flow patterns behaviors found in experimental investigations. This work will be used as a background to subsequent studies concerning dynamical processes of the particles movement on the bottom of a channel. [Spanish] Hace mas de cien anos, se infirio la existencia de corrientes secundarias basandose en el hecho de que la velocidad maxima en canales se encuentra justo debajo de la superficie libre, y el de la variacion ciclica de solidos suspendidos en la direccion transversal de un canal. Gibson, estimo la velocidad aproximada de tales corrientes como aproximadamente el 5% de la velocidad principal. A pesar de su aparente debilidad, las corrientes secundarias juegan un papel esencial en la transferencia lateral de cantidad de

  15. Vortical Flow Management for Improved Configuration Aerodynamics - Recent Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    literature . This paper complements a preceding NASA Langley paper (rtf. 1). 2. HELICAL TRIPS The onset of asymmetry in the forebody vortices at high...this flap (shaded area) may be eliminated by means of a gothic -shaped apex. Further, by a suitable re-structuring of the vortex to delay its inboard

  16. The interplay of curvature and vortices in flow on curved surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Reuther, Sebastian; Voigt, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible fluids on curved surfaces are considered with respect to the interplay between topology, geometry and fluid properties using a surface vorticity-stream function formulation, which is solved using parametric finite elements. Motivated by designed examples for superfluids, we consider the influence of a geometric potential on vortices for fluids with finite viscosity and show numerical examples in which a change in the geometry is used to manipulate the flow field.

  17. Direct Assessment of Vorticity Alignment with Local and Nonlocal Strain Rates in Turbulent Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlington, Peter E.; Schumacher, Jörg; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2008-01-01

    A direct Biot-Savart integration is used to decompose the strain rate into its local and nonlocal constituents, allowing the vorticity alignment with the local and nonlocal strain rate eigenvectors to be investigated. These strain rate tensor constituents are evaluated in a turbulent flow using data from highly-resolved direct numerical simulations. While the vorticity aligns preferentially with the intermediate eigenvector of the \\textit{combined} strain rate, as has been observed previously...

  18. Streamwise vortices in shear flows: harbingers of transition and the skeleton of coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Spencer; Hall, Phil

    2010-11-01

    The relationship between asymptotic descriptions of vortex-wave interactions and more recent work on "exact coherent structures" is investigated. We have recently shown that the so-called "lower branch" state, which has been identified as playing a crucial role in these self-sustained processes, is a finite Reynolds number analogue of a Rayleigh vortex-wave interaction with scales appropriately modified from those for external flows to Couette flow the flow of interest here. Remarkable agreement between the asymptotic theory and numerical solutions of the Navier Stokes equations is found even down to relatively small Reynolds numbers thereby suggesting the possible importance of vortex-wave interaction theory in turbulent shear flows. In this paper we will outline the motivation behind the asymptotic analysis and computational modelling which demonstrate the linkage between wave vortex interaction and self sustaining processes. The minimum drag configuration associated with a fixed spanwise wavenumber is also determined as a function of the downstream wavelength and this points to the crucial importance of long waves evolving on the spatial scale appropriate to the roll/streak flow. [4pt] Hall, P. & Sherwin, S.J. 2010, Streamwise vortices in shear flows: harbingers of transition and the skeleton of coherent structures, J. Fluid Mech./ in press.

  19. Toroidal vortices over isolated topography in geophysical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshel, Konstantin V; Ryzhov, Evgeny A; Zyryanov, Valery N

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with a model of a topographically trapped vortex appearing over isolated topography in a geophysical flow. The main feature of the study is that we pay special attention to the vertical structure of a topographically trapped vortex. The model considered allows one to study the vertical motion which is known not to be negligible in many cases. Given topography in the form of an isolated cylinder, and radial symmetry and stationarity of a uniform flow, in the linear approximation, we formulate a boundary value problem that determines all the components of the velocity field through a six-order differential operator, and nonincreasing boundary conditions at the center of the topography, and at infinity. The eigenvalues of the boundary value problem correspond to bifurcation points, in which the flow becomes unstable, hence non-negligible vertical velocities occur. We formulate a condition for the boundary value problem to have a discrete spectrum of these bifurcation points, and hence to be solvable. Conducting a series of test calculations, we show that the resulting vortex lies in the vicinity of topography, and can attain the distance up to half of the topography characteristic radius. (papers)

  20. Stationary drift-Rossby vortices in shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horihata, Satoshi; Irie, Haruyuki; Sato, Masatomo

    1990-01-01

    Starting from Hasegawa-Mima equation with the generalized vorticity q which describes both electrostatic drift waves in plasmas and Rossby waves in the atmosphere of rotating planets, the stationary solutions of this equation in the (x, y) plane were considered assuming that the equilibrium density no depends on x and the electron temperature T 0 is constant. The arbitrary function F(φ) yielded from integration of transformed Hasegawa-Mima equation was taken either linear or nonlinear in φ, where φ is the stream function. When F is linear, vortex solutions were obtained by dividing the entire plane into internal and external regions by a closed boundary curve. Imposing the boundary conditions at the boundary curve, the constants in the solutions φ ex and φ in were determined. 4 examples are figured. When F is nonlinear, isolated (localized) vortex was considered. Deriving the equation to determine F, the equation for ψ, the internal vortical motion beyond the boundary was given. 2 examples are shown. (M.T.)

  1. Fundamental interactions of vortical structures with boundary layers in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1991-01-01

    The effect of no-slip walls on the evolution of coherent, vortical structures in two-dimensional flows is studied by numerical calculations. The calculations are based on an accurate and efficient spectral scheme which has been developed for the solution of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in the v......The effect of no-slip walls on the evolution of coherent, vortical structures in two-dimensional flows is studied by numerical calculations. The calculations are based on an accurate and efficient spectral scheme which has been developed for the solution of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations...... down of vortex dipoles by "vortex shielding"....

  2. VISUALIZATION METHODS OF VORTICAL FLOWS IN COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with conceptions and methods for visual representation of research numerical results in the problems of fluid mechanics and gas. The three-dimensional nature of unsteady flow being simulated creates significant difficulties for the visual representation of results. It complicates control and understanding of numerical data, and exchange and processing of obtained information about the flow field. Approaches to vortical flows visualization with the usage of gradients of primary and secondary scalar and vector fields are discussed. An overview of visualization techniques for vortical flows using different definitions of the vortex and its identification criteria is given. Visualization examples for some solutions of gas dynamics problems related to calculations of jets and cavity flows are presented. Ideas of the vortical structure of the free non-isothermal jet and the formation of coherent vortex structures in the mixing layer are developed. Analysis of formation patterns for spatial flows inside large-scale vortical structures within the enclosed space of the cubic lid-driven cavity is performed. The singular points of the vortex flow in a cubic lid-driven cavity are found based on the results of numerical simulation; their type and location are identified depending on the Reynolds number. Calculations are performed with fine meshes and modern approaches to the simulation of vortical flows (direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation. Paradigm of graphical programming and COVISE virtual environment are used for the visual representation of computational results. Application that implements the visualization of the problem is represented as a network which links are modules and each of them is designed to solve a case-specific problem. Interaction between modules is carried out by the input and output ports (data receipt and data transfer giving the possibility to use various input and output devices.

  3. Fluid vortices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Sheldon I

    1995-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vorticity Kinematics and Dynamics - Physical Principles The Vorticity Equation with Examples . . . . Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vorticity in Orthogonal...

  4. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.

  5. Steady state drift vortices in plasmas with shear flow in equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Mima equation in the presence of sheared poloidal flow is solved for two-dimensional steady state vortex. It is shown that when the phase velocity of the vortex is the same as the diamagnetic drift velocity, an exact solution in the form of counter-rotating vortices may appear...

  6. Vorticity and circulation aspects of twin jets in cross-flow for an oblique nozzle arrangement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Václav; Savory, E.; Takao, H.; Todoroki, T.; Okamoto, S.; Toy, N.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 4 (2006), s. 247-252 ISSN 0954-4100 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : twin jets in cross-flow * vorticity * circulation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.143, year: 2006

  7. Rotating shallow water modeling of planetary,astrophysical and plasma vortical structures (plasma transport across a magnetic field,model of the jupiter's GRS, prediction of existence of giant vortices in spiral galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nezlin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of results have been described in this paper. Firstly, an experimental study of the Rossby vortex meridional drift on the rotating shallow water has been carried out. Owing to the stringent physical analogy between the Rossby vortices and drift vortices in the magnetized plasma, the results obtained have allowed one to make a conclusion that the transport rate of the plasma, trapped by the drift vortices, across the magnetic field is equivalent to the “gyro-Bohm” diffusion coefficient. Secondly, a model of big vortices of the type of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, dominating in the atmospheres of the outer planets, has been produced. Thirdly, the rotating shallow water modeling has been carried out of the hydrodynamical generation mechanism of spiral structures in galaxies. Trailing spiral waves of various azimuthal modes, generated by a shear flow between fast rotating “nucleus” and slow rotating periphery, were produced. The spirals are similar to those existing in the real galaxies. The hydrodynamical concept of the spiral structure formation in galaxies has been substantiated. Strong anticyclonic vortices between the spiral arms of the structures under study have been discovered for the first time. The existence of analogous vortices in real galaxies has been predicted. (This prediction has been reliably confirmed recently in special astronomical observations, carried out on the basis of the mentioned laboratory modeling and the prediction made – see the paper by A. Fridman et al. (Astrophysics and Space Science, 1997, 252, 115.

  8. Quantification of topological changes of vorticity contours in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkitani, Koji; Al Sulti, Fayeza

    2010-06-01

    A characterization of reconnection of vorticity contours is made by direct numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow at a relatively low Reynolds number. We identify all the critical points of the vorticity field and classify them by solving an eigenvalue problem of its Hessian matrix on the basis of critical-point theory. The numbers of hyperbolic (saddles) and elliptic (minima and maxima) points are confirmed to satisfy Euler's index theorem numerically. Time evolution of these indices is studied for a simple initial condition. Generally speaking, we have found that the indices are found to decrease in number with time. This result is discussed in connection with related works on streamline topology, in particular, the relationship between stagnation points and the dissipation. Associated elementary procedures in physical space, the merging of vortices, are studied in detail for a number of snapshots. A similar analysis is also done using the stream function.

  9. Visualization of pre-set vortices in boundary layer flow over wavy surface in rectangular channel

    KAUST Repository

    Budiman, Alexander Christantho

    2014-12-04

    Abstract: Smoke-wire flow visualization is used to study the development of pre-set counter-rotating streamwise vortices in boundary layer flow over a wavy surface in a rectangular channel. The formation of the vortices is indicated by the vortical structures on the cross-sectional plane normal to the wavy surface. To obtain uniform spanwise vortex wavelength which will result in uniform vortex size, two types of spanwise disturbances were used: a series of perturbation wires placed prior and normal to the leading edge of the wavy surface, and a jagged pattern in the form of uniform triangles cut at the leading edge. These perturbation wires and jagged pattern induce low-velocity streaks that result in the formation of counter-rotating streamwise vortices that evolve downstream to form the mushroom-like structures on the cross-sectional plane of the flow. The evolution of the most amplified disturbances can be attributed to the formation of these mushroom-like structures. It is also shown that the size of the mushroom-like structures depends on the channel entrance geometry, Reynolds number, and the channel gap.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Zero absolute vorticity: insight from experiments in rotating laminar plane Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadi, Alexandre; Segalini, Antonio; Alfredsson, P Henrik

    2014-03-01

    For pressure-driven turbulent channel flows undergoing spanwise system rotation, it has been observed that the absolute vorticity, i.e., the sum of the averaged spanwise flow vorticity and system rotation, tends to zero in the central region of the channel. This observation has so far eluded a convincing theoretical explanation, despite experimental and numerical evidence reported in the literature. Here we show experimentally that three-dimensional laminar structures in plane Couette flow, which appear under anticyclonic system rotation, give the same effect, namely, that the absolute vorticity tends to zero if the rotation rate is high enough. It is shown that this is equivalent to a local Richardson number of approximately zero, which would indicate a stable condition. We also offer an explanation based on Kelvin's circulation theorem to demonstrate that the absolute vorticity should remain constant and approximately equal to zero in the central region of the channel when going from the nonrotating fully turbulent state to any state with sufficiently high rotation.

  11. A hydrodynamic model for superfluid helium with vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhuillier, D.; Francois, M.

    1975-01-01

    Although their existence is experimentally well verified, the so-called mutual friction force Fsub(sn) and superfluid friction force Fsub(s) cannot emerge from the Landau irrotational model of superfluidity. Up to now these forces have merely been added to the Landau equations but this is untenable since, as a consequence, one destroys the irrotationality condition with which the equations have expressly been built. It is shown that these friction forces appear in a natural way in a model where superfluid helium with vortices is compared to a fluid with a conserved intrinsic momentum. (Auth.)

  12. Investigation of the Taylor vortices in electrovortex flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, D. A.; Ivochkin, Yu P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of the electrovortex flow appearing when the electric current passing through the liquid metal interacts with own and external magnetic fields was investigated numerically. It was shown that axial external magnetic field leads to the rotation of the liquid and generates secondary flow similar to Taylor vortex. Calculations were carried out for various ratios of electrode sizes.

  13. Improvement of a near wake model for trailing vorticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2014-01-01

    A near wake model, originally proposed by Beddoes, is further developed. The purpose of the model is to account for the radially dependent time constants of the fast aerodynamic response and to provide a tip loss correction. It is based on lifting line theory and models the downwash due to roughly...... the first 90 degrees of rotation. This restriction of the model to the near wake allows for using a computationally efficient indicial function algorithm. The aim of this study is to improve the accuracy of the downwash close to the root and tip of the blade and to decrease the sensitivity of the model...... to temporal discretization, both regarding numerical stability and quality of the results. The modified near wake model is coupled to an aerodynamics model, which consists of a blade element momentum model with dynamic inflow for the far wake and a 2D shed vorticity model that simulates the unsteady buildup...

  14. A simple hydrodynamic model of tornado-like vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Based on similarity arguments, a simple fluid dynamic model of tornado-like vortices is offered that, with account for "vortex breakdown" at a certain height above the ground, relates the maximal azimuthal velocity in the vortex, reachable near the ground surface, to the convective available potential energy (CAPE) stored in the environmental atmosphere under pre-tornado conditions. The relative proportion of the helicity (kinetic energy) destruction (dissipation) in the "vortex breakdown" zone and, accordingly, within the surface boundary layer beneath the vortex is evaluated. These considerations form the basis of the dynamic-statistical analysis of the relationship between the tornado intensity and the CAPE budget in the surrounding atmosphere.

  15. Vortical flows over delta wings and numerical prediction of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1990-01-01

    Navier-Stokes solutions of subsonic vortical flow over a 75 deg sweep delta wing with a sharp leading edge are presented. The sensitivity of the solution to the numerical scheme is examined using both a partially upwind scheme and a scheme with central differencing in all directions. At moderate angles of attack, no vortex breakdown is observed, whereas the higher angle-of-attack cases exhibit breakdown. The effect of numerical grid density is investigated, and solutions that are obtained with various grid densities are compared with experimental data. An embedded grid approach is implemented to enable higher resolution in selected isolated flow regions, such as the leeward-side surface, the leading-edge vortical flow, and the vortex breakdown region.

  16. The near wake structure and the development of vorticity behind a model horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.; Wood, D. [The Univ. of Newcastle, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Callaghan (Australia)

    1997-08-01

    The wake of a two bladed model HAWT operating at zero yaw angle and in a steady flow in a wind tunnel was measured using hot wire probes. By phase locked averaging and moving the probe axially and radially the full three dimensional mean flow file was determined. All measurements were within two chord lengths of the blades and at tip speed ratios giving high turbine power output, a condition approaching runaway, and a stalled condition. For all tip speed ratios the wakes were significantly three dimensional. Large velocity variations were associated with vortex structures in the wakes, and irrotational fluctuations caused by the blade bound circulation. The vorticity clearly defined the hub and tip vortices that traced helical paths downstream, with the constant tip vortex pitch inversely proportional to tip speed ratio. Close to the blades the flow was complicated, though vortex roll-up was completed within one chord length. Considerable changes in wake structure occurred with tip speed ratio. At high power output the wake showed tip and hub vortices connected by a diffuse vortex sheet of mostly radial vorticity from the blade boundary layers; blade bound circulation was almost constant. The structure approaching runaway was similar though the hub vortex was not well defined and formed a vortex sheet around the hub which lifted away and diffused. The stalled condition was more complicated, with evidence of incomplete tip and hub vortex formation. The stream-wise velocity of the tip vortex core decreased with increasing tip speed ratio, but this was never aligned with local streamlines. The core of the tip vortex was not circular but more elliptical. A phase locked averaged angular momentum analysis was undertaken, the extra terms introduced through phase locked averaging were small. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Topology of streamlines and vorticity contours for two - dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten

    generated by a helical vortex filament in an ideal fluid. The classical expression for the stream function obtained by Hardin (Phys. Fluids 25, 1982) contains an infinite sum of modified Bessel functions. Using the approach by Okulov (Russ. J. Eng. Thermophys. 5, 1995) we obtain a closed-form approximation...... filaments with same pitch we use the established results to prove briefly that the velocity field is helical. We discuss the role of the stream function for the topology of the streamlines in incompressible, helical flows. On this basis, we perform a comprehensive study of the topology of the flow field...... which is considerably easier to analyse. Critical points of the stream function can be found from the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. Including the self-induced velocity...

  18. Evolution of the vorticity-area density during the formation of coherent structures in two-dimensional flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capel, H.W.; Pasmanter, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown: (1) that in two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flows the vorticity-area distribution evolves according to an advection-diffusion equation with a negative, time dependent diffusion coefficient and (2) how to use the vorticity-stream function relations, i.e., the so-called

  19. The supernova-regulated ISM. III. Generation of vorticity, helicity, and mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Gent, F. A.; Väisälä, M. S.; Sarson, G. R.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The forcing of interstellar turbulence, driven mainly by supernova (SN) explosions, is irrotational in nature, but the development of significant amounts of vorticity and helicity, accompanied by large-scale dynamo action, has been reported. Aim. Several earlier investigations examined vorticity production in simpler systems; here all the relevant processes can be considered simultaneously. We also investigate the mechanisms for the generation of net helicity and large-scale flow in the system. Methods: We use a three-dimensional, stratified, rotating and shearing local simulation domain of the size 1 × 1 × 2 kpc3, forced with SN explosions occurring at a rate typical of the solar neighbourhood in the Milky Way. In addition to the nominal simulation run with realistic Milky Way parameters, we vary the rotation and shear rates, but keep the absolute value of their ratio fixed. Reversing the sign of shear vs. rotation allows us to separate the rotation- and shear-generated contributions. Results: As in earlier studies, we find the generation of significant amounts of vorticity, the rotational flow comprising on average 65% of the total flow. The vorticity production can be related to the baroclinicity of the flow, especially in the regions of hot, dilute clustered supernova bubbles. In these regions, the vortex stretching acts as a sink of vorticity. In denser, compressed regions, the vortex stretching amplifies vorticity, but remains sub-dominant to baroclinicity. The net helicities produced by rotation and shear are of opposite signs for physically motivated rotation laws, with the solar neighbourhood parameters resulting in the near cancellation of the total net helicity. We also find the excitation of oscillatory mean flows, the strength and oscillation period of which depend on the Coriolis and shear parameters; we interpret these as signatures of the anisotropic-kinetic-α (AKA) effect. We use the method of moments to fit for the turbulent transport

  20. Essential Development of Streamwise Vortical/Secondary Flows in All Ducts with Corners or Slope Discontinuities in Perimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, Hassan; Vidal, Alvaro; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Schlatter, Philipp

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fully-developed turbulent flow through various straight ducts with sharp or rounded corners of various radii were performed to study influence of corner geometry on secondary flows. Unexpectedly, increased rounding of corners in rectangular ducts does not lead to monotonic trend towards pipe case. Instead, secondary vortices relocate close to regions of wall-curvature change. This behavior is connected to inhomogeneous interaction between near-wall bursting events, which are further characterized in this work with definition of their local preferential direction, and vorticity fluxes. Although these motions are relatively weak compared to streamwise velocity their effect on turbulence statistics and shear-stress distribution is very important and has not been sufficiently documented or fully understood. Flow through spanwise-periodic channels, with sinusoidal function to define the geometry of wall, yw = +/- h + A cos(ωz) , was also studied as model flow that is parametrically changed using A and ω, while taking advantage of many resulting symmetries. Consequences on experimental facilities and comparisons between experiments and various numerical and theoretical models are discussed revealing the uniqueness of pipe flow.

  1. Assessment of intracardiac flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot by flow-sensitive 4D MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirtler, Daniel; Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J.; Geiger, Julia

    2016-01-01

    To comprehensively and quantitatively analyse flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) compared with healthy volunteers. Time-resolved flow-sensitive 4D MRI was acquired in 24 rTOF patients and 12 volunteers. Qualitative flow evaluation was based on consensus reading of two observers. Quantitative analysis included segmentation of the right atrium (RA) and ventricle (RV) in a four-chamber view to extract volumes and regional haemodynamic information for computation of regional mean and peak vorticity. Right heart intra-atrial, intraventricular and outflow tract flow patterns differed considerably between rTOF patients and volunteers. Peak RA and mean RV vorticity was significantly higher in patients (p = 0.02/0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between patients' maximum and mean RV and RA vorticity and ventricular volumes (p < 0.05). The main pulmonary artery (MPA) regurgitant flow was associated with higher RA and RV vorticity, which was significant for RA maximum and RV mean vorticity (p = 0.01/0.03). The calculation of vorticity based on 4D flow data is an alternative approach to assess intracardiac flow changes in rTOF patients compared with qualitative flow visualization. Alterations in intracardiac vorticity could be relevant with regard to the development of RV dilation and impaired function. (orig.)

  2. Assessment of intracardiac flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot by flow-sensitive 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirtler, Daniel [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Congenital Heart Defects and Pediatric Cardiology (Heart Center, University of Freiburg), Freiburg (Germany); Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Geiger, Julia [University Childrens' Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    To comprehensively and quantitatively analyse flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) compared with healthy volunteers. Time-resolved flow-sensitive 4D MRI was acquired in 24 rTOF patients and 12 volunteers. Qualitative flow evaluation was based on consensus reading of two observers. Quantitative analysis included segmentation of the right atrium (RA) and ventricle (RV) in a four-chamber view to extract volumes and regional haemodynamic information for computation of regional mean and peak vorticity. Right heart intra-atrial, intraventricular and outflow tract flow patterns differed considerably between rTOF patients and volunteers. Peak RA and mean RV vorticity was significantly higher in patients (p = 0.02/0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between patients' maximum and mean RV and RA vorticity and ventricular volumes (p < 0.05). The main pulmonary artery (MPA) regurgitant flow was associated with higher RA and RV vorticity, which was significant for RA maximum and RV mean vorticity (p = 0.01/0.03). The calculation of vorticity based on 4D flow data is an alternative approach to assess intracardiac flow changes in rTOF patients compared with qualitative flow visualization. Alterations in intracardiac vorticity could be relevant with regard to the development of RV dilation and impaired function. (orig.)

  3. Helicity and Vorticity of Pulmonary Arterial Flow in Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension: Quantitative Analysis of Flow Formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michal; Barker, Alex J; Kheyfets, Vitaly; Stenmark, Kurt R; Crapo, James; Yeager, Michael E; Truong, Uyen; Buckner, J Kern; Fenster, Brett E; Hunter, Kendall S

    2017-12-20

    Qualitative and quantitative flow hemodynamic indexes have been shown to reflect right ventricular (RV) afterload and function in pulmonary hypertension (PH). We aimed to quantify flow hemodynamic formations in pulmonary arteries using 4-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and the spatial velocity derivatives helicity and vorticity in a heterogeneous PH population. Patients with PH (n=35) and controls (n=10) underwent 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging study for computation of helicity and vorticity in the main pulmonary artery (MPA), the right pulmonary artery, and the RV outflow tract. Helicity and vorticity were correlated with standard RV volumetric and functional indexes along with MPA stiffness assessed by measuring relative area change. Patients with PH had a significantly decreased helicity in the MPA (8 versus 32 m/s 2 ; P flow hemodynamic character in patients with PH assessed via quantitative analysis is considerably different when compared with healthy and normotensive controls. A strong association between helicity in pulmonary arteries and ventricular-vascular coupling suggests a relationship between the mechanical and flow hemodynamic domains. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  4. Vortical structures responsible for delayed stall in an idealized humpback whale flipper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesu; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate how the tubercles on the leading edge of an idealized humpback whale flipper model delay the stall. Oil-surface visualization is performed to see the surface flow pattern on the suction surface, and PIV is conducted in several streamwise and crossflow planes at different attack angles (α). Without tubercles, leading edge separation first occurs near the tip region and progresses inboard with increasing α. With tubercles, however, two types of vortical motions are observed at the mid-span. The first is streamwise vortex arrays which are dominant at α 9° , and these structures appear near the trailing edge. These two types of vortical motions delay flow separation at the peak regions of the mid-span, eliminating the spanwise stall progression and resulting in delayed stall. At α = 16° at which the tubercle model stalls, a large-scale streamwise vortex is originated from flow separation near the root region. This structure delays flow separation at the mid-span, leading to higher lift coefficient. Supported by NRF-2014M3C1B1033848.

  5. On vortex loops and filaments: three examples of numerical predictions of flows containing vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Egon

    2003-01-01

    Vortex motion plays a dominant role in many flow problems. This article aims at demonstrating some of the characteristic features of vortices with the aid of numerical solutions of the governing equations of fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations. Their discretized forms will first be reviewed briefly. Thereafter three problems of fluid flow involving vortex loops and filaments are discussed. In the first, the time-dependent motion and the mutual interaction of two colliding vortex rings are discussed, predicted in good agreement with experimental observations. The second example shows how vortex rings are generated, move, and interact with each other during the suction stroke in the cylinder of an automotive engine. The numerical results, validated with experimental data, suggest that vortex rings can be used to influence the spreading of the fuel droplets prior to ignition and reduce the fuel consumption. In the third example, it is shown that vortices can also occur in aerodynamic flows over delta wings at angle of attack as well as pipe flows: of particular interest for technical applications of these flows is the situation in which the vortex cores are destroyed, usually referred to as vortex breakdown or bursting. Although reliable breakdown criteria could not be established as yet, the numerical predictions obtained so far are found to agree well with the few experimental data available in the recent literature.

  6. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields of multiple vortices in the tip region of a ducted propulsor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; Ceccio, Steven L. [University of Michigan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields in the tip region of a ducted marine propulsor are examined. In this flow, a primary tip-leakage vortex interacts with a secondary, co-rotating trailing edge vortex and other co- and counter-rotating vorticity found in the blade wake. Planar particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) is used to examine the flow in a plane approximately perpendicular to the mean axis of the primary vortex. An identification procedure is used to characterize multiple regions of compact vorticity in the flow fields as series of Gaussian vortices. Significant differences are found between the vortex properties from the time-averaged flow fields and the average vortex properties identified in the instantaneous flow fields. Variability in the vortical flow field results from spatial wandering of the vortices, correlated fluctuations of the vortex strength and core size, and both correlated and uncorrelated fluctuations in the relative positions of the vortices. This variability leads to pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations. Corrections for some of this variability are performed on the instantaneous flow fields. The resulting processed flow fields reveal a significant increase in flow variability in a region relatively far downstream of the blade trailing edge, a phenomenon that is masked through the process of simple averaging. This increased flow variability is also accompanied by the inception of discrete vortex cavitation bubbles, which is an unexpected result, since the mean flow pressures in the region of inception are much higher than the vapor pressure of the liquid. This suggests that unresolved fine-scale vortex interactions and stretching may be occurring in the region of increased flow variability. (orig.)

  7. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields of multiple vortices in the tip region of a ducted propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2005-05-01

    The instantaneous and time-averaged flow fields in the tip region of a ducted marine propulsor are examined. In this flow, a primary tip-leakage vortex interacts with a secondary, co-rotating trailing edge vortex and other co- and counter-rotating vorticity found in the blade wake. Planar particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) is used to examine the flow in a plane approximately perpendicular to the mean axis of the primary vortex. An identification procedure is used to characterize multiple regions of compact vorticity in the flow fields as series of Gaussian vortices. Significant differences are found between the vortex properties from the time-averaged flow fields and the average vortex properties identified in the instantaneous flow fields. Variability in the vortical flow field results from spatial wandering of the vortices, correlated fluctuations of the vortex strength and core size, and both correlated and uncorrelated fluctuations in the relative positions of the vortices. This variability leads to pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations. Corrections for some of this variability are performed on the instantaneous flow fields. The resulting processed flow fields reveal a significant increase in flow variability in a region relatively far downstream of the blade trailing edge, a phenomenon that is masked through the process of simple averaging. This increased flow variability is also accompanied by the inception of discrete vortex cavitation bubbles, which is an unexpected result, since the mean flow pressures in the region of inception are much higher than the vapor pressure of the liquid. This suggests that unresolved fine-scale vortex interactions and stretching may be occurring in the region of increased flow variability.

  8. PIV and Hotwire Measurement and Analysis of Tip Vortices and Turbulent Wake Generated by a Model Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D.; Tan, Y. M.; Chamorro, L. P.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sheng, J.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding vortical flow structures and turbulence in the wake flow behind a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) has widespread applications in efficient blade design. Moreover, the knowledge of wake-turbine interactions allows us to devise optimal operational parameters, such as the spatial allocation and control algorithms of wind turbines, for a densely populated wind farm. To understand the influence of tip vortices on energy containing mean flow and turbulence, characteristics of vortical structures and turbulence must be quantified thoroughly. In this study, we conduct phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the flow before and after a model HAWT, which is located in a zero-pressure gradient wind tunnel with a cross section of 1.7 × 1.7 m and a test section of 16 m in length. A three-blade model HAWT with a diameter of 605 mm and tip-speed ratio of 5 is used. PIV images are recorded by a 2048 × 2048 CCD camera and streamed at 6 Hz continuously; and phased locked with the passage of the blade at its vertical position. Each PIV measurement covers a 0.13 × 0.13 m2 sample area with the spatial resolution of 63 μm and a vector spacing of 0.5 mm. All experiments are conducted at the free-stream wind speed of 10 m/s. Flow fields at thirty consecutive downstream locations up to six rotor diameters and 144 mid chord lengths are measured. At each location, we obtain at least 10,000 instantaneous PIV realizations or 20,000 images. Three different configurations: single, dual, and trio turbines located at 5 rotor diameter upstream to each other, are examined experimentally. The flow statistics include mean wake velocity distributions, characteristics of tip vortices evolving downstream, fluctuation velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, stresses, and energy spectra. We find that tip vortices decay much faster in the wake of the upstream turbines (multiple-turbine configurations), whereas they maintain the coherence and strength behind a single

  9. Tracking Blade Tip Vortices for Numerical Flow Simulations of Hovering Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip vortices generated by a helicopter rotor blade are a major source of rotor noise and airframe vibration. This occurs when a vortex passes closely by, and interacts with, a rotor blade. The accurate prediction of Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) continues to be a challenge for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Though considerable research has been devoted to BVI noise reduction and experimental techniques for measuring the blade tip vortices in a wind tunnel, there are only a handful of post-processing tools available for extracting vortex core lines from CFD simulation data. In order to calculate the vortex core radius, most of these tools require the user to manually select a vortex core to perform the calculation. Furthermore, none of them provide the capability to track the growth of a vortex core, which is a measure of how quickly the vortex diffuses over time. This paper introduces an automated approach for tracking the core growth of a blade tip vortex from CFD simulations of rotorcraft in hover. The proposed approach offers an effective method for the quantification and visualization of blade tip vortices in helicopter rotor wakes. Keywords: vortex core, feature extraction, CFD, numerical flow visualization

  10. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  11. Towards reduced order modelling for predicting the dynamics of coherent vorticity structures within wind turbine wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, M; Santoni, C; Leonardi, S; Iungo, G V

    2017-04-13

    The dynamics of the velocity field resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and a wind turbine array can affect significantly the performance of a wind power plant and the durability of wind turbines. In this work, dynamics in wind turbine wakes and instabilities of helicoidal tip vortices are detected and characterized through modal decomposition techniques. The dataset under examination consists of snapshots of the velocity field obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of an isolated wind turbine, for which aerodynamic forcing exerted by the turbine blades on the atmospheric boundary layer is mimicked through the actuator line model. Particular attention is paid to the interaction between the downstream evolution of the helicoidal tip vortices and the alternate vortex shedding from the turbine tower. The LES dataset is interrogated through different modal decomposition techniques, such as proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition. The dominant wake dynamics are selected for the formulation of a reduced order model, which consists in a linear time-marching algorithm where temporal evolution of flow dynamics is obtained from the previous temporal realization multiplied by a time-invariant operator.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Towards reduced order modelling for predicting the dynamics of coherent vorticity structures within wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, M.; Santoni, C.; Leonardi, S.; Iungo, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of the velocity field resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and a wind turbine array can affect significantly the performance of a wind power plant and the durability of wind turbines. In this work, dynamics in wind turbine wakes and instabilities of helicoidal tip vortices are detected and characterized through modal decomposition techniques. The dataset under examination consists of snapshots of the velocity field obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of an isolated wind turbine, for which aerodynamic forcing exerted by the turbine blades on the atmospheric boundary layer is mimicked through the actuator line model. Particular attention is paid to the interaction between the downstream evolution of the helicoidal tip vortices and the alternate vortex shedding from the turbine tower. The LES dataset is interrogated through different modal decomposition techniques, such as proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition. The dominant wake dynamics are selected for the formulation of a reduced order model, which consists in a linear time-marching algorithm where temporal evolution of flow dynamics is obtained from the previous temporal realization multiplied by a time-invariant operator. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  13. Condensation of vortices and disorder parameter in 3d Heisenberg model

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giacomo, A.; Martelli, D.; Paffuti, G.

    1998-01-01

    The 3d Heisenberg model is studied from a dual point of view. It is shown that the disordered phase corresponds to condensation of vortices in the vacuum, and the critical indices are computed from the corresponding disorder parameter.

  14. Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models - the data set consists of 3D O3...

  15. Fast Trailed Vorticity Modeling for Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and its Influence on Aeroelastic Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg

    efficiency is increased. The model is validated against results from full rotor CFD and free wake panel code computations, which show that the model yields improved results in steady and unsteady simulations compared to unsteady BEM modeling. Especially the aerodynamic work due to prescribed in-plane and out......In this work, an aerodynamic model for the use in aeroelastic wind turbine codes is presented. It consists of a simplified lifting line model covering the induction due to the trailed vorticity in the near wake, a 2D shed vorticity model and a far wake model using the well known blade element...... momentum (BEM) theory. The model is an extension of unsteady BEM models, which provides a radial coupling of the aerodynamic sections through the trailed vorticity. The model is very fast and slows down aeroelastic wind turbine simulations by only few percent, compared to an unsteady BEM model. Compared...

  16. How granular vortices can help understanding rheological and mixing properties of dense granular flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense granular flows exhibit fascinating kinematic patterns characterised by strong fluctuations in grain velocities. In this paper, we analyse these fluctuations and discuss their possible role on macroscopic properties such as effective viscosity, non-locality and shear-induced diffusion. The analysis is based on 2D experimental granular flows performed with the stadium shear device and DEM simulations. We first show that, when subjected to shear, grains self-organised into clusters rotating like rigid bodies. The average size of these so-called granular vortices is found to increase and diverge for lower inertial numbers, when flows decelerate and stop. We then discuss how such a microstructural entity and its associated internal length scale, possibly much larger than a grain, may be used to explain two important properties of dense granular flows: (i the existence of shear-induced diffusion of grains characterised by a shear-rate independent diffusivity and (ii the development of boundary layers near walls, where the viscosity is seemingly lower than the viscosity far from walls.

  17. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    estimate dominant mixing structures as well as the basic instabilities than drive the turbulent direct and inverse cascades [12]. References [1] Mahjoub O.B.; Redondo J.M.; and Babiano A. (2000). Hyerarchy flux in nonhomogeneous flows in turbulent diffusion in the environment Eds. Redondo J.M. and Babiano A. 249-260. [2] Redondo J.M. (1992). Termodinámica de los procesos irreversibles, efectos termoeléctricos. Rev. Termoelectricidad2, 16-29. AIT. Pamplona. [3] Dalziel, S. B. (1994). Perturbations and coherent flow in Rayleigh-Taylor instability in 4th International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, ed. P. F. Linden, D. L. Youngs, & S. B. Dalziel; 32-41. [4] Redondo J.M.; Sanchez J.M.; Pascual I.; Noriega, G.F. (1995). Thermoelectric regulation for electric cabinets: XVI International Conference in Thermoelectrics, 02-G20. Ed. V. Vedernikov. 456-468. St. Petersburg, Russia. [5] Mahjoub, O.B; Redondo J.M.; Babiano A. (1998).Structure functions in complex flows: Applied Scientific Research. 59, 299-313. Kluwer. [6] Matulka A.; Redondo J. M.; and Carrillo A. (2008). Experiments in stratified and rotating decaying 2D flows, Il Nuovo Cimento 31, 5-6, 757-770. 2008. [7] Redondo, J.M.; Tellez, J; Sotillos, L.; Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar L.; Sanchez, J.M.; Furmanek P.,; Diez M (2014). Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure: Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 17, EGU2015-14773, 2015 - EGU General Assembly 2015. [8] Nicolleau, F.C.G.A.; Cambon, C.; Redondo, J.M.; Vassilicos, J.C.; Reeks, M.; Nowakowski, A.F. (Eds.) (2012). New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence: ERCOFTAC Series. [9] Redondo J. M.; Sanchez M. A.; and Cantalapiedra I. R. (1995). Turbulent Mechanisms in Stratified Flows, Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans, 23, 454-462. [10] Matulka A.; Redondo J.M.; and Carrillo A. (2008) Experiments in stratified and rotating decaying 2D flows. II Nuovo Cimento 31, 5

  18. Assessment of intracardiac flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot by flow-sensitive 4D MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtler, Daniel; Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J; Geiger, Julia

    2016-10-01

    To comprehensively and quantitatively analyse flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) compared with healthy volunteers. Time-resolved flow-sensitive 4D MRI was acquired in 24 rTOF patients and 12 volunteers. Qualitative flow evaluation was based on consensus reading of two observers. Quantitative analysis included segmentation of the right atrium (RA) and ventricle (RV) in a four-chamber view to extract volumes and regional haemodynamic information for computation of regional mean and peak vorticity. Right heart intra-atrial, intraventricular and outflow tract flow patterns differed considerably between rTOF patients and volunteers. Peak RA and mean RV vorticity was significantly higher in patients (p = 0.02/0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between patients' maximum and mean RV and RA vorticity and ventricular volumes (p tetralogy of Fallot. • Regurgitant flow in the main pulmonary artery is associated with higher right heart vorticity.

  19. Identification on the three-dimensional vortical structures of impeller flow by a multi-plane stereoscopic PIV method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Youl; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2003-01-01

    The three-dimensional spatial structures of impeller flow created by a six bladed Rushton turbine have identified based on the volumetric velocity information from multi-plane stereoscopic PIV measurements. A total of 10 planes with 2 mm space and a 50 mm by 64 mm size of the field of view were targeted. To reduce the depth of focus, we adopted an angle offset configuration which satisfied the Scheimpflug condition. The distortion compensation procedure was utilized during the in situ calibration. Phase-locked instantaneous data were ensemble averaged and interpolated in order to obtain mean 3-D, volumetric velocity fields on a 60 degree sector of a cylindrical ring volume enclosing the turbine blade. Using the equi-vorticity surface rendering, the spatial structure of the trailing vortices was clearly demonstrated. Detail flow characteristics of the radial jet reported in previous studies of mixer flows were easily identified

  20. {Γ}-Convergence Analysis of a Generalized XY Model: Fractional Vortices and String Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Rufat; Cicalese, Marco; De Luca, Lucia; Ponsiglione, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    We propose and analyze a generalized two dimensional XY model, whose interaction potential has n weighted wells, describing corresponding symmetries of the system. As the lattice spacing vanishes, we derive by {Γ}-convergence the discrete-to-continuum limit of this model. In the energy regime we deal with, the asymptotic ground states exhibit fractional vortices, connected by string defects. The {Γ}-limit takes into account both contributions, through a renormalized energy, depending on the configuration of fractional vortices, and a surface energy, proportional to the length of the strings. Our model describes in a simple way several topological singularities arising in Physics and Materials Science. Among them, disclinations and string defects in liquid crystals, fractional vortices and domain walls in micromagnetics, partial dislocations and stacking faults in crystal plasticity.

  1. Two species of vortices in massive gauged non-linear sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca,Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Ambientales, Av. Filiberto Villalobos 119, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Fuertes, W. García [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Facultad de Ciencias, Calle Calvo Sotelo s/n, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Guilarte, J. Mateos [Departamento de Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Ciencias, Plaza de la Merced, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2015-02-23

    Non-linear sigma models with scalar fields taking values on ℂℙ{sup n} complex manifolds are addressed. In the simplest n=1 case, where the target manifold is the S{sup 2} sphere, we describe the scalar fields by means of stereographic maps. In this case when the U(1) symmetry is gauged and Maxwell and mass terms are allowed, the model accommodates stable self-dual vortices of two kinds with different energies per unit length and where the Higgs field winds at the cores around the two opposite poles of the sphere. Allowing for dielectric functions in the magnetic field, similar and richer self-dual vortices of different species in the south and north charts can be found by slightly modifying the potential. Two different situations are envisaged: either the vacuum orbit lies on a parallel in the sphere, or one pole and the same parallel form the vacuum orbit. Besides the self-dual vortices of two species, there exist BPS domain walls in the second case. Replacing the Maxwell contribution of the gauge field to the action by the second Chern-Simons secondary class, only possible in (2+1)-dimensional Minkowski space-time, new BPS topological defects of two species appear. Namely, both BPS vortices and domain ribbons in the south and the north charts exist because the vacuum orbit consits of the two poles and one parallel. Formulation of the gauged ℂℙ{sup 2} model in a reference chart shows a self-dual structure such that BPS semi-local vortices exist. The transition functions to the second or third charts break the U(1)×SU(2) semi-local symmetry, but there is still room for standard self-dual vortices of the second species. The same structures encompassing N complex scalar fields are easily generalized to gauged ℂℙ{sup N} models.

  2. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  3. Energy conserving numerical methods for the computation of complex vortical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaneau, Yves

    One of the original goals of this thesis was to develop numerical tools to help with the design of micro air vehicles. Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are small flying devices of only a few inches in wing span. Some people consider that as their size becomes smaller and smaller, it would be increasingly more difficult to keep all the classical control surfaces such as the rudders, the ailerons and the usual propellers. Over the years, scientists took inspiration from nature. Birds, by flapping and deforming their wings, are capable of accurate attitude control and are able to generate propulsion. However, the biomimicry design has its own limitations and it is difficult to place a hummingbird in a wind tunnel to study precisely the motion of its wings. Our approach was to use numerical methods to tackle this challenging problem. In order to precisely evaluate the lift and drag generated by the wings, one needs to be able to capture with high fidelity the extremely complex vortical flow produced in the wake. This requires a numerical method that is stable yet not too dissipative, so that the vortices do not get diffused in an unphysical way. We solved this problem by developing a new Discontinuous Galerkin scheme that, in addition to conserving mass, momentum and total energy locally, also preserves kinetic energy globally. This property greatly improves the stability of the simulations, especially in the special case p=0 when the approximation polynomials are taken to be piecewise constant (we recover a finite volume scheme). In addition to needing an adequate numerical scheme, a high fidelity solution requires many degrees of freedom in the computations to represent the flow field. The size of the smallest eddies in the flow is given by the Kolmogoroff scale. Capturing these eddies requires a mesh counting in the order of Re³ cells, where Re is the Reynolds number of the flow. We show that under-resolving the system, to a certain extent, is acceptable. However our

  4. Enhanced Forced Convection Heat Transfer using Small Scale Vorticity Concentrations Effected by Flow Driven, Aeroelastically Vibrating Reeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    channel was increased gradually (at a rate of about 16 cm/sec/sec) using a flow controller that is built into the air supply (cf., §III.3.1) while...integrated film heaters (operating in constant heat flux, cf, §III.3.1). The heat flux to the heaters was varied over a range of flow rates (2,000...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0339 Enhanced convection heat transfer using small-scale vorticity concentrations effected by flow -driven, aeroelastically

  5. Inferring the Relative Quality of Reanalysis Data from a Historical Reforecast Using a Vorticity Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, C. A.; Herrmann, M.; Huang, H.

    2011-12-01

    The improvement of numerical weather prediction models in recent decades has led to a measurable decrease in forecast error, for instance as quantified by the 500-hPa geopotential height anomaly correlation. This improvement can be attributed in part to the refinements in the numerical architecture and the representation of physical processes in the model. It is more difficult to attribute the reduction in forecast error to improvements in the accuracy of the models' initial conditions, not least because of the complexity of the data assimilation process. As a contribution to this problem that will also be pedagogically useful, a reforecast experiment was conducted using a simple regional vorticity equation model for the 500-hPa flow over North America. This model is comparable in complexity to the Charney-Fjörtoft-von Neumann model used for the first numerical weather prediction experiment in 1949. Six-hourly predictions are made out to 36 hours for the period from 1948-2010, using the NCEP Reanalysis dataset for the initial conditions. Because initialization is trivial for this "filtered" model, one can clearly attribute the change in forecast skill to the changing quality of the initial state. The choice of the 500 hPa level is relevant since it will reflect the effect of the significant change in the density of upper-air observations from the mid- to late 20th Century. As an important byproduct of this exercise, a trend of improved forecast over time will imply an improved relative quality of the reanalysis data for the mid-troposphere. Therefore, the experiment serves two purposes of studying the forecast error and checking the quality of the reanalysis. An analysis of selected cases indicates that the predictions made for the 21st century have smaller errors compared to those made for the 1950s. A comprehensive analysis for the whole set of forecast is underway and the outcome will be discussed.

  6. A vorticity transport model to restore spatial gaps in velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Siavash; Shadden, Shawn

    2017-11-01

    Often measurements of velocity data do not have full spatial coverage in the probed domain or near boundaries. These gaps can be due to missing measurements or masked regions of corrupted data. These gaps confound interpretation, and are problematic when the data is used to compute Lagrangian or trajectory-based analyses. Various techniques have been proposed to overcome coverage limitations in velocity data such as unweighted least square fitting, empirical orthogonal function analysis, variational interpolation as well as boundary modal analysis. In this talk, we present a vorticity transport PDE to reconstruct regions of missing velocity vectors. The transport model involves both nonlinear anisotropic diffusion and advection. This approach is shown to preserve the main features of the flow even in cases of large gaps, and the reconstructed regions are continuous up to second order. We illustrate results for high-frequency radar (HFR) measurements of the ocean surface currents as this is a common application of limited coverage. We demonstrate that the error of the method is on the same order of the error of the original velocity data. In addition, we have developed a web-based gateway for data restoration, and we will demonstrate a practical application using available data. This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. 1520825.

  7. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2014-10-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  8. EFFECT OF SWEEP ANGLE ON THE VORTICAL FLOW OVER DELTA WINGS AT AN ANGLE OF ATTACK OF 10°

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMES BRETT

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CFD simulations have been used to analyse the vortical flows over sharp edged delta wings with differing sweep angles under subsonic conditions at an angle of attack of 10°. RANS simulations were validated against experimental data for a 65° sweep wing, with a flat cross-section, and the steadiness of the flow field was assessed by comparing the results against unsteady URANS and DES simulations. To assess the effect of sweep angle on the flow field, a range of sweep angles from 65° to 43° were simulated. For moderate sweep wings the primary vortex was observed to detach from the leading edge, undergoing vortex breakdown, and a weaker, replacement, "shadow" vortex was formed. The shadow vortex was observed for sweep angles of 50° and less, and resulted in reduced lift production near the wing tips loss of the stronger primary vortex.

  9. Nielsen-Olesen Vortices in Noncommutative Abelian Higgs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jatkar, D P; Wadia, S R; Jatkar, Dileep P.; Mandal, Gautam; Wadia, Spenta R.

    2000-01-01

    We construct Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution in the noncommutative abelian Higgs model. We derive the quantized topological flux of the vortex solution. We find that the flux is integral by explicit computation in the large $\\theta$ limit as well as in the small $\\theta$ limit. In the context of a tachyon vortex on the brane-antibrane system we demonstrate that it is this topological charge that gives rise to the RR charge of the resulting BPS D-brane. We also consider the left-right-symmetric gauge theory which does not have a commutative limit and construct an exact vortex solution in it.

  10. Water waves interacting with a current of constant vorticity: estimating the vorticity of the wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bruno; Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian; Touboul, Julien

    2017-04-01

    During the last ten years, the topic of water waves interacting with sheared current has drawn a lot of attention, since the interaction of water waves with vorticity was recently found to be significant when modeling the propagation of water waves. In this framework, the configuration involving constantly sheared current (indeed a constant vorticity) is of special interst, since the equations remain tractable. In this framework, it is demonstrated that the flow related to water waves can be described by means of potential theory, since the source term in the vorticity equation is proportionnal to the curvature of the current profile (Nwogu, 2009). In the mean time, the community often wonders if this argument is valid, since the existence of a perfectly linearly sheared current is purely theoretical, and the presence of the vorticity within the wave field can be external (through wave generation mechanisms, for instance). Thus, this work is dedicated to investigate the magnitude of the vorticity related to the wave field, in conditions similar to this analytical case of constant vorticity. This approach is based on the comparison of experimental data, and three models. The first model is linear, supposing a constantly seared current and water waves described by potential theory. The second is fully nonlinear, but still supposing that water waves are potential, and finally, the third model is fully nonlinear, but solves the Euler equations, allowing the existence of vorticity related to the waves. The confrontation of these three approaches with the experimental data will allow to quantify the wave-related vorticity within the total flow, and analyze its importance as a function of nonlinearity and vorticity magnitude. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N°ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  11. Shear flow effect on ion temperature gradient vortices in plasmas with sheared magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1999-01-01

    the coupled equations for potential and pressure exhibit special tripolar vortex-like structures. For the general case, however, parallel ion dynamics is included and the equation describing the stationary ITG vortex has the structure of a nonlinear Poisson-type equation. Analytical as well as numerical...... solutions of this equation are presented for various possible cases. It is shown that, for a critical value of the velocity shear asymmetric dipolar vortices can arise which are strongly modified as a localized vortex chain at resonance. For strong velocity shear these structures are destroyed...

  12. The role of the vorticity field on the increase of drag forces during impulsive deployment of a rectangular flow actuator inside TBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzawawy, Amir; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2014-11-01

    An experimental Time Resolved PIV data is used to evaluate the significant role of the vorticity field on aerodynamic forces during an impulsive deployment of a 100 × 100mm2 flow actuator. In this experiment, the flow actuator is placed inside TBL flow, while it is suddenly deployed, ω = 17 rad / s , against the incoming TBL flow with free stream air velocity of 3.7 m/s. The experiments data has shown a significant increase of drag forces during the impulsive deployment compared with the drag of those stationary actuator cases. In this work, a further analysis is carried out using vorticity moments-based relations of forces of finite bodies exerted by incompressible fluid flows (Wu et al. 2006). These formulations, which shown to be suitable for use with TR-PIV data, are used here to identify the role of the generated vorticity field on the increase of the drag. Only three terms out of the seven terms showed significant contribution to the drag forces enhancement. Two of those were dependent on the vorticity field; the first term represents volume integral of rate of change of the first moment of the vorticity. The second term, which showed a negative contribution to the increase of drag, was the volume integral of the Lamb force. The third term represents the inertia effects at the accelerating boundaries. This identification of the role of each term can provide a basic understanding to the role of the vorticity field and may help in flow actuator design process to obtain enhanced aerodynamics forces with impulsive motion.

  13. Solitons and Vortices of Shear-Flow-Modified Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Usman; Saleem, Hamid; Shan, Shaukat Ali

    2018-01-01

    Shear-flow-driven instability and a modified nonlinear dust acoustic wave (mDAW) are investigated in a dusty plasma. In the nonlinear regime a one dimensional mDAW produces pulse-type solitons and in the two-dimensional case, the dipolar vortex solutions are obtained. This investigation is relevant to magnetospheres of planets such as Saturn and Jupiter as well as dusty interstellar clouds. Here, the theoretical model is applied to Saturn's F-rings, and shape of the nonlinear electric field structures is discussed.

  14. Potential Vorticity Asymmetries and Tropical Cyclone Evolution in a Moist Three-Layer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lloyd J.

    2000-11-01

    The role of potential vorticity (PV) asymmetries in the evolution of a tropical cyclone is investigated using a three-layer model that includes boundary layer friction, surface moisture fluxes, and a convergence-based convective parameterization. In a benchmark experiment, a symmetric vortex is first spun up on an f plane for 24 h. The symmetric vortex has a realistic structure, including a local PV maximum inside its radius of maximum wind (RMW). A weak azimuthal-wavenumber 2 PV asymmetry confined to the lower two layers of the model is then added to the vortex near the RMW. After an additional 2 h (for a total 26-h simulation), the asymmetric PV anomaly produces changes in the symmetric vortex that have significant differences from those in dry experiments with the present model or previous barotropic studies. A diagnosis of the contributions to changes in the symmetric wind tendency due to the asymmetry confirm the dominance of horizontal eddy fluxes at early times. The barotropic eddy kick provided by the anomaly lasts 2 h, which is the damping timescale for the disturbance.Additional experiments with an imposed isolated double-PV anomaly are made. Contrary to expectation from the dry experiments or barotropic studies, based on arguments involving `wave activity,' moving the anomaly closer to the center of the vortex or farther out does not change the overall evolution of the symmetric vortex. The physical mechanism responsible for the differences between the barotropic studies and those including moist physics as well as for the robustness of the response is established using a budget for the asymmetric vorticity. It is shown that the interactions between the asymmetries and the symmetric hurricane vortex at early times depend on realistic features of the model hurricane and not on interactions between the asymmetries and the boundary layer, which possibly depend on the convective parameterization. In particular, the changes in the symmetric wind tendency due

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics and plastic flow of vortices in superconductors with periodic arrays of pinning sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C.; Groth, J.; Olson, C. J.; Field, Stuart B.; Nori, Franco

    1996-12-01

    We present simulations of flux-gradient-driven superconducting rigid vortices interacting with square and triangular arrays of columnar pinning sites in an increasing external magnetic field. These simulations allow us to quantitatively relate spatiotemporal microscopic information of the vortex lattice with typically measured macroscopic quantities, such as the magnetization M(H). The flux lattice does not become completely commensurate with the pinning sites throughout the sample at the magnetization matching peaks, but forms a commensurate lattice in a region close to the edge of the sample. Matching fields related to unstable vortex configurations do not produce peaks in M(H). We observe a variety of evolving complex flux profiles, including flat terraces or plateaus separated by winding current-carrying strings and, near the peaks in M(H), plateaus only in certain regions, which move through the sample as the field increases. Several short videos, illustrating several particular cases of the type of dynamics described here, are available at http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/~nori.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics and plastic flow of vortices in superconductors with periodic arrays of pinning sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Groth, J.; Olson, C.J.; Field, S.B.; Nori, F.

    1996-01-01

    We present simulations of flux-gradient-driven superconducting rigid vortices interacting with square and triangular arrays of columnar pinning sites in an increasing external magnetic field. These simulations allow us to quantitatively relate spatiotemporal microscopic information of the vortex lattice with typically measured macroscopic quantities, such as the magnetization M(H). The flux lattice does not become completely commensurate with the pinning sites throughout the sample at the magnetization matching peaks, but forms a commensurate lattice in a region close to the edge of the sample. Matching fields related to unstable vortex configurations do not produce peaks in M(H). We observe a variety of evolving complex flux profiles, including flat terraces or plateaus separated by winding current-carrying strings and, near the peaks in M(H), plateaus only in certain regions, which move through the sample as the field increases. Several short videos, illustrating several particular cases of the type of dynamics described here, are available at http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/--nori. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. A computational study of soot formation in opposed-flow diffusion flame interacting with vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Selvaraj, Prabhu

    2017-01-05

    The flame-vortex interaction enables the study of basic phenomena that control the coupling between combustion and turbulence. Employing a gas phase reaction mechanism considering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a two dimensional counterflow ethylene-air flame is simulated. A reduced mechanism with PAH pathways that includes until coronene and method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) has been employed to calculate the soot characteristics. Interaction of sooting flame with a prescribed decaying random velocity field is being investigated. Counterflow nonpremixed flames at low strain rate sooting conditions are considered. Effects of vortices are studied on the flame structures and its sensitivity on the soot formation characteristics. As the vortex rolls up the flame, integrated soot volume fraction is found to be larger for the air-side vortex. A detailed analysis on the flame structure and its influence on the formation of soot were carried out. The results indicate that the larger PAH species contributes to the soot formation in the airside perturbation regimes, whereas the soot formation is dominated by the soot transport in fuel-side perturbation.

  18. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  19. Non-linear modelling of monthly mean vorticity time changes: an application to the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Finizio

    Full Text Available Starting from a number of observables in the form of time-series of meteorological elements in various areas of the northern hemisphere, a model capable of fitting past records and predicting monthly vorticity time changes in the western Mediterranean is implemented. A new powerful statistical methodology is introduced (MARS in order to capture the non-linear dynamics of time-series representing the available 40-year history of the hemispheric circulation. The developed model is tested on a suitable independent data set. An ensemble forecast exercise is also carried out to check model stability in reference to the uncertainty of input quantities.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · General circulation ocean-atmosphere interactions · Synoptic-scale meteorology

  20. A numerical study of vorticity-enhanced heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Alben, Silas

    2012-11-01

    The Glezer lab at Georgia Tech has found that vorticity produced by vibrated reeds can improve heat transfer in electronic hardware. Vortices enhance forced convection by boundary layer separation and thermal mixing in the bulk flow. In this work, we simulate the heat transfer process in a 3-dimensional plate-fin heat sink. We propose a simplified model by considering flow and temperature in a 2-D channel, and extend the model to the third dimension using a 1-D heat fin model. We simulate periodically steady-state solutions. We determine how the global Nusselt number is increased, depending on the vortices' strengths and spacings, in the parameter space of Reynolds and Peclet numbers. We find a surprising spatial oscillation of the local Nusselt number due to the vortices. Support from NSF-DMS grant 1022619 is acknowledged.

  1. Vorticity models of ocean surface diffusion in coastal jets and eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, D.; Matulka, A.; Sekula, E.

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss the use of multi-fractal techniques used to investigete vorticity and jet dynamical state of these features detected in the sea surface as well as to identify possible local parametrizations of turbulent diffusion in complex non-homogeneous flows. We use a combined vorticity/energy equation to parametrize mixing at the Rossby Deformation Radius, which may be used even in non Kolmogorov types of flows. The vorticity cascade is seen to be different to the energy cascade and may have important cnsecuences in pollutant dispersion prediction, both in emergency accidental releases and on a day to day operational basis. We also identify different SAR signatures of river plumes near the coast, which are usefull to provide calibrations for the different local configurations that allow to predict the behaviour of different tracers and tensioactives in the coastal sea surface area by means of as a geometrical characterization of the vorticity and velocity maps which induce local mixing and dilution jet processes. The satellite-borne SAR seems to be a good system for the identification of dynamic. lt is also a convenient tool to investigate the eddy structures of a certain area where the effect of bathymetry and local currents are important in describing the ocean surface behavior. Maximum eddy size agrees remarkably well with the limit imposed by the local Rossby deformation radius using the usual thermocline induced stratification, Redondo and Platonov (2000). The Rossby deformation radius, defined as Rd = (N/f)h, where N is the Brunt-Vaisalla frequency, f is the local Coriolis parameter (f=2Osin(lat), where O is the rotation of the earth as function of the latitude), The role of buoyancy may be also detected by seasonal changes in h, the thermocline depth, with these considerations Rd is ranged between 6 and 30 Km. Bezerra M.O., Diez M., Medeiros C. Rodriguez A., Bahia E., Sanchez Arcilla A and Redondo J.M. (1998) "Study on the influence of waves on

  2. Gas transfer under breaking waves: experiments and an improved vorticity-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Tsoukala

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a modified vorticity-based model for gas transfer under breaking waves in the absence of significant wind forcing is presented. A theoretically valid and practically applicable mathematical expression is suggested for the assessment of the oxygen transfer coefficient in the area of wave-breaking. The proposed model is based on the theory of surface renewal that expresses the oxygen transfer coefficient as a function of both the wave vorticity and the Reynolds wave number for breaking waves. Experimental data were collected in wave flumes of various scales: a small-scale experiments were carried out using both a sloping beach and a rubble-mound breakwater in the wave flume of the Laboratory of Harbor Works, NTUA, Greece; b large-scale experiments were carried out with a sloping beach in the wind-wave flume of Delft Hydraulics, the Netherlands, and with a three-layer rubble mound breakwater in the Schneideberg Wave Flume of the Franzius Institute, University of Hannover, Germany. The experimental data acquired from both the small- and large-scale experiments were in good agreement with the proposed model. Although the apparent transfer coefficients from the large-scale experiments were lower than those determined from the small-scale experiments, the actual oxygen transfer coefficients, as calculated using a discretized form of the transport equation, are in the same order of magnitude for both the small- and large-scale experiments. The validity of the proposed model is compared to experimental results from other researchers. Although the results are encouraging, additional research is needed, to incorporate the influence of bubble mediated gas exchange, before these results are used for an environmental friendly design of harbor works, or for projects involving waste disposal at sea.

  3. Efficient use of the velocity gradients tensor in flow modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    For models of fabric development in rocks, with vorticity as a variable parameter, the choice of an unsuitable reference frame for instantaneous flow can hamper clear presentation of results. The orientation of most fabric elements which develop in deforming rocks is attached to some principal

  4. Effects of outer perturbances on dynamics of wake vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, N.A.; Belotserkovsky, A.S.; Turchak, L.I.

    2004-01-01

    One of the problems in aircraft flight safety is reduction of the risk related with aircraft encounter with wake vortices generated by other aircraft. An efficient approach to this problem is design of systems providing information on areas of potential danger of wake vortices to pilots in real time. The main components of such a system are a unit for calculations of wake vortices behind aircraft and a unit for calculations of areas of potential danger. A promising way to development of real time algorithms for calculation of wake vortices is the use of vortex methods in CFD based on the hypothesis of quasi-3D flow in the area of wake vorticity. The mathematical model developed by our team calculates positions and intensity of wake vortices past aircraft taking account of such effects as viscous dissipation of vortices, effects of ambient turbulence, wind shear, as well as viscous interaction between wake vortices and the underlying surface. The necessity of including the last factor could be stems from the fact that in the case where wake vortices are in close proximity of the rigid surface, the viscous interaction between the wake vortices and the surface boundary layer results in the boundary layer separation changing the overall intensity and dynamics of the wake vortices. To evaluate the boundaries of the danger areas the authors use an approach based on calculation of additional aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft encountering wake vortices by means of evaluation of the aircraft additional velocities and angular rates corresponding to distribution of disturbed velocities on the aircraft surface. These criteria could be based on local characteristics of the vorticity areas or on characteristics related to the perturbation effects on the aircraft. The latter characteristics include the actual aerodynamic roll moment, the maximum angular rate or the maximum roll of the aircraft under perturbations in the wake vortices. To estimate the accuracy

  5. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  6. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2018-02-01

    The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  7. Vorticity and particle polarization in heavy ion collisions (experimental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshin Sergei A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent measurements of the global polarization and vector meson spin alignment along the system orbital momentum in heavy ion collisions are briefly reviewed. A possible connection between the global polarization and the chiral anomalous effects is discussed along with possible experimental checks. Future directions, in particular those aimed on the detailed mapping of the vorticity fields, are outlined. The Blast Wave model is used for an estimate of the anisotropic flow effect on the vorticity component along the beam direction. We also point to a possibility of a circular pattern in the vorticity field in asymmetric, e.g. Cu+Au, central collisions.

  8. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have describ...

  9. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have described...

  10. Analytical Models Development of Compact Monopole Vortex Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo V. Lukianov

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. The article contains series of the latest analytical models that describe both laminar and turbulent dynamics of monopole vortex flows which have not been reflected in traditional publications up to the present. The further research must be directed to search of analytical models for the coherent vortical structures in flows of viscous fluids, particularly near curved surfaces, where known in hydromechanics “wall law” is disturbed and heat and mass transfer anomalies take place.

  11. Understanding the Fundamental Roles of Momentum and Vorticity Injections in Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    software package, Cascade Technologies; Ham & Iaccarino (2004); Ham et al. (2006)). The incompressible Navier–Stokes equations are dis- cretized using...second order accurate ( Ham & Iaccarino, 2004; Ham et al., 2006). For this discretization scheme, the non- zero values of the matrix are illustrated in...Springer-Verlag, New York . Cattafesta, L., Song, Q., Williams, D., Rowley, C. & Alvi, F. 2008 Active control of flow-induced cavity oscillations. Progress

  12. Assembly of vorticity-aligned hard-sphere colloidal strings in a simple shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, X.

    2011-12-23

    Colloidal suspensions self-assemble into equilibrium structures ranging from face- and body-centered cubic crystals to binary ionic crystals, and even kagome lattices. When driven out of equilibrium by hydrodynamic interactions, even more diverse structures can be accessed. However, mechanisms underlying out-of-equilibrium assembly are much less understood, though such processes are clearly relevant in many natural and industrial systems. Even in the simple case of hard-sphere colloidal particles under shear, there are conflicting predictions about whether particles link up into string-like structures along the shear flow direction. Here, using confocal microscopy, we measure the shear-induced suspension structure. Surprisingly, rather than flow-aligned strings, we observe log-rolling strings of particles normal to the plane of shear. By employing Stokesian dynamics simulations, we address the mechanism leading to this out-of-equilibrium structure and show that it emerges from a delicate balance between hydrodynamic and interparticle interactions. These results demonstrate a method for assembling large-scale particle structures using shear flows.

  13. Turbulent Flow with Embedded Vortical Structures Induced by Vortex Generators in a Cascade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Součková, Natálie; Uruba, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 571-572 ISSN 1617-7061. [Annual Meeting of the International Association of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics /83./. Darmstadt, 26.03.2012-30.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/10/1230; GA ČR GA101/08/1112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : vortex generator * turbulent flow * PIV Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201210274/abstract

  14. Three-Dimensional Interactions and Vortical Flows with Emphasis on High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    Rainbird (1968b). 24 Overall Viscous Flow Field - With the introduction of fast computers, such as the CDC 7600, a moi ’r less complete picture of the...1M)e) (b) TURBULENT: u.-" 200 ftfm~; RD - 2 x 106, R6 -0.4 x 106! ( FAST AND HOXEY lft) S5 Fig. 34 Skin-friction lines on surfaces about protuberance...isuliatin n crclarcoe a hgh eltiv icidnc, a2,wit trbuen layes (ainird t a. 166) LIA4o -- "o Fi. 7 ildt sr facealo visualization on cirular~s cuofne of

  15. Hydrodynamic response of fuel rod with longitudinal fins to upstream generated vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naot, D.; Oron, A.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1984-01-01

    The hydrodynamic response of turbulent channel flow to upstream generated vortices was numerically simulated for fuel element with longitudinal cooling fins. Turbulence is modelled by an algebraic stress model and an energy-dissipation model. The developing flow is solved using a parabolic pressure correction algorithm. The decay of the initial vortices in non-circular sub-channel in the presence of geometry driven secondary currents is described and the uncertainty in the local turbulent shear stresses is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Some features of viscous flow of vortices in superconducting alloys near the critical temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gor' kov, L.P.; Kopnin, N.B.

    1973-07-01

    It is stated that theoretical studies of the motion of vortex filaments in superconductors have until recently been based only on phenomenological models. Such models have not covered all the significant kinetic processes that occur in superconductors, and a consistent approach to the problem requires the use of microscopic time-dependent equations of the theory of superconductivity. In an earlier paper, using alloys with paramagnetic impurities as an example, a scheme was proposed by which to describe the vortex motion within the framework of microscopic differential time-dependent equations of the Ginzburg-Landau type. The results were valid for large paramagnetic impurity concentrations only for an uncharged Fermi gas since no account was taken of the normal energy loss in the center of the vortex. Time equations are here derived for slow motion of the vortex structure in alloys near T/sub c/ on the basis of microscopic superconductivity theory. The major role is played by the term concerned with the slow diffusion mechanism of relaxation, which leads to a large value for the viscosity coefficient. 16 references.

  17. Vorticity dipoles and a theoretical model of a finite force at the moving contact line singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peter; Devoria, Adam; Mohseni, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    In the well known works of Moffatt (1964) and Huh & Scriven (1971), an infinite force was reported at the moving contact line (MCL) and attributed to a non-integrable stress along the fluid-solid boundary. In our recent investigation of the boundary driven wedge, a model of the MCL, we find that the classical solution theoretically predicts a finite force at the contact line if the forces applied by the two boundaries that make up the corner are taken into consideration. Mathematically, this force can be obtained by the complex contour integral of the holomorphic vorticity-pressure function given by G = μω + ip . Alternatively, this force can also be found using a carefully defined real integral that incorporates the two boundaries. Motivated by this discovery, we have found that the rate of change in circulation, viscous energy dissipation, and viscous energy flux is also finite per unit contact line length. The analysis presented demonstrates that despite a singular stress and a relatively simple geometry, the no-slip semi-infinite wedge is capable of capturing some physical quantities of interest. Furthermore, this result provides a foundation for other challenging topics such as dynamic contact angle.

  18. Airfoil Pitch Control Using Trapped Vorticity Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    Closed-loop feedback control of the attitude of a free pitching airfoil is effected without moving control surfaces by alternate actuation of nominally-symmetric trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The pitching moment is varied with minimal lift and drag penalties over a broad range of angles of attack when the baseline flow is fully attached. Accumulation (trapping) and regulation of vorticity is managed by integrated hybrid actuators (each comprised of a miniature [O(0.01c)] obstruction and a synthetic jet actuator). In the present work, the model is trimmed using a position feedback loop and a servo motor actuator. Once the model is trimmed, the position feedback loop is opened and the servo motor acts like an inner loop control to alter the model's dynamic characteristics. Position control of the model is achieved using a reference model-based outer loop controller.

  19. CONDITIONAL FLOW STATISTICS AND ALIGNMENT OF PRINCIPAL STRAIN RATES, VORTICITY, AND SCALAR GRADIENTS IN A TURBULENT NONPREMIXED JET FLAME

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2015-06-30

    The alignment of vorticity and gradients of conserved and reactive scalars with the eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor (i.e., the principal strains) is investigated in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent nonpremixed flame achieving a Taylor’s scale Reynolds number in the range 100≤Reλ≤150 (Attili et al. Comb. Flame, 161, 2014). The vorticity vector displays a pronounced tendency to align with the direction of the intermediate strain. These alignment statistics are in almost perfect agreement with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (Ashurst et al. Physics of Fluids 30, 1987) and differ significantly from the results obtained in other nonpremixed flames in which vorticity alignment with the most extensive strain was observed (Boratavet al. Physics of Fluids 8, 1996). The gradients of conserved and reactive scalars align with the most compressive strain. It is worth noting that conditioning on the local values of the mixture fraction, or equivalently conditioning on the distance from the flame sheet, does not affect the statistics. Our results suggest that turbulence overshadows the effects of heat release and chemical reactions. This may be due to the larger Reynolds number achieved in the present study compared to that in previous works.

  20. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  1. Experimental Analysis of the Vorticity and Turbulent Flow Dynamics of a Pitching Airfoil at Realistic Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    Element type Hex, independent meshing, Linear 3D stress Hex, independent meshing, Linear 3D stress 1 English Units were used in ABAQUS The NACA...Flow Freestream Condition Instrumentation Test section conditions were measured using a Druck DPI 203 digital pressure gage and an Omega Model 199...temperature gage. The Druck pressure gage measures the set dynamic pressure within 0.08%± of full scale, and the Omega thermometer is accurate to

  2. A review of flow modeling for dense medium cyclones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Narasimha; M.S. Brennan; P.N. Holtham [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India). R& amp; D Division

    2006-06-15

    A critical assessment is presented for the existing fluid flow models used for dense medium cyclones (DMCs) and hydrocyclones. As the present discussion indicates, the understanding of dense medium cyclone flow is still far from the complete. However, its similarity to the hydrocyclone provides a basis for improved understanding of fluid flow in DMCs. The complexity of fluid flow in DMCs is basically due to the existence of medium as well as the dominance of turbulent particle size and density effects on separation. Both the theoretical and experimental analysis is done with respect to two-phase motions and solid phase flow in hydrocyclones or DMCs. A detailed discussion is presented on the empirical, semiempirical, and the numerical models based upon both the vorticity-stream function approach and Navier-Stokes equations in their primitive variables and in cylindrical coordinates available in literature. The existing equations describing turbulence and multiphase flows in cyclone are also critically reviewed.

  3. Analysis of wake vortices of a medium range twin-propeller military cargo aircraft using statistically designed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Burhan

    An experimental study was initiated to analyze the trajectories of the streamwise vortices behind the wing tip and flap of a medium range and propeller driven twin-engine military cargo aircraft. The model used for the experimental study was a generic, high wing and half model of a propeller driven aircraft and mounted within Old Dominion University's Low Speed Wind Tunnel where the wind tunnel flow speed was set to constant value of 9 m/sec. The main purpose of the study was to reach regression models for the motion and vorticity strength of both vortices under varying factors such as angle of attack, flap angle, propeller pitch angle and downstream distance. Velocity measurements of the flow fields were accomplished using both Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Hotwire Anemometry (HWA) to yield average velocities, turbulence levels, vorticity strengths and Reynolds shear stresses in the wake of the model. The results of measurements showed that the vertical motions, horizontal motions, and vorticity strengths of both vortices as well as the shortest distance between both vortices depend on the aforementioned factors and the interactions of some factors. It can be concluded that propeller pitch angle mainly affects the behaviors of the vortices as much as angle of attack to the extent that their second order terms take place in some of the regression models.

  4. Continuous control of asymmetric forebody vortices in a bi-stable state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-te; Cheng, Ke-ming; Gu, Yun-song; Li, Zhuo-qi

    2018-02-01

    Aiming at the problem of continuous control of asymmetric forebody vortices at a high angle of attack in a bi-stable regime, a dual synthetic jet actuator embedded in an ogive forebody was designed. Alternating unsteady disturbance with varying degree asymmetrical flow fields near the nozzles is generated by adjusting the duty cycle of the drive signal of the actuator, specifically embodying the asymmetric time-averaged pattern of jet velocity, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy. Experimental results show that within the range of relatively high angles of attack, including the angle-of-attack region in a bi-stable state, the lateral force of the ogive forebody is continuously controlled by adjusting the duty cycle of the drive signal; the position of the forebody vortices in space, the vorticity magnitude, the total pressure coefficient near the vortex core, and the vortex breakdown location are continuously changed with the duty cycle increased observed from the time-averaged flow field. Instantaneous flow field results indicate that although the forebody vortices are in an unsteady oscillation state, a continuous change in the forebody vortices' oscillation balance position as the duty cycle increases leads to a continuous change in the model's surface pressure distribution and time-averaged lateral force. Different from the traditional control principle, in this study, other different degree asymmetrical states of the forebody vortices except the bi-stable state are obtained using the dual synthetic jet control technology.

  5. Vorticity Transport on a Flexible Wing in Stall Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James; Farnsworth, John; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The circulation budget within dynamic stall vortices was investigated on a flexible NACA 0018 wing model of aspect ratio 6 undergoing stall flutter. The wing had an initial angle of attack of 6 degrees, Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 and large-amplitude, primarily torsional, limit cycle oscillations were observed at a reduced frequency of k = πfc / U = 0 . 1 . Phase-locked stereo PIV measurements were obtained at multiple chordwise planes around the 62.5% and 75% spanwise locations to characterize the flow field within thin volumetric regions over the suction surface. Transient surface pressure measurements were used to estimate boundary vorticity flux. Recent analyses on plunging and rotating wings indicates that the magnitude of the pressure-gradient-driven boundary flux of secondary vorticity is a significant fraction of the magnitude of the convective flux from the separated leading-edge shear layer, suggesting that the secondary vorticity plays a significant role in regulating the strength of the primary vortex. This phenomenon is examined in the present case, and the physical mechanisms governing the growth and evolution of the dynamic stall vortices are explored. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Flow Interactions and Control Program monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith, and through the 2014 AFOSR/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (JA and JB).

  6. On trailing vortices: A short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquin, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews some mechanisms involved in the dynamics of vortices in fluid flows. The topic is first introduced by pointing out its importance in aerodynamics. Several basic notions useful to appraise experimental observations are then surveyed, namely: centrifugal instabilities, inertial waves, cooperative instabilities, vortex merger, vortex breakdown and turbulence in vortices. Each topic is illustrated with experimental or numerical results

  7. Tracers of diabatic changes in potential temperature and potential vorticity: Integral interpretation in terms of net heating and circulation and applications to model consistency across resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne; Methven, John

    2016-04-01

    Diabatic processes in the atmosphere can be characterised by the changes they produce on potential temperature (θ) and potential vorticity (PV) following an air parcel. Diabatic tracers of θ and PV track the changes undergone by those two variables due to the action of diabatic processes in a Lagrangian frame by splitting θ and PV into components that are materially conserved and components that are diabatically generated. Since diabatic tracers are subject to advection by the three-dimensional wind field, they are useful tools for the investigation of the interaction of diabatic processes with the atmospheric flow and the impact of diabatic processes on the evolution of the atmosphere. In this contribution, we present a novel integral interpretation of diabatic tracers over suitably defined control volumes, which depend on the weather system under consideration. Using two contrasting extratropical cyclones as examples, it is shown that θ tracers can be used to assess and systematically compare the cross-isentropic mass transport around each cyclone, which is related to the amount and distribution of heat produced during each cyclone's development. PV tracers are related to circulation and area-average isentropic vorticity through the application of Stoke's theorem. Using the impermeability theorem for PV, which states there can be no PV flux across isentropic surfaces, it is also shown that cross-isentropic motion within the control volumes does not directly influence circulation. Instead, the influence of diabatic processes on the circulation crucially depends on the balance between the fluxes along isentropic surfaces of the materially-conserved and diabatically-generated PV components across the lateral boundaries of the control volumes. Finally, the application of the integral interpretation of diabatic tracers for the assessment of model consistency across different model resolutions is discussed.

  8. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pre-Breaking and Breaking Vorticity within a Plunging Breaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana De Padova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of vorticity induced just prior and at the splash-down of a plunging breaker on a 1:10 planar slope have been studied using wave flume experiments and numerical simulations. Laboratory experiments involved detailed measurements in the outer surf zone of both fluid velocities below trough level, achieved by a fibre-optic laser-Doppler anemometer, and water surface elevations, obtained by an ultrasound probe. A Weakly-Compressible Smoothed Particle (WCSPH model, coupled with a two-equation model for turbulent stresses, has been employed for the numerical simulations. A thorough calibration of the SPH’s numerical parameters has been first performed, through comparison between numerical and experimental wave elevation and velocity data. Then, considering that time-averaged laboratory data shows a significant vorticity beneath the free surface in the wave pre-breaking region, the vorticity generation mechanism has been thoroughly analyzed by means of the numerical model. In the attempt of explaining the generation of vorticity as induced by flow separation, we also inspected the role of the streamwise flow deceleration and surface-parallel vorticity flux. In analogy with the case of spilling breakers a cause-effect relation has been observed between streamwise flow deceleration and vorticity generation. Numerical findings are positively confirmed by the experimental results.

  10. Theory of concentrated vortices an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseenko, S V; Okulov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Vortex motion is one of the basic states of a flowing continuum. Intere- ingly, in many cases vorticity is space-localized, generating concentrated vortices. Vortex filaments having extremely diverse dynamics are the most characteristic examples of such vortices. Notable examples, in particular, include such phenomena as self-inducted motion, various instabilities, wave generation, and vortex breakdown. These effects are typically ma- fested as a spiral (or helical) configuration of a vortex axis. Many publications in the field of hydrodynamics are focused on vortex motion and vortex effects. Only a few books are devoted entirely to v- tices, and even fewer to concentrated vortices. This work aims to highlight the key problems of vortex formation and behavior. The experimental - servations of the authors, the impressive visualizations of concentrated vortices (including helical and spiral) and pictures of vortex breakdown primarily motivated the authors to begin this work. Later, the approach based on the hel...

  11. Potential Flow Model for Compressible Stratified Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydquist, Grant; Reckinger, Scott; Owkes, Mark; Wieland, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is an instability that occurs when a heavy fluid lies on top of a lighter fluid in a gravitational field, or a gravity-like acceleration. It occurs in many fluid flows of a highly compressive nature. In this study potential flow analysis (PFA) is used to model the early stages of RTI growth for compressible fluids. In the localized region near the bubble tip, the effects of vorticity are negligible, so PFA is applicable, as opposed to later stages where the induced velocity due to vortices generated from the growth of the instability dominate the flow. The incompressible PFA is extended for compressibility effects by applying the growth rate and the associated perturbation spatial decay from compressible linear stability theory. The PFA model predicts theoretical values for a bubble terminal velocity for single-mode compressible RTI, dependent upon the Atwood (A) and Mach (M) numbers, which is a parameter that measures both the strength of the stratification and intrinsic compressibility. The theoretical bubble terminal velocities are compared against numerical simulations. The PFA model correctly predicts the M dependence at high A, but the model must be further extended to include additional physics to capture the behavior at low A. Undergraduate Scholars Program - Montana State University.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Vortical Structures in Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taamallah, Soufien; Chakroun, Nadim; Shanbhogue, Santosh; Kewlani, Gaurav; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    A combined experimental and LES investigation is performed to identify the origin of major flow dynamics and vortical structures in a model gas turbine's swirl-stabilized turbulent combustor. Swirling flows in combustion lead to the formation of complex flow dynamics and vortical structures that can interact with flames and influence its stabilization. Our experimental results for non-reacting flow show the existence of large scale precession motion. The precessing vortex core (PVC) dynamics disappears with combustion but only above a threshold of equivalence ratio. In addition, large scale vortices along the inner shear layer (ISL) are observed. These structures interact with the ISL stabilized flame and contribute to its wrinkling. Next, the LES setup is validated against the flow field's low-order statistics and point temperature measurement in relevant areas of the chamber. Finally, we show that LES is capable of predicting the precession motion as well as the ISL vortices in the reacting case: we find that ISL vortices originate from a vortex core that is formed right downstream of the swirler's centerbody. The vortex core has a conical spiral shape resembling a corkscrew that interacts - as it winds out - with the flame when it reaches the ISL.

  13. Spiral blood flows in an idealized 180-degree curved artery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Kulkarni, Varun; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Understanding of cardiovascular flows has been greatly advanced by the Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) technique and its potential for three-dimensional velocity encoding in regions of anatomic interest. The MRV experiments were performed on a 180-degree curved artery model using a Newtonian blood analog fluid at the Richard M. Lucas Center at Stanford University employing a 3 Tesla General Electric (Discovery 750 MRI system) whole body scanner with an eight-channel cardiac coil. Analysis in two regions of the model-artery was performed for flow with Womersley number=4.2. In the entrance region (or straight-inlet pipe) the unsteady pressure drop per unit length, in-plane vorticity and wall shear stress for the pulsatile, carotid artery-based flow rate waveform were calculated. Along the 180-degree curved pipe (curvature ratio =1/7) the near-wall vorticity and the stretching of the particle paths in the vorticity field are visualized. The resultant flow behavior in the idealized curved artery model is associated with parameters such as Dean number and Womersley number. Additionally, using length scales corresponding to the axial and secondary flow we attempt to understand the mechanisms leading to the formation of various structures observed during the pulsatile flow cycle. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE), MRV measurements in collaboration with Prof. John K. Eaton and, Dr. Chris Elkins at Stanford University.

  14. Funnel-shaped vortical structures in wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaftori, D.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the turbulent boundary layer in a horizontal open channel was investigated experimentally by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and by flow visualization synchronized with the LDA. These experiments indicate that the dominant structures in the wall region are large scale streamwise vortices which originate at the wall and grow and expand into the outer flow region. The shape of the vortices is that of an expanding spiral, wound around a funnel which is laid sideways in the direction of flow. Most of the observations of wall turbulence phenomena made over the years, such as quasistreamwise vortices, ejections, and sweeps seem to be part of these funnel-shaped vortices

  15. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  16. What causes Mars' annular polar vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.; Guzewich, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive feature of the Martian atmosphere is that the winter polar vortices exhibit annuli of high potential vorticity (PV) with a local minimum near the pole. These annuli are seen in observations, reanalyses, and free-running general circulation model simulations of Mars, but are not generally a feature of Earth's polar vortices, where there is a monotonic increase in magnitude of PV with latitude. The creation and maintenance of the annular polar vortices on Mars are not well understood. Here we use simulations with a Martian general circulation model to the show that annular vortices are related to another distinctive, and possibly unique in the solar system, feature of the Martian atmosphere: the condensation of the predominant atmospheric gas species (CO2) in polar winter regions. The latent heat associated with CO2 condensation leads to destruction of PV in the polar lower atmosphere, inducing the formation of an annular PV structure.

  17. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11

  18. Numerical and Experimental Modeling of the Recirculating Melt Flow Inside an Induction Crucible Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Amjad; Bauer, Katrin; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor; Schwarze, Rüdiger

    2018-02-01

    In the paper, a new water model of the turbulent recirculating flow in an induction furnace is introduced. The water model was based on the principle of the stirred vessel used in process engineering. The flow field in the water model was measured by means of particle image velocimetry in order to verify the model's performance. Here, it is indicated that the flow consists of two toroidal vortices similar to the flow in the induction crucible furnace. Furthermore, the turbulent flow in the water model is investigated numerically by adopting eddy-resolving turbulence modeling. The two toroidal vortices occur in the simulations as well. The numerical approaches provide identical time-averaged flow patterns. Moreover, a good qualitative agreement is observed on comparing the experimental and numerical results. In addition, a numerical simulation of the melt flow in a real induction crucible furnace was performed. The turbulent kinetic energy spectrum of the flow in the water model was compared to that of the melt flow in the induction crucible furnace to show the similarity in the nature of turbulence.

  19. Two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaje, Dzh.

    1984-01-01

    General hypothesis used to simplify the equations, describing two-phase flows, are considered. Two-component and one-component models of two-phase flow, as well as Zuber and Findlay model for actual volumetric steam content, and Wallis model, describing the given phase rates, are presented. The conclusion is made, that the two-component model, in which values averaged in time are included, is applicable for the solving of three-dimensional tasks for unsteady two-phase flow. At the same time, using the two-component model, including values, averaged in space only one-dimensional tasks for unsteady two-phase flow can be solved

  20. Comparison between vortices created and evolving during fixed and dynamic solar wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Collado-Vega

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulations to examine the creation and evolution of plasma vortices within the Earth's magnetosphere for steady solar wind plasma conditions. Very few vortices form during intervals of such solar wind conditions. Those that do remain in fixed positions for long periods (often hours and exhibit rotation axes that point primarily in the x or y direction, parallel (or antiparallel to the local magnetospheric magnetic field direction. Occasionally, the orientation of the axes rotates from the x direction to another direction. We compare our results with simulations previously done for unsteady solar wind conditions. By contrast, these vortices that form during intervals of varying solar wind conditions exhibit durations ranging from seconds (in the case of those with axes in the x or y direction to minutes (in the case of those with axes in the z direction and convect antisunward. The local-time dependent sense of rotation seen in these previously reported vortices suggests an interpretation in terms of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. For steady conditions, the biggest vortices developed on the dayside (about 6 RE in diameter, had their rotation axes aligned with the y direction and had the longest periods of duration. We attribute these vortices to the flows set up by reconnection on the high-latitude magnetopause during intervals of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF orientation. This is the first time that vortices due to high-latitude reconnection have been visualized. The model also successfully predicts the principal characteristics of previously reported plasma vortices within the magnetosphere, namely their dimension, flow velocities, and durations.

  1. Traveling magnetospheric convection twin vortices: Another case study, global characteristics, and a model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassmeier, K.H.; Heppner, C.

    1992-01-01

    A case study of a transient geomagnetic field variation event associated with a traveling magnetospheric convection twin vortex is presented. The characteristics of this event are different from those of other presented cases, as the sense of rotation of the associated ionospheric current system is reversed, that is, it exhibits upward (downward) field-aligned currents in the tailward (dayside) part of the vortex structure. In particular, a clear tailward motion at high latitudes can be deduced from local as well as global magnetic field observations. At low dayside latitudes, magnetic field variations similar to sudden impulse (SI) variations are recorded. Almost simultaneous onset and no westward propagation are observed, too. As possible source mechanisms of such transient events, localized magnetic field reconnection as well as pressure pulses at the dayside magnetopause are discussed. If the switch-on of magnetic reconnection can be regarded as equivalent to an equivalent current flowing against the existing magnetopause current and if this countercurrent is spatially localized, an Alfven wave is generated with downward (upward) field-aligned current flow in the tailward (dayside) par of the wave, as observed for some of the reported transients. However, the SI-like behavior of the event studied in this paper, its reversed sense of rotation, and the vortex associated field-aligned current density excludes such localized magnetic reconnection as a possible source mechanism and argues in favor of the existence of pressure pulses at the magnetopause

  2. Multi-dimensional upwinding-based implicit LES for the vorticity transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    Complex turbulent flows such as rotorcraft and wind turbine wakes are characterized by the presence of strong coherent structures that can be compactly described by vorticity variables. The vorticity-velocity formulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is employed to increase numerical efficiency. Compared to the traditional velocity-pressure formulation, high order numerical methods and sub-grid scale models for the vorticity transport equation (VTE) have not been fully investigated. Consistent treatment of the convection and stretching terms also needs to be addressed. Our belief is that, by carefully designing sharp gradient-capturing numerical schemes, coherent structures can be more efficiently captured using the vorticity-velocity formulation. In this work, a multidimensional upwind approach for the VTE is developed using the generalized Riemann problem-based scheme devised by Parish et al. (Computers & Fluids, 2016). The algorithm obtains high resolution by augmenting the upwind fluxes with transverse and normal direction corrections. The approach is investigated with several canonical vortex-dominated flows including isolated and interacting vortices and turbulent flows. The capability of the technique to represent sub-grid scale effects is also assessed. Navy contract titled ``Turbulence Modelling Across Disparate Length Scales for Naval Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications,'' through Continuum Dynamics, Inc.

  3. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  4. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model

  5. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  6. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  7. Equilibration of centrifugally unstable vortices: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnevale, G.F.; Kloosterziel, R.C.; Orlandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    In three-dimensional flow, a vortex can become turbulent and be destroyed through a variety of instabilities. In rotating flow, however, the result of the breakup of a vortex is usually a state comprising several vortices with their axes aligned along the ambient rotation direction. This article is

  8. Slow-light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states having...

  9. Domain Walls and Textured Vortices in a Two-Component Ginzburg-Landau Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Gaididei, Yu. B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2005-01-01

    We look for domain wall and textured vortex solutions in a two-component Ginzburg-Landau model inspired by two-band superconductivity. The two-dimensional two-component model, with equal coherence lengths and no magnetic field, shows some interesting properties. In the absence of a Josephson type...... coupling between the two order parameters a ''textured vortex'' is found by analytical and numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations. With a Josephson type coupling between the two order parameters we find the system to split up in two domains separated by a domain wall, where the order parameter...

  10. Vorticity dynamics of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in an axisymmetric aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi, L. P.; Ge, L.; Simon, H. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Yoganathan, A. P.

    2007-06-01

    We present comprehensive particle image velocimetry measurements and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of physiological, pulsatile flow through a clinical quality bileaflet mechanical heart valve mounted in an idealized axisymmetric aorta geometry with a sudden expansion modeling the aortic sinus region. Instantaneous and ensemble-averaged velocity measurements as well as the associated statistics of leaflet kinematics are reported and analyzed in tandem to elucidate the structure of the velocity and vorticity fields of the ensuing flow-structure interaction. The measurements reveal that during the first half of the acceleration phase, the flow is laminar and repeatable from cycle to cycle. The valve housing shear layer rolls up into the sinus and begins to extract vorticity of opposite sign from the sinus wall. A start-up vortical structure is shed from the leaflets and is advected downstream as the leaflet shear layers become wavy and oscillatory. In the second half of flow acceleration the leaflet shear layers become unstable and break down into two von Karman-like vortex streets. The onset of vortex shedding from the valve leaflets is responsible for the growth of significant cycle-to-cycle vorticity oscillations. At peak flow, the housing and leaflet shear layers undergo secondary instabilities and break down rapidly into a chaotic, turbulent-like state with multiple small-scale vortical structures emerging in the flow. During the deceleration and closing phases all large-scale coherent flow features disappear and a chaotic small-scale vorticity field emerges, which persists even after the valve has closed. Probability density functions of the leaflet position during opening and closing phases show that the leaflet position fluctuates from cycle to cycle with larger fluctuations evident during valve closure. The DNS is carried out by prescribing the leaflet kinematics from the experimental data. The computed instantaneous vorticity fields are in very good

  11. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  12. Modeling Microscale Electro-thermally Induced Vortex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajorshi; Tang, Tian; Kumar, Aloke

    2017-11-01

    In presence of a high frequency alternating electric field and a laser induced heat source, vortex flows are generated inside micro-channels. Such electro-thermally influenced micro-vortices can be used for manipulating nano-particles, programming colloidal assemblies, trapping biological cells as well as for fabricating designed bacterial biofilms. In this study, a theoretical model is developed for microscale electro-thermally induced vortex flows with multiple heat sources. Semi-analytical solutions are obtained, using Hankel transformation and linear superposition, for the temperature, pressure and velocity fields. The effect of material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivities, as well as experimental parameters such as the frequency and strength of the alternating electric field, and the intensity and heating profile of the laser source, are systematically investigated. Resolution for a pair of laser sources is determined by analyzing the strength of the micro-vortices under the influence of two heating sources. Results from this work will provide useful insights into the design of efficient optical tweezers and Rapid Electrokinetic Patterning techniques.

  13. Error analysis of a continuous-discontinous Galerkin finite element model for generalized 2D vorticity dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Izsak, F.; Bokhove, Onno

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. A detailed a priori error estimate is provided for a continuous-discontinuous Galerkin ��?nite element method for the generalized 2D vorticity dynamics equations. These equations describe several types of geophysical flows, including the Euler equations. The algorithm consists of a

  14. A Marine Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Yip

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed for studying marine traffic flow through classical traffic flow theories, which can provide us with a better understanding of the phenomenon of traffic flow of ships. On one hand, marine traffic has its special features and is fundamentally different from highway, air and pedestrian traffic. The existing traffic models cannot be simply extended to marine traffic without addressing marine traffic features. On the other hand, existing literature on marine traffic focuses on one ship or two ships but does not address the issues in marine traffic flow.

  15. Hurricane-type vortices in a general circulation model. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, L.; Botzet, M.; Esch, M.

    1994-01-01

    A very high resolution atmospheric general circulation model, T106-L19, has been used for the simulation of hurricanes in a multi-year numerical experiment. Individual storms as well as their geographical and seasonal distribution agree remarkably well with observations. In spite of the fact that only the thermal and dynamical structure of the storms have been used as criteria of their identification, practically all of them occur in areas where the sea surface temperature is higher or equal to 26 C. There are some variations from year to year in the number of storms in spite of the fact that there are no interannual variations in the SST pattern. It is found that the number of storms in particular areas depend on the intensity of the Hadley-Walker cell. The result is clearly resolution dependant. At lower horizonal resolution, T42, for example, the intensity of the storms is significantly reduced and their overall structure is less realistic, including their vertical form and extention. (orig.)

  16. Quantum Vortices and Trajectories in Particle Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Contopoulos, G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the diffraction of charged particles by thin material targets using the method of the de Broglie-Bohm quantum trajectories. The particle wave function can be modeled as a sum of two terms $\\psi=\\psi_{ingoing}+\\psi_{outgoing}$. A thin separator exists between the domains of prevalence of the ingoing and outgoing wavefunction terms. The structure of the quantum-mechanical currents in the neighborhood of the separator implies the formation of an array of \\emph{quantum vortices}. The flow structure around each vortex displays a characteristic pattern called `nodal point - X point complex'. The X point gives rise to stable and unstable manifolds. We find the scaling laws characterizing a nodal point-X point complex by a local perturbation theory around the nodal point. We then analyze the dynamical role of vortices in the emergence of the diffraction pattern. In particular, we demonstrate the abrupt deflections, along the direction of the unstable manifold, of the quantum trajectories approaching an X-point along its stable manifold. Theoretical results are compared to numerical simulations of quantum trajectories. We finally calculate the {\\it times of flight} of particles following quantum trajectories from the source to detectors placed at various scattering angles $\\theta$, and thereby propose an experimental test of the de Broglie - Bohm formalism.

  17. Slow light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states having...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  18. MODELLING OF MATERIAL FLOW SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    PÉTER TELEK

    2012-01-01

    Material flow systems are in generally very complex processes. During design, building and operation of complex systems there are many different problems. If these complex processes can be described in a simple model, the tasks will be clearer, better adaptable and easier solvable. As the material flow systems are very different, so using models is a very important aid to create uniform methods and solutions. This paper shows the details of the application possibilities of modelling in the ma...

  19. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    model structure suggested by University of Lund the WP4 leader. This particular model structure has the advantages that it fits better into the control design frame work used by WP3-4 compared to the model structures previously developed in WP2. The different model structures are first summarised....... Then issues dealing with optimal experimental design is considered. Finally the parameters are estimated in the chosen static and dynamic models and a validation is performed. Two of the static models, one of them the additive model, explains the data well. In case of dynamic models the suggested additive...

  20. Vorticity and vortex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, M-D

    2006-01-01

    The importance of vorticity and vortex dynamics has now been well rec- nized at both fundamental and applied levels of ?uid dynamics, as already anticipatedbyTruesdellhalfcenturyagowhenhewrotethe?rstmonograph onthesubject, The Kinematics of Vorticity(1954);andasalsoevidencedby the appearance of several books on this ?eld in 1990s. The present book is characterizedbythefollowingfeatures: 1. A basic physical guide throughout the book. The material is directed by a basic observation on the splitting and coupling of two fundamental processes in ?uid motion, i.e., shearing (unique to ?uid) and compre- ing/expanding.Thevorticityplaysakeyroleintheformer,andavortex isnothingbuta?uidbodywithhighconcentrationofvorticitycompared to its surrounding ?uid. Thus, the vorticity and vortex dynamics is - cordinglyde?nedasthetheoryofshearingprocessanditscouplingwith compressing/expandingprocess. 2. A description of the vortex evolution following its entire life.Thisbegins from the generation of vorticity to the formation of thi...

  1. Vortices and impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, David; Wong, Kenny [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-17

    We describe the BPS dynamics of vortices in the presence of impurities. We argue that a moduli space of solitons survives the addition of both electric and magnetic impurities. However, dynamics on the moduli space is altered. In the case of electric impurities, the metric remains unchanged but the dynamics is accompanied by a connection term, acting as an effective magnetic field over the moduli space. We give an expression for this connection and compute the vortex-impurity bound states in simple cases. In contrast, magnetic impurities distort the metric on the moduli space. We show that magnetic impurities can be viewed as vortices associated to a second, frozen, gauge group. We provide a D-brane description of the dynamics of vortices in product gauge groups and show how one can take the limit such that a subset of the vortices freeze.

  2. Surface optical vortices

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, incl...

  3. Three dimensional vortices and interfaces in Hele-Shaw cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumir, A.

    1987-06-01

    A model of nonviscous flow, based on the Biot-Savart equations is used to examine the existence of singularities in three dimensional, incompressible, hydrodynamic equations. The results suggest a fairly simple physical mechanism, which could lead to the formation of singularities in the nonviscous case: two vortex tubes with opposite circulations pair up and stretch each other, until the radii of the vortex cores become extremely small, causing a divergence of the vorticity. The cases of a perfect and a slightly viscous fluid are considered. The results are unclear as to whether the vorticity of a slightly viscous fluid can become infinite or not, and whether singularities exist. The dynamics of hydrodynamic interfaces are also investigated. The propagation of bubbles in a slightly viscous fluid, in a Hele-Shaw cell are described [fr

  4. Modeling Diesel Engine Injector Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heister, S

    2001-01-01

    Models have been developed to assess flow fields inside diesel injector orifice passages in order to increase our understanding of the spray formation process which governs performance and emissions in these engines...

  5. Analysis of Wind Vorticity and Divergence in the High-latitude Lower Thermosphere: Dependence on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sil Kwak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the physical processes that control the high-latitude lower thermospheric dynamics, we analyze the divergence and vorticity of the high-latitude neutral wind field in the lower thermosphere during the southern summertime for different IMF conditions. For this study the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIEG CM is used. The analysis of the large-scale vorticity and divergence provides basic understanding flow configurations to help elucidate the momentum sources that ultimately determine the total wind field in the lower polar thermosphere and provides insight into the relative strengths of the different sources of momentum responsible for driving winds. The mean neutral wind pattern in the high-latitude lower thermosphere is dominated by rotational flow, imparted primarily through the ion drag force, rather than by divergent flow, imparted primarily through Joule and solar heating. The difference vorticity, obtained by subtracting values with zero IMF from those with non-zero IMF, in the high-latitude lower thermosphere is much larger than the difference divergence for all IMF conditions, indicating that a larger response of the thermospheric wind system to enhancement in the momentum input generating the rotational motion with elevated IMF than the corresponding energy input generating the divergent motion. the difference vorticity in the high-latitude lower thermosphere depends on the direction of the IMF. The difference vorticity for negative and positive B_y shows positive and negative, respectively, at higher magnetic latitudes than -70°. For negative B_z, the difference vorticities have positive in the dusk sector and negative in the dawn sector. The difference vorticities for positive B_z have opposite sign. Negative IMF B_z has a stronger effect on the vorticity than does positive B_z.

  6. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  7. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefilík, Jiří; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2014-03-01

    The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k - ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  8. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  9. Computational modeling of concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Geiker, Mette Rica; Dufour, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview of the present status regarding computational modeling of the flow of fresh concrete. The computational modeling techniques that can be found in the literature may be divided into three main families: single fluid simulations, numerical modeling of discrete...

  10. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high-speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models, and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary-layer flows, shock-wave boundary-layer interactions, and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  11. Ginzburg-Landau vortices driven by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzke, Matthias; Melcher, Christof; Moser, Roger; Spirn, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    A simplified model for the energy of the magnetization of a thin ferromagnetic film gives rise to a version of the theory of Ginzburg-Landau vortices for sphere-valued maps. In particular we have the development of vortices as a certain parameter tends to 0. The dynamics of the magnetization is ruled by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which combines characteristic properties of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a gradient flow. This paper studies the motion of the vortex centers under this evolution equation. (orig.)

  12. Ginzburg-Landau vortices driven by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzke, Matthias; Melcher, Christof; Moser, Roger; Spirn, Daniel

    2009-06-15

    A simplified model for the energy of the magnetization of a thin ferromagnetic film gives rise to a version of the theory of Ginzburg-Landau vortices for sphere-valued maps. In particular we have the development of vortices as a certain parameter tends to 0. The dynamics of the magnetization is ruled by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which combines characteristic properties of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a gradient flow. This paper studies the motion of the vortex centers under this evolution equation. (orig.)

  13. The dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with pinning sites studied by the time dependent Ginzburg–Landau model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter, E-mail: mpso@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Richard Petersens Plads, Bldg. 324, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Pedersen, Niels Falsig [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Richard Petersens Plads, Bldg. 324, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Ögren, Magnus [School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro SE-70182 (Sweden)

    2017-02-15

    We investigate the dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with normal state pinning sites using the Ginzburg–Landau equations. Simulation results demonstrate hopping of vortices between pinning sites, influenced by external magnetic fields and external currents. The system is highly nonlinear and the vortices show complex nonlinear dynamical behaviour.

  14. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  15. Compact Chern–Simons vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bazeia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate new models of the Chern–Simons type in the three-dimensional spacetime, focusing on the existence of compact vortices. The models are controlled by potentials driven by a single real parameter that can be used to change the profile of the vortex solutions as they approach their boundary values. One of the models unveils an interesting new behavior, the tendency to make the vortex compact, as the parameter increases to larger and larger values. We also investigate the behavior of the energy density and calculate the total energy numerically.

  16. Charged BPS vortices and reversal of the magnetic flux in a Maxwell-Higgs type model without the Chern-Simons term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantanhede, Carlisson M. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira Junior, Manoel M. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), MA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Hora, Eduardo da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Since the seminal works by Abrikosov [1] and Nielsen-Olesen [2] showing the existence of uncharged vortex, such nonperturbative solutions have been a theoretical issue of enduring interest. Already, the electrically charged vortices are obtained only in abelian models endowed with the Chern-Simons term [3,4]. This remains valid even in the context of highly nonlinear models, such as the Born-Infield electrodynamics. In this work, we demonstrated the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model without the Chern- Simons term but endowed with a CPT-even and parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure. The LV term belonging to the CPT-even electrodynamics of the Standard Model Extension [5] plays a similar role that of the Chern-Simons term, mixing the electric and magnetic sectors. Besides the LV coefficients provide a very rich set of vortex configurations exhibiting electric's field inversion also are responsible by controlling the characteristic length of the vortex and by the flipping of the magnetic flux. [1] A. Abrikosov, Sov. Phys. JETP 32, 1442 (1957). [2] H. Nielsen, P. Olesen, Nucl. Phys. B 61, 45 (1973). [3] R. Jackiw and E. J. Weinberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2234 (1990). [4] C.K. Lee, K.M. Lee, H. Min, Phys. Lett. B 252, 79 (1990) [5] D. Colladay and V. A. Kostelecky, Phys. Rev. D 55, 6760 (1997); Phys. Rev. D 58, 116002 (1998). (author)

  17. Vortices wiggled and dragged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, Charles

    2008-01-01

    When a sufficiently strong magnetic field is applied to a superconductor, some of the field can pierce it through the generation of magnetic vortices, each of which contains a quantized amount of magnetic flux. Although the superconducting state of the material outside each vortex is maintained (and destroyed within each vortex), the interaction of vortices with a current passing through the material can cause them to move, dissipating energy and thereby generating a source of electrical resistance. The ability to manipulate an individual superconducting vortex represents a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of vortices and the superconductors that support them. It could also lead to the development of a new class of fluxon-based electronics.

  18. Vortices on hyperbolic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manton, Nicholas S; Rink, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that Abelian Higgs vortices on a hyperbolic surface M can be constructed geometrically from holomorphic maps f: M → N, where N is also a hyperbolic surface. The fields depend on f and on the metrics of M and N. The vortex centres are the ramification points, where the derivative of f vanishes. The magnitude of the Higgs field measures the extent to which f is locally an isometry. Witten's construction of vortices on the hyperbolic plane is rederived, and new examples of vortices on compact surfaces and on hyperbolic surfaces of revolution are obtained. The interpretation of these solutions as SO(3)-invariant, self-dual SU(2) Yang-Mills fields on R 4 is also given.

  19. Effects of drift angle on model ship flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, J.; Stern, F.

    The effects of drift angle on model ship flow are investigated through towing tank tests for the Series 60 CB=0.6 cargo/container model ship. Resistance, side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel data are procured for a range of drift angles β and Froude numbers (Fr) and the model free condition. Detailed free-surface and mean velocity and pressure flow maps are procured for high and low Fr=0.316 and 0.16 and β=5° and 10° (free surface) and β=10° (mean velocity and pressure) for the model fixed condition (i.e. fixed with zero sinkage, trim, and heel). Comparison of results at high and low Fr and previous data for β=0° enables identification of important free-surface and drift effects. Geometry, conditions, data, and uncertainty analysis are documented in sufficient detail so as to be useful as a benchmark for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The resistance increases linearly with β with same slope for all Fr, whereas the increases in the side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel with β are quadratic. The wave profile is only affected near the bow, i.e. the bow wave amplitude increases/decreases on the windward/leeward sides, whereas the wave elevations are affected throughout the entire wave field. However, the wave envelope angle on both sides is nearly the same as β=0°, i.e. the near-field wave pattern rotates with the hull and remains within a similar wave envelope as β=0°. The wave amplitudes are significantly increased/decreased on the windward/leeward sides. The wake region is also asymmetric with larger wedge angle on the leeward side. The boundary layer and wake are dominated by the hull vortex system consisting of fore body keel, bilge, and wave-breaking vortices and after body bilge and counter-rotating vortices. The occurrence of a wave-breaking vortex for breaking bow waves has not been previously documented in the literature. The trends for the maximum vorticity, circulation, minimum axial velocity, and

  20. Debris flows: Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Bowman, Elisabeth T.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    Debris flows and debris avalanches are complex, gravity-driven currents of rock, water and sediments that can be highly mobile. This combination of component materials leads to a rich morphology and unusual dynamics, exhibiting features of both granular materials and viscous gravity currents. Although extreme events such as those at Kolka Karmadon in North Ossetia (2002) [1] and Huascarán (1970) [2] strongly motivate us to understand how such high levels of mobility can occur, smaller events are ubiquitous and capable of endangering infrastructure and life, requiring mitigation. Recent progress in modelling debris flows has seen the development of multiphase models that can start to provide clues of the origins of the unique phenomenology of debris flows. However, the spatial and temporal variations that debris flows exhibit make this task challenging and laboratory experiments, where boundary and initial conditions can be controlled and reproduced, are crucial both to validate models and to inspire new modelling approaches. This paper discusses recent laboratory experiments on debris flows and the state of the art in numerical models.

  1. Kinematical Compatibility Conditions for Vorticity Across Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work develops the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity across arbitrary shock waves in compressible, inviscid fluids. The vorticity compatibility conditions are derived from the curl of the momentum equation using singular distributions defined on two-dimensional shock wave surfaces embedded in three-dimensional flow fields. The singular distributions are represented as generalized differential operators concentrated on moving shock wave surfaces. The derivation of the compatibility conditions for vorticity requires the application of second-order generalized derivatives and elementary tensor algebra. The well-known vorticity jump conditions across a shock wave are then shown to follow from the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity by expressing the flow field velocity in vectorial components normal and tangential to a shock surface.

  2. Surfactant micelles: model systems for flow instabilities of complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perge, Christophe; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Manneville, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    Complex fluids such as emulsions, colloidal gels, polymer or surfactant solutions are all characterized by the existence of a "microstructure" which may couple to an external flow on time scales that are easily probed in experiments. Such a coupling between flow and microstructure usually leads to instabilities under relatively weak shear flows that correspond to vanishingly small Reynolds numbers. Wormlike micellar surfactant solutions appear as model systems to study two examples of such instabilities, namely shear banding and elastic instabilities. Focusing on a semidilute sample we show that two-dimensional ultrafast ultrasonic imaging allows for a thorough investigation of unstable shear-banded micellar flows. In steady state, radial and azimuthal velocity components are recovered and unveil the original structure of the vortical flow within an elastically unstable high shear rate band. Furthermore thanks to an unprecedented frame rate of up to 20,000 fps, transients and fast dynamics can be resolved, which paves the way for a better understanding of elastic turbulence.

  3. ISING MODEL OF CHORIOCAPILLARIS FLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaide, Richard F

    2018-01-01

    To develop a mathematical model of local blood flow in the choriocapillaris using an Ising model. A JavaScript Ising model was used to create images that emulated the development of signal voids as would be seen in optical coherence tomography angiography of the choriocapillaris. The model was produced by holding the temperature near criticality and varying the field strength. Individual frames were evaluated, and a movie video was created to show the hypothetical development of flow-related signal voids over a lifetime. Much the same as actual choriocapillaris images in humans, the model of flow-related signal voids followed a power-law distribution. The slope and intercept both decreased with age, as is seen in human subjects. This model is a working hypothesis, and as such can help predict system characteristics, evaluate conclusions drawn from studies, suggest new research questions, and provide a way of obtaining an estimate of behavior in which experimental data are not yet available. It may be possible to understand choriocapillaris blood flow in health and disease states by determining by observing deviations from an expected model.

  4. Surface optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, including pattern rotation akin to a surface optical Ferris wheel. Applications are envisaged to be in atom lithography, optical surface tweezers, and spanners.

  5. A finite-element model in vorticity and current function for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Furtado, F. da; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure for the integration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, when expressed in terms of a stream function equation and a vorticity transport equation, is presented. This procedure comprises: the variational formulation of the equations, the construction of the approximation spaces by the finite element method and the discretization via the Galerkin method. For the stationary problems, the system of non-linear algebraic equations resulting from the discretization is solved by the Newton-Raphson algorithm. Finally, for the transient problems, the solution of the non-linear ordinary differential equations resulting from the spatial discretization is accomplished through a Crank-Nicolson scheme. (Author) [pt

  6. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2017-04-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611-633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611-633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer ( Re θ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and vortex-in-cell-plus (VIC+). The resulting small-scale flow properties, i.e. vorticity and turbulence dissipation, are compared. The VIC+ technique was recently proposed and uses the concept of pouring time into space to increase reconstruction quality of instantaneous velocity. The tomographic PTV particle track measurements are interpolated using VIC+ to a dense grid, making use of both particle velocity and Lagrangian acceleration. Comparison of the vortical structures by visualization of isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude shows that the two methods return similar coherent vortical structures, but their strength in terms of vorticity magnitude is increased when using VIC+, which suggests an improvement in spatial resolution. Further statistical evaluation shows that the root mean square (rms) of vorticity fluctuations from tomographic PIV is approximately 40% lower in comparison to a reference profile available from a DNS simulation, while the VIC+ technique returns rms vorticity fluctuations to within 10% of the reference. The dissipation rate is heavily underestimated by tomographic PIV with approximately 50% damping, whereas the VIC+ analysis yields a dissipation rate to within approximately 5% for y + > 25. The fact that dissipation can be directly measured by a volumetric experiment is novel. It differs from existing approaches that involve 2d measurements combined with isotropic turbulence assumptions or apply corrections based on sub-grid scale turbulence modelling. Finally, the study quantifies the spatial response of VIC+ with a sine-wave lattice analysis. The results indicate a twofold increase of spatial resolution with respect to cross

  7. Evolution of a Vortex in a Strain Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments and vortex-in-cell simulations are used to study an initially axisymmetric, spatially distributed vortex subject to an externally imposed strain flow. The experiments use a magnetized pure electron plasma to model an inviscid two-dimensional fluid. The results are compared to a theory assuming an elliptical region of constant vorticity. For relatively flat vorticity profiles, the dynamics and stability threshold are in close quantitative agreement with the theory. Physics beyond the constant-vorticity model, such as vortex stripping, is investigated by studying the behavior of nonflat vorticity profiles.

  8. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  9. Vitality of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical vortices are always created or annihilated in pairs with opposite topological charges. However, the presence of such a vortex dipole does not directly indicate whether they are associated with a creation or an annihilation event. Here we...

  10. Vortices and Jacobian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manton, Nicholas S.; M. Romão, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of the moduli space of N-vortices on line bundles over a closed Riemann surface of genus g > 1, in the little explored situation where 1 = 1, the vortex metric typically degenerates as the dissolving limit is approached, the degeneration occurring precisely...

  11. Optimization of the Turbulence Model on Numerical Simulations of Flow Field within a Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reynolds Stress Model and Large Eddy Simulation are used to respectively perform numerical simulation for the flow field of a hydrocyclone. The three-dimensional hexahedral computational grids were generated. Turbulence intensity, vorticity, and the velocity distribution of different cross sections were gained. The velocity simulation results were compared with the LDV test results, and the results indicated that Large Eddy Simulation was more close to LDV experimental data. Large Eddy Simulation was a relatively appropriate method for simulation of flow field within a hydrocyclone.

  12. Three-dimensional instability analysis of boundary layers perturbed by streamwise vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Juan A.; Paredes, Pedro

    2017-12-01

    A parametric study is presented for the incompressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layer perturbed by streamwise vortices. The vortices are placed near the leading edge and model the vortices induced by miniature vortex generators (MVGs), which consist in a spanwise-periodic array of small winglet pairs. The introduction of MVGs has been experimentally proved to be a successful passive flow control strategy for delaying laminar-turbulent transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. The counter-rotating vortex pairs induce non-modal, transient growth that leads to a streaky boundary layer flow. The initial intensity of the vortices and their wall-normal distances to the plate wall are varied with the aim of finding the most effective location for streak generation and the effect on the instability characteristics of the perturbed flow. The study includes the solution of the three-dimensional, stationary, streaky boundary layer flows by using the boundary region equations, and the three-dimensional instability analysis of the resulting basic flows by using the plane-marching parabolized stability equations. Depending on the initial circulation and positioning of the vortices, planar TS waves are stabilized by the presence of the streaks, resulting in a reduction in the region of instability and shrink of the neutral stability curve. For a fixed maximum streak amplitude below the threshold for secondary instability (SI), the most effective wall-normal distance for the formation of the streaks is found to also offer the most stabilization of TS waves. By setting a maximum streak amplitude above the threshold for SI, sinuous shear layer modes become unstable, as well as another instability mode that is amplified in a narrow region near the vortex inlet position.

  13. A Family of Vortices to Study Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    A new analytic model describing a family of vortices has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. The family of vortices incorporates a wide range of prescribed initial vorticity distributions -- including single or dual-core vorticity distributions. The result is analytical solutions for the vorticity and velocities for each member of the family of vortices. This model is of sufficient generality to further illustrate the dependence of vortex reconnection and breakdown on initial vorticity distribution as was suggested by earlier analytical work. This family of vortices, though laminar in nature, is anticipated to provide valuable insight into the vortical evolution of large-scale rotor and propeller wakes.

  14. Effects of external influences in subsonic delta wing vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Anthony E.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine inconsistencies in reported studies for the vortical flow over highly-swept delta wings. A 76-deg swept delta wing was tested in three facilities with open and closed test sections and different model-support systems. The results obtained include surface oil-flow patterns, off-body laser-light-sheet flow visualization, and aerodynamic load measurements. Parameters such as the wall boundaries and model-support systems can drastically alter the loads. The effect of a high level of free-stream turbulence on the delta-wing flowfield was also examined and found to be significant. The increase in free-stream turbulence caused boundary-layer transition, unsteadiness in the vortex core positions, and altered the loads and moments.

  15. Vorticity and Λ polarization in baryon rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Prokhorov, George; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg; Zakharov, Valentin

    2018-02-01

    The polarization of Λ hyperons due to axial chiral vortical effect is discussed. The effect is proportional to (strange) chemical potential and is pronounced at lower energies in baryon-rich matter. The polarization of ¯ has the same sihn and larger magnitude. The emergence of vortical structures is observed in kinetic QGSM models. The hydrodynamical helicity separation receives the contribution of longitudinal velocity and vorticity implying the quadrupole structure of the latter. The transition from the quark vortical effects to baryons in confined phase may be achieved by exploring the axial charge. At the hadronic level the polarization corresponds to the cores of quantized vortices in pionic superfluid. The chiral vortical effects may be also studied in the frmework of Wigner function establishing the relation to the thermodynamical approach to polarization.

  16. Characterizing a middle to upper crustal shear zone: Microstructures, quartz c-axis fabrics, deformation temperatures and flow vorticity analysis of the northern Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbin; Liu, Junlai; Zhang, Lisheng; Qi, Yinchuan; Ling, Chengyang

    2017-05-01

    Structural and microstructural characteristics, deformation temperatures and flow vorticities of the northern Ailao Shan (ALS) high-grade metamorphic belt provide significant information regarding the nature and tectonic evolution of the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone. Mineral deformation mechanisms, quartz lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) patterns and the opening angles of quartz c-axis fabrics of samples from the Gasa section indicate that the northern ALS high-grade metamorphic belt has experienced progressive shear deformation. The early stage shearing is characterized by a gradual decrease of deformation temperatures from >650 °C at the northeastern unit to ca. 300 °C at the southwestern unit, that results in the formation of migmatites, mylonitic gneisses, thin bedded mylonites, mylonitic schists and phyllonites from the NE to SW across the strike of the shear zone. The late stage low-temperature (300-400 °C) shearing is superimposed on the early deformation throughout the belt with the formation of discrete, small-scale shear zones, especially in the thin-banded mylonitic rocks along both margins. The kinematic vorticity values estimated by rotated rigid porphyroclast method and oblique grain-shaped/quartz c-axis-fabric method imply that the general shear-dominated flow (0.49-0.77) progressively changed to a simple shear-dominated flow (0.77-1) toward the late stage of ductile deformation. The two stages of shearing are consistent with early shortening-dominated and late extrusion-controlled regional tectonic processes. The transition between them occurred at ca. 27 Ma in the ALS high-grade metamorphic belt along the ASRR shear zone. The large amount of strike-slip displacement along the ASRR shear zone is predominantly attributed to accelerated flow along the shear zone during the late extrusion-controlled tectonic process.

  17. Numerical modeling of foam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheddadi, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Liquid foam flows are involved in numerous applications, e.g. food and cosmetics industries, oil extraction, nuclear decontamination. Moreover, their study leads to fundamental knowledge: as it is easier to manipulate and analyse, foam is used as a model material to understand the flow of emulsions, polymers, pastes, or cell aggregates, all of which display both solid and liquid behaviour. Systematic experiments performed by Francois Graner et al. provide precise data that emphasize the non Newtonian properties of the foam. Meanwhile, Pierre Saramito proposed a visco-elasto-plastic continuous tensorial model, akin to predict the behaviour of the foam. The goal of this thesis is to understand this complex behaviour, using these two elements. We have built and validated a resolution algorithm based on a bidimensional finite elements methods. The numerical solutions are in excellent agreement with the spatial distribution of all measured quantities, and confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. The dominant parameters have been identified and we evidenced the fact that the viscous, elastic, and plastic contributions to the flow have to be treated simultaneously in a tensorial formalism. We provide a substantial contribution to the understanding of foams and open the path to realistic simulations of complex VEP flows for industrial applications. (author)

  18. Hybrid Manipulation of Streamwise Vorticity in a Diffuser Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissen, Abraham; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The formation of streamwise vorticity concentrations by exploiting the interaction of surface-mounted passive (micro-vanes) and active (synthetic jets) flow control elements with the cross flow is investigated experimentally in a small-scale serpentine duct at high subsonic speeds (up to M = 0.6). Streamwise vortices can be a key element in the mitigation of the adverse effects on pressure recovery and distortion caused by the naturally occurring secondary flows in embedded propulsion systems with complex inlet geometries. Counter rotating and single-sense vortices are formed using conventional passive micro-vanes and active high-power synthetic jet actuators. Interaction of the flow control elements is examined through a hybrid actuation scheme whereby synthetic jet actuation augments the primary vanes' vortices resulting in dynamic enhancement of their strength. It is shown that such sub-boundary layer individual vortices can merge and evolve into duct-scale vortical structures that counteract the inherent secondary flow and mitigates global flow distortion.

  19. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  20. Potential Vorticity in Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ force on the plasma due to the current ${\\bf J}$ and magnetic induction ${\\bf B}$. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjuncti...

  1. Turbulence modeling for high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Huang, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of turbulence models for high speed flows is presented. The flows consist of simple 2D flows over flat plates and complex shock-wave boundary-layer interaction flows over ramps and wedges. The flows are typical of those encountered by high speed vehicles such as the NASP. The turbulence models investigated include various two-equation models which, as a class, are considered to be well suited to the design of high speed vehicles. A description and discussion of the specific models is given and includes both baseline or uncorrected models, and model corrections which are needed to improve predictions of complex flows. It is found that most of the models studied are able to give good predictions of the flat plate flows, and some of the models are able to predict some of the complex flows, but none of them are able to accurately predict all of the complex flows. Recommendations for future model improvements are discussed.

  2. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  3. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic flow is simplified and classified into three traffic states depending on the propagation of congestion. The traffic states are represented on a phase diagram with the upstream demand axis and the interaction strength axis which was defined in this research. The states diagram and the phase diagram provide a basis for the development of the dynamic flow-density relation. The first-order hydrodynamic traffic flow model was programmed according to the cell-transmission scheme extended by the modification of flow dependent sending/receiving functions, the classification of cells and the determination strategy for the flow-density relation in the cells. The unreasonable results of macroscopic traffic flow models, which may occur in the first and last cells in certain conditions are alleviated by applying buffer cells between the traffic data and the model. The sending/receiving functions of the cells are determined dynamically based on the classification of the

  4. Detection of multi-scale secondary flow structures using anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets in a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Daniel H.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Interpretation of complex flow patterns observed in this study of a model curved artery required characterization of multiple, low-circulation secondary flow structures that were observed during the late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases under physiological inflow conditions. Phase-locked, planar vorticity PIV data were acquired at various cross-sectional locations of the 180-degree bent tube model. High circulation, deformed Dean- and Lyne-type vortices were observed during early stages of deceleration, while several smaller scale, highly deformed, low-circulation vortical patterns appeared in the core and near-wall regions during late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases. Due to the multiplicity of vortical scales and shapes, anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets were used for coherent structure detection in a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2). Our bio-inspired study is geared towards understanding whether optimizing the shape of the wavelet kernel will enable better resolution of several low-circulation, multi-scale secondary flow morphologies and whether new insights into the dynamics of arterial secondary flow structures can accordingly be gained. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  5. Representations of the Stratospheric Polar Vortices in Versions 1 and 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R.S.; Nielsen, J.E.; Perlwitz, J.; Oman, L.; Waugh, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study will document the behavior of the polar vortices in two versions of the GEOS CCM. Both versions of the model include the same stratospheric chemistry, They differ in the underlying circulation model. Version 1 of the GEOS CCM is based on the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 4, general circulation model which includes the finite-volume (Lin-Rood) dynamical core and physical parameterizations from Community Climate Model, Version 3. GEOS CCM Version 2 is based on the GEOS-5 GCM that includes a different tropospheric physics package. Baseline simulations of both models, performed at two-degree spatial resolution, show some improvements in Version 2, but also some degradation, In the Antarctic, both models show an over-persistent stratospheric polar vortex with late breakdown, but the year-to-year variations that are overestimated in Version I are more realistic in Version 2. The implications of this for the interactions with tropospheric climate, the Southern Annular Mode, will be discussed. In the Arctic both model versions show a dominant dynamically forced variabi;ity, but Version 2 has a persistent warm bias in the low stratosphere and there are seasonal differences in the simulations. These differences will be quantified in terms of climate change and ozone loss. Impacts of model resolution, using simulations at one-degree and half-degree, and changes in physical parameterizations (especially the gravity wave drag) will be discussed.

  6. Reasoning with multilevel flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paassen, M.M. van; Wieringa, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    Complex heterogeneous systems, such as power plants or petro-chemical process plants, nowadays contain complex automation for start-up and shut-down control and support systems for the operators. Often, however, the operator support and automation suffers from a lack of flexibility, and only functions for a number of well defined operating modes and pre-defined paths for the transition between these modes. This paper proposes an alternative and more flexible method for developing and describing intentional mode transitions, and for developing diagnostic systems, using Multilevel Flow Modeling (MFM). MFM models a system by expressing it in terms of its goals and in terms of elementary functions that describe the mass, energy and information flows in the system. This paper describes the use of MFM models as a basis for reasoning about the actions that are necessary to achieve the goals of a system or to obtain an intentional change in the system's mode. For this, data measured from the system must be used to update the state of the MFM model so that the state of the model reflects the state of the system. The outcome of the reasoning can be used as support for an operator or for automated control of complex systems. This paper defines the relevant states for goals and flow functions and presents a set of rules for determining these states on the basis of measurements from a process. The relations between goals and functions, and among functions themselves, are discussed. A mechanism is introduced to produce a change in the desired mode of a process, and expressed in rules to implement this change. The approach is explained at the hand of a simple example system. An MFM model of this example system is presented, and used to illustrate how measured variables can be used to calculate the states of the elements in the MFM model. At the hand of the same model the rules for inferring the states of goals and functions, and for determining the required actions will be

  7. Detection of Mesoscale Vortices and Their Role in Subsequent Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, M.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-level mesoscale vortices impact warm-season precipitation by initiating and focusing deep convection. Given their significance to forecasting, it is important to understand mesoscale vortices, their frequency, and their impact on subsequent convection in greater detail. This research was a pilot study to identify such vortices using two separate techniques. Vortices were identified through a subjective visual identification technique that relied mostly on composite radar reflectivity and satellite imagery, as well as through an objective algorithm applied to hourly 20-km Rapid Update Cycle model analyses. Vortices arising within organized convection, called mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), as well as ones forming in the absence of convection (dry vortices) were identified over the central United States during an active period from 1-10 June 2009. Additionally, MCVs were identified that were responsible for triggering subsequent convection. The results from the subjective and objective methods were compared, and vortex characteristics such as duration were analyzed. The objective algorithm detected more vortices than expected, as well as an approximately equal distribution of dry and convective vortices. Approximately two-thirds of the MCVs detected by the algorithm were also detectable by the subjective, visual method. MCVs that triggered new convection accounted for less than half of all cases, while in general MCVs lasted longer than dry vortices. While extension of this research is necessary in order to apply to a more broad range of MCVs, these results demonstrate the potential of the methodology in identifying these vortices, which will potentially lead to a greater understanding of such systems.

  8. Interaction of Ultrasound with Vortices in Type-II Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    The theory of the ultrasound propagation in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is shown to be linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths used in the ultrasound experiments now. Therefore, in contrast to pre...

  9. Mean Characteristics of Conical Vortices Above Roof Eaves of Low–Rise Cubic Buildings Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gamboa–Marrufo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating low pressures near the edges of flat roofs are often caused when the wind impinges on one corner of the building so that conical vortices form above the diagonal roof edges. In turbulent flow, these vortices vary in position and strength and the underlying surface pressures fluctuate accordingly. A preliminary approach to the study of the mechanism linking instantaneous roof edge pressures with the wind vortical structures involves the evaluation of mean characteristics and positions of the latter. However the flow examination has so far been severely limited by the restriction of available anemometers to single–point sampling. In this experimental study, a 200mm cube has been used to model a building with a flat square roof set at an angle of 45° to the oncoming flow direction, and a Particle Image Velocimetry system was used to capture instantaneous two–dimensional velocity vector images of entire flow cross–sections, both normal to the vortex axis and in planes parallel to that axis. The se vector maps were used to estimate the mean characteristics of the vortices and appropriate observation–plane directions to measure wind velocities in the study of the instantaneous problem.

  10. A vorticity based approach to handle the fluid-structure interaction problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahbakhsh, Iman; Ghassemi, Hassan [Department of Ocean Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabetghadam, Fereidoun, E-mail: i.farahbakhsh@aut.ac.ir [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A vorticity based approach for the numerical solution of the fluid-structure interaction problems is introduced in which the fluid and structure(s) can be viewed as a continuum. Retrieving the vorticity field and recalculating a solenoidal velocity field, specially at the fluid-structure interface, are the kernel of the proposed algorithm. In the suggested method, a variety of constitutive equations as a function of left Cauchy–Green deformation tensor can be applied for modeling the structure domain. A nonlinear Mooney–Rivlin and Saint Venant–Kirchhoff model are expressed in terms of the left Cauchy–Green deformation tensor and the presented method is able to model the behavior of a visco-hyperelastic structure in the incompressible flow. Some numerical experiments, with considering the neo-Hookean model for structure domain, are executed and the results are validated via the available results from literature. (paper)

  11. Ginzburg-Landau vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bethuel, Fabrice; Helein, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    This book is concerned with the study in two dimensions of stationary solutions of uɛ of a complex valued Ginzburg-Landau equation involving a small parameter ɛ. Such problems are related to questions occurring in physics, e.g., phase transition phenomena in superconductors and superfluids. The parameter ɛ has a dimension of a length which is usually small.  Thus, it is of great interest to study the asymptotics as ɛ tends to zero. One of the main results asserts that the limit u-star of minimizers uɛ exists. Moreover, u-star is smooth except at a finite number of points called defects or vortices in physics. The number of these defects is exactly the Brouwer degree – or winding number – of the boundary condition. Each singularity has degree one – or as physicists would say, vortices are quantized. The singularities have infinite energy, but after removing the core energy we are lead to a concept of finite renormalized energy.  The location of the singularities is completely determined by minimiz...

  12. Analysis of flow within a left ventricle model fully assisted with continuous flow through the aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tetsuya; Funayama, Masanori; Sudo, Seiichi; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2012-08-01

    Blood compatibility of a ventricular assist device (VAD) depends on the dynamics of blood flow. The focus in most previous studies was on blood flow in the VAD. However, the tip shape and position of the VAD inflow cannula influence the dynamics of intraventricular blood flow and thus thrombus formation in the ventricle. In this study, blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) under support with a catheter-type continuous flow blood pump was investigated. The flow field was analyzed both numerically and experimentally to investigate the effects of catheter tip shape and its insertion depth on intraventricular flow patterns. A computational model of the LV cavity with a simplified shape was constructed using computer-aided design software. Models of catheters with three different tip shapes were constructed and each was integrated to the LV model. In addition, three variations of insertion depth were prepared for all models. The fully supported intraventricular flow field was calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A transparent LV model made of silicone was also fabricated to analyze the intraventricular flow field by the particle image velocimetry technique. A mock circulation loop was constructed and water containing tracer particles was circulated in the loop. The motion of particles in the LV model was recorded with a digital high-speed video camera and analyzed to reveal the flow field. The results of numerical and experimental analyses indicated the formation of two large vortices in the bisector plane of the mitral and aortic valve planes. The shape and positioning of the catheter tip affected the flow distribution in the LV, and some of these combinations elongated the upper vortex toward the ventricular apex. Assessment based on average wall shear stress on the LV wall indicated that the flow distribution improved the washout effect. The flow patterns obtained from flow visualization coincided with those calculated by CFD analysis. Through these

  13. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  14. Generation of zonal flows in rotating fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    contribution the generation of zonal flows will be illustrated in a simple fluid experiment performed in a rotating container with radial symmetric bottom topography. An effective mixing that homogenizes the potential vorticity in the fluid layer will lead to the replacement of the high-potential vorticity......The spontaneous generation of large-scale flows by the rectification of small-scale turbulent fluctuations is of great importance both in geophysical flows and in magnetically confined plasmas. These flows regulate the turbulence and may set up effective transport barriers. In the present...... near the centre with low potential vorticity from the outside, which will imply the formation of a large-scale flow. The experimental results are supported by direct numerical solutions of the quasi-geostrophic vorticity equation in the beta-plane approximation modelling the experimental situation...

  15. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  16. Dynamics of vortices in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinan, E.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of vortices in type-II superconductors from the point of view of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We outline a proof of existence, uniqueness and regularity of strong solutions for these equations. We then derive reduced systems of ODEs governing the motion of the vortices in the asymptotic limit of large Ginzburg-Landau parameter

  17. Potential vorticity in magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the J × B force on the plasma due to the current J and magnetic induction B. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjunction with a class of fluid relabelling symmetries in which the symmetry generator for the Lagrange label transformations is non-parallel to the magnetic field induction in Lagrange label space. This is associated with an Abelian Lie pseudo algebra and a foliated phase space in Lagrange label space. It contains as a special case Ertel's theorem in ideal fluid mechanics. An independent derivation shows that the new conservation law is also valid for more general physical situations.

  18. Partial-depth lock-release flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodkar, M. A.; Nasr-Azadani, M. M.; Meiburg, E.

    2017-06-01

    We extend the vorticity-based modeling concept for stratified flows introduced by Borden and Meiburg [Z. Borden and E. Meiburg, J. Fluid Mech. 726, R1 (2013), 10.1017/jfm.2013.239] to unsteady flow fields that cannot be rendered quasisteady by a change of reference frames. Towards this end, we formulate a differential control volume balance for the conservation of mass and vorticity in the fully unsteady parts of the flow, which we refer to as the differential vorticity model. We furthermore show that with the additional assumptions of locally uniform parallel flow within each layer, the unsteady vorticity modeling approach reproduces the familiar two-layer shallow-water equations. To evaluate its accuracy, we then apply the vorticity model approach to partial-depth lock-release flows. Consistent with the shallow water analysis of Rottman and Simpson [J. W. Rottman and J. E. Simpson, J. Fluid Mech. 135, 95 (1983), 10.1017/S0022112083002979], the vorticity model demonstrates the formation of a quasisteady gravity current front, a fully unsteady expansion wave, and a propagating bore that is present only if the lock depth exceeds half the channel height. When this bore forms, it travels with a velocity that does not depend on the lock height and the interface behind it is always at half the channel depth. We demonstrate that such a bore is energy conserving. The differential vorticity model gives predictions for the height and velocity of the gravity current and the bore, as well as for the propagation velocities of the edges of the expansion fan, as a function of the lock height. All of these predictions are seen to be in good agreement with the direct numerical simulation data and, where available, with experimental results. An energy analysis shows lock-release flows to be energy conserving only for the case of a full lock, whereas they are always dissipative for partial-depth locks.

  19. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  20. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  1. MODELING OBSERVED DECAY-LESS OSCILLATIONS AS RESONANTLY ENHANCED KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ VORTICES FROM TRANSVERSE MHD WAVES AND THEIR SEISMOLOGICAL APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, P.; De Moortel, I. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: patrick.antolin@st-andrews.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-10-20

    In the highly structured solar corona, resonant absorption is an unavoidable mechanism of energy transfer from global transverse MHD waves to local azimuthal Alfvén waves. Due to its localized nature, direct detection of this mechanism is extremely difficult. Yet, it is the leading theory explaining the observed fast damping of the global transverse waves. However, at odds with this theoretical prediction are recent observations that indicate that in the low-amplitude regime such transverse MHD waves can also appear decay-less, a still unsolved phenomenon. Recent numerical work has shown that Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) often accompany transverse MHD waves. In this work, we combine 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling to show that for currently achieved spatial resolution and observed small amplitudes, an apparent decay-less oscillation is obtained. This effect results from the combination of periodic brightenings produced by the KHI and the coherent motion of the KHI vortices amplified by resonant absorption. Such an effect is especially clear in emission lines forming at temperatures that capture the boundary dynamics rather than the core, and reflects the low damping character of the local azimuthal Alfvén waves resonantly coupled to the kink mode. Due to phase mixing, the detected period can vary depending on the emission line, with those sensitive to the boundary having shorter periods than those sensitive to the loop core. This allows us to estimate the density contrast at the boundary.

  2. Quantification of flexoelectricity in PbTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice polar vortices using machine learning and phase-field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Nelson, C T; Hsu, S-L; Damodaran, A R; Li, L-L; Yadav, A K; McCarter, M; Martin, L W; Ramesh, R; Kalinin, S V

    2017-11-13

    Flexoelectricity refers to electric polarization generated by heterogeneous mechanical strains, namely strain gradients, in materials of arbitrary crystal symmetries. Despite more than 50 years of work on this effect, an accurate identification of its coupling strength remains an experimental challenge for most materials, which impedes its wide recognition. Here, we show the presence of flexoelectricity in the recently discovered polar vortices in PbTiO 3 /SrTiO 3 superlattices based on a combination of machine-learning analysis of the atomic-scale electron microscopy imaging data and phenomenological phase-field modeling. By scrutinizing the influence of flexocoupling on the global vortex structure, we match theory and experiment using computer vision methodologies to determine the flexoelectric coefficients for PbTiO 3 and SrTiO 3 . Our findings highlight the inherent, nontrivial role of flexoelectricity in the generation of emergent complex polarization morphologies and demonstrate a viable approach to delineating this effect, conducive to the deeper exploration of both topics.

  3. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  4. Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    OCT-11 -31-DEC-14 To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-12...239-18 Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors Jules W. Lindau The Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, State...flow nature, waterjets are expected to maintain resistance to cavitation , are amenable to ad- vanced concepts such as thrust vectoring, should

  5. DSMC Modeling of Flows with Recombination Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    Reactions S. Gimelshein, I. Wysong Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 Air Force Research...dimensional flows, modeling is usually con- ducted for Knudsen numbers Kn > 0.001, where the impact of recombination reactions is almost always minor, so...prac- tical applicability of the DSMC method. These methods have already been tested for reacting air flows.20 Today, modeling of gas flows at

  6. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  7. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  8. A turbulent two-phase flow model for nebula flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champney, J.M.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    A new and very efficient turbulent two-phase flow numericaly model is described to analyze the environment of a protoplanetary nebula at a stage prior to the formation of planets. Focus is on settling processes of dust particles in flattened gaseous nebulae. The model employs a perturbation technique to improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations of such flows where small variations of physical quantities occur over large distance ranges. The particles are allowed to be diffused by gas turbulence in addition to settling under gravity. Their diffusion coefficients is related to the gas turbulent viscosity by the non-dimensional Schmidt number. The gas turbulent viscosity is determined by the means of the eddy viscosity hypothesis that assumes the Reynolds stress tensor proportional to the mean strain rate tensor. Zero- and two-equation turbulence models are employed. Modeling assumptions are detailed and discussed. The numerical model is shown to reproduce an existing analytical solution for the settling process of particles in an inviscid nebula. Results of nebula flows are presented taking into account turbulence effects of nebula flows. Diffusion processes are found to control the settling of particles. 24 refs

  9. A Review on Macroscopic Pedestrian Flow Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kormanová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews several various approaches to macroscopic pedestrian modelling. It describes hydrodynamic models based on similarity of pedestrian flow with fluids and gases; first-order flow models that use fundamental diagrams and conservation equation; and a model similar to LWR vehicular traffic model, which allows non-classical shocks. At the end of the paper there is stated a comparison of described models, intended to find appropriate macroscopic model to eventually be a part of a hybrid model. The future work of the author is outlined.

  10. Influence of Initial Vorticity Distribution on Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    An analytical treatment has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. In particular, the presence of negative vorticity in the inner core of a vortex filament (one example of which is examined in this paper) subsequent to "cutting" by a solid body has a profound influence on the vortex reconnection, leading to analog flow behavior similar to vortex breakdown phenomena described in the literature. Initial vorticity distributions (three specific examples which are examined) without an inner core of negative vorticity do not exhibit vortex breakdown and instead manifest diffusion-like properties while undergoing vortex reconnection. Though this work focuses on laminar vortical flow, this work is anticipated to provide valuable insight into rotary-wing aerodynamics as well as other types of vortical flow phenomena.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  12. Role of electric discharges in the generation of atmospheric vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkevich, O. A.; Maslov, S. A.; Gusein-zade, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    The existing thermohydrodynamic and hydroelectromagnetic models of tornado are considered. The potentialities of the humid atmosphere as a heat engine generating air vortices are analyzed in detail. The ability of long-term atmospheric electric discharges to form a tornado funnel and create an initial twist of up to 10-3-10-2 s-1 in it are estimated. The possible effect of a lightning discharge on the initiation and evolution of the tornado is discussed. It is shown that the electric current flowing along the lightning channel can lead to helical instability and generation of a weak primary vortex. The channel formed in the atmosphere by a lightning discharge and the vortex motion of the parent thundercloud can enhance the primary vortex and promote its transformation into a tornado. Possible mechanisms of enhancement of the primary vortex created by a lightning discharge and the possibility of its transformation into a tornado in the postdischarge stage are discussed.

  13. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  14. Study of ultrasonic propagation through vortices for acoustic monitoring of high-temperature and turbulent fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massacret, Nicolas; Moysan, Joseph; Ploix, Marie-Aude; Chaouch, Naim; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic monitoring in high temperature fluids with turbulences requires the knowledge of wave propagation in such media and the development of simulation tools. Applications could be the monitoring of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The objectives are mainly acoustic telemetry and thermometry, which involve the propagation of ultrasounds in turbulent and heated sodium flows. We developed a ray-tracing model to simulate the wave propagation and to determine wave deviations and delays due to an inhomogeneous medium. In previous work we demonstrated the sensitivity of ultrasounds to temperature gradients in liquid sodium. To complete that study, we need to investigate the sensitivity of ultrasounds to vortices created in a moving fluid. We designed a specific experimental setup called IKHAR (Instabilities of Kelvin-Helmholtz for Acoustic Research) in order to assess the validity of the ray-tracing model and the potential of ultrasounds for monitoring such fluid. In this experiment, Von Karman instabilities were created in a flow of water. Fluid temperature was homogeneous in our experimental setup. Through a careful choice of the parameters, periodic vortices were generated. The experiment was also simulated using Comsol registered to allow discussion about repeatability. The throughtransmission method was used to measure wave delays due to the vortices. Arrays of transducers were used to measure time of flight variations of several nanoseconds with a high spatial resolution. Results were similar to simulation results. They demonstrate that beam delays due to vortices can be measured and confirm the potential of ultrasounds in monitoring very inhomogeneous fluid media such as liquid sodium used as coolant fluid in nuclear fast reactors.

  15. Sharp asymptotic estimates for vorticity solutions of the 2D Navier-Stokes equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng You

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymptotic dynamics of high-order temporal-spatial derivatives of the two-dimensional vorticity and velocity of an incompressible, viscous fluid flow in $mathbb{R}^2$ are studied, which is equivalent to the 2D Navier-Stokes equation. It is known that for any integrable initial vorticity, the 2D vorticity solution converges to the Oseen vortex. In this paper, sharp exterior decay estimates of the temporal-spatial derivatives of the vorticity solution are established. These estimates are then used and combined with similarity and $L^p$ compactness to show the asymptotical attraction rates of temporal-spatial derivatives of generic 2D vorticity and velocity solutions by the Oseen vortices and velocity solutions respectively. The asymptotic estimates and the asymptotic attraction rates of all the derivatives obtained in this paper are independent of low or high Reynolds numbers.

  16. Error Propagation dynamics: from PIV-based pressure reconstruction to vorticity field calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Richards, Geordie; Truscott, Tadd; USU Team; BYU Team

    2017-11-01

    Noninvasive data from velocimetry experiments (e.g., PIV) have been used to calculate vorticity and pressure fields. However, the noise, error, or uncertainties in the PIV measurements would eventually propagate to the calculated pressure or vorticity field through reconstruction schemes. Despite the vast applications of pressure and/or vorticity field calculated from PIV measurements, studies on the error propagation from the velocity field to the reconstructed fields (PIV-pressure and PIV-vorticity are few. In the current study, we break down the inherent connections between PIV-based pressure reconstruction and PIV-based vorticity calculation. The similar error propagation dynamics, which involve competition between physical properties of the flow and numerical errors from reconstruction schemes, are found in both PIV-pressure and PIV-vorticity reconstructions.

  17. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  18. A model of flow and surfactant transport in an oscillatory alveolus partially filled with liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2005-03-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. By assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension and small surfactant activity, we combine semianalytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant transport equations. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants, however, induces a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I :E ratio) and the sorption parameter K. For an insoluble surfactant, a single vortex is formed when the I :E ratio is either smaller or larger than 1:1, but the recirculations have opposite directions in the two cases. A soluble surfactant can lead to more complex flow patterns such as three vortices or saddle-point flow structures. The estimated unsteady velocity is 10-3cm/s, and the corresponding Péclet number for transporting respiratory gas is O(1). For a cell-cell signaling molecule such as surfactant-associated protein-A for regulating surfactant secretion, the Péclet number could be O(10) or higher. Convection is either comparable to or more dominant than diffusion in these processes. The estimated steady velocity ranges from 10-6to10-4cm /s, depending on I :E and K, and the corresponding steady Péclet number is between 10-8/Dm and 10-6/Dm (Dm is the molecular diffusivity with units of cm2/s). Therefore, for Dm⩽10-8cm2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  19. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process

  20. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  1. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  2. Dynamic manipulation of asymmetric forebody vortices to achieve linear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to further investigate the potential of the dynamic manipulation of forebody vortices as a means of supplementing directional control of fighter aircraft at high angles of attack. Tests were conducted on a 65-deg delta-wing model fitted with a slender, pointed tangent-ogive forebody of circular cross-section and 12.8 deg semi-apex angle. Forward-blowing nozzles located near the apex of the forebody served as the means of manipulating the forebody vortices. As expected, forward blowing was very effective, i.e., little blowing effort was required to cause the forebody vortex on the blown side to assume the 'high' position. However, the magnitudes of yawing moment and side force developed by the slender forebody with blowing do not differ significantly from that of the no-blowing, baseline case. Moreover, blowing above a certain threshold value produced an unexpected reversal, with blowing causing the vortex on the blown side to assume the 'low' position instead and the yawing moment and side force to change sense. The results have shown that the dynamic manipulation scheme is very successful in producing a linear variation of time-average yawing moment with a duty-cycle parameter, even with sideslip, for the aircraft-like model. The results also show that, by switching the vortex pattern rapidly, the linearity can be maintained up to a reduced frequency of at least 0.32, which is expected to be very satisfactory for practical applications. A subsequent water tunnel experiment with the forebody alone was undertaken to conduct off-surface flow visualizations that confirmed the vortex reversal phenomenon. Based on the flow visualization studies, a hypothesis was formed regarding the cause of the reversal phenomenon; it postulates that at the reversal threshold the nozzle flux interrupts the formation of the high forebody vortex on the blowing side and encourages the shear layer to form a replacement vortex that lies close to the

  3. Investigation of flow-induced vibration for energy harvesting using a model soap-film system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenchao; Stremler, Mark; Virginia Tech Team

    2017-11-01

    One way to extract energy from geophysical flows is to take advantage of flow-induced vibration (FIV) caused by vortices being shed from a bluff body. Wake-induced vibration of the downstream cylinder in a tandem pair is a promising design for a FIV energy harvesting system, especially suitable for low Reynolds number flows. For this design, the upstream cylinder is fixed in place, while the downstream cylinder is free to oscillate like a pendulum that is driven by interactions with the flow, including the wake of the upstream cylinder. We use a flowing soap film system, with behavior that resembles two-dimensional hydrodynamics, to experimentally investigate the wake interaction between a stationary upstream circular disk and a free downstream circular disk, which acts as a swinging pendulum. The wake flow generates thickness variations in the thin soap film, allowing direct observation of wake patterns through visualization of interference fringes. With the ability to tie together the wake structure and the object motion, we investigate the relationship between energy generation and flow structure in the simplified model energy harvesting system for Re =150. The research results find the optimal efficiency of the energy harvesting system by a parametric study.

  4. Incorporating groundwater flow into the WEPP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Erin Brooks; Tim Link; Sue Miller

    2010-01-01

    The water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model is a physically-based hydrology and erosion model. In recent years, the hydrology prediction within the model has been improved for forest watershed modeling by incorporating shallow lateral flow into watershed runoff prediction. This has greatly improved WEPP's hydrologic performance on small watersheds with...

  5. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  6. Upscaling on Fracture Flow Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dugstad, Martin Sandanger

    2017-01-01

    Fractures have a great impact on the quality of a porous media. The understanding of the fractures is important to describe the challenges linked to flow of geothermal heat, the transport of groundwater or transport of hydrocarbons in a porous media. The understanding of fracture can help to increase the energy production, or the extraction of clean drinkable groundwater. In this study we will investigate the effects of fractures in a porous medium by incorporate fractures as a...

  7. The modified drift-Poisson model: Analogies with geophysical flows and Rossby waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Finn, J. M.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss an analogy between magnetically confined nonneutral plasmas and geophysical fluid dynamics. The analogy has its roots in the modified drift Poisson model, a recently proposed model that takes into account the plasma compression due to the variations of the plasma length [1]. The conservation of the line integrated density in the new model is analogous to the conservation of potential vorticity in the shallow water equations, and the variation of the plasma length is isomorphic to variations in the Coriolis parameter with latitude or to topography variations in the quasigeostrophic dynamics. We discuss a new class of linear and nonlinear waves that owe their existence to the variations of the plasma length. These modes are the analog of Rossby waves in geophysical flows

  8. Computational Design and Analysis of a Transonic Natural Laminar Flow Wing for a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    A natural laminar flow (NLF) wind tunnel model has been designed and analyzed for a wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The NLF design method is built into the CDISC design module and uses a Navier-Stokes flow solver, a boundary layer profile solver, and stability analysis and transition prediction software. The NLF design method alters the pressure distribution to support laminar flow on the upper surface of wings with high sweep and flight Reynolds numbers. The method addresses transition due to attachment line contamination/transition, Gortler vortices, and crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting modal instabilities. The design method is applied to the wing of the Common Research Model (CRM) at transonic flight conditions. Computational analysis predicts significant extents of laminar flow on the wing upper surface, which results in drag savings. A 5.2 percent scale semispan model of the CRM NLF wing will be built and tested in the NTF. This test will aim to validate the NLF design method, as well as characterize the laminar flow testing capabilities in the wind tunnel facility.

  9. DNS and PIV Measurements of the Flow in a Model of the Human Upper Airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Oren, Liran; Gutmark, Epharim; Elghobashi, Said; University of California, Irvine Collaboration; Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The flow in the human upper airway (HUA) is 3D, unsteady, undergoes transition from laminar to turbulent, and reverses its main direction about every two seconds. In order to enhance the understanding of the flow properties, both numerical and experimental studies are needed. In the present study, DNS results of the flow in a patient-specific model of HUA are compared with experimental data. The DNS solver uses the lattice Boltzmann method which was validated for some canonical laminar and turbulent flows The experimental model was constructed from transparent silicone using a mold prepared by 3D printing. Velocity measurements were performed via high speed particle image velocimetry (HSPIV). The refractive index of the fluid used in the HUA experimental model matched the refractive index of the silicone. Both inspiration and expiration cases with several flow rates in the HUA are studied. The DNS velocity fields at several cross section planes are compared with the HSPIV measurements. The computed pressure and vorticity distributions will be also presented. NIH Heart Lung and Blood Inst.-Grant HL105215.

  10. An experimental investigation of wind pressures on square pillars in tornado-like vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatani, Yoshiharu; Maruta, Eizou; Kanda, Makoto; Hattori, Yousuke; Hamano, Naoki; Matsuura, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a laboratory simulation of tornado-like vortices and laboratory measurements of steady wind loads on model structures in tornado-like vortices. The variations of wind direction and wind speed of tornado-like vortices and ground surface pressure under tornado-like vortices with the swirl ratio, Reynolds number and the surface roughness were investigated. Wind pressure distributions on square pillars were measured in tornado-like vortices. It was observed in the experiment that the negative pressures on the roof faces of square pillars were high and distributed rather uniformly but these on the side faces differed greatly from place to place and locally became high. The high pressure regions on the side faces were close to ground surface in the case where the model structures stood in the center of tornado-like vortex, and became higher as the increase of distance between the model structures and the center of tornado-like vortices. (author)

  11. Integrated soft sensor model for flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijälä, G; Lumley, D

    2006-01-01

    Tighter discharge permits often require wastewater treatment plants to maximize utilization of available facilities in order to cost-effectively reach these goals. Important aspects are minimizing internal disturbances and using available information in a smart way to improve plant performance. In this study, flow control throughout a large highly automated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was implemented in order to reduce internal disturbances and to provide a firm foundation for more advanced process control. A modular flow control system was constructed based on existing instrumentation and soft sensor flow models. Modules were constructed for every unit process in water treatment and integrated into a plant-wide model. The flow control system is used to automatically control recirculation flows and bypass flows at the plant. The system was also successful in making accurate flow estimations at points in the plant where it is not possible to have conventional flow meter instrumentation. The system provides fault detection for physical flow measuring devices. The module construction allows easy adaptation for new unit processes added to the treatment plant.

  12. Hyperbolic monopoles from hyperbolic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Yang-Mills-Higgs monopoles and vortices in hyperbolic space can be constructed from {{SO}}(2) and {{SO}}(3) invariant Yang-Mills instantons, respectively. We use this fact to describe a large class of hyperbolic monopoles directly in terms of hyperbolic vortices embedded into 3 dimensions, yielding a remarkably simple relation between their Higgs fields. The class of monopoles we obtain are fixed relative to a plane in hyperbolic space, in a way which will be made clear by a study of the monopole spectral curve. We will use the correspondence between vortices and monopoles to give new insight into the moduli space of hyperbolic monopoles. Finally, our technique allows an explicit construction of the fields of a hyperbolic monopole invariant under a {Z} action, which we compare to periodic monopoles in Euclidean space.

  13. Base Flow Model Validation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program focuses on turbulence modeling enhancements for predicting high-speed rocket base flows. A key component of the effort is the collection of high-fidelity...

  14. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process improvement projects. The paper finds that traditional diagrams, such as the flowchart, the VSM, and OR-type of diagrams, have severe limitations, miss certain elements, or are based on implicit but cons...

  15. Improved choked flow model for MARS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Sun; Lee, Won Jae; Ha, Kwi Seok; Hwang, Moon Kyu

    2002-01-01

    Choked flow calculation is improved by using a new sound speed criterion for bubbly flow that is derived by the characteristic analysis of hyperbolic two-fluid model. This model was based on the notion of surface tension for the interfacial pressure jump terms in the momentum equations. Real eigenvalues obtained as the closed-form solution of characteristic polynomial represent the sound speed in the bubbly flow regime that agrees well with the existing experimental data. The present sound speed shows more reasonable result in the extreme case than the Nguyens did. The present choked flow criterion derived by the present sound speed is employed in the MARS code and assessed by using the Marviken choked flow tests. The assessment results without any adjustment made by some discharge coefficients demonstrate more accurate predictions of choked flow rate in the bubbly flow regime than those of the earlier choked flow calculations. By calculating the Typical PWR (SBLOCA) problem, we make sure that the present model can reproduce the reasonable transients of integral reactor system

  16. Intrinsic nonadiabatic topological torque in magnetic skyrmions and vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2017-03-01

    We propose that topological spin currents flowing in topologically nontrivial magnetic textures, such as magnetic skyrmions and vortices, produce an intrinsic nonadiabatic torque of the form Tt∼[(∂xm×∂ym)·m]∂ym. We show that this torque, which is absent in one-dimensional domain walls and/or nontopological textures, is responsible for the enhanced nonadiabaticity parameter observed in magnetic vortices compared to one-dimensional textures. The impact of this torque on the motion of magnetic skyrmions is expected to be crucial, especially to determine their robustness against defects and pinning centers.

  17. Turn function and vorticity method for numerical fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical method is presented that solves in a consistent fashion, conservation equations for both vorticity and linear momentum in multidimensional fluid-dynamics calculations. The equations are given in both two- and three-dimensional Cartesian geometry, and it is shown how the method can be easily implemented in a two-dimensional Eulerian fluid-dynamics code. The results of example calculations, which were performed with and without the new method, show the large errors that can arise when the vorticity equation is not solved in compressible flow calculations

  18. General single phase wellbore flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  19. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  20. Modeling groundwater flow and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Selinus, Olle

    2013-01-01

    In most areas, rocks in the subsurface are saturated with water at relatively shallow depths. The top of the saturated zone—the water table—typically occurs anywhere from just below land surface to hundreds of feet below the land surface. Groundwater generally fills all pore spaces below the water table and is part of a continuous dynamic flow system, in which the fluid is moving at velocities ranging from feet per millennia to feet per day (Fig. 33.1). While the water is in close contact with the surfaces of various minerals in the rock material, geochemical interactions between the water and the rock can affect the chemical quality of the water, including pH, dissolved solids composition, and trace-elements content. Thus, flowing groundwater is a major mechanism for the transport of chemicals from buried rocks to the accessible environment, as well as a major pathway from rocks to human exposure and consumption. Because the mineral composition of rocks is highly variable, as is the solubility of various minerals, the human-health effects of groundwater consumption will be highly variable.

  1. Prediction of velocity distributions in rod bundle axial flow, with a statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, H.C. da.

    1978-12-01

    Reactor fuel elements generally consist of rod bundles with the coolant flowing axially through the region between the rods. The confiability of the thermohydraulic design of such elements is related to a detailed description of the velocity field. A two-equation statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence is applied to compute main and secondary flow fields, wall shear stress distributions and friction factors of steady, fully developed turbulent flows, with incompressible, temperature independent fluid flowing axially through triangular or square arrays of rod bundles. The numerical procedure uses the vorticity and the stream function to describe the velocity field. Comparison with experimental and analytical data of several investigators is presented. Results are in good agreement. (Author) [pt

  2. General aspects of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual image Real image Reconstruction Beam +1 order Zeroth order -1 order Hologram CSIR National Laser Centre – p.26/32 Computer generated hologram Compute an artificial amplitude transmission function for an arbitrary phase function: t(x, y) = 12 + 1 2... to generate optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/32 Persistent dark spots Optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.3/32 Speckle field Amplitude Phase CSIR National Laser Centre – p.4/32 Singular phase function CSIR National Laser Centre – p...

  3. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  4. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  5. Amendment to Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of WP2 is to establish flow models relating the wind speed at turbines in a farm. Until now, active control of power reference has not been included in these models as only data with standard operation has been available. In this report the first data series with power reference excit...... turbine in undisturbed flow. For this data set both the multiplicative model and in particular the simple first order transfer function model can predict the down wind wind speed from upwind wind speed and loading.......The purpose of WP2 is to establish flow models relating the wind speed at turbines in a farm. Until now, active control of power reference has not been included in these models as only data with standard operation has been available. In this report the first data series with power reference...

  6. Modeling complex flow structures and drag around a submerged plant of varied posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard J.; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy I.

    2017-04-01

    Although vegetation is present in many rivers, the bulk of past work concerned with modeling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple and has generally neglected the complexity of natural plants. Here we report on a combined flume and numerical model experiment which incorporates time-averaged plant posture, collected through terrestrial laser scanning, into a computational fluid dynamics model to predict flow around a submerged riparian plant. For three depth-limited flow conditions (Reynolds number = 65,000-110,000), plant dynamics were recorded through high-definition video imagery, and the numerical model was validated against flow velocities collected with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The plant morphology shows an 18% reduction in plant height and a 14% increase in plant length, compressing and reducing the volumetric canopy morphology as the Reynolds number increases. Plant shear layer turbulence is dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortices generated through shear instability, the frequency of which is estimated to be between 0.20 and 0.30 Hz, increasing with Reynolds number. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the complex morphology of natural plants has on in-stream drag, and allow a physically determined, species-dependent drag coefficient to be calculated. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, the approach developed here demonstrates the necessity to account for plant motion when calculating vegetative resistance.

  7. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  8. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolf, P; Štefan, D

    2014-01-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations

  9. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICONE, 15

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (''thermal striping'') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums

  10. Scaled experimental modeling of VHTR plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, Glenn E.; Condie, Keith G.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. Various scaled heated and unheated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification ('thermal striping') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the buoyancy effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, scaling distortions will occur due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the upper plenum than in the prototype in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums. (author)

  11. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  12. Multiple Temperature Model for Near Continuum Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, Kun; Liu, Hongwei; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2007-01-01

    In the near continuum flow regime, the flow may have different translational temperatures in different directions. It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flow fields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations, lose accuracy. These inaccuracies may be partially due to the single temperature assumption in the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, based on the gas-kinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation, a multitranslational temperature model is proposed and used in the flow calculations. In order to fix all three translational temperatures, two constraints are additionally proposed to model the energy exchange in different directions. Based on the multiple temperature assumption, the Navier-Stokes relation between the stress and strain is replaced by the temperature relaxation term, and the Navier-Stokes assumption is recovered only in the limiting case when the flow is close to the equilibrium with the same temperature in different directions. In order to validate the current model, both the Couette and Poiseuille flows are studied in the transition flow regime

  13. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is the systematic "building-block" validation of CFD/turbulence models employing a GUI driven CFD code (RPFM) and existing as well as new data sets to...

  14. Flow field mapping in data rack model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matěcha J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to map the flow field inside the data rack model, fitted with three 1U server models. The server model is based on the common four-processor 1U server. The main dimensions of the data rack model geometry are taken fully from the real geometry. Only the model was simplified with respect to the greatest possibility in the experimental measurements. The flow field mapping was carried out both experimentally and numerically. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method was used for the experimental flow field mapping, when the flow field has been mapped for defined regions within the 2D/3D data rack model. Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM software were used for the numerical solution. Boundary conditions for numerical model were based on data obtained from experimental measurement of velocity profile at the output of the server mockup. This velocity profile was used as the input boundary condition in the calculation. In order to achieve greater consistency of the numerical model with experimental data, the numerical model was modified with regard to the results of experimental measurements. Results from the experimental and numerical measurements were compared and the areas of disparateness were identified. In further steps the obtained proven numerical model will be utilized for the real geometry of data racks and data.

  15. A numerical study of the stabilitiy of helical vortices using vortex methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, J H; Guenot, M; Machefaux, E; Rasmussen, J T; Chatelain, P; Okulov, V L; Soerensen, J N; Bergdorf, M; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-01-01

    We present large-scale parallel direct numerical simulations using particle vortex methods of the instability of the helical vortices. We study the instability of a single helical vortex and find good agreement with inviscid theory. We outline equilibrium configurations for three double helical vortices-similar to those produced by three blade wind turbines. The simulations confirm the stability of the inviscid model, but predict a breakdown of the vortical system due to viscosity

  16. Potential Vorticity Evolution in the Co-orbital Region of Embedded Protoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-04-01

    This thesis presents two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk simulations with embedded protoplanets, emphasizing the non-linear dynamics in the co-orbital region. In particular, it demonstrates how a protoplanetary disk responds to embedded low mass planets at the inviscid limit. Since the potential vorticity (PV) flow is not conserved, due to the spiral shocks and possibly boundary layer effects emanating from the planet, the PV profile develops inflection points which eventually render the flow unstable. Vortices are produced in association with the potential vorticity minima. Born in the separatrix region, these vortices experience close encounters with the planet, consequently exerting strong torques on the planet. The existence of these vortices, if confirmed, have important implications on planetary migration rates. The formation of vortices is discussed in more detail and a key parameter is found which depends solely on planet mass and sound speed. With this key parameter, one can predict the disk evolution, PV growth rates, and threshold conditions for forming vortices in the co-orbital region. An analytical estimate for the change of PV due to shocks is compared to the actual change in PV in the hydrodynamic simulations. They match well except in the inner region where vortices form. In addition, extensive resolution tests were carried out but uncertainties remain about the physics of this particular region.

  17. A Coherent vorticity preserving eddy-viscosity correction for Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelier, J.-B.; Wasistho, B.; Scalo, C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces a new approach to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) where subgrid-scale (SGS) dissipation is applied proportionally to the degree of local spectral broadening, hence mitigated or deactivated in regions dominated by large-scale and/or laminar vortical motion. The proposed coherent-vorticity preserving (CvP) LES methodology is based on the evaluation of the ratio of the test-filtered to resolved (or grid-filtered) enstrophy, σ. Values of σ close to 1 indicate low sub-test-filter turbulent activity, justifying local deactivation of the SGS dissipation. The intensity of the SGS dissipation is progressively increased for σ vortex breakdown demonstrates that the CvP methodology improves the performance of traditional, non-dynamic dissipative SGS models, capturing the peak of total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation during transition. Similar accuracy is obtained by adopting Germano's dynamic procedure albeit at more than twice the computational overhead. A CvP-LES of a pair of unstable periodic helical vortices is shown to predict accurately the experimentally observed growth rate using coarse resolutions. The ability of the CvP methodology to dynamically sort the coherent, large-scale motion from the smaller, broadband scales during transition is demonstrated via flow visualizations. LES of compressible channel are carried out and show a good match with a reference DNS.

  18. Shear-induced pressure anisotropization and correlation with fluid vorticity in a low collisionality plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    The momentum anisotropy contained in a sheared flow may be transferred to a pressure anisotropy, both gyrotropic and non-gyrotropic, via the action of the fluid strain on the pressure tensor components. In particular, it is the traceless symmetric part of the strain tensor (i.e. the so-called shear tensor) that drives the mechanism, the fluid vorticity just inducing rotations of the pressure tensor components. This possible mechanism of anisotropy generation from an initially isotropic pressure is purely dynamical and can be described in a fluid framework where the full pressure tensor evolution is retained. Here, we interpret the correlation between vorticity and anisotropy, often observed in numerical simulations of solar wind turbulence, as due to the correlation between shear rate tensor and fluid vorticity. We then discuss some implications of this analysis for the onset of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in collisionless plasmas where a full pressure tensor evolution is allowed, and for the modelling of secondary reconnection in turbulence.

  19. Turbulence Modeling of Torsional Couette Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Haddadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study considers the numerical modeling of the turbulent flow inside a rotor-stator cavity subjected or not to a superimposed throughflow. Extensive numerical predictions based on one-point statistical modeling using a low Reynolds number second-order full stress transport closure (RSM model are performed mainly in the case of turbulent flows with merged boundary layers known as turbulent torsional Couette flows and belonging to regime III of Daily and Nece (1960. The RSM model has already shown its capability of predicting accurately the mean and turbulent fields in various rotating disk configurations (Poncet, 2005; Poncet et al., 2005, 2007, 2008. For the first time, a detailed mapping of the hydrodynamic flow over a wide range of rotational Reynolds numbers (180 000≤Re≤10 000 000, aspect ratios of the cavity (0.02≤G≤0.05, and flow rate coefficients (−10000≤Cw≤10000 is here provided in the turbulent torsional Couette flow regime.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of the Diurnal Variation of Flow in a Street Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Baik, Jong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Ryu, Young-Hee

    2011-10-01

    Urban surface and radiation processes are incorporated into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to investigate the diurnal variation of flow in a street canyon with an aspect ratio of 1. The developed CFD model predicts surface and substrate temperatures of the roof, walls, and road. One-day simulations are performed with various ambient wind speeds of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ms-1, with the ambient wind perpendicular to the north-south oriented canyon. During the day, the largest maximum surface temperature for all surfaces is found at the road surface for an ambient wind speed of 3 ms-1 (56.0°C). Two flow regimes are identified by the vortex configuration in the street canyon. Flow regime I is characterized by a primary vortex. Flow regime II is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices, which appears in the presence of strong downwind building-wall heating. Air temperature is relatively low near the downwind building wall in flow regime I and inside the upper vortex in flow regime II. In flow regime II, the upper vortex expands with increasing ambient wind speed, thus enlarging the extent of cool air within the canyon. The canyon wind speed in flow regime II is proportional to the ambient wind speed, but that in flow regime I is not. For weak ambient winds, the dependency of surface sensible heat flux on the ambient wind speed is found to play an essential role in determining the relationship between canyon wind speed and ambient wind speed.

  1. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  2. GENERALIZED VISCOPLASTIC MODELING OF DEBRIS FLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    The earliest model developed by R. A. Bagnold was based on the concept of the 'dispersive' pressure generated by grain collisions. Some efforts have recently been made by theoreticians in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics to modify or improve Bagnold's concept or model. A viable rheological model should consist both of a rate-independent part and a rate-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criterion) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical for general use in debris-flow modeling. In fact, Bagnold's model is found to be only a particular case of the GVF model. analytical solutions for (steady) uniform debris flows in wide channels are obtained from the GVF model based on Bagnold's simplified assumption of constant grain concentration.

  3. Numerical modelling of flow pattern for high swirling flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets. High swirl burners are suitable for lean flames and produce low emissions. Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the isothermal behaviour of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model is a Total Variation Diminishing and PISO is used to pressure velocity coupling. Transient analysis let identify the non-axisymmetric region of reverse flow. The center of instantaneous azimuthal velocities is not located in the axis of the chamber. The temporal sampling evidences this center spins around the axis of the device forming the precessing vortex core (PVC whose Strouhal numbers are more than two for Swirl numbers of one. Influence of swirl number evidences strong swirl numbers are precursor of large vortex breakdown. Influence of conical diffusers evidence the reduction of secondary flows associated to boundary layer separation.

  4. Numerical modelling of flow pattern for high swirling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Teresa; Perez, J. R.; Szasz, R.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Castro, F.

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets. High swirl burners are suitable for lean flames and produce low emissions. Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the isothermal behaviour of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model is a Total Variation Diminishing and PISO is used to pressure velocity coupling. Transient analysis let identify the non-axisymmetric region of reverse flow. The center of instantaneous azimuthal velocities is not located in the axis of the chamber. The temporal sampling evidences this center spins around the axis of the device forming the precessing vortex core (PVC) whose Strouhal numbers are more than two for Swirl numbers of one. Influence of swirl number evidences strong swirl numbers are precursor of large vortex breakdown. Influence of conical diffusers evidence the reduction of secondary flows associated to boundary layer separation.

  5. Lagrangian investigations of vorticity dynamics in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Nishant; Sinha, Sawan Suman; Danish, Mohammad; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of compressibility on vorticity-strain rate dynamics. Well-resolved direct numerical simulations of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence performed over a cubical domain of 10243 are employed for this study. To clearly identify the influence of compressibility on the time-dependent dynamics (rather than on the one-time flow field), we employ a well-validated Lagrangian particle tracker. The tracker is used to obtain time correlations between the instantaneous vorticity vector and the strain-rate eigenvector system of an appropriately chosen reference time. In this work, compressibility is parameterized in terms of both global (turbulent Mach number) and local parameters (normalized dilatation-rate and flow field topology). Our investigations reveal that the local dilatation rate significantly influences these statistics. In turn, this observed influence of the dilatation rate is predominantly associated with rotation dominated topologies (unstable-focus-compressing, stable-focus-stretching). We find that an enhanced dilatation rate (in both contracting and expanding fluid elements) significantly enhances the tendency of the vorticity vector to align with the largest eigenvector of the strain-rate. Further, in fluid particles where the vorticity vector is maximally misaligned (perpendicular) at the reference time, vorticity does show a substantial tendency to align with the intermediate eigenvector as well. The authors make an attempt to provide physical explanations of these observations (in terms of moment of inertia and angular momentum) by performing detailed calculations following tetrads {approach of Chertkov et al. ["Lagrangian tetrad dynamics and the phenomenology of turbulence," Phys. Fluids 11(8), 2394-2410 (1999)] and Xu et al. ["The pirouette effect in turbulent flows," Nat. Phys. 7(9), 709-712 (2011)]} in a compressible flow field.

  6. Effect of Fluid Viscoelasticity on Turbulence and Large-Scale Vortices behind Wall-Mounted Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tsukahara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations of turbulent viscoelastic fluid flows in a channel with wall-mounted plates were performed to investigate the influence of viscoelasticity on turbulent structures and the mean flow around the plate. The constitutive equation follows the Giesekus model, valid for polymer or surfactant solutions, which are generally capable of reducing the turbulent frictional drag in a smooth channel. We found that turbulent eddies just behind the plates in viscoelastic fluid decreased in number and in magnitude, but their size increased. Three pairs of organized longitudinal vortices were observed downstream of the plates in both Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids: two vortex pairs were behind the plates and the other one with the longest length was in a plate-free area. In the viscoelastic fluid, the latter vortex pair in the plate-free area was maintained and reached the downstream rib, but its swirling strength was weakened and the local skin-friction drag near the vortex was much weaker than those in the Newtonian flow. The mean flow and small spanwise eddies were influenced by the additional fluid force due to the viscoelasticity and, moreover, the spanwise component of the fluid elastic force may also play a role in the suppression of fluid vortical motions behind the plates.

  7. Numerical investigations on interactions between tangles of quantized vortices and second sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penz, H.; Aarts, R.; de Waele, F.

    1995-01-01

    The reconnecting vortex-tangle model is used to investigate the interaction of tangles of quantized vortices with second sound. This interaction can be expressed in terms of an effective line-length density, which depends on the direction of the second-sound wave. By comparing the effective line-length densities in various directions the tangle structure can be examined. Simulations were done for flow channels with square and circular cross sections as well as for slits. The results show that in all these cases the tangles are inhomogeneous in direction as well as in space. The calculated inhomogeneities are in agreement with experiment

  8. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  9. Lagrangian Vortices in Developing Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-25

    Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2015) Lagrangian Vortices in Developing Tropical Cyclones these vortices through diabatic vortex stretching or...through horizontal mergers. The Lagrangian structures and their role in the merger of these smaller vorticity anomalies and diabatic activation

  10. Review of vortices in wildland fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Scott L. Goodrick

    2011-01-01

    Vortices are almost always present in the wildland fire environment and can sometimes interact with the fire in unpredictable ways, causing extreme fire behavior and safety concerns. In this paper, the current state of knowledge of the interaction of wildland fire and vortices is examined and reviewed. A basic introduction to vorticity is given, and the two common...

  11. Multiphase flow models for hydraulic fracturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiptsov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-01

    The technology of hydraulic fracturing of a hydrocarbon-bearing formation is based on pumping a fluid with particles into a well to create fractures in porous medium. After the end of pumping, the fractures filled with closely packed proppant particles create highly conductive channels for hydrocarbon flow from far-field reservoir to the well to surface. The design of the hydraulic fracturing treatment is carried out with a simulator. Those simulators are based on mathematical models, which need to be accurate and close to physical reality. The entire process of fracture placement and flowback/cleanup can be conventionally split into the following four stages: (i) quasi-steady state effectively single-phase suspension flow down the wellbore, (ii) particle transport in an open vertical fracture, (iii) displacement of fracturing fluid by hydrocarbons from the closed fracture filled with a random close pack of proppant particles, and, finally, (iv) highly transient gas-liquid flow in a well during cleanup. The stage (i) is relatively well described by the existing hydralics models, while the models for the other three stages of the process need revisiting and considerable improvement, which was the focus of the author’s research presented in this review paper. For stage (ii), we consider the derivation of a multi-fluid model for suspension flow in a narrow vertical hydraulic fracture at moderate Re on the scale of fracture height and length and also the migration of particles across the flow on the scale of fracture width. At the stage of fracture cleanaup (iii), a novel multi-continua model for suspension filtration is developed. To provide closure relationships for permeability of proppant packings to be used in this model, a 3D direct numerical simulation of single phase flow is carried out using the lattice-Boltzmann method. For wellbore cleanup (iv), we present a combined 1D model for highly-transient gas-liquid flow based on the combination of multi-fluid and

  12. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  13. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O.

    1994-01-01

    Since the 1960's, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970's, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970's and well into the 1980's focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M ampersand O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M ampersand O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing

  14. Dipolar vortices in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of dipolar vortex solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations is studied. A new type of nonlinear dipole is found and its dynamics in a slightly viscous system is compared with the dynamics of the Lamb dipole. The evolution of dipolar structures from an initial turbulent patch...

  15. Assessing alternative conceptual models of fracture flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    The numerical code TOUGH2 was used to assess alternative conceptual models of fracture flow. The models that were considered included the equivalent continuum model (ECM) and the dual permeability (DK) model. A one-dimensional, layered, unsaturated domain was studied with a saturated bottom boundary and a constant infiltration at the top boundary. Two different infiltration rates were used in the studies. In addition, the connection areas between the fracture and matrix elements in the dual permeability model were varied. Results showed that the two conceptual models of fracture flow produced different saturation and velocity profiles-even under steady-state conditions. The magnitudes of the discrepancies were sensitive to two parameters that affected the flux between the fractures and matrix in the dual permeability model: (1) the fracture-matrix connection areas and (2) the capillary pressure gradients between the fracture and matrix elements

  16. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation regarding groundwater travel times at geologic repositories, various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially nonuniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated

  17. The Interaction of Two Surface Vortices Near a Topographic Slope in a Stratified Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charly de Marez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the influence of bottom topography on the interaction of two identical vortices in a two-layer, quasi-geostrophic model. The two vortices have piecewise-uniform potential vorticity and are lying in the upper layer of the model. The topography is a smooth bottom slope. For two cyclones, topography modifies the merger critical distance and the merger efficiency: the topographic wave and vortices can advect the two cyclones along the shelf when they are initially far from it or towards the shelf when they are initially closer to it. They can also advect the two cyclones towards each other and thus favour merger. The cyclones deform, and the potential vorticity field undergoes filamentation. Regimes of partial vortex merger or of vortex splitting are then observed. The interaction of the vorticity poles in the two layers are analysed to explain the evolution of the two upper layer cyclones. For taller topography, two new regimes appear: vortex drift and splitting; and filamentation and asymmetric merger. They are due to the hetonic coupling of lower layer vorticity with the upper layer vortices (a heton is a baroclinic vortex dipole, carrying heat and momentum and propagating horizontally in the fluid, or to the strong shear that the former exerts on the latter. The interaction of two anticyclones shows regimes of co-rotation or merger, but specifically, it leads to the drift of the two vortices away from the slope, via a hetonic coupling with oppositely-signed vorticity in the lower layer. This vorticity originates in the breaking of the topographic wave. The analysis of passive tracer evolution confirms the inshore or offshore drift of the fluid, the formation of tracer fronts along filaments and its stirring in regions of vortex merger. The trajectories of particles indicate how the fluid initially in the vortices is finally partitioned.

  18. Overland flow model for asphalt oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J C Y

    2006-01-01

    Along the asphalt production line, the hot asphalt oil needs to undergo a cooling process that involves temporary storage in a tank. Safety is always a concern as to what if the tank is ruptured. Scenario studies of asphalt oil spills are required when designing the layout and open space for such a cooling process in the refinery yard. Applying the laminar flow theory to an asphalt oil spill, this paper presents an overland flow model to calculate the possible range of spread. The major parameters used in this model include fluid viscosity, ground slope, hydraulic conveyance, and asphalt oil volume. As a simplified model for a quasi-steady state flow condition, a hot asphalt oil spill for a typical case in a refinery yard can run approximately 400 to 600 feet before the asphalt mass cools down and becomes solid-like.

  19. Multiphase reacting flows modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisio, Daniele L

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book describe the most widely applicable modeling approaches and are organized in six groups covering from fundamentals to relevant applications. In the first part, some fundamentals of multiphase turbulent reacting flows are covered. In particular the introduction focuses on basic notions of turbulence theory in single-phase and multi-phase systems as well as on the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. In the second part, models for the physical and chemical processes involved are discussed. Among other things, particular emphasis is given to turbulence modeling strategies for multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory for granular flows. Next, the different numerical methods based on Lagrangian and/or Eulerian schemes are presented. In particular the most popular numerical approaches of computational fluid dynamics codes are described (i.e., Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach). The book will cover particle-based meth...

  20. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model

  1. Three-Dimensional Flow Separation Induced by a Model Vocal Fold Polyp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelley C.; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    The fluid-structure energy exchange process for normal speech has been studied extensively, but it is not well understood for pathological conditions. Polyps and nodules, which are geometric abnormalities that form on the medial surface of the vocal folds, can disrupt vocal fold dynamics and thus can have devastating consequences on a patient's ability to communicate. A recent in-vitro investigation of a model polyp in a driven vocal fold apparatus demonstrated that such a geometric abnormality considerably disrupts the glottal jet behavior and that this flow field adjustment was a likely reason for the severe degradation of the vocal quality in patients. Understanding of the formation and propagation of vortical structures from a geometric protuberance, and their subsequent impact on the aerodynamic loadings that drive vocal fold dynamic, is a critical component in advancing the treatment of this pathological condition. The present investigation concerns the three-dimensional flow separation induced by a wall-mounted prolate hemispheroid with a 2:1 aspect ratio in cross flow, i.e. a model vocal fold polyp. Unsteady three-dimensional flow separation and its impact of the wall pressure loading are examined using skin friction line visualization and wall pressure measurements. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-1236351 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  2. Streaming vorticity flux from oscillating walls with finite amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, X. H.; Wu, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    How to describe vorticity creation from a moving wall is a long standing problem. This paper discusses relevant issues at the fundamental level. First, it is shown that the concept of 'vorticity flux due to wall acceleration' can be best understood by following fluid particles on the wall rather than observing the flow at fixed spatial points. This is of crucial importance when the time-averaged flux is to be considered. The averaged flux has to be estimated in a wall-fixed frame of reference (in which there is no flux due to wall acceleration at all); or, if an inertial frame of reference is used, the generalized Lagrangian mean (GLM) also gives the same result. Then, for some simple but typical configurations, the time-averaged vorticity flux from a harmonically oscillating wall with finite amplitude is analyzed, without appealing to small perturbation. The main conclusion is that the wall oscillation will produce an additional mean vorticity flux (a fully nonlinear streaming effect), which is partially responsible for the mechanism of vortex flow control by waves. The results provide qualitative explanation for some experimentally and/or computationally observed phenomena.

  3. Dynamics and stability of electron plasma vortices under external strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Surko, C. M.

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of an initially axisymmetric 2D ideal vortex under an externally imposed strain flow is studied experimentally. The experiments are carried out using pure electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap; here, the dynamics of the plasma density transverse to the field are directly analogous to the dynamics of vorticity in a 2D ideal fluid. An external strain flow is applied using boundary conditions in a way that is consistent with 2D fluid dynamics. Primarily, elliptical distortions of the vortex core are studied, including dynamical orbits, equilibria, and stability properties. In the case of a quasi-flat vorticity profile, the results are in good agreement with a simple theory of a piecewise elliptical vorticity distribution. For smooth vorticity profiles, deviations from this theory are discussed. Results for time-dependent strain and tests of adiabatic behavior will also be discussed. These experiments may be relevant to many types of quasi-2D fluid behavior, including the dynamics of geophysical fluids, other types of strongly magnetized plasma, and various astrophysical scenarios. This work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570 and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0016532.

  4. Three-dimensional flow structure measurements behind a queue of studied model vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.F.; Chan, T.L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow structures of a queue of studied model vehicles (i.e., one-, two- and three-vehicle cases) were investigated comprehensively in a closed-circuit wind tunnel using particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the typical urban vehicle speeds (i.e., 10, 30 and 50 km/h). In this three-dimensional vehicle wake, a pair of longitudinal vortices is characterized by counter-rotating and moving downstream at relatively low velocity than their surrounding flow. The flow structures of multiple studied model vehicles are dominated by the wake generated from the last studied model vehicle but the preceding studied model vehicle(s) also has/have some minor effects. Cross-sectional turbulence distribution is non-uniform in the far-wake region for all studied cases. The lowest turbulence occurs at the center part of the vehicle wake while high turbulence occurs at its two sides. As such, it may lead to considerable underestimation in turbulence magnitude if the measurement is only taken along the centerline of the vehicle wake.

  5. Constraints on Cosmological Models from Cosmic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. J.; Smith, R. J.; Lucey, J. R.; Schlegel, D. J.; Davies, R. L.

    Cosmic flows are the only probe of the large-scale mass power spectrum available at low redshift. An important statistic is the bulk flow of a peculiar velocity sample with respect to the Cosmic Microwave background. We compare the bulk flow of the SMAC cluster sample to the predictions of popular cosmological models and to other recent large-scale peculiar velocity surveys. Both analyses account for aliasing of small-scale power due to the sparse and non-uniform sampling of the surveys. We conclude that the SMAC bulk flow is in marginal conflict with flat COBE-normalized ΛCDM models which fit the cluster abundance constraint. However, power spectra which are steeper shortward of the peak are consistent with all of the above constraints. When recent large-scale peculiar velocity surveys are compared, we conclude that all measured bulk flows (with the possible exception of that of Lauer & Postman) are consistent with each other given the errors, provided the latter allow for ``cosmic covariance''. A rough estimate of the mean bulk flow of all surveys (except Lauer & Postman) is ˜400 km/s with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  6. A study of vorticity formation in high energy nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becattini, F. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); Inghirami, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rolando, V.; Pagliara, G. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy); Del Zanna, L. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Florence (Italy); Chandra, V. [Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad, Gujrat (India)

    2015-09-15

    We present a quantitative study of vorticity formation in peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV by using the ECHO-QGP numerical code, implementing relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics in the causal Israel-Stewart framework in 3 + 1 dimensions with an initial Bjorken flow profile. We consider different definitions of vorticity which are relevant in relativistic hydrodynamics. After demonstrating the excellent capabilities of our code, which proves to be able to reproduce Gubser flow up to 8 fm/c, we show that, with the initial conditions needed to reproduce the measured directed flow in peripheral collisions corresponding to an average impact parameter b = 11.6 fm and with the Bjorken flow profile for a viscous Quark Gluon Plasma with η/s = 0.1 fixed, a vorticity of the order of some 10{sup -2} c/fm can develop at freeze-out. The ensuing polarization of Λ baryons does not exceed 1.4 % at midrapidity. We show that the amount of developed directed flow is sensitive to both the initial angular momentum of the plasma and its viscosity. (orig.)

  7. Origin of chaos near three-dimensional quantum vortices: A general Bohmian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzemos, Athanasios C.; Efthymiopoulos, Christos; Contopoulos, George

    2018-04-01

    We provide a general theory for the structure of the quantum flow near three-dimensional (3D) nodal lines, i.e., one-dimensional loci where the 3D wave function becomes equal to zero. In suitably defined coordinates (comoving with the nodal line) the generic structure of the flow implies the formation of 3D quantum vortices. We show that such vortices are accompanied by nearby invariant lines of the comoving quantum flow, called X lines, which are normally hyperbolic. Furthermore, the stable and unstable manifolds of the X lines produce chaotic scatterings of nearby quantum (Bohmian) trajectories, thus inducing an intricate form of the quantum current in the neighborhood of each 3D quantum vortex. Generic formulas describing the structure around 3D quantum vortices are provided, applicable to an arbitrary choice of 3D wave function. We also give specific numerical examples as well as a discussion of the physical consequences of chaos near 3D quantum vortices.

  8. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 2nd Report. Behavior of the interacting flow field controlled passively; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Judo seigyosareta nagareba no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents the behavior of a passively controlled horseshoe vortex at the root of NACA0024 wing which is established on a turbulent boundary layer, A pair of vortex generators of half delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The flow field of the optimally controlled horseshoe vortex both in case of Common Flow Up (CFUC) and Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC) is carefully investigated by an X-array hot-wire. In case of CFUC, the horseshoe vortex is not shifted from the wing, because the longitudinal vortex is restrained. The interacted vortex presents a circular profile, in a optimally controlled case. In case of CFDC, the interacted vortex that has strong vorticity by the pairing process is shifted away from the wing. Then, the high momentum fluid flow penetrates between the wing and the vortex. (author)

  9. Effect of the atmospheric heat source on the development and eastward movement of the Tibetan Plateau vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the final analyses data (FNL of the Global Forecasting System of the National Centers for Environment Prediction (NCEP and the radiosonde data over the Tibetan Plateau, evolutions of two types of the Tibetan Plateau vortices, moving-off the plateau (Type A and dying-out on the plateau (Type B, are investigated respectively. Compared to Type B vortices, the large-scale circulations associated with Type A vortices show stronger ridge to the north of the plateau and deeper trough near the Bay of Bengal at 500 hPa, and the southwesterly flow from the trough and the northwesterly flow from the ridge converge more intensively to the east of Type A vortices. Meanwhile, at 200 hPa the divergence on the right-hand side of the upper westerly jet is just over the vortices. The convergence at 500 hPa and divergence at 200 hPa provide favourable conditions for the development and eastward motion of the vortices. The diagnoses of the potential vorticity (PV budgets reveal that in the developing stages of the two types of vortices, the vertical distribution of the atmospheric heat source determines both their intensity and the moving direction. In the decaying stage, the maintenance and eastward movement for Type A vortices mainly depend on the convergence of the strong northwesterly and southwesterly to the east of the vortices. For Type B vortices, the vertical PV flux divergence caused by the ascending motion around the vortices reduces the intensity of the vortices and is unfavourable for their eastward motion.

  10. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ

  11. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  12. A POD reduced order unstructured mesh ocean modelling method for moderate Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Navon, I. M.; Gorman, G. J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Goddard, A. J. H.

    Herein a new approach to enhance the accuracy of a novel Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) model applied to moderate Reynolds number flows (of the type typically encountered in ocean models) is presented. This approach develops the POD model of Fang et al. [Fang, F., Pain, C.C., Navon, I.M., Piggott, M.D., Gorman, G.J., Allison, P., Goddard, A.J.H., 2008. Reduced-order modelling of an adaptive mesh ocean model. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids. doi:10.1002/fld.1841] used in conjunction with the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM), an adaptive, non-hydrostatic finite element model. Both the velocity and vorticity results of the POD reduced order model (ROM) exhibit an overall good agreement with those obtained from the full model. The accuracy of the POD-Galerkin model with the use of adaptive meshes is first evaluated using the Munk gyre flow test case with Reynolds numbers ranging between 400 and 2000. POD models using the L2 norm become oscillatory when the Reynolds number exceeds Re=400. This is because the low-order truncation of the POD basis inhibits generally all the transfers between the large and the small (unresolved) scales of the fluid flow. Accuracy is improved by using the H1 POD projector in preference to the L2 POD projector. The POD bases are constructed by incorporating gradients as well as function values in the H1 Sobolev norm. The accuracy of numerical results is further enhanced by increasing the number of snapshots and POD bases. Error estimation was used to assess the effect of truncation (involved in the POD-Galerkin approach) when adaptive meshes are used in conjunction with POD/ROM. The RMSE of velocity results between the full model and POD-Galerkin model is reduced by as much as 50% by using the H1 norm and increasing the number of snapshots and POD bases.

  13. Flow over 50º Delta Wings with Different Leading-Edge Radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental study focuses on the effects of the leading-edge radius on the flow over 50º swept delta wing models. Three models were tested, one model has a sharp leading edge and two other have a semi-circular leading edge of different radius. The vortical flow on and off the surface of the

  14. Pinned vorticity in rotating superfluids, with application to neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.; Shaham, J.; Alpar, M.A.; Anderson, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic consequences of the existence of pinned vorticity in a rotating superfluid are studied by means of a simple model: the behavior of a rotating cylinder which contains a uniform region of either weakly or strongly pinned vorticity and which is being spun up or spun down by an external torque. It is shown that in the case of strong pinning, spin down can lead to periodic jumps (glitches) in the rotation frequency of the cylinder, followed by quasi-oscillatory relaxation, while in the case of weak pinning no glitches occur unless the cylinder is shaken so violently that vortices unpin. We conclude that the giant glitches and post-glitch behavior observed in the Vela pulsar may be explained by the sudden release of some 10% of the strongly pinned vortices in the neutron crust every few years as a result of pulsar spin down. We further suggest that the post-glitch behavior observed in the Crab pulsar can be explained if the macroglitches represent vorticity jumps induced by small starquakes in the weakly pinned vortex region expected in the crust of a young neutron star, and that the differences in ''glitch'' behavior of the Crab, Vela, and older pulsars may be explained on evolutionary grounds. (author)

  15. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  16. Modelling Nitrogen Transformation in Horizontal Subsurface Flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical model was developed to permit dynamic simulation of nitrogen interaction in a pilot horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland receiving effluents from primary facultative pond. The system was planted with Phragmites mauritianus, which was provided with root zone depth of 75 cm. The root zone was ...

  17. Multiphase flow modeling in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelmann, S; Schwienheer, C; Schembecker, G

    2011-09-09

    The separation efficiency in Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) depends on selection of a suitable biphasic solvent system (distribution ratio, selectivity factor, sample solubility) and is influenced by hydrodynamics in the chambers. Especially the stationary phase retention, the interfacial area for mass transfer and the flow pattern (backmixing) are important parameters. Their relationship with physical properties, operating parameters and chamber geometry is not completely understood and predictions are hardly possible. Experimental flow visualization is expensive and two-dimensional only. Therefore we simulated the flow pattern using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which was implemented in OpenFOAM®. For the three-dimensional simulation of a rotating FCPC®-chamber, gravitational centrifugal and Coriolis forces were added to the conservation equation. For experimental validation the flow pattern of different solvent systems was visualized with an optical measurement system. The amount of mobile phase in a chamber was calculated from gray scale values of videos recorded by an image processing routine in ImageJ®. To visualize the flow of the stationary phase polyethylene particles were used to perform a qualitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis. We found a good agreement between flow patterns and velocity profiles of experiments and simulations. By using the model we found that increasing the chamber depth leads to higher specific interfacial area. Additionally a circular flow in the stationary phase was identified that lowers the interfacial area because it pushes the jet of mobile phase to the chamber wall. The Coriolis force alone gives the impulse for this behavior. As a result the model is easier to handle than experiments and allows 3D prediction of hydrodynamics in the chamber. Additionally it can be used for optimizing geometry and operating parameters for given physical properties of solvent systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B

  18. Modeling Coherent Structures in Canopy Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Mitul

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that flows over vegetation canopies are characterized by the presence of energetic coherent structures. Since the mean profile over dense canopies exhibits an inflection point, the emergence of such structures is often attributed to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. However, though stability analyses provide useful mechanistic insights into canopy flows, they are limited in their ability to generate predictions for spectra and coherent structure. The present effort seeks to address this limitation by extending the resolvent formulation (McKeon and Sharma, 2010, J. Fluid Mech.) to canopy flows. Under the resolvent formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based (singular value) decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. A key advantage of this approach is that it reconciles multiple mechanisms that lead to high amplification in turbulent flows, including modal instability, transient growth, and critical-layer phenomena. Further, individual high-gain modes can be combined to generate more complete models for coherent structure and velocity spectra. Preliminary resolvent-based model predictions for canopy flows agree well with existing experiments and simulations.

  19. Road maintenance planning using network flow modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chao; Remenyte-Prescott, Rasa; Andrews, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a road maintenance planning model that can be used to balance out maintenance cost and road user cost, since performing road maintenance at night can be convenient for road users but costly for highway agency. Based on the platform of the network traffic flow modelling, the traffic through the worksite and its adjacent road links is evaluated. Thus, maintenance arrangements at a worksite can be optimized considering the overall network performance. In addition, genetic alg...

  20. Zonal flow shear amplification by depletion of anisotropic potential eddies in a magnetized plasma: idealized models and laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorczak, N; Manz, P; Chakraborty Thakur, S; Xu, M; Tynan, G R

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of vorticity conservation on the spatio-temporal interaction of a E × B zonal shear with a generic pattern of plasma potential modes are investigated in a magnetized plasma environment. Eddies organized on a chain along the zonal direction are locally depleted, resulting in what appears to be a radial decorrelation by the shear flow in the absence of dissipation. The eddy depletion occurs due to a transfer of enstrophy from the chain to the shear flow during the progressive growth in the chain anisotropy. The rate of zonal shear acceleration is derived analytically and its expression is validated by numerical simulations. The rate is proportional to the chain amplitude in the weak shear regime and to the shearing rate in the strong shear regime. Basic properties of the model are validated with fast visible imaging data collected on a magnetized plasma column experiment. A characteristic vorticity flux across the edge shear layer of tokamak plasmas is associated with the model predictions. The dependence of the interaction rate with turbulence amplitude and shearing rate could be an important ingredient of the low to high confinement mode transition. (paper)

  1. Imparting small vorticity to a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batakis, Nikos A.

    1981-04-01

    We present and briefly discuss a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime. The field equations have been solved after being linearized with respect to a parameter which imparts vorticity to the model. The limit of zero vorticity is an already known solution.

  2. Pair interactions of heavy vortices in quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnyuk, Ivan A.

    2018-02-01

    The dynamics of quantum vortex pairs carrying heavy doping matter trapped inside their cores is studied. The nonlinear classical matter field formalism is used to build a universal mathematical model of a heavy vortex applicable to different types of quantum mixtures. It is shown how the usual vortex dynamics typical for undoped pairs qualitatively changes when heavy dopants are used: heavy vortices with opposite topological charges (chiralities) attract each other, while vortices with the same charge are repelled. The force responsible for such behavior appears as a result of superposition of vortices velocity fields in the presence of doping substance and can be considered as a special realization of the Magnus effect. The force is evaluated quantitatively and its inverse proportionality to the distance is demonstrated. The mechanism described in this paper gives an example of how a light nonlinear classical field may realize repulsive and attractive interactions between embedded heavy impurities.

  3. Vortices and domain walls: 'Wormholes' in unconventional superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessarab, P F; Radievsky, A V

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the 2D and 3D time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model we study superconductors with multicomponent order parameter (d-pairing). We argue that topological defects inside the sample do affect its thermodynamic properties such as hysteresis loop, susceptibility, etc. Along with earlier known topological defects such as Abrikosov vortices, domain walls (DWs) which separate different magnetic phases and even vortices inside the DW, we found an interesting combination of DWs and vortices. Namely we show that equivalent magnetic phases may be linked together with a vortex going through the other magnetic phase. This configuration may correspond to a stable state even in a zero external magnetic field. We also mention that this configuration is topologically similar to the 'wormholes' in the quantum gravity.

  4. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walicka A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  5. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  6. Dynamics of vortices in polariton quantum fluids : From full vortices, to half vortices and vortex pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud-Plédran, Benoit

    2012-02-01

    Polariton quantum fluids may be created both spontaneously through a standard phase transition towards a Bose Einstein condensate, or may be resonantly driven with a well-defined speed. Thanks to the photonic component of polaritons, the properties of the quantum fluid may be accessed rather directly with in particular the possibility of detained interferometric studies. Here, I will detail the dynamics of vortices, obtained with a picosecond time resolution, in different configurations, with in particular their phase dynamics. I will show in particular the dynamics the dynamics of spontaneous creation of a vortex, the dissociation of a full vortex into two half vortices as well as the dynamics of the dissociation of a dark soliton line into a street of pairs of vortices. Work done at EPFL by a dream team of Postdocs PhD students and collaborators: K. Lagoudakis, G. Nardin, T. Paraiso, G. Grosso, F. Manni, Y L'eger, M. Portella Oberli, F. Morier-Genoud and the help of our friend theorists V, Savona, M. Vouters and T. Liew.

  7. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  8. Flow stress model in metal cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the plastic deformation that occurs in metal cutting, based on dislocation mechanics, is presented. The model explains the fundamental deformation structure that develops during machining and is based on the well known Cottrell-Stokes Law, wherein the flow stress is partitioned into two parts; an athermal part which occurs in the shear fronts (or shear bands); and a thermal part which occurs in the lamella regions. The deformation envokes the presence of a cellular dislocation distribution which always exists in the material ahead of the shear process. This 'alien' dislocation distribution either exists in the metal prior to cutting or is produced by the compressive stress field which operates in front of the shear process. The magnitude of the flow stress and direction of the shear are shown to be correlated to the stacking fault energy of the metal being cut. The model is tested with respect to energy consumption rates and found to be consistent with observed values.

  9. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  10. Modelling asphaltene deposition in turbulent pipeline flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskin, D.; Ratulowski, J.; Akbarzadeh, K.; Pan, S. [Schlumberg DBR Technology Center (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Asphaltene deposition is one of the important problems of oil production that requires accurate predictive modeling. A model of asphaltene deposition in a turbulent pipe flow is introduced in this paper. A Couette device is employed to perform experiments. There are two major modules in this model. (1) A model of particle size distribution evolution along a pipe - the concept of 'critical particle size' is introduced. Only particles smaller than the critical particle size may deposit. (2) A model of particle transport to the wall. The major mechanism of particle transport to the wall is the Brownian motion. The model developed contains three major tuning parameters that are determined experimentally using a Couette device: particle-particle collision efficiency, particle-wall sticking efficiency, and particle critical size. Performance of the deposition model for a pipeline with the coefficients obtained using a laboratory Couette device is also illustrated in this paper.

  11. The decay of wake vortices in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Frech, M.; Doernbrack, A.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of three wake vortex pairs of B-747 aircraft in a convectively driven atmospheric boundary layer is investigated by means of large-eddy simulations (LES). This situation is considered as being hazardous as the updraft velocities of a thermal may compensate the induced descent speed of the vortex pair resulting in vortices stalled in the flight path. The LES results, however, illustrate that (i) the primary rectilinear vortices are rapidly deformed on the scale of the alternating updraft and downdraft regions; (ii) parts of the vortices stay on flight level but are quickly eroded by the enhanced turbulence of an updraft; (iii) longest living sections of the vortices are found in regions of relatively calm downdraft flow which augments their descent. Strip theory calculations are used to illustrate the temporal and spatial development of lift and rolling moments experienced by a following medium weight class B-737 aircraft. Characteristics of the respective distributions are analysed. Initially, the maximum rolling moments slightly exceed the available roll control of the B-737. After 60 seconds the probability of rolling moments exceeding 50% of the roll control, a value which is considered as a threshold for acceptable rolling moments, has decreased to 1% of its initial probability. (orig.)

  12. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  13. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  14. How hairpin vortices emerge from exact invariant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tobias M.; Farano, Mirko; de Palma, Pietro; Robinet, Jean-Christoph; Cherubini, Stefania

    2017-11-01

    Hairpin vortices are among the most commonly observed flow structures in wall-bounded shear flows. However, within the dynamical system approach to turbulence, those structures have not yet been described. They are not captured by known exact invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations nor have other state-space structures supporting hairpins been identified. We show that hairpin structures are observed along an optimally growing trajectory leaving a well known exact traveling wave solution of plane Poiseuille flow. The perturbation triggering hairpins does not correspond to an unstable mode of the exact traveling wave but lies in the stable manifold where non-normality causes strong transient amplification.

  15. Spectral modeling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerenzung, J; Politano, H; Ponty, Y; Pouquet, A

    2008-08-01

    We present a dynamical spectral model for large-eddy simulation of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian approximation. This model extends classical spectral large-eddy simulations for the Navier-Stokes equations to incorporate general (non-Kolmogorovian) spectra as well as eddy noise. We derive the model for MHD flows and show that the introduction of an eddy damping time for the dynamics of spectral tensors, in the absence of equipartition between the velocity and magnetic fields, leads to better agreement with direct numerical simulations, an important point for dynamo computations.

  16. Optimization of grid pattern and single distribution in singularity method: application to modeling of cavitating flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonnier, Herve

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis belongs to the field of fluid mechanics, and more particularly reports the development of a fine modelling of flows while taking the unsteady feature of the flow, the partial development of cavitation on blade upper surface, as well as the geometry of the downstream vortical sheet into account. In a first part, the author reports the search for a grid problem formulation, and for a minimization of discretization errors due to geometry. Then, among a range of numerical solutions of the same mathematical problem, he selects the one which minimizes discretization errors. The author outlines the properties and opportunities of the selected model. Due to its ability to solve free boundary problems, the model is applied to the calculation of a super-cavitation. Then, the problem of an axisymmetric geometry is addressed for which the discretization of integral equations requires further analytic developments. The model appears to be very flexible, and is still efficient for very low Froude numbers [fr

  17. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over the DrivAer fastback vehicle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruettgers, Mario; Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2017-11-01

    In 2012 the Technical University of Munich (TUM) made realistic generic car models called DrivAer available to the public. These detailed models allow a precise calculation of the flow around a lifelike car which was limited to simplified geometries in the past. In the present study, the turbulent flow around one of the models, the DrivAer Fastback model, is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). The goal of the study is to give a deeper physical understanding of highly turbulent regions around the car, like at the side mirror or at the rear end. For each region the contribution to the total drag is worked out. The results have shown that almost 35% of the drag is generated from the car wheels whereas the side mirror only contributes 4% of the total drag. Detailed frequency analysis on velocity signals in each wake region have also been conducted and found 3 dominant frequencies which correspond to the dominant frequency of the total drag. Furthermore, vortical structures are visualized and highly energetic points are identified. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government(Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning) (No. 2014R1A2A1A11049599, No. 2015R1A2A1A15056086, No. 2016R1E1A2A01939553).

  18. Modelling framework for groundwater flow at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, A.J.; Billington, D.E.; Herbert, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The principal objective of Nirex is to develop a single deep geological repository for the safe disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. In safety assessment, use is made of a variety of conceptual models that form the basis for modelling of the pathways by which radionuclides might return to the environment. In this paper, the development of a conceptual model for groundwater flow and transport through fractured rock on the various scales of interest is discussed. The approach is illustrated by considering how some aspects of the conceptual model are developed in particular numerical models. These representations of the conceptual model use fracture network geometries based on realistic rock properties. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  19. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, Eric G.; Chou, Tom

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  20. Effect of variation of geometric parameters on the flow within a synthetic models of lower human airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Moreno, Andres Santiago; Duque Daza, Carlos Alberto

    2017-11-01

    The effects of variation of two geometric parameters, such as bifurcation angle and carina rounding radius, during the respiratory inhalation process, are studied numerically using two synthetic models of lower human airways. Laminar flow simulations were performed for six angles and three rounding radius, for 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 for Reynolds numbers. Numerical results showed the existence of a direct relationship between the deformation of the velocity profiles (effect produced by the bifurcation) and the vortical structures observed through the secondary flow patterns. It is observed that the location of the vortices (and their related saddle point) is associated with the displacement of the velocity peak. On the other hand, increasing the angle and the rounding radius seems to bring about a growth of the pressure drop, which in turn displaces the distribution and peaks of the maximum shear stresses of the carina, that is, of the bifurcation point. Some physiological effects associated with the phenomena produced by these geometric variations are also discussed.

  1. A numerical study of the role of the vertical structure of vorticity during tropical cyclone genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, T N; Mathew, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    An eight-level axisymmetric model with simple parameterizations for clouds and the atmospheric boundary layer was developed to examine the evolution of vortices that are precursors to tropical cyclones. The effect of vertical distributions of vorticity, especially that arising from a merger of mid-level vortices, was studied by us to provide support for a new vortex-merger theory of tropical cyclone genesis. The basic model was validated with the analytical results available for the spin-down of axisymmetric vortices. With the inclusion of the cloud and boundary layer parameterizations, the evolution of deep vortices into hurricanes and the subsequent decay are simulated quite well. The effects of several parameters such as the initial vortex strength, radius of maximum winds, sea-surface temperature and latitude (Coriolis parameter) on the evolution were examined. A new finding is the manner in which mid-level vortices of the same strength decay and how, on simulated merger of these mid-level vortices, the resulting vortex amplifies to hurricane strength in a realistic time frame. The importance of sea-surface temperature on the evolution of full vortices was studied and explained. Also it was found that the strength of the surface vortex determines the time taken by the deep vortex to amplify to hurricane strength.

  2. Effect of potential vorticity flux on the circulation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaohua; Sun, Junchuan; Wang, Yonggang; Wei, Zexun; Yang, Dezhou; Qu, Tangdong

    2017-08-01

    This study analyzes temperature and salinity products from the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environment Model. To avoid the fictitious assumption of no-motion reference level, a P-vector inverse method is employed to derive geostrophic velocity. Line integral of geostrophic velocity shows evidence for the existence of a sandwiched circulation in the South China Sea (SCS), i.e., cyclonic circulation in the subsurface and deep layers and anticyclonic in the intermediate layer. To reveal the factors responsible for the sandwiched circulation, we derive the potential vorticity equation based on a four-and-a-half-layer quasi-geostrophic model and apply theoretical potential vorticity constraint to density layers. The result shows that the sandwiched circulation is largely induced by planetary potential vorticity flux through lateral boundaries, mainly the Luzon Strait. This dynamical mechanism lies in the fact that the net potential vorticity inflow in the subsurface and deep layers leads to a positive layer-average vorticity in the SCS basin, yielding vortex stretching and a cyclonic basin-wide circulation. On the contrary, the net potential vorticity outflow in the intermediate layer induces a negative layer-average vorticity, generating an anticyclonic basin-wide circulation in the SCS. Furthermore, by illustrating different consequence from depth/density layers, we clarify that density layers are essential for applying theoretical potential vorticity constraint to the isolated deep SCS basin.

  3. Numerical and experimental study on vorticity measurement in liquid metal using local Lorentz force velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Daniel; Marangoni, Rafael; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Local Lorentz force velocimetry (local LFV) is a contactless velocity measurement technique for liquid metals. Due to the relative movement between an electrically conductive fluid and a static applied magnetic field, eddy currents and a flow-braking Lorentz force are generated inside the metal melt. This force is proportional to the flow rate or to the local velocity, depending on the volume subset of the flow spanned by the magnetic field. By using small-size magnets, a localized magnetic field distribution is achieved allowing a local velocity assessment in the region adjacent to the wall. In the present study, we describe a numerical model of our experiments at a continuous caster model where the working fluid is GaInSn in eutectic composition. Our main goal is to demonstrate that this electromagnetic technique can be applied to measure vorticity distributions, i.e. to resolve velocity gradients as well. Our results show that by using a cross-shaped magnet system, the magnitude of the torque perpendicular to the surface of the mold significantly increases improving its measurement in a liquid metal flow. According to our numerical model, this torque correlates with the vorticity of the velocity in this direction. Before validating our numerical predictions, an electromagnetic dry calibration of the measurement system composed of a multicomponent force and torque sensor and a cross-shaped magnet was done using a rotating disk made of aluminum. The sensor is able to measure simultaneously all three components of force and torque, respectively. This calibration step cannot be avoided and it is used for an accurate definition of the center of the magnet with respect to the sensor’s coordinate system for torque measurements. Finally, we present the results of the experiments at the mini-LIMMCAST facility showing a good agreement with the numerical model.

  4. On the modelling of shallow turbidity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapidevskii, Valery Yu.; Dutykh, Denys; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2018-03-01

    In this study we investigate shallow turbidity density currents and underflows from mechanical point of view. We propose a simple hyperbolic model for such flows. On one hand, our model is based on very basic conservation principles. On the other hand, the turbulent nature of the flow is also taken into account through the energy dissipation mechanism. Moreover, the mixing with the pure water along with sediments entrainment and deposition processes are considered, which makes the problem dynamically interesting. One of the main advantages of our model is that it requires the specification of only two modeling parameters - the rate of turbulent dissipation and the rate of the pure water entrainment. Consequently, the resulting model turns out to be very simple and self-consistent. This model is validated against several experimental data and several special classes of solutions (such as travelling, self-similar and steady) are constructed. Unsteady simulations show that some special solutions are realized as asymptotic long time states of dynamic trajectories.

  5. Modelling debris flows down general channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of the single-phase cohesionless dry granular avalanche model over curved and twisted channels proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter (2003. It is a generalisation of the Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991 equations based on simple channel topography to a two-phase fluid-solid mixture of debris material. Important terms emerging from the correct treatment of the kinematic and dynamic boundary condition, and the variable basal topography are systematically taken into account. For vanishing fluid contribution and torsion-free channel topography our new model equations exactly degenerate to the previous Savage-Hutter model equations while such a degeneration was not possible by the Iverson and Denlinger (2001 model, which, in fact, also aimed to extend the Savage and Hutter model. The model equations of this paper have been rigorously derived; they include the effects of the curvature and torsion of the topography, generally for arbitrarily curved and twisted channels of variable channel width. The equations are put into a standard conservative form of partial differential equations. From these one can easily infer the importance and influence of the pore-fluid-pressure distribution in debris flow dynamics. The solid-phase is modelled by applying a Coulomb dry friction law whereas the fluid phase is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Input parameters of the equations are the internal and bed friction angles of the solid particles, the viscosity and volume fraction of the fluid, the total mixture density and the pore pressure distribution of the fluid at the bed. Given the bed topography and initial geometry and the initial velocity profile of the debris mixture, the model equations are able to describe the dynamics of the depth profile and bed parallel depth-averaged velocity distribution from the initial position to the final deposit. A shock capturing, total variation diminishing numerical scheme is implemented to

  6. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-10

    Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer ground-water flow models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. In the area of scientific modeling, the M&O CRWMS has the following responsibilities: To provide overall management and integration of modeling activities. To provide a framework for focusing modeling and model development. To identify areas that require increased or decreased emphasis. To ensure that the tools necessary to conduct performance assessment are available. These responsibilities are being initiated through a three-step process. It consists of a thorough review of existing models, testing of models which best fit the established requirements, and making recommendations for future development that should be conducted. Future model enhancement will then focus on the models selected during this activity. Furthermore, in order to manage future model development, particularly in those areas requiring substantial enhancement, the three-step process will be updated and reported periodically in the future.

  7. Dynamic analysis of electro- and magneto-rheological fluid dampers using duct flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteki, Kambiz; Bagchi, Ashutosh; Sedaghati, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) and electro-rheological (ER) fluid dampers provide a semi-active control mechanism for suppressing vibration responses of a structure. MR and ER fluids change their viscosity under the influence of magnetic and electrical fields, respectively, which facilitates automatic control when these fluids are used in damping devices. The existing models, namely the phenomenological models for simulating the behavior of MR and ER dampers, rely on various parameters determined experimentally by the manufacturers for each damper configuration. It is of interest to develop mechanistic models of these dampers which can be applied to various configurations so that their fundamental characteristics can be studied to develop flexible design solutions for smart structures. This paper presents a formulation for dynamic analysis of electro-rheological (ER) and magneto-rheological (MR) fluid dampers in flow and mix mode configurations under harmonic and random excitations. The procedure employs the vorticity transport equation and the regularization function to deal with the unsteady flow and nonlinear behavior of ER/MR fluid in general motion. The finite difference method has been used to solve the governing differential equations. Using the developed approach, the damping force of ER/MR dampers can be calculated under any type of excitation. (paper)

  8. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An introduction to multilevel flow modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel Flow Modeling (MFM) is a methodology for functional modeling of industrial processes on several interconnected levels of means-end and part-whole abstractions. The basic idea of MFM is to represent an industrial plant as a system which provides the means required to serve purposes in i...... in detail by a water mill example. The overall reasoning capabilities of MFM and its basis in cause-effect relations are also explained. The appendix contains an overview of MFM concepts and their definitions....

  10. Vorticity and helicity decompositions and dynamics with real Schur form of the velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2018-03-01

    The real Schur form (RSF) of a generic velocity gradient field ∇u is exploited to expose the structures of flows, in particular, our field decomposition resulting in two vorticities with only mutual linkage as the topological content of the global helicity (accordingly decomposed into two equal parts). The local transformation to the RSF may indicate alternative (co)rotating frame(s) for specifying the objective argument(s) of the constitutive equation. When ∇u is uniformly of RSF in a fixed Cartesian coordinate frame, i.e., ux = ux(x, y) and uy = uy(x, y), but uz = uz(x, y, z), the model, with the decomposed vorticities both frozen-in to u, is for two-component-two-dimensional-coupled-with-one-component-three-dimensional flows in between two-dimensional-three-component (2D3C) and fully three-dimensional-three-component ones and may help curing the pathology in the helical 2D3C absolute equilibrium, making the latter effectively work in more realistic situations.

  11. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  12. Effect of vorticity on polycrystalline ice deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Jansen, Daniela; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Weikusat, Ilka

    2017-04-01

    Understanding ice sheet dynamics requires a good knowledge of how dynamic recrystallisation controls ice microstructures and rheology at different boundary conditions. In polar ice sheets, pure shear flattening typically occurs at the top of the sheets, while simple shearing dominates near their base. We present a series of two-dimensional microdynamic numerical simulations that couple ice deformation with dynamic recrystallisation of various intensities, paying special attention to the effect of boundary conditions. The viscoplastic full-field numerical modelling approach (VPFFT) (Lebensohn, 2001) is used to calculate the response of a polycrystalline aggregate that deforms purely by dislocation glide. This code is coupled with the ELLE microstructural modelling platform that includes recrystallisation in the aggregate by intracrystalline recovery, nucleation by polygonisation, as well as grain boundary migration driven by the reduction of surface and strain energies (Llorens et al., 2016a, 2016b, 2017). The results reveal that regardless the amount of DRX and ice flow a single c-axes maximum develops all simulations. This maximum is oriented approximately parallel to the maximum finite shortening direction and rotates in simple shear towards the normal to the shear plane. This leads to a distinctly different behaviour in pure and simple shear. In pure shear, the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) and shape-preferred orientation (SPO) are increasingly unfavourable for deformation, leading to hardening and an increased activity of non-basal slip. The opposite happens in simple shear, where the imposed vorticity causes rotation of the LPO and SPO to a favourable orientation, leading to strain softening. An increase of recrystallisation enhances the activity of the non-basal slip, due to the reduction of deformation localisation. In pure shear conditions, the pyramidal slip activity is thus even more enhanced and can become higher than the basal-slip activity. Our

  13. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  15. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e., fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rates. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  16. Potential vorticity dynamics for global scale circulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.; Schubert, W.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most notable advances in extratropical dynamics this decade has been the understanding of large-scale atmospheric and oceanic processes by using potential vorticity dynamics, the so called open-quotes IPV thinking.close quotes This analysis method has also been successfully extended to some tropical atmospheric circulation systems such as hurricanes and the Hadley circulation. The fundamental idea behind such a dynamic system rests with the fact that PV is a tracer-like quantity since it is conserved (in the absence of friction and diabatic heating) following a fluid particle and carries both significant dynamic and thermodynamic information regarding fluid motion. Thus, the prediction and inversion of PV form the most succinct dynamic view of atmospheric and oceanic motions. Furthermore, PV dynamics provides access to many insightful dynamic analyses such as: Propagation of Rossby waves, barotropic and baroclinic instabilities for shear flows, and wave-mean flow interactions. All these features make IPV analysis a very attractive tool for studying geophysical fluid systems

  17. Characterization of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall

    KAUST Repository

    Bouremel, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to characterize the evolution of counter-rotating streamwise vortices in a rectangular channel with one sided wavy surface. The vortices were created by a uniform set of saw-tooth carved over the leading edge of a flat plate at the entrance of a flat rectangular channel with one-sided wavy wall. PIV measurements were taken over the spanwise and streamwise planes at different locations and at Reynolds number of 2500. Two other Reynolds numbers of 2885 and 3333 have also been considered for quantification purpose. Pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices have been shown experimentally to be centred along the spanwise direction at the saw-tooth valley where the vorticity ωz=0ωz=0. It has also been found that the vorticity ωzωz of the pairs of counter-rotating vortices decreases along the streamwise direction, and increases with the Reynolds number. Moreover, different quantifications of such counter-rotating vortices have been discussed such as their size, boundary layer, velocity profile and vorticity. The current study shows that the mixing due to the wall shear stress of counter-rotating streamwise vortices as well as their averaged viscous dissipation rate of kinetic energy decrease over flat and adverse pressure gradient surfaces while increasing over favourable pressure gradient surfaces. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the main direction of stretching is orientated at around 45° with the main flow direction.

  18. Numerical investigations on the influence of wind shear and turbulence on aircraft trailing vortices; Numerische Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von Windscherung und Turbulenz auf Flugzeugwirbelschleppen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, T.

    2003-07-01

    In several aspects, the behaviour of aircraft wake vortices under situations of vertical wind shear is significantly different from non-shear scenarios and its operational real-time forcast is challenging. By means of numerical investigations of idealized scenarios, the influence of wind shear on the lateral and vertical transport of vortices is analysed both, phenomenologically as well as in the scope of a sensitivity study. The results allow for the verification of controversial views and the benchmark of modelling approaches. Case studies of turbulent shear flows focus on the persistence of vortices. A detailed analysis of the flow fields evidence that unequal vortex decay rates can be attributed to the asymmetric distribution of secondary vorticity structures. The results moreover suggest that extended vortex lifespans can be expected under situations of wind shear. The unusual vortex behaviour observed by means of a LIDAR measurement is reproduced by realistic simulations and permits to reveal potential causes. (orig.) [German] Das Wirbelschleppenverhalten unterscheidet sich in Situationen vertikaler Windscherung in mehrfacher Hinsicht signifikant von scherungsfreien Szenarien und stellt eine besondere Herausforderung fuer eine operationelle Echtzeitvorhersage dar. Mittels numerischer Untersuchungen idealisierter Szenarien wird zunaechst der Einfluss von Windscherung auf den lateralen und vertikalen Wirbeltransport sowohl phaenomenologisch als auch quantitativ im Rahmen einer Sensitivitaetsstudie analysiert. Anhand der gewonnenen Ergebnisse werden auseinandergehende Erklaerungsansaetze geprueft und Modellierungsansaetze bewertet. Fallstudien turbulenter Scherstroemungen zur Wirbelpersistenz stellen einen weiteren Schwerpunkt dieser Arbeit dar. Durch die ausfuehrliche Analyse der Stroemungsfelder wird der Nachweis erbracht, dass sich unterschiedliche Zerfallsraten der Wirbel auf die asymmetrische Verteilung von sekundaeren Vorticity-Strukturen zurueckfuehren

  19. On generating counter-rotating streamwise vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Winoto, S H

    2015-09-23

    Counter-rotating streamwise vortices are known to enhance the heat transfer rate from a surface and also to improve the aerodynamic performance of an aerofoil. In this paper, some methods to generate such counter-rotating vortices using different methods or physical conditions will be briefly considered and discussed.

  20. Phase space vortices in collisionless plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Results on the formation and propagation of electron phase space vortices from laboratory experiments are summarized. The electron phase space vortices were excited in a strongly magnetized Q-machine plasma by applying a pulse to a segment of a waveguide surrounding the plasma. Depending on the temporal variation of the applied pulse, one or more phase space vortices can be excited, and their interaction can be followed in space and time. We were able to demonstrate, for instance, an irreversible coalescence of two such vortices. These results are extended by numerical simulations, showing how electron phase space vortices can also be formed by beam instabilities. Furthermore, a study of ion phase space vortices is performed by numerical simulations. Both codes allow for an externally applied magnetic field in three spatial dimensions. Ion phase space vortices are formed by the nonlinear saturation of the ion-ion two-stream instability, excited by injecting an ion beam at the plasma boundary. By following the evolution of the ion distribution of the velocity perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the injected ion beam, we find a significant ion heating in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field associated with the ion phase space vortices being formed. The results are relevant, for instance, for the interpretation of observations by instrumented spacecraft in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  1. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  2. Heat-Transfer Enhancement by Artificially Generated Streamwise Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Akram; Habchi, Charbel; Lemenand, Thierry; Della Valle, Dominique; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Vortex-induced heat transfer enhancement exploits longitudinal and transverse pressure-driven vortices through the deliberate artificial generation of large-scale vortical flow structures. Thermal-hydraulic performance, Nusselt number and friction factor are experimentally investigated in a HEV (high-efficiency vortex) mixer, which is a tubular heat exchanger and static mixer equipped with trapezoidal vortex generators. Pressure gradients are generated on the trapezoidal tab initiating a streamwise swirling motion in the form of two longitudinal counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVP). Due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, the shear layer generated at the tab edges, which is a production site of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), becomes unstable further downstream from the tabs and gives rise to periodic hairpin vortices. The aim of the study is to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the heat- and masstransfer phenomena accompanying such flows for comparison with the results of numerical studies and validate the high efficiency of the intensification process implementing such vortex generators. The experimental results reflect the enhancement expected from the numerical studies and confirm the high status of the HEV heat exchanger and static mixer.

  3. Role of electric discharges in the generation of atmospheric vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkevich, O. A., E-mail: oleg.sinkevich@itf.mpei.ac.ru [National Research University “MPEI,” (Russian Federation); Maslov, S. A., E-mail: sergm90@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Gusein-zade, N. G., E-mail: ngus@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The existing thermohydrodynamic and hydroelectromagnetic models of tornado are considered. The potentialities of the humid atmosphere as a heat engine generating air vortices are analyzed in detail. The ability of long-term atmospheric electric discharges to form a tornado funnel and create an initial twist of up to 10{sup –3}–10{sup –2} s{sup –1} in it are estimated. The possible effect of a lightning discharge on the initiation and evolution of the tornado is discussed. It is shown that the electric current flowing along the lightning channel can lead to helical instability and generation of a weak primary vortex. The channel formed in the atmosphere by a lightning discharge and the vortex motion of the parent thundercloud can enhance the primary vortex and promote its transformation into a tornado. Possible mechanisms of enhancement of the primary vortex created by a lightning discharge and the possibility of its transformation into a tornado in the postdischarge stage are discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulation and Flow Behaviors of Taylor Flow in Co-Axial Rotating Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chung Tzeng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work uses the incense as the trace of flow to perform flow visualization of Taylor-Couette flow. The test section was made of a rotational inner cylinder and a stationary outer cylinder. Two modes of inner cylinder were employed. One had a smooth wall, and the other had an annular ribbed wall. Clear and complete Taylor vortices were investigated in both smooth and ribbed wall of co-axial rotating cylinder. Besides, a steady-state, axis-symmetrical numerical model was provided to simulate the present flow field. The Taylor vortices could be also successfully predicted. However, the assumption of steady-state flow might reduce some flow perturbations, resulting in an over-predicted critical Taylor number. A transient simulation is suggested to be performed in the future.

  5. Consequence Reasoning in Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Ravn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Consequence reasoning is a major element for operation support system to assess the plant situations. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how Multilevel Flow Models can be used to reason about consequences of disturbances in complex engineering systems. MFM is a modelling methodology...... for representing process knowledge for complex systems. It represents the system by using means-end and part-whole decompositions, and describes not only the purposes and functions of the system but also the causal relations between them. Thus MFM is a tool for causal reasoning. The paper introduces MFM modelling...... syntax and gives detailed reasoning formulas for consequence reasoning. The reasoning formulas offers basis for developing rule-based system to perform consequence reasoning based on MFM, which can be used for alarm design, risk monitoring, and supervision and operation support system design....

  6. The Flow Field on Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid

    2009-11-01

    The exceptional mobility of the humpback whale has been linked to the use of its unique pectoral flippers. Biologists speculate that the flippers leading edge protuberances are a form of passive flow control. Force measurements on 2D hydrofoils with spanwise uniform leading edge protuberances, resembling those seen on the humpback whale flipper, were taken in a water tunnel and have revealed performance modifications when compared to a baseline NACA 63(4)-021 hydrofoil model. Qualitative flow visualization techniques and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) flow field measurements on the modified hydrofoils have shown that streamwise vortices originating from the shoulders of the protuberances are the likely cause of performance changes. Varying levels of interaction among adjacent streamwise vortices have been observed as a function of angle of attack and chord location. The circulation of these vortices as a function of angle of attack and spatial location was measured and an analysis of the vortex interactions will be presented.

  7. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  8. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  9. Modeling reproducibility of porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Bao, J.; Oostrom, M.; Battiato, I.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-phase flow in porous media is widely encountered in geological systems. Understanding immiscible fluid displacement is crucial for processes including, but not limited to, CO2 sequestration, non-aqueous phase liquid contamination and oil recovery. Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  10. Modeling of liquid flow in surface discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, I. S.; Meshcheryakov, V. A.; Kalinichenko, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Polymer composite and metallic materials have found wide application in various industries such as aviation, rocket, car manufacturing, ship manufacturing, etc. Many design elements need permanent quality control. Ensuring high quality and reliability of products is impossible without effective nondestructive testing methods. One of these methods is penetrant testing using penetrating substances based on liquid penetration into defect cavities. In this paper, we propose a model of liquid flow to determine the rates of filling the defect cavities with various materials and, based on this, to choose optimal control modes.

  11. Vitality of optical vortices (Presentation)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available (negative) vortices C (A) — creation (annihilation) events per unit volume aFS Roux, Opt. Commun. 283, 4855-4858 (2010) – p. 3/11 Conservation of V and T For V = np + nn and T = np − nn:a ∂zV +∇ · JV = 2(C − A) ∂zT +∇ · JT = 0 V — vortex density... T — topological charge density JV — current for the vortex density JT — current for the topological charge density aFS Roux, Opt. Commun. 283, 4855-4858 (2010) – p. 4/11 Vortex line and critical points Vortex location: Re{g(x)} = Im{g(x)} = 0 Vortex line...

  12. The Born-Infeld vortices induced from a generalized Higgs mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaosen

    2016-04-01

    We construct self-dual Born-Infeld vortices induced from a generalized Higgs mechanism. Two specific models of the theory are of focused interest where the Higgs potential is either of a | ϕ | 4 - or | ϕ | 6 -type. For the | ϕ | 4 -model, we obtain a sharp existence and uniqueness theorem for doubly periodic and planar vortices. For doubly periodic solutions, a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence is explicitly derived in terms of the vortex number, the Born-Infeld parameter, and the size of the periodic lattice domain. For the | ϕ | 6 -model, we show that both topological and non-topological vortices are present. This new phenomenon distinguishes the model from the classical Born-Infeld-Higgs theory studied earlier in the literature. A series of results regarding doubly periodic, topological, and non-topological vortices in the | ϕ | 6 -model are also established.

  13. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models

  14. Part I. Inviscid, swirling flows and vortex breakdown. Part II. A numerical investigation of the Lundgren turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buntine, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time-independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters does a solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A open-quotes quasi-cylindricalclose quotes amplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. open-quotes Criticalityclose quotes or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi-cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between open-quotes failureclose quotes of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a open-quotes criticalclose quotes flow state. Lundgren developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k -5/3 behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin ampersand Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the model numerically. The first part considers how the flow description compares with numerical simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations

  15. A modified calculation model for groundwater flowing to horizontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    well pipe and aquifer couples the turbulent flow inside the horizontal seepage well with laminar flow in the aquifer. .... In the well pipe, the relationship between hydraulic head loss and flow velocity .... the steady-state mathematic model is developed for groundwater flowing to the horizontal seepage well under a river valley.

  16. Task Flow Modeling in Electronic Business Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, internet based commerce has developed as a new paradigm. Many factors such as "at home delivery", easy ordering, and usually lower prices contributed to the success of the e-commerce. However, more recently, companies realized that one of the major factors in having a successful internet based business is the design of a user interface that is in concordance with the users' expectations, which includes both functionality and user friendly features. The func-tionality feature of an e-business interface is one of the most important elements when discussing about a specific internet based business. In our paper, we present methods to model task flows for e-business interfaces. We strengthen our study with the design modeling of a practical scenario that may appear in an on-line commercial environment.

  17. PIV-measured versus CFD-predicted flow dynamics in anatomically realistic cerebral aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew D; Nikolov, Hristo N; Milner, Jaques S; Lownie, Stephen P; Demont, Edwin M; Kalata, Wojciech; Loth, Francis; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2008-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of nominally patient-specific cerebral aneurysms is increasingly being used as a research tool to further understand the development, prognosis, and treatment of brain aneurysms. We have previously developed virtual angiography to indirectly validate CFD-predicted gross flow dynamics against the routinely acquired digital subtraction angiograms. Toward a more direct validation, here we compare detailed, CFD-predicted velocity fields against those measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Two anatomically realistic flow-through phantoms, one a giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm and the other a basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysm, were constructed of a clear silicone elastomer. The phantoms were placed within a computer-controlled flow loop, programed with representative flow rate waveforms. PIV images were collected on several anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) planes. CFD simulations were then carried out using a well-validated, in-house solver, based on micro-CT reconstructions of the geometries of the flow-through phantoms and inlet/outlet boundary conditions derived from flow rates measured during the PIV experiments. PIV and CFD results from the central AP plane of the ICA aneurysm showed a large stable vortex throughout the cardiac cycle. Complex vortex dynamics, captured by PIV and CFD, persisted throughout the cardiac cycle on the central LAT plane. Velocity vector fields showed good overall agreement. For the BA, aneurysm agreement was more compelling, with both PIV and CFD similarly resolving the dynamics of counter-rotating vortices on both AP and LAT planes. Despite the imposition of periodic flow boundary conditions for the CFD simulations, cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were evident in the BA aneurysm simulations, which agreed well, in terms of both amplitudes and spatial distributions, with cycle-to-cycle fluctuations measured by PIV in the same geometry. The overall good agreement

  18. Testing of self-similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Gámiz, Unai; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2016-01-01

    ) velocity components. Furthermore, the measured vortices have beenobserved to obey the criteria for helical symmetry. These are powerful results, as it reduces the highly complex 3-D flow tomerely four parameters and therefore significantly facilitates the modeling of this type of flow, which in a larger...

  19. A vorticity budget for the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, Isabela; Toole, John

    2017-04-01

    We develop a depth-averaged vorticity budget framework to diagnose the dynamical balance of the Gulf Stream, and apply this framework to observations and the ECCO state estimate (Wunsch and Heimbach 2013) above the thermocline in the subtropical North Atlantic. Using the hydrographic and ADCP data along the WOCE/CLIVAR section A22 and a variety of wind stress data products, we find that the advective vorticity flux out of the western region is on the same order as the wind stress forcing over the eastern portion of the gyre. This is consistent with a large-scale balance between a negative source of vorticity from wind stress forcing and a positive source of vorticity in the western region. Additionally, the form of the vorticity flux indicates that the Gulf Stream has a significant inertial component. In the ECCO state estimate, we diagnose a seasonal cycle in advective vorticity flux across a meridional section associated with seasonal fluctuations in Gulf Stream transport. This vorticity flux is forced by wind stress over the eastern subtropical North Atlantic and balanced by lateral friction with the western boundary. The lateral friction in ECCO is a necessary parameterization of smaller scale processes that occur in the real ocean, and quantifying these remains an open and interesting question. This simplified framework provides a means to interpret large scale ocean dynamics. In our application, it points to wind stress forcing over the subtropical North Altantic as an important regulator of the Gulf Stream and hence the climate system.

  20. Modeling fluid flow in faulted basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faille, I.; Thibaut, M.; Cacas, M.C.; Have, P.; Willien, F.; Wolf, S.; Agelas, L.; Pegaz-Fiornet, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time) geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers). In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretization, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat) at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator. (authors)

  1. Vorticity confinement technique for drag prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povitsky, Alex; Snyder, Troy

    2011-11-01

    This work couples wake-integral drag prediction and vorticity confinement technique (VC) for the improved prediction of drag from CFD simulations. Induced drag computations of a thin wing are shown to be more accurate than the more widespread method of surface pressure integration when compared to theoretical lifting-line value. Furthermore, the VC method improves trailing vortex preservation and counteracts the shift from induced drag to numerical entropy drag with increasing distance of Trefftz plane downstream of the wing. Accurate induced drag prediction via the surface integration of pressure barring a sufficiently refined surface grid and increased computation time. Furthermore, the alternative wake-integral technique for drag prediction suffers from numerical dissipation. VC is shown to control the numerical dissipation with very modest computational overhead. The 2-D research code is used to test specific formulations of the VC body force terms and illustrate the computational efficiency of the method compared to a ``brute force'' reduction in spatial step size. For the 3-D wing simulation, ANSYS FLUENT is employed with the VC body force terms added to the solver with user-defined functions (UDFs). VC is successfully implemented to highly unsteady flows typical for Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) producing oscillative drag force either by natural vortex shedding at high angles of attack or by flapping wing motion.

  2. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  3. Doppler Velocity Signatures of Idealized Elliptical Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar observations have revealed a class of atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes, dust devils that possess elliptical radar reflectivity signatures. One famous example is Typhoon Herb (1996 that maintained its elliptical reflectivity structure over a 40-hour period. Theoretical work and dual-Doppler analyses of observed tropical cyclones have suggested two physical mechanisms that can explain the formation of two types of elliptical vortices observed in nature, namely, the combination of a circular vortex with either a wavenumber two vortex Rossby wave or a deformation field. The characteristics of these two types of elliptical vortices and their corresponding Doppler velocity signatures have not been previously examined.

  4. Tunneling decay of self-gravitating vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, Manu B.; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-01-01

    We investigate tunneling decay of false vortices in the presence of gravity, in which vortices are trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in three dimensions. The core of the vortex contains magnetic flux in the true vacuum, while outside the vortex is the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum. We numerically obtain vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they could decay via tunneling. To show this phenomenon, we construct the proper junction conditions in curved spacetime. We find that the tunneling exponent for the vortices is half that for Coleman-de Luccia bubbles and discuss possible future applications.

  5. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Cheong, Cheolung; Park, Warn-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k - ɛ turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  6. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k − ε turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  7. Groundwater flow modelling of Yamuna–Krishni interstream, a part ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keeping this in mind groundwater flow modelling was attempted to simulate the behaviour of the flow system and evaluate the water balance. The groundwater flow modelling was carried ... Long term groundwater level trends show an average decline of 0.88m/year (Umar 2008). Groundwater serves as the main source of ...

  8. Predictive models for moving contact line flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Modeling flows with moving contact lines poses the formidable challenge that the usual assumptions of Newtonian fluid and no-slip condition give rise to a well-known singularity. This singularity prevents one from satisfying the contact angle condition to compute the shape of the fluid-fluid interface, a crucial calculation without which design parameters such as the pressure drop needed to move an immiscible 2-fluid system through a solid matrix cannot be evaluated. Some progress has been made for low Capillary number spreading flows. Combining experimental measurements of fluid-fluid interfaces very near the moving contact line with an analytical expression for the interface shape, we can determine a parameter that forms a boundary condition for the macroscopic interface shape when Ca much les than l. This parameter, which plays the role of an "apparent" or macroscopic dynamic contact angle, is shown by the theory to depend on the system geometry through the macroscopic length scale. This theoretically established dependence on geometry allows this parameter to be "transferable" from the geometry of the measurement to any other geometry involving the same material system. Unfortunately this prediction of the theory cannot be tested on Earth.

  9. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  10. Environmental flows in hydro-economic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereau, Jean-Christophe; Pryet, Alexandre

    2018-03-01

    The protection of environmental flows, as a management objective for a regulating agency, needs to be consistent with the aquifer water balance and the degree of resource renewability. A stylized hydro-economic model is used where natural recharge, which sustains environmental flows, is considered both in the aquifer water budget and in the welfare function as ecosystem damage. Groundwater recharge and the associated natural drainage may be neglected for aquifers containing fossil water, where the groundwater is mined. However, when dealing with an aquifer that constitutes a renewable resource, for which recharge is not negligible, natural drainage should explicitly appear in the water budget. In doing so, the optimum path of net extraction rate does not necessarily converge to the recharge rate, but depends on the costs associated with ecosystem damages. The optimal paths and equilibrium values for the water volume and water extraction are analytically derived, and numerical simulations based on the Western La Mancha aquifer (southwest Spain) illustrate the theoretical results of the study.

  11. Nuclear vorticity and the low-energy nuclear response. Towards the neutron drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papakonstantinou, P.; Athens Univ.; Wambach, J.; Ponomarev, V.Y.; Mavrommatis, E.

    2004-01-01

    The transition density and current provide valuable insight into the nature of nuclear vibrations. Nuclear vorticity is a quantity related to the transverse transition current. In this work, we study the evolution of the strength distribution, related to density fluctuations, and the vorticity strength distribution, as the neutron drip line is approached. Our results on the isoscalar, natural-parity multipole response of Ni isotopes, obtained by using a self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+continuum RPA model, indicate that, close to the drip line, the low-energy response is dominated by L > 1 vortical transitions. (orig.)

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Electrolyte Flow Dynamic Patterns and Volumetric Flow Penetrations in the Flow Channel over Porous Electrode Layered System in Vanadium Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Field Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Xinyou; Prahl, Joseph M.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional mathematical model is developed to study the flow patterns and volumetric flow penetrations in the flow channel over the porous electrode layered system in vanadium flow battery with serpentine flow field design. The flow distributions at the interface between the flow channel and porous electrode are examined. It is found that the non-linear pressure distributions can distinguish the interface flow distributions under the ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic fl...

  13. Performance comparison of hydrological model structures during low flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Maria; Stahl, Kerstin; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Clark, Martyn P.; Seibert, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Low flows are still poorly reproduced by common hydrological models since they are traditionally designed to meet peak flow situations best possible. As low flow becomes increasingly important to several target areas there is a need to improve available models. We present a study that assesses the impact of model structure on low flow simulations. This is done using the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE), which identifies the set of (subjective) decisions made when building a hydrological model, and provides multiple options for each modeling decision. 79 models were built using the FUSE framework, and applied to simulate stream flows in the Narsjø catchment in Norway (119 km²). To allow comparison all new models were calibrated using an automatic optimization method. Low flow and recession analysis of the new models enables us to evaluate model performance focusing on different aspects by using various objective functions. Additionally, model structures responsible for poor performance, and hence unsuitable, can be detected. We focused on elucidating model performance during summer (August - October) and winter low flows which evolve from entirely different hydrological processes in the Narsjø catchment. Summer low flows develop out of a lack of precipitation while winter low flows are due to water storage in ice and snow. The results showed that simulations of summer low flows were throughout poorer than simulations of winter low flows when evaluating with an objective function focusing on low flows; here, the model structure influencing winter low flow simulations is the lower layer architecture. Different model structures were found to influence model performance during the summer season. The choice of other objective functions has the potential to affect such an evaluation. These findings call for the use of different model structures tailored to particular needs.

  14. Effect of Flow Rate Controller on Liquid Steel Flow in Continuous Casting Mold using Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Kadir Ali; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    In continuous casting operation of steel, the flow through tundish to the mold can be controlled by different flow rate control systems including stopper rod and slide-gate. Ladle changes in continuous casting machines result in liquid steel level changes in tundishes. During this transient event of production, the flow rate controller opening is increased to reduce the pressure drop across the opening which helps to keep the mass flow rate at the desired level for the reduced liquid steel level in tundish. In the present study, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are developed to investigate the effect of flow rate controller on mold flow structure, and particularly to understand the effect of flow controller opening on meniscus flow. First, a detailed validation of the CFD models is conducted using available experimental data and the performances of different turbulence models are compared. Then, the constant throughput casting operations for different flow rate controller openings are simulated to quantify the opening effect on meniscus region. The results indicate that the meniscus velocities are significantly affected by the flow rate controller and its opening level. The steady state operations, specified as constant throughput casting, do not provide the same mold flow if the controller opening is altered. Thus, for quality and castability purposes, adjusting the flow controller opening to obtain the fixed mold flow structure is proposed. Supported by Middle East Technical University (METU) BAP (Scientific Research Projects) Coordination.

  15. Three-dimensional stability of free convection vortices in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Dimitris; Pelekasis, Nikos, E-mail: pel@uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, Volos 38334 (Greece)

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stability of 2D vortical flow of a liquid metal in a cavity of square cross section is examined. Vortices are produced as a result of free convection and internal heating in the cavity in the presence of a magnetic field. Low-magnetic-Reynolds-number equations are used for the base flow and stability formulation. Finite element methodology is used to discretize the problem. Efficient calculation of the dominant eigenvalues is afforded by the Arnoldi method, while neutral stability diagrams are constructed using continuation techniques. The number of vortices exhibited by the base flow switches from one to two as the internal heating crosses a threshold value. The dominant instability mechanism is the Goertler instability in the case of a single vortex and elliptical instability in the case of two vortices. In elliptic instability, axial vorticity is symmetric, it is characterized by two lobed structures aligned with one of the two principal directions of strain and the dominant eigenmode assumes the form of a traveling wave. The magnetic field opposes buoyancy, alters the direction of maximal strain by accentuating wall shear layers in comparison with the vortex pair in the core and leads to smaller frequencies at criticality.

  16. Nonlinear flow model for well production in an underground formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Guo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow in underground formations is a nonlinear process. In this article we modelled the nonlinear transient flow behaviour of well production in an underground formation. Based on Darcy's law and material balance equations, we used quadratic pressure gradients to deduce diffusion equations and discuss the origins of nonlinear flow issues. By introducing an effective-well-radius approach that considers skin factor, we established a nonlinear flow model for both gas and liquid (oil or water. The liquid flow model was solved using a semi-analytical method, while the gas flow model was solved using numerical simulations because the diffusion equation of gas flow is a stealth function of pressure. For liquid flow, a series of standard log-log type curves of pressure transients were plotted and nonlinear transient flow characteristics were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The effect of nonlinearity upon pressure transients should not be ignored. For gas flow, pressure transients were simulated and compared with oil flow under the same formation and well conditions, resulting in the conclusion that, under the same volume rate production, oil wells demand larger pressure drops than gas wells. Comparisons between theoretical data and field data show that nonlinear models will describe fluid flow in underground formations realistically and accurately.

  17. Vortices in Bose–Einstein condensates: A review of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Rotating dilute Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC) of alkali atoms offer a test- ing ground for theories of vortices in weakly interacting superfluids. In a rotating super- fluid, quantised vortices, with a vorticity h/m, form above a critical velocity. Such vortices have been generated in BEC of alkali atoms by different ...

  18. Shear-dependant toroidal vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani, Nariman Ashrafi; Haghighi, Habib Karimi [Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Pseudoplastic circular Couette flow in annulus is investigated. The flow viscosity is dependent on the shear rate, which directly affects the conservation equations that are solved in the present study by the spectral method in the present study. The pseudoplastic model adopted here is shown to be a suitable representative of nonlinear fluids. Unlike the previous studies, where only the square of shear rate term in the viscosity expression was considered to ease the numerical manipulations, in the present study takes the term containing the quadratic power into account. The curved streamlines of the circular Couette flow can cause a centrifugal instability leading to toroidal vortices, known as Taylor vortices. It is further found that the critical Taylor number becomes lower as the pseudoplastic effect increases. Comparison with existing measurements on pseudoplastic circular Couette flow results in good agreement.

  19. Structure and evolution of 3D Rossby Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S.; Barge, P.

    2013-04-01

    Three dimensional compressible simulations of the Rossby Wave Instability are presented in a non-homentropic model of protoplanetary disk. The instability develops like in the two dimensional case, gradually coming to the formation of a single big vortex. This 3D vortex has a quasi-2D structure which looks like a vorticity column with only tiny vertical motions. The vortex survives hundred of rotations in a quasi-steady evolution and slowly migrates inward toward the star.

  20. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  1. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A M; Marchant, N G; Parker, N G; O’Dell, D H J

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition. (topical review)

  2. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

  3. On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow in the presence of particle inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwasame, Paul M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Mwasame et al. ["On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow," J. Fluid Mech. 831, 433 (2017)] developed a macroscopic model for the dynamics and rheology of a dilute emulsion with droplet morphology in the limit of negligible particle inertia using the bracket formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of Beris and Edwards [Thermodynamics of Flowing Systems: With Internal Microstructure (Oxford University Press on Demand, 1994)]. Here, we improve upon that work to also account for particle inertia effects. This advance is facilitated by using the bracket formalism in its inertial form that allows for the natural incorporation of particle inertia effects into macroscopic level constitutive equations, while preserving consistency to the previous inertialess approximation in the limit of zero inertia. The parameters in the resultant Particle Inertia Thermodynamically Consistent Ellipsoidal Emulsion (PITCEE) model are selected by utilizing literature-available mesoscopic theory for the rheology at small capillary and particle Reynolds numbers. At steady state, the lowest level particle inertia effects can be described by including an additional non-affine inertial term into the evolution equation for the conformation tensor, thereby generalizing the Gordon-Schowalter time derivative. This additional term couples the conformation and vorticity tensors and is a function of the Ohnesorge number. The rheological and microstructural predictions arising from the PITCEE model are compared against steady-shear simulation results from the literature. They show a change in the signs of the normal stress differences that is accompanied by a change in the orientation of the major axis of the emulsion droplet toward the velocity gradient direction with increasing Reynolds number, capturing the two main signatures of particle inertia reported in simulations.

  4. Structure, stability, and evolution of 3D Rossby vortices in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S.; Barge, P.; Le Dizès, S.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Large-scale persistent vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead zone where no turbulence associated with a magnetic field is expected. These vortices are known to form easily in 2D disks via the Rossby wave or the baroclinic instability. In three dimensions, however, their formation and stability is a complex problem and still a matter of debate. Aims: We study the formation of vortices by the Rossby wave instability in a stratified inviscid disk and describe their 3D structure, stability, and long-term evolution. Methods: Numerical simulations were performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second-order finite volume method. We assumed a perfect-gas law and a non-homentropic adiabatic flow. Results: The Rossby wave instability is found to proceed in 3D in a similar way as in 2D. Vortices produced by the instability look like columns of vorticity in the whole disk thickness; the weak vertical motions are related to the weak inclination of the vortex axis that appears during the development of the RWI. Vortices with aspect ratios higher than 6 are unaffected by the elliptical instability. They relax into a quasi-steady columnar structure that survives hundreds of rotations while slowly migrating inward toward the star at a rate that reduces with the vortex aspect ratio. Vortices with a lower aspect ratio are by contrast affected by the elliptic instability. Short aspect ratio vortices (χ < 4) are completely destroyed in a few orbital periods. Vortices with an intermediate aspect ratio (4 < χ < 6) are partially destroyed by the elliptical instability in a region away from the midplane where the disk stratification is sufficiently strong. Conclusions: Elongated Rossby vortices can survive many orbital periods in protoplanetary disks in the form of vorticity columns. They could play a significant role in the evolution of the gas and the gathering of solid particles to form

  5. Vortices in superfluids. Les tourbillons dans les superfluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.

    1991-12-01

    Cooled near the absolute zero limits, liquid helium becomes superfluid. Since its discovery in 1937, this phenomenon has given rise to the interest of numerous Nobel prices, and today we know that superfluidity is a quantum property of matter, next to superconductivity, which allows some fluids to flow without apparent viscosity. However, a simple physical description was still missing of what's going on when heated superfluid helium is becoming a normal viscous liquid. Here, Gary Williams describes the scenario of this state change. Vortices, hydrodynamic remarkable structure, play the first role. Their importance, in supraconductivity, in magnetism or in cosmology should be greater than it was thought until now.

  6. Dissecting zero modes and bound states on BPS vortices in Ginzburg-Landau superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, A. Alonso; Fuertes, W. Garcia; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the zero modes of fluctuation of cylindrically symmetric self-dual vortices are analyzed and described in full detail. These BPS topological defects arise at the critical point between Type II and Type I superconductors, or, equivalently, when the masses of the Higgs particle and the vector boson in the Abelian Higgs model are equal. In addition, novel bound states of Higss and vector bosons trapped by the self-dual vortices at their core are found and investigated.

  7. Dissecting zero modes and bound states on BPS vortices in Ginzburg-Landau superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, A. Alonso [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca,Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Ambientales,Av. Filiberto Villalobos 119, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Fuertes, W. Garcia [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Facultad de Ciencias,Calle Calvo Sotelo s/n, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Guilarte, J. Mateos [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Ciencias,Plaza de la Merced, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2016-05-12

    In this paper the zero modes of fluctuation of cylindrically symmetric self-dual vortices are analyzed and described in full detail. These BPS topological defects arise at the critical point between Type II and Type I superconductors, or, equivalently, when the masses of the Higgs particle and the vector boson in the Abelian Higgs model are equal. In addition, novel bound states of Higss and vector bosons trapped by the self-dual vortices at their core are found and investigated.

  8. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solis, Kyle Jameson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  9. Vortex Stability In Two -layer Rotating Shallow-water Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Xavier; Baey, Jean-Michel

    The stability of circular vortices subject to an initial normal-mode perturbation is studied in a two-layer shallow-water fluid with rigid lid, flat bottom and constant background rotation. Considerable similarity with quasi-geostrophic dynamics is found for linear (barotropic or baroclinic) instability, except in the frontal and nonlinear barotropic limits. This discrepancy is explained by asymptotic models. In many cases, the elliptical mode of deformation is the most unstable one. The ability of these perturbed circular vortices to stabilize nonlinearly as long-lived multipoles is then investigated. For elliptical perturbations, steady tripoles form from moderately unstable vortices as in the quasi-geostrophic limit. These tripoles, which exhibit various 3D structures, are robust when perturbed by non coherent disturbances. More unstable circular vortices break as two dipoles, propagating in opposite directions. Triangular perturbations can also lead to stationary quadrupoles or to dipolar breaking. The similarity with quasi-geostrophic dynamics, which ext ends to these nonlinear regimes, is related to the weakness of the divergent circulation, as shown by the analysis of the Lighthill equation. J.M. Baey &X. Carton, 2001: "Piecewise-constant vortices in a two-layer shallow - water flow". Advances in mathematical modelling of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 61, p.87-92. J.M. Baey &X. Carton, 2002: "Vortex multipoles in two-layer rotating shallow -water flows". To appear in J. Fluid Mech.

  10. Topology Model of the Flow around a Submarine Hull Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Topology Model of the Flow around a Submarine Hull Form S.-K. Lee Maritime Division Defence Science and Technology Group DST-Group–TR...3177 ABSTRACT A topology model constructed from surface-streamer visualisation describes the flow around a generic conventional submarine hull form at...7999 c© Commonwealth of Australia 2015 AR-016-453 December, 2015 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Topology Model of the Flow

  11. A modified calculation model for groundwater flowing to horizontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The simulation models for groundwater flowing to horizontal seepage wells proposed by Wang and Zhang (2007) are based on the theory of coupled seepage-pipe flow model which treats the well pipe as a highly permeable medium. However, the limitations of the existing model were found during applications. Specifically ...

  12. Novel simplified hourly energy flow models for photovoltaic power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, Tamer; Elmenreich, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed an energy flow model for standalone PV system using MATLAB line code. • We developed an energy flow model for hybrid PV/wind system using MATLAB line code. • We developed an energy flow model for hybrid PV/diesel system using MATLAB line code. - Abstract: This paper presents simplified energy flow models for photovoltaic (PV) power systems using MATLAB. Three types of PV power system are taken into consideration namely standalone PV systems, hybrid PV/wind systems and hybrid PV/diesel systems. The logic of the energy flow for each PV power system is discussed first and then the MATLAB line codes for these models are provided and explained. The results prove the accuracy of the proposed models. Such models help modeling and sizing PV systems

  13. Effects of wing locations on wing rock induced by forebody vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that asymmetric vortex wakes over slender bodies exhibit a multi-vortex structure with an alternate arrangement along a body axis at high angle of attack. In this investigation, the effects of wing locations along a body axis on wing rock induced by forebody vortices was studied experimentally at a subcritical Reynolds number based on a body diameter. An artificial perturbation was added onto the nose tip to fix the orientations of forebody vortices. Particle image velocimetry was used to identify flow patterns of forebody vortices in static situations, and time histories of wing rock were obtained using a free-to-roll rig. The results show that the wing locations can affect significantly the motion patterns of wing rock owing to the variation of multi-vortex patterns of forebody vortices. As the wing locations make the forebody vortices a two-vortex pattern, the wing body exhibits regularly divergence and fixed-point motion with azimuthal variations of the tip perturbation. If a three-vortex pattern exists over the wing, however, the wing-rock patterns depend on the impact of the highest vortex and newborn vortex. As the three vortices together influence the wing flow, wing-rock patterns exhibit regularly fixed-points and limit-cycled oscillations. With the wing moving backwards, the newborn vortex becomes stronger, and wing-rock patterns become fixed-points, chaotic oscillations, and limit-cycled oscillations. With further backward movement of wings, the vortices are far away from the upper surface of wings, and the motions exhibit divergence, limit-cycled oscillations and fixed-points. For the rearmost location of the wing, the wing body exhibits stochastic oscillations and fixed-points.

  14. 3-D numerical modelling of flow around a groin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, R.; Roulund, A.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D flow code, EllipSys3D, has been implemented to simulate the 3-D flow around a groin in steady current. The k  turbulence model has been used for closure. Two kinds of groins are considered: (1) A vertical-wall groin, and (2) A groin with a side slope. Steady-flow simulations were conducted...

  15. Modelling flow through unsaturated zones: Sensitivity to unsaturated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    water flow through unsaturated zones and study the effect of unsaturated soil parameters on water movement during different processes such as gravity drainage and infiltration. 2. Modelling Richards equation for vertical unsaturated flow. For one-dimensional vertical flow in unsaturated soil, the pressure-head based ...

  16. Stochastic evolutions of dynamic traffic flow modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiqun (Michael); Shi, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals the underlying mechanisms of complexity and stochastic evolutions of traffic flows. Using Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements, the authors propose lognormal headway/spacing/velocity distributions and subsequently develop a Markov car-following model to describe drivers’ random choices concerning headways/spacings, putting forward a stochastic fundamental diagram model for wide scattering flow-density points. In the context of highway onramp bottlenecks, the authors present a traffic flow breakdown probability model and spatial-temporal queuing model to improve the stability and reliability of road traffic flows. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of transportation engineering and civil engineering.

  17. Machine learning vortices at the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Matthew J. S.; Golubeva, Anna; Melko, Roger G.

    2018-01-01

    Efficient and automated classification of phases from minimally processed data is one goal of machine learning in condensed-matter and statistical physics. Supervised algorithms trained on raw samples of microstates can successfully detect conventional phase transitions via learning a bulk feature such as an order parameter. In this paper, we investigate whether neural networks can learn to classify phases based on topological defects. We address this question on the two-dimensional classical XY model which exhibits a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. We find significant feature engineering of the raw spin states is required to convincingly claim that features of the vortex configurations are responsible for learning the transition temperature. We further show a single-layer network does not correctly classify the phases of the XY model, while a convolutional network easily performs classification by learning the global magnetization. Finally, we design a deep network capable of learning vortices without feature engineering. We demonstrate the detection of vortices does not necessarily result in the best classification accuracy, especially for lattices of less than approximately 1000 spins. For larger systems, it remains a difficult task to learn vortices.

  18. Modelling of high-enthalpy, high-Mach number flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrez, G; Lani, A; Panesi, M; Chazot, O; Deconinck, H

    2009-01-01

    A review is made of the computational models of high-enthalpy flows developed over the past few years at the von Karman Institute and Universite Libre de Bruxelles, for the modelling of high-enthalpy hypersonic (re-)entry flows. Both flows in local thermo-chemical equilibrium (LTE) and flows in thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) are considered. First, the physico-chemical models are described, i.e. the set of conservation laws, the thermodynamics, transport phenomena and chemical kinetics models. Particular attention is given to the correct modelling of elemental (LTE flows) and species (chemical non-equilibrium-CNEQ-flows) transport. The numerical algorithm, based on a state-of-the-art finite volume discretization, is then briefly described. Finally, selected examples are included to illustrate the capabilities of the developed solver. (review article)

  19. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  20. Modeling Blood Flow in the Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Colin J.; Carmichael, Jonathan B.; DeMont, M. Edwin

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise to demonstrate two fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics: the Reynolds number and the Principle of Continuity. The exercise demonstrates flow in a major blood vessel, such as the aorta, with and without a stenosis. Students observe the transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as downstream persistence of turbulence.…

  1. Spatial modeling of potential woody biomass flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodam Chung; Nathaniel Anderson

    2012-01-01

    The flow of woody biomass to end users is determined by economic factors, especially the amount available across a landscape and delivery costs of bioenergy facilities. The objective of this study develop methodology to quantify landscape-level stocks and potential biomass flows using the currently available spatial database road network analysis tool. We applied this...

  2. Modelling of Churn-Annular foam flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westende, J.M.C. van 't; Shoeibi Omrani, P.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Nennie, E.D.

    2016-01-01

    Foam assisted lift is a deliquification method in the oil and gas industry, which aims to prevent or postpone countercurrent gas-liquid flow in maturing gas wells or to assist in removing downhole accumulated liquids. According to Nimwegen, who performed experiments with foam flows, foam

  3. Interaction of trailing vortices in the wake of a wall-mounted rectangular cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Amalendu; Hwang, Robert R; Sheu, Tony W H; Yang, W C

    2003-11-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate three-dimensional unsteady vortex-vortex and vortex-surface interactions in the near field of a wall-mounted rectangular cylinder placed inside a channel. The generation mechanism of the upstream and the trailing vortices from the topologically important critical points and their near-wall evolution pattern have been examined in detail. In the upstream region, a laminar necklace vortex system formed around the junction between the rectangular block (cylinder) and the flat channel floor. A sequence of streamwise vortical rollers dominated the downstream interaction region, and they exhibited strong unsteady vortex-surface interaction. Streamwise vortices which formed upstream of the obstacle exhibited quadrupole structure with the dominant pair being central downwash, whereas those lifting the flow behind the obstacle were of predominantly central upwash. Notably, at some downstream location, the near-wall wake structure was observed to locally disappear due to mutual interaction and annihilation by opposite strength vortices on either side of the wake centerline. During the entire course of unsteady flow evolution, such a disappearance of the wake remained closely associated with local contraction of the limiting streamlines on the channel floor, the development of a pair of topologically important floor critical points (saddles), and the presence of a near-wall node on the vertical symmetry plane. The dominance of inward transverse flow toward these saddles together with flow evolution from the downstream node on the vertical symmetry plane were found to be particularly responsible for facilitating the local interaction of various vortices of opposite strength, leading to significant vorticity cancellation in the region. Moreover, the basic source of the wake vortices and their nature of evolution behind the cylinder were also investigated here, and they were found to be fundamentally different from what one

  4. Modelling of a cross flow evaporator for CSP application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Franco, Alessandro; Pelagotti, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    ) applications. Heat transfer and pressure drop prediction methods are an important tool for design and modelling of diabatic, two-phase, shell-side flow over a horizontal plain tubes bundle for a vertical up-flow evaporator. With the objective of developing a model for a specific type of cross flow evaporator...... the available correlations for the definition of two-phase flow heat transfer, void fraction and pressure drop in connection with the operation of steam generators, focuses attention on a comparison of the results obtained using several different models resulting by different combination of correlations...

  5. A compressible Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite volume code for solving two dimensional, compressible turbulent flows is described. Second order upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations is used to enhance stability and accuracy. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency. Several zero and two equation turbulence models are incorporated to study their impact on overall flow modeling accuracy. Applications to external and internal flows are discussed.

  6. Some exact BPS solutions for exotic vortices and monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handhika S. Ramadhan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present several analytical solutions of BPS vortices and monopoles in the generalized Abelian Maxwell–Higgs and Yang–Mills–Higgs theories, respectively. These models have recently been extensively studied and several exact solutions have already been obtained in [1,2]. In each theory, the dynamics is controlled by the additional two positive scalar-field-dependent functions, f(|ϕ| and w(|ϕ|. For the case of vortices, we work in the ordinary symmetry-breaking Higgs potential, while for the case of monopoles we have the ordinary condition of the Prasad–Sommerfield limit. Our results generalize the exact solutions found previously. We also present solutions for BPS vortices with higher winding number. These solutions suffer from the condition that w(|ϕ| has negative value at some finite range of r, but we argue that since it satisfies the weaker positive-value conditions then the corresponding energy density is still positive-definite and, thus, they are acceptable BPS solutions.

  7. Some exact BPS solutions for exotic vortices and monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2016-07-01

    We present several analytical solutions of BPS vortices and monopoles in the generalized Abelian Maxwell-Higgs and Yang-Mills-Higgs theories, respectively. These models have recently been extensively studied and several exact solutions have already been obtained in [1,2]. In each theory, the dynamics is controlled by the additional two positive scalar-field-dependent functions, f (| ϕ |) and w (| ϕ |). For the case of vortices, we work in the ordinary symmetry-breaking Higgs potential, while for the case of monopoles we have the ordinary condition of the Prasad-Sommerfield limit. Our results generalize the exact solutions found previously. We also present solutions for BPS vortices with higher winding number. These solutions suffer from the condition that w (| ϕ |) has negative value at some finite range of r, but we argue that since it satisfies the weaker positive-value conditions then the corresponding energy density is still positive-definite and, thus, they are acceptable BPS solutions.

  8. A Hamiltonian vorticity-dilatation formulation of the compressible Euler equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polner, M.A.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.

    Using the Hodge decomposition on bounded domains the ncompressible Euler equations of gas dynamics are reformulated using a density weighted vorticity and dilatation as primary variables, together with the entropy and density. This formulation is an extension to compressible flows of the well-known

  9. On the vorticity characteristics of lobe-forced mixer at different configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    mao, R.; Yu, S.C.M.; Zhou, T.; Chua, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    Lobe-forced mixer is one typical example of the passive flow controllers owing to its corrugated trailing edge. Besides the spanwise Kelvin–Helmholtz vortex shedding, streamwise vortices are also generated within its mixing layer. The geometrical configuration of the lobe significantly affects these

  10. A fully subordinated linear flow model for hillslope subsurface stormflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Baeumer, Boris; Chen, Li; Reeves, Donald M.; Sun, HongGuang

    2017-04-01

    Hillslope subsurface stormflow exhibits complex patterns when natural soils with multiscale heterogeneity impart a spatiotemporally nonlocal memory on flow dynamics. To efficiently quantify such nonlocal flow responses, this technical note proposes a fully subordinated flow (FSF) equation where the time- and flow-subordination capture the temporal and spatial memory, respectively. Results show that the time-subordination component of the FSF model captures a wide range of delayed flow response due to various degrees of soil heterogeneity (especially for low-conductivity zones), while the model's flow-subordination term accounts for the rapid flow responses along preferential flow paths. In the FSF model, parameters defining spatiotemporal memory functions may be related to soil properties, while other parameters such as scalar factors controlling the overall advection and diffusion are difficult to predict and can be estimated from subsurface stormflow hydrographs. These parameters can be constants at the hillslope scale because the spatiotemporal subordination, an upscaling technique, can capture the impact of system heterogeneity on flow dynamics, leading to a linear FSF model that might be applicable for various slopes. Valid scale, limitation and extension of the FSF model, and modification of the model for other complex hydrological dynamics are also discussed.

  11. Local Scour : Flow model with prescribed eddy viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmans, G.J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    A two dimensional mathematical model DUCT, which is based on a parabolic boundary layer technique, using finite elements, is proposed to predict the flow and turbulence field in complicated geometrical conditions, where recirculating flow may occur. Numerical results of the DUCT-model are compared

  12. Modeling of high speed micro rotors in moderate flow confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikmen, E.; van der Hoogt, Peter; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Sas, P.; Bergen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The recent developments in high speed micro rotating machinery lead to the need for multiphysical modeling of the rotor and the surrounding medium. In this study, thermal and flow induced effects on rotor dynamics of geometries with moderate flow confinement are studied. The structure is modeled via

  13. Reverse stream flow routing by using Muskingum models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Reverse stream flow routing is a procedure that determines the upstream hydrograph given the downstream hydrograph. This paper presents the develop- ment of methodology for Muskingum models parameter estimation for reverse stream flow routing. The standard application of the Muskingum models involves.

  14. TWO PHASE FLOW SPLIT MODEL FOR PARALLEL CHANNELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ifeanyichukwu Onwuka

    A model has been developed for the determination of two phase flow distributions between multiple parallel channels which ... transients, up to ten parallel flow paths, simple and complicated geometries, including the boilers of fossil steam generators and ..... The above model and numerical technique were programmed in ...

  15. Higher-order RANS turbulence models for separated flows

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Higher-order Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are developed to overcome the shortcomings of second-moment RANS models in predicting separated flows....

  16. Goertler vortices in growing boundary layers: The leading edge receptivity problem, linear growth and the nonlinear breakdown stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Goertler vortices are thought to be the cause of transition in many fluid flows of practical importance. A review of the different stages of vortex growth is given. In the linear regime, nonparallel effects completely govern this growth, and parallel flow theories do not capture the essential features of the development of the vortices. A detailed comparison between the parallel and nonparallel theories is given and it is shown that at small vortex wavelengths, the parallel flow theories have some validity; otherwise nonparallel effects are dominant. New results for the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices are given; in particular vortices induced by free stream perturbations impinging on the leading edge of the walls are considered. It is found that the most dangerous mode of this type can be isolated and it's neutral curve is determined. This curve agrees very closely with the available experimental data. A discussion of the different regimes of growth of nonlinear vortices is also given. Again it is shown that, unless the vortex wavelength is small, nonparallel effects are dominant. Some new results for nonlinear vortices of 0(1) wavelengths are given and compared to experimental observations.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Flow trough a Mechanical Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Esmaeili, Farida; Oshkai, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Turbulent flow trough a model of a mechanical heart valve is investigated using digital particle image velocimetry. The valve leaflets are represented by flat plates mounted in a duct. The emphasis is on the effect of the valve design on the platelet activation state associated with the resulting flow field. Global quantitative images corresponding to multiple planes of data acquisition provide insight into the three-dimensional nature of the flow. Turbulent flow structures including jet-like regions and shed vortices are characterized in terms of patterns of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity, vorticity, and streamline topology. Potential of bileaflet heart valves for being thrombogenic is assessed by quantitative comparison of the associated flow fields in terms of maximum values of turbulent stresses and platelet activation states.

  18. Vorticity dynamics after the shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livescu, D.; Ryu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756:R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms=10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  20. Dynamics of quantised vortices in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sonin, Edouard B

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the basic principles of vortex dynamics in superfluids, this book addresses the problems of vortex dynamics in all three superfluids available in laboratories (4He, 3He, and BEC of cold atoms) alongside discussions of the elasticity of vortices, forces on vortices, and vortex mass. Beginning with a summary of classical hydrodynamics, the book guides the reader through examinations of vortex dynamics from large scales to the microscopic scale. Topics such as vortex arrays in rotating superfluids, bound states in vortex cores and interaction of vortices with quasiparticles are discussed. The final chapter of the book considers implications of vortex dynamics to superfluid turbulence using simple scaling and symmetry arguments. Written from a unified point of view that avoids complicated mathematical approaches, this text is ideal for students and researchers working with vortex dynamics in superfluids, superconductors, magnetically ordered materials, neutron stars and cosmological mo...

  1. experimental investigation of flow pattern around repelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Mahdieh NajafAbadi and M. M. Bateni

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... FLOW-3D® software used to simulate flow pattern. The simulation was .... separated into separation zone, shear layer, vortices zone, end point of vorticity zone and primary flow zone. In the figure, b1 and b2 denote ... closer to the wall for the attractive spur dike. For case of the repelling spur dike, transverse.

  2. Generalized Kutta–Joukowski theorem for multi-vortex and multi-airfoil flow (a lumped vortex model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chenyuan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For purpose of easy identification of the role of free vortices on the lift and drag and for purpose of fast or engineering evaluation of forces for each individual body, we will extend in this paper the Kutta–Joukowski (KJ theorem to the case of inviscid flow with multiple free vortices and multiple airfoils. The major simplification used in this paper is that each airfoil is represented by a lumped vortex, which may hold true when the distances between vortices and bodies are large enough. It is found that the Kutta–Joukowski theorem still holds provided that the local freestream velocity and the circulation of the bound vortex are modified by the induced velocity due to the outside vortices and airfoils. We will demonstrate how to use the present result to identify the role of vortices on the forces according to their position, strength and rotation direction. Moreover, we will apply the present results to a two-cylinder example of Crowdy and the Wagner example to demonstrate how to perform fast force approximation for multi-body and multi-vortex problems. The lumped vortex assumption has the advantage of giving such kinds of approximate results which are very easy to use. The lack of accuracy for such a fast evaluation will be compensated by a rigorous extension, with the lumped vortex assumption removed and with vortex production included, in a forthcoming paper.

  3. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Shen

    Full Text Available This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows.

  4. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries’ roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading “trophic levels” have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  5. Stream function-vorticity finite elements and the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, R.C.C. de.

    1987-07-01

    A stream function-vorticity finite element formulation for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is proposed. The present work shows a procedure to solve the problem posed by the no-slip conditions on solid frontiers which can also be applied to flow problems in a multi-connected domain. Moreover, a methodology to solve the pressure is developed using the stream function-vorticity approximate solution. Numerical experiments were conducted for some steady and unsteady problems and the performance of the proposed methods is discussed. (author) [pt

  6. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices in helical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.

    1996-01-01

    The study of large-scale coherent hydrodynamic (HD) vortex generation has been extended to electrified charged dusty vortices to be termed as electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices, incorporating helical turbulence in electric and magnetic fields into that in fluid velocity, which are all created by an external DC electric field on the background. A new equation of EHD vortices is introduced on the basis of a set of EHD or electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) equations, including equations of state and a full set of Maxwell's equations by using functional techniques for estimating equations for an ensemble average, turbulent background, and additional random field. In fact, EHD vortices for a charged dusty fluid can be more explosive with larger instabilities than HD vortices. In addition, it is inferred that an external DC electric field could provide the origin of additional self-organization to a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines as a manifestation of a new frozen-in field concept for electric fields when the electric Reynolds number is sufficiently high. This is discussed on the basis of a set of general transport equations for fluid vorticity, magnetic and electric fields that are rederived concisely. In particular, a novel concept of electric field line merging-reconnection is developed in close relation to fluid vortex line merging, indicating a coalescence of fluid vortex breakdown or merging point and electric field line reconnection point, X-type or O-type with possible application to tornadic thunderstorms. In fact, a thundercloud charge distribution so as to provide a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines is quite possible without theoretical inconsistency, and is thought most likely to occur from observations available so far. (orig.)

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FLUID VORTICITY, KINETIC HELICITY, AND MAGNETIC FIELD ON SMALL-SCALES (QUIET-NETWORK) ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, C. R.; Rajaguru, S. P., E-mail: crsangeetha@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore-34 (India)

    2016-06-20

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . From these we calculate the horizontal divergence, the vertical component of vorticity, and the kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and the magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic fields cause transfer of vorticity from supergranular inflow regions to outflow regions, and that they tend to suppress the vortical motions around them when magnetic flux densities exceed about 300 G (from HMI). We also show that such an action of the magnetic fields leads to marked changes in the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity. These results are speculated to be of importance to local dynamo action (if present) and to the dynamical evolution of magnetic helicity at the small-scale.

  8. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  9. A formal definition of data flow graph models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi, Krishna M.; Buckles, Bill P.; Bhat, U. Narayan

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a new model for parallel computations and parallel computer systems that is based on data flow principles is presented. Uninterpreted data flow graphs can be used to model computer systems including data driven and parallel processors. A data flow graph is defined to be a bipartite graph with actors and links as the two vertex classes. Actors can be considered similar to transitions in Petri nets, and links similar to places. The nondeterministic nature of uninterpreted data flow graphs necessitates the derivation of liveness conditions.

  10. Wedge Experiment Modeling and Simulation for Reactive Flow Model Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Joseph T.; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit T.

    2017-06-01

    Wedge experiments are a typical method for generating pop-plot data (run-to-detonation distance versus input shock pressure), which is used to assess an explosive material's initiation behavior. Such data can be utilized to calibrate reactive flow models by running hydrocode simulations and successively tweaking model parameters until a match between experiment is achieved. Typical simulations are performed in 1D and typically use a flyer impact to achieve the prescribed shock loading pressure. In this effort, a wedge experiment performed at the Army Research Lab (ARL) was modeled using CTH (SNL hydrocode) in 1D, 2D, and 3D space in order to determine if there was any justification in using simplified models. A simulation was also performed using the BCAT code (CTH companion tool) that assumes a plate impact shock loading. Results from the simulations were compared to experimental data and show that the shock imparted into an explosive specimen is accurately captured with 2D and 3D simulations, but changes significantly in 1D space and with the BCAT tool. The difference in shock profile is shown to only affect numerical predictions for large run distances. This is attributed to incorrectly capturing the energy fluence for detonation waves versus flat shock loading. Portions of this work were funded through the Joint Insensitive Munitions Technology Program.

  11. Cash flow forecasting model for nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Guo Jilin

    2002-01-01

    Cash flow forecasting is very important for owners and contractors of nuclear power projects to arrange the capital and to decrease the capital cost. The factors related to contractor cash flow forecasting are analyzed and a cash flow forecasting model is presented which is suitable for both contractors and owners. The model is efficiently solved using a cost-schedule data integration scheme described. A program is developed based on the model and verified with real project data. The result indicates that the model is efficient and effective

  12. Stochastic description of heterogeneities of permeability within groundwater flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacas, M.C.; Lachassagne, P.; Ledoux, E.; Marsily, G. de

    1991-01-01

    In order to model radionuclide migration in the geosphere realistically at the field scale, the hydrogeologist needs to be able to simulate groundwater flow in heterogeneous media. Heterogeneity of the medium can be described using a stochastic approach, that affects the way in which a flow model is formulated. In this paper, we discuss the problems that we have encountered in modelling both continuous and fractured media. The stochastic approach leads to a methodology that enables local measurements of permeability to be integrated into a model which gives a good prediction of groundwater flow on a regional scale. 5 Figs.; 8 Refs

  13. Vortex network community based reduced-order force model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan Meena, Muralikrishnan; Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2017-11-01

    We characterize the vortical wake interactions by utilizing network theory and cluster-based approaches, and develop a data-inspired unsteady force model. In the present work, the vortical interaction network is defined by nodes representing vortical elements and the edges quantified by induced velocity measures amongst the vortices. The full vorticity field is reduced to a finite number of vortical clusters based on network community detection algorithm, which serves as a basis for a skeleton network that captures the essence of the wake dynamics. We use this reduced representation of the wake to develop a data-inspired reduced-order force model that can predict unsteady fluid forces on the body. The overall formulation is demonstrated for laminar flows around canonical bluff body wake and stalled flow over an airfoil. We also show the robustness of the present network-based model against noisy data, which motivates applications towards turbulent flows and experimental measurements. Supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant 1632003).

  14. Modeling shallow water flows using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Abdul A

    2014-01-01

    Replacing the Traditional Physical Model Approach Computational models offer promise in improving the modeling of shallow water flows. As new techniques are considered, the process continues to change and evolve. Modeling Shallow Water Flows Using the Discontinuous Galerkin Method examines a technique that focuses on hyperbolic conservation laws and includes one-dimensional and two-dimensional shallow water flows and pollutant transports. Combines the Advantages of Finite Volume and Finite Element Methods This book explores the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, also known as the discontinuous finite element method, in depth. It introduces the DG method and its application to shallow water flows, as well as background information for implementing and applying this method for natural rivers. It considers dam-break problems, shock wave problems, and flows in different regimes (subcritical, supercritical, and transcritical). Readily Adaptable to the Real World While the DG method has been widely used in the fie...

  15. Modeling shallow water flows using the discontinuous galerkin method

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Abdul A

    2014-01-01

    Replacing the Traditional Physical Model Approach Computational models offer promise in improving the modeling of shallow water flows. As new techniques are considered, the process continues to change and evolve. Modeling Shallow Water Flows Using the Discontinuous Galerkin Method examines a technique that focuses on hyperbolic conservation laws and includes one-dimensional and two-dimensional shallow water flows and pollutant transports. Combines the Advantages of Finite Volume and Finite Element Methods This book explores the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, also known as the discontinuous finite element method, in depth. It introduces the DG method and its application to shallow water flows, as well as background information for implementing and applying this method for natural rivers. It considers dam-break problems, shock wave problems, and flows in different regimes (subcritical, supercritical, and transcritical). Readily Adaptable to the Real World While the DG method has been widely used in the fie...

  16. Transient Non-Newtonian Screw Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Nariman

    2013-03-01

    The influence of axial flow on the transient response of the pseudoplastic rotating flow is carried out. The fluid is assumed to follow the Carreau-Bird model and mixed boundary conditions are imposed. The four-dimensional low-order dynamical system, resulted from Galerkin projection of the conservation of mass and momentum equations, includes additional nonlinear terms in the velocity components originated from the shear-dependent viscosity. In absence of axial flow the base flow loses its radial flow stability to the vortex structure at a lower critical Taylor number, as the pseudoplasticity increases. The emergence of the vortices corresponds to the onset of a supercritical bifurcation which is also seen in the flow of a linear fluid. However, unlike the Newtonian case, pseudoplastic Taylor vortices lose their stability as the Taylor number reaches a second critical number corresponding to the onset of a Hopf bifurcation. Existence of an axial flow, manifested by a pressure gradient appears to further advance each critical point on the bifurcation diagram. In addition to the simulation of spiral flow, the proposed formulation allows the axial flow to be independent of the main rotating flow. Complete transient flow field together with viscosity maps are also presented.

  17. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  18. The shallow water equation and the vorticity equation for a change in height of the topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, ChaoJiu; Shen, BingLu; Yan, PengCheng; Ma, DeShan; Song, Jian

    2017-01-01

    We consider the shallow water equation and the vorticity equations for a variable height of topography. On the assumptions that the atmosphere is incompressible and a constant density, we simplify the coupled dynamic equations. The change in topographic height is handled as the sum of the inherent and changing topography using the perturbation method, together with appropriate boundary conditions of the atmosphere, to obtain the relationship between the relative height of the flow, the inherent topography and the changing topography. We generalize the conservation of the function of relative position, and quantify the relationship between the height of the topography and the relative position of a fluid element. If the height of the topography increases (decreases), the relative position of a fluid element descends (ascends). On this basis, we also study the relationship between the vorticity and the topography to find the vorticity decreasing (increasing) for an increasing (decreasing) height of the topography.

  19. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  20. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumo, T.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors

  1. Analysis of Blood Flow Characteristics in a Model of a Mature Side-to-Side Arteriovenous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Myo Lwin, Nay; Asyraf, Muhammad; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2017-11-01

    The creation of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a common surgical procedure in hemodialysis patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, several complications may occur after surgery, including thrombosis, stenosis, and aneurysm. These complications are attributed to hemodynamics perturbations including pathophysiological wall shear stress (WSS) and flow recirculation zones. In this study, we present a computational hemodynamic analysis in a model of a mature side-to-side AVF, which is then validated by experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental results confirmed the presence of complex flow patterns within the AVF with vortices initially developing at the center of the venous region and gradually moving downstream, such that at four characteristic anastomosis lengths downstream, the flow disturbances became minimum. A complex pattern was also observed in WSS distribution with regions of low and high WSS identified in proximal vein and feeding artery, respectively. In addition, the temporal distribution of WSS varied significantly along the venous wall where a large portion of it remained above normal levels of WSS during systole while the area was largely normal during diastole. Our findings support the hypothesis that high WSS is not detrimental to immediate patency of AVF; however, other factors including low WSS and temporal and spatial gradients of WSS increase the risk of vascular access complications. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reduced-order aeroelastic model for limit-cycle oscillations in vortex-dominated unsteady airfoil flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Babu, Arun Vishnu; Ramesh, Kiran; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2017-11-01

    In previous research, Ramesh et al. (JFM,2014) developed a low-order discrete vortex method for modeling unsteady airfoil flows with intermittent leading edge vortex (LEV) shedding using a leading edge suction parameter (LESP). LEV shedding is initiated using discrete vortices (DVs) whenever the Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) exceeds a critical value. In subsequent research, the method was successfully employed by Ramesh et al. (JFS, 2015) to predict aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations in airfoil flows dominated by intermittent LEV shedding. When applied to flows that require large number of time steps, the computational cost increases due to the increasing vortex count. In this research, we apply an amalgamation strategy to actively control the DV count, and thereby reduce simulation time. A pair each of LEVs and TEVs are amalgamated at every time step. The ideal pairs for amalgamation are identified based on the requirement that the flowfield in the vicinity of the airfoil is least affected (Spalart, 1988). Instead of placing the amalgamated vortex at the centroid, we place it at an optimal location to ensure that the leading-edge suction and the airfoil bound circulation are conserved. Results of the initial study are promising.

  3. Evolution of Coronary Flow in an Experimental Slow Flow Model in Swines: Angiographic and Pathological Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pathomechanism of coronary slow flow phenomenon remains largely unclear now. Present study observed the pathological and angiographic evolution in a pig model of coronary slow flow. Methods. Coronary slow flow was induced by repeat coronary injection of small doses of 40 µm microspheres in 18 male domestic pigs and angiographic and pathological changes were determined at 3 hours, 7 days, and 28 days after microspheres injection. Results. Compared to control group treated with coronary saline injection n=6 and baseline level, coronary flow was significantly reduced at 3 hours and 7 days but completely recovered at 28 days after coronary microsphere injection in slow flow group. Despite normal coronary flow at 28 days after microsphere injection, enhanced myocardial cytokine expression, left ventricular dysfunction, adverse remodelling, and ischemia/microembolism related pathological changes still persisted or even progressed from 3 hours to 28 days after coronary microsphere injection. Conclusions. Our results show that this large animal slow flow model could partly reflect the chronic angiographic, hemodynamic, and pathological changes of coronary slow flow and could be used to test new therapy strategies against the slow flow phenomenon.

  4. Streamwise counter-rotating vortices generated by triangular leading edge pattern in flat plate boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S. M.

    2016-01-05

    A series of flow visualizations were conducted to qualitatively study the development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices over a flat plate induced by triangular patterns at the leading edge of a flat plate. The experiments were carried out for a Reynolds number based on the pattern wavelength (λ) of 3080. The results depict the onset, development and breakdown of the vortical structures within the flat plate boundary layer. Moreover, the effect of one spanwise array of holes with diameter of 0.2λ (=3 mm) was examined. This investigation was done on two different flat plates with holes placed at the location x/λ = 2 downstream of the troughs and peaks. The presence of holes after troughs does not show any significant effect on the vortical structures. However, the plate with holes after peaks noticeably delays the vortex breakdown. In this case, the “mushroom-like” vortices move away from the wall and propagate downstream with stable vortical structures. The vortex growth is halted further downstream but start to tilt aside.

  5. Migration Flows: Measurement, Analysis and Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.; White, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an introduction to the study of migration flows. It starts with a review of major definition and measurement issues. Comparative studies of migration are particularly difficult because different countries define migration differently and measurement methods are not harmonized.

  6. Numerical simulation of interior flow field of nuclear model pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunlin; Peng Na; Kang Can; Zhao Baitong; Zhang Hao

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds time-averaged N-S equations and the standard k-ε turbulent model were adopted, and three-dimensional non-structural of tetrahedral mesh division was used for modeling. Multiple reference frame model of rotating fluid mechanical model was used, under the design condition, the three-dimensional incompressible turbulent flow of nuclear model pump was simulated, and the results preferably post the characteristics of the interior flow field. This paper first analyzes the total pressure and velocity distribution in the flow field, and then describes the interior flow field characteristics of each part such as the impeller, diffuser and spherical shell, and also discusses the reasons that cause these characteristics. The study results can be used to estimate the performance of nuclear model pump, and will provide some useful references for its hydraulic optimized design. (authors)

  7. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  8. A methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow coefficients and flow rate in hydraulic valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés, José R.; Rodríguez, José M.; Saumell, Javier; Pütz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of flow in hydraulic valves. • We characterize the flow coefficients with a generic function with two parameters. • The parameters are derived from CFD simulations of the generic geometry. • We apply the methodology to two cases from the automotive brake industry. • We validate by comparing with CFD results varying the original dimensions. - Abstract: The main objective of this work is to develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow rate in hydraulic valve systems. This methodology is based on the derivation, from CFD simulations, of the flow coefficient of the critical restrictions as a function of the Reynolds number, using a generalized square root function with two parameters. The methodology is then demonstrated by applying it to two completely different hydraulic systems: a brake master cylinder and an ABS valve. This type of parametric valve models facilitates their implementation in dynamic simulation models of complex hydraulic systems

  9. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  10. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. A. Zyvoloski

    2001-06-28

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M&O 1999

  11. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a)

  12. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar, E-mail: soundar@dalembert.upmc.fr; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme [Institut Jean Le Rond d' Alembert, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 and CNRS-UMR 7190, F-75005 Paris (France); Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Univ. Grenoble Alpes and CNRS - UMR 5519, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  13. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  14. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex

  15. Model for radial gas fraction profiles in vertical pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, D.; Krepper, E.; Prasser, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented, which predicts the radial volume fraction profiles from a given bubble size distribution. It bases on the assumption of an equilibrium of the forces acting on a bubble perpendicularly to the flow path (non drag forces). For the prediction of the flow pattern this model could be used within an procedure together with appropriate models for local bubble coalescence and break-up. (orig.)

  16. An eddy viscosity model for flow in a tube bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, D.; Grandotto, M.

    1998-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of the development of GENEPI a 3-dimensional finite element code, designed for the thermalhydraulic analysis of steam generators. It focuses on the implementation of two-phase flow turbulence-induced viscosity in a tube bundle. The GENEPI code, as other industrial codes, uses the eddy viscosity concept introduced by Boussinesq for single phase flow. The concept assumes that the turbulent momentum transfer is similar to the viscous shear stresses. Eddy viscosity formulation is reasonably well known for single phase flows, especially in simple geometries (i.e., in smooth tube, around a single body, or behind a row of bars/tubes), but there exists very little information on it for two-phase flows. An analogy between single and two-phases is used to set up a model for eddy viscosity. The eddy viscosity model examined in this paper is used for a tube bundle geometry and, therefore, is extended to include anisotropy to the classic model. Each of the main flow directions (cross flow inline, cross flow staggered, and parallel flows) gives rise to a specific eddy viscosity formula. The results from a parametric study indicate that the eddy viscosity in the staggered flow is roughly 1.5 times as large as that for the inline cross flow, 60 times as large as that for the parallel flow, and 105 as large as that for the molecular viscosity. Then, the different terms are combined with each other to result in a global eddy viscosity model for a steam generator tube bundle flow. (author)

  17. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  18. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  19. Experimental Observations of Ion Phase-Space Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Armstrong, R. J.; Trulsen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental observations of ion phase-space vortices are reported. The ion phase-space vortices form in the region of heated ions behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical and analytic studies....

  20. Improvements of Critical Heat Flux Models Based on the Viscous Potential Flow Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2014-01-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is analyzed based on a potential flow of inviscid fluids. However, if the viscosity effect is taken into consideration, a nonuniform flow occurs due to the shear stress at the interface. The idea to incorporate the effects of fluid viscosities into the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can be found in the viscous potential flow theory. Joseph and Liao showed that the potential (irrotational) flow of viscous fluids satisfies the Navier- Stokes equation. For the potential flow, since the vorticity is identically zero, the viscous term vanishes in the Navier-Stokes equation; the motion of fluid is governed by the Bernoulli equation. However, the viscous stresses do not vanish in general. Therefore, the viscous pressure is entered through the normal stress balance at the interface. In the viscous potential flow, the shear stress is neglected at the interface and wall, and thus there is a velocity slip at the interface. These treatments are consistent with the fact that the interface waves are induced more by pressure than by shear force. Funada and Joseph presented a viscous potential flow analysis of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Funada et al. carried out a stability analysis of a circular fluid jet into another fluid. Funada and Joseph considered the capillary instability. The viscous potential flow analysis is more accurate than the inviscid flow analysis in terms of the growth rate. Therefore, the critical condition of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can be predicted more accurately than the inviscid flow analysis. In this study, the interfacial instabilities of viscous potential flows are applied to critical heat flux models for saturated pool boiling on infinite horizontal surfaces, with the aim of including the effects of fluid viscosities. The critical conditions of the circular jet and Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities are incorporated into the hydrodynamic theory model and liquid macrolayer dryout model. Circular jet instabilities is

  1. Flow interaction based propagation model and bursty influence behavior analysis of Internet flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Ren-Tao; Ji, Yue-Feng

    2016-11-01

    QoS (quality of service) fluctuations caused by Internet bursty flows influence the user experience in the Internet, such as the increment of packet loss and transmission time. In this paper, we establish a mathematical model to study the influence propagation behavior of the bursty flow, which is helpful for developing a deep understanding of the network dynamics in the Internet complex system. To intuitively reflect the propagation process, a data flow interaction network with a hierarchical structure is constructed, where the neighbor order is proposed to indicate the neighborhood relationship between the bursty flow and other flows. The influence spreads from the bursty flow to each order of neighbors through flow interactions. As the influence spreads, the bursty flow has negative effects on the odd order neighbors and positive effects on the even order neighbors. The influence intensity of bursty flow decreases sharply between two adjacent orders and the decreasing degree can reach up to dozens of times in the experimental simulation. Moreover, the influence intensity increases significantly when network congestion situation becomes serious, especially for the 1st order neighbors. Network structural factors are considered to make a further study. Simulation results show that the physical network scale expansion can reduce the influence intensity of bursty flow by decreasing the flow distribution density. Furthermore, with the same network scale, the influence intensity in WS small-world networks is 38.18% and 18.40% lower than that in ER random networks and BA scale-free networks, respectively, due to a lower interaction probability between flows. These results indicate that the macro-structural changes such as network scales and styles will affect the inner propagation behaviors of the bursty flow.

  2. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberg Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  3. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  4. Modelling of transit-time ultrasonic flow meters under multi-phase flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simurda, Matej; Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    of the background flow are included. Spatial derivatives are calculated by a Fourier collocation scheme allowing the use of the Fast Fourier transform. The method is compared against analytical solutions and experimental measurements. Additionally, a study of clamp-on and in-line ultrasonic flowmeters operating......A pseudospectral model for transit time ultrasonic flowmeters under multiphase flow conditions is presented. The method solves first order stress-velocity equations of elastodynamics, with acoustic media being modelled by setting shear modulus to zero. Additional terms to account for the effect...... under multiphase flow conditions is carried out....

  5. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-09-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model.

  6. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model. (paper)

  7. Development of conceptual groundwater flow model for Pali Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also extensively uses GIS for preprocessing of hydrological, hydrogeological and geological data. In our view, the methodology presented here provides better tools for building a conceptual model for tackling groundwater modeling problems. Keywords: Groundwater flow model, conceptual model, groundwater ...

  8. Optical vortices and singularities due to interference in atomic radiation near a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shu, Jie; Arnoldus, Henk F

    2009-11-15

    We consider radiation emitted by an electric dipole close to a mirror. We have studied the field lines of the Poynting vector, representing the flow lines of the electromagnetic energy, and we show that numerous singularities and subwavelength optical vortices appear in this energy flow pattern. We also show that the field line pattern in the plane of the mirror contains a singular circle across which the field lines change direction.

  9. Evaporation of a packet of quantized vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Samuels, David C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the diffusion of a packet of quantized vorticity initially confined inside a small region. We find that reconnections fragment the packet into a gas of small vortex loops which fly away. The time scale of the process is in order-of-magnitude agreement with recent experiments performed in 3 He-B

  10. Interaction of plasma vortices with resonant particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic effects associated with the electron motion along magnetic field lines in low‐beta plasmas are studied. Using the gyrokinetic description of electrons, a kinetic analog of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, and it is shown that in the strongly nonlinear regime they poss...... particles. The evolution equations indicate the possibility of excitation of plasma vortices by electron beams....

  11. RIPPLE: A new model for incompressible flows with free surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, D. B.; Mjolsness, R. C.

    1991-09-01

    A new free surface flow model, RIPPLE, is summarized. RIPPLE obtains finite difference solutions for incompressible flow problems having strong surface tension forces at free surfaces of arbitrarily complex topology. The key innovation is the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model which represents surface tension as a (strongly) localized volume force. Other features include a high-order momentum advection model, a volume-of-fluid free surface treatment, and an efficient two-step projection solution method. RIPPLE'S unique capabilities are illustrated with two example problems: low-gravity jet-induced tank flow, and the collision and coalescence of two cylindrical rods.

  12. RIPPLE - A new model for incompressible flows with free surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, D. B.; Mjolsness, R. C.

    1991-09-01

    A new free surface flow model, RIPPLE, is summarized. RIPPLE obtains finite difference solutions for incompressible flow problems having strong surface tension forces at free surfaces of arbitrarily complex topology. The key innovation is the continuum surface force model which represents surface tension as a (strongly) localized volume force. Other features include a higher-order momentum advection model, a volume-of-fluid free surface treatment, and an efficient two-step projection solution method. RIPPLE's unique capabilities are illustrated with two example problems: low-gravity jet-induced tank flow, and the collision and coalescence of two cylindrical rods.

  13. One-dimensional energy flow model for poroelastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Kang, Yeon June

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional energy flow model to investigate the energy behavior for poroelastic media coupled with acoustical media. The proposed energy flow model is expressed by an independent energy governing equation that is classified into each wave component propagating in poroelastic media. The energy governing equation is derived using the General Energetic Method (GEM). To facilitate a comparison with the classical solution based on the conventional displacement-base formulation, approximate solutions of energy density and intensity are obtained. Furthermore, the limitations and usability of the proposed energy flow model for poroelastic media are described.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for thermal binary-mixture gas flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinfen; Prasianakis, Nikolaos I; Mantzaras, John

    2013-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for thermal gas mixtures is derived. The kinetic model is designed in a way that combines properties of two previous literature models, namely, (a) a single-component thermal model and (b) a multicomponent isothermal model. A comprehensive platform for the study of various practical systems involving multicomponent mixture flows with large temperature differences is constructed. The governing thermohydrodynamic equations include the mass, momentum, energy conservation equations, and the multicomponent diffusion equation. The present model is able to simulate mixtures with adjustable Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Validation in several flow configurations with temperature and species concentration ratios up to nine is presented.

  15. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mütze, Annekathrin, E-mail: muetzea@ethz.ch; Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter [ETH Zürich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  16. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs

  17. Aircraft High-Lift Aerodynamic Analysis Using a Surface-Vorticity Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik D.; Albertson, Cindy W.

    2016-01-01

    This study extends an existing semi-empirical approach to high-lift analysis by examining its effectiveness for use with a three-dimensional aerodynamic analysis method. The aircraft high-lift geometry is modeled in Vehicle Sketch Pad (OpenVSP) using a newly-developed set of techniques for building a three-dimensional model of the high-lift geometry, and for controlling flap deflections using scripted parameter linking. Analysis of the low-speed aerodynamics is performed in FlightStream, a novel surface-vorticity solver that is expected to be substantially more robust and stable compared to pressure-based potential-flow solvers and less sensitive to surface perturbations. The calculated lift curve and drag polar are modified by an empirical lift-effectiveness factor that takes into account the effects of viscosity that are not captured in the potential-flow solution. Analysis results are validated against wind-tunnel data for The Energy-Efficient Transport AR12 low-speed wind-tunnel model, a 12-foot, full-span aircraft configuration with a supercritical wing, full-span slats, and part-span double-slotted flaps.

  18. An improved Burgers cellular automaton model for bicycle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuqi; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui; Li, Xingang; Shan, Jingjing

    2017-12-01

    As an energy-efficient and healthy transport mode, bicycling has recently attracted the attention of governments, transport planners, and researchers. The dynamic characteristics of the bicycle flow must be investigated to improve the facility design and traffic operation of bicycling. We model the bicycle flow by using an improved Burgers cellular automaton model. Through a following move mechanism, the modified model enables bicycles to move smoothly and increase the critical density to a more rational level than the original model. The model is calibrated and validated by using experimental data and field data. The results show that the improved model can effectively simulate the bicycle flow. The performance of the model under different parameters is investigated and discussed. Strengths and limitations of the improved model are suggested for future work.

  19. Modelling the Multiphase Flow in Dense Medium Cyclones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiwei Chu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dense medium cyclone (DMC is widely used in mineral industry to separate solids by density. It is simple in design but the flow pattern within it is complex due to the size and density distributions of the feed and process medium solids, and the turbulent vortex formed. Recently, the so-called combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD and discrete element method (DEM (CFD-DEM was extended from two-phase flow to model the flow in DMCs at the University of New South Wales (UNSW. In the CFD-DEM model, the flow of coal particles is modelled by DEM and that of medium flow by CFD, allowing consideration of medium-coal mutual interaction and particle-particle collisions. In the DEM model, Newton's laws of motion are applied to individual particles, and in the CFD model the local-averaged Navier-Stokes equations combined with the volume of fluid (VOF and mixture multiphase flow models are solved. The application to the DMC studies requires intensive computational effort. Therefore, various simplified versions have been proposed, corresponding to the approaches such as Lagrangian particle tracking (LPT method where dilute phase flow is assumed so that the interaction between particles can be ignored, one-way coupling where the effect of particle flow on fluid flow is ignored, and the use of the concept of parcel particles whose properties are empirically determined. In this paper, the previous works on the modelling of DMCs at UNSW are summarized and the features and applicability of the models used are discussed.

  20. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We considered a two-phase model flow of blood subject to both pulsative pressure gradient due to normal heart action and a periodic body acceleration. The leakback of flow due to the fact that the velocity of the red cell is greater than the mean velocity is derived using the method of characteristics. The variation in body ...