WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling thermal ignition

  1. Thermal Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Philipp Andreas

    Accidental ignition of flammable gases is a critical safety concern in many industrial applications. Particularly in the aviation industry, the main areas of concern on an aircraft are the fuel tank and adjoining regions, where spilled fuel has a high likelihood of creating a flammable mixture. To this end, a fundamental understanding of the ignition phenomenon is necessary in order to develop more accurate test methods and standards as a means of designing safer air vehicles. The focus of this work is thermal ignition, particularly auto-ignition with emphasis on the effect of heating rate, hot surface ignition and flame propagation, and puffing flames. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is traditionally separated into slow reaction, cool flame, and ignition regimes based on pressure and temperature. Standard tests, such as the ASTM E659, are used to determine the lowest temperature required to ignite a specific fuel mixed with air at atmospheric pressure. It is expected that the initial pressure and the rate at which the mixture is heated also influences the limiting temperature and the type of combustion. This study investigates the effect of heating rate, between 4 and 15 K/min, and initial pressure, in the range of 25 to 100 kPa, on ignition of n-hexane air mixtures. Mixtures with equivalence ratio ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 were investigated. The problem is also modeled computationally using an extension of Semenov's classical auto-ignition theory with a detailed chemical mechanism. Experiments and simulations both show that in the same reactor either a slow reaction or an ignition event can take place depending on the heating rate. Analysis of the detailed chemistry demonstrates that a mixture which approaches the ignition region slowly undergoes a significant modification of its composition. This change in composition induces a progressive shift of the explosion limit until the mixture is no longer flammable. A mixture that approaches the ignition region

  2. Modeling Thermal Ignition of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerri, Norman J; Berning, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents an attempt to computationally simulate the mechanics and thermal regimes created when a threat perforates an armor envelope and comes in contact with stowed energetic material...

  3. A new closed-form thermodynamic model for thermal simulation of spark ignition internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjaneh, Afshin; Sayyaadi, Hoseyn

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new closed-form thermal model was developed for SI engines. • Various irreversibilities of real engines were integrated into the model. • The accuracy of the model was examined on two real SI engines. • The superiority of the model to previous closed-form models was shown. • Accuracy and losses were studied over the operating range of engines. - Abstract: A closed form model based on finite speed thermodynamics, FST, modified to consider various losses was developed on Otto cycle. In this regard, the governing equations of the finite speed thermodynamics were developed for expansion/compression processes while heat absorption/rejection of the Otto cycle was determined based on finite time thermodynamics, FTT. In addition, other irreversibility including power loss caused by heat transfer through the cylinder walls and irreversibility due to throttling process was integrated into the model. The developed model was verified by implementing on two different spark ignition internal combustion engines and the results of modeling were compared with experimental results as well as FTT model. It was found that the developed model was not only very simple in use like a closed form thermodynamic model, but also it models a real spark ignition engine with reasonable accuracy. The error in predicting the output power at rated operating range of the engine was 39%, while in the case of the FTT model, this figure was 167.5%. This comparison for predicting thermal efficiency was +7% error (as difference) for the developed model compared to +39.4% error of FTT model.

  4. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Rodney J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  5. Biomass ignition in mills and storages – is it explained by conventional thermal ignition theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    Self-ignition temperatures determined in the framework of conventional thermal ignition theory does not explain why biomass is much more susceptible to spontaneous ignition in power plant mills or storages. Examining the onset of reactions at low temperatures may provide a better understanding......, suggesting that a heterogeneous oxidation is the dominating mechanism in self-ignition. It could also be shown that both mechanisms compete for reactive material. While oxidation was exothermic, pyrolysis was largely thermally neutral in these experiments. Reaction behavior was seen to depend highly...

  6. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M. van; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The

  7. Ignition in an Atomistic Model of Hydrogen Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Newcomb, Lucas B; Green, Jason R

    2017-03-02

    Hydrogen is a potential substitute for fossil fuels that would reduce the combustive emission of carbon dioxide. However, the low ignition energy needed to initiate oxidation imposes constraints on the efficiency and safety of hydrogen-based technologies. Microscopic details of the combustion processes, ephemeral transient species, and complex reaction networks are necessary to control and optimize the use of hydrogen as a commercial fuel. Here, we report estimates of the ignition time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures over a wide range of equivalence ratios from extensive reactive molecular dynamics simulations. These data show that the shortest ignition time corresponds to a fuel-lean mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.5, where the number of hydrogen and oxygen molecules in the initial mixture are identical, in good agreement with a recent chemical kinetic model. We find two signatures in the simulation data precede ignition at pressures above 200 MPa. First, there is a peak in hydrogen peroxide that signals ignition is imminent in about 100 ps. Second, we find a strong anticorrelation between the ignition time and the rate of energy dissipation, suggesting the role of thermal feedback in stimulating ignition.

  8. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blijderveen, Maarten; Bramer, Eddy A; Brem, Gerrit

    2012-09-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensitivity and Effect of Ignition Timing on the Performance of a Spark Ignition Engine: An Experimental and Modeling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Kakaee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a spark ignition engine is investigated under different values of ignition advance. A two-zone burnt/unburned model with the fuel burning rate described by a Wiebe function is used for modeling in-cylinder combustion, and then experiments are carried out to validate the calculated data. By varying the ignition timing, the results of some characteristics such as power, torque, thermal efficiency, pressure, and heat release are obtained and compared. The results show that optimal power and torque are achieved at 31°CA before top dead center, and performance is decreased if this ignition timing is changed. It is also shown that the maximum thermal efficiency is accomplished when peak pressure occurs between 5 and 15°CA after top dead center.

  10. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  11. Thermal ignition in a reactive variable viscosity Poiseuille flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we investigate the thermal ignition in a strongly exothermic reaction of a variable viscosity combustible material flowing through a channel with isothermal walls under Arrhenius kinetics, neglecting the consumption of the material. Analytical solutions are constructed for the governing nonlinear boundary-value ...

  12. Modeling potential structure ignitions from flame radiation exposure with implications for wildland/urban interface fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Cohen; Bret W. Butler

    1998-01-01

    Residential losses associated with wildland fires have become a serious international fire protection problem. The radiant heat flux from burning vegetation adjacent to a structure is a principal ignition factor. A thermal radiation and ignition model estimated structure ignition potential using designated flame characteristics (inferred from various types and...

  13. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  14. Effectiveness of thermal ignition devices in lean hydrogen-air-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, H.; McFarlane, R.; Liu, D.D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Deliberate ignition of hydrogen at low concentrations in reactor containment systems is one method of controlling hydrogen during degraded core accidents. Since many postulated accident conditions have substantial amounts of steam present, experiments have been performed to determine the hydrogen-air-steam concentration regimes in which ignitors would be effective. In these experiments, both a GM AC 7G thermal flow plug and a Tayco Model 3442 ignitor have been used. These ignitors have been installed in PWR containments with ice condensers and in BWR Mark III containments. This report presents the results of these ignitor effectiveness experiments, and gives the ignition limits and the effect of steam on the ignitor surface temperatures required for ignition

  15. Integrated thermodynamic model for ignition target performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer P.T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have derived a 3-dimensional synthetic model for NIF implosion conditions, by predicting and optimizing fits to a broad set of x-ray and nuclear diagnostics obtained on each shot. By matching x-ray images, burn width, neutron time-of-flight ion temperature, yield, and fuel ρr, we obtain nearly unique constraints on conditions in the hotspot and fuel in a model that is entirely consistent with the observables. This model allows us to determine hotspot density, pressure, areal density (ρr, total energy, and other ignition-relevant parameters not available from any single diagnostic. This article describes the model and its application to National Ignition Facility (NIF tritium–hydrogen–deuterium (THD and DT implosion data, and provides an explanation for the large yield and ρr degradation compared to numerical code predictions.

  16. Radial effects in heating and thermal stability of a sub-ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.; Thibaudeau, G.; Harten, L.; Bers, A.

    1982-02-01

    The existence of thermally stable sub-ignited equilibria of a tokamak reactor, sustained in operation by a feedback-controlled supplementary heating source, is demonstrated. The establishment of stability depends on a number of radially non-uniform, nonlinear processes whose effect is analyzed. One-dimensional (radial) stability analyses of model transport equations, together with numerical results from a 1-D transport code, are used in studying the heating of DT-plasmas in the thermonuclear regime. Plasma core supplementary heating is found to be a thermally more stable process than bulk heating. In the presence of impurity line radiation, however, core-heated temperature profiles may collapse, contracting inward from the limiter, the result of an instability caused by the increasing nature of the radiative cooling rate, with decreasing temperature. Conditions are established for the realization of a sub-ignited high-Q, toroidal reactor plasma with appreciable output power

  17. Structure ignition assessment model (SIAM)\\t

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Cohen

    1995-01-01

    Major wildland/urban interface fire losses, principally residences, continue to occur. Although the problem is not new, the specific mechanisms are not well known on how structures ignite in association with wildland fires. In response to the need for a better understanding of wildland/urban interface ignition mechanisms and a method of assessing the ignition risk,...

  18. Recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, J.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Marti, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-01

    We show recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition, from both full-PIC and the recently developed hybrid-PIC capability of OSIRIS 2.0. Our results show full-scale modeling of fast ignition over full density and time scales, where laser absorption, electron beam divergence, and energy deposition in the compressed core will be addressed in a self-consistent manner. Full-PIC and hybrid-PIC simulations of isolated targets will be presented, illustrating the importance of this type of modeling in order to accurately infer the beam divergence and transport properties. We will also demonstrate the possibility of performing full-scale simulations of shock ignition with the new hybrid-PIC capability, using compressed target profiles from hydrodynamic simulations, and studying the self-consistent laser absorption, electron transport, and energy deposition that can lead to the generation of the shock required for ignition. Work supported by DOE under DE-FC02-04-ER54789 and DE-FG52-09NA29552, and NSF under NSF-Phy-0904039, FCT (Portugal), and the HiPER project. Simulations performed on Hoffman at UCLA, Thresher at SDSC, and Intrepid at ANL supported by Incite grant FastIgnitionPIC.

  19. Shock ignition: modelling and target design robustness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeyre, X; Lafon, M; Schurtz, G; Olazabal-Loume, M; Breil, J; Galera, S; Weber, S, E-mail: ribeyre@celia.u-bordeaux1.f [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS, CEA, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351, cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)

    2009-12-15

    Shock ignition of a pre-compressed deuterium tritium fuel is considered here. When properly timed, a converging shock launched in the target prior to stagnation time strongly enhances the hot spot pressure. This allows ignition to be reached in a nonisobaric configuration. We show in this work that the igniting mechanism is pressure amplification by shock convergence and shock collision. The shock ignition applied to the HiPER target allows one to study the robustness of this method. It is shown that the spike energy is not a critical parameter and that the spike power delivered on the target depends mainly on the shell implosion velocity. Finally, a family of homothetic targets ignited with a shock wave is studied.

  20. Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

    2010-04-07

    Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

  1. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE CYCLE OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE WITH EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Öğüçlü, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed and applied to predict the emission levels and performance of a spark ignition engine with using Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) gas. The model simulates the full thermodynamic cycle of the engine and includes heat transfer, combustion, gas exchange process, thermal dissociation of water and carbon dioxide, and chemical equilibrium. 

  2. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for LOX/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/methane propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. In order to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability in the vacuum conditions and eliminate corona discharge issues, a coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed. The ICPTA uses spark-plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark-plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp.-2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, Plum Brook testing demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/methane propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  3. Microinstability-based models for confinement properties and ignition criteria in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Bishop, C.M.; Coppi, B.; Kaye, S.M.; Perkins, F.W.; Redi, M.H.; Rewoldt, G.

    1987-02-01

    This paper reports on results of theoretical studies dealing with: (1) the use of microinstability-based thermal transport models to interpret the anomalous confinement properties observed in key tokamak experiments such as TFTR and (2) the likely consequences of the presence of such instabilities for future ignition devices. Transport code simulations using profile-consistent forms of anomalous thermal diffusivities due to drift-type instabilities have yielded good agreement with the confinement times and temperatures observed in TFTR under a large variety of operating conditions including pellet-fuelling in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. With regard to achieving an optimal ignition margin, the adverse temperature scaling of anomalous losses caused by drift modes leads to the conclusion that it is best to operate at the maximum allowable density while holding the temperature close to the minimum value required for ignition

  4. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menikoff, R.; Shaw, M. S.

    Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition & Growth concept, introduced by LeeTarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homo- genized burn rate needs to account for three meso-scale physical effects: (i) the density of active hot spots or burn centers; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by the burn centers; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent burn centers. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable λ = g(s) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length s(t) = rbc/ℓbc, rather than by specifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale ℓbc(Ps) = [Nbc(Ps)]-1/3 is the average distance between burn centers, where Nbc is the number density of burn centers activated by the lead shock. The reaction length rbc(t) = ∫t0 D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single burn center, where D(P) is the deflagration speed as a function of the local pressure and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. We have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  5. Laser-Based Ignition for a Gunfire Simulator (GUFS): Thermal Transport Properties for Candidate Igniter Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McQuaid, M

    1999-01-01

    ...) the technique developed by Miller and Kotlar ("Technique for Measuring Thermal Diffusivity/Conductivity of Small Thermal Insulator Specimens," Review of Scientific instruments, vol. 64, p. 2954, 1993) and (2...

  6. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  7. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature. This leads to the Ignition & Growth concept, introduced by LeeTarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homo- genized burn rate needs to account for three meso-scale physical effects: (i the density of active hot spots or burn centers; (ii the growth of the burn fronts triggered by the burn centers; (iii a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent burn centers. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable λ = g(s as a function of a dimensionless reaction length s(t = rbc/ℓbc, rather than by specifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale ℓbc(Ps = [Nbc(Ps]−1/3 is the average distance between burn centers, where Nbc is the number density of burn centers activated by the lead shock. The reaction length rbc(t = ∫t0 D(P(t′dt′ is the distance the burn front propagates from a single burn center, where D(P is the deflagration speed as a function of the local pressure and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. We have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  8. Physics-based modeling of live wildland fuel ignition experiments in the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Anand; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    A computational study was performed to improve our understanding of the ignition of live fuel in the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus, a setup where the impact of the heating mode is investigated by subjecting the fuel to forced convection and radiation. An improvement was first made in the physics-based model WFDS where the fuel is treated as fixed...

  9. Understanding Piloted Ignition of Solid Combustibles in Spacecraft Environments through Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereres, S.; Fernandez-Pello, C.; Ruff, G.; Urban, D.

    2012-01-01

    Space exploration vehicles can present internal atmospheres different from sea level standard atmospheric conditions (100 kPa, 21%O2). In NASA's most recent human space exploration crew vehicles the cabin environments were designed to have reduced ambient pressure and increased oxygen concentration (around 55 kPa, 32%O2,). These distinct ambient conditions, in addition to the absence of gravity, may increase the fire risk of combustible materials on board. Enhancing the oxygen concentration will lead to higher flame temperatures. Reducing the ambient pressure will decrease convective heat losses from heated surfaces but also will reduce the amount of pyrolyzate required to reach a flammable mixture near the pilot. This study explores the effect of ambient variables such as reduced pressure, oxygen concentration or microgravity on the physical mechanisms that lead to the piloted ignition of solid combustibles through numerical analysis. Two-dimensional simulations of piloted ignition of thermally irradiated samples of PMMA (polymethyl- methacrylate) were performed with the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS5) code. Finite-rate single-step combustion kinetics is used in the gas-phase and a single step Arrhenius type reaction rate describes the solid pyrolysis. Oxidative pyrolysis is not considered and the in-depth formed pyrolyzate is assumed to flow unrestricted through the PMMA. The model correctly describes the thermo-physical mechanisms leading to the piloted ignition of solid fuels. It is shown that as the ambient pressure is reduced or the oxygen concentration enhanced, both the time to ignition and the fuel mass loss rate at ignition are reduced, increasing the fire hazard of the material when externally heated. The calculated ignition times and mass loss rates at ignition are compared to those measured experimentally in a laboratory-scale combustion wind tunnel. It is also shown that with appropriate kinetic parameters the model agrees qualitatively well with the

  10. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  11. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-05-31

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  12. Half bridge resonant converter for ignition of thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena E, L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work the background, design, implementation and performance of a half bridge resonant converter (HBRC) used as an electronic ignition system for arc plasma torch generation is presented. The significance of the design lies in its simplicity, versatility and low cost. The system operates like a high voltage supply attached to electrodes before gaseous breakdown and like open circuit when electric arc is established. Resonant converter is implemented with a high voltage and high speed power driver intended for control the power MOSFET transistors connected in half bridge topology with L C load. The HBRC operates besides interference into domestic electric supply line (120 V, 60 Hz) as well electric measurement devices. Advantages and limitations of the converter are reviewed. Experimental impedance variation in the medium as a function of frequency operation and some experiences in striking arcs are also presented. (Author)

  13. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  14. Thermal stability and ignition of a thermonuclear plasma with Kaye-Goldston scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1987-01-01

    Stability of the ignition operation with respect to the pure thermal instability is investigated in the case of a temperature dependent non radiative energy confinement time (τ E ∝ 1/T γ ). The thermal stability of the operation with an external power independent of temperature is also studied. The stability criterion is put in the form of a (nτ E ,T) condition. The temperature for divergence leading to the minimum stable ignition is calculated in terms of γ as well as the corresponding external density power. Special attention is paid to the case of Kaye-Goldston scaling (γ=1.38). The necessary conditions for dimension and fusion power of an ignited tokamak with Kaye-Goldston scaling are derived taking into account explicit bremsstrahlung losses and plasma elongation. At the Murakami or β density limits, realistic dimensions can only be obtained with strong magnetic fields and elongations, but the corresponding high densities yield in turn impracticably large fusion powers. Dimension and density can then be calculated for a fixed power of the reactor (4000 MW(th)). Again, reasonable dimensions need high fields and elongations (B t ∼ 10T, x ∼ 1.5), but now Murakami and β limits are never exceeded. The external power necessary for thermal divergence can also be calculated in this case. It is found to be independent of elongation and decreasing with final ignition temperature. (author). 8 refs, 9 figs

  15. Modeling spatio-temporal wildfire ignition point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda S. Hering; Cynthia L. Bell; Marc G. Genton

    2009-01-01

    We analyze and model the structure of spatio-temporal wildfire ignitions in the St. Johns River Water Management District in northeastern Florida. Previous studies, based on the K-function and an assumption of homogeneity, have shown that wildfire events occur in clusters. We revisit this analysis based on an inhomogeneous K-...

  16. Progress towards a lightning ignition model for the Northern Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Sopko; Don Latham

    2010-01-01

    We are in the process of constructing a lightning ignition model specific to the Northern Rockies using fire occurrence, lightning strike, ecoregion, and historical weather, NFDRS (National Fire Danger Rating System), lightning efficiency and lightning "possibility" data. Daily grids for each of these categories were reconstructed for the 2003 fire season (...

  17. Advances in Modeling Direct-Drive Ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) makes it possible to perform direct-drive-ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) while the facility is configured for indirect drive. We present for the first time PDD ignition-relevant target designs with decreased laser intensities. These designs include the physical effects of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and nonlocal heat transport, both of which substantially affect the target drive. In the PDD configuration, a multiwavelength detuning strategy was found to be effective in mitigating the loss of coupling caused by CBET, allowing for implosion speeds comparable to those of previous designs. Target designs will be presented that span the region from alpha-particle heating to ignition. In addition, ignition-relevant designs will also be discussed for use in symmetric direct drive on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Preliminary results of thermal igniter experiments in H2-air-steam environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal igniters (glow plugs), proposed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for intentional ignition of hydrogen in nuclear reactor containment, have been tested for functionability in mixtures of air, hydrogen, and steam. Test environments included 6% to 16% hydrogen concentrations in air, and 8%, 10%, and 12% hydrogen in mixtures with 30% and 40% steam fractions. All were conducted in a 10.6 ft 3 insulated pressure vessel. For all of these tests the glow plug successfully initiated combustion. Dry air/hydrogen tests exhibited a distinct tendency for complete combustion at hydrogen concentrations between 8% and 9%. Steam suppressed both peak pressures and completeness of combustion. No combustion could be initiated at or above a 50% steam fraction. Circulation of the mixture with a fan increased the completeness of combustion. The glow plug showed no evidence of performance degradation throughout the program

  19. Zero-dimensional mathematical model of the torch ignited engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Igor William Santos Leal; Alvarez, Carlos Eduardo Castilla; Teixeira, Alysson Fernandes; Valle, Ramon Molina

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Publications about the torch ignition system are mostly CFD or experimental research. • A zero-dimensional mathematical model is presented. • The model is based on classical thermodynamic equations. • Approximations are based on empirical functions. • The model is applied to a prototype by means of a computer code. - Abstract: Often employed in the analysis of conventional SI and CI engines, mathematical models can also be applied to engines with torch ignition, which have been researched almost exclusively by CFD or experimentally. The objective of this work is to describe the development and application of a zero-dimensional model of the compression and power strokes of a torch ignited engine. It is an initial analysis that can be used as a basis for future models. The processes of compression, combustion and expansion were described mathematically and applied to an existing prototype by means of a computer code written in MATLAB language. Conservation of energy and mass and the ideal gas law were used in determining gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate within the cylinder. Gas motion through the orifice was modelled as an isentropic compressible flow. The thermodynamic properties of the mixture were found by a weighted arithmetic mean of the data for each component, computed by polynomial functions of temperature. Combustion was modelled by the Wiebe function. Heat transfer to the cylinder walls was estimated by Annand’s correlations. Results revealed the behaviour of pressure, temperature, jet velocity, energy transfer, thermodynamic properties, among other variables, and how some of these are influenced by others.

  20. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for Oxygen/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal-Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/liquid methane (LCH4) rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/LCH4 propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability at these conditions while preventing corona discharge issues. The ICPTA uses spark plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp -2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, hot-fire testing at Plum Brook demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/LCH4 propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  1. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  2. Experiment and modeling: Ignition of aluminum particles with a carbon dioxide laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Salil

    Aluminum is a promising ingredient for high energy density compositions used in propulsion systems, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Aluminum powder fuel additives enable one to achieve higher combustion enthalpies and reaction temperatures. Therefore, to develop aluminum based novel and customized high density energetic materials, understanding of ignition and combustion kinetics of aluminum powders is required. In most practical systems, metal ignition and combustion occur in environments with rapidly changing temperatures and gas compositions. The kinetics of exothermic reactions in related energetic materials is commonly characterized by thermal analysis, where the heating rates are very low, on the order of 1--50 K/min. The extrapolation of the identified kinetics to the high heating rates is difficult and requires direct experimental verification. This difficulty led to development of new experimental approaches to directly characterize ignition kinetics for the heating rates in the range of 103--104 K/s. However, the practically interesting heating rates of 106 K/s range have not been achieved. This work is directed at development of an experimental technique and respective heat transfer model for studying ignition of aluminum and other micron-sized metallic particles at heating rates varied around 106 K/s. The experimental setup uses a focused CO2 laser as a heating source and a plate capacitor aerosolizer to feed the aluminum particles into the laser beam. The setup allows using different environment for particle aerosolization. The velocities of particles in the jet are in the range of 0.1 --0 3 m/s. For each selected jet velocity, the laser power is increased until the particles are observed to ignite. The ignition is detected optically using a digital camera and a photomultiplier. The ignition thresholds for spherical aluminum powder were measured at three different particle jet velocities, in air environment. A single particle heat transfer model was

  3. Modeling Ignition of HMX with the Gibbs Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibaek; Stewart, D. Scott

    2017-06-01

    We present a HMX model with the Gibbs formulation in which stress tensor and temperature are assumed to be in local equilibrium, but phase/chemical changes are not assumed to be in equilibrium. We assume multi-components for HMX including beta- and delta-phase, liquid, and gas phase of HMX and its gas products. Isotropic small strain solid model, modified Fried Howard liquid EOS, and ideal gas EOS are used for its relevant component. Phase/chemical changes are characterized as reactions and are in individual reaction rate. Maxwell-Stefan model is used for diffusion. Excited gas products in the local domain lead unreacted HMX solid to the ignition event. Density of the mixture, stress, strain, displacement, mass fractions, and temperature are considered in 1D domain with time histories. Office of Naval Research and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  4. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  5. Hydrodynamic modeling and simulations of shock ignition thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafon M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Shock Ignition (SI scheme [1] offers to reduce the laser requirements by relaxing the implosion phase to sub-ignition velocities and later adding an intense laser spike. Depending on laser energy, target characteristics and implosion velocity, high gains are expected [2,3]. Relevant intensities for scaled targets imploded in the velocity range from 150 to 400 km/s are defined at ignition thresholds. A range of moderate implosion velocities is specified to match safe implosions. These conditions for target design are then inferred for relevant NIF and LMJ shock-ignited targets.

  6. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. IV. Ignition stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    The present paper is the continuation of the previous publications of the present authors in the Journal of Engineering Physics under the general title in which three sequential stages of the thermal preparation of a carbon particle for combustion are considered: heating, drying, and the yield of volatiles. The present paper is devoted to a detailed investigation of the stage of ignition of a carbon particle under the conditions of external radiative-convective supply that most adequately reflects the furnace medium. The characteristics of thermal ignition of a carbon matrix were studied with the aid of the adiabatic method. Such parameters as time and the heating temperature, the time of induction, the total time and the temperature of ignition of a carbon particle, the scale temperature, etc. have been found. The degree of dependence of the time of ignition on the initial temperature of the particle, the temperature of the external medium, heat transfer coefficient, and other inlet data has been analyzed.

  7. Ignition phase and steady-state structures of a non-thermal air plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xin Pei

    2003-01-01

    An AC-driven, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure air plasma is generated within the gap separating a disc-shaped metal electrode and a water electrode. The ignition phase and the steady-state are studied by a high-speed CCD camera. It is found that the plasma always initiates at the surface of the water electrode. The plasma exhibits different structures depending on the polarity of the water electrode: when the water electrode plays the role of cathode, a relatively wide but visibly dim plasma column is generated. At the maximum driving voltage, the gas temperature is between 800 and 900 K, and the peak current is 67 mA; when the water electrode is anode, the plasma column narrows but increases its light emission. The gas temperature in this case is measured to be in the 1400-1500 K range, and the peak current is 81 mA.

  8. Space-time modelling of lightning-caused ignitions in the Blue Mountains, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Avalos, Carlos; Peterson, D.L.; Alvarado, Ernesto; Ferguson, Sue A.; Besag, Julian E.

    2001-01-01

    Generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to study the effect of vegetation cover, elevation, slope, and precipitation on the probability of ignition in the Blue Mountains, Oregon, and to estimate the probability of ignition occurrence at different locations in space and in time. Data on starting location of lightning-caused ignitions in the Blue Mountains between April 1986 and September 1993 constituted the base for the analysis. The study area was divided into a pixela??time array. For each pixela??time location we associated a value of 1 if at least one ignition occurred and 0 otherwise. Covariate information for each pixel was obtained using a geographic information system. The GLMMs were fitted in a Bayesian framework. Higher ignition probabilities were associated with the following cover types: subalpine herbaceous, alpine tundra, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), and grand fir (Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl.). Within each vegetation type, higher ignition probabilities occurred at lower elevations. Additionally, ignition probabilities are lower in the northern and southern extremes of the Blue Mountains. The GLMM procedure used here is suitable for analysing ignition occurrence in other forested regions where probabilities of ignition are highly variable because of a spatially complex biophysical environment.

  9. Thermal Issues Associated with the Lighting Systems, Electronics Racks, and Pre-Amplifier Modules in the National Ignition System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. C. Owen; J. D. Bernardin; K. L. Lam

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. The influence of heat sources such as lighting fixtures, electronics racks, and pre-amplifier modules (PAMs) on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes and optical alignment hardware in the NE laser bays were investigated with experiments and numerical models. In particular, empirical heat transfer data was used to establish representative and meaningful boundary conditions and also serve as bench marks for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Numerical models, constructed with a commercial CFD code, were developed to investigate the extent of thermal plumes and radiation heat transfer from the heat sources. From these studies, several design modifications were recommended including reducing the size of all fluorescent lights in the NIF laser bays to single 32 W bulb fixtures, maintaining minimum separation distances between light fixtures/electronics racks and beam transport hardware, adding motion sensors in areas of the laser bay to control light fixture operation during maintenance procedures, properly cooling all electronics racks with air-water heat exchangers with heat losses greater than 25 W/rack to the M1 laser bay, ensuring that the electronics racks are not overcooked and thus maintain their surface temperatures to within a few degrees centigrade of the mean air temperature, and insulating the electronic bays and optical support structures on the PAMs.

  10. Influences of ignition improver additive on ternary (diesel-biodiesel-higher alcohol) blends thermal stability and diesel engine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imdadul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Zulkifli, N.W.M.; Alabdulkarem, Abdullah; Rashed, M.M.; Ashraful, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ignition improver additives makes the biodiesel-alcohol blends more thermally stable. • Density and cetane number improved significantly with EHN mixing. • BP and BSFC improved by adding ignition improver additives. • Nitric oxides and smoke of the EHN treated blends decreased. • CO and HC increased slightly with EHN addition. - Abstract: Pentanol is a long chain alcohol produced from renewable sources and considered as a promising biofuel as a blending component with diesel or biodiesel blends. However, the lower cetane number of alcohols is a limitation, and it is important to increase the overall cetane number of biodiesel fuel blends for efficient combustion and lower emission. In this consideration, ignition improver additive 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) were used at a proportion of 1000 and 2000 ppm to diesel-biodiesel-pentanol blends. Experiments were conducted in a single cylinder; water-cooled DI diesel engine operated at full throttle and varying speed condition. The thermal stability of the modified ternary fuel blends was evaluated through thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, and the physic-chemical properties of the fuel as well as engine characteristics were studied and compared. The addition of EHN to ternary fuel blends enhanced the cetane number significantly without any significant adverse effect on the other properties. TGA and DSC analysis reported about the improvement of thermal characteristics of the modified blends. It was found that, implementing ignition improver make the diesel-biodiesel-alcohol blends more thermally stable. Also, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), nitric oxides (NO) and smoke emission reduced remarkably with the addition of EHN. Introducing EHN to diesel-biodiesel-alcohol blends increased the cetane number, shorten the ignition delay by increasing the diffusion rate and improve combustion. Hence, the NO and BSFC reduced while, carbon

  11. Progress in catalytic ignition fabrication and modeling : fabrication part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The ignition temperature and heat generation from oxidation of methane on a platinum catalyst were : determined experimentally. A 127 micron diameter platinum coiled wire was placed crosswise in a : quartz tube of a plug flow reactor. A source meter ...

  12. Building Thermal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume L.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is meant to be an overview of the model building process It is based on typical techniques (Monte Carlo Ray Tracing for radiation exchange, Lumped Parameter, Finite Difference for thermal solution) used by the aerospace industry This is not intended to be a "How to Use ThermalDesktop" course. It is intended to be a "How to Build Thermal Models" course and the techniques will be demonstrated using the capabilities of ThermalDesktop (TD). Other codes may or may not have similar capabilities. The General Model Building Process can be broken into four top level steps: 1. Build Model; 2. Check Model; 3. Execute Model; 4. Verify Results.

  13. Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal

  14. Thermal-Catalytic Ignition Source for Ionic Liquid Monopropellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet recently demonstrated rapid, reliable, and repeated ignition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN)-hydroxyethylhydrazinium nitrate (HEHN) monopropellant...

  15. Flammability properties of British heathland and moorland vegetation: models for predicting fire ignition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M; Marrs, Rob H

    2014-06-15

    Temperate ecosystems, for example British heathlands and moorlands, are predicted to experience an increase in severe summer drought and wildfire frequency over the next few decades. The development of fire ignition probability models is fundamental for developing fire-danger rating systems and predicting wildfire outbreaks. This work assessed the flammability properties of the fuel complex of British moorlands as a function of their moisture content under laboratory conditions. Specifically, we aimed to develop: (1) models of the probability of fire ignition in peat/litter fuel-beds (litter of four different plant species, Sphagnum moss and peat); (2) flammability properties in terms of ignitability, sustainability, consumability and combustibility of these peat/litter fuel-beds; (3) the probability of ignition in a canopy-layer of Calluna vulgaris (the most dominant heath/moor species in Britain) as a function of its dead-fuel proportion and moisture content; (4) the efficacy of standardized smouldering and flaming ignition sources in developing sustained ignitions. For this, a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fuel structure of moor vegetation were performed. The flammability properties in peat/litter fuel-beds were influenced strongly by the fuel moisture content. There were small differences in moisture thresholds for experiencing initial flaming ignitions (35-59%), however, the threshold for sustained ignitions (i.e. spreading a fixed distance from the ignition point) varied across a much wider range (19-55%). Litter/peat fuel-beds were classified into three groups: fuel-beds with high ignitability and combustibility, fuel-beds with high levels of sustainability, and fuel-beds with low levels in all flammability descriptors. The probability of ignition in the upper Calluna-vegetation layer was influenced by both the proportion of dead fuels and their moisture content, ranging from 19% to 35% of moisture as dead fuel proportion increased

  16. Knock Prediction Using a Simple Model for Ignition Delay

    KAUST Repository

    Kalghatgi, Gautam

    2016-04-05

    An earlier paper has shown the ability to predict the phasing of knock onset in a gasoline PFI engine using a simple ignition delay equation for an appropriate surrogate fuel made up of toluene and PRF (TPRF). The applicability of this approach is confirmed in this paper in a different engine using five different fuels of differing RON, sensitivity, and composition - including ethanol blends. An Arrhenius type equation with a pressure correction for ignition delay can be found from interpolation of previously published data for any gasoline if its RON and sensitivity are known. Then, if the pressure and temperature in the unburned gas can be estimated or measured, the Livengood-Wu integral can be estimated as a function of crank angle to predict the occurrence of knock. Experiments in a single cylinder DISI engine over a wide operating range confirm that this simple approach can predict knock very accurately. The data presented should enable engineers to study knock or other auto-ignition phenomena e.g. in premixed compression ignition (PCI) engines without explicit chemical kinetic calculations. © Copyright 2016 SAE International.

  17. Influence of chemically produced singlet delta oxygen molecules on thermal ignition of O2-H2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, N. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2016-02-01

    Thermal ignition of the H2-O2 mixture with O2(a 1Δ g ) addition is studied experimentally and theoretically. The singlet delta oxygen was produced in a chemical generator. In this way, the competing chemical processes involving plasma produced chemically active O atoms and ozone (O3) were excluded. A satisfactory agreement is achieved between experimentally observed and numerically predicted values of the ignition time at the initial gas temperature (900-950) K and gas pressure (9-10) Torr. The percentage of the reactive channel in the binary collisions O2(a 1Δg) H is evaluated on the level (10-20)% for the H2-O2 mixture.

  18. Modeling anthropogenic and natural fire ignitions in an inner-alpine valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vacchiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and assessing the factors that drive forest fire ignitions is critical for fire prevention and sustainable ecosystem management. In southern Europe, the anthropogenic component of wildland fire ignitions is especially relevant. In the Alps, however, the role of fire as a component of disturbance regimes in forest and grassland ecosystems is poorly known. The aim of this work is to model the probability of fire ignition for an Alpine region in Italy using a regional wildfire archive (1995–2009 and MaxEnt modeling. We analyzed separately (i winter forest fires, (ii winter fires on grasslands and fallow land, and (iii summer fires. Predictors were related to morphology, climate, and land use; distance from infrastructures, number of farms, and number of grazing animals were used as proxies for the anthropogenic component. Collinearity among predictors was reduced by a principal component analysis. Regarding ignitions, 30 % occurred in agricultural areas and 24 % in forests. Ignitions peaked in the late winter–early spring. Negligence from agrosilvicultural activities was the main cause of ignition (64 %; lightning accounted for 9 % of causes across the study time frame, but increased from 6 to 10 % between the first and second period of analysis. Models for all groups of fire had a high goodness of fit (AUC 0.90–0.95. Temperature was proportional to the probability of ignition, and precipitation was inversely proportional. Proximity from infrastructures had an effect only on winter fires, while the density of grazing animals had a remarkably different effect on summer (positive correlation and winter (negative fires. Implications are discussed regarding climate change, fire regime changes, and silvicultural prevention. Such a spatially explicit approach allows us to carry out spatially targeted fire management strategies and may assist in developing better fire management plans.

  19. Modeling anthropogenic and natural fire ignitions in an inner-alpine valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchiano, Giorgio; Foderi, Cristiano; Berretti, Roberta; Marchi, Enrico; Motta, Renzo

    2018-03-01

    Modeling and assessing the factors that drive forest fire ignitions is critical for fire prevention and sustainable ecosystem management. In southern Europe, the anthropogenic component of wildland fire ignitions is especially relevant. In the Alps, however, the role of fire as a component of disturbance regimes in forest and grassland ecosystems is poorly known. The aim of this work is to model the probability of fire ignition for an Alpine region in Italy using a regional wildfire archive (1995-2009) and MaxEnt modeling. We analyzed separately (i) winter forest fires, (ii) winter fires on grasslands and fallow land, and (iii) summer fires. Predictors were related to morphology, climate, and land use; distance from infrastructures, number of farms, and number of grazing animals were used as proxies for the anthropogenic component. Collinearity among predictors was reduced by a principal component analysis. Regarding ignitions, 30 % occurred in agricultural areas and 24 % in forests. Ignitions peaked in the late winter-early spring. Negligence from agrosilvicultural activities was the main cause of ignition (64 %); lightning accounted for 9 % of causes across the study time frame, but increased from 6 to 10 % between the first and second period of analysis. Models for all groups of fire had a high goodness of fit (AUC 0.90-0.95). Temperature was proportional to the probability of ignition, and precipitation was inversely proportional. Proximity from infrastructures had an effect only on winter fires, while the density of grazing animals had a remarkably different effect on summer (positive correlation) and winter (negative) fires. Implications are discussed regarding climate change, fire regime changes, and silvicultural prevention. Such a spatially explicit approach allows us to carry out spatially targeted fire management strategies and may assist in developing better fire management plans.

  20. Modelling of streamer ignition and propagation in the system of two approaching hydrometeors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansky, J.; Pasko, V. P.

    2017-12-01

    The lightning initiation in low thundercloud fields represents an unsolved problem in lightning discharge physics. One of the initial conditions required for formation of a hot leader channel is initiation of non-thermal streamer discharges. Streamers can be initiated from electron avalanches, however, the problem of existence of an electric field strong enough for streamer initiation in thunderclouds is still open. The maximum electric field in thunderstorms measured by balloons is typically 3-4 kV cm-1 atm-1, that is significantly smaller than the breakdown electric field needed for avalanche multiplication of electrons Ek≃28.7 kV cm-1 atm-1. One of the possible explanations for the streamer corona initiation is that hydrometeors greatly intensify the local electric field by at least an order of magnitude to initiate an electron avalanche. It was suggested that a particle pair or chain create more favorable conditions for initiation of lightning discharge than a single precipitation particle in low electric fields. Recently Cai et al. [GRL, 44, 5758-5765, 2017] analyzed the ignition conditions for two hydrometeors of same radii. In the present work we use streamer fluid model to study streamer initiation scenarios in a system of two hydrometeors with different radii. When the hydrometeors are approaching the Townsend discharge may develop first between them. Then the Townsend discharge transforms to streamer and two hydrometeors connect electrically, which leads to increase of the electric field on the outside hemispheres of hydrometeors. This increase of field for two particles of same radii was analyzed by Cooray et al. [Proceedings of 24th International Conference on Lightning Protection, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 1998]. The combination of small and large hydrometeors leads to higher enhancement on the outside of small hydrometeor. Simulation results show that streamer ignites there and propagates away from two hydrometeors. The streamer ignites at fields

  1. Modelling of hot surface ignition within gas turbines subject to flammable gas in the intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea Duedahl; Nielsen, Kenny Krogh; Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    successfully developed and implemented in the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS CFX. This model is based on a combination of standard models, User Defined Functions (UDFs) and the CFX Expression Language (CEL). Prediction of ignition is based on a set of criteria to be fulfilled while......Controlling risks associated with fires and explosions from leaks of flammable fluids at oil and gas facilities is paramount to ensuring safe operations. The gas turbine is a significant potential source of ignition; however, the residual risk is still not adequately understood. A model has been...... but decreases with increase in initial mixture temperature and pressure. The model shows a great potential in reliable prediction of the risk of hot surface ignition within gas turbines in the oil and gas industry. In the future, a dedicated experimental study will be performed not only to improve...

  2. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  3. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    % oxygen with those under inert atmosphere revealed two distinct pathways, pyrolysis and exothermic heterogeneous oxidation. At low temperatures and sufficient oxygen availability, heterogeneous oxidation of the solid seems to be favored over pyrolysis for wood, but not for coal. Current ignition models do......Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  4. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  5. Application of transient ignition model to multi-canister (MCO) accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummerer, M.

    1996-01-01

    The potential for ignition of spent nuclear fuel in a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) is examined. A transient model is applied to calculate the highest ambient gas temperature outside an MCO wall tube or shipping cask for which a stable temperature condition exists. This integral analysis couples reaction kinetics with a description of the MCO configuration, heat and mass transfer, and fission product phenomena. It thereby allows ignition theory to be applied to various complex scenarios, including MCO water loss accidents and dry MCO air ingression

  6. The IGNITE network: a model for genomic medicine implementation and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Kristin Wiisanen; Alexander, Madeline; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Calman, Neil; Carey, David J; Cavallari, Larisa H; Field, Julie R; Hauser, Diane; Junkins, Heather A; Levin, Phillip A; Levy, Kenneth; Madden, Ebony B; Manolio, Teri A; Odgis, Jacqueline; Orlando, Lori A; Pyeritz, Reed; Wu, R Ryanne; Shuldiner, Alan R; Bottinger, Erwin P; Denny, Joshua C; Dexter, Paul R; Flockhart, David A; Horowitz, Carol R; Johnson, Julie A; Kimmel, Stephen E; Levy, Mia A; Pollin, Toni I; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-05

    Patients, clinicians, researchers and payers are seeking to understand the value of using genomic information (as reflected by genotyping, sequencing, family history or other data) to inform clinical decision-making. However, challenges exist to widespread clinical implementation of genomic medicine, a prerequisite for developing evidence of its real-world utility. To address these challenges, the National Institutes of Health-funded IGNITE (Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE; www.ignite-genomics.org ) Network, comprised of six projects and a coordinating center, was established in 2013 to support the development, investigation and dissemination of genomic medicine practice models that seamlessly integrate genomic data into the electronic health record and that deploy tools for point of care decision making. IGNITE site projects are aligned in their purpose of testing these models, but individual projects vary in scope and design, including exploring genetic markers for disease risk prediction and prevention, developing tools for using family history data, incorporating pharmacogenomic data into clinical care, refining disease diagnosis using sequence-based mutation discovery, and creating novel educational approaches. This paper describes the IGNITE Network and member projects, including network structure, collaborative initiatives, clinical decision support strategies, methods for return of genomic test results, and educational initiatives for patients and providers. Clinical and outcomes data from individual sites and network-wide projects are anticipated to begin being published over the next few years. The IGNITE Network is an innovative series of projects and pilot demonstrations aiming to enhance translation of validated actionable genomic information into clinical settings and develop and use measures of outcome in response to genome-based clinical interventions using a pragmatic framework to provide early data and proofs of concept on the utility of these

  7. EcoSmart Fire as structure ignition model in wildland urban interface: predictions and validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2016-01-01

    EcoSmartFire is a Windows program that models heat damage and piloted ignition of structures from radiant exposure to discrete landscaped tree fires. It calculates the radiant heat transfer from cylindrical shaped fires to the walls and roof of the structure while accounting for radiation shadowing, attenuation, and ground reflections. Tests of litter burn, a 0.6 m...

  8. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methanol Ignition and Oxidation at High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aranda, V.; Christensen, J. M.; Alzueta, Maria

    2013-01-01

    the conditions studied, the onset temperature for methanol oxidation was not dependent on the stoichiometry, whereas increasing pressure shifted the ignition temperature toward lower values. Model predictions of the present experimental results, as well as rapid compression machine data from the literature, were...

  9. Experimental and modeling study on effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition characteristics of methane/air mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ignition delay times of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 were experimentally measured in a chemical shock tube. The experiments were performed over the temperature range of 1300–2100 K, pressure range of 0.1–1.0 MPa, equivalence ratio range of 0.5–2.0 and for the dilution coefficients of 0%, 20% and 50%. The results suggest that a linear relationship exists between the reciprocal of temperature and the logarithm of the ignition delay times. Meanwhile, with ignition temperature and pressure increasing, the measured ignition delay times of methane/air mixture are decreasing. Furthermore, an increase in the dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2 results in increasing ignition delays and the inhibition effect of CO2 on methane/air mixture ignition is stronger than that of N2. Simulated ignition delays of methane/air mixture using three kinetic models were compared to the experimental data. Results show that GRI_3.0 mechanism gives the best prediction on ignition delays of methane/air mixture and it was selected to identify the effects of N2 and CO2 on ignition delays and the key elementary reactions in the ignition chemistry of methane/air mixture. Comparisons of the calculated ignition delays with the experimental data of methane/air mixture diluted by N2 and CO2 show excellent agreement, and sensitivity coefficients of chain branching reactions which promote mixture ignition decrease with increasing dilution coefficient of N2 or CO2.

  10. Thermal issues associated with the HVAC and lighting systems influences on the performance of the national ignition facility beam transport tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. In particular, the influences of the HVAC system and lighting fixtures on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes are reviewed and discussed. An analytical model of the oscillating HVAC air temperatures in the NIF switchyard and target bay will cause significant amounts of beam distortion. However, these negative effects can be drastically reduced by adding thermal insulation to the outside of the beam tubes. A computational fluid dynamics model and an analytical investigation found that the light-fixture to beam-tube separation distance must be on the order of 5.7 m (18.7 ft) to maintain acceptable beam operating performance in the current NIF design. By reducing the fluorescent light fixture power by 33% this separation distance can be reduced to 3.5 m (11.5 ft). If in addition, thermal insulation with a reflective aluminum foil covering is added to the outside of the beam tubes, the separation distance can be reduced further to 1.6m (5.2 ft). A 1.27 cm (0.5 in.) rigid foam insulation sheet with aluminum foil covering will provide adequate insulation for the beam tubes in the NIF switchyards and target bay. The material cost for this amount of insulation would be roughly $30,000.

  11. Hydrodynamic modelling of the shock ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The shock ignition concept in inertial confinement fusion uses an intense power spike at the end of an assembly laser pulse. The key features of shock ignition are the generation of a high ablation pressure, the shock pressure amplification by at least a factor of a hundred in the cold fuel shell and the shock coupling to the hot-spot. In this thesis, new semi-analytical hydrodynamic models are developed to describe the ignitor shock from its generation up to the moment of fuel ignition. A model is developed to describe a spherical converging shock wave in a pre-heated hot spot. The self-similar solution developed by Guderley is perturbed over the shock Mach number Ms ≥≥1. The first order correction accounts for the effects of the shock strength. An analytical ignition criterion is defined in terms of the shock strength and the hot-spot areal density. The ignition threshold is higher when the initial Mach number of the shock is lower. A minimal shock pressure of 20 Gbar is needed when it enters the hot-spot. The shock dynamics in the imploding shell is then analyzed. The shock is propagating into a non inertial medium with a high radial pressure gradient and an overall pressure increase with time. The collision with a returning shock coming from the assembly phase enhances further the ignitor shock pressure. The analytical theory allows to describe the shock pressure and strength evolution in a typical shock ignition implosion. It is demonstrated that, in the case of the HiPER target design, a generation shock pressure near the ablation zone on the order of 300-400 Mbar is needed. An analysis of experiments on the strong shock generation performed on the OMEGA laser facility is presented. It is shown that a shock pressure close to 300 Mbar near the ablation zone has been reached with an absorbed laser intensity up to 2 * 10 15 W:cm -2 and a laser wavelength of 351 nm. This value is two times higher than the one expected from collisional laser absorption only

  12. Thermal-hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    This chapter describes the physical processes and natural and engineered system conditions that affect thermal-hydrological (T-H) behavior in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain and how these effects are represented in mathematical and numerical models that are used to predict T-H conditions in the near field, altered zone, and engineered barrier system (EBS), and on waste package (WP) surfaces.

  13. Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Sirri

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

  14. A means to estimate thermal and kinetic parameters of coal dust layer from hot surface ignition tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haejun; Rangwala, Ali S; Dembsey, Nicholas A

    2009-08-30

    A method to estimate thermal and kinetic parameters of Pittsburgh seam coal subject to thermal runaway is presented using the standard ASTM E 2021 hot surface ignition test apparatus. Parameters include thermal conductivity (k), activation energy (E), coupled term (QA) of heat of reaction (Q) and pre-exponential factor (A) which are required, but rarely known input values to determine the thermal runaway propensity of a dust material. Four different dust layer thicknesses: 6.4, 12.7, 19.1 and 25.4mm, are tested, and among them, a single steady state dust layer temperature profile of 12.7 mm thick dust layer is used to estimate k, E and QA. k is calculated by equating heat flux from the hot surface layer and heat loss rate on the boundary assuming negligible heat generation in the coal dust layer at a low hot surface temperature. E and QA are calculated by optimizing a numerically estimated steady state dust layer temperature distribution to the experimentally obtained temperature profile of a 12.7 mm thick dust layer. Two unknowns, E and QA, are reduced to one from the correlation of E and QA obtained at criticality of thermal runaway. The estimated k is 0.1 W/mK matching the previously reported value. E ranges from 61.7 to 83.1 kJ/mol, and the corresponding QA ranges from 1.7 x 10(9) to 4.8 x 10(11)J/kg s. The mean values of E (72.4 kJ/mol) and QA (2.8 x 10(10)J/kg s) are used to predict the critical hot surface temperatures for other thicknesses, and good agreement is observed between measured and experimental values. Also, the estimated E and QA ranges match the corresponding ranges calculated from the multiple tests method and values reported in previous research.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Upset and Recovery of the National Ignition Facility's Optics Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bernardin

    1999-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed as the latest in a series of high-power laser facilities to study inertial confinement fusion. In particular, the NIF will generate and amplify 192 laser beams and focus them onto a fusion fuel capsule the size of a BB. The energy deposited by the laser beams will raise the core temperature of the target to 100,OOO,OOO C, which will ignite the fusion fuel and produce a fusion energy output that is several times greater than the energy input. The ability to generate, condition, and focus 192 laser beams onto a target the size of a BB, requires precision optical hardware and instrumentation. One of the most critical pieces of optical hardware within the NIF is the Optics Module (OM), a mechanical apparatus which is responsible for optical focusing and frequency conversion of the laser beam to optimize the energy deposition at the fusion target. The OM contains two potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens. The functionality of the KDP crystals is extremely temperature sensitive. Small temperature changes on the order of 0.1 C can significantly alter the performance of these components. Consequently, to maximize NIF system availability and minimize beam conditioning problems, accurate temperature control of the OM optical components was deemed a necessity. In this study, an experimental OM prototype, containing mock frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens, was used determine the thermal stability provided by a prototype water temperature control system. More importantly, the OM prototype was used to identify and characterize potential thermal upsets and corresponding recovery times of the KDP crystals. The results of this study indicate that the water temperature control system is adequate in maintaining uniform steady-state temperatures within the OM. Vacuum pump-down and venting of the OM generated significant

  16. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  17. A computational study of syngas auto-ignition characteristics at high-pressure and low-temperature conditions with thermal inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-07-30

    A computational study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of auto-ignition in a syngas mixture at high-pressure and low-temperature conditions in the presence of thermal inhomogeneities. Highly resolved one-dimensional numerical simulations incorporating detailed chemistry and transport were performed. The temperature inhomogeneities were represented by a global sinusoidal temperature profile and a local Gaussian temperature spike (hot spot). Reaction front speed and front Damköhler number analyses were employed to characterise the propagating ignition front. In the presence of a global temperature gradient, the ignition behaviour shifted from spontaneous propagation (strong) to deflagrative (weak), as the initial mean temperature of the reactant mixture was lowered. A predictive Zel\\'dovich–Sankaran criterion to determine the transition from strong to weak ignition was validated for different parametric sets. At sufficiently low temperatures, the strong ignition regime was recovered due to faster passive scalar dissipation of the imposed thermal fluctuations relative to the reaction timescale, which was quantified by the mixing Damköhler number. In the presence of local hot spots, only deflagrative fronts were observed. However, the fraction of the reactant mixture consumed by the propagating front was found to increase as the initial mean temperature was lowered, thereby leading to more enhanced compression-heating of the end-gas. Passive scalar mixing was not found to be important for the hot spot cases considered. The parametric study confirmed that the relative magnitude of the Sankaran number translates accurately to the quantitative strength of the deflagration front in the overall ignition advancement. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  18. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  19. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

    2005-01-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  20. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert M.; Celeste, John R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Guyton, Robert L.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lee, Tony L.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Ng, Edmund W.; Reinbachs, Imants P.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Tunnell, Thomas W.; Watts, Phillip W.

    2005-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  1. A Hot Spots Ignition Probability Model for Low-Velocity Impacted Explosive Particles Based on the Particle Size and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fu Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size and distribution play an important role in ignition. The size and distribution of the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX particles were investigated by Laser Particle Size Analyzer Malvern MS2000 before experiment and calculation. The mean size of particles is 161 μm. Minimum and maximum sizes are 80 μm and 263 μm, respectively. The distribution function is like a quadratic function. Based on the distribution of micron scale explosive particles, a microscopic model is established to describe the process of ignition of HMX particles under drop weight. Both temperature of contact zones and ignition probability of powder explosive can be predicted. The calculated results show that the temperature of the contact zones between the particles and the drop weight surface increases faster and higher than that of the contact zones between two neighboring particles. For HMX particles, with all other conditions being kept constant, if the drop height is less than 0.1 m, ignition probability will be close to 0. When the drop heights are 0.2 m and 0.3 m, the ignition probability is 0.27 and 0.64, respectively, whereas when the drop height is more than 0.4 m, ignition probability will be close to 0.82. In comparison with experimental results, the two curves are reasonably close to each other, which indicates our model has a certain degree of rationality.

  2. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2018-04-03

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  3. Powerplant Thermal-Pollution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.

    1982-01-01

    Three models predict nature of thermal plumes from powerplant discharge into water. Free-surface model accomodates major changes in ocean currents. Rigid-model accurately predicts changes in thermal plume caused by other inputs and outputs, such as pumped-water storage and hydroelectric-plant discharges. One-dimensional model predicts approximate stratification in lake with such inputs and outputs over a long period.

  4. Numerical study of heat and mass transfer during ignition of thermal decomposition products of a coal particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical research was executed for macroscopic regularities determination of heat and mass transfer processes under the conditions of phase transformation and chemical reaction at the ignition of vapour coming from fabrics impregnated by typical combustible liquid into oxidant area at the local power supply. Limit conditions of heterogeneous system “fabric – combustible liquid – oxidant” ignition at the heating of single metal particle was established. Dependences of ignition delay time on temperature and rates of local power source were obtained.

  5. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on the HMX-Based Explosive LX-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Dehaven, Martin R.; Strickland, Shawn L.; Tarver, Craig M.; Springer, H. Keo; Cowan, Matt R.

    2017-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX-based explosive LX-14 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample disks pressed to different densities ( 1.57 or 1.83 g/cm3 that corresponds to 85 or 99% of theoretical maximum density (TMD), respectively). The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities will be compared to prior work published on other HMX-based formulations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  6. Numerical Parameter Optimization of the Ignition and Growth Model for HMX Based Plastic Bonded Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, James; Tarver, Craig; Springer, H. Keo; White, Bradley; Fried, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for optimizing parameters of the Ignition and Growth reactive flow (I&G) model for high explosives. The I&G model can yield accurate predictions of experimental observations. However, calibrating the model is a time-consuming task especially with multiple experiments. In this study, we couple the differential evolution global optimization algorithm to simulations of shock initiation experiments in the multi-physics code ALE3D. We develop parameter sets for HMX based explosives LX-07 and LX-10. The optimization finds the I&G model parameters that globally minimize the difference between calculated and experimental shock time of arrival at embedded pressure gauges. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNS, LLC LLNL-ABS- 724898.

  7. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-12-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large, and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (eta/sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large (≤2), and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (/eta//sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters (aB 0 2 /q* /approximately/ IB 0 , etc.) are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating LX-04 (85% HMX / 15% VITON) Using New and Previously Obtained Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Craig

    2017-06-01

    An Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for detonating LX-04 (85% HMX / 15% Viton) was developed using new and previously obtained experimental data on: cylinder test expansion; wave curvature; failure diameter; and laser interferometric copper and tantalum foil free surface velocities and LiF interface particle velocity histories. A reaction product JWL EOS generated by the CHEETAH code compared favorably with the existing, well normalized LX-04 product JWL when both were used with the Ignition and Growth model. Good agreement with all existing experimental data was obtained. Keywords: LX-04, HMX, detonation, Ignition and Growth PACS:82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Relative importance of fuel management, ignition management and weather for area burned: Evidence from five landscape-fire-succession models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan; Robert E. Keane; Ross A. Bradstock; Ian D. Davies; James M. Lenihan; Chao Li; Kimberley A. Logan; Russell A. Parsons

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEMLAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets...

  11. Chemical kinetics modeling of the influence of molecular structure on shock tube ignition delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    The current capabilities of kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon oxidation in shock waves are discussed. The influence of molecular size and structure on ignition delay times are stressed. The n-paraffin fuels from CH 4 to n-C 5 H 12 are examined under shock tube conditions, as well as the branched chain fuel isobutane, and the computed results are compared with available experimental data. The modeling results show that it is important in the reaction mechanism to distinguish between abstraction of primary, secondary and tertiary H atom sites from the fuel molecule. This is due to the fact that both the rates and the product distributions of the subsequent alkyl radical decomposition reactions depend on which H atoms were abstracted. Applications of the reaction mechanisms to shock tube problems and to other practical problems such as engine knock are discussed

  12. Lumped Thermal Household Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Andersen, Palle; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    a lumped model approach as an alternative to the individual models. In the lumped model, the portfolio is seen as baseline consumption superimposed with an ideal storage of limited power and energy capacity. The benefit of such a lumped model is that the computational effort of flexibility optimization...

  13. Characterization of ignition transient processes in kerosene-fueled model scramjet engine by dual-pulse laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xipeng; Liu, Weidong; Pan, Yu; Yang, Leichao; An, Bin; Zhu, Jiajian

    2018-03-01

    Dual-pulse laser-induced plasma ignition of kerosene in cavity at model scramjet engine is studied. The simulated flight condition is Ma 6 at 30 km, and the isolator entrance has a Mach number of 2.92, a total pressure of 2.6 MPa and a stagnation temperature of 1650 K. Two independent laser pulses at 532 nm with a pulse width of 10 ns, a diameter of 12 mm and a maximum energy of 300 mJ are focused into cavity for ignition. The flame structure and propagation during transient ignition processes are captured by simultaneous CH* and OH* chemiluminescence imaging. The entire ignition process of kerosene can be divided into five stages, which are referred as turbulent dissipation stage, quasi-stable state, combustion enhancement stage, reverting stage and combustion stabilization stage. A local closed loop of propagations of the burning mixtures from the shear layer into the recirculation zone of cavity is revealed, which the large-scale eddy in the shear layer plays a key role. The enhancement of mass exchange between shear layer and the recirculation zone of cavity could promote the flame propagation process and enhance the ignition capability as well as extend the ignition limits. A cavity shear-layer stabilized combustion of kerosene is established in the supersonic flow roughly 3.3 ms after the laser pulse. Chemical reactions mainly occur in the shear layer and the near-wall zone downstream of the cavity. The distribution of OH* is thicker than CH* at stable combustion condition.

  14. Numerical Model to Quantify the Influence of the Cellulosic Substrate on the Ignition Propensity Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guindos Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model based on the finite element method has been constructed to simulate the ignition propensity (IP tests. The objective of this mathematical model was to quantify the influence of different characteristics of the cellulosic substrate on the results of the IP-tests. The creation and validation of the model included the following steps: (I formulation of the model based on experimental thermodynamic characteristics of the cellulosic substrate; (ii calibration of the model according to cone calorimeter tests; (iii validation of the model through mass loss and temperature profiling during IP-testing. Once the model was validated, the influence of each isolated parameter of the cellulosic substrate was quantified via a parametric study. The results revealed that the substrate heat capacity, the cigarette temperature and the pyrolysis activation energy are the most influencing parameters on the thermodynamic response of the substrates, while other parameters like heat of the pyrolysis reaction, density and roughness of the substrate showed little influence. Also the results indicated that the thermodynamic mechanisms involved in the pyrolysis and combustion of the cellulosic substrate are complex and show low repeatability which might impair the reliability of the IP-tests.

  15. An Investigation Into Bayesian Networks for Modeling National Ignition Facility Capsule Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J

    2008-08-18

    Bayesian networks (BN) are an excellent tool for modeling uncertainties in systems with several interdependent variables. A BN is a directed acyclic graph, and consists of a structure, or the set of directional links between variables that depend on other variables, and conditional probabilities (CP) for each variable. In this project, we apply BN's to understand uncertainties in NIF ignition experiments. One can represent various physical properties of National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosions as variables in a BN. A dataset containing simulations of NIF capsule implosions was provided. The dataset was generated from a radiation hydrodynamics code, and it contained 120 simulations of 16 variables. Relevant knowledge about the physics of NIF capsule implosions and greedy search algorithms were used to search for hypothetical structures for a BN. Our preliminary results found 6 links between variables in the dataset. However, we thought there should have been more links between the dataset variables based on the physics of NIF capsule implosions. Important reasons for the paucity of links are the relatively small size of the dataset, and the sampling of the values for dataset variables. Another factor that might have caused the paucity of links is the fact that in the dataset, 20% of the simulations represented successful fusion, and 80% didn't, (simulations of unsuccessful fusion are useful for measuring certain diagnostics) which skewed the distributions of several variables, and possibly reduced the number of links. Nevertheless, by illustrating the interdependencies and conditional probabilities of several parameters and diagnostics, an accurate and complete BN built from an appropriate simulation set would provide uncertainty quantification for NIF capsule implosions.

  16. Ignition probabilities for Compact Ignition Tokamak designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Goldston, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    A global power balance code employing Monte Carlo techniques had been developed to study the ''probability of ignition'' and has been applied to several different configurations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Probability distributions for the critical physics parameters in the code were estimated using existing experimental data. This included a statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in extrapolating the energy confinement time. A substantial probability of ignition is predicted for CIT if peaked density profiles can be achieved or if one of the two higher plasma current configurations is employed. In other cases, values of the energy multiplication factor Q of order 10 are generally obtained. The Ignitor-U and ARIES designs are also examined briefly. Comparisons of our empirically based confinement assumptions with two theory-based transport models yield conflicting results. 41 refs., 11 figs

  17. Ignition tuning for the National Ignition Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landen O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion [1] tuning campaigns [2] is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics [3] used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models, and by checking for and resolving unexpected shot-to-shot variability in performance [4]. This has been started successfully using a variety of surrogate capsules that set key laser, hohlraum and capsule parameters to maximize ignition capsule implosion velocity, while minimizing fuel adiabat, core shape asymmetry and ablator-fuel mix.

  18. Development and Validation of 3D-CFD Injection and Combustion Models for Dual Fuel Combustion in Diesel Ignited Large Gas Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Eder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on improving the 3D-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modeling of diesel ignited gas engines, with an emphasis on injection and combustion modeling. The challenges of modeling are stated and possible solutions are provided. A specific approach for modeling injection is proposed that improves the modeling of the ballistic region of the needle lift. Experimental results from an inert spray chamber are used for model validation. Two-stage ignition methods are described along with improvements in ignition delay modeling of the diesel ignited gas engine. The improved models are used in the Extended Coherent Flame Model with the 3 Zones approach (ECFM-3Z. The predictive capability of the models is investigated using data from single cylinder engine (SCE tests conducted at the Large Engines Competence Center (LEC. The results are discussed and further steps for development are identified.

  19. Non-thermal AGN models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (α ≅ .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig

  20. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Anders

    emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. The complex combustion process of a compression ignition engine may be divided...... it is well suited for optical line of sight diagnostics in both pre and post combustion regions. The work also includes some preliminary studies of radiant emissions from helium stabilized ethylene/air and methane/oxygen flames. It is demonstrated that nano particles below the sooting threshold actually...... of ethylene/air flames well known from the experimental work, was used for the model validation. Two cases were helium stabilized flames with φ = 1 and 2.14. The third case was an unstable flame with φ = 2.14. The unstable case was used to test whether a transient model would be able to predict the frequency...

  1. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  2. Fluctuations in the Energetic Properties of a Spark-Ignition Engine Model with Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Angulo-Brown

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the energetic functions obtained in a simulated spark-ignited engine that incorporates cyclic variability through a quasi-dimensional combustion model. Our analyses are focused on the effects of the fuel-air equivalence ratio of the mixture simultaneously over the cycle-to-cycle fluctuations of heat release (QR and the performance outputs, such as the power (P and the efficiency (QR. We explore the fluctuant behavior for QR, P and n related to random variations of the basic physical parameters in an entrainment or eddy-burning combustion model. P and n show triangle shaped first return maps, while QR exhibits a structured map, especially at intermediated fuel-air ratios. Structure disappears to a considerable extent in the case of heat release and close-to-stoichiometry fuel-air ratios. By analyzing the fractal dimension to explore the presence of correlations at different scales, we find that whereas QR displays short-range correlations for intermediate values of the fuel ratio, both P and n are characterized by a single scaling exponent, denoting irregular fluctuations. A novel noisy loop-shaped P vs. n plot for a large number of engine cycles is obtained. This plot, which evidences different levels of irreversibilities as the fuel ratio changes, becomes the observed loop P vs. n curve when fluctuations are disregarded, and thus, only the mean values for efficiency and power are considered.

  3. Ignition and growth reactive flow modeling of recent HMX/TATB detonation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-01-01

    Two experimental studies in which faster HMX detonation waves produced oblique detonation waves in adjoining slower detonating TATB charges were modeled using the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow detonation model parameters for PBX 9501 (95% HMX / 2.5% Estane / 2.5% BDNPA/F) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB / 5% Kel-F binder). Matignon et al. used X1 explosive (96% HMX / 4% binder) to drive an oblique detonation wave into an attached charge of T2 explosive (97% TATB / 3% binder). The flow angles were measured in the T2 shock initiation region and in steady T2 detonation. Anderson et al. used detonating PBX 9501 slabs of various thicknesses ranging from 0.56 mm to 2.5 mm to create oblique detonation waves in 8 mm thick slabs of PBX 9502. Several diagnostics were employed to: photograph the waves; measure detonation velocities and flow angles; and determine the output of the PBX 9501 slabs, the PBX 9502 slabs, and the "initiation regions" using LiF windows and PDV probes.

  4. Ignition and growth modeling of detonation reaction zone experiments on single crystals of PETN and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bradley W.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that detonating single crystals of solid explosives have much larger failure diameters than those of heterogeneous charges of the same explosive pressed or cast to 98 - 99% theoretical maximum density (TMD). In 1957, Holland et al. demonstrated that PETN single crystals have failure diameters of about 8 mm, whereas heterogeneous PETN charges have failure diameters of less than 0.5 mm. Recently, Fedorov et al. quantitatively determined nanosecond time resolved detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX by measuring the interface particle velocity histories of the detonating crystals and LiF windows using a PDV system. The measured reaction zone time durations for PETN and HMX single crystal detonations were approximately 100 and 260 nanoseconds, respectively. These experiments provided the necessary data to develop Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model parameters for the single crystal detonation reaction zones. Using these parameters, the calculated unconfined failure diameter of a PETN single crystal was 7.5 +/- 0.5 mm, close to the 8 mm experimental value. The calculated failure diameter of an unconfined HMX single crystal was 15 +/- 1 mm. The unconfined failure diameter of an HMX single crystal has not yet been determined precisely, but Fedorov et al. detonated 14 mm diameter crystals confined by detonating a HMX-based plastic bonded explosive (PBX) without initially overdriving the HMX crystals.

  5. A Yield Strength Model and Thoughts on an Ignition Criterion for a Reactive PTFE-Aluminum Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    original cylinder. The conical surface shown in Figure 2 displays evidence of ductile flow, and its blackened regions suggest ignition. On the basis of...this specimen, we developed a shear localization hypothesis and adopted a metals -like approach to modeling mechanical properties of PTFE-Al, i.e., an...to the phenomenon of shear localization such as occurs in certain metals . The material is locally unable to equilibrate its load. Additional plastic

  6. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinpeng; Huang, Congliang; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-02-01

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  7. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinpeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Huang, Congliang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; School of Electrical and Power Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China; Liu, Qingkun [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Buildings and Thermal Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

    2018-02-28

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  8. Self-Ignition Behavior of Propane-Air Mixtures with Hydrogen Addition in Catalytic Micro-Channels Coupling Reduced-Order Kinetic Model and Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen-assisted self-ignition of propane-air mixtures under ambient condition were carried out in platinum-coated micro-channels, using a two-dimensional model with reduced-order reaction schemes, heat conduction in the solid walls, convection and surface radiation heat transfer. The self-ignition behavior of the hydrogen-propane mixed fuel is compared for the case of heated feed is analyzed. Simulations indicate that hydrogen can successfully cause self-ignition of propane-air mixtures in ...

  9. Hypergolic ignition of a catalytically promoted fuel with rocket grade hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourpoint, Timothee Louis

    The ignition delay for the incipient sustained reaction of hypergolic propellants is of crucial importance. Too short of a delay can lead to injector damage while too long of a delay can lead to very large pressure spikes and engine failure. The coupling of the physical and chemical processes controlling the ignition delays of hypergolic propellants renders the direct analysis of the transient ignition process very difficult. Well defined test conditions must, therefore, be specified to properly study the factors influencing the ignition delays of hypergolic propellants. Theories regarding the thermal ignition of conventional hypergolic propellants, such as nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine-based fuels, have been established. The goals of the present research are to investigate the applicability of thermal ignition theories to the ignition processes occurring between a catalytically promoted fuel and hydrogen peroxide and to develop a model of the incipient reactions. The hypergolic fuel considered in the study is a methanol-based mixture containing a soluble metal catalyst. First, physical and chemical factors influencing an ignition event between liquid hypergolic propellants are discussed. Whenever possible, emphasis is placed on data obtained with fuels that are hypergolic with rocket grade hydrogen peroxide. Following this review, the applicability of traditional vaporization and ignition theories to the ignition of a catalytically promoted fuel with rocket grade hydrogen peroxide are discussed. An experimental program aimed at determining the effects of initial ambient pressure, initial ambient gas properties, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on ignition delay is presented. Results show that ignition delay can be reduced by increasing the hydrogen peroxide concentration or the initial ambient pressure. The combined effects of large thermal conductivity and large mass diffusion coefficient of helium rich environments are postulated to be responsible for the

  10. Thermal modeling and optimization of a thermally matched energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughaleb, J.; Arnaud, A.; Cottinet, P. J.; Monfray, S.; Gelenne, P.; Kermel, P.; Quenard, S.; Boeuf, F.; Guyomar, D.; Skotnicki, T.

    2015-08-01

    The interest in energy harvesting devices has grown with the development of wireless sensors requiring small amounts of energy to function. The present article addresses the thermal investigation of a coupled piezoelectric and bimetal-based heat engine. The thermal energy harvester in question converts low-grade heat flows into electrical charges by achieving a two-step conversion mechanism for which the key point is the ability to maintain a significant thermal gradient without any heat sink. Many studies have previously focused on the electrical properties of this innovative device for energy harvesting but until now, no thermal modeling has been able to describe the device specificities or improve its thermal performances. The research reported in this paper focuses on the modeling of the harvester using an equivalent electrical circuit approach. It is shown that the knowledge of the thermal properties inside the device and a good comprehension of its heat exchange with the surrounding play a key role in the optimization procedure. To validate the thermal modeling, finite element analyses as well as experimental measurements on a hot plate were carried out and the techniques were compared. The proposed model provided a practical guideline for improving the generator design to obtain a thermally matched energy harvester that can function over a wide range of hot source temperatures for the same bimetal. A direct application of this study has been implemented on scaled structures to maintain an important temperature difference between the cold surface and the hot reservoir. Using the equations of the thermal model, predictions of the thermal properties were evaluated depending on the scaling factor and solutions for future thermal improvements are presented.

  11. W-320 Project thermal modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18

    This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

  12. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D S; Weber, C R; Eder, D C; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Kritcher, A L; Marinak, M M; Milovich, J L; Patel, P K; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Sepke, S M

    2016-01-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF. (paper)

  13. Ignition and flame-growth modeling on realistic building and landscape objects in changing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2010-01-01

    Effective mitigation of external fires on structures can be achieved flexibly, economically, and aesthetically by (1) preventing large-area ignition on structures by avoiding close proximity of burning vegetation; and (2) stopping flame travel from firebrands landing on combustible building objects. Using bench-scale and mid-scale fire tests to obtain flammability...

  14. Multi-zone modelling of partially premixed low-temperature combustion in pilot-ignited natural-gas engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S. R.; inivasan, K. K.

    2010-09-14

    Detailed results from a multi-zone phenomenological simulation of partially premixed advanced-injection low-pilot-ignited natural-gas low-temperature combustion are presented with a focus on early injection timings (the beginning of (pilot) injection (BOI)) and very small diesel quantities (2-3 per cent of total fuel energy). Combining several aspects of diesel and spark ignition engine combustion models, the closed-cycle simulation accounted for diesel autoignition, diesel spray combustion, and natural-gas combustion by premixed turbulent flame propagation. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone, several pilot fuel zones (or 'packets') that modelled diesel evaporation and ignition, a flame zone for natural-gas combustion, and a burned zone. The simulation predicted the onset of ignition, cylinder pressures, and heat release rate profiles satisfactorily over a wide range of BOIs (20-60° before top dead centre (before TDC)) but especially well at early BOIs. Strong coupling was observed between pilot spray combustion in the packets and premixed turbulent combustion in the flame zone and, therefore, the number of ignition centres (packets) profoundly affected flame combustion. The highest local peak temperatures (greater than 2000 K) were observed in the packets, while the flame zone was much cooler (about 1650 K), indicating that pilot diesel spray combustion is probably the dominant source of engine-out emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx). Further, the 60° before TDC BOI yielded the lowest average peak packet temperatures (about 1720 K) compared with the 20° before TDC BOI (about 2480 K) and 40° before TDC BOI (about 2700 K). These trends support experimental NOx trends, which showed the lowest NOx emissions for the 60°, 20°, and 40° before TDC BOIs in that order. Parametric studies showed that increasing the intake charge temperature, pilot quantity, and natural-gas equivalence ratio all led to

  15. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  16. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah

    2016-03-21

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  17. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three......-dimensional thermal models based on Finite Element Method (FEM) need massive computations, which make the long-term thermal dynamics difficult to calculate. In this paper, a new lumped three-dimensional thermal model is proposed, which can be easily characterized from FEM simulations and can acquire the critical...

  18. One-dimensional Numerical Model of Transient Discharges in Air of a Spatial Plasma Ignition Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saceleanu, Florin N.

    This thesis examines the modes of discharge of a plasma ignition device. Oscilloscope data of the discharge voltage and current are analyzed for various pressures in air at ambient temperature. It is determined that the discharge operates in 2 modes: a glow discharge and a postulated streamer discharge. Subsequently, a 1-dimensional fluid simulation of plasma using the finite volume method (FVM) is developed to gain insight into the particle kinetics. Transient results of the simulation agree with theories of electric discharges; however, quasi-steady state results were not reached due to high diffusion time of ions in air. Next, an ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived to understand the discharge transition. Simulated results were used to estimate the voltage waveform, which describes the ODE's forcing function; additional simulated results were used to estimate the discharge current and the ODE's non-linearity. It is found that the ODE's non-linearity increases exponentially for capacitive discharges. It is postulated that the non-linearity defines the mode transition observed experimentally. The research is motivated by Spatial Plasma Discharge Ignition (SPDI), an innovative ignition system postulated to increase combustion efficiency in automobile engines for up to 9%. The research thus far can only hypothesize SPDI's benefits on combustion, based on the literature review and the modes of discharge.

  19. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  20. Overview of thermal conductivity models of anisotropic thermal insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurikhin, A. V.; Kostanovsky, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, the most of existing materials and substances under elaboration are anisotropic. It makes certain difficulties in the study of heat transfer process. Thermal conductivity of the materials can be characterized by tensor of the second order. Also, the parallelism between the temperature gradient vector and the density of heat flow vector is violated in anisotropic thermal insulation materials (TIM). One of the most famous TIM is a family of integrated thermal insulation refractory material («ITIRM»). The main component ensuring its properties is the «inflated» vermiculite. Natural mineral vermiculite is ground into powder state, fired by gas burner for dehydration, and its precipitate is then compressed. The key feature of thus treated batch of vermiculite is a package structure. The properties of the material lead to a slow heating of manufactured products due to low absorption and high radiation reflection. The maximum of reflection function is referred to infrared spectral region. A review of current models of heat propagation in anisotropic thermal insulation materials is carried out, as well as analysis of their thermal and optical properties. A theoretical model, which allows to determine the heat conductivity «ITIRM», can be useful in the study of thermal characteristics such as specific heat capacity, temperature conductivity, and others. Materials as «ITIRM» can be used in the metallurgy industry, thermal energy and nuclear power-engineering.

  1. Validation of a zero-dimensional and 2-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to re-duce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of liquid fuel injected directly into the cylinder acts as the ignition inhibitor of the gaseous fuel. Achieving the optimum combustion process in such an engine requires the application of advanced control algorithms which require mathematical modelling support. In response to the growing demand for new simulation tools, a 0-D model of a dual-fuel engine was proposed and validated. The validation was performed in a broad range of engine operating points, including various speeds and load condition, as well as different natural gas/diesel blend ratios. It was demonstrated that the average model calculation error within the entire cycle did not exceed 6.2%, and was comparable to the measurement results cycle to cycle variations. The maximum model calculation error in a single point of a cycle was 15% for one of the complex (multipoint injection cases. In other cases, it did not exceed 11%.

  2. Combined effects of cooled EGR and a higher geometric compression ratio on thermal efficiency improvement of a downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jianye; Xu, Min; Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments for the effects of cooled EGR and two compression ratios (CR) on fuel efficiency were conducted. • The mechanism for the observed fuel efficiency behaviors by cooled EGR and high CR was clarified. • Cooled EGR offers more fuel efficiency improvement than elevating CR from 9.3 to 10.9. • Combining 18–25% cooled EGR with 10.9 CR lead to 2.1–3.5% brake thermal efficiency improvements. - Abstract: The downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. However, the boosted engine is typically designed at a lower geometric compression ratio (CR) due to the increased knock tendency in comparison to naturally aspirated engines, limiting the potential of improving fuel economy. On the other hand, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has drawn attention due to the potential to suppress knock and improve fuel economy. Combing the effects of boosting, increased CR and cooled EGR to further improve fuel economy within acceptable knock tolerance has been investigated using a 2.0 L downsized boosted SIDI engine over a wide range of engine operating conditions from 1000 rpm to 3000 rpm at low to high loads. To clarify the mechanism of this complicated effects, the first law of thermodynamics analysis was conducted with the inputs from GT-Power® engine simulation. Experiment results indicate that cooled EGR provides more brake thermal efficiency improvement than increasing geometric CR from 9.3 to 10.9. The benefit of brake thermal efficiency from the higher CR is limited to low load conditions. The attributes for improving brake thermal efficiency by cooled EGR include reduced heat transfer loss, reduced pumping work and increased ratio of specific heats for all the engine operating conditions, as well as higher degree of constant volume heat release only for the knock-limited high load conditions. The combined effects of 18–25% cooled EGR

  3. Ignition inhibitors for cellulosic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    By exposing samples to various irradiance levels from a calibrated thermal radiation source, the ignition responses of blackened alpha-cellulose and cotton cloth with and without fire-retardant additives were compared. Samples treated with retardant compounds which showed the most promise were then isothermally pyrolyzed in air for comparisons between the pyrolysis rates. Alpha-cellulose samples containing a mixture of boric acid, borax, and ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate could not be ignited by irradiances up to 4.0 cal cm -2 s-1 (16.7 W/cm 2 ). At higher irradiances the specimens ignited, but flaming lasted only until the flammable gases were depleted. Cotton cloth containing a polymeric retardant with the designation THPC + MM was found to be ignition-resistant to all irradiances below 7.0 cal cm -2 s -1 (29.3 W/cm 2 ). Comparison of the pyrolysis rates of the retardant-treated alpha-cellulose and the retardant-treated cotton showed that the retardant mechanism is qualitatively the same. Similar ignition-response measurements were also made with specimens exposed to ionizing radiation. It was observed that gamma radiation results in ignition retardance of cellulose, while irradiation by neutrons does not

  4. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the

  5. An experimental and modeling study of propene oxidation. Part 2: Ignition delay time and flame speed measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Sinéad M.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data obtained in this study (Part II) complement the speciation data presented in Part I, but also offer a basis for extensive facility cross-comparisons for both experimental ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) observables. To improve our understanding of the ignition characteristics of propene, a series of IDT experiments were performed in six different shock tubes and two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions not previously studied. This work is the first of its kind to directly compare ignition in several different shock tubes over a wide range of conditions. For common nominal reaction conditions among these facilities, cross-comparison of shock tube IDTs suggests 20-30% reproducibility (2σ) for the IDT observable. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the data available for validation of propene oxidation models to higher pressures (2-40. atm) and lower temperatures (750-1750. K).Propene flames were studied at pressures from 1 to 20. atm and unburned gas temperatures of 295-398. K for a range of equivalence ratios and dilutions in different facilities. The present propene-air LFS results at 1. atm were also compared to LFS measurements from the literature. With respect to initial reaction conditions, the present experimental LFS cross-comparison is not as comprehensive as the IDT comparison; however, it still suggests reproducibility limits for the LFS observable. For the LFS results, there was agreement between certain data sets and for certain equivalence ratios (mostly in the lean region), but the remaining discrepancies highlight the need to reduce uncertainties in laminar flame speed experiments amongst different groups and different methods. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the burning rate characteristics of propene at elevated pressures (>5. atm).IDT and LFS measurements are compared to predictions of the chemical kinetic mechanism presented in Part I and good

  6. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics advantages, including Ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, lower ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits) and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic field, larger aspect ratios and smaller plasma cross-sections, translate to significant cost reductions for both ignition and reactor applications. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. Devices that are under construction should go a long way toward resolving this scaling uncertainty. The 4 MA ZTH is expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data by three orders of magnitude above the results of ZT-40M, and, if the present scaling holds, ZTH is expected to achieve a D-T equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q = 1. A base case RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. (author). 19 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Homogenized thermal conduction model for particulate foods

    OpenAIRE

    Chinesta , Francisco; Torres , Rafael; Ramón , Antonio; Rodrigo , Mari Carmen; Rodrigo , Miguel

    2002-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition of an equivalent thermal conductivity for particulate foods. An homogenized thermal model is used to asses the effect of particulate spatial distribution and differences in thermal conductivities. We prove that the spatial average of the conductivity can be used in an homogenized heat transfer model if the conductivity differences among the food components are not very large, usually the highest conductivity ratio between the foods ...

  8. Asteroid thermal modeling: recent developments and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of thermal models are used for the derivation of asteroid physical parameters from thermal-infrared observations Simple models based on spherical geometry are often adequate for obtaining sizes and albedos when very little information about an object is available However sophisticated

  9. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Extinction and Ignition of Methyl Decanoate in Laminar Nonpremixed Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadri, K; Lu, T; Herbinet, O; Humer, S; Niemann, U; Pitz, W J; Law, C K

    2008-01-09

    Methyl decanoate is a large methyl ester that can be used as a surrogate for biodiesel. In this experimental and computational study, the combustion of methyl decanoate is investigated in nonpremixed, nonuniform flows. Experiments are performed employing the counterflow configuration with a fuel stream made up of vaporized methyl decanoate and nitrogen, and an oxidizer stream of air. The mass fraction of fuel in the fuel stream is measured as a function of the strain rate at extinction, and critical conditions of ignition are measured in terms of the temperature of the oxidizer stream as a function of the strain rate. It is not possible to use a fully detailed mechanism for methyl decanoate to simulate the counterflow flames because the number of species and reactions is too large to employ with current flame codes and computer resources. Therefore a skeletal mechanism was deduced from a detailed mechanism of 8555 elementary reactions and 3036 species using 'directed relation graph' method. This skeletal mechanism has only 713 elementary reactions and 125 species. Critical conditions of ignition were calculated using this skeletal mechanism and are found to agree well with experimental data. The predicted strain rate at extinction is found to be lower than the measurements. In general, the methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  10. The Effect of Particle Properties on Hot Particle Spot Fire Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Casey David

    The ignition of natural combustible material by hot metal particles is an important fire ignition pathway by which wildland and wildland-urban-interface spot fires are started. There are numerous cases reported of wild fires started by clashing power-lines or from sparks generated by machines or engines. Similarly there are many cases reported of fires caused by grinding, welding and cutting sparks. Up to this point, research on hot particle spot fire ignition has largely focused on particle generation and transport. A small number of studies have examined what occurs after a hot particle contacts a natural fuel bed, but until recently the process remained poorly understood. This work describes an investigation of the effect of particle size, temperature and thermal properties on the ability of hot particles to cause flaming ignition of cellulosic fuel beds. Both experimental and theoretical approaches are used, with a focus on understanding the physics underlying the ignition process. For the experimental study, spheres of stainless steel, aluminum, brass and copper are heated in a tube furnace and dropped onto a powdered cellulose fuel bed; the occurrence of flaming ignition or lack thereof is visually observed and recorded. This procedure is repeated a large number of times for each metal type, varying particle diameter from 2 to 11 mm and particle temperature between 575 and 1100°C. The results of these experiments are statistically analyzed to find approximate ignition boundaries and identify boundary trends with respect to the particle parameters of interest. Schlieren images recorded during the ignition experiments are also used to more accurately describe the ignition process. Based on these images, a simple theoretical model of hot particle spot fire ignition is developed and used to explore the experimental trends further. The model under-predicts the minimum ignition temperatures required for small spheres, but agrees qualitatively with the experimental

  11. Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

  12. Thermal Effects Modeling Developed for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    1998-01-01

    Applying smart materials in aeropropulsion systems may improve the performance of aircraft engines through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. To facilitate the experimental characterization of these smart structures, researchers have been focusing on developing analytical models to account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of these materials. One focus of current research efforts has been directed toward incorporating a comprehensive thermal analysis modeling capability. Typically, temperature affects the behavior of smart materials by three distinct mechanisms: Induction of thermal strains because of coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch 1. Pyroelectric effects on the piezoelectric elements; 2. Temperature-dependent changes in material properties; and 3. Previous analytical models only investigated the first two thermal effects mechanisms. However, since the material properties of piezoelectric materials generally vary greatly with temperature (see the graph), incorporating temperature-dependent material properties will significantly affect the structural deflections, sensory voltages, and stresses. Thus, the current analytical model captures thermal effects arising from all three mechanisms through thermopiezoelectric constitutive equations. These constitutive equations were incorporated into a layerwise laminate theory with the inherent capability to model both the active and sensory response of smart structures in thermal environments. Corresponding finite element equations were formulated and implemented for both the beam and plate elements to provide a comprehensive thermal effects modeling capability.

  13. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model

  14. Numerical Modeling of a Jet Ignition Direct Injection (JI DI LPG Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boretti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents indirectly validated simulations of the operation of a LPG engine fitted with Direct Injection (DI and Jet Ignition (JI. It is demonstrated that the engine may have diesel like efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected.  As the liquid propane quickly evaporates after injection in the main chamber, the main chamber mixture may be much closer to stoichiometry than a diesel for a better specific power at low engine speeds. This design also works at the high engine speeds impossible for the diesel, as combustion within the main chamber is controlled by the turbulent mixing rather than the vaporization and diffusion processes of the injected fuel of the diesel. 

  15. Thermal sensation models: a systematic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelblen, B; Psikuta, A; Bogdan, A; Annaheim, S; Rossi, R M

    2017-05-01

    Thermal sensation models, capable of predicting human's perception of thermal surroundings, are commonly used to assess given indoor conditions. These models differ in many aspects, such as the number and type of input conditions, the range of conditions in which the models can be applied, and the complexity of equations. Moreover, the models are associated with various thermal sensation scales. In this study, a systematic comparison of seven existing thermal sensation models has been performed with regard to exposures including various air temperatures, clothing thermal insulation, and metabolic rate values after a careful investigation of the models' range of applicability. Thermo-physiological data needed as input for some of the models were obtained from a mathematical model for human physiological responses. The comparison showed differences between models' predictions for the analyzed conditions, mostly higher than typical intersubject differences in votes. Therefore, it can be concluded that the choice of model strongly influences the assessment of indoor spaces. The issue of comparing different thermal sensation scales has also been discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Phenomenological Model for Prediction Auto-Ignition and Soot Formation of Turbulent Diffusion Combustion in a High Pressure Common Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghui Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new phenomenological model, the TP (Temperature Phase model, is presented to carry out optimization calculations for turbulent diffusion combustion in a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature is the most important parameter in the TP model, which includes two parts: an auto-ignition and a soot model. In the auto-ignition phase, different reaction mechanisms are built for different zones. For the soot model, different methods are used for different temperatures. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimization. The results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP model, KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed. The results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and CFD (computational fluid dynamics and can be a useful tool to study turbulent diffusion combustion.

  17. Pressure And Thermal Modeling Of Rocket Launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.; Farmer, Richard C.; Freeman, Jon A.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents mathematical model for use in designing rocket-launching stand. Predicts pressure and thermal environment, as well as thermal responses of structures to impinging rocket-exhaust plumes. Enables relatively inexperienced analyst to determine time-varying distributions and absolute levels of pressure and heat loads on structures.

  18. A comparative experimental study on engine operating on premixed charge compression ignition and compression ignition mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhiogade Girish E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New combustion concepts have been recently developed with the purpose to tackle the problem of high emissions level of traditional direct injection Diesel engines. A good example is the premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A strategy in which early injection is used causing a burning process in which the fuel burns in the premixed condition. In compression ignition engines, soot (particulate matter and NOx emissions are an extremely unsolved issue. Premixed charge compression ignition is one of the most promising solutions that combine the advantages of both spark ignition and compression ignition combustion modes. It gives thermal efficiency close to the compression ignition engines and resolves the associated issues of high NOx and particulate matter, simultaneously. Premixing of air and fuel preparation is the challenging part to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. In the present experimental study a diesel vaporizer is used to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A vaporized diesel fuel was mixed with the air to form premixed charge and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke. Low diesel volatility remains the main obstacle in preparing premixed air-fuel mixture. Exhaust gas re-circulation can be used to control the rate of heat release. The objective of this study is to reduce exhaust emission levels with maintaining thermal efficiency close to compression ignition engine.

  19. Laser performance operations model (LPOM): a computational system that automates the setup and performance analysis of the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M; House, R; Williams, W; Haynam, C; White, R; Orth, C; Sacks, R [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)], E-mail: shaw7@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 MJ, 500-TW, 351-nm laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for many target diagnostics. NIF will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. A computational system, the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) has been developed and deployed that automates the laser setup process, and accurately predict laser energetics. LPOM determines the settings of the injection laser system required to achieve the desired main laser output, provides equipment protection, determines the diagnostic setup, and supplies post shot data analysis and reporting.

  20. Advanced Spacecraft Thermal Modeling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft developers who spend millions to billions of dollars per unit and require 3 to 7 years to deploy, the LoadPath reduced-order (RO) modeling thermal...

  1. The NPS Virtual Thermal Image Processing Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenter, Yucel

    2001-01-01

    ...). The MRTD is a standard performance measure for forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imaging systems. It takes into account thermal imaging system modeling concerns, such as modulation transfer functions...

  2. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  3. Progress Towards Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John

    2012-10-01

    Since completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project in March 2009, a wide variety of diagnostics, facility infrastructure, and experimental platforms have been commissioned in pursuit of generating the conditions necessary to reach thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory via the inertial confinement approach. NIF's capabilities and infrastructure include over 50 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostics systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic DT layered capsules. There are two main approaches to ICF: direct drive in which laser light impinges directly on a capsule containing a solid layer of DT fuel, and indirect drive in which the laser light is first converted to thermal X-rays. To date NIF has been conducting experiments using the indirect drive approach, injecting up to 1.8MJ of ultraviolet light (0.35 micron) into 1 cm scale cylindrical gold or gold-coated uranium, gas-filled hohlraums, to implode 1mm radius plastic capsules containing solid DT fuel layers. In order to achieve ignition conditions the implosion must be precisely controlled. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort with the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory, is making steady progress toward this. Utilizing precision pulse-shaping experiments in early 2012 the NIC achieve fuel rhoR of approximately 1.2 gm/cm^2 with densities of around 600-800 g/cm^3 along with neutron yields within about a factor of 5 necessary to enter a regime in which alpha particle heating will become important. To achieve these results, experimental platforms were developed to carefully control key attributes of the implosion. This talk will review NIF's capabilities and the progress toward ignition, as well as the physics of ignition targets on NIF and on other facilities. Acknowledgement: this work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Photo-sensitized ignition of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures for hypersonic flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavid, Moshe; Poulos, Arthur T.; Stevens, John G.

    1989-01-01

    An approach toward improving supersonic ignition and combustion efficiency was investigated under a feasibility program with NASA-Ames. The idea is to selectively irradiate targetted species in the combustion zone. The ensuing photodissociation reactions produce highly reactive radicals which modify the gas phase kinetics. The overall objective of this research was to demonstrate photosensitized ignition of H2/O2 mixtures, and to gain a preliminary understanding of the ignition mechanism, especially as it pertains to the concept of supersonic combustion. To this end, a series of experiments were performed with a model sensitizer, NO2. At subatmospheric pressures and moderate temperatures (above 100 F), mixtures of H2/O2/NO2 are ignitable by a pulsed eximer laser at 308 nm, 115 to 200 mJ. Ignitability was found to be a function of NO2 pressure, temperature, laser energy per pulse, and laser lens focal length (fluence at focal volume). Mixtures could not be ignited in the absence of the sensitizer. While increasing temperature improved sensitized ignition in the lower temperature range, a retarding effect was observed at the highest temperatures. To more thoroughly understand these thermal effects, the UV-Vis and IR spectra of NO2 and H2/O2/NO2 mixtures were studied over the temperature range 70 to 900 F. Initially, increasing temperature shifts the N2O4 in a reversible reaction to 2 NO2 equilibrium toward NO2, favoring photochemical ignition. However, at still higher temperature, NO2 converts to non-absorbing NO + 1/2 O2, thus preventing photosensitized ignition.

  5. Thermal conductivity model for nanoporous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Zhao, Xinpeng; Regner, Keith; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous thin films have attracted great interest because of their extremely low thermal conductivity and potential applications in thin thermal insulators and thermoelectrics. Although there are some numerical and experimental studies about the thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films, a simplified model is still needed to provide a straightforward prediction. In this paper, by including the phonon scattering lifetimes due to film thickness boundary scattering, nanopore scattering and the frequency-dependent intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering, a fitting-parameter-free model based on the kinetic theory of phonon transport is developed to predict both the in-plane and the cross-plane thermal conductivities of nanoporous thin films. With input parameters such as the lattice constants, thermal conductivity, and the group velocity of acoustic phonons of bulk silicon, our model shows a good agreement with available experimental and numerical results of nanoporous silicon thin films. It illustrates that the size effect of film thickness boundary scattering not only depends on the film thickness but also on the size of nanopores, and a larger nanopore leads to a stronger size effect of the film thickness. Our model also reveals that there are different optimal structures for getting the lowest in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities.

  6. Aqueous Ethanol Ignition and Engine Studies, Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Our objectives were to design a micro-dilution tunnel for monitoring engine emissions, measure ignition temperature and heat release from ethanol-water-air mixtures on platinum, and initiate a computational fluid dynamics model of a catalytic igniter...

  7. Debris Thermal Hydraulics Modeling of QUENCH Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, Arcadi E.; Kobelev, Gennadii V.; Strizhov, Valerii F.; Vasiliev, Alexander D.

    2006-01-01

    Porous debris formation and behavior in QUENCH experiments (QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03) plays a considerable role and its adequate modeling is important for thermal analysis. This work is aimed to the development of a numerical module which is able to model thermal hydraulics and heat transfer phenomena occurring during the high-temperature stage of severe accident with the formation of debris region and molten pool. The original approach for debris evolution is developed from classical principles using a set of parameters including debris porosity; average particle diameter; temperatures and mass fractions of solid, liquid and gas phases; specific interface areas between different phases; effective thermal conductivity of each phase, including radiative heat conductivity; mass and energy fluxes through the interfaces. The debris model is based on the system of continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations, which consider the dynamics of volume-averaged velocities and temperatures of fluid, solid and gaseous phases of porous debris. The different mechanisms of debris formation are considered, including degradation of fuel rods according to temperature criteria, taking into consideration some correlations between rod layers thicknesses; degradation of rod layer structure due to thermal expansion of melted materials inside intact rod cladding; debris formation due to sharp temperature drop of previously melted material due to reflood; and transition to debris of material from elements lying above. The porous debris model was implemented to best estimate numerical code RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST developed for modeling thermal hydraulics and severe accident phenomena in a reactor. The model is used for calculation of QUENCH experiments. The results obtained by the model are compared to experimental data concerning different aspects of thermal behavior: thermal hydraulics of porous debris, radiative heat transfer in a porous medium, the generalized melting and refreezing

  8. Thermal modeling of an AFPMSM: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shazly

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the axial-flux permanent-magnet synchronous motor (AFPMSM and the history of axial-flux machines. Various machine structures, features of the AFPMSM over the conventional machines and disadvantages are clarified. AFPMSMs are being developed for many applications due to their attractive features; these applications are mentioned. It also reviews the studies of thermal modeling of AFPMSM and the various techniques to analyze the thermal behavior of it.

  9. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation. In the present thesis constitutive models are presented for the coating components and the most detrimental failure mechanisms. To simulate the thermomechanical failure response, the numerical mode...

  10. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  11. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Dipole–dipole interaction; relaxation; modeling; TSDC; activation energy; PVC; ABS. Abstract. The study of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) using the dipole–dipole interaction model is described in this work. The dipole–dipole interactionmodel (DDIM) determines the TSDC peak successfully ...

  12. Cycle Engine Modelling Of Spark Ignition Engine Processes during Wide-Open Throttle (WOT) Engine Operation Running By Gasoline Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, M F Abdul; Rahman, M M; Bakar, R A

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional engine model is developed to simulate spark ignition engine processes in a 4-stroke, 4 cylinders gasoline engine. Physically, the baseline engine is inline cylinder engine with 3-valves per cylinder. Currently, the engine's mixture is formed by external mixture formation using piston-type carburettor. The model of the engine is based on one-dimensional equation of the gas exchange process, isentropic compression and expansion, progressive engine combustion process, and accounting for the heat transfer and frictional losses as well as the effect of valves overlapping. The model is tested for 2000, 3000 and 4000 rpm of engine speed and validated using experimental engine data. Results showed that the engine is able to simulate engine's combustion process and produce reasonable prediction. However, by comparing with experimental data, major discrepancy is noticeable especially on the 2000 and 4000 rpm prediction. At low and high engine speed, simulated cylinder pressures tend to under predict the measured data. Whereas the cylinder temperatures always tend to over predict the measured data at all engine speed. The most accurate prediction is obtained at medium engine speed of 3000 rpm. Appropriate wall heat transfer setup is vital for more precise calculation of cylinder pressure and temperature. More heat loss to the wall can lower cylinder temperature. On the hand, more heat converted to the useful work mean an increase in cylinder pressure. Thus, instead of wall heat transfer setup, the Wiebe combustion parameters are needed to be carefully evaluated for better results.

  13. Measurements of temperature on LHC thermal models

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C

    2001-01-01

    Full-scale thermal models for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator cryogenic system have been studied at CERN and at Fermilab. Thermal measurements based on two different models permitted us to evaluate the performance of the LHC dipole cryostats as well as to validate the LHC Interaction Region (IR) inner triplet cooling scheme. The experimental procedures made use of temperature sensors supplied by industry and assembled on specially designed supports. The described thermal models took the advantage of advances in cryogenic thermometry which will be implemented in the future LHC accelerator to meet the strict requirements of the LHC for precision, accuracy, reliability, and ease-of-use. The sensors used in the temperature measurement of the superfluid (He II) systems are the primary focus of this paper, although some aspects of the LHC control system and signal conditioning are also reviewed. (15 refs).

  14. Advances for laser ignition of internal combustion and rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of the PhD thesis presented here is the investigation of theoretical and practical aspects of laser-induced spark ignition and laser thermal ignition. Laser ignition systems are currently undergoing a rapidly development with growing intensity involving more and more research groups who mainly concentrate on the field of car and large combustion engines. This research is primarily driven by the engagement to meet the increasingly strict emission limits and by the intention to use the limited energy reserves more efficiently. For internal combustion engines, laser plasma-induced ignition will allow to combine the goals for legally required reductions of pollutant emissions and higher engine efficiencies. Also for rocket engines laser ignition turns out to be very attractive. A highly reliable ignition system like laser ignition would represent an option for introducing non-toxic propellants in order to replace highly toxic and carcinogenic hydrazine-based propellants commonly used in launch vehicle upper stages and satellites. The most important results on laser ignition and laser plasma generation, accomplished by the author and, in some respects, enriched by cooperation with colleagues are presented in the following. The emphasis of this thesis is placed on the following issues: - Two-color effects on laser plasma generation - Theoretical considerations about the focal volume concerning plasma generation - Plasma transmission experiments - Ignition experiments on laser-induced ignition - Ignition experiments on thermally-induced ignition - Feasibility study on laser ignition of rocket engines The purpose of the two-color laser plasma experiments is to investigate possible constructive interference effects of driving fields that are not monochromatic, but contain (second) harmonic radiation with respect to the goal of lowering the plasma generation threshold. Such effects have been found in a number of related processes, such as laser ablation or high

  15. Development of a self-ignition and combustion model for diesel engines; Modelisation de l`auto-inflammation et de la combustion pour les moteurs diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires Da Cruz, A.

    1997-12-09

    The work concerns self-ignition and combustion modelling in Diesel engines. Special attention is given to turbulence induced effects. Only gas fuel injection is taken into account. Turbulent mixing is identified as one of the main parameters controlling self-ignition in Diesel engines. However, turbulence effects are often neglected by models currently used in engine calculation codes. A new model based on results obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) is proposed. It includes turbulence effects by means of the scalar dissipation rate and presumed pdf of the mixture fraction and a chemical reaction progress variable. The model is validated through several steps. First, its results are compared to DNS in simple mixing and self-ignition cases. Then, its averaged version is integrated into the KIVA2-MB calculation code, where its behavior is tested in a one dimensional version and compared to other formulations. Finally, the model is validated with comparisons to experimental results of methane injection into a high pressure combustion chamber filled with hot air. The combustion chamber allows large optical access and therefore, optical diagnostics can be made. (author) 101 refs.

  16. A Brief Study on the Ignition of the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet from a Double Dielectric Barrier Configured Plasma Pencil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the self sustained propagation of the plasma jet/bullet in air under atmospheric pressure, the ignition of the plasma jet/bullet, the plasma jet/bullet ignition point in the plasma pencil, the formation time and the formation criteria from a dielectric barrier configured plasma pencil were investigated in this study. The results were confirmed by comparing these results with the plasma jet ignition process in the plasma pencil without a dielectric barrier. Electrical, optical, and imaging techniques were used to study the formation of the plasma jet from the ignition of discharge in a double dielectric barrier configured plasma pencil. The investigation results show that the plasma jet forms at the outlet of the plasma pencil as a donut shaped discharge front because of the electric field line along the outlet's surface. It is shown that the required time for the formation of the plasma jet changes with the input voltage of the discharge. The input power calculation for the gap discharge and for the whole system shows that 56% of the average input power is used by the first gap discharge. The estimated electron density inside the gap discharge is in the order of 10 11 cm −3 . If helium is used as a feeding gas, a minimum 1.48×10 −8 C charge is required per pulse in the gap discharge to generate a plasma jet

  17. Ignition parameters and early flame kernel development of laser-ignited combustible gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecek, H.; Wintner, E.; Ruedisser, D.; Iskra, K.; Neger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Laser induced breakdown of focused pulsed laser radiation, the subsequent plasma formation and thermalization offers a possibility of ignition of combustible gas mixtures free from electrode interferences, an arbitrary choice of the location within the medium and exact timing regardless of the degree of turbulence. The development and the decreasing costs of solid state laser technologies approach the pay-off for the higher complexity of such an ignition system due to several features unique to laser ignition. The feasability of laser ignition was demonstrated in an 1.5 MW(?) natural gas engine, and several investigations were performed to determine optimal ignition energies, focus shapes and laser wavelengths. The early flame kernel development was investigated by time resolved planar laser induced fluorescence of the OH-radical which occurs predominantly in the flame front. The flame front propagation showed typical features like toroidal initial flame development, flame front return and highly increased flame speed along the laser focus axis. (author)

  18. Electrical and thermal modeling of railguns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical and thermal modeling of railguns at Los Alamos has been done for two purposes: (1) to obtain detailed information about the behavior of specific railgun components such as the rails, and (2) to predict overall performance of railgun tests. Detailed electrical and thermal modeling has concentrated on calculations of the inductance and surface current distribution of long parallel conductors in the high-frequency limit and on calculations of current and thermal diffusion in rails. Inductance calculations for various rail cross sections and for magnetic flux compression generators (MFCG) have been done. Inductance and current distribution results were compared with experimental measurements. Twodimensional calculations of current and thermal diffusion in rail cross sections have been done; predictions of rail heating and melting as a function of rail size and total current have been made. An overall performance model of a railgun and power supply has been developed and used to design tests at Los Alamos. The lumped-parameter circuit model uses results from the detailed inductance and current diffusion calculations along with other circuit component models to predict rail current and projectile acceleration, velocity, and position as a function of time

  19. Irradiated ignition over solid materials in reduce pressure environment: Fire safety issue in man-made enclosure system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Aoki, A.

    Effects of ambient pressure and oxygen yield on irradiated ignition characteristics over solid combustibles have been studied experimentally Aim of the present study is to elucidate the flammability and chance of fire in depressurized enclosure system and give ideas for the fire safety and fire fighting strategies in such environment Thin cellulosic paper is considered as the solid combustible since cellulose is one of major organic compounds and flammables in the nature Applied atmosphere consists of inert gas either CO2 or N2 and oxygen and various mixture ratios are of concerned Total ambient pressure level is varied from 0 1MPa standard atmospheric pressure to 0 02MPa Ignition is initiated by external thermal flux exposed into the solid surface as a model of unexpected thermal input to initiate the localized fire Thermal degradation of the solid induces combustible gaseous products e g CO H2 or other low class of HCs and the gas mixes with ambient oxygen to form the combustible mixture over the solid Heat transfer from the hot irradiated surface into the mixture accelerates the local exothermic reaction in the gas phase and finally thermal runaway ignition is achieved Ignition event is recorded by high-speed digital video camera to analyze the ignition characteristics Flammable map in partial pressure of oxygen Pox and total ambient pressure Pt plane is made to reveal the fire hazard in depressurized environment Results show that wider flammable range is obtained depending on the imposed ambient

  20. Numerical modeling of the autumnal thermal bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.

    2018-03-01

    The autumnal riverine thermal bar of Kamloops Lake has been simulated using atmospheric data from December 1, 2015, to January 4, 2016. The nonhydrostatic 2.5D mathematical model developed takes into account the diurnal variability of the heat fluxes and wind on the lake surface. The average values for shortwave and longwave radiation and latent and sensible heat fluxes were 19.7 W/m2, - 95.9 W/m2, - 11.8 W/m2, and - 32.0 W/m2 respectively. Analysis of the wind regime data showed prevailing easterly winds and maximum speed of 11 m/s on the 8th and 19th days. Numerical experiments with different boundary conditions at the lake surface were conducted to evaluate effects of variable heat flux and wind stress. The results of modeling demonstrated that the variable heat flux affects the process of thermal bar evolution, especially during the lengthy night cooling. However, the wind had the greatest impact on the behavior of the autumnal thermal bar: The easterly winds contributed to an earlier appearance of the thermal bar, but the strong winds generating the intensive circulations (the velocity of the upper lake flow increased to 6 cm/s) may destroy the thermal bar front.

  1. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-02

    Aug 2, 2007 ... and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) using the thermal sampling technique were used. Furthermore, to compare the model, calculated peak parameters (i.e. the energy (E) and pre-exponential factor (τ0)), two known peak shape me- thods were used: (i) the initial rise method (IR) (Garlick and Gibson ...

  2. Auto-ignition modelling: analysis of the dilution effects by the unburnt gases and of the interactions with turbulence for diesel homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines; Modelisation de l'auto-inflammation: analyse des effets de la dilution par les gaz brules et des interactions avec la turbulence dediee aux moteurs Diesel a charge homogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, G.

    2005-09-15

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is an alternative engine combustion process that offers the potential for substantial reductions in both NO{sub x} and particulate matter still providing high Diesel-like efficiencies. Combustion in HCCI mode takes place essentially by auto-ignition. It is mainly controlled by the chemical kinetics. It is therefore necessary to introduce detailed chemistry effects in combustion CFD codes in order to properly model the HCCI combustion process. The objective of this work is to develop an auto-ignition model including detailed chemical kinetics and its interactions with turbulence. Also, a comprehensive study has been performed to analyze the chemical influence of CO and H{sub 2} residual species on auto-ignition, which can be present in the exhaust gases. A new auto-ignition model, TKI-PDF (Tabulated Kinetics for Ignition - with turbulent mixing interactions through a pdf approach) dedicated to RANS 3D engine combustion CFD calculations is proposed. The TKI-PDF model is formulated in order to accommodate the detailed chemical kinetics of auto-ignition coupled with turbulence/chemistry interactions. The complete model development and its validation against experimental results are presented in two parts. The first part of this work describes the detailed chemistry input to the model. The second part is dedicated to the turbulent mixing description. A method based on a progress variable reaction rate tabulation is used. A look-up table for the progress variable reaction rates has been built through constant volume complex chemistry simulations. Instantaneous local reaction rates inside the CFD computational cell are then calculated by linear interpolation inside the look-up table depending on the local thermodynamic conditions. In order to introduce the turbulent mixing effects on auto-ignition, a presumed pdf approach is used. The model has been validated in different levels. First, the detailed kinetic approach was

  3. Modelling Thermal Diffusivity of Differently Textured Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukiashchenko, K. I.; Arkhangelskaya, T. A.

    2018-02-01

    A series of models has been proposed for estimating thermal diffusivity of soils at different water contents. Models have been trained on 49 soil samples with the texture range from sands to silty clays. The bulk density of the studied soils varied from 0.86 to 1.82 g/cm3; the organic carbon was between 0.05 and 6.49%; the physical clay ranged from 1 to 76%. The thermal diffusivity of undisturbed soil cores measured by the unsteady-state method varied from 0.78×10-7 m2/s for silty clay at the water content of 0.142 cm3/cm3 to 10.09 × 10-7 m2/s for sand at the water content of 0.138 cm3/cm3. Each experimental curve was described by the four-parameter function proposed earlier. Pedotransfer functions were then developed to estimate the parameters of the thermal diffusivity vs. water content function from data on soil texture, bulk density, and organic carbon. Models were tested on 32 samples not included in the training set. The root mean square errors of the best-performing models were 17-38%. The models using texture data performed better than the model using only data on soil bulk density and organic carbon.

  4. Mathematical model of integrated thermal apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Mikulová Polčová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the integrated thermal apparatus was developed. It consists of program modules from which individualfurnace model can be generated. For the model generation elementary balance method was used. Generation of the individual modelincludes model formulation and parameters determination. Model formulation is based on first principles, heuristics and empirical results.Parameters determination is generally based on priory information, but it has to take into account specific conditions. The developed modelwas adapted for real time applications. For quantitative application developed model has to be calibrated. For the calibration theoperational furnace can be used. For model calibration of not existing furnace the priory knowledge and physical model can be used.Presented model was calibrated on experimental furnace. The results were gained by simulations.

  5. 75 FR 61820 - Model Specifications for Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Devices (BAIIDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...? (6) Circumvention testing. The 1992 Model Specifications offer a number of procedures for evaluating... believe that they represent a broad consensus in the industry. F. Tampering and Circumvention Testing There was some criticism that the 1992 Model Specifications for tampering and circumvention testing are...

  6. Thermal modelling of Advanced LIGO test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H; Dovale Álvarez, M; Mow-Lowry, C M; Freise, A; Blair, C; Brooks, A; Kasprzack, M F; Ramette, J; Meyers, P M; Kaufer, S; O’Reilly, B

    2017-01-01

    High-reflectivity fused silica mirrors are at the epicentre of today’s advanced gravitational wave detectors. In these detectors, the mirrors interact with high power laser beams. As a result of finite absorption in the high reflectivity coatings the mirrors suffer from a variety of thermal effects that impact on the detectors’ performance. We propose a model of the Advanced LIGO mirrors that introduces an empirical term to account for the radiative heat transfer between the mirror and its surroundings. The mechanical mode frequency is used as a probe for the overall temperature of the mirror. The thermal transient after power build-up in the optical cavities is used to refine and test the model. The model provides a coating absorption estimate of 1.5–2.0 ppm and estimates that 0.3 to 1.3 ppm of the circulating light is scattered onto the ring heater. (paper)

  7. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Free Piston Linear Alternator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson Wu; Nicholas Paradiso; Peter Van Blarigan; Scott Goldsborough

    1998-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) free piston powered linear alternator has been conducted to determine if improvements can be made in the thermal and conversion efficiencies of modern electrical generator systems. Performance of a free piston engine was investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine and a full cycle thermodynamic model. Linear alternator performance was investigated with a computer model. In addition linear alternator testing and permanent magnet characterization hardware were developed. The development of the two-stroke cycle scavenging process has begun.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic model in MABEL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.; Cooper, C.A.

    1979-09-01

    The thermal-hydraulic subroutines for MABEL-2 have been written and programmed for testing as a stand-alone code MABSA. The model is that of a fuel rod, surrounded by 8 other rods, with a flow region outside representing the reactor geometry. A subchannel model, similar to that in HAMBO, is used to calculate the feed-back effect of cladding strain on heat transfer due to the progressive blocking of the subchannels around the central fuel rod. A number of assumptions was made in building the coolant model. Their use and validation are discussed. (author)

  10. Validation of a zero-dimensional and two-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to reduce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of

  11. Class-conditional feature modeling for ignitable liquid classification with substantial substrate contribution in fire debris analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatka, M.; Sigman, M.E.; Sjerps, M.J.; Williams, M.R.; Vivó-Truyols, G.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic chemical analysis of fire debris addresses the question of whether ignitable liquid residue is present in a sample and, if so, what type. Evidence evaluation regarding this question is complicated by interference from pyrolysis products of the substrate materials present in a fire. A method

  12. Numerical research of heat and mass transfer during low-temperature ignition of a coal particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical researches have been carried out to study the influence of air flow temperature and a fossil fuel particle rate on sufficient conditions of ignition in a “coal particle - air” system. Developed mathematical model takes into account interconnected processes of heat transfer in a coal particle and gas area, thermal decomposition of organic material, diffusion and gas-phase oxidation of volatiles, heating of a coke (carbon and its heterogeneous ignition. The effect of low-temperature (about 600 K ignition for a single coal particle is impossible even at variation of its rate (radius from 0.05 mm to 0.5 mm. Nevertheless this process is possible for group of particles (two, three, et al. situated at close-range from each other. The physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  13. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-06-01

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MINIMUM IGNITION TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor WACHTER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is an analysis of the minimum ignition temperature of dust layer and the minimum ignition temperatures of dust clouds. It could be used to identify the threats in industrial production and civil engineering, on which a layer of combustible dust could occure. Research was performed on spent coffee grounds. Tests were performed according to EN 50281-2-1:2002 Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust (Method A. Objective of method A is to determine the minimum temperature at which ignition or decomposition of dust occurs during thermal straining on a hot plate at a constant temperature. The highest minimum smouldering and carbonating temperature of spent coffee grounds for 5 mm high layer was determined at the interval from 280 °C to 310 °C during 600 seconds. Method B is used to determine the minimum ignition temperature of a dust cloud. Minimum ignition temperature of studied dust was determined to 470 °C (air pressure – 50 kPa, sample weight 0.3 g.

  15. Characterization of thermal-hydraulic and ignition phenomena in prototypic, full-length boiling water reactor spent fuel pool assemblies after a complete loss-of-coolant accident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric Richard; Durbin, Samuel G

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide basic thermal-hydraulic data associated with a SFP complete loss-of-coolant accident. The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full-scale prototypic fashion (electrically-heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate code validation (primarily MELCOR) and reduce questions associated with interpretation of the experimental results. It was necessary to simulate a cluster of assemblies to represent a higher decay (younger) assembly surrounded by older, lower-power assemblies. Specifically, this program provided data and analysis confirming: (1) MELCOR modeling of inter-assembly radiant heat transfer, (2) flow resistance modeling and the natural convective flow induced in a fuel assembly as it heats up in air, (3) the potential for and nature of thermal transient (i.e., Zircaloy fire) propagation, and (4) mitigation strategies concerning fuel assembly management.

  16. The development of a comvenient thermal dynamic building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbosch, G.G.J.; de Jong, P.P.G.; Krist-Spit, C.E.; van der Meulen, S.F.; Verberne, J.F.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper describes a method to set up a thermal building model combining relative simplicity with high dynamic accuracy. The models were verified in two Dutch semi-detached dwellings characterized by extreme values of thermal capacity.

  17. Modelling and simulation of thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eborn, J.

    1998-02-01

    Mathematical modelling and simulation are important tools when dealing with engineering systems that today are becoming increasingly more complex. Integrated production and recycling of materials are trends that give rise to heterogenous systems, which are difficult to handle within one area of expertise. Model libraries are an excellent way to package engineering knowledge of systems and units to be reused by those who are not experts in modelling. Many commercial packages provide good model libraries, but they are usually domain-specific and closed. Heterogenous, multi-domain systems requires open model libraries written in general purpose modelling languages. This thesis describes a model database for thermal power plants written in the object-oriented modelling language OMOLA. The models are based on first principles. Subunits describe volumes with pressure and enthalpy dynamics and flows of heat or different media. The subunits are used to build basic units such as pumps, valves and heat exchangers which can be used to build system models. Several applications are described; a heat recovery steam generator, equipment for juice blending, steam generation in a sulphuric acid plant and a condensing steam plate heat exchanger. Model libraries for industrial use must be validated against measured data. The thesis describes how parameter estimation methods can be used for model validation. Results from a case-study on parameter optimization of a non-linear drum boiler model show how the technique can be used 32 refs, 21 figs

  18. Physics parameter space of tokamak ignition devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to explore the physics parameter space of tokamak ignition experiments. A new physics systems code has been developed to perform the study. This code performs a global plasma analysis using steady-state, two-fluid, energy-transport models. In this paper, we discuss the models used in the code and their application to the analysis of compact ignition experiments. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  19. Modelling and multi-objective optimization of a variable valve-timing spark-ignition engine using polynomial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atashkari, K.; Nariman-Zadeh, N.; Goelcue, M.; Khalkhali, A.; Jamali, A.

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for the efficiency decrease at part load conditions for four-stroke spark-ignition (SI) engines is the flow restriction at the cross-sectional area of the intake system. Traditionally, valve-timing has been designed to optimize operation at high engine-speed and wide open throttle conditions. Several investigations have demonstrated that improvements at part load conditions in engine performance can be accomplished if the valve-timing is variable. Controlling valve-timing can be used to improve the torque and power curve as well as to reduce fuel consumption and emissions. In this paper, a group method of data handling (GMDH) type neural network and evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are firstly used for modelling the effects of intake valve-timing (V t ) and engine speed (N) of a spark-ignition engine on both developed engine torque (T) and fuel consumption (Fc) using some experimentally obtained training and test data. Using such obtained polynomial neural network models, a multi-objective EA (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, NSGA-II) with a new diversity preserving mechanism are secondly used for Pareto based optimization of the variable valve-timing engine considering two conflicting objectives such as torque (T) and fuel consumption (Fc). The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the GMDH type models over feedforward neural network models in terms of the statistical measures in the training data, testing data and the number of hidden neurons. Further, it is shown that some interesting and important relationships, as useful optimal design principles, involved in the performance of the variable valve-timing four-stroke spark-ignition engine can be discovered by the Pareto based multi-objective optimization of the polynomial models. Such important optimal principles would not have been obtained without the use of both the GMDH type neural network modelling and the multi-objective Pareto optimization approach

  20. Quantitative Infrared Image Analysis Of Thermally-Thin Cellulose Surface Temperatures During Upstream and Downstream Microgravity Flame Spread from A Central Ignition Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Lee, J. R.; Fujita, O.; Kikuchi, M.; Kashiwagi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface view calibrated infrared images of ignition and flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were obtained at 30 Hz during microgravity flame spread tests in the 10 second Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). The tests also used a color video of the surface view and color images of the edge view using 35 millimeter 1600 Kodak Ektapress film at 2 Hz. The cellulose fuel samples (50% long fibers from lumi pine and 50% short fibers from birch) were made with an area density of 60 grams per square meters. The samples were mounted in the center of a 12 centimeter wide by 16 centimeter tall flow duct that uses a downstream fan to draw the air through the flow duct. Samples were ignited after the experiment package was released using a straight hot wire across the center of the 7.5 centimeter wide by 14 centimeter long samples. One case, at 1 atmosphere 35%O2 in N2, at a forced flow of 10 centimeters per second, is presented here. In this case, as the test progresses, the single flame begins to separate into simultaneous upstream and downstream flames. Surface temperature profiles are evaluated as a function of time, and temperature gradients for upstream and downstream flame spread are measured. Flame spread rates from IR image data are compared to visible image spread rate data. IR blackbody temperatures are compared to surface thermocouple readings to evaluate the effective emissivity of the pyrolyzing surface. Preheat lengths are evaluated both upstream and downstream of the central ignition point. A surface energy balance estimates the net heat flux from the flame to the fuel surface along the length of the fuel.

  1. Stochastic modeling of thermal fatigue crack growth

    CERN Document Server

    Radu, Vasile

    2015-01-01

    The book describes a systematic stochastic modeling approach for assessing thermal-fatigue crack-growth in mixing tees, based on the power spectral density of temperature fluctuation at the inner pipe surface. It shows the development of a frequency-temperature response function in the framework of single-input, single-output (SISO) methodology from random noise/signal theory under sinusoidal input. The frequency response of stress intensity factor (SIF) is obtained by a polynomial fitting procedure of thermal stress profiles at various instants of time. The method, which takes into account the variability of material properties, and has been implemented in a real-world application, estimates the probabilities of failure by considering a limit state function and Monte Carlo analysis, which are based on the proposed stochastic model. Written in a comprehensive and accessible style, this book presents a new and effective method for assessing thermal fatigue crack, and it is intended as a concise and practice-or...

  2. Approach to ignition of tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    Recent transport modeling results for JET, INTOR, and ETF are reviewed and analyzed with respect to existing uncertainties in the underlying physics, the self-consistency of the very large numerical codes, and the margin for ignition. The codes show ignition to occur in ETF/INTOR-sized machines if empirical scaling can be extrapolated to ion temperatures (and beta values) much higher than those presently achieved, if there is no significant impurity accumulation over the first 7 s, and if the known ideal and resistive MHD instabilities remain controllable for the evolving plasma profiles during ignition startup.

  3. Mars Propellant Liquefaction Modeling in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  4. Analytical model for thermal boundary conductance and equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient at solid/gas interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2016-02-28

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a gas. By considering the thermal fluxes in the solid and the gas, we describe the transmission of energy across the solid/gas interface with diffuse mismatch theory. From the predicted thermal boundary conductances across solid/gas interfaces, the equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient is determined and compared to predictions from molecular dynamics simulations on the model solid-gas systems. We show that our model is applicable for modeling the thermal accommodation of gases on solid surfaces at non-cryogenic temperatures and relatively strong solid-gas interactions (ε(sf) ≳ k(B)T).

  5. Low current approach to ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenacchi, G.; Sugiyama, L.; Airoldi, A.; Coppi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The open-quotes standardclose quotes path to achieve ignition conditions so far has been that of producing plasmas with the maximum current and poloidal field that axe compatible with the applied toroidal field and the geometry of the adopted configuration (the low q a approach.) The other approach is that motivated by recent experiments with reversed shear configurations, with relatively low currents and high fields corresponding to high values of q a (e-g., q a ≅ 6). While the first approach can be pursued with ohmic heating alone, the second one necessarily involves an auxiliary heating system. One of the advantages of this approach is that the onset of large scale internal modes can be avoided as q(ψ) is kept above 1 over the entire plasma column. Since quite peaked density profiles are produced in the regimes where enhanced confinement is observed, the α-particle power levels for which ignition can be reached and therefore the thermal wall loading on the first wall, can be reduced relatively to the standard, low q a , approach. The possibility is considered that ignition is reached in the reversed shear, high q a , regime and that this is followed by a transition to non-reversed profiles, or even the low q a regime, assuming that the excitation of modes involving magnetic reconnection will not undermine the needed degree of confinement. These results have been demonstrated by numerical transport simulation for the Ignitor-Ult machine, but are applicable to all high field ignition experiments

  6. Novel fragmentation model for pulverized coal particles gasification in low temperature air thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Rastko D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New system for start-up and flame support based on coal gasification by low temperature air thermal plasma is planned to supplement current heavy oil system in Serbian thermal power plants in order to decrease air pollutions emission and operational costs. Locally introduced plasma thermal energy heats up and ignites entrained coal particles, thus starting chain process which releases heat energy from gasified coal particles inside burner channel. Important stages during particle combustion, such as particle devolatilisation and char combustion, are described with satisfying accuracy in existing commercial CFD codes that are extensively used as powerful tool for pulverized coal combustion and gasification modeling. However, during plasma coal gasification, high plasma temperature induces strong thermal stresses inside interacting coal particles. These stresses lead to “thermal shock” and extensive particle fragmentation during which coal particles with initial size of 50-100 m disintegrate into fragments of at most 5-10 m. This intensifies volatile release by a factor 3-4 and substantially accelerates the oxidation of combustible matter. Particle fragmentation, due to its small size and thus limited influence on combustion process is commonly neglected in modelling. The main focus of this work is to suggest novel approach to pulverized coal gasification under high temperature conditions and to implement it into commercial comprehensive code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. Proposed model was validated against experimental data obtained in newly built pilot scale D.C plasma burner test facility. Newly developed model showed very good agreement with experimental results with relative error less than 10%, while the standard built-in gasification model had error up to 25%.

  7. The role of viscosity in TATB hot spot ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Laurence E.; Zepeda-Ruis, Luis; Howard, W. Michael; Najjar, Fady; Reaugh, John E.

    2012-03-01

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  8. The thermal evolution of universe: standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, L.C.S. do.

    1975-08-01

    A description of the dynamical evolution of the Universe following a model based on the theory of General Relativity is made. The model admits the Cosmological principle,the principle of Equivalence and the Robertson-Walker metric (of which an original derivation is presented). In this model, the universe is considered as a perfect fluid, ideal and symmetric relatively to the number of particles and antiparticles. The thermodynamic relations deriving from these hypothesis are derived, and from them the several eras of the thermal evolution of the universe are established. Finally, the problems arising from certain specific predictions of the model are studied, and the predictions of the abundances of the elements according to nucleosynthesis and the actual behavior of the universe are analysed in detail. (author) [pt

  9. Comprehensive study of ignition and combustion of single wooden particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    How quickly large biomass particles can ignite and burn out when transported into a pulverized-fuel (pf) furnace and suddenly exposed to a hot gas flow containing oxygen is very important in biomass co-firing design and optimization. In this paper, the ignition and burnout of the largest possible...... for all the test conditions. As the particle is further heated up and the volume-weighted average temperature reaches the onset of rapid decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose, a secondary homogeneous ignition occurs. The model-predicted ignition delays and burnout times show a good agreement...... with the experimental results. Homogeneous ignition delays are found to scale with specific surface areas while heterogeneous ignition delays show less dependency on the areas. The ignition and burnout are also affected by the process conditions, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced...

  10. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  11. Observations and modeling of debris and shrapnel impacts on optics and diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of targets with laser energies spanning two orders of magnitude have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC targets are cryogenic with Si supports and cooling rings attached to an Al Thermo-Mechanical Package (TMP with a thin (30 micron Au hohlraum inside. Particular attention is placed on the low-energy shots where the TMP is not completely vaporized. In addition to NIC targets, a range of other targets has also been fielded on NIF. For all targets, simulations play a critical role in determining if the risks associated with debris and shrapnel are acceptable. In a number of cases, experiments were redesigned, based on simulations, to reduce risks or to obtain data. The majority of these simulations were done using the ALE-AMR code, which provides efficient late-time (100 – 1000 X the pulse duration 3 D calculations of complex NIF targets.

  12. Application of Thermal Network Model to Transient Thermal Analysis of Power Electronic Package Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Ishizuka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a growing demand to have smaller and lighter electronic circuits which have greater complexity, multifunctionality, and reliability. High-density multichip packaging technology has been used in order to meet these requirements. The higher the density scale is, the larger the power dissipation per unit area becomes. Therefore, in the designing process, it has become very important to carry out the thermal analysis. However, the heat transport model in multichip modules is very complex, and its treatment is tedious and time consuming. This paper describes an application of the thermal network method to the transient thermal analysis of multichip modules and proposes a simple model for the thermal analysis of multichip modules as a preliminary thermal design tool. On the basis of the result of transient thermal analysis, the validity of the thermal network method and the simple thermal analysis model is confirmed.

  13. Thermal effects in shales: measurements and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstry, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Research is reported concerning thermal and physical measurements and theoretical modeling relevant to the storage of radioactive wastes in a shale. Reference thermal conductivity measurements are made at atmospheric pressure in a commercial apparatus; and equipment for permeability measurements has been developed, and is being extended with respect to measurement ranges. Thermal properties of shales are being determined as a function of temperature and pressures. Apparatus was developed to measure shales in two different experimental configurations. In the first, a disk 15 mm in diameter of the material is measured by a steady state technique using a reference material to measure the heat flow within the system. The sample is sandwiched between two disks of a reference material (single crystal quartz is being used initially as reference material). The heat flow is determined twice in order to determine that steady state conditions prevail; the temperature drop over the two references is measured. When these indicate an equal heat flow, the thermal conductivity of the sample can be calculated from the temperature difference of the two faces. The second technique is for determining effect of temperature in a water saturated shale on a larger scale. Cylindrical shale (or siltstone) specimens that are being studied (large for a laboratory sample) are to be heated electrically at the center, contained in a pressure vessel that will maintain a fixed water pressure around it. The temperature is monitored at many points within the shale sample. The sample dimensions are 25 cm diameter, 20 cm long. A micro computer system has been constructed to monitor 16 thermocouples to record variation of temperature distribution with time

  14. Thermal modelling of a torpedo-car

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdeja-Gonzalez, L. F.; Barbes-Fernandez, M. F.; Gonzalez-Ojeda, R.; Castillo, G. A.; Colas, R.

    2005-07-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model for computing the temperature distribution in a torpedo-car holding pig iron is described in this work. The model determines the temperature gradients in steady and transient conditions whiting the different parts that constitute the systems, which are considered to be the steel casing, refractory lining, liquid iron, slag and air. Heat transfer within the main fluid phases (iron and air) is computed assuming an apparent thermal conductivity term incorporating the contribution from convention and radiation, and it is affected by the dimensions of the vessel. Thermal gradients within the constituents of the torpedo-car are used to calculate heat losses during operation. It was found that the model required the incorporate of a region within the iron-refractory interface to reproduce thermographic data recorded during operation; the heat transfer coefficient of this interface was found to be equal to 30 Wm''-2K''-1. (Author) 11 refs.

  15. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Worley, B.A.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-01-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. Since October 1991, US (DOE), (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review. The vision and strategy of the interagency team for developing NTP system models will be discussed in this paper. A review of the progress on the Level 1 interagency model is also presented

  16. A numerical investigation of the influence of radiation and moisture content on pyrolysis and ignition of a leaf-like fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Yashwanth; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; C.W. Lautenberger; David Weise

    2016-01-01

    The effects of thermal radiation and moisture content on the pyrolysis and gas phase ignition of a solid fuel element containing high moisture content were investigated using the coupled Gpyro3D/FDS models. The solid fuel has dimensions of a typical Arctostaphylos glandulosa leaf which is modeled as thin cellulose subjected to radiative heating on...

  17. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10 15 cm -3 , high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition

  18. Ignition delay times of Gasoline Distillation Cuts measured with Ignition Quality Tester

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal

    2017-04-21

    Tailoring fuel properties to maximize the efficiency of internal combustion engines is a way towards achieving cleaner combustion systems. In this work, the ignition properties of various gasoline fuel distillation cuts are analyzed to better understand fuel properties of the full boiling range fuel. An advanced distillation column (ADC) provides a more realistic representation of volatility characteristics, which can be modeled using equilibrium thermodynamic methods. The temperature reported is that of the liquid, as opposed to the vapor temperature in conventional ASTM D86 distillation standard. Various FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasolines were distilled and various cuts were obtained. The separated fractions were then tested in an ignition quality tester (IQT) to see the effect of chemical composition of different fractions on their ignition delay time. Fuels with lower aromatic content showed decreasing ignition delay time with increasing boiling point (i.e., molecular weight). However, fuels with higher aromatic content showed an initial decrease in ignition delay time with increasing boiling point, followed by drastic increase in ignition delay time due to fractions containing aromatics. This study also provides an understanding on contribution of different fractions to the ignition delay time of the fuel, which provides insights into fuel stratification utilized in gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines to tailor heat release rates.

  19. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  20. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2 Abstract Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is

  1. In-situ measurements of material thermal parameters for accurate LED lamp thermal modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellvehi, M.; Perpina, X.; Jorda, X.; Werkhoven, R.J.; Kunen, J.M.G.; Jakovenko, J.; Bancken, P.; Bolt, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the extraction of key thermal parameters for accurate thermal modelling of LED lamps: air exchange coefficient around the lamp, emissivity and thermal conductivity of all lamp parts. As a case study, an 8W retrofit lamp is presented. To assess simulation results, temperature is

  2. Tokamak two-fluid ignition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2017-08-01

    This work focuses on modeling the properties needed by a plasma to reach ignition, where ignition is the condition in which fusion power is produced at the steady state without any external input power. We extend the classic work by Lawson giving the ptotτE (product between density, temperature, and energy confinement time) needed for ignition [J. D. Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, Sect. B 70, 6 (1957)] by improving the original zero-dimensional, single fluid model. The effect of multi-fluid physics is included, by distinguishing ions, electrons, and α particles. The effects of one-dimensional density and temperature profiles are also considered. It is found that the multi-fluid model predicts a larger Lawson product required for ignition than the single-fluid one. A detailed analysis of the energy confinement times for each species and energy equilibration times between species shows that the electron energy confinement time is the parameter more strongly affecting the Lawson product needed for ignition. It is also found that peaked profiles (of either temperature or density) require a smaller Lawson product for ignition than flat profiles.

  3. Model of thermal conductivity of anisotropic nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, S.F.; Kalinichenko, A.I.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2014-01-01

    Dependence of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline diamond on grain size and shape is theoretically investigated. Nanodiamond is considered as two-phase material composed of diamond grains characterizing by three main dimensions and segregated by thin graphite layers with electron, phonon or hybrid thermal conductivity. Influence of type of thermal conductance and thickness of boundary layer on thermal conductivity of nanodiamond is analyzed. Derived dependences of thermal conductivity on grain dimensions are compared with experimental data

  4. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  5. Modeling Multiple-Core Updraft Plume Rise for an Aerial Ignition Prescribed Burn by Coupling Daysmoke with a Cellular Automata Fire Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Liu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Smoke plume rise is critically dependent on plume updraft structure. Smoke plumes from landscape burns (forest and agricultural burns are typically structured into “sub-plumes” or multiple-core updrafts with the number of updraft cores depending on characteristics of the landscape, fire, fuels, and weather. The number of updraft cores determines the efficiency of vertical transport of heat and particulate matter and therefore plume rise. Daysmoke, an empirical-stochastic plume rise model designed for simulating wildland fire plumes, requires updraft core number as an input. In this study, updraft core number was gained via a cellular automata fire model applied to an aerial ignition prescribed burn conducted at Eglin AFB on 6 February 2011. Typically four updraft cores were simulated in agreement with a photo-image of the plume showing three/four distinct sub-plumes. Other Daysmoke input variables were calculated including maximum initial updraft core diameter, updraft core vertical velocity, and relative emissions production. Daysmoke simulated a vertical tower that mushroomed 1,000 m above the mixing height. Plume rise was validated by ceilometer. Simulations with two temperature profiles found 89–93 percent of the PM2.5 released during the flaming phase was transported into the free atmosphere above the mixing layer. The minimal ground-level smoke concentrations were verified by a small network of particulate samplers. Implications of these results for inclusion of wildland fire smoke in air quality models are discussed.

  6. A thermal model of the economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo Colon, Luis Balbino

    The motivation for this work came from an interest in Economics (particularly since the 2008 economic downturn) and a desire to use the tools of physics in a field that has not been the subject of great exploration. We propose a model of economics in analogy to thermodynamics and introduce the concept of the Value Multiplier as a fundamental addition to any such model. Firstly, we attempt to make analogies between some economic concepts and fundamental concepts of thermal physics. Then we introduce the value multiplier and justify its existence in our system; the value multiplier allows us to account for some intangible, psychological elements of the value of goods and services. We finally bring all the elements together in a qualitative system. In particular, we attempt to make an analogy with the Keynesian Multiplier that justifies the usefulness of fiscal stimulus in severe economic downturns. ii

  7. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Use of the Long Duration Exposure Facility's thermal measurement system for the verification of thermal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) postflight thermal model predicted temperatures were matched to flight temperature data recorded by the Thermal Measurement System (THERM), LDEF experiment P0003. Flight temperatures, recorded at intervals of approximately 112 minutes for the first 390 days of LDEF's 2105 day mission were compared with predictions using the thermal mathematical model (TMM). This model was unverified prior to flight. The postflight analysis has reduced the thermal model uncertainty at the temperature sensor locations from +/- 40 F to +/- 18 F. The improved temperature predictions will be used by the LDEF's principal investigators to calculate improved flight temperatures experienced by 57 experiments located on 86 trays of the facility.

  9. Acoustic Igniter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  10. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  11. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in

  12. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-08-20

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the H α line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the H α line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the H α line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the H α line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  13. Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

    2008-06-30

    Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies and approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.

  14. A mechanistic approach to safe igniter implementation for hydrogen mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.; Dorofeev, S.B.; Travis, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A new methodology for safe igniter implementation in a full-scale 3-d containment is described. The method consists of the following steps: determination of bounding H 2 /steam sources; high-resolution analysis of the 3-d transport and mixing processes; evaluation of the detonation potential at the time of ignition; optimization of the igniter system such that only early ignition and nonenergetic combustion occurs; and modelling of the continuous deflagration processes during H 2 -release. The method was implemented into the GASFLOW code. The principle and the feasibility is demonstrated for a single room geometry. A full-scale 3-d reactor case is analyzed without and with deliberate ignition, assuming a severe dry H 2 release sequence (1200 kg). In the unmitigated case significant DDT potential in the whole containment develops, including the possibility of global detonations. The analysis with igniters in different positions predicted deflagration or detonation in the break compartment, depending on the igniter location. Igniter positions were found which lead to early ignition, effective H 2 -removal, and negligible pressure loads. The approach can be used to determine number, position and frequency of a safe igniter system for a given large dry containment. (author)

  15. Concept of a Helias ignition experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobig, H.; Andreeva, T.; Beidler, C. D.; Harmeyer, E.; Herrnegger, F.; Igitkhanov, Y.; Kisslinger, J.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Lutsenko, V. V.; Marchenko, V. S.; Nührenberg, C.; Sidorenko, I.; Turkin, Y.; Wieczorek, A.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.

    2003-09-01

    The Helias ignition experiment is an upgraded version of the Wendelstein 7-X experiment. The magnetic configuration is a four-period Helias configuration (major radius 18 m, plasma radius 2.0 m, B = 4.5 T), which presents a more compact option than the five-period configuration. Much effort has been focused on two versions of the four-period configuration. One option is the power reactor HSR4/18 providing at least 3 GW of fusion power and the second is the ignition experiment HSR 4/18i aiming at a minimum of fusion power and the demonstration of self-sustaining burn. The design criteria of the ignition experiment HSR 4/18i are the following: The experiment should demonstrate a safe and reliable route to ignition; self-sustained burn without external heating; steady-state operation during several hundred seconds; reliability of the technical components and tritium breeding in a test blanket. The paper discusses the technical issues of the coil system and describes the vacuum vessel and the shielding blanket. The power balance will be modelled with a transport code and the ignition conditions will be investigated using current scaling laws of energy confinement in stellarators. The plasma parameters of the ignition experiment are: peak density 2-3×1020 m-3, peak temperature 11-15 keV, average beta 3.6% and fusion power 1500-1700 MW.

  16. Model for thermal conductivity of CNT-nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. This work presents a simple model for predicting the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube. (CNT) nanofluids. Effects due to the high thermal conductivity of CNTs and the percolation of heat through it are considered to be the most important reasons for their anomalously high thermal conductivity enhance- ment.

  17. Thermal Properties of Metallic Nanowires: Modeling & Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Nenad; Berg, Jordan; Maithripala, Sanjeeva; Holtz, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Effects such as surface and grain boundary scattering significantly influence electrical and thermal properties of nanoscale materials with important practical implications for current and future electronics and photonics. Conventional wisdom for metals holds that thermal transport is predominantly by electrons and transport by phonons is negligible. This assumption is used to justify the use of the Wiedemann-Franz law to infer thermal conductivity based on measurements of electrical resistivity. Recently experiments suggest a breakdown of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the nanoscale. This talk will examine the assumption that thermal transport by phonons can be neglected. The electrical resistivities and thermal conductivities of aluminum nanowires of various sizes are directly measured. These values are used in conjunction with the Boltzmann transport equation to conclude that the Wiedemann-Franz law describes the electronic component of thermal conductivity, but that the phonon term must also be considered. A novel experimental device is described for the direct thermal conductivity measurements.

  18. New Methodologies for the Thermal Modelling of CubeSats

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Philip

    2012-01-01

    One of the main threats for the success of a CubeSat mission is the unbalanced distribution of thermal loads caused by internal and external heat sources. In order to design an appropriate thermal subsystem that can cope with these loads a detailed analysis is required. However, currently available thermal software is considered as being less convenient for the application with CubeSats, mainly due to the complexity of the modelling process. This paper examines thermal engineering issues for ...

  19. An improved thermal model for the computer code NAIAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, M.T.

    1982-12-01

    An improved thermal model, based on the concept of heat slabs, has been incorporated as an option into the thermal hydraulic computer code NAIAD. The heat slabs are one-dimensional thermal conduction models with temperature independent thermal properties which may be internal and/or external to the fluid. Thermal energy may be added to or removed from the fluid via heat slabs and passed across the external boundary of external heat slabs at a rate which is a linear function of the external surface temperatures. The code input for the new option has been restructured to simplify data preparation. A full description of current input requirements is presented

  20. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  1. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Thermal Power Model in Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Fabanich, William A.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal power model that was built using the Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit (EU) test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's Ideas TMG thermal model. ASRG performance under (1) ASC hot-end temperatures, (2) ambient temperatures, and (3) years of mission for the general purpose heat source fuel decay was predicted using this model for the flight unit. The results were compared with those reported by Lockheed Martin and showed good agreement. In addition, the model was used to study the performance of the ASRG flight unit for operations on the ground and on the surface of Titan, and the concept of using gold film to reduce thermal loss through insulation was investigated.

  2. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a ;segmented; thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed ;segmented; model shows more precise than the ;non-segmented; model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the ;segmented; model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  3. Model-based analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Thermal insulation properties of coatings based on selected functional filler materials are investigated. The underlying physics, thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating, and porosity and thermal conductivity of hollow spheres (HS) are quantified and a mathematical model...... for a thermal insulation coating developed. Data from a previous experimental investigation with hollow glass sphere-based epoxy and acrylic coatings were used for model validation. Simulations of thermal conductivities were in good agreement with experimental data. Using the model, a parameter study was also...... conducted exploring the effects of the following parameters: pigment (hollow spheres) volume concentration (PVC), average sphere size or sphere size distribution, thermal conductivities of binder and sphere wall material, and sphere wall thickness. All the parameters affected the thermal conductivity...

  4. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David

    2017-01-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  5. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of the Effectof H2S Addition to Methane on the Ignition and Oxidation at High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersen, Sander; van Essen, Martijn; Darmeveil, Harry

    2017-01-01

    has been established, describing the oxidation of CH4 and H2S as well as the formation and consumption of organo sulfuric species. Computations with the modelshow good agreement with the ignition measurements, provided that reactions of H2S and SH with peroxides (HO2 and CH3OO) are constrained....... A comparison of the flow reactordata to modeling predictions shows satisfactory agreement under stoichiometric conditions, while at very reducing conditions, the model underestimates the consumption of both H2S and CH4. Similar to the RCM experiments, the presence of H2S is predicted to promote oxidation...... of methane. Analysis of the calculations indicates a significant interaction between the oxidation chemistry of H2S and CH4, but this chemistry is not well understood at present. More work is desirable on the reactions of H2S and SH with peroxides (HO2 and CH3OO) and the formation and consumption...

  6. Modeling Stimulated Raman Scattering in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas for National Ignition Facility Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, A. V.; Shaw, J. G.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    In the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the coupling of laser power to the target plasma is strongly influenced by the laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes driven by multiple crossing laser beams. For the plasma parameters relevant to the conditions of the experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the threshold of the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is usually well exceeded because of the large scale length of the plasma density, making the study of SRS vital for the NIF ICF program. The SRS evolution starts as a convective or absolute instability, and the nonlinear saturation is determined by the ion-acoustic perturbations and kinetic effects. The LPI processes of cross-beam energy transfer and two-plasmon decay also drive the ion-acoustic modes and their interplay with SRS is analyzed. This work was supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Development and evaluation of thermal model reduction algorithms for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiml, Michael; Suderland, Martin; Reiss, Philipp; Czupalla, Markus

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the topic of the reduction of thermal models of spacecraft. The work presented here has been conducted in cooperation with the company OHB AG, formerly Kayser-Threde GmbH, and the Institute of Astronautics at Technische Universität München with the goal to shorten and automatize the time-consuming and manual process of thermal model reduction. The reduction of thermal models can be divided into the simplification of the geometry model for calculation of external heat flows and radiative couplings and into the reduction of the underlying mathematical model. For simplification a method has been developed which approximates the reduced geometry model with the help of an optimization algorithm. Different linear and nonlinear model reduction techniques have been evaluated for their applicability in reduction of the mathematical model. Thereby the compatibility with the thermal analysis tool ESATAN-TMS is of major concern, which restricts the useful application of these methods. Additional model reduction methods have been developed, which account to these constraints. The Matrix Reduction method allows the approximation of the differential equation to reference values exactly expect for numerical errors. The summation method enables a useful, applicable reduction of thermal models that can be used in industry. In this work a framework for model reduction of thermal models has been created, which can be used together with a newly developed graphical user interface for the reduction of thermal models in industry.

  8. High Power Solid State Retrofit Lamp Thermal Characterization and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jakovenko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL retrofit LED lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D thermal lamp model for further thermal optimization. Simulations are performed with ANSYS and CoventorWare software tools to compere different simulation approaches. Simulated thermal distribution has been validated with thermal measurement on a commercial 8W LED lamp. Materials parametric study has been carried out to discover problematic parts for heat transfer from power LEDs to ambient and future solutions are proposed. The objectives are to predict the thermal management by simulation of LED lamp, get more understanding in the effect of lamp shape and used materials in order to design more effective LED lamps and predict light quality, life time and reliability.

  9. Modeling of Viscosity and Thermal Expansion of Bioactive Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Farid, Saad B. H.

    2012-01-01

    The behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion for different compositions of bioactive glasses have been studied. The effect of phosphorous pentoxide as a second glass former in addition to silica was investigated. Consequently, the nonlinear behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion with respect to the oxide composition have been modeled. The modeling uses published data on bioactive glass compositions with viscosity and thermal expansion. -regression optimization technique has been uti...

  10. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  11. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  12. Modeling thermal dilepton radiation for SIS experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seck, Florian [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Dileptons are radiated during the whole time evolution of a heavy-ion collision and leave the interaction zone unaffected. Thus they carry valuable information about the hot and dense medium created in those collisions to the detector. Realistic dilepton emission rates and an accurate description of the fireball's space-time evolution are needed to properly describe the contribution of in-medium signals to the dilepton invariant mass spectrum. In this presentation we demonstrate how this can be achieved at SIS collision energies. The framework is implemented into the event generator Pluto which is used by the HADES and CBM experiments to produce their hadronic freeze-out cocktails. With the help of an coarse-graining approach to model the fireball evolution and pertinent dilepton rates via a parametrization of the Rapp-Wambach in-medium ρ meson spectral function, the thermal contribution to the spectrum can be calculated. The results also enable us to get an estimate of the fireball lifetime at SIS18 energies.

  13. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  14. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  15. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  16. Thermal modeling of a mini rotor-stator system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikmen, E.; van der Hoogt, Peter; de Boer, Andries; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study the temperature increase and heat dissipation in the air gap of a cylindrical mini rotor stator system has been analyzed. A simple thermal model based on lumped parameter thermal networks has been developed. With this model the temperature dependent air properties for the fluid-rotor

  17. Thermal modeling: at the crossroads of several subjects of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The modeling of thermal phenomena is of prime importance for the dimensioning of industrial facilities. However, the understanding of thermal processes requires to refer to other subjects of physics like electromagnetism, matter transformation, fluid mechanics, chemistry etc.. The aim of this workshop organized by the industrial electro-thermal engineering section of the French society of thermal engineers is to take stock of current or forthcoming advances in the coupling of thermal engineering codes with electromagnetic, fluid mechanics, chemical and mechanical engineering codes. The modeling of phenomena remains the essential link between the laboratory research of new processes and their industrial developments. From the 9 talks given during this workshop, 2 of them deal with thermal processes in nuclear reactors and fall into the INIS scope and the others concern the modeling of industrial heating or electrical processes and were selected for ETDE. (J.S.)

  18. Sensitivity of ICF ignition conditions to non-Maxwellian DT fusion reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbett, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The hotspot ignition conditions in ICF are determined by considering the power balance between fusion energy deposition and energy loss terms. Uncertainty in any of these terms has potential to modify the ignition conditions, changing the optimum ignition capsule design. This paper considers the impact of changes to the DT fusion reaction rate due to non-thermal ion energy distributions. The DT fusion reactivity has been evaluated for a class of non-Maxwellian distributions representing a perturbation to the tail of a thermal distribution. The resulting reactivity has been used to determine hotspot ignition conditions as a function of the characteristic parameter of the modified distribution. (authors)

  19. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

    Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2

    Abstract

    Aquifer

  20. A solid reactor core thermal model for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods, and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions

  1. Effect of laser induced plasma ignition timing and location on Diesel spray combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, José V.; García-Oliver, José M.; García, Antonio; Pinotti, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser plasma ignition is applied to a direct injection Diesel spray, compared with auto-ignition. • Critical local fuel/air ratio for LIP provoked ignition is obtained. • The LIP system is able to stabilize Diesel combustion compared to auto-ignition cases. • Varying LIP position along spray axis directly affects Ignition-delay. • Premixed combustion is reduced both by varying position and delay of the LIP ignition system. - Abstract: An experimental study about the influence of the local conditions at the ignition location on combustion development of a direct injection spray is carried out in an optical engine. A laser induced plasma ignition system has been used to force the spray ignition, allowing comparison of combustion’s evolution and stability with the case of conventional autoignition on the Diesel fuel in terms of ignition delay, rate of heat release, spray penetration and soot location evolution. The local equivalence ratio variation along the spray axis during the injection process was determined with a 1D spray model, previously calibrated and validated. Upper equivalence ratios limits for the ignition event of a direct injected Diesel spray, both in terms of ignition success possibilities and stability of the phenomena, could been determined thanks to application of the laser plasma ignition system. In all laser plasma induced ignition cases, heat release was found to be higher than for the autoignition reference cases, and it was found to be linked to a decrease of ignition delay, with the premixed peak in the rate of heat release curve progressively disappearing as the ignition delay time gets shorter. Ignition delay has been analyzed as a function of the laser position, too. It was found that ignition delay increases for plasma positions closer to the nozzle, indicating that the amount of energy introduced by the laser induced plasma is not the only parameter affecting combustion initiation, but local equivalence ratio

  2. Correleation of the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Models in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; McLeod, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III was launched on February 19, 2017 and mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Correlation of the thermal model is important since the payload will be expected to survive a three-year mission on ISS under varying thermal environments. Three major thermal vacuum (TVAC) tests were completed during the development of the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP); two subsystem-level tests and a payload-level test. Additionally, a characterization TVAC test was performed in order to verify performance of a system of heater plates that was designed to allow the IP to achieve the required temperatures during payload-level testing; model correlation was performed for this test configuration as well as those including the SAGE III flight hardware. This document presents the methods that were used to correlate the SAGE III models to TVAC at the subsystem and IP level, including the approach for modeling the parts of the payload in the thermal chamber, generating pre-test predictions, and making adjustments to the model to align predictions with temperatures observed during testing. Model correlation quality will be presented and discussed, and lessons learned during the correlation process will be shared.

  3. Project W-320 thermal hydraulic model benchmarking and baselining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, K.

    1998-01-01

    Project W-320 will be retrieving waste from Tank 241-C-106 and transferring the waste to Tank 241-AY-102. Waste in both tanks must be maintained below applicable thermal limits during and following the waste transfer. Thermal hydraulic process control models will be used for process control of the thermal limits. This report documents the process control models and presents a benchmarking of the models with data from Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Revision 1 of this report will provide a baselining of the models in preparation for the initiation of sluicing

  4. A hydrocode study of explosive shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, George; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the results of hydrocode simulations of shock-induced ignition of PBXN-109, Octol, and PETN, using the History Variable Reactive Burn model in the CTH hydrocode. The simulations began with small-scale sympathetic detonation experiments, from which normalized values of pressure and time were derived and used to define an upper bound for ignition. This upper bound corresponds to the well established Pop-plot data for supported detonation, i . e . detonations in which a constant shock pressure is applied to an explosive until full detonation is achieved. Subsequently, one-dimensional flyer-plate simulations were conducted where the response of constant-amplitude, limited-duration shock pulses into semi-infinite explosive samples was examined. These simulations confirmed not only the existence of an upper bound for ignition as expected, but also showed ignition by ``lower level'' shocks, in which full detonation is reached at a time longer than the input shock duration. These lower-level shocks can be used to define a distinct minimal ignition threshold, below which shock pulses do not result in detonation. Numerical experiments using these bounds offer a new framework for interpreting explosive initiation data.

  5. A simplified model to estimate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Maxim; Rosamond, Mark C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is an attractive technique for nanoscale thermal measurements. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be used to enhance a SThM probe in order to drastically increase spatial resolution while keeping required thermal sensitivity. However, an accurate prediction of the thermal resistance at the interface between the MWCNT-enhanced probe tip and a sample under study is essential for the accurate interpretation of experimental measurements. Unfortunately, there is very little literature on Kapitza interfacial resistance involving carbon nanotubes under SThM configuration. We propose a model for heat conductance through an interface between the MWCNT tip and the sample, which estimates the thermal resistance based on phonon and geometrical properties of the MWCNT and the sample, without neglecting the diamond-like carbon layer covering the MWCNT tip. The model considers acoustic phonons as the main heat carriers and account for their scattering at the interface based on a fundamental quantum mechanical approach. The predicted value of the thermal resistance is then compared with experimental data available in the literature. Theoretical predictions and experimental results are found to be of the same order of magnitude, suggesting a simplified, yet realistic model to approximate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in SThM, albeit low temperature measurements are needed to achieve a better match between theory and experiment. As a result, several possible avenues are outlined to achieve more accurate predictions and to generalize the model.

  6. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of A Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and test data validation of the thermal model that is the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented to validate the model are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Centigrade of the thermal vacuum test data, and was found to be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed, however, to refine the thermal model to further improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank. Temperatures predictions in this portion were found to be 2-2.5 degrees Centigrade lower than the test data. A road map to apply the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  7. Computational characterization of ignition regimes in a syngas/air mixture with temperature fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2016-07-27

    Auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations were computationally investigated. The main objectives were to quantify the observed ignition characteristics and numerically validate the theory of the turbulent ignition regime diagram recently proposed by Im et al. 2015 [29] that provides a framework to predict ignition behavior . a priori based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and initial flow and scalar field conditions. Ignition regimes were classified into three categories: . weak (where deflagration is the dominant mode of fuel consumption), . reaction-dominant strong, and . mixing-dominant strong (where volumetric ignition is the dominant mode of fuel consumption). Two-dimensional (2D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean syngas/air mixture with uniform mixture composition at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions were performed in a fixed volume. The initial conditions considered two-dimensional isotropic velocity spectrums, temperature fluctuations and localized thermal hot spots. A number of parametric test cases, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers, were investigated. The evolution of the auto-ignition phenomena, pressure rise, and heat release rate were analyzed. In addition, combustion mode analysis based on front propagation speed and computational singular perturbation (CSP) was applied to characterize the auto-ignition phenomena. All results supported that the observed ignition behaviors were consistent with the expected ignition regimes predicted by the theory of the regime diagram. This work provides new high-fidelity data on syngas ignition characteristics over a broad range of conditions and demonstrates that the regime diagram serves as a predictive guidance in the understanding of various physical and chemical mechanisms controlling auto-ignition

  8. Hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors dynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrizal, N.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J.I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal dynamic model is presented. ► The model, once calibrated, can predict the power output for any set of climate data. ► The physical electrical model includes explicitly thermal and irradiance dependences. ► The results agree with those obtained through steady-state characterization. ► The model approaches the junction cell temperature through the system energy balance. -- Abstract: A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal transient model has been developed and validated experimentally. The methodology extends the quasi-dynamic thermal model stated in the EN 12975 in order to involve the electrical performance and consider the dynamic behavior minimizing constraints when characterizing the collector. A backward moving average filtering procedure has been applied to improve the model response for variable working conditions. Concerning the electrical part, the model includes the thermal and radiation dependences in its variables. The results revealed that the characteristic parameters included in the model agree reasonably well with the experimental values obtained from the standard steady-state and IV characteristic curve measurements. After a calibration process, the model is a suitable tool to predict the thermal and electrical performance of a hybrid solar collector, for a specific weather data set.

  9. The Space Thermal Signature Model: Principles And Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, John A.

    1987-09-01

    The SPACE (Sun, Precipitation, Atmosphere, Clouds, Earth) Thermal Signature Model has been developed by XonTech as a tool to be used in the accurate prediction of military thermal signatures. Currently this model has been optimized to address 8-12 micrometer signatures of armored ground targets in natural background settings. With somewhat lesser accuracy the current model design can address the 3-5 micrometer spectral region. With some model modifications, air and space targets could be addressed. The model is based entirely on first principles with respect to the thermal signature components induced by the natural environment. However, self-heating effects such as those caused by a tank engine or by friction require empirical input data which must be derived from pre-existing thermal measurements. The SPACE model has been programmed in compiled Microsoft BASIC to run on PC-compatible computers. Some generic target and background descriptions are part of the model ensemble. The development of additional descriptive data bases to cover specific target/background scenarios is possible using related utility software which has been developed for this purpose. The SPACE model is currently being used both by Government and industry to support model comparison studies, the prediction of target-to-background thermal contrast signatures, and the generation of synthetic infrared thermal imagery. It is the purpose of this paper to provide a brief tutorial on the modeling principles behind SPACE, a description of the SPACE software architecture and operation, and some example problems.

  10. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Mahmood

    Full Text Available Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2-water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary. Keywords: Solar energy, Thermal collectors, Maxwell-nanofluid, Thermal radiation, Partial slip, Variable thermal conductivity

  11. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  12. Frequency-domain thermal modelling of power semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede; Andresen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    to correctly predict the device temperatures, especially when considering the thermal grease and heat sink attached to the power semiconductor devices. In this paper, the frequency-domain approach is applied to the modelling of thermal dynamics for power devices. The limits of the existing RC lump...

  13. High power solid state retrofit lamp thermal characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovenko, J.; Formánek, J.; Vladimír, J.; Husák, M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) retrofit LED Lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount Importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D

  14. 3D Temperature Distribution Model Based on Thermal Infrared Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the construction of 3D temperature distribution reconstruction system based on binocular vision technology. Initially, a traditional calibration method cannot be directly used, because the thermal infrared camera is only sensitive to temperature. Therefore, the thermal infrared camera is calibrated separately. Belief propagation algorithm is also investigated and its smooth model is improved in terms of stereo matching to optimize mismatching rate. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution model is built based on the matching of 3D point cloud and 2D thermal infrared information. Experimental results show that the method can accurately construct the 3D temperature distribution model and has strong robustness.

  15. Viscous and thermal modelling of thermoplastic composites forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Eduardo; Liang, Biao; Hamila, Nahiene; Boisse, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process. It is suitable for automotive composite parts manufacturing. The simulation of thermoplastic prepreg forming is achieved by alternate thermal and mechanical analyses. The thermal properties are obtained from a mesoscopic analysis and a homogenization procedure. The forming simulation is based on a viscous-hyperelastic approach. The thermal simulations define the coefficients of the mechanical model that depend on the temperature. The forming simulations modify the boundary conditions and the internal geometry of the thermal analyses. The comparison of the simulation with an experimental thermoforming of a part representative of automotive applications shows the efficiency of the approach.

  16. Assessment of the effect of gaseous fuel delivery mode on thermal efficiency and fuel losses during the valve overlap period in a dual-fuel compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzek, T.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes the effect of dual fuelling of single cylinder AVL test CI engine with the use of two ways of gas delivery to the engine manifold. The engine was fuelled diesel oil and propane. For all the tests, gas consumption was maintained at the same level. In the first mode the gas was delivered by injector located under inlet valve. In the second method, there was used a mixer fitted to the intake manifold. The paper compares the results of thermal efficiency and emissions of propane in the exhaust for both fuelling modes. Research clearly show how important it is to synchronize the injector opening time of the intake stroke. This is especially important for supercharged engines in which there is a valve overlap.

  17. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  18. Disappearance of criticality in branched-chain thermal explosion with heat loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoya, Samuel S.

    2003-09-01

    In the framework of the currently developed branched-chain thermal explosion theory, the equation governing leakage through a hole of a reaction vessel is given. The critical ignition, extinction and transition temperature excess, activation energy parameter and modified Semenov's number are estimated employing this equation. We calculated numerically and obtained analytically these non-dimensional parameters with and without initiation respectively. The similar solution for Semenov model appear as a limiting case of our solution. We also obtained the ignition times. (author)

  19. Thermal modeling with solid/liquid phase change of the thermal energy storage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1991-01-01

    A thermal model which simulates combined conduction and phase change characteristics of thermal energy storage (TES) materials is presented. Both the model and results are presented for the purpose of benchmarking the conduction and phase change capabilities of recently developed and unvalidated microgravity TES computer programs. Specifically, operation of TES-1 is simulated. A two-dimensional SINDA85 model of the TES experiment in cylindrical coordinates was constructed. The phase change model accounts for latent heat stored in, or released from, a node undergoing melting and freezing.

  20. Effect of structural heterogeneity water-coal fuel conditions and characteristics of ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrodoy S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the particle ignition of coal-water fuel (CWF with a joint course of the main processes of a thermal (thermal conductivity, evaporation, filtration heat and mass transfer, thermal decomposition of the organic part has been solved. According to the results of numerical simulation ways of describing the extent of the influence of the thermophysical properties on the characteristics and conditions of ignition WCF have been set.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for thermal binary-mixture gas flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinfen; Prasianakis, Nikolaos I; Mantzaras, John

    2013-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for thermal gas mixtures is derived. The kinetic model is designed in a way that combines properties of two previous literature models, namely, (a) a single-component thermal model and (b) a multicomponent isothermal model. A comprehensive platform for the study of various practical systems involving multicomponent mixture flows with large temperature differences is constructed. The governing thermohydrodynamic equations include the mass, momentum, energy conservation equations, and the multicomponent diffusion equation. The present model is able to simulate mixtures with adjustable Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Validation in several flow configurations with temperature and species concentration ratios up to nine is presented.

  2. Parameterization of a Cookoff Model for LX-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles-Ramos, Cuauhtemoc [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Advanced Engineering Analysis Group (W-13)

    2016-11-22

    A thermal decomposition model for PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% Estane® binder, 2.5% BDNPA/F nitro-plasticizer) was implemented by Dickson, et. al. The objective in this study is to estimate parameters associated with this kinetics model so it can be applied to carry out thermal ignition predictions for LX-07 (90% HMX, 10% Viton binder). LX-07 thermal ignition experiments have been carried out using the “Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition Apparatus”, SITI. The SITI design consists of solid cylinders (1” diameter × 1” height) of high explosive (HE) confined by a cylindrical aluminum case. An electric heater is wrapped around the outer surface of the case. This heater produces a temperature heating ramp on the outer surface of the case. Internal thermocouples measure the HE temperature rise from the center to locations close to the HE-aluminum interface. The energetic material is heated until thermal ignition occurs. A two–dimensional axisymmetric heat conduction finite element model is used to simulate these experiments. The HE thermal decomposition kinetics is coupled to a heat conduction model trough the definition of an energy source term. The parameters used to define the HE thermal decomposition model are optimized to obtain a good agreement with the experimental time to thermal ignition and temperatures. Also, heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the LX-07 mixture were estimated using temperatures measured at the center of the HE before the solid to solid HMX phase transition occurred.

  3. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Aziz, Asim; Jamshed, Wasim; Hussain, Sajid

    Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2 -water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary.

  4. Burner ignition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  5. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

  6. Ignition in net for different energy confinement time scalings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.; Prevot, F.

    1988-06-01

    A zero-dimensional profile dependent model is used to assess the feasibility of ignition in the extended version of NET. Five recent scalings for the energy confinement time (Goldston, Kaye All, Kaye Big, Shimomura-Odajima, Rebut-Lallia) are compared in the frame of two different scenarii, i.e., H-mode with a flat density profile or L-mode with a peaked density profile. For the flat density H-mode case, ignition is accessible with none of the scalings except Rebut-Lallia's. For the peaked density L-mode case, ignition is accessible with none of the scalings except Rebut-Lallia's. For the two Kaye's scalings, ignition is forbidden in H-mode even with the peaked density profile. For the Rebut-Lallia scaling, ignition is allowed in L-mode even with the flat density profile

  7. Coupled electrochemical thermal modelling of a novel Li-ion battery pack thermal management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Suman; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Sohn, Dong Kee; Yeo, Taejung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional electrochemical thermal model of Li-ion battery pack using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). • Novel pack design for compact liquid cooling based thermal management system. • Simple temperature estimation algorithm for the cells in the pack using the results from the model. • Sensitivity of the thermal performance to contact resistance has been investigated. - Abstract: Thermal management system is of critical importance for a Li-ion battery pack, as high performance and long battery pack life can be simultaneously achieved when operated within a narrow range of temperature around the room temperature. An efficient thermal management system is required to keep the battery temperature in this range, despite widely varying operating conditions. A novel liquid coolant based thermal management system, for 18,650 battery pack has been introduced herein. This system is designed to be compact and economical without compromising safety. A coupled three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical thermal model is constructed for the proposed Li-ion battery pack. The model is used to evaluate the effects of different operating conditions like coolant flow-rate and discharge current on the pack temperature. Contact resistance is found to have the strongest impact on the thermal performance of the pack. From the numerical solution, a simple and novel temperature correlation of predicting the temperatures of all the individual cells given the temperature measurement of one cell is devised and validated with experimental results. Such coefficients have great potential of reducing the sensor requirement and complexity in a large Li-ion battery pack, typical of an electric vehicle.

  8. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus-FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met) indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  9. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus–FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  10. Quasi-dimensional modeling of a fast-burn combustion dual-plug spark-ignition engine with complex combustion chamber geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altın, İsmail; Bilgin, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    This study builds on a previous parametric investigation using a thermodynamic-based quasi-dimensional (QD) cycle simulation of a spark-ignition (SI) engine with dual-spark plugs. The previous work examined the effects of plug-number and location on some performance parameters considering an engine with a simple cylindrical disc-shaped combustion chamber. In order to provide QD thermodynamic models applicable to complex combustion chamber geometries, a novel approach is considered here: flame-maps, which utilizes a computer aided design (CAD) software (SolidWorks). Flame maps are produced by the CAD software, which comprise all the possible flame radiuses with an increment of one-mm between them, according to the spark plug positions, spark timing, and piston position near the top dead center. The data are tabulated and stored as matrices. Then, these tabulated data are adapted to the previously reported cycle simulation. After testing for simple disc-shaped chamber geometries, the simulation is applied to a real production automobile (Honda-Fit) engine to perform the parametric study. - Highlights: • QD model was applied in dual plug engine with complex realistic combustion chamber. • This method successfully modeled the combustion in the dual-plug Honda-Fit engine. • The same combustion chamber is tested for various spark plug(s) locations. • The centrally located single spark-plug results in the fastest combustion

  11. Approach to chemical equilibrium in thermal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The experimentally measured (μ - , charged particle)/(μ - ,n) and (p,n/p,p') ratios for the emission of energetic nucleons are used to estimate the time evolution of a system of secondary nucleons produced in a direct interaction of a projectile or captured muon. The values of these ratios indicate that chemical equilibrium is not achieved among the secondary nucleons in noncomposite induced reactions, and this restricts the time scale for the emission of energetic nucleons to be about 0.7 x 10 -23 sec. It is shown that the reason why thermal equilibrium can be reached so rapidly for a particular nucleon species is that the sum of the particle spectra produced in multiple direct reactions looks surprisingly thermal. The rate equations used to estimate the reaction times for muon and nucleon induced reactions are then applied to heavy ion collisions, and it is shown that chemical equilibrium can be reached more rapidly, as one would expect

  12. Modelling thermal plume impacts - Kalpakkam approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.; Anup Kumar, B.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    A good understanding of temperature patterns in the receiving waters is essential to know the heat dissipation from thermal plumes originating from coastal power plants. The seasonal temperature profiles of the Kalpakkam coast near Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) thermal out fall site are determined and analysed. It is observed that the seasonal current reversal in the near shore zone is one of the major mechanisms for the transport of effluents away from the point of mixing. To further refine our understanding of the mixing and dilution processes, it is necessary to numerically simulate the coastal ocean processes by parameterising the key factors concerned. In this paper, we outline the experimental approach to achieve this objective. (author)

  13. Simple-II: A new numerical thermal model for predicting thermal performance of Stirling engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaelahi, Mojtaba; Sayyaadi, Hoseyn

    2014-01-01

    A new thermal model called Simple-II was presented based on modification of the original Simple analysis. First, the engine was modeled considering adiabatic expansion and compression spaces, in which effect of gas leakage from cylinder to buffer space and shuttle effect of displacer were implemented in the basic differential equations. Moreover, non-ideal thermal operation of the regenerator and the longitudinal heat conduction between heater and cooler through the regenerator wall were considered. Based on the magnitudes of pressure drops in heat exchangers, values of pressure in the expansion and compression spaces were corrected. Furthermore, based on the theory of finite speed thermodynamics (FST), the corresponding power loss due to the piston motion and also the mechanical friction were considered. Simple-II was employed for thermal simulation of a prototype Stirling engine. Finally, result of the new model was evaluated by comprehensive comparison of experimental results with those of the previous models. The output power and thermal efficiency were predicted with +20.7% and +7.1% errors, respectively. Also, the regenerator was demonstrated to be the main source of power and heat losses; nevertheless, other loss mechanisms have reasonable effects on output power and/or thermal efficiency of Stirling engines. - Highlights: • A new thermal model was presented based on various loss mechanisms. • Shuttle effect and mass leakage were integrated into differential equations. • FST, mechanical friction and longitudinal conduction losses were considered. • A methodology was presented for numerical solution and correcting results based on losses. • The new model predicted thermal performance of engine with higher accuracy

  14. Thermal behaviour modelling of superplastic forming tools

    OpenAIRE

    Velay , Vincent; Cutard , Thierry; Guegan , N.

    2008-01-01

    High-temperature operational conditions of super plastic forming (SPF) tools induce very complex thermomechanical loadings responsible to their failure. Various materials can be used to manufacture forming tools: ceramic, refractory castable or heat resistant steel. In this paper, an experimental and numerical analysis is performed in order to characterise the environmental loadings undergone by the tool whatever the considered material. This investigation allows to lead a thermal calculation...

  15. Transient thermal modelling of ball bearing using finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Sibilli, Thierry; Igie, Uyioghosa

    2017-01-01

    Gas turbines are fitted with rolling element bearings, which transfer loads and supports the shafts. The interaction between the rotating and stationary parts in the bearing causes a conversion of some of the power into heat, influencing the thermal behaviour of the entire bearing chamber. To improve thermal modelling of bearing chambers, this work focused on modelling of the heat generated and dissipated around the bearings, in terms of magnitude and location, and the interaction with the co...

  16. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents recent thermal model results of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The three-dimensional (3D) ASRG thermal power model was built using the Thermal Desktop(trademark) thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's (LM's) I-deas(trademark) TMG thermal model. The auxiliary cooling system (ACS) of the ASRG is also included in the ASRG thermal model. The ACS is designed to remove waste heat from the ASRG so that it can be used to heat spacecraft components. The performance of the ACS is reported under nominal conditions and during a Venus flyby scenario. The results for the nominal case are validated with data from Lockheed Martin. Transient thermal analysis results of ASRG for a Venus flyby with a representative trajectory are also presented. In addition, model results of an ASRG mounted on a Cassini-like spacecraft with a sunshade are presented to show a way to mitigate the high temperatures of a Venus flyby. It was predicted that the sunshade can lower the temperature of the ASRG alternator by 20 C for the representative Venus flyby trajectory. The 3D model also was modified to predict generator performance after a single Advanced Stirling Convertor failure. The geometry of the Microtherm HT insulation block on the outboard side was modified to match deformation and shrinkage observed during testing of a prototypic ASRG test fixture by LM. Test conditions and test data were used to correlate the model by adjusting the thermal conductivity of the deformed insulation to match the post-heat-dump steady state temperatures. Results for these conditions showed that the performance of the still-functioning inboard ACS was unaffected.

  17. Thermal energy dissipation and xanthophyll cycles beyond the Arabidopsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Esteban, Raquel; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Kranner, Ilse; Porcar-Castell, Albert

    2012-09-01

    Thermal dissipation of excitation energy is a fundamental photoprotection mechanism in plants. Thermal energy dissipation is frequently estimated using the quenching of the chlorophyll fluorescence signal, termed non-photochemical quenching. Over the last two decades, great progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanism of thermal energy dissipation through the use of a few model plants, mainly Arabidopsis. Nonetheless, an emerging number of studies suggest that this model represents only one strategy among several different solutions for the environmental adjustment of thermal energy dissipation that have evolved among photosynthetic organisms in the course of evolution. In this review, a detailed analysis of three examples highlights the need to use models other than Arabidopsis: first, overwintering evergreens that develop a sustained form of thermal energy dissipation; second, desiccation tolerant plants that induce rapid thermal energy dissipation; and third, understorey plants in which a complementary lutein epoxide cycle modulates thermal energy dissipation. The three examples have in common a shift from a photosynthetically efficient state to a dissipative conformation, a strategy widely distributed among stress-tolerant evergreen perennials. Likewise, they show a distinct operation of the xanthophyll cycle. Expanding the list of model species beyond Arabidopsis will enhance our knowledge of these mechanisms and increase the synergy of the current studies now dispersed over a wide number of species.

  18. Thermal properties. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Wrafter, John; Sundberg, Jan; Rosen, L ars

    2007-09-01

    The lithological data acquired from boreholes and mapping of the rock surface need to be reclassified into thermal rock classes, TRCs. The main reason is to simplify the simulations. The lithological data are used to construct models of the transition between different TRCs, thus describing the spatial statistical structure of each TRC. The result is a set of transition probability models that are used in the simulation of TRCs. The intermediate result of this first stochastic simulation is a number of realisations of the geology, each one equally probable. Based on the thermal data, a spatial statistical thermal model is constructed for each TRC. It consists of a statistical distribution and a variogram for each TRC. These are used in the stochastic simulation of thermal conductivity and the result is a number of equally probable realisations of thermal conductivity for the domain. In the next step, the realisations of TRCs (lithology) and thermal conductivity are merged, i.e. each realisation of geology is filled with simulated thermal conductivity values. The result is a set of realisations of thermal conductivity that considers both the difference in thermal properties between different TRCs, and the variability within each TRC. If the result is desired in a scale different from the simulation scale, i.e. the canister scale, upscaling of the realisations can be performed. The result is a set of equally probable realisations of thermal properties. The presented methodology was applied to rock domain RFM029 and RFM045. The main results are sets of realisations of thermal properties that can be used for further processing, most importantly for statistical analysis and numerical temperature simulations for the design of repository layout (distances between deposition holes). The main conclusions of the thermal modelling are: The choice of scale has a profound influence on the distribution of thermal conductivity values. The variance decreases and the lower tail

  19. Thermal properties. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Wrafter, John; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden); Rosen, L ars [Sweco Viak AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    The lithological data acquired from boreholes and mapping of the rock surface need to be reclassified into thermal rock classes, TRCs. The main reason is to simplify the simulations. The lithological data are used to construct models of the transition between different TRCs, thus describing the spatial statistical structure of each TRC. The result is a set of transition probability models that are used in the simulation of TRCs. The intermediate result of this first stochastic simulation is a number of realisations of the geology, each one equally probable. Based on the thermal data, a spatial statistical thermal model is constructed for each TRC. It consists of a statistical distribution and a variogram for each TRC. These are used in the stochastic simulation of thermal conductivity and the result is a number of equally probable realisations of thermal conductivity for the domain. In the next step, the realisations of TRCs (lithology) and thermal conductivity are merged, i.e. each realisation of geology is filled with simulated thermal conductivity values. The result is a set of realisations of thermal conductivity that considers both the difference in thermal properties between different TRCs, and the variability within each TRC. If the result is desired in a scale different from the simulation scale, i.e. the canister scale, upscaling of the realisations can be performed. The result is a set of equally probable realisations of thermal properties. The presented methodology was applied to rock domain RFM029 and RFM045. The main results are sets of realisations of thermal properties that can be used for further processing, most importantly for statistical analysis and numerical temperature simulations for the design of repository layout (distances between deposition holes). The main conclusions of the thermal modelling are: The choice of scale has a profound influence on the distribution of thermal conductivity values. The variance decreases and the lower tail

  20. Modelling of a Spark Ignition Engine for Power-Heat Production Optimization Modèle de moteur à allumage commandé en vue de l’optimisation de la production chaleur-force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descieux D.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Spark ignition gas engine is more and more used in order to produce electricity and heat simultaneously. The engine crankshaft drives a synchronous electric generator. The thermal power output is recovered from the engine coolant system and exhaust gas, and is used to produce generally hot water for heating system. In order to have a better adequacy between supply (production of the engine and user demand, good knowledge of the engine and implemented phenomena are necessary. A generic methodology is proposed to simulate the stationary state response of a SI engine. The engine simulation is based on a one zone thermodynamic model, which characterizes each phase of the engine cycle to predict energy performances: exergy efficiency as high as 0.70 is attainable. Le moteur a allumage commande alimente en gaz est un moteur de plus en plus utilise pour la production simultanee d’electricite et de chaleur. Classiquement le moteur entraine sur l’arbre une generatrice electrique. Le flux thermique est recupere principalement sur le systeme de refroidissement du moteur ainsi que sur les fumees chaudes et il est generalement utilise pour produire de la chaleur pour les systemes de chauffage. Pour avoir une meilleure adaptation entre la production du moteur et la demande de l’usager, une bonne connaissance des evolutions dans le moteur et des phenomenes correspondants est necessaire. Une methode thermodynamique generale est proposee pour simulation du fonctionnement dynamique stationnaire d’un MACI. Le modele utilise une analyse monozone et les caracteristiques de chaque transformation du cycle pour etudier les performances energetiques : rendement exergetique de l’ordre de 0,70.

  1. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  2. OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project phase I: Benchmark of the ignition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina, E-mail: martina_adorni@hotmail.it [UNIPI (Italy); Herranz, Luis E. [CIEMAT (Spain); Hollands, Thorsten [GRS (Germany); Ahn, Kwang-II [KAERI (Korea, Republic of); Bals, Christine [GRS (Germany); D' Auria, Francesco [UNIPI (Italy); Horvath, Gabor L. [NUBIKI (Hungary); Jaeckel, Bernd S. [PSI (Switzerland); Kim, Han-Chul; Lee, Jung-Jae [KINS (Korea, Republic of); Ogino, Masao [JNES (Japan); Techy, Zsolt [NUBIKI (Hungary); Velazquez-Lozad, Alexander; Zigh, Abdelghani [USNRC (United States); Rehacek, Radomir [OECD/NEA (France)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A unique PWR spent fuel pool experimental project is analytically investigated. • Predictability of fuel clad ignition in case of a complete loss of coolant in SFPs is assessed. • Computer codes reasonably estimate peak cladding temperature and time of ignition. - Abstract: The OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project provided unique thermal-hydraulic experimental data associated with Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) complete drain down. The study conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was successfully completed (July 2009 to February 2013). The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full scale prototypic fashion (electrically heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate severe accident code validation and to reduce modeling uncertainties within the codes. Phase I focused on axial heating and burn propagation in a single PWR 17 × 17 assembly (i.e. “hot neighbors” configuration). Phase II addressed axial and radial heating and zirconium fire propagation including effects of fuel rod ballooning in a 1 × 4 assembly configuration (i.e. single, hot center assembly and four, “cooler neighbors”). This paper summarizes the comparative analysis regarding the final destructive ignition test of the phase I of the project. The objective of the benchmark is to evaluate and compare the predictive capabilities of computer codes concerning the ignition testing of PWR fuel assemblies. Nine institutions from eight different countries were involved in the benchmark calculations. The time to ignition and the maximum temperature are adequately captured by the calculations. It is believed that the benchmark constitutes an enlargement of the validation range for the codes to the conditions tested, thus enhancing the code applicability to other fuel assembly designs and configurations. The comparison of

  3. Measurement and model on thermal properties of sintered diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, Tala; Garnier, Bertrand; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermal properties of sintered diamond used for grinding is studied. ► Flash method with infrared temperature measurement is used to investigate. ► Thermal conductivity increases with the amount of diamond. ► It is very sensitive to binder conductivity. ► Results agree with models assuming imperfect contact between matrix and particles. - Abstract: A prelude to the thermal management of grinding processes is measurement of the thermal properties of working materials. Indeed, tool materials must be chosen not only for their mechanical properties (abrasion performance, lifetime…) but also for thermal concerns (thermal conductivity) for efficient cooling that avoids excessive temperatures in the tool and workpiece. Sintered diamond is currently used for grinding tools since it yields higher performances and longer lifetimes than conventional materials (mineral or silicon carbide abrasives), but its thermal properties are not yet well known. Here the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density of sintered diamond are measured as functions of the diamond content in composites and for two types of metallic binders: hard tungsten-based and soft cobalt-based binders. The measurement technique for thermal conductivity is derived from the flash method. After pulse heating, the temperature of the rear of the sample is measured with a noncontact method (infrared camera). A parameter estimation method associated with a three-layer nonstationary thermal model is used to obtain sample thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient and absorbed energy. With the hard metallic binder, the thermal conductivity of sintered diamond increased by up to 64% for a diamond content increasing from 0 to 25%. The increase is much less for the soft binder: 35% for diamond volumes up to 25%. In addition, experimental data were found that were far below the value predicted by conventional analytical models for effective thermal conductivity. A possible explanation

  4. Modeling thermally active building components using space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frank; Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    simplified models of the components do not always provide useful solutions, since they are not always able to reproduce the correct thermal behavior. The space mapping technique transforms a simplified, but computationally inexpensive model, in order to align it with a detailed model or measurements....... This paper describes the principle of the space mapping technique, and introduces a simple space mapping technique. The technique is applied to a lumped parameter model of a thermo active component, which provides a model of the thermal performance of the component as a function of two design parameters...

  5. Evaluation of the Thermodynamic Models for the Thermal Diffusion Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Bagnoli, Mariana G.; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, several thermodynamic models for the thermal diffusion factors for binary mixtures have been proposed. The goal of this paper is to test some of these models in combination with different equations of state. We tested the following models: those proposed by Rutherford and Drickamer...... we applied different thermodynamic models, such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and the Peng-Robinson equations of state. The necessity to try different thermo-dynamic models is caused by the high sensitivity of the thermal diffusion factors to the values of the partial molar properties. Two different...

  6. Study of the shock ignition scheme in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Shock Ignition (SI) scheme is an alternative to classical ignition schemes in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Its singularity relies on the relaxation of constraints during the compression phase and fulfilment of ignition conditions by launching a short and intense laser pulse (∼500 ps, ∼300 TW) on the pre-assembled fuel at the end of the implosion.In this thesis, it has been established that the SI process leads to a non-isobaric fuel configuration at the ignition time thus modifying the ignition criteria of Deuterium-Tritium (DT) against the conventional schemes. A gain model has been developed and gain curves have been inferred and numerically validated. This hydrodynamical modeling has demonstrated that the SI process allows higher gain and lower ignition energy threshold than conventional ignition due to the high hot spot pressure at ignition time resulting from the ignitor shock propagation.The radiative hydrodynamic CHIC code developed at the CELIA laboratory has been used to determine parametric dependences describing the optimal conditions for target design leading to ignition. These numerical studies have enlightened the potential of SI with regards to saving up laser energy, obtain high gains but also to safety margins and ignition robustness.Finally, the results of the first SI experiments performed in spherical geometry on the OMEGA laser facility (NY, USA) are presented. An interpretation of the experimental data is proposed from mono and bidimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Then, different trails are explored to account for the differences observed between experimental and numerical data and alternative solutions to improve performances are suggested. (author) [fr

  7. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S; D' Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of

  8. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs

  10. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O.

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost

  11. A new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere (10°W-35°E; 35°N-60°N), which is based on a combination of recently obtained geophysical models. To determine temperature distribution we use a new tomography model, which is principally improved by an a-priori correction of

  12. Ignition of detonation in accreted helium envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ami Glasner, S.; Livne, E.; Steinberg, E.; Yalinewich, A.; Truran, James W.

    2018-02-01

    Sub Chandrasekhar CO white dwarfs accreting helium have been considered as candidates for SNIa progenitors since the early 1980's (helium shell mass >0.1M⊙). These models, once detonated did not fit the observed spectra and light curve of typical SNIa observations. New theoretical work examined detonations on much less massive (<0.05M⊙) envelopes. They find stable detonations that lead to light curves, spectra and abundances that compare relatively well with the observational data. The exact mechanism leading to the ignition of helium detonation is a key issue, since it is a mandatory first step for the whole scenario. As the flow of the accreted envelope is unstable to convection long before any hydrodynamic phenomena develops, a multidimensional approach is needed in order to study the ignition process. The complex convective reactive flow is challenging to any hydrodynamical solver. According to our best knowledge all previous 2D studies ignited the detonation artificially. We present here, for the first time, fully consistent results from two hydrodynamical 2D solvers that adopt two independent accurate schemes. For both solvers an effort was made to overcome the problematics raised by the finite resolution and numerical diffusion by the advective terms. Our best models lead to the ignition of a detonation in a convective cell. Our results are robust and the agreement between the two different numerical approaches is very good.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  14. Modelling and Preliminary Prediction of Thermal Balance Test for COMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Yoll Jun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available COMS (Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite is a geostationary satellite and developed by KARI for communication, ocean and meteorological observations. It will be tested under vacuum and very low temperature conditions in order to verify thermal design of COMS. The test will be performed by using KARI large thermal vacuum chamber, which was developed by KARI, and the COMS will be the first flight satellite tested in this chamber. The purposes of thermal balance test are to correlate analytical model used for design evaluation and predicting temperatures, and to verify and adjust thermal control concept. KARI has plan to use heating plates to simulate space hot condition especially for radiator panels of satellite such as north and south panels. They will be controlled from 90 K to 273 K by circulating GN2 and LN2 alternatively according to the test phases, while the main shroud of the vacuum chamber will be under constant temperature, 90 K, during all thermal balance test. This paper presents thermal modelling including test chamber, heating plates and the satellite without solar array wing and Ka-band reflectors and discusses temperature prediction during thermal balance test.

  15. INFORMATION SUPPLY FOR SOLAR THERMAL SYSTEMS MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitaytseva Elena Khalilovna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar thermal system are its constituent elements with their connection between each other, thermal processes within them and also input/output data. The conjunction of external and internal factors determines the efficiency of solar thermal system. No excess heat as well as its deficiency displays us high level efficiency of system. The initial data for modeling of solar thermal systems functioning are dissimilar. Parameters of system’s equipment are constant. Solar radiation amount and water consumption are variable data. The more close initial data to reality, the more definite simulated result is. The main problem is in unpredictability of water consumption by the reason of daily regime and requirement of each user. In this way user is the most instable element of the system. In this study the input data for mathematical modeling of solar thermal systems was analyzed. The climatic databases and standard specifications of hot water demand were also analyzed. The operability estimation method for solar thermal systems with variable input data was offered. The extent of suitability of any solar thermal system can be defined by certain characteristic. The value of this characteristic displays energy accumulation process.

  16. High-Gain Shock Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K.; Bailey, D.; Lambert, M.; MacKinnon, A.; Blackfield, D.; Comley, A.; Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P.; Anderson, K.; Theobald, W.; Schmitt, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility for a near-term test of high-gain ICF on the NIF at less than 1MJ drive energy and with day-1 laser hardware. We will summarize the status of target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the R&D program to be performed in order to test the potential of a shock-ignited target on NIF. In shock ignition, compressed fuel is separately ignited by a late-time laser-driven shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, simulations indicate that fusion energy gains of 60 may be achievable at laser energies around 0.5MJ. Like fast ignition, shock ignition offers high gain but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and focusing requirements. Conventional symmetry and stability constraints apply, thus a key immediate step towards attempting shock ignition on NIF is to demonstrate adequacy of low-mode uniformity and shock symmetry under polar drive

  17. Mathematical Models of IABG Thermal-Vacuum Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Daniel; Ulfers, Hendrik

    2014-06-01

    IABG in Ottobrunn, Germany, operates thermal-vacuum facilities of different sizes and complexities as a service for space-testing of satellites and components. One aspect of these tests is the qualification of the thermal control system that keeps all onboard components within their save operating temperature band. As not all possible operation / mission states can be simulated within a sensible test time, usually a subset of important and extreme states is tested at TV facilities to validate the thermal model of the satellite, which is then used to model all other possible mission states. With advances in the precision of customer thermal models, simple assumptions of the test environment (e.g. everything black & cold, one solar constant of light from this side) are no longer sufficient, as real space simulation chambers do deviate from this ideal. For example the mechanical adapters which support the spacecraft are usually not actively cooled. To enable IABG to provide a model that is sufficiently detailed and realistic for current system tests, Munich engineering company CASE developed ESATAN models for the two larger chambers. CASE has many years of experience in thermal analysis for space-flight systems and ESATAN. The two models represent the rather simple (and therefore very homogeneous) 3m-TVA and the extremely complex space simulation test facility and its solar simulator. The cooperation of IABG and CASE built up extensive knowledge of the facilities thermal behaviour. This is the key to optimally support customers with their test campaigns in the future. The ESARAD part of the models contains all relevant information with regard to geometry (CAD data), surface properties (optical measurements) and solar irradiation for the sun simulator. The temperature of the actively cooled thermal shrouds is measured and mapped to the thermal mesh to create the temperature field in the ESATAN part as boundary conditions. Both models comprise switches to easily

  18. Ignition and explosion of nanopowders: something new under the dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufaud, Olivier; Vignes, Alexis; Henry, François; Perrin, Laurent; Bouillard, Jacques

    2011-07-01

    This work deals with the study of ignition and explosion characteristics of nanoparticles. It has been carried out on various powders: zinc, aluminum, carbon blacks... Specific behaviours have been highlighted during the first phase of this project (Nanosafe 2). For instance, it has been demonstrated that there mainly exists two combustion regimes that are either kinetically controlled, for small size particles, or diffusion controlled, for large size particles (generally with diameters greater than 1 or 2 μm). It has been found that as the particle size decreases, minimum ignition temperature and minimum ignition energy decrease (even lower than 1 mJ), indicating higher potential inflammation and explosion risks for metallic nanopowders. Moreover, the presence of agglomerates in the nanopowders could modify their reactivity. Thus, the explosion severity of Al powders tends to increase as the specific surface area decreases, before reaching a peak for 1 μm particle size. These results are essential for industries producing or handling nanopowders in order to propose/design new and proper prevention and protection means. Nevertheless, the validity of the classical characterization tools with regard to nanopowders should be discussed. For example, the experimental laminar flame velocity of Al dusts has been compared to a theoretical one, determined by Huang's model, which assumes that the propagation of the flame is run mainly by conduction. It has shown a good agreement. However, under certain conditions, the Al flame propagation is expected to be mainly conducted by radiation. Two hypotheses can then be made. On the one hand, it can be assumed that the 20 L sphere probably disturbs the flame propagation and thermal mechanisms by absorbing radiation (wall quenching effect). On the other hand, it has been observed, thanks to the use of a high speed camera that the preheating zone is smaller for some nanopowders than for micro-particles (figure below). It could

  19. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization

  20. Thermal ecological risk assessment - methodology for modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markandeya, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge of hot effluents into natural water bodies is a potential risk to the aquatic life. The stipulations imposed by the MoEF, Government of India for protecting the environment are in place. However, due to lack of quality scientific information, these stipulations are generally conservative in nature and hence questionable. A Coordinated Research Project on Thermal Ecological Studies, successfully completed recently came out with a suggestion of implementing multi-factorially estimated mixing zone concept. In the present paper, risk based assessment methodology is proposed as an alternate approach. The methodology is presented only conceptually and briefly over which further refining may be necessary. The methodology would enable to account for variations in the plant operational conditions, climatic conditions and the geographical and hydraulic characteristic conditions of the water body in a suitable manner. (author)

  1. Physical-Statistical Model of Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Usowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical-statistical model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids is proposed. The volumetric unit of nanofluids in the model consists of solid, liquid, and gas particles and is treated as a system made up of regular geometric figures, spheres, filling the volumetric unit by layers. The model assumes that connections between layers of the spheres and between neighbouring spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of thermal resistors, respectively. This model is expressed in terms of thermal resistance of nanoparticles and fluids and the multinomial distribution of particles in the nanofluids. The results for predicted and measured effective thermal conductivity of several nanofluids (Al2O3/ethylene glycol-based and Al2O3/water-based; CuO/ethylene glycol-based and CuO/water-based; and TiO2/ethylene glycol-based are presented. The physical-statistical model shows a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results and gives more accurate predictions for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids compared to existing classical models.

  2. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Vergunova, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile ("low-foot" and "high-foot" regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  3. System performance modeling of extreme ultraviolet lithographic thermal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P. A.; Gianoulakis, S. E.; Moen, C. D.; Kanouff, M. P.; Fisher, A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithography Engineering Test Stand. Extensive modeling was applied to predict the impact of thermal loads on key lithographic parameters such as image placement error, focal shift, and loss of CD control. We show that thermal issues can be effectively managed to ensure that their impact on lithographic performance is maintained within design error budgets. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  4. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/ 2 /q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs

  5. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. Thermal analysis of dry eye subjects and the thermal impulse perturbation model of ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhong; Maki, Kara L; Salahura, Gheorghe; Kottaiyan, Ranjini; Yoon, Geunyoung; Hindman, Holly B; Aquavella, James V; Zavislan, James M

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we explore the usage of ocular surface temperature (OST) decay patterns to distinguished between dry eye patients with aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The OST profiles of 20 dry eye subjects were measured by a long-wave infrared thermal camera in a standardized environment (24 °C, and relative humidity (RH) 40%). The subjects were instructed to blink every 5 s after 20 ∼ 25 min acclimation. Exponential decay curves were fit to the average temperature within a region of the central cornea. We find the MGD subjects have both a higher initial temperature (p model, referred to as the thermal impulse perturbation (TIP) model. We conclude that long-wave-infrared thermal imaging is a plausible tool in assisting with the classification of dry eye patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Progress Towards Microwave Ignition of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curling, Mark; Collins, Adam; Dima, Gabriel; Proud, William

    2009-06-01

    Microwaves could provide a method of propellant ignition that does away with a traditional primer, making ammunition safer and suitable for Insensitive Munitions (IM) applications. By embedding a suitable material inside a propellant, it is postulated that microwaves could be used to stimulate hotspots, through direct heating or electrostatic discharge (arcing) across the energetic material. This paper reports on progress in finding these suitable materials. Graphite rod, magnetite cubes and powders of graphite, aluminium, copper oxide, and iron were irradiated in a conventional microwave oven. Temperature measurements were made using a shielded thermocouple and thermal paints. Only graphite rod and magnetite showed significant heating upon microwave exposure. The light output from arcing of iron, steel, iron pyrite, magnetite and graphite was measured in the same microwave oven as above. Sample mass and shape were correlated with arcing intensity. A strategy is proposed to create a homogeneous igniter material by embedding arcing materials within an insulator, Polymethylpentene (TPX). External discharges were transmitted through TPX, however no embedded samples were successful in generating an electrical breakdown suitable for propellant ignition.

  8. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  9. Radiative Transport Modelling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    derived by Thrane et al from Fresnel-Huygens diffraction theory .5 The Thrane model defines the normalized signal current as a function of integrated...problem is in part application-driven, namely based on the need to be able to extract the radiative properties from the shape the LCI signal . On the...walk model to test model approaches 75 June 2017 4 Apply the theory to experimental data on TBCs 20 June 2017 5 Report on results and future

  10. Rocket Ignition Demonstrations Using Silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sibtosh; Santoro, Robert; Watkins, William B.; Kincaid, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Rocket ignition demonstration tests using silane were performed at the Penn State Combustion Research Laboratory. A heat sink combustor with one injection element was used with gaseous propellants. Mixtures of silane and hydrogen were used as fuel, and oxygen was used as oxidizer. Reliable ignition was demonstrated using fuel lead and and a swirl injection element.

  11. Gravitational collapse and thermalization in the hard wall model

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Rosen, Christopher; Taliotis, Anastasios; Vanhoof, Joris; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-01-01

    We study a simple example of holographic thermalization in a confining field theory: the homogeneous injection of energy in the hard wall model. Working in an amplitude expansion, we find black brane formation for sufficiently fast energy injection and a scattering wave solution for sufficiently slow injection. We comment on our expectations for more sophisticated holographic QCD models.

  12. Modeling of droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour during spray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathematical modeling of supersonic gas atomization for spray forming has been investigated. Influence of the droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour on the resultant microstructure has been studied. Analytical models have been constructed taking into account the higher Reynolds number owing to supersonic gas flow.

  13. Thermal and mechanical modelling of convergent plate margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, P.J. van den

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical structure of convergent plate margins will be investigated by means of numerical modelling. In addition, we will discuss the implications of modelling results for geological processes such as metamorphism or the break-up of a plate at a convergent plate

  14. Laser imprint and implications for direct drive ignition with the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    For direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination can seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called imprint. Such nonuniformities will grow during the capsule implosion and can penetrate the capsule shell impede ignition, or degrade burn. We have simulated imprint for a number of experiments on tile Nova laser. Results are in generally good agreement with experimental data. We leave also simulated imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules. Imprint modulation amplitude comparable to the intrinsic surface finish of ∼40 nm is predicted for a laser bandwidth of 0.5 THz. Ablation front modulations experience growth factors up to several thousand, carrying modulation well into the nonlinear regime. Saturation modeling predicts that the shell should remain intact at the time of peak velocity, but penetration at earlier times appears more marginal

  15. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  16. Thermal Models for Intelligent Heating of Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thavlov, Anders; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2012-01-01

    using a grey box approach, i.e. by formulating the model using physical knowledge about heat flow, while the parameters in the model are estimated using collected data and statistics. The physical parameters in the model, e.g. heat capacities and resistances to transfer heat, have been estimated...... share of renewable power generation, which is in general intermittent and non-controllable, the consumption side has to be much more flexible than today. To achieve such flexibility, methods for moving power consumption in time, within the hourly timescale, have to be developed. One approach currently...

  17. Development and validation of a multi-zone combustion model for performance and nitric oxide formation in syngas fueled spark ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Michos, C.N.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a zero-dimensional, multi-zone combustion model is presented for predicting the performance and nitric oxide (NO) emissions of a spark ignition (SI) engine. The model is validated against experimental data from a multi-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged and aftercooled, SI gas engine running with syngas fuel. This alternative fuel, the combustible part of which consists mainly of CO and H 2 with the rest containing non-combustible gases, has been recently identified as a promising substitute of fossil fuels in view of environmentally friendly engine operation. The basic concept of the model is the division of the burned gas into several distinct zones, unlike the simpler two-zone models, for taking into account the temperature stratification of the burned mixture during combustion. This is especially important for accurate NO emissions predictions, since NO formation is strongly temperature dependent. The multi-zone formulation provides the chemical species concentrations gradient existing in the burned zones, as well as the relative contribution of each burned zone to the total in-cylinder NO formation. The burning rate required as input to the model is expressed as a Wiebe function, fitted to experimentally derived burn rates. All model's constants are calibrated at one operating point and then kept unchanged. Zone-resolved combustion related information is obtained, assisting in the understanding of the complex phenomena occurring during combustion in SI engines. Combustion characteristics of the lean-burn gas engine tested are provided for the complete load range, aiding the interpretation of its performance and knocking tendency. Computed NO emissions from the multi-zone model for various values of the engine load (i.e. air-fuel ratios) are presented and found to be in good agreement with the respective experimental ones, providing confidence for the predictive capability of the model. The superiority of the multi-zone model over its two

  18. Modeling directional thermal radiance from a forest canopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, M.J.; Balick, L.K.; Smith, J.A.; Hutchison, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology have increased interest in utilizing the thermal-infared region to gain additional information about surface features such as vegetation canopies. Studies have shown that sensor view angle, canopy structure, and percentage of canopy coverage can affect the response of a thermal sensor. These studies have been primarily of agricultural regions and there have been relatively few examples describing the thermal characteristics of forested regions. This paper describes an extension of an existing thermal vegetation canopy radiance model which has been modified to partially account for the geometrically rough structure of a forest canopy. Fourier series expansion of a canopy height profile is used to calculate improved view factors which partially account for the directional variations in canopy thermal radiance transfers. The original and updated radiance model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained over a deciduous (oak-hickory) forest site. The experimental observations are also used to document azimuthal and nadir directional radiance variations. Maximum angular variations in measured canopy temperatures were 4–6°C (azimuth) and 2.5°C (nadir). Maximum angular variations in simulated temperatures using the modified rough surface model was 4°C. The rough surface model appeared to be sensitive to large gaps in the canopy height profile, which influenced the resultant predicted temperature. (author)

  19. Can polymer thermal oxidative ageing be modelled?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouin, L.; Colin, X.; Fayolle, B.; Richaud, E.; Verdu, J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been supposed, for a long time, that kinetic modelling of polymer ageing for nonempirical lifetime prediction was out of reach for two main reasons: hyper-complexity of mechanisms and heterogeneity of reactions. The arguments relative to both aspects are examined here. It is concluded that, thanks to recent advances, especially the introduction of numerical methods, kinetic modelling is possible in various important practical cases. (authors)

  20. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chambers, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  1. A new thermal model for Northern and Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Ward; Beekman, Fred; Kaban, Mikhail; Tesauro, Magdala; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2010-05-01

    Central and Northern Asia is a key natural laboratory for the study of active intra-continental deformation in response to the ongoing far-field collision of India and Eurasia. The induced tectonic processes strongly depend on the thermo-mechanical and compositional (density and thickness) structure of the lithosphere. Density heterogeneities within the crust and upper mantle are important factors in the control of the dynamics of Earth deformation at shallow and deep levels. The main aim of this research project is to construct new high-resolution 3D models of the compositional, thermal and rheological structure of the intra-continental lithosphere of the study area. The 3D models will be constructed by combining and jointly analysing satellite gravity data with terrestrial data (seismic velocity distributions, seismic tomography, GPS derived surface deformations, heat flow measurements and terrestrial gravity). Here we present a first new 3D thermal and lithospheric thickness model for Central and Northern Asia. This new thermal model is constructed using an improved version of the methodology presented by Goes et al (2000) and Tesauro et al (2009), and is based on a recent seismic tomographic model of Central Asia (Koulakov, personal communication) and a global Moho model. We also present a new estimate for the lithospheric thickness in the study area, based on the analysis of the spatial distribution of the 1100, 1200, and 1300C isotherms. The new higher resolution models show significant lateral variations in thermal structure across the study area, in particular across main structural boundaries. Central Asia is characterized by more heterogeneous thermal structure of the lithosphere compared to the adjacent cratonic areas in Northern and Western Asia. The observed thermal heterogeneity of Central Asia will result in an anomalous thermo-mechanical structure of the continental lithosphere, which in turn may control the development of the contemporary

  2. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  3. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  4. Adaptive thermal modeling of Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadman Rad, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple, accurate and adaptive thermal model is proposed for Li-ion batteries. • Equilibrium voltages, overpotentials and entropy changes are quantified from experimental results. • Entropy changes are highly dependent on the battery State-of-Charge. • Good agreement between simulated and measured heat development is obtained under all conditions. • Radiation contributes to about 50% of heat dissipation at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: An accurate thermal model to predict the heat generation in rechargeable batteries is an essential tool for advanced thermal management in high power applications, such as electric vehicles. For such applications, the battery materials’ details and cell design are normally not provided. In this work a simple, though accurate, thermal model for batteries has been developed, considering the temperature- and current-dependent overpotential heat generation and State-of-Charge dependent entropy contributions. High power rechargeable Li-ion (7.5 Ah) batteries have been experimentally investigated and the results are used for model verification. It is shown that the State-of-Charge dependent entropy is a significant heat source and is therefore essential to correctly predict the thermal behavior of Li-ion batteries under a wide variety of operating conditions. An adaptive model is introduced to obtain these entropy values. A temperature-dependent equation for heat transfer to the environment is also taken into account. Good agreement between the simulations and measurements is obtained in all cases. The parameters for both the heat generation and heat transfer processes can be applied to the thermal design of advanced battery packs. The proposed methodology is generic and independent on the cell chemistry and battery design. The parameters for the adaptive model can be determined by performing simple cell potential/current and temperature measurements for a limited number of charge/discharge cycles

  5. The Effect of the Heat Flux on the Self-Ignition of Oriented Strand Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirle Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the initiation phase of flaming and smouldering burning of oriented strand board. The influence of heat flux on thermal degradation of OSB boards, time to ignition, heat release rate and mass loss rate using thermal analysis and vertical electrical radiation panel methods were studied. Significant information on the influence of the heat flux density and the thickness of the material on time to ignition was obtained.

  6. An experimental and analytical investigation of glow plug performance in ignition and flame propagation through low concentrations of H2 in a steam/fog environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal igniters proposed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for intentional ignition of hydrogen in nuclear reactor containments have been tested in mixtures of air, hydrogen, and steam. The igniters, conventional diesel engine glow plugs, were tested in a 10.6 ft 3 pressure vessel with dry hydrogen concentrations from 4% to 29%, and in steam fractions of up to 50%. Dry tests indicated complete combustion consistently occurred at H 2 fractions above 8% with no combustion for concentrations below 5%. Combustion tests in the presence of steam were conducted with hydrogen volume fractions of 8%, 10%, and 12%. Steam concentrations of up to 30% consistently resulted in ignition. Most of the 40% steam fraction tests indicated a pressure rise. Circulation of the mixture improved combustion in both the dry and the steam tests, most notably at low H 2 concentrations. An analysis of the high steam fraction test data yielded evidence of the presence of small, suspended, water droplets in the combustion mixture. The suppressive influence of condensation-generated fog on combustion is evaluated. Analysis of experimental results along with results derived from analytic models have provided consistent evidence of the strong influence of mass condensation rates and fog on experimentally observed ignition and flame propagation phenomena

  7. More Bayesian Transdimensional Inversion for Thermal History Modelling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Since the publication of Dodson (1973) quantifying the relationship between geochronogical ages and closure temperatures, an ongoing concern in thermochronology is reconstruction of thermal histories consistent with the measured data. Extracting this thermal history information is best treated as an inverse problem, given the complex relationship between the observations and the thermal history. When solving the inverse problem (i.e. finding thermal acceptable thermal histories), stochastic sampling methods have often been used, as these are relatively global when searching the model space. However, the issue remains how best to estimate those parts of the thermal history unconstrained by independent information, i.e. what is required to fit the data ? To solve this general problem, we use a Bayesian transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and this has been integrated into user-friendly software, QTQt (Quantitative Thermochronology with Qt), which runs on both Macintosh and PC. The Bayesian approach allows us to consider a wide range of possible thermal history as general prior information on time, temperature (and temperature offset for multiple samples in a vertical profile). We can also incorporate more focussed geological constraints in terms of more specific priors. In this framework, it is the data themselves (and their errors) that determine the complexity of the thermal history solutions. For example, more precise data will justify a more complex solution, while more noisy data will be happy with simpler solutions. We can express complexity in terms of the number of time-temperature points defining the total thermal history. Another useful feature of this method is that was can easily deal with imprecise parameter values (e.g. kinetics, data errors), by drawing samples from a user specified probability distribution, rather than using a single value. Finally, the method can be applied to either single samples, or multiple samples (from a borehole or

  8. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of reactivity accidents in MTR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater Hany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a dynamic model for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of MTR research reactors during a reactivity insertion accident. The model is formulated for coupling reactor kinetics with feedback reactivity and reactor core thermal-hydraulics. To represent the reactor core, two types of channels are considered, average and hot channels. The developed computer program is compiled and executed on a personal computer, using the FORTRAN language. The model is validated by safety-related benchmark calculations for MTR-TYPE reactors of IAEA 10 MW generic reactor for both slow and fast reactivity insertion transients. A good agreement is shown between the present model and the benchmark calculations. Then, the model is used for simulating the uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod of an ETRR-2 reactor in transient with over power scram trip. The model results for ETRR-2 are analyzed and discussed.

  9. The thermal impact of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems: a case study in the Netherlands, combining monitoring and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.W.; Kooi, H.; Stuijfzand, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive thermal impact study on an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Bilthoven, the Netherlands. The study involved monitoring of the thermal impact and modeling of the three-dimensional temperature evolution of the storage aquifer and over- and

  10. Parametric Thermal Soak Model for Earth Entry Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Samareh, Jamshid; Doan, Quy D.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and design of an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application many disciplines. An integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing or M-SAPE is being developed as part of Entry Vehicle Technology project under In-Space Technology program. Integration of a multidisciplinary problem is a challenging task. Automation of the execution process and data transfer among disciplines can be accomplished to provide significant benefits. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various interior components of entry vehicle, including the impact foam and payload container are part of the solution that M-SAPE will offer to spacecraft designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into M-SAPE. One of the main objectives is to be able to identify the important parameters and to develop correlation coefficients so that, for a given trajectory, can estimate the peak payload temperature based on relevant trajectory parameters and vehicle geometry. The models are being developed for two primary thermal protection (TPS) materials: 1) carbon phenolic that was used for Galileo and Pioneer Venus probes and, 2) Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), TPS material for Mars Science Lab mission. Several representative trajectories were selected from a very large trade space to include in the thermal analysis in order to develop an effective parametric thermal soak model. The selected trajectories covered a wide range of heatload and heatflux combinations. Non-linear, fully transient, thermal finite element simulations were performed for the selected trajectories to generate the temperature histories at the interior of the vehicle. Figure 1 shows the finite element model

  11. VHTR core modeling: coupling between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.; Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Studer, E.

    2005-01-01

    Following the present interest in the next generation nuclear power plan (NGNP), Cea is deploying special effort to develop new models and qualify its research tools for this next generation reactors core. In this framework, the Very High Temperature Reactor concept (VHTR) has an increasing place in the actual research program. In such type of core, a strong interaction exists between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. Consequently, the global core modelling requires accounting for the temperature feedback in the neutronic models. The purpose of this paper is to present the new neutronic and thermal-hydraulics coupling model dedicated to the High Temperature Reactors (HTR). The coupling model integrates a new version of the neutronic scheme calculation developed in collaboration between Cea and Framatome-ANP. The neutronic calculations are performed using a specific calculation processes based on the APOLLO2 transport code and CRONOS2 diffusion code which are part of the French reactor physics code system SAPHYR. The thermal-hydraulics model is characterised by an equivalent porous media and 1-D fluid/3-D thermal model implemented in the CAST3M/ARCTURUS code. The porous media approach involves the definition of both homogenous and heterogeneous models to ensure a correct temperature feedback. This study highlights the sensitivity of the coupling system's parameters (radial/axial meshing and data exchange strategy between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics code). The parameters sensitivity study leads to the definition of an optimal coupling system specification for the VHTR. Besides, this work presents the first physical analysis of the VHTR core in steady-state condition. The analysis gives information about the 3-D power peaking and the temperature coefficient. Indeed, it covers different core configurations with different helium distribution in the core bypass. (authors)

  12. The analogic model ''RIC'' of thermal behaviour of mass concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Redondo, M.; Gonzalez de Posada, F.; Plana Claver, J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the thermal field and calorific flows in heat sources (i.e. mass concrete during setting) we have conceived, built and experimented with an analogical electric model. This model, named RIC, consists of resistors (R) and capacitors (C) in which nodes an electric current (I) has been injected. Several analogical constants were used for the mathematical approximation. Thus, this paper describes the analogical RIC model, simulating heat generation, boundary and initial conditions and concreting. (Author) 4 refs

  13. A thermal conductivity model for U-­Si compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    U3Si2 is a candidate for accident tolerant nuclear fuel being developed as an alternative to UO2 in commercial light water reactors (LWRs). One of its main benefits compared to UO2 is higher thermal conductivity that increases with temperature. This increase is contrary to UO2, for which the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature. The reason for the difference is the electronic origin of thermal conductivity in U3Si2, as compared to the phonon mechanism responsible for thermal transport in UO2. The phonon thermal conductivity in UO2 is unusually low for a fluorite oxide due to the strong interaction with the spins in the paramagnetic phase. The thermal conductivity of U3Si2 as well as other U-­Si compounds has been measured experimentally [1-­4]. However, for fuel performance simulations it is also critical to model the degradation of the thermal conductivity due to damage and microstructure evolution caused by the reactor environment (irradiation and high temperature). For UO2 this reduction is substantial and it has been the topic of extensive NEAMS research resulting in several publications [5, 6]. There are no data or models for the evolution of the U3Si2 thermal conductivity under irradiation. We know that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of UO2 (semi-conductor) and U3Si2 (metal) are very different, and we do not necessarily expect the dependence on damage to be the same either, which could present another advantage for the silicide fuel. In this report we summarize the first step in developing a model for the thermal conductivity of U-­Si compounds with the goal of capturing the effect of damage in U3Si2. Next year, we will focus on lattice damage. We will also attempt to assess the impact of fission gas bubbles.

  14. Features of Functioning the Integrated Building Thermal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Maxim N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of the building heating system, consisting of energy source, a distributed automatic control system, elements of individual heating unit and heating system is designed. Application Simulink of mathematical package Matlab is selected as a platform for the model. There are the specialized application Simscape libraries in aggregate with a wide range of Matlab mathematical tools allow to apply the “acausal” modeling concept. Implementation the “physical” representation of the object model gave improving the accuracy of the models. Principle of operation and features of the functioning of the thermal model is described. The investigations of building cooling dynamics were carried out.

  15. Analysis of the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Test System for Friction-Ignition of Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    Friction is a known ignition source for metals in oxygen-enriched atmospheres. The test system developed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility in response to ASTM G-94 has been used successfully to determine the relative ignition from friction of numerous metallic materials and metallic materials pairs. These results have been ranked in terms of a pressure-velocity product (PV) as measured under the prescribed test conditions. A high value of 4.1(exp 8) watts per square meter for Inconel MA 754 is used to imply resistance to friction ignition, whereas a low value of 1.04(exp 8) watts per square meter for stainless steel 304 is taken as indicating material susceptible to friction ignition. No attempt has been made to relate PV values to other material properties. This work reports the analysis of the WSTF friction-ignition test system for producing fundamental properties of metallic materials relating to ignition through friction. Three materials, aluminum, titanium, and nickel were tested in the WSTF frictional ignition instrument system under atmospheres of oxygen or nitrogen. Test conditions were modified to reach a steady state of operation, that is applied, the force was reduced and the rotational speed was reduced. Additional temperature measurements were made on the stator sample. The aluminum immediately galled on contact (reproducible) and the test was stopped. Titanium immediately ignited as a result of non-uniform contact of the stator and rotor. This was reproducible. A portion of the stator sampled burned, but the test continued. Temperature measurements on the stator were used to validate the mathematical model used for estimating the interface (stator/rotor) temperature. These interface temperature measurements and the associate thermal flux into the stator were used to distinguish material-phase transitions, chemical reaction, and mechanical work. The mechanical work was used to analyze surface asperities in the materials and to estimate a

  16. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  17. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  18. Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    E PIEKOS 2 ADVANCED THERMAL (PDF) BATTERIES , INC D BRISCOE G CHAGNON 3 EAGLE PICHER (PDF) TECHNOLOGIES, LLC C LAMB J...Thin-Film Thermal Batteries by Frank C Krieger and Michael S Ding Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...Laboratory Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries by Frank C Krieger and Michael S

  19. Numerical investigation on soot particles emission in compression ignition diesel engine by using particulate mimic soot model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fadzli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research via computational method, specifically by detailed-kinetic soot model offers much more advantages than the simple model as more detailed formation/oxidation process is taken into consideration, thus providing better soot mass concentration, soot size, soot number density as well as information regarding other related species. In the present computational study, investigation of in-cylinder soot concentration as well as other emissions in a single cylinder diesel engine has been conducted, using a commercial multidimensional CFD software, CONVERGE CFD. The simulation was carried out for a close-cycle combustion environment from inlet valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. In this case, detailed-kinetic Particulate Mimic (PM soot model was implemented as to take benefit of the method of moment, instead of commonly implemented simple soot model. Analyses of the results are successfully plotted to demonstrate that the soot size and soot mass concentration are strongly dependent on the detailed soot formation and oxidation process rates. The calculated of soot mass concentration and average soot size at EVO provide the end value of 29.2 mg/m3 and 2.04 × 10−8 m, respectively. Besides, post-processing using EnSight shows the qualitative results of soot concentration along simulation period in the combustion chamber.

  20. Sparse estimation of model-based diffuse thermal dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Melis O.; Bobin, Jérôme

    2018-03-01

    Component separation for the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data is primarily concerned with the estimation of thermal dust emission, which requires the separation of thermal dust from the cosmic infrared background (CIB). For that purpose, current estimation methods rely on filtering techniques to decouple thermal dust emission from CIB anisotropies, which tend to yield a smooth, low-resolution, estimation of the dust emission. In this paper, we present a new parameter estimation method, premise: Parameter Recovery Exploiting Model Informed Sparse Estimates. This method exploits the sparse nature of thermal dust emission to calculate all-sky maps of thermal dust temperature, spectral index, and optical depth at 353 GHz. premise is evaluated and validated on full-sky simulated data. We find the percentage difference between the premise results and the true values to be 2.8, 5.7, and 7.2 per cent at the 1σ level across the full sky for thermal dust temperature, spectral index, and optical depth at 353 GHz, respectively. A comparison between premise and a GNILC-like method over selected regions of our sky simulation reveals that both methods perform comparably within high signal-to-noise regions. However, outside of the Galactic plane, premise is seen to outperform the GNILC-like method with increasing success as the signal-to-noise ratio worsens.

  1. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Devynck, F.; Krack, M.; Maillard, S.

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO2. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO2. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  2. Fusion ignition and burning of D-3He system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiancai; Zhang Lifa; Gao Yaoming; Li Yunsheng

    1997-01-01

    The processes of ignition and burning in the fusion system of D- 3 He with a small number of neutrons have been analyzed and the corresponding conditions of ignition and burning have been given. Several typical physics models of D- 3 He reaction have also been simulated numerically. The results further demonstrate that the fusion system of D- 3 He is the optimum candidate of the fusion power with a small number of neutrons in future

  3. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed.

  4. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed

  5. Numerical Modeling of Water Thermal Plumes Emitted by Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena Durán-Colmenares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the study of thermal dispersion of plumes emitted by power plants into the sea. Wastewater discharge from power stations causes impacts that require investigation or monitoring. A study to characterize the physical effects of thermal plumes into the sea is carried out here by numerical modeling and field measurements. The case study is the thermal discharges of the Presidente Adolfo López Mateos Power Plant, located in Veracruz, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. This plant is managed by the Federal Electricity Commission of Mexico. The physical effects of such plumes are related to the increase of seawater temperature caused by the hot water discharge of the plant. We focus on the implementation, calibration, and validation of the Delft3D-FLOW model, which solves the shallow-water equations. The numerical simulations consider a critical scenario where meteorological and oceanographic parameters are taken into account to reproduce the proper physical conditions of the environment. The results show a local physical effect of the thermal plumes within the study zone, given the predominant strong winds conditions of the scenario under study.

  6. Failure of thermal barrier coatings under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading. Microstructural observations and modelling aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, Haakan

    2004-09-01

    Industrial and air-borne gas turbine hot components suffer from creep, oxidation, corrosion and microstructural degradation if not shielded from the hot and aggressive combustion gases. Two major strategies commercially available are adopted; film cooling by pressurised air and application of protective coatings. Protective coatings form a slow-growing oxide that protects from oxidation and corrosion. By application of a thermal insulator, a thermal barrier coating, the material will be protected from high temperature through good insulation properties of the coating system. If thermal barrier coatings are to be used in situations where capabilities and possibilities for inspections are limited, better knowledge of the fatigue properties of the coatings is also needed. Therefore development of a reliable fatigue life model is needed. The present work aims at serving as a basis from which a general physically founded thermal barrier coating life model can be formulated. The effects of exposure to high temperatures and mechanical loads on thermal barrier coatings under service like conditions have been investigated in the present thesis. Emphasis is put on the coupling between materials science and solid mechanics approaches in order to establish a better knowledge concerning degradation mechanisms and fatigue life issues than what is common if only one discipline is explored. Investigations of material exposed to isothermal oxidation and thermal cyclic fatigue were performed on plasma-sprayed systems with NiCoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coats and yttria partially stabilised zirconia top coats. It has been shown that the thermally grown oxide that will form upon high temperature exposure influences the failure behaviour. If the oxide is composed mainly of alumina, the fatigue properties are good since the adhesion between the ceramic top coat and the metallic bond coat is good. This is also shown in a comparison between different plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

  7. A thermal model for photovoltaic panels under varying atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, S.; Hurley, W.G.

    2010-01-01

    The response of the photovoltaic (PV) panel temperature is dynamic with respect to the changes in the incoming solar radiation. During periods of rapidly changing conditions, a steady state model of the operating temperature cannot be justified because the response time of the PV panel temperature becomes significant due to its large thermal mass. Therefore, it is of interest to determine the thermal response time of the PV panel. Previous attempts to determine the thermal response time have used indoor measurements, controlling the wind flow over the surface of the panel with fans or conducting the experiments in darkness to avoid radiative heat loss effects. In real operating conditions, the effective PV panel temperature is subjected to randomly varying ambient temperature and fluctuating wind speeds and directions; parameters that are not replicated in controlled, indoor experiments. A new thermal model is proposed that incorporates atmospheric conditions; effects of PV panel material composition and mounting structure. Experimental results are presented which verify the thermal behaviour of a photovoltaic panel for low to strong winds.

  8. Thermal-Chemical Model Of Subduction: Results And Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Gerya, T. V.; Connolly, J. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Rudolph, M.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structures with strong positive and negative velocity anomalies in the mantle wedge above subduction zones have been interpreted as thermally and/or chemically induced phenomena. We have developed a thermal-chemical model of subduction, which constrains the dynamics of seismic velocity structure beneath volcanic arcs. Our simulations have been calculated over a finite-difference grid with (201×101) to (201×401) regularly spaced Eulerian points, using 0.5 million to 10 billion markers. The model couples numerical thermo-mechanical solution with Gibbs energy minimization to investigate the dynamic behavior of partially molten upwellings from slabs (cold plumes) and structures associated with their development. The model demonstrates two chemically distinct types of plumes (mixed and unmixed), and various rigid body rotation phenomena in the wedge (subduction wheel, fore-arc spin, wedge pin-ball). These thermal-chemical features strongly perturb seismic structure. Their occurrence is dependent on the age of subducting slab and the rate of subduction.The model has been validated through a series of test cases and its results are consistent with a variety of geological and geophysical data. In contrast to models that attribute a purely thermal origin for mantle wedge seismic anomalies, the thermal-chemical model is able to simulate the strong variations of seismic velocity existing beneath volcanic arcs which are associated with development of cold plumes. In particular, molten regions that form beneath volcanic arcs as a consequence of vigorous cold wet plumes are manifest by > 20% variations in the local Poisson ratio, as compared to variations of ~ 2% expected as a consequence of temperature variation within the mantle wedge.

  9. Source data for modeling of thermal engineering calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charvátová Pavlína

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands on thermal insulation. Their more accurate assessment by computers lead to increasingly bigger differences between computational models and reality. The result is an increasingly problematic optimization of building design. One of the key initial parameters is climatological data.

  10. Thermal Model Parameter Identification of a Lithium Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Nissing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of a Lithium battery cell is important for its performance, efficiency, safety, and capacity and is influenced by the environmental temperature and by the charging and discharging process itself. Battery Management Systems (BMS take into account this effect. As the temperature at the battery cell is difficult to measure, often the temperature is measured on or nearby the poles of the cell, although the accuracy of predicting the cell temperature with those quantities is limited. Therefore a thermal model of the battery is used in order to calculate and estimate the cell temperature. This paper uses a simple RC-network representation for the thermal model and shows how the thermal parameters are identified using input/output measurements only, where the load current of the battery represents the input while the temperatures at the poles represent the outputs of the measurement. With a single measurement the eight model parameters (thermal resistances, electric contact resistances, and heat capacities can be determined using the method of least-square. Experimental results show that the simple model with the identified parameters fits very accurately to the measurements.

  11. Thermalization time in a model of neutron star

    OpenAIRE

    Ducomet, B.; Nečasová, Š. (Šárka)

    2011-01-01

    We consider an initial boundary value problem for the equation describing heat conduction in a spherical model of neutron star considered by Lattimer et al. We estimate the asymptotic decay of the solution, which provides a plausible estimate for a "thermalization time" for the system.

  12. Model for thermal conductivity of CNT-nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    viour of oil based as well as water based CNT nanofluids, which are quite different from each other in thermal characteristics. The model is found ... like sedimentation, clogging of small channels, erosion, excessive pressure drop etc. ... MWCNT suspensions in water as well as ethylene glycol. Liu et al (2005) also measured ...

  13. Modelling of thermal degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) loss in thermally treated pawpaw and potato was modelled mathematically. Isothermal experiments in the temperature range of 50 -80 oC for the drying of pawpaw and 60 -100 oC for the blanch-drying of potato were utilized to determine the kinetics of ascorbic acid loss in both fruit and vegetable.

  14. Modelling of Thermal Degradation Kinetics of Ascorbic Acid in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) loss in thermally treated pawpaw and potato was modelled mathematically. Isothermal experiments in the temperature range of 50 -80 oC for the drying of pawpaw and 60 -100 oC for the blanch-drying of potato were utilized to determine the kinetics of ascorbic acid loss in both fruit and vegetable.

  15. Land Cover Characterization for Hydrological Modeling Using Thermal Infrared Emissivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing with multispectral thermal infrared observations has the potential to improve regional scale estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) by constraining the land surface energy balance in a way that is not possible using more conventional remote sensing techniques. Current models use data f...

  16. A modelling approach to designing microstructures in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.; Nylen, P.; Wigren, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermomechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young's modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected parameters for spraying Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) topcoat. The microstructure was assessed with SEM, and image analysis was used to characterize the porosity content. The relationships between microstructural features and properties predicted by modelling are discussed. The microstructural features having the most beneficial effect on properties were sprayed with a different spray gun so as to verify the results obtained from modelling. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure evaluation, thermal conductivity and lifetime measurements. The modelling approach in combination with experiments undertaken in this study was shown to be an effective way to achieve coatings with optimised thermo-mechanical properties.

  17. Thermalization in integrable models and conformal field theories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Mandal TIFR, Mumbai

    Introduction. Critical quench: model building. Quantum Ergodicity and integrability. Relaxation rates. Holography. Thermalization in gravity: gravitational collapse. No hair theorem: different forms and descriptions of matter, collapse into a black hole characterized by only the to- tal mass (and angular momentum and charge) ...

  18. Plans for ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E.I.; Meier, W.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at LLNL for performing ignition experiments for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities producing and for developing ICF. The ignition studies will be the next important step in developing inertial fusion energy. The NIF Project is over 90% complete and scheduled for completion in 2009. The building and nearly the entire beam path have been completed. The Project is presently installing the optics and electronics and commissioning the beams. Over half of the optical and electronics components needed to complete the Project have been installed. One cluster of 48 beams has been commissioned in the laser bay with the demonstrated capability of producing 1000 kJ of 1053 nm light (1), nearly ten times the capability of Nova or Omega, the previous largest laser systems. In addition, experiments using one beam have demonstrated that NIF can meet all of its performance goals. A detailed plan called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to begin ignition experiments in 2010. The plan includes the target physics and the equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for the ignition experiment. Target designs have been developed that calculate to ignite at energy as low as 1 MJ. Experiments using the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester are validating these designs. Development of manufacturing capability is well under way for producing these targets to the required tolerances. Diagnostics and other support equipment is being designed and fabricated to perform the ignition experiments. (orig.)

  19. Numerical modeling of Thermal Response Tests in Energy Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A.; Toledo, M.; Moffat, R.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, thermal response tests (TRT) are used as the main tools for the evaluation of low enthalpy geothermal systems such as heat exchangers. The results of TRT are used for estimating thermal conductivity and thermal resistance values of those systems. We present results of synthetic TRT simulations that model the behavior observed in an experimental energy pile system, which was installed at the new building of the Faculty of Engineering of Universidad de Chile. Moreover, we also present a parametric study to identify the most influent parameters in the performance of this type of tests. The modeling was developed using the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows the incorporation of flow and heat transport processes. The modeled system consists on a concrete pile with 1 m diameter and 28 m deep, which contains a 28 mm diameter PEX pipe arranged in a closed circuit. Three configurations were analyzed: a U pipe, a triple U and a helicoid shape implemented at the experimental site. All simulations were run considering transient response in a three-dimensional domain. The simulation results provided the temperature distribution on the pile for a set of different geometry and physical properties of the materials. These results were compared with analytical solutions which are commonly used to interpret TRT data. This analysis demonstrated that there are several parameters that affect the system response in a synthetic TRT. For example, the diameter of the simulated pile affects the estimated effective thermal conductivity of the system. Moreover, the simulation results show that the estimated thermal conductivity for a 1 m diameter pile did not stabilize even after 100 hours since the beginning of the test, when it reached a value 30% below value used to set up the material properties in the simulation. Furthermore, we observed different behaviors depending on the thermal properties of concrete and soil. According to the simulations, the thermal

  20. House thermal model parameter estimation method for Model Predictive Control applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; de Wit, J.B.; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    In this paper we investigate thermal network models with different model orders applied to various Dutch low-energy house types with high and low interior thermal mass and containing floor heating. Parameter estimations are performed by using data from TRNSYS simulations. The paper discusses results

  1. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  2. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Scheme for Direct-Drive: Modeling and Evidence from National Ignition Facility Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been shown to significantly reduce the laser absorption and implosion speed in direct-drive implosion experiments on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Mitigating CBET assists in achieving ignition-relevant hot-spot pressures in deuterium-tritium cryogenic OMEGA implosions. In addition, reducing CBET permits lower, more hydrodynamically stable, in-flight aspect ratio ignition designs with smaller nonuniformity growth during the acceleration phase. Detuning the wavelengths of the crossing beams is one of several techniques under investigation at the University of Rochester to mitigate CBET. This talk will describe these techniques with an emphasis on wavelength detuning. Recent experiments designed and predicted using multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET on the NIF have exploited the wavelength arrangement of the NIF beam geometry to demonstrate CBET mitigation through wavelength detuning in polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions. Shapes and trajectories inferred from time-resolved x-ray radiography of the imploding shell, scattered-light spectra, and hard x-ray spectra generated by suprathermal electrons all indicate a reduction in CBET. These results and their implications for direct-drive ignition will be presented and discussed. In addition, hydrodynamically scaled ignition-relevant designs for OMEGA implosions exploiting wavelength detuning will be presented. Changes required to the OMEGA laser to permit wavelength detuning will be discussed. Future plans for PDD on the NIF including more-uniform implosions with CBET mitigation will be explored. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  4. Use of advanced modeling techniques to optimize thermal packaging designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formato, Richard M; Potami, Raffaele; Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed case study the authors demonstrate, for the first time, the capability of using advanced modeling techniques to correctly simulate the transient temperature response of a convective flow-based thermal shipper design. The objective of this case study was to demonstrate that simulation could be utilized to design a 2-inch-wall polyurethane (PUR) shipper to hold its product box temperature between 2 and 8 °C over the prescribed 96-h summer profile (product box is the portion of the shipper that is occupied by the payload). Results obtained from numerical simulation are in excellent agreement with empirical chamber data (within ±1 °C at all times), and geometrical locations of simulation maximum and minimum temperature match well with the corresponding chamber temperature measurements. Furthermore, a control simulation test case was run (results taken from identical product box locations) to compare the coupled conduction-convection model with a conduction-only model, which to date has been the state-of-the-art method. For the conduction-only simulation, all fluid elements were replaced with "solid" elements of identical size and assigned thermal properties of air. While results from the coupled thermal/fluid model closely correlated with the empirical data (±1 °C), the conduction-only model was unable to correctly capture the payload temperature trends, showing a sizeable error compared to empirical values (ΔT > 6 °C). A modeling technique capable of correctly capturing the thermal behavior of passively refrigerated shippers can be used to quickly evaluate and optimize new packaging designs. Such a capability provides a means to reduce the cost and required design time of shippers while simultaneously improving their performance. Another advantage comes from using thermal modeling (assuming a validated model is available) to predict the temperature distribution in a shipper that is exposed to ambient temperatures which were not bracketed

  5. Resolving a central ICF issue for ignition: Implosion symmertry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cray, M.; Delamater, N.D.; Fernandez, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program focuses on resolving key target-physics issues and developing technology needed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This work is being performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A major requirement for the indirect-drive NIF ignition target is to achieve the irradiation uniformity on the capsule surface needed for a symmetrical high-convergence implosion. Los Alamos employed an integrated modeling technique using the Lasnex radiation-hydrodynamics code to design two different targets that achieve ignition and moderate gain. Los Alamos is performing experiments on the Nova Laser at LLNL in order to validate our NIF ignition calculations

  6. Analysis on fuel thermal conductivity model of the computer code for performance prediction of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hai; Huang Chen; Du Aibing; Xu Baoyu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity is one of the most important parameters in the computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods. Several fuel thermal conductivity models used in foreign computer code, including thermal conductivity models for MOX fuel and UO 2 fuel were introduced in this paper. Thermal conductivities were calculated by using these models, and the results were compared and analyzed. Finally, the thermal conductivity model for the native computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods in fast reactor was recommended. (authors)

  7. Modeling of the thermal comfort in vehicles using COMSOL multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrila, Camelia; Vartires, Andreea

    2016-12-01

    The environmental quality in vehicles is a very important aspect of building design and evaluation of the influence of the thermal comfort inside the car for ensuring a safe trip. The aim of this paper is to modeling and simulating the thermal comfort inside the vehicles, using COMSOL Multiphysics program, for different ventilation grilles. The objective will be the implementing innovative air diffusion grilles in a prototype vehicle. The idea behind this goal is to introduce air diffusers with a special geometry allowing improving mixing between the hot or the cold conditioned air introduced in the cockpit and the ambient.

  8. Modelling of thermal stress in vapor generator supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpert, S.; Vazquez, L.

    1997-01-01

    To assure safety and availability of a nuclear power plant components or equipment stress analysis are done. When thermal loads are involved it's necessary to know the temperature field of the component or equipment. This paper describes the structural analysis of a steam generator lug with thermal load including the model used for computer simulation and presents the evolution of the temperature profile, the stress intensity and principal stress during start up and shut down of a nuclear power reactor. Temperature field obtained from code calculation show good agreement with the experimental data while stress analysis results are in agreement with a preview estimation. (author) [es

  9. Lumped-parameter fuel rod model for rapid thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, K.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1975-07-01

    The thermal behavior of fuel rods during simulated accident conditions is extremely sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient which is, in turn, very sensitive to the cladding surface temperature and the fluid conditions. The development of a semianalytical, lumped-parameter fuel rod model which is intended to provide accurate calculations, in a minimum amount of computer time, of the thermal response of fuel rods during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident is described. The results show good agreement with calculations from a comprehensive fuel-rod code (FRAP-T) currently in use at Aerojet Nuclear Company

  10. Towards patient specific thermal modelling of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; DeLeeuw, Astrid A. C.; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.; Raaymakers, Bas W.; van Vulpen, Marco; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The application of thermal modelling for hyperthermia and thermal ablation is severely hampered by lack of information about perfusion and vasculature. However, recently, with the advent of sophisticated angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques, it has become possible to image small vessels and blood perfusion bringing the ultimate goal of patient specific thermal modelling closer within reach. In this study dynamic contrast enhanced multi-slice CT imaging techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of this concept for regional hyperthermia treatment of the prostate. The results are retrospectively compared with clinical thermometry data of a patient group from an earlier trial. Furthermore, the role of the prostate vasculature in the establishment of the prostate temperature distribution is studied. Quantitative 3D perfusion maps of the prostate were constructed for five patients using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetics model to analyse dynamic CT data. CT angiography was applied to construct a discrete vessel model of the pelvis. Additionally, a discrete vessel model of the prostate vasculature was constructed of a prostate taken from a human corpse. Three thermal modelling schemes with increasing inclusion of the patient specific physiological information were used to simulate the temperature distribution of the prostate during regional hyperthermia. Prostate perfusion was found to be heterogeneous and T3 prostate carcinomas are often characterized by a strongly elevated tumour perfusion (up to 70-80 ml 100 g-1 min-1). This elevated tumour perfusion leads to 1-2 °C lower tumour temperatures than thermal simulations based on a homogeneous prostate perfusion. Furthermore, the comparison has shown that the simulations with the measured perfusion maps result in consistently lower prostate temperatures than clinically achieved. The simulations with the discrete vessel model indicate that significant pre-heating takes place

  11. Similarity conditions for investigations of hydraulic-thermal tidal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, G.; Schwarze, H.

    1975-01-01

    With the construction of nuclear power plants near German tidal estuaries in mind, investigations of mixing and spreading processes which occur during the discharge of heated cooling water in tidal waters were carried out in hydraulic-thermal tidal models of the Lower Weser and Lower Elbe by the Franzius Institute for hydraulic and coastal engineering of the Technical University Hannover. This contribution discusses in detail the problems met and the experience gained in constructing and operating these models. (orig./TK) [de

  12. Analytical Modeling of Unsteady Aluminum Depletion in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    YEŞİLATA, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in aircraft turbines is studied. A simple, unsteady and one-dimensional, diffusion model based on aluminum depletion from a bond-coat to form an oxide layer of Al2O3 is introduced. The model is employed for a case study with currently available experimental data. The diffusion coefficient of the depleted aluminum in the alloy, the concentration profiles at different oxidation times, and the thickness of Al-depleted region are...

  13. Thermohydraulic modeling of nuclear thermal rockets: The KLAXON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, M.L.; Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrogen flow from the storage tanks, through the reactor core, and out the nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an integral design consideration. To provide an analysis and design tool for this phenomenon, the KLAXON code is being developed. A shock-capturing numerical methodology is used to model the gas flow (the Harten, Lax, and van Leer method, as implemented by Einfeldt). Preliminary results of modeling the flow through the reactor core and nozzle are given in this paper

  14. Modeling solid thermal explosion containment on reactor HNIW and HMX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ping; Chang, Chang-Ping; Chou, Yu-Chuan; Chu, Yung-Chuan; Shu, Chi-Min

    2010-04-15

    2,4,6,8,10,12-Hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaaza-isowurtzitane (HNIW), also known as CL-20 and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), are highly energetic materials which have been popular in national defense industries for years. This study established the models of thermal decomposition and thermal explosion hazard for HNIW and HMX. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data were used for parameters determination of the thermokinetic models, and then these models were employed for simulation of thermal explosion in a 437L barrel reactor and a 24 kg cubic box package. Experimental results indicating the best storage conditions to avoid any violent runaway reaction of HNIW and HMX were also discovered. This study also developed an efficient procedure regarding creation of thermokinetics and assessment of thermal hazards of HNIW and HMX that could be applied to ensure safe storage conditions. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. FASTSAT-HSV01 Thermal Math Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Callie

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the thermal math model correlation effort for the Fast Affordable Science and Technology SATellite (FASTSAT-HSV01), which was designed, built and tested by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and multiple partners. The satellite launched in November 2010 on a Minotaur IV rocket from the Kodiak Launch Complex in Kodiak, Alaska. It carried three Earth science experiments and two technology demonstrations into a low Earth circular orbit with an inclination of 72deg and an altitude of 650 kilometers. The mission has been successful to date with science experiment activities still taking place daily. The thermal control system on this spacecraft was a passive design relying on thermo-optical properties and six heaters placed on specific components. Flight temperature data is being recorded every minute from the 48 Resistance Temperature Devices (RTDs) onboard the satellite structure and many of its avionics boxes. An effort has been made to correlate the thermal math model to the flight temperature data using Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop and by obtaining Earth and Sun vector data from the Attitude Control System (ACS) team to create an "as-flown" orbit. Several model parameters were studied during this task to understand the spacecraft's sensitivity to these changes. Many "lessons learned" have been noted from this activity that will be directly applicable to future small satellite programs.

  16. Thermal expansion model for multiphase electronic packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, B.E.; Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Control of thermal expansion is often necessary in the design and selection of electronic packages. In some instances, it is desirable to have a coefficient of thermal expansion intermediate between values readily attainable with single or two phase materials. The addition of a third phase in the form of fillers, whiskers, or fibers can be used to attain intermediate expansions. To help design the thermal expansion of multiphase materials for specific applications, a closed form model has been developed that accurately predicts the effective elastic properties of isotropic filled materials and transversely isotropic lamina. Properties of filled matrix materials are used as inputs to the lamina model to obtain the composite elastic properties as a function of the volume fraction of each phase. Hybrid composites with two or more fiber types are easily handled with this model. This paper reports that results for glass, quartz, and Kevlar fibers with beta-eucryptite filled polymer matrices show good agreement with experimental results for X, Y, and Z thermal expansion coefficients

  17. Performance Analysis and Modeling of Thermally Sprayed Resistive Heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Marcoux, Pierre; Perrault, Michel; Abbott, Richard C.; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2013-08-01

    Many processes and systems require hot surfaces. These are usually heated using electrical elements located in their vicinity. However, this solution is subject to intrinsic limitations associated with heating element geometry and physical location. Thermally spraying electrical elements directly on surfaces can overcome these limitations by tailoring the geometry of the heating element to the application. Moreover, the element heat transfer is maximized by minimizing the distance between the heater and the surface to be heated. This article is aimed at modeling and characterizing resistive heaters sprayed on metallic substrates. Heaters were fabricated by using a plasma-sprayed alumina dielectric insulator and a wire flame-sprayed iron-based alloy resistive element. Samples were energized and kept at a constant temperature of 425 °C for up to 4 months. SEM cross-sectional observations revealed the formation of cracks at very specific locations in the alumina layer after thermal use. Finite-element modeling shows that these cracks originate from high local thermal stresses and can be predicted according to the considered geometry. The simulation model was refined using experimental parameters obtained by several techniques such as emissivity and time-dependent temperature profile (infra-red camera), resistivity (four-probe technique), thermal diffusivity (laser flash method), and mechanical properties (micro and nanoindentation). The influence of the alumina thickness and the substrate material on crack formation was evaluated.

  18. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Thermal Power Model in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical thermal power model of the ASRG. It aims to provide a guideline of understanding how the ASRG works and what can change its performance. The thermal dynamics and energy balance of the generator is explained using the thermal circuit of the ASRG. The Stirling convertor performance map is used to represent the convertor. How the convertor performance map is coupled in the thermal circuit is explained. The ASRG performance characteristics under i) different sink temperatures and ii) over the years of mission (YOM) are predicted using the one-dimensional model. Two Stirling converter control strategies, i) fixing the hot-end of temperature of the convertor by adjusting piston amplitude and ii) fixing the piston amplitude, were tested in the model. Numerical results show that the first control strategy can result in a higher system efficiency than the second control strategy when the ambient gets warmer or the general-purpose heat source (GPHS) fuel load decays over the YOM. The ASRG performance data presented in this paper doesn't pertain to the ASRG flight unit. Some data of the ASRG engineering unit (EU) and flight unit that are available in public domain are used in this paper for the purpose of numerical studies.

  19. Ignitability and explosibility of gases and vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Tingguang

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression modeling. For the first time, fundamental principles of energy conservation are used to develop theoretical flammability diagrams and are then explored to understand various safety-related mixing problems. This provides the basis for a fully-analytical solution to any flammability problem. Instead of the traditional view that flammability is a fundamental material property, here flammability is discovered to be a result of the explosibility of air and the ignitability of fuel, or a process property. By exploring the more fundamental concepts of explosibility and ignitability, the safety targets of dilution and purge can be better defined and utilized for guiding safe operations in process safety. This book provides various engineering approaches to mixture flammability, benefiting not only the safety students, but al...

  20. Cyclopentane combustion. Part II. Ignition delay measurements and mechanism validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-12

    This study reports cyclopentane ignition delay measurements over a wide range of conditions. The measurements were obtained using two shock tubes and a rapid compression machine, and were used to test a detailed low- and high-temperature mechanism of cyclopentane oxidation that was presented in part I of this study (Al Rashidi et al., 2017). The ignition delay times of cyclopentane/air mixtures were measured over the temperature range of 650–1350K at pressures of 20 and 40atm and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The ignition delay times simulated using the detailed chemical kinetic model of cyclopentane oxidation show very good agreement with the experimental measurements, as well as with the cyclopentane ignition and flame speed data available in the literature. The agreement is significantly improved compared to previous models developed and investigated at higher temperatures. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insights into the ignition-controlling chemistry at low, intermediate and high temperatures. The results obtained in this study confirm that cycloalkanes are less reactive than their non-cyclic counterparts. Moreover, cyclopentane, a high octane number and high octane sensitivity fuel, exhibits minimal low-temperature chemistry and is considerably less reactive than cyclohexane. This study presents the first experimental low-temperature ignition delay data of cyclopentane, a potential fuel-blending component of particular interest due to its desirable antiknock characteristics.

  1. Thermal analysis of charring materials based on pyrolysis interface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charring thermal protection systems have been used to protect hypersonic vehicles from high heat loads. The pyrolysis of charring materials is a complicated physical and chemical phenomenon. Based on the pyrolysis interface model, a simulating approach for charring ablation has been designed in order to obtain one dimensional transient thermal behavior of homogeneous charring materials in reentry capsules. As the numerical results indicate, the pyrolysis rate and the surface temperature under a given heat flux rise abruptly in the beginning, then reach a plateau, but the temperature at the bottom rises very slowly to prevent the structural materials from being heated seriously. Pyrolysis mechanism can play an important role in thermal protection systems subjected to serious aerodynamic heat.

  2. Thermal shock analysis of functionally graded materials by micromechanical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei

    2002-01-01

    The transient thermoelastic behavior of the functionally graded plate due to a thermal shock with temperature dependent properties is studied in this paper. The development of a micromechanical model for the functionally graded materials is presented and its application to thermoelastic analysis is discussed for the case of the W-Cu functionally graded material for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor divertor plate. The divertor plate is made of a graded layer bonded between a homogeneous substrate and a homogeneous coating, and it is subjected to a cycle of heating and cooling on the coating surface of the material. The thermal and elastic properties of the material are dependent on the temperature and the position. Numerical calculations are carried out, and the results for the transient temperature and thermal stress distributions are displayed graphically. (author)

  3. COMMIX analysis of four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in a thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1989-04-01

    The three-dimensional thermal hydraulics computer code COMMIX-1AR was used to analyze four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in the thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR. An objective of these analyses was the validation of COMMIX-1AR for buoyancy affected flows. The COMMIX calculated temperature histories of some thermocouples in the model were compared with the corresponding measured data. The conclusions of this work are presented. 3 refs., 5 figs

  4. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  5. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in ICF targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effect testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule and costs associated with the construction project

  6. Alcohol ignition interlock programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirness, D J; Marques, P R

    2004-09-01

    The alcohol ignition interlock is an in-vehicle DWI control device that prevents a car from starting until the operator provides a breath alcohol concentration (BAC) test below a set level, usually .02% (20 mg/dl) to .04% (40 mg/dl). The first interlock program was begun as a pilot test in California 18 years ago; today all but a few US states, and Canadian provinces have interlock enabling legislation. Sweden has recently implemented a nationwide interlock program. Other nations of the European Union and as well as several Australian states are testing it on a small scale or through pilot research. This article describes the interlock device and reviews the development and current status of interlock programs including their public safety benefit and the public practice impediments to more widespread adoption of these DWI control devices. Included in this review are (1) a discussion of the technological breakthroughs and certification standards that gave rise to the design features of equipment that is in widespread use today; (2) a commentary on the growing level of adoption of interlocks by governments despite the judicial and legislative practices that prevent more widespread use of them; (3) a brief overview of the extant literature documenting a high degree of interlock efficacy while installed, and the rapid loss of their preventative effect on repeat DWI once they are removed from the vehicles; (4) a discussion of the representativeness of subjects in the current research studies; (5) a discussion of research innovations, including motivational intervention efforts that may extend the controlling effect of the interlock, and data mining research that has uncovered ways to use the stored interlock data record of BAC tests in order to predict high risk drivers; and (6) a discussion of communication barriers and conceptual rigidities that may be preventing the alcohol ignition interlock from taking a more prominent role in the arsenal of tools used to control

  7. Plasma engineering assessments of compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Confinement, startup sequences, and fast-alpha particle effects are assessed for a class of compact tokamak ignition experiments having high toroidal magnetic fields (8 to 12 T) and high toroidal currents (7 to 10 MA). The uncertainties in confinement scaling are spanned through examples of performance with an optimistic model based on ohmically heated plasmas and a pessimistic model that includes confinement degradation by both auxiliary and alpha heating. The roles of neoclassical resistivity enhancement and sawtooth behavior are also evaluated. Copper toroidal field coils place restrictions on pulse lengths due to resistive heating, so a simultaneous rampup of the toroidal field and plasma current is proposed as a means of compressing the startup phase and lengthening the burn phase. If the ignition window is small, fast-alpha particle physics is restricted to the high-density regime where a short slowing-down time leads to low fast-particle density and pressure contributions. Under more optimistic confinement, a larger ignition margin broadens the range of alpha particle physics that can be addressed. These issues are illustrated through examples of transport simulations for a set of machine parameters called BRAND-X, which typify the designs under study

  8. Theoretical Modelling Methods for Thermal Management of Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Shabani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge associated with renewable energy generation is the intermittency of the renewable source of power. Because of this, back-up generation sources fuelled by fossil fuels are required. In stationary applications whether it is a back-up diesel generator or connection to the grid, these systems are yet to be truly emissions-free. One solution to the problem is the utilisation of electrochemical energy storage systems (ESS to store the excess renewable energy and then reusing this energy when the renewable energy source is insufficient to meet the demand. The performance of an ESS amongst other things is affected by the design, materials used and the operating temperature of the system. The operating temperature is critical since operating an ESS at low ambient temperatures affects its capacity and charge acceptance while operating the ESS at high ambient temperatures affects its lifetime and suggests safety risks. Safety risks are magnified in renewable energy storage applications given the scale of the ESS required to meet the energy demand. This necessity has propelled significant effort to model the thermal behaviour of ESS. Understanding and modelling the thermal behaviour of these systems is a crucial consideration before designing an efficient thermal management system that would operate safely and extend the lifetime of the ESS. This is vital in order to eliminate intermittency and add value to renewable sources of power. This paper concentrates on reviewing theoretical approaches used to simulate the operating temperatures of ESS and the subsequent endeavours of modelling thermal management systems for these systems. The intent of this review is to present some of the different methods of modelling the thermal behaviour of ESS highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  9. An Analytic Model Of Thermal Drift In Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, A; Elhadj, S; Sirbuly, D J; McCall, S K; Hart, B R; Ratto, T V

    2009-08-26

    A closed form semi-empirical model has been developed to understand the physical origins of thermal drift in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. The two-component model describes both the effects of temperature-related bending and heat dissipation on the piezoresistance. The temperature-related bending component is based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory of elastic deformation applied to a multilayer cantilever. The heat dissipation component is based on energy conservation per unit time for a piezoresistive cantilever in a Wheatstone bridge circuit, representing a balance between electrical power input and heat dissipation into the environment. Conduction and convection are found to be the primary mechanisms of heat transfer, and the dependence of these effects on the thermal conductivity, temperature, and flow rate of the gaseous environment is described. The thermal boundary layer value which defines the length scale of the heat dissipation phenomenon is treated as an empirical fitting parameter. Using the model, it is found that the cantilever heat dissipation is unaffected by the presence of a thin polymer coating, therefore the residual thermal drift in the differential response of a coated and uncoated cantilever is the result of non-identical temperature-related bending. Differential response data shows that residual drift is eliminated under isothermal laboratory conditions but not the unregulated and variable conditions that exist in the outdoor environment (i.e., the field). The two-component model is then validated by simulating the thermal drifts of an uncoated and a coated piezoresistive cantilever under field conditions over a 24 hour period using only meteorological data as input.

  10. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  11. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan

    2007-09-01

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  12. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  13. Modeling thermal inkjet and cell printing process using modified pseudopotential and thermal lattice Boltzmann methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Salman; Liu, Yaling

    2018-03-01

    Pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) can simulate a phase transition in high-density ratio multiphase flow systems. If coupled with thermal LBMs through equation of state, they can be used to study instantaneous phase transition phenomena with a high-temperature gradient where only one set of formulations in an LBM system can handle liquid, vapor, phase transition, and heat transport. However, at lower temperatures an unrealistic spurious current at the interface introduces instability and limits its application in real flow system. In this study, we proposed new modifications to the LBM system to minimize a spurious current which enables us to study nucleation dynamic at room temperature. To demonstrate the capabilities of this approach, the thermal ejection process is modeled as one example of a complex flow system. In an inkjet printer, a thermal pulse instantly heats up the liquid in a microfluidic chamber and nucleates bubble vapor providing the pressure pulse necessary to eject droplets at high speed. Our modified method can present a more realistic model of the explosive vaporization process since it can also capture a high-temperature/density gradient at nucleation region. Thermal inkjet technology has been successfully applied for printing cells, but cells are susceptible to mechanical damage or death as they squeeze out of the nozzle head. To study cell deformation, a spring network model, representing cells, is connected to the LBM through the immersed boundary method. Looking into strain and stress distribution of a cell membrane at its most deformed state, it is found that a high stretching rate effectively increases the rupture tension. In other words, membrane deformation energy is released through creation of multiple smaller nanopores rather than big pores. Overall, concurrently simulating multiphase flow, phase transition, heat transfer, and cell deformation in one unified LB platform, we are able to provide a better insight into the

  14. Asteroid thermal modeling in the presence of reflected sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    A new derivation of simple asteroid thermal models is presented, investigating the need to account correctly for Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation when IR observations contain substantial reflected sunlight. The framework applies to both the NEATM and related thermal models. A new parameterization of these models eliminates the dependence of thermal modeling on visible absolute magnitude H, which is not always available. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the potential impact of violating Kirchhoff's law on estimates of physical parameters such as diameter and IR albedo, with an emphasis on NEOWISE results. The NEOWISE papers use ten different models, applied to 12 different combinations of WISE data bands, in 47 different combinations. The most prevalent combinations are simulated and the accuracy of diameter estimates is found to be depend critically on the model and data band combination. In the best case of full thermal modeling of all four band the errors in an idealized model the 1σ (68.27%) confidence interval is -5% to +6%, but this combination is just 1.9% of NEOWISE results. Other combinations representing 42% of the NEOWISE results have about twice the CI at -10% to +12%, before accounting for errors due to irregular shape or other real world effects that are not simulated. The model and data band combinations found for the majority of NEOWISE results have much larger systematic and random errors. Kirchhoff's law violation by NEOWISE models leads to errors in estimation accuracy that are strongest for asteroids with W1, W2 band emissivity ɛ12 in both the lowest (0.605 ≤ɛ12 ≤ 0 . 780), and highest decile (0.969 ≤ɛ12 ≤ 0 . 988), corresponding to the highest and lowest deciles of near-IR albedo pIR. Systematic accuracy error between deciles ranges from a low of 5% to as much as 45%, and there are also differences in the random errors. Kirchhoff's law effects also produce large errors in NEOWISE estimates of pIR, particularly for high

  15. LES of an ignition sequence in a gas turbine engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boileau, M.; Staffelbach, G.; Cuenot, B. [CERFACS, Toulouse (France); Poinsot, T. [IMFT - CNRS, Toulouse (France); Berat, C. [Turbomeca (SAFRAN group), Bordes (France)

    2008-07-15

    Being able to ignite or reignite a gas turbine engine in a cold and rarefied atmosphere is a critical issue for many manufacturers. From a fundamental point of view, the ignition of the first burner and the flame propagation from one burner to another are phenomena that are usually not studied. The present work is a large eddy simulation (LES) of these phenomena. To simulate a complete ignition sequence in an annular chamber, LES has been applied to the full 360 geometry, including 18 burners. This geometry corresponds to a real gas turbine chamber. Massively parallel computing (700 processors on a Cray XT3 machine) was essential to perform such a large calculation. Results show that liquid fuel injection has a strong influence on the ignition times. Moreover, the rate of flame progress from burner to burner is much higher than the turbulent flame speed due to a major effect of thermal expansion. This flame speed is also strongly modified by the main burner aerodynamics due to the swirled injection. Finally, the variability of the combustor sectors and quadrant ignition times is highlighted. (author)

  16. HELOKA-HP thermal-hydraulic model validation and calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xue Zhou; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Badea, Aurelian Florin

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The electrical heater in HELOKA-HP has been modeled with RELAP5-3D using experimental data as input. • The model has been validated using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data and the representative model parameters with BEST-EST. • The methodology is successfully used for reducing the model uncertainties and provides a quantitative measure of the consistency between the experimental data and the model. - Abstract: The Helium Loop Karlsruhe High Pressure (HELOKA-HP) is an experimental facility for the testing of various helium-cooled components at high temperature (500 °C) and high pressure (8 MPa) for nuclear fusion applications. For modeling the loop thermal dynamics, a thermal-hydraulic model has been created using the system code RELAP5-3D. Recently, new experimental data covering the behavior of the loop components under relevant operational conditions have been made available giving the possibility of validating and calibrating the existing models in order to reduce the uncertainties of the simulated responses. This paper presents an example where such process has been applied for the HELOKA electrical heater model. Using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data, implemented in the computational module BEST-EST, the representative parameters of the model have been calibrated.

  17. A Robust Model Predictive Control for efficient thermal management of internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzonia, Francesco; Castiglione, Teresa; Bova, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Robust Model Predictive Control for ICE thermal management was developed. • The proposed control is effective in decreasing the warm-up time. • The control system reduces coolant flow rate under fully warmed conditions. • The control strategy operates the cooling system around onset of nucleate boiling. • Little on-line computational effort is required. - Abstract: Optimal thermal management of modern internal combustion engines (ICE) is one of the key factors for reducing fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. These are measured by using standardized driving cycles, like the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), during which the engine does not reach thermal steady state; engine efficiency and emissions are therefore penalized. Several techniques for improving ICE thermal efficiency were proposed, which range from the use of empirical look-up tables to pulsed pump operation. A systematic approach to the problem is however still missing and this paper aims to bridge this gap. The paper proposes a Robust Model Predictive Control of the coolant flow rate, which makes use of a zero-dimensional model of the cooling system of an ICE. The control methodology incorporates explicitly the model uncertainties and achieves the synthesis of a state-feedback control law that minimizes the “worst case” objective function while taking into account the system constraints, as proposed by Kothare et al. (1996). The proposed control strategy is to adjust the coolant flow rate by means of an electric pump, in order to bring the cooling system to operate around the onset of nucleate boiling: across it during warm-up and above it (nucleate or saturated boiling) under fully warmed conditions. The computationally heavy optimization is carried out off-line, while during the operation of the engine the control parameters are simply picked-up on-line from look-up tables. Owing to the little computational effort required, the resulting control strategy is suitable for

  18. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  19. Thermal Model of a Dish Stirling Cavity-Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thermal model for a dish Stirling cavity based on the finite differences method. This model is a theoretical tool to optimize the cavity in terms of thermal efficiency. One of the main outcomes of this work is the evaluation of radiative exchange using the radiosity method; for that purpose, the view factors of all surfaces involved have been accurately calculated. Moreover, this model enables the variation of the cavity and receiver dimensions and the materials to determine the optimal cavity design. The tool has been used to study the cavity optimization regarding geometry parameters and material properties. Receiver absorptivity has been identified as the most influential property of the materials. The optimal aperture height depends on the minimum focal space.

  20. Thermal models of electric machines with dynamic workloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pohlandt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electric powertrains are increasingly used in off-highway machines because of easy controllability and excellent overall efficiency. The main goals are increasing the energy efficiency of the machine and the optimization of the work process. The thermal behaviour of electric machines with dynamic workloads applied to is a key design factor for electric powertrains in off-highway machines. This article introduces a methodology to model the thermal behaviour of electric machines. Using a noncausal modelling approach, an electric powertrain is analysed for dynamic workloads. Cause-effect relationships and reasons for increasing temperature are considered as well as various cooling techniques. The validation of the overall simulation model of the powertrain with measured field data workloads provides convincing results to evaluate numerous applications of electric machines in off-highway machines.

  1. Thermal/Mechanical Measurement and Modeling of Bicycle Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Feier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Brake induced heating has become more difficult to control as bicycle component mass has been reduced. High-power braking with insufficient cooling or thermal capacitance can create excessive temperatures, boiling brake fluid, performance degradation, and damage. To better understand component heating, a disc braking dynamometer has been constructed with a motor driven disc, hydraulic braking, and a miniature wind tunnel. Disc temperatures are studied for various braking scenarios using infrared techniques and thermocouples. A transient, numerical, MATLAB, lumped parameter thermal/mechanical model is created to predict the impact of key design parameters on braking performance and to understand the heat loss mechanisms from the brake system components. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations are used to estimate the disc surface convective cooling coefficients for the model. The final model provides transient temperature predictions based on bicycle velocity and braking power, and successfully matches dynamometer experimental data.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Some Heating and Thermal Treatment Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Voronova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper-is to construct a mathematical model that makes it possible to investigate and modify design and heat technological models of units intended for heating and thermal treatment of products with due account of all parameters affecting the quality of the process proceeding. Orthogonal Bubnov-Galiorcin method has been used to solve boundary equation problems of heat conduction with corresponding initial and limiting conditions of the first, second and third origin. Maximum error of the results obtained with the help of the proposed model does not exceed 3,7 %, that testifies its adequacy and proves its possible usage with the purpose to optimize heating and thermal treatment processes of products.

  3. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is anticipated to be instrumental for understanding and predicting the development of residual stress field during the build process. However, SLM process modelling requires determination of the heat transients within the part being built which is coupled to a mechanical boundary value problem to calculate displacement and residual stress fields. Thermal models associated with SLM are typically complex and computationally demanding. In this paper, we present a simple semi-analytical thermal-mechanical model, developed for SLM that represents the effect of laser scanning vectors with line heat sources. The temperature field within the part being build is attained by superposition of temperature field associated with line heat sources in a semi-infinite medium and a complimentary temperature field which accounts for the actual boundary conditions. An analytical solution of a line heat source in a semi-infinite medium is first described followed by the numerical procedure used for finding the complimentary temperature field. This analytical description of the line heat sources is able to capture the steep temperature gradients in the vicinity of the laser spot which is typically tens of micrometers. In turn, semi-analytical thermal model allows for having a relatively coarse discretisation of the complimentary temperature field. The temperature history determined is used to calculate the thermal strain induced on the SLM part. Finally, a mechanical model governed by elastic-plastic constitutive rule having isotropic hardening is used to predict the residual stresses.

  4. Fast ignition breakeven scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2005-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations have been performed to determine scaling laws for fast ignition break even of a hot spot formed by energetic particles created by a short pulse laser. Hot spot break even is defined to be when the fusion yield is equal to the total energy deposited in the hot spot through both the initial compression and the subsequent heating. In these simulations, only a small portion of a previously compressed mass of deuterium-tritium fuel is heated on a short time scale, i.e., the hot spot is tamped by the cold dense fuel which surrounds it. The hot spot tamping reduces the minimum energy required to obtain break even as compared to the situation where the entire fuel mass is heated, as was assumed in a previous study [S. A. Slutz, R. A. Vesey, I. Shoemaker, T. A. Mehlhorn, and K. Cochrane, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3483 (2004)]. The minimum energy required to obtain hot spot break even is given approximately by the scaling law E T = 7.5(ρ/100) -1.87 kJ for tamped hot spots, as compared to the previously reported scaling of E UT = 15.3(ρ/100) -1.5 kJ for untamped hotspots. The size of the compressed fuel mass and the focusability of the particles generated by the short pulse laser determines which scaling law to use for an experiment designed to achieve hot spot break even

  5. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  6. Modeling of thermal explosion under pressure in metal ceramic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Dudko, V.; Skachek, B.; Matvienko, A.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The process of reactive in situ synthesis of dense ceramic matrix composites in Ti-B-C, Ti-B-N, Ti-Si-N systems is modeled. These ceramics are fabricated on the basis of compacted blends of ceramic powders, namely Ti-B 4 C and/or Ti-BN. The objectives of the project are to identify and investigate the optimal thermal conditions preferable for production of fully dense ceramic matrix composites. Towards this goal heat transfer and combustion in dense and porous ceramic blends are investigated during monotonous heating at a constant rate. This process is modeled using a heat transfer-combustion model with kinetic parameters determined from the differential thermal analysis of the experimental data. The kinetic burning parameters and the model developed are further used to describe the thermal explosion synthesis in a restrained die under pressure. It is shown that heat removal from the reaction zone affects the combustion process and the final phase composition

  7. Electricity pricing model in thermal generating stations under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reji, P.; Ashok, S.; Moideenkutty, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    In regulated public utilities with competitive power markets, deregulation has replaced the monopoly. Under the deregulated power market, the electricity price primarily depends on market mechanism and power demand. In this market, generators generally follow marginal pricing. Each generator fixes the electricity price based on their pricing strategy and it leads to more price volatility. This paper proposed a model to determine the electricity price considering all operational constraints of the plant and economic variables that influenced the price, for a thermal generating station under deregulation. The purpose of the model was to assist existing stations, investors in the power sector, regulatory authorities, transmission utilities, and new power generators in decision-making. The model could accommodate price volatility in the market and was based on performance incentive/penalty considering plant load factor, availability of the plant and peak/ off peak demand. The model was applied as a case study to a typical thermal utility in India to determine the electricity price. It was concluded that the case study of a thermal generating station in a deregulated environment showed that the electricity price mainly depended on the gross calorific value (GCV) of fuel, mode of operation, price of the fuel, and operating charges. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Transient electro-thermal modeling of bipolar power semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gachovska, Tanya Kirilova; Du, Bin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents physics-based electro-thermal models of bipolar power semiconductor devices including their packages, and describes their implementation in MATLAB and Simulink. It is a continuation of our first book Modeling of Bipolar Power Semiconductor Devices. The device electrical models are developed by subdividing the devices into different regions and the operations in each region, along with the interactions at the interfaces, are analyzed using the basic semiconductor physics equations that govern device behavior. The Fourier series solution is used to solve the ambipolar diffusio

  9. Carbon footprint of automotive ignition coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huey-Ling; Chen, Chih-Ming; Sun, Chin-Huang; Lin, Hung-Di

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, environmental issues, such as climate change and global warming due to the excessive development of industry, have attracted increasing attention of citizens worldwide. It is known that CO2 accounts for the largest proportion of greenhouse gases. Therefore, how to reduce CO2 emissions during the life cycle of a product to lessen its impact on environment is an important topic in the industrial society. Furthermore, it is also of great significance to cut down the required energy so as to lower its production costs during the manufacturing process nowadays. This study presents the carbon footprint of an automotive ignition coil and its partial materials are defined to explore their carbon emissions and environmental impact. The model IPCC GWP100a calculates potential global greenhouse effect by converting them into CO2 equivalents. In this way, the overall carbon footprint of an ignition coil can be explored. By using IPCC GWP100a, the results display that the shell has the most carbon emissions. The results can help the industry reduce the carbon emissions of an ignition coil product.

  10. Thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Link, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal IR exitance model of a plant canopy based on a mathematical abstraction of three horizontal layers of vegetation was developed. Canopy geometry within each layer is quantitatively described by the foliage and branch orientation distributions and number density. Given this geometric information for each layer and the driving meteorological variables, a system of energy budget equations was determined and solved for average layer temperatures. These estimated layer temperatures, together with the angular distributions of radiating elements, were used to calculate the emitted thermal IR radiation as a function of view angle above the canopy. The model was applied to a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) canopy over a diurnal cycle. Simulated vs measured radiometric average temperatures of the midcanopy layer corresponded with 2 C. Simulation results suggested that canopy geometry can significantly influence the effective radiant temperature recorded at varying sensor view angles.

  11. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    . The total power consumption of all loads is controlled indirectly through a real-time price. The MPC incorporates forecasts of the power production and disturbances that influence the loads, e.g. time-varying weather forecasts, in order to react ahead of time. A simulation scenario demonstrates......The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination...... that the method allows for the integration of flexible thermal loads in a smart energy system in which consumption follows the changing production....

  12. Self-ignition and oxidation of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 K at high pressure: experimental study with fast compression machine and modeling; Autoinflammation et oxydation de divers hydrocarbures entre 600 et 1000 K a haute pression: etude experimentale en machine a compression rapide et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaucour, M.

    2002-12-01

    Low- and intermediate-temperature oxidation and self-ignition of hydrocarbons play a major role in spark ignition, diesel and HCCI (homogenous charge compression ignition) engines. A deep understanding of the chemistry linked with both phenomena is necessary to improve the engines efficiency and to reduce the formation of pollutants. This document treats of works about the self-ignition and oxidation at high pressure of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 deg. K. The experimental tool used is a fast compression machine fitted with a fast sampling system for the measurement of self-ignition delays and of the concentrations of intermediate oxidation products. The advantages and limitations of this tool are discussed. The self-ignition of various hydrocarbons is compared using pre-defined data which characterize the phenomenologies like cold flames, negative temperature coefficients and self-ignition limits. The hydrocarbons considered are pure or binary mixtures of alkanes, pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The development of high pressure oxidation reaction schemes of alkanes between 600 and 1000 deg. K is described. It is directly based on the analysis of intermediate oxidation products. This methodology is also applied to pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The construction of detailed thermo-kinetic models of oxidation and the modeling of phenomena are made for n-butane, n-heptane, for the 3 pentane isomers, for pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. Finally, the perspectives of future works are evoked. They concern new modeling and new methodologies to be applied in more predictive thermo-kinetic models and the reduction of detailed models in order to include them inside fluid dynamics codes. (J.S.)

  13. Power Loss Calculation and Thermal Modelling for a Three Phase Inverter Drive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhou

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Power losses calculation and thermal modelling for a three-phase inverter power system is presented in this paper. Aiming a long real time thermal simulation, an accurate average power losses calculation based on PWM reconstruction technique is proposed. For carrying out the thermal simulation, a compact thermal model for a three-phase inverter power module is built. The thermal interference of adjacent heat sources is analysed using 3D thermal simulation. The proposed model can provide accurate power losses with a large simulation time-step and suitable for a long real time thermal simulation for a three phase inverter drive system for hybrid vehicle applications.

  14. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  15. Software for Automated Generation of Reduced Thermal Models for Spacecraft Thermal Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal analysis is increasingly used in thermal engineering of spacecrafts in every stage, including design, test, and ground-operation simulation. Current...

  16. A thermal lens model including the Soret effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, Humberto; Sira, Eloy; Rahn, Kareem; Garcia-Sucre, Maximo

    2009-01-01

    In this letter we generalize the thermal lens model to account for the Soret effect in binary liquid mixtures. This formalism permits the precise determination of the Soret coefficient in a steady-state situation. The theory is experimentally verified using the measured values in the ethanol/water mixtures. The time evolution of the Soret signal has been used to derive mass-diffusion times from which mass-diffusion coefficients were calculated. (Author)

  17. Numerical Modelling of Wood Gasification in Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirka, Ivan; Živný, Oldřich; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 947-965 ISSN 0272-4324 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma modelling * CFD * Thermal plasma reactor * Biomass * Gasification * Syngas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9812-z

  18. Model predictive control of a solar-thermal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade Saade, Maria Elizabeth

    Solar-thermal reactors represent a promising alternative to fossil fuels because they can harvest solar energy and transform it into storable and transportable fuels. The operation of solar-thermal reactors is restricted by the available sunlight and its inherently transient behavior, which affects the performance of the reactors and limits their efficiency. Before solar-thermal reactors can become commercially viable, they need to be able to maintain a continuous high-performance operation, even in the presence of passing clouds. A well-designed control system can preserve product quality and maintain stable product compositions, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective operation, which can ultimately lead to scale-up and commercialization of solar thermochemical technologies. In this work, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) system for a solar-thermal reactor for the steam-gasification of biomass. The proposed controller aims at rejecting the disturbances in solar irradiation caused by the presence of clouds. A first-principles dynamic model of the process was developed. The model was used to study the dynamic responses of the process variables and to identify a linear time-invariant model used in the MPC algorithm. To provide an estimation of the disturbances for the control algorithm, a one-minute-ahead direct normal irradiance (DNI) predictor was developed. The proposed predictor utilizes information obtained through the analysis of sky images, in combination with current atmospheric measurements, to produce the DNI forecast. In the end, a robust controller was designed capable of rejecting disturbances within the operating region. Extensive simulation experiments showed that the controller outperforms a finely-tuned multi-loop feedback control strategy. The results obtained suggest that our controller is suitable for practical implementation.

  19. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  20. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed...... and the backingplate by solving an inverse modelling problem in which experimental data and a numerical model are used for determining the contact heat transfer coefficient. Different parametrizations of the spatial distribution of the heat transfer coefficient are studied and discussed, and the optimization problem...

  1. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  2. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is ∼0.5 cm diameter by ∼1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a ∼2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer

  3. Cu/Zn Thermal Conductivity: Experimental And ANFIS Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid S. Kareem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are fluids within which particles of nanometre sizes are suspended. In terms of thermal characteristics, nanofluids have a greater heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity than other traditional fluids. Bimetallic core/shell Cu/Zn particles of nanometre sizes are novel invented nanoparticle materials with considerable variations in its applications. The particles of nanometre size were suspended in a base fluid for the preparation of nanofluids for different volume fractions. A coated transitory hot wire device were built and standardized and this was subsequently employed for the determination of heat conductivities of the nanofluids for bimetallic ratios, volume fraction, base fluid temperatures and base fluids thermal conductivity. The Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS model was subsequently employed for modelling the determined results generated. A random test of 20% from various nanofluids showed a deviation less than 1% between measured and modeled results. It was inferred that heat conductivities increase with increase in the particle volume concentrations, especially when the later one at value of 1, the heat conductivities ratio approach to 1.35. Nevertheless, the shape and the method of preparing the particles of nanometre size reveals anomalous enhancements in heat conductivities of bimetallic compared to monocular metallic nanofluids.

  4. Review: laser ignition for aerospace propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. O’Briant

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to provide the reader an overview of advanced ignition methods, with an emphasis on laser ignition and its applications to aerospace propulsion. A comprehensive review of advanced ignition systems in aerospace applications is performed. This includes studies on gas turbine applications, ramjet and scramjet systems, and space and rocket applications. A brief overview of ignition and laser ignition phenomena is also provided in earlier sections of the report. Throughout the reading, research papers, which were presented at the 2nd Laser Ignition Conference in April 2014, are mentioned to indicate the vast array of projects that are currently being pursued.

  5. Modeling thermal sensation in a Mediterranean climate—a comparison of linear and ordinal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantavou, Katerina; Lykoudis, Spyridon

    2014-08-01

    A simple thermo-physiological model of outdoor thermal sensation adjusted with psychological factors is developed aiming to predict thermal sensation in Mediterranean climates. Microclimatic measurements simultaneously with interviews on personal and psychological conditions were carried out in a square, a street canyon and a coastal location of the greater urban area of Athens, Greece. Multiple linear and ordinal regression were applied in order to estimate thermal sensation making allowance for all the recorded parameters or specific, empirically selected, subsets producing so-called extensive and empirical models, respectively. Meteorological, thermo-physiological and overall models - considering psychological factors as well - were developed. Predictions were improved when personal and psychological factors were taken into account as compared to meteorological models. The model based on ordinal regression reproduced extreme values of thermal sensation vote more adequately than the linear regression one, while the empirical model produced satisfactory results in relation to the extensive model. The effects of adaptation and expectation on thermal sensation vote were introduced in the models by means of the exposure time, season and preference related to air temperature and irradiation. The assessment of thermal sensation could be a useful criterion in decision making regarding public health, outdoor spaces planning and tourism.

  6. Modeling the thermal absorption factor of photovoltaic/thermal combi-panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santbergen, R.; Zolingen, R.J.Ch. van

    2006-01-01

    In a photovoltaic/thermal combi-panel solar cells generate electricity while residual heat is extracted to be used for tap water heating or room heating. In such a panel the entire solar spectrum can be used in principle. Unfortunately long wavelength solar irradiance is poorly absorbed by the semiconductor material in standard solar cells. A computer model was developed to determine the thermal absorption factor of crystalline silicon solar cells. It was found that for a standard untextured solar cell with a silver back contact a relatively large amount of long wavelength irradiance is lost by reflection resulting in an absorption factor of only 74%. The model was then used to investigate ways to increase this absorption factor. One way is absorbing long wavelength irradiance in a second absorber behind a semi-transparent solar cell. According to the model this will increase the total absorption factor to 87%. The second way is to absorb irradiance in the back contact of the solar cell by using rough interfaces in combination with a non-standard metal as back contact. Theoretically the absorption factor can then be increased to 85%

  7. Thermal balance of cattle grazing winter range: model application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, E N; Olson, B E

    2006-05-01

    Beef cattle grazing semiarid foothill rangeland of the Northern Rockies during winter may be exposed to cold temperatures and high winds while grazing pastures with low nutritional value. Cattle can physiologically and behaviorally respond to the changing environment to lower their metabolic requirements and reduce the effects of cold exposure. Requirements of grazing cattle may be overpredicted with models developed in controlled settings that do not account for energy-conserving behaviors. We refined a simple thermal balance equation to model heat exchange of free-ranging cattle. We accounted for the complex interactions between animal behavior and the changing natural environment by applying the insulation characteristics of the cattle's tissue and coat to a simple geometric shape of an asymmetric ellipsoid at different orientations to the sun and wind. We compared the model predictions with heat production measured in 3 studies, and in all cases the model predictions were similar to those reported. Model simulations indicate behaviors, such as lying and orientation to the sun, mitigated the effects of extreme weather. For many combinations of winter weather variables, metabolic requirements increased only slightly due to cold exposure of mature beef cattle in a near-maintenance state. The results indicate that solar radiation contributes strongly to the thermal balance of a cow. Thus, previous models that do not account for the irradiative environment may overestimate metabolic requirements of cattle acclimated to grazing winter range.

  8. Correlation of spacecraft thermal mathematical models to reference data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralbo, Ignacio; Perez-Grande, Isabel; Sanz-Andres, Angel; Piqueras, Javier

    2018-03-01

    Model-to-test correlation is a frequent problem in spacecraft-thermal control design. The idea is to determine the values of the parameters of the thermal mathematical model (TMM) that allows reaching a good fit between the TMM results and test data, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the mathematical model. Quite often, this task is performed manually, mainly because a good engineering knowledge and experience is needed to reach a successful compromise, but the use of a mathematical tool could facilitate this work. The correlation process can be considered as the minimization of the error of the model results with regard to the reference data. In this paper, a simple method is presented suitable to solve the TMM-to-test correlation problem, using Jacobian matrix formulation and Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse, generalized to include several load cases. Aside, in simple cases, this method also allows for analytical solutions to be obtained, which helps to analyze some problems that appear when the Jacobian matrix is singular. To show the implementation of the method, two problems have been considered, one more academic, and the other one the TMM of an electronic box of PHI instrument of ESA Solar Orbiter mission, to be flown in 2019. The use of singular value decomposition of the Jacobian matrix to analyze and reduce these models is also shown. The error in parameter space is used to assess the quality of the correlation results in both models.

  9. Auto-Ignition and Spray Characteristics of n-Heptane and iso-Octane Fuels in Ignition Quality Tester

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2018-04-04

    Numerical simulations were conducted to systematically assess the effects of different spray models on the ignition delay predictions and compared with experimental measurements obtained at the KAUST ignition quality tester (IQT) facility. The influence of physical properties and chemical kinetics over the ignition delay time is also investigated. The IQT experiments provided the pressure traces as the main observables, which are not sufficient to obtain a detailed understanding of physical (breakup, evaporation) and chemical (reactivity) processes associated with auto-ignition. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE™, was used to capture the detailed fluid/spray dynamics and chemical characteristics within the IQT configuration. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence with multi-zone chemistry sub-models was adopted with a reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane. The emphasis was on the assessment of two common spray breakup models, namely the Kelvin-Helmholtz/Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) and linearized instability sheet atomization (LISA) models, in terms of their influence on auto-ignition predictions. Two spray models resulted in different local mixing, and their influence in the prediction of auto-ignition was investigated. The relative importance of physical ignition delay, characterized by spray evaporation and mixing processes, in the overall ignition behavior for the two different fuels were examined. The results provided an improved understanding of the essential contribution of physical and chemical processes that are critical in describing the IQT auto-ignition event at different pressure and temperature conditions, and allowed a systematic way to distinguish between the physical and chemical ignition delay times.

  10. Models for describing the thermal characteristics of building components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, M.J.; Madsen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor testing of buildings and building components under real weather conditions provides useful information about their dynamic performance. Such knowledge is needed to properly characterize the heat transfer dynamics and provides useful information for implementing energy saving strategies...... of these approaches may therefore be very useful for selecting a suitable approach for each particular case. This paper presents an overview of models that can be applied for modelling the thermal characteristics of buildings and building components using data from outdoor testing. The choice of approach depends...

  11. Hydraulic modeling of thermal discharges into shallow, tidal affected streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copp, H.W.; Shashidhara, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    A two-unit nuclear fired power plant is being constructed in western Washington state. Blowdown water from cooling towers will be discharged into the Chehalis River nearby. The location of a diffuser is some 21 miles upriver from Grays Harbor on the Pacific Ocean. Because the Chehalis River is classified as an excellent stream from the standpoint of water quality, State regulatory agencies required demonstration that thermal discharges would maintain water quality standards within fairly strict limits. A hydraulic model investigation used a 1:12 scale, undistorted model of a 1300-foot river reach in the vicinity of the diffuser. The model scale was selected to insure fully turbulent flows both in the stream and from the diffuser (Reynolds similitude). Model operation followed the densimetric Froude similitude. Thermistors were employed to measure temperatures in the model; measurements were taken by computer command and such measurements at some 250 positions were effected in about 2.5 seconds

  12. Thermal experiments in the model of ADS target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Efanov; Yuri, Orlov; Alexander, Sorokin; Eugeni, Ivanov; Galina, Bogoslovskaia; Ning, Li

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents thermal experiments performed in the SSC RF IPPE on the ADS window target model. Brief description of the model, specific features of structure, measurement system and some methodological approaches are presented. Eutectic lead-bismuth alloy is modeled here by eutectic sodium-potassium alloy. The following characteristics of the target model were measured directly and estimated by processing: coolant flow rate, model power, absolute temperature of the coolant with a distance from the membrane of the target, absolute temperature of the membrane surface, mean square value and pulsating component of coolant temperature, as well as membrane temperature. Measurements have shown a great pulsations of temperature existing at the membrane surface that must be taken into account in analysis of strength of real target system. Experimental temperature fields (present work) and velocity fields measured earlier make up a complete database for verification of 2D and 3D thermohydraulic codes. (author)

  13. Linear induction accelerator requirements for ion fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.

    1998-01-26

    induction linacs, the purpose of this memo is to explore possible new features and characteristic parameters that induction linacs would need to meet the stringent requirements for beam quality and compression (sufficiently low longitudinal and transverse thermal spread) for ion driven fast ignition. Separately, Ed Lee at LBNL is looking at heavy-ion synchrotrons to meet similar fast ignition requirements. Parameters relating to cost (e.g, total beam-line length and transport quads, total core volt-seconds and power switching) have to be considered in addition to meeting the challenging beam quality requirements for fast ignition compared to conventional HIF. The aim of this preliminary study is to motivate, after critical debate, taking a next step to do more detailed designs, particle simulations, and experimental tests of the most critical accelerator elements and focusing optics, to further assess the feasibility of ion-driven fast ignition.

  14. Theoretical modeling of molar volume and thermal expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaogang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: gang@mse.kth.se; Selleby, Malin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sundman, Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-05-15

    The molar volumes and thermal expansions of transition cubic metals were studied by means of the Calphad approach and the Debye-Grueneisen model. Experimental data were collected and assessed using Calphad procedures, and consistent results were obtained which give the best description of all experimental data. In order to put the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of metastable phases on a sound physical basis, the Debye-Grueneisen model was chosen to account for the vibrational contribution and calculate the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CLEs) of stable cubic metals. Two approximations for Grueneisen parameter {gamma}, i.e. Slater's and Dugdale and MacDonald's expressions were adopted. A modified calculation scheme, first proposed by Wang et al., was derived in a straightforward way and used to evaluate the Debye temperature from ab initio electronic total-energy calculations at T = 0 K. The thermal electronic contribution to CLE was also evaluated from the electronic density of states. The calculated total CLEs were compared with those from the Calphad assessments. A satisfactory agreement is reached.

  15. Theoretical modeling of molar volume and thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaogang; Selleby, Malin; Sundman, Bo

    2005-01-01

    The molar volumes and thermal expansions of transition cubic metals were studied by means of the Calphad approach and the Debye-Grueneisen model. Experimental data were collected and assessed using Calphad procedures, and consistent results were obtained which give the best description of all experimental data. In order to put the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of metastable phases on a sound physical basis, the Debye-Grueneisen model was chosen to account for the vibrational contribution and calculate the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CLEs) of stable cubic metals. Two approximations for Grueneisen parameter γ, i.e. Slater's and Dugdale and MacDonald's expressions were adopted. A modified calculation scheme, first proposed by Wang et al., was derived in a straightforward way and used to evaluate the Debye temperature from ab initio electronic total-energy calculations at T = 0 K. The thermal electronic contribution to CLE was also evaluated from the electronic density of states. The calculated total CLEs were compared with those from the Calphad assessments. A satisfactory agreement is reached

  16. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  17. Progress in catalytic ignition fabrication, modeling and infrastructure : (part 2) development of a multi-zone engine model simulated using MATLAB software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the purpose of providing students with data : acquisition and engine modeling experience at the University of Idaho. In developing the : model, multiple heat transfer and emissions models were researched and com...

  18. Fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion target by jet impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pedro@din.upm.es; Ogando, F. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (Spain); Eliezer, S. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel); Martinez-Val, J.M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel)

    2005-05-21

    A new target design for HIF, based on the fast-ignition principles, is proposed. Unlike the previous designs proposed so far, in this case just one energy source is needed to drive the whole process to ignition. The ultra-fast deposition of energy onto the compressed core is produced in this case by hypervelocity jets generated during the process. The collision of jets converts their kinetic energy into thermal energy of the nuclear fuel, which is expected to produce ignition under proper design. The process is studied in this paper, describing its most relevant features like jet production and later collision.

  19. Time-dependent analytical thermal model to investigate thermally induced stresses in quasi-CW-pumped laser rods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernhardi, EH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available that determines the temperature and the thermally induced stresses in isotropic rods is presented. Even though the model is developed for isotropic rods, it is shown that it can also be used to accurately estimate the thermal effects in anisotropic rods...

  20. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chung, M. K.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of advanced nuclear reactor system for evaluating key thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant to new safety concepts. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. The Followings are main research topics: - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation-induced Thermal Mixing in a Pool - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Construction of T-H Data Base

  1. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  2. Electro-thermal modeling of a microbridge gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huber, R.J. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-08-01

    Fully CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined polysilicon microbridges have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in catalytic, calorimetric gas sensing. To improve sensor behavior, extensive electro-thermal modeling efforts were undertaken using SPICE. The validity of the SPICE model was verified comparing its simulated behavior with experiment. Temperature distribution of an electrically heated microbridges was measured using an infrared microscope. Comparisons among the measured distribution, the SPICE simulation, and distributions obtained by analytical methods show that heating at the ends of a microbridges has important implications for device response. Additional comparisons between measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics, as well as transient response, further support the accuracy of the model. A major benefit of electro- thermal modeling with SPICE is the ability to simultaneously simulate the behavior of a device and its control/sensing electronics. Results for the combination of a unique constant-resistance control circuit and microbridges gas sensor are given. Models of in situ techniques for monitoring catalyst deposition are shown to be in agreement with experiment. Finally, simulated chemical response of the detector is compared with the data, and methods of improving response through modifications in bridge geometry are predicted.

  3. Thermal evolution of the Schwinger model with matrix product operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Cichy, K. [Frankfurt am Main Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing (NIC); Jansen, K.; Saito, H. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing (NIC)

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate the suitability of tensor network techniques for describing the thermal evolution of lattice gauge theories. As a benchmark case, we have studied the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model, using matrix product operators to approximate the thermal equilibrium states for finite system sizes with non-zero lattice spacings. We show how these techniques allow for reliable extrapolations in bond dimension, step width, system size and lattice spacing, and for a systematic estimation and control of all error sources involved in the calculation. The reached values of the lattice spacing are small enough to capture the most challenging region of high temperatures and the final results are consistent with the analytical prediction by Sachs and Wipf over a broad temperature range.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of porous bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum design of nuclear reactor core requires an iterative approach between the thermal-hydraulic, neutronic and operational analysis. This paper concentrates on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a hydrogen cooled, small particle bed reactor (PBR). The PBR core, modeled here, consists of a hexagonal array of fuel elements embedded in a moderator matrix. The fuel elements are annular packed beds of fuel particles held between two porous cylindrical frits. These particles, 500 to 600 μm in diameter, have a uranium carbide core, which is coated by two layers of graphite and an outer coating of zirconium carbide. Coolant flow, radially inward, from the cold frit through the packed bed and hot frit and axially out the channel, formed by the hot frit, to a common plenum. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. Ignition of hydrocarbon-air supersonic flow by volumetric ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Marat A.; Pozdnyakov, George A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the results of the electron-beam initiation of the combustion in the mixtures of hydrogen, natural gas or kerosene vapors with air. Electron beam characteristics were studied in closed volume with immobile gas. The researches included definition of an integrated current of an electronic beam, distribution of a current density and an estimation of average energy of electrons. Possibility of fuel mixtures ignition by means of this approach in the combustor at high velocity at the entrance was demonstrated. Experiments were carried out at Mach numbers of 4 and 5. Process of ignition and combustion under electron beam action was researched. It was revealed that ignition of mixture occurs after completion of electron gun operation. Data obtained have confirmed effectiveness of electron beam application for ignition of hydrogen and natural gas. The numerical simulation of the combustion of mixture in channel was carried out by means of ANSYS CFD 12.0 instrumentation on the basis of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equation using SST/k-ω turbulence model. For combustion modeling, a detailed kinetic scheme with 38 reactions of 8 species was implemented taking into account finite rate chemistry. Computations have shown that the developed model allow to predict ignition of a mixture and flame propagation even at low flow temperatures.

  6. Determining the Radii of Sixteen Transneptunian Bodies Through Thermal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Melissa; Grundy, W. M.; Stansberry, J.; Spencer, J.; Buie, M.; Chiang, E.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2007-10-01

    We will present an analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope observations with the MIPS 24mm and 70mm channels of thermal radiation from 15 Kuiper Belt Objects and one Neptune Trojan. Objects were chosen to explore differences between hot and cold classical KBOs. The observed fluxes, along with the absolute visual magnitude, are input into a program that finds the best fitting radius and albedo using a fast-rotator Standard Thermal Model (STM). We will discuss our extensive comparison of the STM to a rough surface thermophysical model (TPM) in order to estimate the error in radius caused by using the simpler STM. Using a wide range of thermal parameters, the fast-rotator STM more closely approximated the TPM than did the slow-rotator STM. For rotational periods on the order of hours, the radii determined by the fast STM were within 4% of the TPM radii and for a six day period (similar to Pluto) the radii were within 7%. Implementing the STM is advantageous since the specific thermal parameters of KBOs cannot be determined at this time and its computer run time is much faster than the TPM. Monte Carlo techniques have been employed to interpret observations with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) on a case-by-case basis and to derive the overall error in radius. Once all objects were analyzed, we looked for trends in radius and albedo with other dynamical properties. Spitzer Space Telescope is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. This work was supported by NASA through JPL/Caltech Contract Number #1265877.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock

  8. Sensitivity analysis on the zirconium ignition in a postulated SFP loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggil; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-ki; Chun, Tae-hyun; Bang, Je-geon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    From both SFP complete LOCA experiments, it was observed that zirconium alloy cladding temperature was abruptly increased at a certain point and the cladding was almost fully oxidized. To capture this phenomenon, the concept of air oxidation breakaway model was adopted in MELCOR code. This paper examines this air oxidation breakaway model by comparing the SFP project test data and MELCOR code calculation results by using this model. The air oxidation model parameters are slightly altered to see their sensitivities on the occurrence of the zirconium ignition. Through such sensitivity analysis, limitations of the air oxidation breakaway model are revealed in comparison to the actual zirconium ignition phenomenon during air ingress scenarios. In addition, ways to overcome the identified limitations of the air oxidation model are recommended to estimate better the zirconium ignition phenomenon in SFP sequences. In this paper, the zirconium ignition phenomenon was reviewed and the model to capture this phenomenon was investigated. The model is the air oxidation breakaway model in MELCOR code, and its sensitivity of the model parameters on the time to ignition was studied. From the sensitivity analysis, the slight change of model parameters induce the large variation of the time to ignition. The model itself includes its weakness to fully represent both the air oxidation breakaway phenomenon and the followed zirconium ignition behavior. Furthermore, this model considers no effect of N2 on the cladding degradation and its promoted exothermic heat release.

  9. Thermal stability and modeling of lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botte, Gerardine Gabriela

    2000-10-01

    First-principles mathematical models were developed to examine the effect of the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles on the performance of a lithium foil cell. Two different models were developed: the chemical potential model (CPM) that includes the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles and the diffusion model (DIM) that does not include the interactions. Significant differences in the thermal and electrochemical performance of the cell were observed between the two approaches. The temperature of the cell predicted by the DFM is higher than the one predicted by the CPM at a given capacity. The discharge time of the cell predicted by the DFM is shorter than the one predicted by the CPM. The results indicate that the cell needs to be modeled using the CPM approach especially at high discharge rates. An evaluation of the numerical techniques, control volume formulation (CVF) and finite difference method (FDM), used for the models was performed. It is shown that the truncation error is the same for both methods when the boundary conditions are of the Dirichlet type, the system of equations are linear and represented in Cartesian coordinates. A new technique to analyze the accuracy of the methods is presented. The only disadvantage of the FDM is that it failed to conserve mass for a small number of nodes when both boundary conditions include a derivative term whereas the CVF did conserve mass for these cases. However, for a large number of nodes the FDM provides mass conservation. It is important to note that the CVF has only (DeltaX) order of accuracy for a Neumann type boundary condition whereas the FDM has (DeltaX) 2 order. The second topic of this dissertation presents a study of the thermal stability of LiPF6 EC:EMC electrolyte for lithium ion batteries. A differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to perform the study of the electrolyte. For first time, the effect of different variables on its thermal stability

  10. Modelling measurement microphones using BEM with visco-thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2012-01-01

    For many decades, models that can explain the behaviour of measurement condenser microphones have been proposed in the literature. These devices have an apparently simple working principle, a charged capacitor whose charge varies when one of its electrodes, the diaphragm, moves as a result of sound...... waves. However, measurement microphones must be manufactured very carefully due to their sensitivity to small changes of their physical parameters. There are different elements in a microphone, the diaphragm, the gap behind it, a back cavity, a vent for pressure equalization and an external medium. All...... visco-thermal losses is used to model measurement condenser microphones. The models presented are fully coupled and include a FEM model of the diaphragm. The behaviour of the acoustic variables in the gap and the effect of the pressure equalization vent are discussed, as well as the practical difficulty...

  11. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-01-01

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and –resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold–helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to

  12. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-11-01

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and -resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold-helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to hindered

  13. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter, E-mail: amendt1@llnl.gov; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and –resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold–helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to

  14. Thermal simulation of the magnesium thermal of metallic uranium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, W.A.; Saliba-Silva, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Metallic uranium production is vital to fabricate fuel elements for nuclear research reactors and to produce radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Metallic uranium is got via magnesiothermal reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is carried out inside a closed graphite crucible inserted in a metallic reactor adequately sealed without any outside contact. The assembled set is gradually heated up inside a pit furnace up to reach the reaction ignition temperature (between 600-650 deg C). The optimization of the reactive system depends on the mathematical modeling using simulation by finite elements and computational calculation with specialized programs. In this way, the reactants' thermal behavior is forecast until they reach the ignition temperature. The optimization of the uranium production reaction is based on minimization of thermal losses using better the exo thermal reaction heat. As lower the thermal losses, as higher would be the heat amount to raise the temperature of reaction products. This promotes the adequate melting of uranium and slag, so allowing better metal/slag separation with higher metallic yield. This work shows how the mathematical simulation is made and supplies some preliminary results. (author)

  15. Prestressed concrete reactor vessel thermal cylinder model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, J.P.; Canonico, D.A.; Richardson, M.; Corum, J.M.; Dodge, W.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal cylinder experiment was designed both to provide information for evaluating the capability of analytical methods to predict the time-dependent stress-strain behavior of a 1 / 6 -scale model of the barrel section of a single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel and to demonstrate the structural behavior under design and off-design thermal conditions. The model was a thick-walled cylinder having a height of 1.22 m, a thickness of 0.46 m, and an outer diameter of 2.06 m. It was prestressed both axially and circumferentially and subjected to 4.83 MPa internal pressure together with a thermal crossfall imposed by heating the inner surface to 338.8 K and cooling the outer surface to 297.1 K. The initial 460 days of testing were divided into time periods that simulated prestressing, heatup, reactor operation, and shutdown. At the conclusion of the simulated operating period, the model was repressurized and subjected to localized heating at 505.4 K for 84 days to produce an off-design hot-spot condition. Comparisons of experimental data with calculated values obtained using the SAFE-CRACK finite-element computer program showed that the program was capable of predicting time-dependent behavior in a vessel subjected to normal operating conditions, but that it was unable to accurately predict the behavior during off-design hot-spot heating. Readings made using a neutron and gamma-ray backscattering moisture probe showed little, if any, migration of moisture in the concrete cross section. Destructive examination indicated that the model maintained its basic structural integrity during localized hot-spot heating

  16. Multiscale modeling of lithium ion batteries: thermal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Latz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries has a huge impact on their lifetime and the initiation of degradation processes. The development of hot spots or large local overpotentials leading, e.g., to lithium metal deposition depends on material properties as well as on the nano- und microstructure of the electrodes. In recent years a theoretical structure emerges, which opens the possibility to establish a systematic modeling strategy from atomistic to continuum scale to capture and couple the relevant phenomena on each scale. We outline the building blocks for such a systematic approach and discuss in detail a rigorous approach for the continuum scale based on rational thermodynamics and homogenization theories. Our focus is on the development of a systematic thermodynamically consistent theory for thermal phenomena in batteries at the microstructure scale and at the cell scale. We discuss the importance of carefully defining the continuum fields for being able to compare seemingly different phenomenological theories and for obtaining rules to determine unknown parameters of the theory by experiments or lower-scale theories. The resulting continuum models for the microscopic and the cell scale are numerically solved in full 3D resolution. The complex very localized distributions of heat sources in a microstructure of a battery and the problems of mapping these localized sources on an averaged porous electrode model are discussed by comparing the detailed 3D microstructure-resolved simulations of the heat distribution with the result of the upscaled porous electrode model. It is shown, that not all heat sources that exist on the microstructure scale are represented in the averaged theory due to subtle cancellation effects of interface and bulk heat sources. Nevertheless, we find that in special cases the averaged thermal behavior can be captured very well by porous electrode theory.

  17. Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becraft, W.R.; Golzy, J.; Houlberg, W.A.; Kukielka, C.A.; Onega R.J.; Raju, G.V.S.; Stone, R.S.

    1980-10-01

    The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented.

  18. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  19. General 3D Lumped Thermal Model with Various Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Accurate thermal dynamics modeling of high power Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated...... thermal behaviors in the IGBTs. In this paper, a new three-dimensional (3D) lumped thermal model is proposed, which can easily be characterized from Finite Element Methods (FEM) based simulation and acquire the thermal distribution in critical points. Meanwhile the boundary conditions including...... the cooling system and power losses are modeled in the 3D thermal model, which can be adapted to different real field applications of power electronic converters. The accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by experimental results....

  20. effect of gasket of varying thickness on spark ignition engines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    In the study of Toyota, In-line, 4 cylinders, spark ignition engine using gaskets of varying thicknesses. (1.75mm, 3.5mm, 5.25mm, 7mm and 8.75mm) between the cylinder head and the engine block, the performance characteristics of the engine was investigated via the effect of engine speed on brake power, brake thermal ...

  1. Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C. Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases.

  2. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  3. Numerical model for the thermal behavior of thermocline storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtiwesh, Ismael A. S.; Sousa, Antonio C. M.

    2017-10-01

    Energy storage is a critical factor in the advancement of solar thermal power systems for the sustained delivery of electricity. In addition, the incorporation of thermal energy storage into the operation of concentrated solar power systems (CSPs) offers the potential of delivering electricity without fossil-fuel backup even during peak demand, independent of weather conditions and daylight. Despite this potential, some areas of the design and performance of thermocline systems still require further attention for future incorporation in commercial CSPs, particularly, their operation and control. Therefore, the present study aims to develop a simple but efficient numerical model to allow the comprehensive analysis of thermocline storage systems aiming better understanding of their dynamic temperature response. The validation results, despite the simplifying assumptions of the numerical model, agree well with the experiments for the time evolution of the thermocline region. Three different cases are considered to test the versatility of the numerical model; for the particular type of a storage tank with top round impingement inlet, a simple analytical model was developed to take into consideration the increased turbulence level in the mixing region. The numerical predictions for the three cases are in general good agreement against the experimental results.

  4. Numerical model for the thermal behavior of thermocline storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtiwesh, Ismael A. S.; Sousa, Antonio C. M.

    2018-03-01

    Energy storage is a critical factor in the advancement of solar thermal power systems for the sustained delivery of electricity. In addition, the incorporation of thermal energy storage into the operation of concentrated solar power systems (CSPs) offers the potential of delivering electricity without fossil-fuel backup even during peak demand, independent of weather conditions and daylight. Despite this potential, some areas of the design and performance of thermocline systems still require further attention for future incorporation in commercial CSPs, particularly, their operation and control. Therefore, the present study aims to develop a simple but efficient numerical model to allow the comprehensive analysis of thermocline storage systems aiming better understanding of their dynamic temperature response. The validation results, despite the simplifying assumptions of the numerical model, agree well with the experiments for the time evolution of the thermocline region. Three different cases are considered to test the versatility of the numerical model; for the particular type of a storage tank with top round impingement inlet, a simple analytical model was developed to take into consideration the increased turbulence level in the mixing region. The numerical predictions for the three cases are in general good agreement against the experimental results.

  5. Advanced modelling and numerical strategies in nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staedtke, H.

    2001-01-01

    The first part of the lecture gives a brief review of the current status of nuclear thermal hydraulics as it forms the basis of established system codes like TRAC, RELAP5, CATHARE or ATHLET. Specific emphasis is given to the capabilities and limitations of the underlying physical modelling and numerical solution strategies with regard to the description of complex transient two-phase flow and heat transfer conditions as expected to occur in PWR reactors during off-normal and accident conditions. The second part of the lecture focuses on new challenges and future needs in nuclear thermal-hydraulics which might arise with regard to re-licensing of old plants using bestestimate methodologies or the design and safety analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors relying largely on passive safety systems. In order to meet these new requirements various advanced modelling and numerical techniques will be discussed including extended wellposed (hyperbolic) two-fluid models, explicit modelling of interfacial area transport or higher order numerical schemes allowing a high resolution of local multi-dimensional flow processes.(author)

  6. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  7. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  8. Assessment of RANS CFD modelling for pressurised thermal shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander M Willemsen; Ed MJ Komen; Sander Willemsen

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The most severe Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) scenario is a cold water Emergency Core Coolant (ECC) injection into the cold leg during a LOCA. The injected ECC water mixes with the hot fluid present in the cold leg and flows towards the downcomer where further mixing takes place. When the cold mixture comes into contact with the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall, it may lead to large temperature gradients and consequently to high stresses in the RPV wall. Knowledge of these thermal loads is important for RPV remnant life assessments. The existing thermal-hydraulic system codes currently applied for this purpose are based on one-dimensional approximations and can, therefore, not predict the complex three-dimensional flows occurring during ECC injection. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be applied to predict these phenomena, with the ultimate benefit of improved remnant RPV life assessment. The present paper presents an assessment of various Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) CFD approaches for modeling the complex mixing phenomena occurring during ECC injection. This assessment has been performed by comparing the numerical results obtained using advanced turbulence models available in the CFX 5.6 CFD code in combination with a hybrid meshing strategy with experimental results of the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). The UPTF was a full-scale 'simulation' of the primary system of the four loop 1300 MWe Siemens/KWU Pressurised Water Reactor at Grafenrheinfeld. The test vessel upper plenum internals, downcomer and primary coolant piping were replicas of the reference plant, while other components, such as core, coolant pump and steam generators were replaced by simulators. From the extensive test programme, a single-phase fluid-fluid mixing experiment in the cold leg and downcomer was selected. Prediction of the mixing and stratification is assessed by comparison with the measured temperature profiles at several locations

  9. LASER IGNITION SYSTEM FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    Mr.Utsav Kothari*; Mr.Pravin Bharane; Mr.Akash Modasara

    2016-01-01

    Laser ignition is considered to be one of the most promising future ignition concepts for internal combustion engines. It not only combines requirement of reduction of pollutant emissions but also improves engine efficiencies. In general, a well-defined ignition location and ignition time is of great importance for an IC engine. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes & inflexible or un-optimal location of spark plug. Also the conv...

  10. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  11. Ignition of Propellants Through Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The liquid fuel was injected at a rate of about 3 cm3/min through a programmable syringe pump . These images were captured at 2000 FPS and...and nano-energetics for ignition of fuel spray. There are a number of properties that are desirable for an ignition system. Ideally an ignition...of conditions in order to maximize the operational flexibility of energy and propulsion systems. We have studied the ignition of liquid fuel and

  12. Influence of test configuration on the combustion characteristics of polymers as ignition sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Howard L.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental evaluation of polymers as ignition sources for metals was accomplished at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) using a standard promoted combustion test. These tests involve the transient burning of materials in high-pressure oxygen environments. They have provided data from which design decisions can be made; data include video recordings of ignition and non-ignition for specific combinations of metals and polymers. Other tests provide the measured compositions of combustion products for polymers at select burn times and an empirical basis for estimating burn rates. With the current test configuration, the detailed analysis of test results requires modeling a three-dimensional, transient convection process involving fluid motion, thermal conduction and convection, the diffusion of chemical species, and the erosion of sample surface. At the high pressure extremes, it even requires the analysis of turbulent, transient convection where the physics of the problem are not well known and the computation requirements are not practical at this time. An alternative test configuration that can be analyzed with a relatively-simple convection model was developed during the summer period. The principal change constitutes replacing a large-diameter polymer disk at the end of the metal test rod with coaxial polymer cylinders that have a diameter nearer to that of the metal rod. The experimental objective is to assess the importance of test geometries on the promotion of metal ignition by testing with different lengths of the polymer and, with an extended effort, to analyze the surface combustion in the redesigned promoted combustion tests through analytical modeling of the process. The analysis shall use the results of cone-calorimeter tests of the polymer material to model primary chemical reactions and, with proper design of the promoted combustion test, modeling of the convection process could be conveniently limited to a quasi-steady boundary layer

  13. Compositional effects on the ignition of FACE gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-05-08

    As regulatory measures for improved fuel economy and decreased emissions are pushing gasoline engine combustion technologies towards extreme conditions (i.e., boosted and intercooled intake with exhaust gas recirculation), fuel ignition characteristics become increasingly important for enabling stable operation. This study explores the effects of chemical composition on the fundamental ignition behavior of gasoline fuels. Two well-characterized, high-octane, non-oxygenated FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G, having similar antiknock indices but different octane sensitivities and chemical compositions are studied. Ignition experiments were conducted in shock tubes and a rapid compression machine (RCM) at nominal pressures of 20 and 40. atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1.0, and temperatures ranging from 650 to 1270. K. Results at temperatures above 900. K indicate that ignition delay time is similar for these fuels. However, RCM measurements below 900. K demonstrate a stronger negative temperature coefficient behavior for FACE F gasoline having lower octane sensitivity. In addition, RCM pressure profiles under two-stage ignition conditions illustrate that the magnitude of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) increases with decreasing fuel octane sensitivity. However, intermediate-temperature heat release is shown to increase as fuel octane sensitivity increases. Various surrogate fuel mixtures were formulated to conduct chemical kinetic modeling, and complex multicomponent surrogate mixtures were shown to reproduce experimentally observed trends better than simpler two- and three-component mixtures composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene. Measurements in a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine demonstrated that the multicomponent surrogates accurately captured the antiknock quality of the FACE gasolines. Simulations were performed using multicomponent surrogates for FACE F and G to reveal the underlying chemical

  14. Modeling the thermal characteristics of masonry mortar containing recycled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Morgan Gretchen

    As the building industry in the United States rapidly expands, the reuse of recycled demolition waste aggregates is becoming increasingly more important. Currently, the building industry is the largest consumer of natural resources. The constant use of raw virgin aggregate is resulting in depleting resources, lack of space for landfills, increasing costs, and heightened levels of pollution. The use of these recycled aggregates in building envelopes and the study of thermal properties are becoming a popular area of research in order to improve building energy usage. The construction of Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB) is encouraged by the United States government as a result of the unresolved finite resources and environmental pollution. The focus of this research is on the impact of using recycled demolition waste aggregates on thermal properties, including specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity, in masonry mortar applications. The new forms of aggregate were analyzed for efficiency and practical utilization in construction in seven locations across the United States by embedding the new material into the building envelope of a strip mall mercantile build model from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program (BESP). It was determined that the recycled aggregate mortar mixtures performed as well as or better than the traditional mortar mix. Opportunities for future research in recycled aggregate mortar mixtures exist in a regional analysis, a regional recycled aggregate cost analysis, and a life cycled cost analysis (LCCA).

  15. Modeling Microscale Electro-thermally Induced Vortex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajorshi; Tang, Tian; Kumar, Aloke

    2017-11-01

    In presence of a high frequency alternating electric field and a laser induced heat source, vortex flows are generated inside micro-channels. Such electro-thermally influenced micro-vortices can be used for manipulating nano-particles, programming colloidal assemblies, trapping biological cells as well as for fabricating designed bacterial biofilms. In this study, a theoretical model is developed for microscale electro-thermally induced vortex flows with multiple heat sources. Semi-analytical solutions are obtained, using Hankel transformation and linear superposition, for the temperature, pressure and velocity fields. The effect of material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivities, as well as experimental parameters such as the frequency and strength of the alternating electric field, and the intensity and heating profile of the laser source, are systematically investigated. Resolution for a pair of laser sources is determined by analyzing the strength of the micro-vortices under the influence of two heating sources. Results from this work will provide useful insights into the design of efficient optical tweezers and Rapid Electrokinetic Patterning techniques.

  16. Hot surface assisted compression ignition in a direct injection natural gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aesoey, Vilmar

    1996-12-31

    This study investigates the problem of ignition in a direct injection natural gas engine. Due to poor auto-ignition properties of natural gas compared to regular diesel engine fuels, a special arrangement to assist and secure ignition is required. The objective was to investigate the feasibility of using a hot surface as ignition assistance, primarily for application in medium and large size engines, and further study the main mechanisms involved in the ignition process. A constant volume combustion bomb and a test engine are used for experiments, supported by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. Variable composition of natural gas depending on the gas source and over time, is a important problem causing significant variation in ignition properties. It is shown that even small quantities of non-methane components, which are normally present in natural gases, strongly influence ignition. Actions to handle the ignition problem caused by variable natural composition, are also discussed. In order to estimate the ignition properties of natural gas, a simple correlation to gas composition is proposed, showing good correlation to the experimental data. Mathematical models for simulation of the processes are developed based on fundamental physical relations and experimental results. They are mainly used in this study to support and analyze the physical experiments, but can also be useful in future design and optimization processes. 71 refs., 80 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Propellant-Flow-Actuated Rocket Engine Igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A rocket engine igniter has been created that uses a pneumatically driven hammer that, by specialized geometry, is induced into an oscillatory state that can be used to either repeatedly impact a piezoelectric crystal with sufficient force to generate a spark capable of initiating combustion, or can be used with any other system capable of generating a spark from direct oscillatory motion. This innovation uses the energy of flowing gaseous propellant, which by means of pressure differentials and kinetic motion, causes a hammer object to oscillate. The concept works by mass flows being induced through orifices on both sides of a cylindrical tube with one or more vent paths. As the mass flow enters the chamber, the pressure differential is caused because the hammer object is supplied with flow on one side and the other side is opened with access to the vent path. The object then crosses the vent opening and begins to slow because the pressure differential across the ball reverses due to the geometry in the tube. Eventually, the object stops because of the increasing pressure differential on the object until all of the kinetic energy has been transferred to the gas via compression. This is the point where the object reverses direction because of the pressure differential. This behavior excites a piezoelectric crystal via direct impact from the hammer object. The hammer strikes a piezoelectric crystal, then reverses direction, and the resultant high voltage created from the crystal is transferred via an electrode to a spark gap in the ignition zone, thereby providing a spark to ignite the engine. Magnets, or other retention methods, might be employed to favorably position the hammer object prior to start, but are not necessary to maintain the oscillatory behavior. Various manifestations of the igniter have been developed and tested to improve device efficiency, and some improved designs are capable of operation at gas flow rates of a fraction of a gram per second (0

  18. Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

  19. Thermal experiments with LMFBR subassembly models in sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.

    1982-01-01

    Within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project research work has been undertaken at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center on the thermal and fluid dynamics of nominal and distorted core subassemblies. In 19-rod bundle models (P/D=1.30, W/R=1.38) three-dimensional temperature distributions were measured in the cladding tubes exposed to sodium flow. Results of measurements of the azimuthal temperature profiles of rotated rods in the duct wall zone are indicated for different operating conditions 80 2 , evenly distributed load and oblique load; different axial positions of the spacer grids; and different positions of one bowed rod

  20. Modeling the Thermal Interactions of Meteorites Below the Antarctic Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, William Jared; Radebaugh, Jani; Stephens, Denise C.; Lorenz, Ralph; Harvey, Ralph; Karner, James

    2017-10-01

    Meteorites with high specific gravities, such as irons, appear to be underrepresented in Antarctic collections over the last 40 years. This underrepresentation is in comparison with observed meteorite falls, which are believed to represent the actual population of meteorites striking Earth. Meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet absorb solar flux, possibly leading to downward tunneling into the ice, though observations of this in action are very limited. This descent is counteracted by ice sheet flow supporting the meteorites coupled with ablation near mountain margins, which helps to force meteorites towards the surface. Meteorites that both absorb adequate thermal energy and are sufficiently dense may instead reach a shallow equilibrium depth as downward melting overcomes upward forces during the Antarctic summer. Using a pyronometer, we have measured the incoming solar flux at multiple depths in two deep field sites in Antarctica, the Miller Range and Elephant Moraine. We compare these data with laboratory analogues and model the thermal and physical interactions between a variety of meteorites and their surroundings. Our Matlab code model will account for a wide range of parameters used to characterize meteorites in an Antarctic environment. We will present the results of our model along with depth estimates for several types of meteorites. The recovery of an additional population of heavy meteorites would increase our knowledge of the formation and composition of the solar system.

  1. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  2. Cooling problems of thermal power plants. Physical model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neale, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Alden Research Laboratories of Worcester Polytechnic Institute has for many years conducted physical model studies, which are normally classified as river or structural hydraulic studies. Since 1952 one aspect of these studies has involved the heated discharge from steam power plants. The early studies on such problems concentrated on improving the thermal efficiency of the system. This was accomplished by minimizing recirculation and by assuring full use of available cold water supplies. With the growing awareness of the impact of thermal power generation on the environment attention has been redirected to reducing the effect of heated discharges on the biology of the receiving body of water. More specifically the efforts of designers and operators of power plants are aimed at meeting or complying with standards established by various governmental agencies. Thus the studies involve developing means of minimizing surface temperatures at an outfall or establishing a local area of higher temperature with limits specified in terms of areas or distances. The physical models used for these studies have varied widely in scope, size, and operating features. These models have covered large areas with both distorted geometric scales and uniform dimensions. Instrumentations has also varied from simple mercury thermometers to computer control and processing of hundreds of thermocouple indicators

  3. Tank farm potential ignition sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1996-01-01

    This document identifies equipment, instrumentation, and sensors that are located in-tank as well as ex-tank in areas that may have communication paths with the tank vapor space. For each item, and attempt is made to identify the potential for ignition of flammable vapors using a graded approach. The scope includes all 177 underground storage tanks

  4. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  5. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneford, Emma S.; Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  6. The Disk Instability Model for SU UMa systems - a Comparison of the Thermal-Tidal Model and Plain Vanilla Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzo, John K.

    2017-01-01

    We utilize the time dependent accretion disk model described by Ichikawa & Osaki (1992) to explore two basic ideas for the outbursts in the SU UMa systems, Osaki's Thermal-Tidal Model, and the basic accretion disk limit cycle model. We explore a range in possible input parameters and model assumptions to delineate under what conditions each model may be preferred.

  7. Thermal modelling of borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores; Zur thermischen Modellierung von Erdwaermesonden und Erdsonden-Waermespeichern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dan

    2011-07-15

    The thermal use of the underground for heating and cooling applications can be done with borehole heat exchangers. This work deals with the further development of the modelling of thermal transport processes inside and outside the borehole as well as with the application of the further developed models. The combination of high accuracy and short computation time is achieved by the development of three-dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for borehole heat exchangers. Short transient transport processes can be calculated by the developed model with a considerable higher dynamic and accuracy than with known models from literature. The model is used to evaluate measurement data of a thermal response test by parameter estimation technique with a transient three-dimensional model for the first time. Clear advantages like shortening of the test duration are shown. The developed borehole heat exchanger model is combined with a three-dimensional description of the underground in the Finite-Element-Program FEFLOW. The influence of moving groundwater on borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores is then quantified.

  8. Laser ignition application in a space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Larry C.; Culley, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    A laser ignition system is proposed for the Combustion Experiment Module on an orbiting spacecraft. The results of a design study are given using the scheduled 'Flame Ball Experiment' as the design guidelines. Three laser ignition mechanisms and wavelengths are evaluated. A prototype laser is chosen and its specifications are given, followed by consideration of the beam optical arrangement, the ignition power requirement, the laser ignition system weight, size, reliability, and laser cooling and power consumption. Electromagnetic interference to the onboard electronics caused by the laser ignition process is discussed. Finally, ground tests are suggested.

  9. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, Ryan [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Clark, Billy [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pantoya, Michelle L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Heaps, Ronald J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daniels, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  10. Focus issue introduction: Laser Ignition Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Takunori; Furutani, Hirohide; Guo, Chunlei; Wintner, Ernst; Akamatsu, Fumiteru; Lucht, Robert; Washio, Kunihiko

    2014-03-10

    The purpose of this feature issue is to share information on laser ignition and related sciences and technologies. This feature offers five papers in the field that cover aspects of laser-induced laser ignition, including novel giant pulse micro-lasers, new phenomena of laser breakdown, advanced combustion systems and applications. These topics were chosen from the first Laser Ignition Conference (LIC) covering the topics of high brightness lasers for ignition and diagnostics, laser ignited engines for power generators and vehicles, and from a joint symposium with the Laser Display Conference covering applications of high brightness lasers.

  11. Thermal Modeling of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Solar Panel and Instruments during Aerobraking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005 and started aerobraking at Mars in March 2006. During the spacecraft s design phase, thermal models of the solar panels and instruments were developed to determine which components would be the most limiting thermally during aerobraking. Having determined the most limiting components, thermal limits in terms of heat rate were established. Advanced thermal modeling techniques were developed utilizing Thermal Desktop and Patran Thermal. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique. Analysis established that the solar panels were the most limiting components during the aerobraking phase of the mission.

  12. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  13. CFD modeling of thermal mixing in a T-junction geometry using LES model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayhan, Hueseyin, E-mail: huseyinayhan@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Soekmen, Cemal Niyazi, E-mail: cemalniyazi.sokmen@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD simulations of temperature and velocity fluctuations for thermal mixing cases in T-junction are performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz contains most of the energy; therefore, may cause thermal fatigue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study shows that RANS based calculations fail to predict a realistic mixing between the fluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LES model can predict instantaneous turbulence behavior. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of fluids at different temperatures can lead to temperature fluctuations at the pipe material. These fluctuations, or thermal striping, inducing cyclical thermal stresses and resulting thermal fatigue, may cause unexpected failure of pipe material. Therefore, an accurate characterization of temperature fluctuations is important in order to estimate the lifetime of pipe material. Thermal fatigue of the coolant circuits of nuclear power plants is one of the major issues in nuclear safety. To investigate thermal fatigue damage, the OECD/NEA has recently organized a blind benchmark study including some of results of present work for prediction of temperature and velocity fluctuations performing a thermal mixing experiment in a T-junction. This paper aims to estimate the frequency of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the mixing region using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to simulate turbulence. CFD results were compared with the available experimental results. Predicted LES results, even in coarse mesh, were found to be in well-agreement with the experimental results in terms of amplitude and frequency of temperature and velocity fluctuations. Analysis of the temperature fluctuations and the power spectrum densities (PSD) at the locations having the strongest temperature fluctuations in the tee junction shows that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz

  14. Improving the temperature predictions of subsurface thermal models by using high-quality input data. Part 1: Uncertainty analysis of the thermal-conductivity parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The subsurface temperature field and the geothermal conditions in sedimentary basins are frequently examined by using numerical thermal models. For those models, detailed knowledge of rock thermal properties are paramount for a reliable parameterization of layer properties and boundary conditions...

  15. Self-Organized Criticality Theory Model of Thermal Sandpile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiao-Dong; Qu Hong-Peng; Xu Jian-Qiang; Han Zui-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    A self-organized criticality model of a thermal sandpile is formulated for the first time to simulate the dynamic process with interaction between avalanche events on the fast time scale and diffusive transports on the slow time scale. The main characteristics of the model are that both particle and energy avalanches of sand grains are considered simultaneously. Properties of intermittent transport and improved confinement are analyzed in detail. The results imply that the intermittent phenomenon such as blobs in the low confinement mode as well as edge localized modes in the high confinement mode observed in tokamak experiments are not only determined by the edge plasma physics, but also affected by the core plasma dynamics. (paper)

  16. Modeling of the Response Time of Thermal Flow Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model uses the finite-difference method to solve the heat transfer equations, taking into consideration the transient conduction and convection between the sensor membrane and the surrounding fluid. Program results agree with experimental measurements and explain the response time dependence on the velocity and the sensor geometry. Values of the response time vary from about 5 ms in the case of stagnant flow to 1.5 ms for a flow velocity of 44 m/s.

  17. Modeling of composite synthesis in conditions of controlled thermal explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukta, Yaroslav; Knyazeva, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The paper proposes the model for the titanium-based composite synthesis from powders of titanium and carbon of non-stoichiometric composition. The model takes into account the mixture heating from chamber walls, the dependence of liquidus and solidus temperatures on the composition of reacting mixture and the formation of possible irreversible phases. The reaction retardation by the reaction product is taken into consideration in kinetic laws. As an example, the results of temperature and conversion level calculation are presented for the system Ti-C with the summary reaction for different temperatures of chamber walls heating. It was revealed that the reaction retardation being the reaction product can be the cause of incomplete conversion in the thermal explosion conditions. Non-stoichiometric composition leads to the conditions of degenerated mode when some additional heating is necessary to complete the reaction.

  18. Thermal Efficiency Degradation Diagnosis Method Using Regression Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Chang Hyun; Heo, Gyun Young; Jang, Seok Won; Lee, In Cheol

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an idea for thermal efficiency degradation diagnosis in turbine cycles, which is based on turbine cycle simulation under abnormal conditions and a linear regression model. The correlation between the inputs for representing degradation conditions (normally unmeasured but intrinsic states) and the simulation outputs (normally measured but superficial states) was analyzed with the linear regression model. The regression models can inversely response an associated intrinsic state for a superficial state observed from a power plant. The diagnosis method proposed herein is classified into three processes, 1) simulations for degradation conditions to get measured states (referred as what-if method), 2) development of the linear model correlating intrinsic and superficial states, and 3) determination of an intrinsic state using the superficial states of current plant and the linear regression model (referred as inverse what-if method). The what-if method is to generate the outputs for the inputs including various root causes and/or boundary conditions whereas the inverse what-if method is the process of calculating the inverse matrix with the given superficial states, that is, component degradation modes. The method suggested in this paper was validated using the turbine cycle model for an operating power plant

  19. Thermal-hydraulic models and correlations for the SPACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. D.; Lee, S. W.; Bae, S. W.; Moon, S. K.; Kim, S. Y.; Lee, Y. H.

    2009-01-01

    The SPACE code which is based on a multi-dimensional two-fluid, three-field model is under development to be used for licensing future pressurized water reactors. Several research and industrial organizations are participated in the collaboration of the development program, including KAERI, KHNP, KOPEC, KNF, and KEPRI. KAERI has been assigned to develop the thermal-hydraulic models and correlations which are required to solve the field equations as the closure relationships. This task can be categorized into five packages; i) a flow regime selection package, ii) a wall and interfacial friction package, iii) an interfacial heat and mass transfer package iv) a droplet entrainment and de-entrainment package and v) a wall heat transfer package. Since the SPACE code, unlike other major best-estimate nuclear reactor system analysis codes, RELAP5, TRAC-M and CATHARE which consider only liquid and vapor phases, incorporates a dispersed liquid field in addition to vapor and continuous liquid fields, intel facial interaction models between continuous, dispersed liquid phases and vapor phase have to be developed separately. The proper physical models can significantly improve the accuracy of the prediction of a nuclear reactor system behavior under many different transient conditions because those models are composed of the source terms for the governing equations. In this paper, a development program for the physical models and correlations for the SPACE code will be introduced briefly

  20. State reduced order models for the modelling of the thermal behavior of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezo, Christophe; Bouia, Hassan; Roux, Jean-Jacques; Depecker, Patrick [Institute National de Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Villeurbanne Cedex, (France). Centre de Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL). Equipe Thermique du Batiment]. E-mail: menezo@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; bouia@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; roux@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; depecker@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr

    2000-07-01

    This work is devoted to the field of building physics and related to the reduction of heat conduction models. The aim is to enlarge the model libraries of heat and mass transfer codes through limiting the considerable dimensions reached by the numerical systems during the modelling process of a multizone building. We show that the balanced realization technique, specifically adapted to the coupling of reduced order models with the other thermal phenomena, turns out to be very efficient. (author)