WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling technology motivated

  1. Applying the ARCS Motivation Model in Technological and Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Wang, Ya-huei

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction) motivation model into traditional classroom instruction-learning process. Viewing that technological and vocational students have low confidence and motivation in learning, the authors applied the ARCS motivation model not only in the…

  2. A Technology Integration Education (TIE) Model: Millennial Preservice Teachers' Motivations about Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2014-01-01

    Nobel laureates Schultz (1971) and Becker (1964, 1993) reinvigorated the analysis of education investments. Human capital investments that improve cognitive skills for elementary and secondary students have important economic implications. An interdisciplinary, 12-construct technology integration education (TIE) model was developed. The sample…

  3. Testing a Technology Integration Education Model for Millennial Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Moderating Relationships of Goals, Feedback, Task Value, and Self-Regulation among Motivation and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    The technology integration education model is a 12 construct model that includes 8 primary constructs and 4 moderator constructs. By testing the relationships among two primary constructs (motivation and technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge competencies) and four moderator constructs (goals, feedback, task value, and self-regulation),…

  4. Data visualisations as motivational technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Wied, Kia

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute with an (affirmative) critique of current tendencies to govern and educate students’ motivation through visualisations. The paper explores how educational policy with a focus on motivating improved learning for ‘all’ children is brought into the lived life of schooling...... through the invention and increased use of (small data) visualisations. Different forms of visualisation techniques such as for instance visible learning (Hattie, 2009; Nottingham, 2013) and more locally designed concepts (as True North, Rubrics e.g.) are enacted to enhance learning and performance among...

  5. Agent Models for Self-Motivated Home-Assistant Bots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Kathryn; Shafi, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Modern society increasingly relies on technology to support everyday activities. In the past, this technology has focused on automation, using computer technology embedded in physical objects. More recently, there is an expectation that this technology will not just embed reactive automation, but also embed intelligent, proactive automation in the environment. That is, there is an emerging desire for novel technologies that can monitor, assist, inform or entertain when required, and not just when requested. This paper presents three self-motivated, home-assistant bot applications using different self-motivated agent models. Self-motivated agents use a computational model of motivation to generate goals proactively. Technologies based on self-motivated agents can thus respond autonomously and proactively to stimuli from their environment. Three prototypes of different self-motivated agent models, using different computational models of motivation, are described to demonstrate these concepts.

  6. BRIDGE21--Exploring the Potential to Foster Intrinsic Student Motivation through a Team-Based, Technology-Mediated Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, John; Marshall, Kevin; Tangney, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that intrinsic student motivation is a critical requirement for effective learning but formal learning in school places a huge reliance on extrinsic motivation to focus the learner. This reliance on extrinsic motivation is driven by the pressure on formal schooling to "deliver to the test." The experience of the…

  7. The Role of Technology in Gifted Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housand, Brian C.; Housand, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Although technology by itself may not be motivating, a relationship seems to exist between the opportunities that technology presents and motivation for gifted students. When technology use aligns with authentic or "real-world" applications, motivation can be enhanced. This article explores the overlap between factors that have historically been…

  8. On the application of motivation theory to human factors/ergonomics: motivational design principles for human-technology interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, James L

    2014-12-01

    Motivation is a driving force in human-technology interaction. This paper represents an effort to (a) describe a theoretical model of motivation in human technology interaction, (b) provide design principles and guidelines based on this theory, and (c) describe a sequence of steps for the. evaluation of motivational factors in human-technology interaction. Motivation theory has been relatively neglected in human factors/ergonomics (HF/E). In both research and practice, the (implicit) assumption has been that the operator is already motivated or that motivation is an organizational concern and beyond the purview of HF/E. However, technology can induce task-related boredom (e.g., automation) that can be stressful and also increase system vulnerability to performance failures. A theoretical model of motivation in human-technology interaction is proposed, based on extension of the self-determination theory of motivation to HF/E. This model provides the basis for both future research and for development of practical recommendations for design. General principles and guidelines for motivational design are described as well as a sequence of steps for the design process. Human motivation is an important concern for HF/E research and practice. Procedures in the design of both simple and complex technologies can, and should, include the evaluation of motivational characteristics of the task, interface, or system. In addition, researchers should investigate these factors in specific human-technology domains. The theory, principles, and guidelines described here can be incorporated into existing techniques for task analysis and for interface and system design.

  9. Motivation in action: A process model of L2 motivation

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    As part of a long-term project aimed at designing classroom interventions to motivate language learners, we have searched for a motivation model that could serve as a theoretical basis for the methodological applications. We have found that none of the existing models we considered were entirely adequate for our purpose for three reasons: (1) they did not provide a sufficiently comprehensive and detailed summary of all the relevant motivational influences on classroom behaviour; (2) they tend...

  10. Modeling motive activation in the Operant Motives Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, J. Malte; Lang, Jonas W. B.; Engeser, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Operant Motive Test (OMT) is a picture-based procedure that asks respondents to generate imaginative verbal behavior that is later coded for the presence of affiliation, power, and achievement-related motive content by trained coders. The OMT uses a larger number of pictures and asks...... respondents to provide more brief answers than earlier and more traditional picture-based implicit motive measures and has therefore become a frequently used measurement instrument in both research and practice. This article focuses on the psychometric response mechanism in the OMT and builds on recent...... measures (Lang, 2014) and reports the first analysis of which we are aware that applies this model to OMT data (N = 633) and studies dynamic motive activation in the OMT. Results of this analysis yielded evidence for dynamic motive activation in the OMT and showed that simulated IRT reliabilities based...

  11. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  12. Mathematical learning instruction and teacher motivation factors affecting science technology engineering and math (STEM) major choices in 4-year colleges and universities: Multilevel structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahlam

    2011-12-01

    Using the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002/06, this study examined the effects of the selected mathematical learning and teacher motivation factors on graduates' science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) related major choices in 4-year colleges and universities, as mediated by math performance and math self-efficacy. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, I analyzed: (1) the association between mathematical learning instruction factors (i.e., computer, individual, and lecture-based learning activities in mathematics) and students' STEM major choices in 4-year colleges and universities as mediated by math performance and math self-efficacy and (2) the association between school factor, teacher motivation and students' STEM major choices in 4-year colleges and universities via mediators of math performance and math self-efficacy. The results revealed that among the selected learning experience factors, computer-based learning activities in math classrooms yielded the most positive effects on math self-efficacy, which significantly predicted the increase in the proportion of students' STEM major choice as mediated by math self-efficacy. Further, when controlling for base-year math Item Response Theory (IRT) scores, a positive relationship between individual-based learning activities in math classrooms and the first follow-up math IRT scores emerged, which related to the high proportion of students' STEM major choices. The results also indicated that individual and lecture-based learning activities in math yielded positive effects on math self-efficacy, which related to STEM major choice. Concerning between-school levels, teacher motivation yielded positive effects on the first follow up math IRT score, when controlling for base year IRT score. The results from this study inform educators, parents, and policy makers on how mathematics instruction can improve student math performance and encourage more students to prepare for STEM careers. Students

  13. Gender-Based Motivational Differences in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Sonja; Räikkönen, Eija; Ikonen, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Because of a deeply gendered history of craft education in Finland, technology education has a strong gender-related dependence. In order to motivate girls into pursuing technological studies and to enable them to see their own potential in technology, gender sensitive approaches should be developed in technology education. This study explores…

  14. Motivational Spiral Models (MSM): common and distinct motivations in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Laurel J

    2013-01-01

    Motivational Spiral Models (MSM) show links over time among self concepts, feelings, strategies, skills and participation in everyday activities. In theory, MSM have many common features, with distinct features in particular contexts. This project examined children's motivation to participate in literacy (MSM-L), social (MSM-S) and physical activities (MSM-P). The participants in Study 1 (N = 32) were 9 to 11 years old, and in Study 2 (N = 73) were 4 to 12 year old children. Locations were close to the Australian national average in socio-economic indicators, and initial screening showed these were representative samples. Analyses used variable-oriented correlational models as well as person-oriented clusters that suggest the standard and alternative motivational pathways. The results of Study 1 suggested bi-directional links between children's self concepts and participation in activities. Study 2 identified the common features as: openness and stability over time; and self concepts that motivate and justify participation in activities. Distinct features of MSM-L show the few negative feelings that may limit reading. In MSM-S, self concepts support the positive feelings, and in MSM-P, positive feelings support the task strategies. In conclusion, findings support MSM theory with common features based on self concepts and distinct features of developing motivations in particular contexts. MSM provide a sound base for future research in the contexts of everyday activities for children. In addition, there are practical applications of the findings to prevention, monitoring and intervention programmes.

  15. Effect Of Technology On Motivation In EFL Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Binnur GENC ILTER

    2009-01-01

    In language classrooms, being in unnatural conversational situations, students need motivation more than other learning milieus. Teachers try to capture the attention of students through various methods and techniques. Many researchers in EFL teaching profession have stated that good motivation has appositive effect on foreign language learning. The purpose of this study is to explore how technology could be used to increase students’ motivation in EFL classrooms. For this purpose; a ques...

  16. Enhancing Teachers' Motivation to Apply Humanist Information Technology Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assor, Avi

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the following issue: How can we build a training and support system that would enhance the motivation and capacity of teachers for high-quality implementation of information technology innovations guided by humanist ideas? That is, a system that would not only increase teachers' motivation to apply Humanist Information…

  17. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adile Aşkım Kurt; Yavuz Akbulut; H.Ferhan Odabaşı; Beril Ceylan; Elif Buğra Kuzu; Onur Dönmez; Özden Şahin İzmirli

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC) can be defined as “individuals’ motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions...

  18. A Motivation Contract Model of Employee Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Robert B.

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a process model for identification and assessment of employee job performance, through motivation contracting. The model integrated various components of expectancy theories of motivation and performance contracting and is based on humanistic assumptions about the nature of people. More specifically, the…

  19. Towards an Islamic model of work motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abdul Cader

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimal motivation (al-himmah al-‘āliyyah is an important concept in Islamic psychology. Current Islamic models predominantly focus on integration with Western theories. This study proposes a synthesised model of Islamic motivation through an interpretive approach of Islamic theological texts (Qur’ān and Sunnah, classical Islamic works, and a systematic analysis of Western academic research. Islamic work motivation focuses on states of the nafs (self: al-nafs al-muṭma’innah (tranquil, al-nafs al-lawwāmah (self-reproaching, and al-nafs al-ammārah bi-al-sū’ (inclined to evil. Tawḥīd (monotheism, mediated by sincerity and Sunnah compliance, drives īmān (belief. Optimal motivation is a result of strengthened īmān moderated by knowledge, patience, reliance, piety, encouragement, and admonishment. The resultant action, integrated with a rewards/punishment system, yields motivated behaviour. Motivated behaviour is classified in three behavioural types: ẓālim li-nafsih (self-oppressive, muqtaṣid (moderate, and sābiq bi-al-khayrāt (foremost in good. Optimal motivation is the state of tranquillity where the individual sincerely strives towards good action. The model provides practitioners with a model that can be used to manage motivation and provides researchers a comprehensive framework of Islamic motivation.

  20. Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2007-01-01

    Motivation is short-term focused energy. The oldest theories of motivation explain motivated activity as effort to overcome primary deficiencies, such as hunger or boredom. Such theories are difficult to apply because individuals learn idiosyncratic secondary motives as alternative ways of responding to these needs. Three prominent needs theories are discussed: Herzberg's theory of hygiene and motivational factors; McClelland's needs for achievement, power, and affiliation; and Maslow's hierarchy and theory of self-actualization. A second approach to motivation holds that individuals may be thought of as engaging in rational processes to maximize their self-interests. The presented examples of this approach include Vroom's expectancy theory, Adam's theory of inequality, and the Porter-Lawler model that addresses the question of whether satisfaction leads to high performance or vice versa. Finally, several theories of motivation as life orientation are developed.

  1. Towards an Islamic model of work motivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akram Abdul Cader

    2016-01-01

    .... Current Islamic models predominantly focus on integration with Western theories. This study proposes a synthesised model of Islamic motivation through an interpretive approach of Islamic theological texts (Qur'an and Sunnah...

  2. Motivating Information Technology Professionals: The case of New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Shoaib Ahmed; Nazim Taskin; DAVID J. PAULEEN; Jane Parker

    2017-01-01

    IT professionals play a critical role in organizations. Research indicates that they may be unique in their attitudes toward motivation and job satisfaction. In New Zealand, a shortage of skilled professionals may contribute to or impact on motivation. Using a modified model of Herzberg’s two-factor theory by Smerek and Peterson (2007), this research seeks to answer the question: what motivates New Zealand IT professionals? In response, an online questionnaire was distributed to a population ...

  3. EFFECT OF TECHNOLOGY ON MOTIVATION IN EFL CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binnur GENC ILTER

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In language classrooms, being in unnatural conversational situations, students need motivation more than other learning milieus. Teachers try to capture the attention of students through various methods and techniques. Many researchers in EFL teaching profession have stated that good motivation has appositive effect on foreign language learning. The purpose of this study is to explore how technology could be used to increase students’ motivation in EFL classrooms. For this purpose; a questionnaire was administered to a group of students at Akdeniz University Preparatory Classes in 2007-2008 academic year. As a result it was found out that technology was a dynamic and challenging motivating factor in EFL classrooms and there may be some suggestions focusing on the achievement of learning objectives.

  4. Exploring motivations for the use of bitcoin technology

    OpenAIRE

    Khairuddin, Irni Eliana; Sas, Corina; Clinch, Sarah; Davies, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study focusing on user experience with Bitcoin technology. We describe interviews with 9 Bitcoin users and report findings related to users’ motivations for buying and using bitcoins. Our initial findings capture three main motivations such as Bitcoin’s predicted role in a monetary revolution, users’ increased empowerment, and their perception of real value of Bitcoin currency. We conclude with reflections on the value of these findings for HCI researchers....

  5. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  6. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Adile Askim; Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Ceylan, Beril; Kuzu, Elif Bugra; Donmez, Onur; Izmirli, Ozden Sahin

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC) can be defined as "individuals' motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions". Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this…

  7. The Role of Educational Technology in Developing Achievement Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1969-01-01

    Essay focusing on how achievement motivation is developed in students and adults, with some discussion of how various dimensions of educational technology may contribute to this development. Paper written pursuant to contract 0-8-071231-1747 with the U.S. Office of Education, under provisions of the Cooperative Research Program. (LS)

  8. The Role of Educational Technology in Developing Achievement Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1969-01-01

    Essay focusing on how achievement motivation is developed in students and adults, with some discussion of how various dimensions of educational technology may contribute to this development. Paper written pursuant to contract 0-8-071231-1747 with the U.S. Office of Education, under provisions of the Cooperative Research Program. (LS)

  9. Smart Home Technologies: Insights into Generation-Specific Acceptance Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Sylvia; Ziefle, Martina

    In this research we examine the generation specific acceptance motives of eHealth technologies in order to assess the likelihood of success for these new technologies. 280 participants (14 - 92 years of age) volunteered to participate in a survey, in which using motives and barriers toward smart home technologies were explored. The scenario envisaged was the use of a medical stent implemented into the body, which monitors automatically the health status and which is able to remotely communicate with the doctor. Participants were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of this technology, their acceptance motives and potential utilization barriers. In order to understand the complex nature of acceptance, personal variables (age, technical expertise, health status), individual's cognitive concepts toward ageing as well as perceived usefulness were related. Outcomes show that trust, believe in the reliability of technology, privacy and security as well as intimacy facets are essential for acceptance and should be considered in order to proactively design a successful rollout of smart home technologies.

  10. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adile Aşkım Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC can be defined as “individuals’ motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions”. Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this study aimed to determine the views of preservice teachers and instructors in Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT departments about the motivating and hindering factors regarding ICTAC. Researchers used purposeful sampling technique and identified seven instructors and 16 students attending outlier CEIT departments from four different Turkish state universities. Since there is no contemporary framework on factors motivating or hindering ICTAC, the study was conducted with a qualitative approach and the data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Factors motivating and hindering ICTAC were identified through a content analysis. Findings of the study are believed to guide ICT and ICT education professionals in training students with higher levels of ICTAC and guide the course developers to focus on relevant social responsibility issues

  11. Developing a Motivational Model of College Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Abry, Dennis

    This study involves developing a motivational model of college achievement. The predictor variables, which were procrastination tendency, self-efficacy, self-regulation, intrinsic value, outcome value, cognitive strategy, test anxiety, students grade goals, parent grade goals, and grade point average, as well as the criterion variable exam…

  12. An Attributional (Cognitive) Model of Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bernard; And Others

    A cognitive model of motivation is proposed which postulates four components as the determinants of the actual and anticipated outcome of an achievement-related event. The four determinants are ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck. These factors may be classified as either internal or external sources of control, and as either stable or…

  13. Integration of Information and Communication Technology and Pupils' Motivation in a Physical Education Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, Pascal; Gillet, Nicolas; Gernigon, Christophe; Lafreniere, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an integrative model regarding the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on achievement in physical education. Pupils' perceptions of autonomy-support from teacher, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and self-determined motivation were considered to mediate the impact of ICT on…

  14. Integration of Information and Communication Technology and Pupils' Motivation in a Physical Education Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, Pascal; Gillet, Nicolas; Gernigon, Christophe; Lafreniere, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an integrative model regarding the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on achievement in physical education. Pupils' perceptions of autonomy-support from teacher, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and self-determined motivation were considered to mediate the impact of ICT on…

  15. Developing countries' motivation to use nuclear technology. Motivation von Drittweltlaendern zur Nutzung der Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratsch, U. (FEST, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1990-08-01

    Governments of various developing countries see nuclear energy as an important tool for at least three political goals: Firstly, the expected rise in future energy demand, so they argue, can only be met if nuclear electricity production in the Third World is expanded. Fossil sources are supposed to become increasingly scarce and expensive, and they are also seen to be ecologically damaging. Technologies to harness renewable energy sources are not yet mature and still too costly. Secondly, nuclear technology is seen as one of the most advanced technologies. Mastering of it might help to diminish the technological gap between the First and the Third World. Thirdly, scientific progress in developing countries is hoped to be accelerated by operating research reactors in these countries. All of these arguments ought to be taken as serious motivations. (orig./HSCH).

  16. Motivating Information Technology Professionals: The case of New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IT professionals play a critical role in organizations. Research indicates that they may be unique in their attitudes toward motivation and job satisfaction. In New Zealand, a shortage of skilled professionals may contribute to or impact on motivation. Using a modified model of Herzberg’s two-factor theory by Smerek and Peterson (2007, this research seeks to answer the question: what motivates New Zealand IT professionals? In response, an online questionnaire was distributed to a population of New Zealand IT professionals and the data analysed using Partial Least Squares to understand the relationship between the various dimensions of job satisfaction, the impact of personal and job characteristics, and turnover intention. The findings show that the New Zealand IT professional is primarily motivated by the nature of his or her work, followed by perceptions of responsibility, and how supervisors encourage an environment for such. Satisfaction with salary is a predictor to a lesser degree. Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, professional growth opportunities, career advancement, and recognition do not have a statistically-significant positive association with motivation. We conclude that, to motivate their IT workforce, organizations should: 1 focus on the nature of the jobs that IT professionals undertake; 2 train supervisors to provide an empowering environment; 3 offer competitive salaries to retain top talent; 4 not hesitate to employ IT professionals born outside New Zealand; and 5 take account of the singularities of the New Zealand labour market in seeking to attract, recruit and retain IT professionals. Implications for policy, practice and theory are discussed.

  17. MOTIVATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction What is the difference between instrumental and integrative motivation? What kind of motivations do students have? How can our knowledge of motivation help the language learning process? Motivation can be very important in language teaching. Students can do very well when they are motivated. Teachers, with their knowledge of motivation, can make their classes more efficient and successful. Middle school teachers, in addition to learning about the English language itself, and about teaching methods, should also learn more about motivation and how this affects our students. "When we consider language teaching, motivation can be classified as either integrative or instrumental motivation" (Luxon)

  18. Employee motivation: a powerful new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohria, Nitin; Groysberg, Boris; Lee, Linda-Eling

    2008-01-01

    Motivating employees begins with recognizing that to do their best work, people must be in an environment that meets their basic emotional drives to acquire, bond, comprehend, and defend. So say Nohria and Groysberg, of Harvard Business School, and Lee, of the Center for Research on Corporate Performance. Using the results of surveys they conducted with employees at a wide range of Fortune 500 and other companies, they developed a model for how to increase workplace motivation dramatically. The authors identify the organizational levers that companies and frontline managers have at their disposal as they try to meet workers' deep needs. Reward systems that truly value good performance fulfill the drive to acquire. The drive to bond is best met by a culture that promotes collaboration and openness. Jobs that are designed to be meaningful and challenging meet the need to comprehend. Processes for performance management and resource allocation that are fair, trustworthy, and transparent address the drive to defend. Equipped with real-world company examples, the authors articulate how to apply these levers in productive ways. That application should not be selective, they argue, because a holistic approach gets you more than a piecemeal one. By using all four levers simultaneously, and thereby tackling all four drives, organizations can improve motivation levels by leaps and bounds. For example, a company that falls in the 50th percentile on employee motivation improves only to the 56th by boosting performance on one drive, but way up to the 88th percentile by doing better on all four drives. That's a powerful gain in competitive advantage that any business would relish.

  19. Privatization processes in banking: Motives and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Života

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper consists of three methodologically and causally connected thematic parts: the first part deals with crucial motives and models of the privatization processes in the USA and EU with a particular analytical focus on the Herfindahl-Hirschman doctrine of the collective domination index, as well as on the essence of merger-acquisition and take-over models. The second thematic part of the paper, as a logical continuation of the first one represents a brief comparative analysis of the motives and models implemented in bank privatization in the south-eastern European countries with particular focus on identifying interests of foreign investors, an optimal volume and price of the investment, and assessment of finalized privatizations in those countries. The final part of the paper theoretically and practically stems from the first and the second part, in that way making an interdependent and a compatible thematic whole with them, presents qualitative and quantitative aspects of analyzing finalized privatization and/or sale-purchase of Serbian banks with particular focus on IPO and IPOPLUS as the prevailing models of future sale-purchase in privatizing Serbian banks.

  20. Toward a tripartite model of intrinsic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Noémie; Vallerand, Robert J; Lafrenière, Marc-André K

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) refers to engaging in an activity for the pleasure inherent in the activity. The present article presents a tripartite model of IM consisting of IM to know (i.e., engaging in an activity to experience pleasure while learning and trying to understand something new), IM toward accomplishment (i.e., engaging in an activity for the pleasure experienced when attempting task mastery), and IM to experience stimulation (i.e., engaging in an activity for feelings of sensory pleasure). The tripartite model of IM posits that each type of IM can result from task, situational, and personality determinants and can lead to specific types of cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes. The purpose of this research was to test some predictions derived from this model. Across 4 studies (Study 1: N = 331; Study 2: N = 113; Study 3: N = 58; Study 4: N = 135), the 3 types of IM as well as potential determinants and consequences were assessed. Results revealed that experiencing one type of IM over the others depends in part on people's personality styles. Also, each type of IM was found to predict specific outcomes (i.e., affective states and behavioral choices). The implications of the tripartite model of IM for motivation research are discussed.

  1. Motivation and Academic Resilience: Developing a Model for Student Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Explores a model of student motivation and introduces the concept of academic resilience. Draws together seminal motivation theory, posits constructs that represent these theories, and then repackages them into a model that can be used by educators and understood by students. Discusses strategies for enhancing motivation and academic resilience.…

  2. Motivation Mechanism Prevents Adverse Selection in Industrial Technology Innovation Strategic Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxia Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choosing proper partners is the key to the success of the alliance. Based on the analysis of the characters of the Industrial Technology Innovation Strategic Alliance, a new kind of cooperative organization occurred in China in recent years. The problem of “adverse selection” at the stage of the its establishment is discussed in this paper. The game model is built based on motivation theory and the principle-agent theory and then proved by examples. The conclusions can be got from the model. By setting the ranges of funds, preferential policy, and sharable profits and designing membership rules, the organizer of the Industrial Technology Innovation Strategic Alliance can motivate the risk neutral applicant to reveal his real capacity and the one with higher capacity to participate intothe alliance more actively and even can set capacity threshold for applicants implicitly.

  3. The Socio-Educational Model of Music Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Potter, Gillian K.; Burns, Jillian N.

    2012-01-01

    The well-established socio-educational model of second language learning motivation developed by R. C. Gardner was adapted and applied to study instrumental music learning motivation. The similarities between music and language suggested that the adaptation might lead to new insights in the study of music motivation. At the heart of the proposed…

  4. College English Students’ Autonomous Learning Motivation and Cultivation Model Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳荣; 李娥

    2015-01-01

    Studying the autonomous learning motivation and excitation model can stimulate intrinsic motivation of foreign language learners,develop students self-management strategy evaluation are very necessary.The purpose of this paper is to give students the skills of listening and speaking for their autonomous learning.Then study the cultivation and motivation of college English students autonomous learning,hoping to make students to learn autonomous learning and stimulate their motivation fully.

  5. Persistence Motivations of Chinese Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored what motivated 6 Chinese international students to complete a PhD in science, technology, engineering, and math fields in the United States despite perceived dissatisfaction. This study was grounded in the value-expectancy achievement motivation theory and incorporated a Confucian cultural lens to understand motivation. Four…

  6. Persistence Motivations of Chinese Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored what motivated 6 Chinese international students to complete a PhD in science, technology, engineering, and math fields in the United States despite perceived dissatisfaction. This study was grounded in the value-expectancy achievement motivation theory and incorporated a Confucian cultural lens to understand motivation. Four…

  7. Understanding and motivating health care employees: integrating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, training and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Suzanne G; Dundis, Stephen P

    2003-09-01

    This paper applies Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model to the challenges of understanding and motivating employees in a rapidly changing health care industry. The perspective that Maslow's Model brings is an essential element that should be considered as the health care arena is faced with reorganization, re-engineering, mergers, acquisitions, increases in learning demands, and the escalating role of technology in training. This paper offers a new perspective related to how Maslow's Model, as used in business/organizational settings, can be directly related to current workforce concerns: the need for security and freedom from stress, social belongingness, self-esteem, self-actualization, altered work/social environments, and new opportunities for learning and self-definition. Changes in health care will continue at an accelerated pace and with these changes will come the need for more and more training. The use of technology in training has heightened access, faster distribution, innovation and increased collaboration. However, with this technology come attendant challenges including keeping up with the technology, the increased pace of training, depersonalization, and fear of the unknown. The Maslow model provides a means for understanding these challenges in terms of universal individual needs. How does one motivate employees in the face of increased demands, particularly when they are being asked to meet these demands with fewer resources? The answer is, in large part, to make the employee feel secure, needed, and appreciated. This is not at all easy, but if leaders take into consideration the needs of the individual, the new technology that provides challenges and opportunities for meeting those needs, and provides the training to meet both sets of needs, enhanced employee motivation and commitment is possible.

  8. Assessing Music Students' Motivation Using the Music Model of Academic Motivation Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Jones, Brett D.; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of using a motivation inventory with music students in upper-elementary, middle, and high school. We used the middle/high school version of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation Inventory to survey 93 students in the 5th to 12th grades in one school. Our analysis revealed…

  9. Calibrating a Measure of Gender Differences in Motivation for Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Fisher, William; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the theory, design, and calibration of an instrument for measuring gender difference in motivation for learning technology. The content of the instrument was developed based upon the motivational theories of Eccles and others. More specifically, the learners' self-concept of ability, perception of technology, perception of…

  10.  A matter of motivation: Designing engaging interactive technologies for museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    and motivation when designing the digital museum installations. Our conceptualization of motives and motivation is based on Cultural-Historical Theory and especially the work of Vygotsky (1982) and Hedegaard (2002) as these perspectives capture the dynamics of motivation as it develops in context.......We explore the concepts of motivation and motives in relation to inform the design of digital interactive technologies for museum exhibitions. A central issue for museums is to create strong links between the subject matter knowledge and the everyday life of the children. Pursuing such an agenda...... spaces are more successful than others in spurring this engagement. We suggest that digital technology can potentially support this “double move” in which subject matter knowledge is naturally integrated into the children’s everyday life if designers take into consideration the hierarchy of motives...

  11. Motivation to Improve Work through Learning: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kueh Hua Ng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to enhance our current understanding of the transfer of training by proposing a conceptual model that supports the mediating role of motivation to improve work through learning about the relationship between social support and the transfer of training. The examination of motivation to improve work through motivation to improve work through a learning construct offers a holistic view pertaining to a learner's profile in a workplace setting, which emphasizes learning for the improvement of work performance. The proposed conceptual model is expected to benefit human resource development theory building, as well as field practitioners by emphasizing the motivational aspects crucial for successful transfer of training.

  12. Motivation-driven learning and teaching model for construction education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality learning outcomes are correlated with students’ motivation to learn. Lecturers need to design courses that enthuse, inspire and motivate their students. But, this is a fundamental challenge facing many lecturers. A new motivation-driven learning and teaching model was developed to help lecturers in this regard. Its operationalisation, implementation and evaluation were conducted in a first year course in Construction Management degree through action research. Study findings suggest that the new model can help lecturers to improve overall teaching quality and student learning experience as it facilitates effective course delivery, stimulation of student motivation to learn and improved learning support.

  13. Factors that impact students’ motivation in an online course: Using the MUSIC model of academic motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehmuz Akalin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the factors that motivate students in large online courses. Specifically, the purposes were: (a to document how highly men and women rated motivational beliefs in a large online course; (b to determine why men and women rated their motivational beliefs the way in which they did; and (c to provide recommendations for how to intentionally design online courses to motivate students. Using a mixed methods design, we used a questionnaire to assess undergraduate students’ perceptions of the components of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation (i.e., eMpowerment, Usefulness, Success, Interest, and Caring in an online course and their suggestions for changing the course. Overall, men and women provided high ratings for their motivational beliefs in the course. The suggestions students provided for changing the course were similar for both sexes and revealed a preference for instructional strategies that were consistent with the tenets of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation, including: offering more and/or varied assessments, providing interactive activities, including videos and/or video lectures, and offering face-toface meetings. Other suggestions for improving the online course design are provided.

  14. Motivation to Improve Work through Learning: A Conceptual Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kueh Hua Ng; Rusli Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to enhance our current understanding of the transfer of training by proposing a conceptual model that supports the mediating role of motivation to improve work through learning about the relationship between social support and the transfer of training. The examination of motivation to improve work through motivation to improve work through a learning construct offers a holistic view pertaining to a learner's profile in a workplace setting, which emphasizes learning for the imp...

  15. Effect of Technology on Motivation in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc Ilter, Binnur

    2009-01-01

    In language classrooms, being in unnatural conversational situations, students need motivation more than other learning milieus. Teachers try to capture the attention of students through various methods and techniques. Many researchers in EFL teaching profession have stated that good motivation has appositive effect on foreign language learning.…

  16. The Role of Self-Determination Theory in Explaining Teachers' Motivation to Continue to Use E-Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorebo, Oystein; Halvari, Hallgier; Gulli, Vebjorn Flaata; Kristiansen, Roar

    2009-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory, this study proposes an extended information systems continuance theory in the context of teachers' utilization of e-learning technology in connection with on-site courses. In the proposed model teachers' extrinsic motivation (i.e. perceived usefulness), confirmation of pre-acceptance expectations and intrinsic…

  17. Addiction Motivation Reformulated: An Affective Processing Model of Negative Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B.; Piper, Megan E.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Majeskie, Matthew R.; Fiore, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This article offers a reformulation of the negative reinforcement model of drug addiction and proposes that the escape and avoidance of negative affect is the prepotent motive for addictive drug use. The authors posit that negative affect is the motivational core of the withdrawal syndrome and argue that, through repeated cycles of drug use and…

  18. A Model for Employee Motivation and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip C.

    1979-01-01

    To increase an employee's motivation, an employee must perceive that s/he will achieve higher satisfaction for greater effort. To generate such perception, rewards must clearly be contingent on effort and the cost of increased effort must grow at a slower rate than the increase in reward. (Author/IRT)

  19. Student motivation in a high school science laboratory: The impact of computers and other technologies on young adolescent physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen Allan

    The impact of technology (including computers and probes, low friction carts, video camera, VCR's and electronic balances) on the motivation of adolescent science students was investigated using a naturalistic case study of college preparatory ninth grade physics classes at a comprehensive high school in the southeastern United States. The students were positively affected by the use of computer technology as compared to other "low tech" labs. The non-computer technologies had little motivational effect on the students. The most important motivational effect was the belief among the students that they could successfully operate the equipment and gather meaningful results. At times, the students spent more cognitive energy on performing the experiment than on learning the physics. This was especially true when microcomputer-based labs were used. When the technology led to results that were clear to the students and displayed in a manner that could be easily interpreted, they were generally receptive and motivated to persist at the task. Many students reported being especially motivated when a computer was used to gather the data because they "just liked computers." Furthermore, qualitative evidence suggested that they had learned the physics concept they were working on. This is in close agreement with the conceptual change model of learning in that students are most likely to change their prior conceptions when the new idea is plausible (the technology makes it so), intelligible (real time graphing, actual light rays), and fruitful (the new idea explains what they actually see). However, many of the microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) activities and "high tech" labs were too unstructured, leaving students bewildered, confused and unmotivated. To achieve maximum motivational effects from the technology, it was necessary to reduce the cognitive demand on the students so they could concentrate on the data gathered rather than the operation of the equipment.

  20. The Opposite of Control: A Deweyan Perspective on Intrinsic Motivation in "After 3" Technology Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D.; Packard, B.; Girod, M.; Pugh, K.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses intrinsic motivation and John Dewey's perspectives on aesthetic experiences in relation to "After 3" technology programs, based on experiences with KLICK (Kids Learning in Computer Klubhouses). Highlights include control and theories of motivation and learning; and Dewey's perspectives on the opposite of control in…

  1. Rethinking Common Assumptions about Adolescents' Motivation to Use Technology in and out of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gloria E.

    2013-01-01

    Research on youth use of multiliteracies and multimodal texts often imply that youth are inherently motivated by digital technologies. In this column, I consider the nature of research into motivation and multiliteracies. I suggest that the concepts of competence, autonomy, and relatedness should be integrated with a multilayered contextual…

  2. Pre-Service Teachers' Motivation in Using Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexander S.; Tay, Eng Guan; Hui, Chenri; Lin, Jane Huiling; Low, Ee-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology (DT) has a significant role to play in modern education. This study examined motivational goals of student teachers in initial teacher education in Singapore and the influences of goals on their use of DT personally and in the classroom. The participants (N = 312) responded to a survey about their motivational goals (learning…

  3. Rethinking Common Assumptions about Adolescents' Motivation to Use Technology in and out of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gloria E.

    2013-01-01

    Research on youth use of multiliteracies and multimodal texts often imply that youth are inherently motivated by digital technologies. In this column, I consider the nature of research into motivation and multiliteracies. I suggest that the concepts of competence, autonomy, and relatedness should be integrated with a multilayered contextual…

  4. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation towards Technology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose: The present study is to validate an…

  5. The behavioural motivation model in open distance learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaikin, Oleg; Malinowska, Magdalena; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2014-01-01

    The article contains the concept of developing a motivation model aimed at supporting activity of both students and teachers in the process of implementing and using an open and distance learning system. Proposed motivation model is focused on the task of filling the knowledge repository with high...... quality didactic material. Open and distance learning system assures a computer space for the teaching/learning process in open environment. The structure of the motivation model and formal assumptions are described. Additionally, there is presented a structure of the linguistic database, helping...... the teacher to assess the student's motivation and the basic simulation model to analysis the teaching/learning process constrains. The proposed approach is based on the games theory and simulation approach....

  6. The behavioural motivation model in open distance learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaikin, Oleg; Malinowska, Magdalena; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2014-01-01

    The article contains the concept of developing a motivation model aimed at supporting activity of both students and teachers in the process of implementing and using an open and distance learning system. Proposed motivation model is focused on the task of filling the knowledge repository with hig...... the teacher to assess the student's motivation and the basic simulation model to analysis the teaching/learning process constrains. The proposed approach is based on the games theory and simulation approach.......The article contains the concept of developing a motivation model aimed at supporting activity of both students and teachers in the process of implementing and using an open and distance learning system. Proposed motivation model is focused on the task of filling the knowledge repository with high...... quality didactic material. Open and distance learning system assures a computer space for the teaching/learning process in open environment. The structure of the motivation model and formal assumptions are described. Additionally, there is presented a structure of the linguistic database, helping...

  7. Exploring Student Persistence in STEM Programs: A Motivational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Rebecca A.; Aulls, Mark W.; Dedic, Helena; Hubbard, Kyle; Hall, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    To address continually decreasing enrollment and rising attrition in post-secondary STEM degree (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs, particularly for women, the present study examines the utility of motivation and emotion variables to account for persistence and achievement in science in male and female students…

  8. E-Learning and Social Media Motivation Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Mohd Shafie; Saleh, Nor Shela; Aris, Baharuddin; Ahmad, Maizah Hura; Sejzi, Abbas Abjoli; Shamsudin, Nur Amalina

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to probe into the motivational factors toward the usage of e-learning and social media among educational technology postgraduate students in the Faculty of Education, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. This study had involved 70 respondents via the means of a questionnaire. Four factors have been studied, named, the factor…

  9. The Effects of Embedding Information Technologies within ELT on EFL Learners’ Motivation and Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Al-Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalised world, technologies have been embedded in every aspect of daily activities and discourses. The field of education made no exception and hence technologies have become an integral part of all educational systems worldwide, but with different levels and layers. The presence of information technology in English language teaching has brought about notable changes for teachers and learners alike. Accordingly, this paper investigates the impact of integrating information technologies in ELT on EFL learners’ motivation and interest. Based on an authentic comparative case study, this paper explores the influence of information technology on EFL learners’ perceptions, motivation, and interest in the context of ELT in the Tunisian higher education. The findings of this study suggest that the integration of IT in ELT heavily affects EFL students’ motivation and academic performance and hence EFL instructors should take this variable into consideration.

  10. A Technology Integration Education (TIE) Model for Millennial Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Canonical Correlation Relationships among Attitudes, Subjective Norms, Perceived Behavioral Controls, Motivation, and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual goods can follow the same pattern as physical goods with the product life cycle of birth, growth, maturity, and decline. For the intellectual good of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), its birth began with Shulman (1986, 1987). Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to test the relationships among five…

  11. Model of Employees Motivation Through Gamification of Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kostecka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article the problem of motivation of employees, who are working with information system and whose work environment is full of monotonous, boring and repetitive tasks, is analyzed. On the basis of literature, theoretical aspects of work motivation are analyzed and it is suggested to use gamification in order to solve this problem. On the basis of literature, theoretical and practical aspects of motivation of gamers and gamification are analyzed. After all, it is suggested to use model which joins main aspects of employee needs and gamification. Through example of accounting specialists the offered model is used in practice. Based on the results of the research, opportunities of motivating accounting specialists through gamification of information system are evaluated.

  12. Validation of an instrument to measure students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-05-01

    Background:Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose:The present study is to validate an instrument for assessing senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning. Sample:A total of 1822 Taiwanese senior high school students (1020 males and 802 females) responded to the newly developed instrument. Design and method:The Motivation and Self-regulation towards Technology Learning (MSRTL) instrument was developed based on the previous instruments measuring students' motivation and self-regulation towards science learning. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were utilized to investigate the structure of the items. Cronbach's alpha was applied for measuring the internal consistency of each scale. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine gender differences. Results:Seven scales, including 'Technology learning self-efficacy,' 'Technology learning value,' 'Technology active learning strategies,' 'Technology learning environment stimulation,' 'Technology learning goal-orientation,' 'Technology learning self-regulation-triggering,' and 'Technology learning self-regulation-implementing' were confirmed for the MSRTL instrument. Moreover, the results also showed that male and female students did not present the same degree of preference in all of the scales. Conclusions:The MSRTL instrument composed of seven scales corresponding to 39 items was shown to be valid based on validity and reliability analyses. While male students tended to express more positive and active performance in the motivation scales, no gender differences were found in the self-regulation scales.

  13. KICS: A Model of Motivational Leadership in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This pure research gave birth to a Model of Motivational Leadership – KICS: which embraces knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy. It is a synergistic  proposition based on the theory of emotional intelligence as the index of competencies needed for effective leadership. It opened with a general discussion on traditional models of leadership, then the roles of knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy as they relate to motivational leadership. Issues of emotional intelligence clusters and synthesis of the model’s elements were discussed, emphasizing how KICS-based motivational leadership skills can be developed and sustained. Motivational leadership entails exciting people’s imaginations and inspiring them to move in a desired direction. It takes more than simple power to motivate and lead in organizations. Realizing that unity and cohesiveness are built from personal bonds, the best leaders ensure to deepen their rapport with employees and colleagues which enhances organizational performance. This pure research argues that the synergy of related emotional intelligence competencies can lead to motivational leadership behaviour. Knowledge is critical to leadership because there are different types of leadership and different situations require different kinds of knowledge, and the person possessing the knowledge demanded by a certain situation in most cases, tends to become the best leader. A knowledgeable person is one who is trained to consider his actions to undertake them deliberately, in a disciplined manner. Added to this ability is the intelligence to endure in a chosen course in the face of distraction, confusion and difficulty, all combined in producing a motivational leader. Knowledge tends to be procedural in nature and to operate outside of focal awareness. It also reflects the structure of the situation more closely than it does in the structure of formal disciplinary knowledge. The survey research design

  14. Older adults' motivated choice for technological innovation: Evidence for benefit-driven selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melenhorst, Anne-Sophie; Rogers, Wendy A.; Bouwhuis, Don G.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined older adults' motivation to adopt technological innovation. Sixty-eight older e-mail users and nonusers discussed the use of e-mail and of traditional communication methods in 18 focus groups. The results show older adults' benefit-driven approach to new communication technology.

  15. Motivating Factors of Florida Community and State College Information Technology Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Wendy Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this study the core job characteristics that contribute to the internal motivational factors and job satisfaction of information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida were investigated. Fifty-four information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida completed the Job…

  16. Employee commitment and motivation: a conceptual analysis and integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, John P; Becker, Thomas E; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2004-12-01

    Theorists and researchers interested in employee commitment and motivation have not made optimal use of each other's work. Commitment researchers seldom address the motivational processes through which commitment affects behavior, and motivation researchers have not recognized important distinctions in the forms, foci, and bases of commitment. To encourage greater cross-fertilization, the authors present an integrative framework in which commitment is presented as one of several energizing forces for motivated behavior. E. A. Locke's (1997) model of the work motivation process and J. P. Meyer and L. Herscovitch's (2001) model of workplace commitments serve as the foundation for the development of this new framework. To facilitate the merger, a new concept, goal regulation, is derived from self-determination theory (E. L. Deci & R. M. Ryan, 1985) and regulatory focus theory (E. I. Higgins, 1997). By including goal regulation, it is acknowledged that motivated behavior can be accompanied by different mindsets that have particularly important implications for the explanation and prediction of discretionary work behavior.

  17. Motivating Children to Learn: The Role of Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Coral; Jane, Beverley

    2012-01-01

    Design and technology education provides children with opportunities to create solutions to specific needs in innovative ways. This paper reports on research that focused on the language that the children used when they were involved in a design and technology activity. In accessing the results of the language study, the findings suggest that the…

  18. Models of misbelief: Integrating motivational and deficit theories of delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Ryan; Langdon, Robyn; Coltheart, Max

    2007-12-01

    The impact of our desires and preferences upon our ordinary, everyday beliefs is well-documented [Gilovich, T. (1991). How we know what isn't so: The fallibility of human reason in everyday life. New York: The Free Press.]. The influence of such motivational factors on delusions, which are instances of pathological misbelief, has tended however to be neglected by certain prevailing models of delusion formation and maintenance. This paper explores a distinction between two general classes of theoretical explanation for delusions; the motivational and the deficit. Motivational approaches view delusions as extreme instances of self-deception; as defensive attempts to relieve pain and distress. Deficit approaches, in contrast, view delusions as the consequence of defects in the normal functioning of belief mechanisms, underpinned by neuroanatomical or neurophysiological abnormalities. It is argued that although there are good reasons to be sceptical of motivational theories (particularly in their more floridly psychodynamic manifestations), recent experiments confirm that motives are important causal forces where delusions are concerned. It is therefore concluded that the most comprehensive account of delusions will involve a theoretical unification of both motivational and deficit approaches.

  19. Linguistically motivated statistical machine translation models and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Deyi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a wide variety of algorithms and models to integrate linguistic knowledge into Statistical Machine Translation (SMT). It helps advance conventional SMT to linguistically motivated SMT by enhancing the following three essential components: translation, reordering and bracketing models. It also serves the purpose of promoting the in-depth study of the impacts of linguistic knowledge on machine translation. Finally it provides a systematic introduction of Bracketing Transduction Grammar (BTG) based SMT, one of the state-of-the-art SMT formalisms, as well as a case study of linguistically motivated SMT on a BTG-based platform.

  20.  A matter of motivation: Designing engaging interactive technologies for museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    spaces are more successful than others in spurring this engagement. We suggest that digital technology can potentially support this “double move” in which subject matter knowledge is naturally integrated into the children’s everyday life if designers take into consideration the hierarchy of motives......We explore the concepts of motivation and motives in relation to inform the design of digital interactive technologies for museum exhibitions. A central issue for museums is to create strong links between the subject matter knowledge and the everyday life of the children. Pursuing such an agenda...... entails a commitment to understanding structures of children curiosity, interest, and engagement and the potential intersections between the everyday life of children and museum practice. Although engagement may be said to be a pervasive phenomenon, it is obvious that some technologies and exhibition...

  1. Motivating Mathematics Learning through an Integrated Technology Enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Many developed nations have a serious problem with a shortage in the supply of numerate graduates, fuelled by their school students' negative attitudes towards their future study of mathematics. At the same time, the smart phone and other personal sensing technological devices are becoming commonplace amongst students in schools and universities.…

  2. Intrinsic motivation, curiosity, and learning: Theory and applications in educational technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudeyer, P-Y; Gottlieb, J; Lopes, M

    2016-01-01

    This chapter studies the bidirectional causal interactions between curiosity and learning and discusses how understanding these interactions can be leveraged in educational technology applications. First, we review recent results showing how state curiosity, and more generally the experience of novelty and surprise, can enhance learning and memory retention. Then, we discuss how psychology and neuroscience have conceptualized curiosity and intrinsic motivation, studying how the brain can be intrinsically rewarded by novelty, complexity, or other measures of information. We explain how the framework of computational reinforcement learning can be used to model such mechanisms of curiosity. Then, we discuss the learning progress (LP) hypothesis, which posits a positive feedback loop between curiosity and learning. We outline experiments with robots that show how LP-driven attention and exploration can self-organize a developmental learning curriculum scaffolding efficient acquisition of multiple skills/tasks. Finally, we discuss recent work exploiting these conceptual and computational models in educational technologies, showing in particular how intelligent tutoring systems can be designed to foster curiosity and learning. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing the Factors Deemed to Support Individual Student Intrinsic Motivation in Technology Supported Online and Face-to-Face Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    Research has established that intrinsic motivation has a positive effect on learning and academic achievement. In order to investigate the phenomenon of intrinsic motivation in technology-supported learning environments, this paper investigates the factors deemed to support individual student intrinsic motivation in online discussions. A research…

  4. A Metacognitive-Motivational Model of Surface Approach to Studying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Marcantonio M.; Moneta, Giovanni B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we put forward and tested a model of how surface approach to studying during examination preparation is influenced by the trait variables of motivation and metacognition and the state variables of avoidance coping and evaluation anxiety. A sample of 528 university students completed, one week before examinations, the following…

  5. Applying an Employee-Motivation Model to Prevent Student Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M.; Sims, Randi L.

    1996-01-01

    A model based on Vroom's expectancy theory of employee motivation posits that instructors can prevent plagiarism by ensuring that students understand the rules of ethical writing, expect assignments to be manageable and have personal benefits, and expect plagiarism to be difficult and have important personal costs. (SK)

  6. Reflections on Wittrock's Generative Model of Learning: A Motivation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I examine developments in research on achievement motivation and comment on how those developments are reflected in Wittrock's generative model of learning. Specifically, I focus on the roles of prior knowledge, the generation of knowledge, and beliefs about ability. Examples from Wittrock's theory and from current motivational…

  7. Applying an Employee-Motivation Model to Prevent Student Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M.; Sims, Randi L.

    1996-01-01

    A model based on Vroom's expectancy theory of employee motivation posits that instructors can prevent plagiarism by ensuring that students understand the rules of ethical writing, expect assignments to be manageable and have personal benefits, and expect plagiarism to be difficult and have important personal costs. (SK)

  8. The Role of Implicit Motives in Strategic Decision-Making: Computational Models of Motivated Learning and the Evolution of Motivated Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Merrick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Individual behavioral differences in humans have been linked to measurable differences in their mental activities, including differences in their implicit motives. In humans, individual differences in the strength of motives such as power, achievement and affiliation have been shown to have a significant impact on behavior in social dilemma games and during other kinds of strategic interactions. This paper presents agent-based computational models of power-, achievement- and affiliation-motivated individuals engaged in game-play. The first model captures learning by motivated agents during strategic interactions. The second model captures the evolution of a society of motivated agents. It is demonstrated that misperception, when it is a result of motivation, causes agents with different motives to play a given game differently. When motivated agents who misperceive a game are present in a population, higher explicit payoff can result for the population as a whole. The implications of these results are discussed, both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents with certain salient behavioral characteristics.

  9. Federal investment in health information technology: how to motivate it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Anthony G

    2005-01-01

    Health care market failures include inefficient standard making, problems with coordination among local providers to optimize care, and inability to measure quality accurately, inexpensively, or reliably. Study of other industries suggests policy directions for health information technology and the magnitude of gains from improving market functioning, which are very large. A perspective drawn from U.S. industrial history--in particular railroads and the interstate highway system--suggests an investment level roughly consistent with recent estimates drawn from the medical literature. The benefits of quick action probably outweigh the benefits of delaying and choosing the perfect funding mechanism.

  10. The motivational theory of role modeling : How role models influence role aspirants' goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenroth, Thekla; Ryan, Michelle K.; Peters, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Role models are often suggested as a way of motivating individuals to set and achieve ambitious goals, especially for members of stigmatized groups in achievement settings. Yet, the literature on role models tends not to draw on the motivational literature to explain how role models may help role

  11. Effect of Middle School Students' Motivation to Learn Technology on Their Attitudes toward Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksoo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of motivation to learn technology, as perceived by South Korean middle school students, on their attitudes toward engineering. Using the instruments of Glynn et al. (2011) and Lee (2008), the study focused on eighth and ninth grade students in four middle schools located in South Korea's…

  12. International career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in science & technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Reimira; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes; Godbole, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into international career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in Science and Technology. Design/methodology/approach In total, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted with (upper) middle-class Indian women in Science and

  13. The Relational-Behavior Model: The Relationship between Intrinsic Motivational Instruction and Extrinsic Motivation in Psychologically Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study examined the relational-behavior model (RBM) as a method of intrinsic motivational instruction in psychology courses. Among a sample of 33 college students enrolled in two undergraduate psychology courses, a Spearman rho analysis revealed a significant relationship between the intrinsic motivational factors (e.g. student/class…

  14. Determination of Motivation of 5th Grade Students Living in Rural and Urban Environments towards Science Learning and Their Attitudes towards Science-Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenar, Ismail; Köse, Mücahit; Demir, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In this research, determination of motivation of 5th grade students living in rural and urban environments towards science learning and their attitudes towards science-technology course is aimed. This research is conducted based on descriptive survey model. Samples are selected through teleological model in accordance with the aim of this…

  15. 基于信息技术的ARCS动机设计模型在高职应用文写作教学中的运用%The ARCS Model of Motivational Design Based on Information Technology in the Applied Writing Course Teaching of Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓滢

    2016-01-01

    Learning is not the process of passive acceptance,but an active behavior. Therefore,in order to change the traditional and boring teaching methods of writing course,it is necessary for teachers to make the student learning from“hate to write”to“be willing to write”. So it is the key to improve the teaching efficiency that teachers may introduce some sorts of teaching methods to stimulate and maintain the students’learning motivation. The purpose of the study is to stimulate and maintain the motivation in writing practice by the combination of the ARCS model of motivational design and information technology,.%学习不应该是被动接受的过程,而应该是一种主动行为,因此,要改变传统的枯燥写作教学,让学生从“厌写”到“乐写”,在教学中采用一些教学手段和方法来激发和维持学生的学习动机是提高教学效果的关键。将ARCS动机设计模型与信息技术有效结合,可以很好地激发和维持学生的写作动机。

  16. THE IMPACT OF ARCS MOTIVATION MODEL ON MOTIVATION AND SUCCESS LEVEL OF PRIMARY 4TH GRADE STUDENTS IN SOCIAL STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa TAHİROĞLU

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect the impact of a teaching-learning process, structured taking the components of ARCS Motivation Model into consideration, on the motivation and success level of primary grade 4 students in social studies. In scope of the study, grouped pretest-posttest testing model is used. The experimental group consists of 32, and the control group 30 students. In order to collect research data, the “Grade 4 and 5 Social Studies Motivation Scale” and “Social Studies Ac...

  17. Motivation and timing: clues for modeling the reward system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtress, Tiffany; Marshall, Andrew T; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    There is growing evidence that a change in reward magnitude or value alters interval timing, indicating that motivation and timing are not independent processes as was previously believed. The present paper reviews several recent studies, as well as presenting some new evidence with further manipulations of reward value during training vs. testing on a peak procedure. The combined results cannot be accounted for by any of the current psychological timing theories. However, in examining the neural circuitry of the reward system, it is not surprising that motivation has an impact on timing because the motivation/valuation system directly interfaces with the timing system. A new approach is proposed for the development of the next generation of timing models, which utilizes knowledge of the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the reward system to guide the development of a neurocomputational model of the reward system. The initial foundation along with heuristics for proceeding with developing such a model is unveiled in an attempt to stimulate new theoretical approaches in the field.

  18. Why my classmates drink: drinking motives of classroom peers as predictors of individual drinking motives and alcohol use in adolescence -- a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Stewart, Sherry H

    2009-05-01

    A structural equation model was estimated based on a Swiss national sample of 5649 12- to 18-year-olds to test whether individual drinking motives mediate the link between classmates' motives and individual alcohol use. Results showed that the social, enhancement, coping and conformity motives of individual students are associated with the corresponding motive dimension of other students in the class. No direct effect of the four classmates' motives on individual drinking, but an indirect effect via individual motives was observed. It appears that drinking motives within the adolescent social environment exert their influence on drinking by way of shaping individual motives.

  19. The Impact of Personality on Training-Related Aspects of Motivation: Test of a Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Jens

    2007-01-01

    A model that proposed dispositional influences on training-related aspects of motivation was developed. More specifically, the model predicted influences of the Big Five personality variables on motivation to learn and transfer motivation, while controlling for general attitudes toward training. The model was tested empirically, drawing on a…

  20. Motivation and Technology Use During Second-Language Study Abroad in the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroline E. Seibert Hanson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study abroad culture is constantly changing (Kinginger, 2013, involving new challenges such as easier access to the first language culture via technology. There has been little research done on technology use abroad and its relationship with both linguistic gains (Coleman & Chafer, 2010; Kelly, 2010 and motivation (Allen, 2013; Irie & Ryan, 2015. To explore the role of motivation in developing a successful study abroad culture in the digital age, we documented technology use in the first language and second language of 15 college students during their summer sojourn in Argentina. We quantitatively evaluated participants’ motivation (Gardner, 1985; Ushida, 2003 and proficiency (Seibert Hanson & Carlson, 2014, and qualitatively analyzed their responses to open-ended questions about goals and culture shock. We found that higher motivation levels were correlated with greater linguistic gains and less technology use in the first language (specifically internet-related. Lower motivation levels matched increased technology use in the first language, and perceptions of failure to achieve study abroad goals and integrate into the host culture. Résumé La culture de l’étude à l’étranger est en pleine évolution (Kinginger 2013, ce qui entraîne de nouveaux défis comme l’accès facile à la culture de la langue maternelle grâce à la technologie. L’usage de la technologie à l’étranger, y compris son rapport aux acquisitions linguistiques (Coleman et Chafer, 2010 ; Kelly, 2010 et à la motivation des étudiants (Allen, 2013 ; Irie et Ryan, 2015, est un sujet peu étudié jusqu’à présent. Afin d’explorer le rôle de la motivation dans le développement réussi d’une culture de l’étude à l’étranger, nous avons documenté l’usage de la technologie dans la première et la deuxième langues d’étudiants universitaires lors de leur séjour d’été en Argentine. Nous avons analysé quantitativement la motivation

  1. Educational Technology Funding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Library and cross-disciplinary literature all stress the increasing importance of instructional technology in higher education. However, there is a dearth of articles detailing funding for library instructional technology. The bulk of library literature on funding for these projects focuses on one-time grant opportunities and on the architecture…

  2. Intrinsic motivation, curiosity and learning: theory and applications in educational technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Gottlieb, Jacqueline; Lopes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This article studies the bi-directional causal interactions between curiosity and learning, and discusses how understanding these interactions can be leveraged in educational technology applications. First, we review recent results showing how state curiosity, and more generally the experience of novelty and surprise, can enhance learning and memory retention. Then, we discuss how psychology and neuroscience have conceptualized curiosity and intrinsic motivation, study...

  3. Differences in Students' School Motivation: A Latent Class Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the school motivation of 7,257 9th grade students in 80 secondary schools across the Netherlands. Using a multiple goal perspective, four motivation dimensions were included: performance, mastery, extrinsic, and social motivation. Our first aim was to identify distinct motivation profiles within our sample, using the…

  4. How Motivation Affects Academic Performance: A Structural Equation Modelling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, R. A.; Ten Cate, Th. J.; Vos, C. M. P.; Westers, P.; Croiset, G.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies in medical education have studied effect of quality of motivation on performance. Self-Determination Theory based on quality of motivation differentiates between Autonomous Motivation (AM) that originates within an individual and Controlled Motivation (CM) that originates from external sources. To determine whether Relative Autonomous…

  5. Differences in Students' School Motivation: A Latent Class Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the school motivation of 7,257 9th grade students in 80 secondary schools across the Netherlands. Using a multiple goal perspective, four motivation dimensions were included: performance, mastery, extrinsic, and social motivation. Our first aim was to identify distinct motivation profiles within our sample, using the…

  6. Motivation of Young Students: A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of a Model for Motivational Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aalsvoort, Geerdina Maria; Lepola, Janne; Overtoom, Lisette; Laitinen, Satu

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for an early education teacher to enhance the development of self-regulation of young children to become and stay motivated for tasks that elicit school-related skills that do not immediately make sense for them. Being aware of motivational orientations in young students is therefore a must. In the study, a cross-cultural…

  7. Motivating Children to Develop Their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Motivation in mathematics and science appears to be more important to STEM occupational choice than ability. Using the expectancy value model, parents may be able to recognize potential barriers to children's selection of a STEM occupation and take actions to help facilitate talent development. These are especially important for parents of…

  8. Exploring persistence in science in CEGEP: Toward a motivational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Rebecca A.

    There is currently a shortage of science teachers in North America and continually decreasing rates of enrollment in science programs. Science continues to be the academic domain that sees the highest attrition rates, particularly for women. The purpose of the present study was to examine male and female students' experiences in mathematics and science courses during a crucial time in their academic development in an attempt to explain the high attrition rates in science between the last year of high school and the first year of CEGEP (junior college). In line with self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), as well as achievement-goal theory (Pintrich & Schunk, 1996) and research on academic emotions, the study examined the relation between a set of motivational variables (i.e., perceptions of autonomy-support, self-efficacy, achievement goals, and intrinsic motivation), affect, achievement, and persistence. A secondary objective was to test a motivational model of student persistence in science using structural equation modeling (SEM). The sample consisted of 603 male and 706 female students from four English-language CEGEPs in the greater Montreal area. Just prior to beginning CEGEP, participants completed a questionnaire that asked about the learning environment in high school mathematics and science classes as well as student characteristics including sources of motivation, personal achievement goals, and feelings of competence. All students expressed an initial interest in pursuing a career in science by enrolling in optional advanced mathematics and science courses during high school. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine differences among male and female students across the variables measured. Structural equation modeling was used to test the validity of a questionnaire designed specifically to gather information about CEGEP students' experiences with mathematics and science, and to evaluate the fit of a model designed to reflect the

  9. Structurally Motivated Models of the Arterial Wall Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Hadi; Shadpour, Mohammad Tafazzoli

    2013-05-01

    Mechanical characteristics of soft biological tissues mostly depend on their hierarchy at different scales from nano- to macro-structure. It is shown that arterial wall tissue is highly sensitive to its mechanical environment and any alteration in mechanical factors such as blood pressure, triggers physio- pathological processes within arterial wall. Quantification of these mechanical properties will provide us with deeper insights of ongoing biological events. In this context, mechanical contributions of wall constituents in health and diseases are of growing interest. Hence, this review is concerned with mechanical models of arterial wall tissue with a focus on microstructurally motivated representations.

  10. Optoelectronic technology profiles: motivating and developing research skills in undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D. M.

    2009-06-01

    A case study is described of the redesign of an assessment task - the writing of an Optoelectronic Technology profile - to achieve improved outcomes in student education and capability development, in particular, research skills. Attention is drawn to the value of a formally scheduled discussion between teacher and student around controlling the scope of the profile via an appropriately constructed "brief", and the selection and evaluation of the reference resources to be used in completing the task. Student motivation is improved through "student publishing" and encouraging students to regard their technology profile as an example of their work that can be shown to potential employers, possibly as part of a portfolio. Students have the choice as to whether they will also use the technology profile task as a vehicle to develop teamwork experience and skills.

  11. Differences in students' school motivation : A latent class modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the school motivation of 7,257 9th grade students in 80 secondary schools across the Netherlands. Using a multiple goal perspective, four motivation dimensions were included: performance, mastery, extrinsic, and social motivation. Our first aim was to identify distinct

  12. Differences in students' school motivation : A latent class modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    In this study, we investigated the school motivation of 7,257 9th grade students in 80 secondary schools across the Netherlands. Using a multiple goal perspective, four motivation dimensions were included: performance, mastery, extrinsic, and social motivation. Our first aim was to identify distinct

  13. Optimizing neural network models: motivation and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Harp, S A; T. Samad

    2012-01-01

    Practical successes have been achieved  with neural network models in a variety of domains, including energy-related industry. The large, complex design space presented by neural networks is only minimally explored in current practice. The satisfactory results that nevertheless have been obtained testify that neural networks are a robust modeling technology; at the same time, however, the lack of a systematic design approach implies that the best neural network models generally  rem...

  14. A Model of Motivation for Extensive Reading in Japanese as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burgh-Hirabe, Ryoko; Feryok, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that extensive reading (ER) has a positive influence on affect. Recent studies suggest that motivation for ER changes. This is in line with recent developments in second language (L2) motivation research that have highlighted the complex and dynamic nature of L2 motivation. This study presents a model of complex and…

  15. A Model of Motivation for Extensive Reading in Japanese as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burgh-Hirabe, Ryoko; Feryok, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that extensive reading (ER) has a positive influence on affect. Recent studies suggest that motivation for ER changes. This is in line with recent developments in second language (L2) motivation research that have highlighted the complex and dynamic nature of L2 motivation. This study presents a model of complex and…

  16. Enriching the Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between…

  17. A structural model of technology acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Erasmus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Enterprise resource systems have not always led to significant organisational enhancement and many projects in which these systems have been implemented turn out to be over budget, not on time and unsuccessful.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to test the technology acceptance model within a South African SAP® Enterprise Resource Planning user environment.Motivation for the study: No study could be traced in which the technology acceptance model has been evaluated in the South African context.Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. The 23-item Technology Acceptance Model Questionnaire was deployed amongst SAP® Enterprise Resource Planning users (N = 241. Main findings: The results confirmed significant paths from perceived usefulness of the information system to attitudes towards and behavioural intentions to use it. Furthermore, behavioural intention to use the system predicted actual use thereof. Perceived ease of use indirectly affected attitudes towards and behavioural intentions to use via perceived usefulness of the information system.Practical/managerial implications: Practitioners should build user confidence by ensuring the ease of use of a new system, providing relevant education, training and guidance and reiterating its usefulness and future added value to the user’s job and career.Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to scientific knowledge regarding the influence of individuals’ perceptions of information system usage on their attitudes, behavioural intentions and actual use of such a system.

  18. College English Students’Autonomous Learning Motivation and Cultivation Model Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳荣; 李娥

    2015-01-01

    Studying the autonomous learning motivation and excitation model can stimulate intrinsic motivation of foreign language learners,develop students self-management strategy evaluation are very necessary.The purpose of this paper is to give students the skills of listening and speaking for their autonomous learning.Then study the cultivation and motivation of college English students autonomous learning,hoping to make students to learn autonomous learning and stimulate their motivation fully.

  19. Persuasive Technology and Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Lindgren, Peter; Veirum, Niels Einar

    specific behavior, this results to the ability of designing for specific changes. Businesses use different persuasive technologies to persuade users, customers and network partners to change behavior. Operating more than one value proposition, both tangible and intangible value proposition, in combination...... seems to be crucial to the success of a persuasive business model. We will give a short introduction into the area of persuasive technology and business models. Moreover, we will present a number of concrete case examples where persuasive technologies were employed, the first in health care, the second...

  20. The Development of Writing Learning Model Based on the Arces Motivation for Students of Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kosasih

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research obtains some of the findings which in a word can be described as follows: (1 the step of Introduction (exploration: through study library and observation, it can be found that the quality of writing learning and the need of a better writing learning model, and it is formulated the prototype of writing learning model based on the ARCES motivation, serta dirumuskan prototipe model pembelajaran menulis berbasis motivasi ARCES after the draft is validated by the Indonesian language experts and education technology experts. (2 The step of model development: through development of preliminary model and development of  main model and after it is done by  monitoring, evaluation, focus group discussion and revision, then it is produced a better writing learning model based on ARCES motivation. (3 The step of model effectiveness examination: through pre-test, treatment, and post-test which is produced writing learning model  based on ARCES motivation. From the effectiveness test result of model, it can be concluded that writing learning based on ARCES motivation is more effective (in average value of post test is 83,94 than writing learning conventionally (in average value of post-test is 75,79.

  1. Appropriateness of the use of innovative technologies in the formation of personality oriented motivation of students to physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruzhevsky V.A.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: introduction in educational process of innovative technologies aimed at creating a student-centered motivation of students on the value of physical education. Material : the study involved 379 1st year students from different regions of the Crimea and the students of the Crimean Tatar nationality. Results : determined the dominant category of motives that emphasize feature innovative technologies in shaping the personality- oriented motivation of students to physical education. Identified the following groups of motives: cognitive activity, social, emotional satisfaction from motives of exercise; motives of needs of importance of physical education in the future professional activity; motives of critical attitude to the conditions and forms of organization of physical education. Found that the fundamental principles in innovative implementations become the following: the humanization; nature- compliance and nature- appropriate; tolerance; differentiation and individuality, which is closely linked with the principles of physical education. Conclusions : the proven efficiency of formation of positive student-centered motivation among college students to physical education provided records of all significant components of the previous ethnic environment.

  2. A Cross Cultural Model for FlexibleMotivation in Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratiela Dana BOCA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of world business has created a demand for managers sophisticated in global management skills and working with people from other countries. Organizational behavior from different countries and cultures compares organizational behavior across countries and cultures and seeks to understand how to improve the interaction of co workers, manager’s executives, client’s suppliers and alliance partners from around the world. The economic world shows us that all the elements that we consider static have a pulsation around an equilibrium position. The present study concerning the organization’s culture the motivational factors of the employees an outlet in this field. The flexibility in a global economy is an important element on which people can communicate and the manager can exercise his leading task thus is an imperfect world that imposed the necessity of adaptation to a cross cultural model.

  3. The effects of motivational factors on car use: a multidisciplinary modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steg, L.; Ras, M. [University of Groningen (Netherlands). Centre for Environmental and Traffic Psychology; Geurs, K. [National Institute of Public Health and Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2001-11-01

    Current transport models usually do not take motivational factors into account, and if they do, it is only implicitly. This paper presents a modelling approach aimed at explicitly examining the effects of motivational factors on present and future car use in the Netherlands. A car-use forecasting model for the years 2010 and 2020 was constructed on the basis of (i) a multinominal regression analysis, which revealed the importance of a motivational variable (viz., problem awareness) in explaining current car-use behavior separate from socio-demographic and socio-economic variables, and (ii) a population model constructed to forecast the size and composition of the Dutch population. The results show that car use could be better explained by taking motivational factors explicitly into account, and that the level of car use forecast might change significantly if changes in motivations are assumed. The question on how motivational factors could be incorporated into current (Dutch) national transport models was also addressed. (author)

  4. A preliminary Analysis of Dörnyei and Otto’s Process Model of L2 Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐佳佳

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, motivation has already become a recurring topic in SLA field, where motivational theories have placed great influence on language teaching. Different from previous motivation theories, Dörnyei and Otto’s process model of L2 motivation focuses on the dynamicity of motivation.This paper aims at analyzing the process model of L2 motivation and proposing stimulation strategies for each phase to attain learning effect.

  5. A preliminary Analysis of Drnyei and Otto’s Process Model of L2 Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐佳佳

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, motivation has already become a recurring topic in SLA field, where motivational theories have placed great influence on language teaching.Different from previous motivation theories, Drnyei and Otto’s process model of L2 motivation focuses on the dynamicity of motivation.This paper aims at analyzing the process model of L2 motivation and proposing stimulation strategies for each phase to attain learning effect.

  6. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST.

  7. DESIGNING AN EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION SYSTEM BASED ON ABCD MODEL FOR HOTEL ESTABLISHMENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onur Çakir; Meryem Akoglan Kozak

    2017-01-01

    .... Factor analyses and importance-satisfaction analysis were utilized to interpret data. CFA results demonstrated that ABCD model performed well in explaining employee motivation phenomenon in hotel establishments...

  8. Toward the development of a motivational model of pain self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Nielson, Warren R; Kerns, Robert D

    2003-11-01

    Adaptive management of chronic pain depends to a large degree on how patients choose to cope with pain and its impact. Consequently, patient motivation is an important factor in determining how well patients learn to manage pain. However, the role of patient motivation in altering coping behavior and maintaining those changes is seldom discussed, and theoretically based research on motivation for pain treatment is lacking. This article reviews theories that have a direct application to understanding motivational issues in pain coping and presents a preliminary motivational model of pain self-management. The implications of this model for enhancing engagement in and adherence to chronic pain treatment programs are then discussed. The article ends with a call for research to better understand motivation as it applies to chronic pain self-management. In particular, there is a need to determine whether (and which) motivation enhancement interventions increase active participation in self-management treatment programs for chronic pain.

  9. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  10. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  11. Achievement Motivation in High School: Contrasting Theoretical Models in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Celay, I. Montero; Tapia, J. Alonso

    1992-01-01

    Three models of achievement motivation in the classroom are contrasted. Results with 155 high school students suggest that the model of C. S. Dweck and E. S. Elliott offers a better explanation of the relationships among achievement motivation, attributions, emotional reactions, expectancies, and performance than do the other models. (SLD)

  12. K- nuclear potentials from in-medium chirally motivated models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Gazda, D.; Mareš, J.

    2011-10-01

    A self-consistent scheme for constructing K- nuclear optical potentials from subthreshold in-medium K¯N s-wave scattering amplitudes is presented and applied to analysis of kaonic atoms data and to calculations of K- quasibound nuclear states. The amplitudes are taken from a chirally motivated meson-baryon coupled-channel model, both at the Tomozawa-Weinberg leading order and at the next to leading order. Typical kaonic atoms potentials are characterized by a real part -ReVK-chiral=85±5 MeV at nuclear matter density, in contrast to half this depth obtained in some derivations based on in-medium K¯N threshold amplitudes. The moderate agreement with data is much improved by adding complex ρ- and ρ2-dependent phenomenological terms, found to be dominated by ρ2 contributions that could represent K¯NN→YN absorption and dispersion, outside the scope of meson-baryon chiral models. Depths of the real potentials are then near 180 MeV. The effects of p-wave interactions are studied and found secondary to those of the dominant s-wave contributions. The in-medium dynamics of the coupled-channel model is discussed and systematic studies of K- quasibound nuclear states are presented.

  13. Driving with advanced vehicle technology: A qualitative investigation of older drivers' perceptions and motivations for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Jessica; Vrkljan, Brenda; Grenier, Amanda; Van Miltenburg, Benita

    2016-08-04

    For older drivers, in-vehicle technology offers much potential to improve safety and increase longevity of retaining both licensure and community mobility. However, little is known about how older drivers perceive Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVTs) based on everyday driving experience. Interviews with 35 older drivers (20 men; 15 women) aged 60-85 who owned a vehicle with at least two AVTs (e.g., back-up camera, lane departure warning) were conducted to explore the meanings that older drivers assigned to AVTs and motivations for use, including whether age-related functional changes were part of their automobile purchase decision. Findings indicate that age-related changes are not a primary reason for why older adults seek out AVTs, but they still perceived and experienced AVTs to counteract age-related changes in driving performance based upon changes they felt occurring within the body. Older drivers also described AVTs as generating a sense of comfort behind-the-wheel. Comfort with this technology was equated with convenience, ease of use, and increased feelings of safety. Discussion emphasizes how assessments of the quality of driving performance and value of technology occur in relation to an aging body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of personnel motivation models as a key component of innovative activity management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Krykunenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to examine the algorithm, approaches and methods of development the model of staff motivation at high technology enterprises, to strengthen the creative-directed processes of developing new products, as well as analysis of additional factors that have contributed to the effective creative work of the staff. The results of the analysis. The problem of improving the efficiency of different economic systems in the situation of limited amount of resources and fierce competition among enterprises is highlighted in the article. The author found that the performance of the considered task can be achieved through the active use of creative abilities of employees. Entities of innovative business must address the development of management concepts creativity of staff motivation model of creative work, the development and application of a wide range of methods and instruments for the control creativity. In this case, the algorithm of motivation improvement involves defining the objective model of motivation, diagnosis of the existing system of staff incentives, building a creative ranking of employees, development of effective methods of creative work motivation. Scientific novelty of the present study is in organizing of staff creativity management, which involves the intensification and revitalization innovations of the company, the aim of which is in development and implementation of innovative products. An important phase of model motivation is to create additional motivators manifestation of the creative energy of employees, which will increase the cost-effectiveness of high-tech enterprises, to reduce the turnaround time for the development of innovative products. Thus, the development, implementation and operation of the motivation model to incorporate the creative abilities of the staff of the enterprise should be based on an integrated, generalized, systemic and integrated approach, taking into

  15. Integrating behavioral-motive and experiential-requirement perspectives on psychological needs: a two process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Kennon M

    2011-10-01

    Psychological need theories offer much explanatory potential for behavioral scientists, but there is considerable disagreement and confusion about what needs are and how they work. A 2-process model of psychological needs is outlined, viewing needs as evolved functional systems that provide both (a) innate psychosocial motives that tend to impel adaptive behavior and (b) innate experiential requirements that when met reinforce adaptive behavior and promote mental health. The literature is reviewed to find support for 8 hypotheses derived from this model: that certain basic psychosocial motives are present at birth; that successful enactment of these motives supports the functioning and wellness of all humans; that individual differences in these motives develop in childhood; that these strong motive dispositions tend to produce the satisfying experiences they seek; that motive dispositions do not moderate the effect of motive-corresponding need satisfaction on well-being but do moderate the effect of assigned goal-type on rated self-concordance for those goals; that need dissatisfaction and need satisfaction correspond to the separable behavioral-motive and experiential-reward aspects of needs; and that motives and needs can become decoupled when chronic dissatisfaction of particular requirements warps or depresses the corresponding motives, such that the adaptive process fails in its function. Implications for self-determination theory and motive disposition theory are considered.

  16. HOW TO IMPROVE EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION AND GROUP PERFORMANCE THROUGH LEADERSHIP – CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebeian Adriana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We live times of intense change, due to fast technological development, when information and knowledge are certain factors of power. Organizations today must not underestimate the importance of capable employees, owners of these great factors like information and knowledge. The key to success, as many organizations have shown, is, of course a mix of attributes, but one of much importance stands in the quality of employees and their performance. How to motivate and keep such employees is a real challenge in the actual business world. Employee fluctuation is a big risk, because it brings many losses: loss of expertise, of know-how, of time, it breaks relationships and teams. One solution to this problem is creating a good and attractive environment, so that employees are motivated enough to bring up the best in them and rise their performance to a high level. The main objective of this study is to present a new approach in motivating employees and raising their performance. In this approach, the leader is the main pawn, the generator and sustainer of a healthy environment. By reviewing the literature and the most recent works in this domain, two styles of leadership come into focus: transformational and servant leadership. Both are relatively new concepts, with common but also different attributes, and both having the same final goal: performance, but through a different approach. Based on a vast literature research, the conceptual model was built, considering the main attributes of the two leadership styles, their impact on motivational factors, their influence on job satisfaction and ultimately on team performance. The intermediary results of the research sustain the conceptual framework and main hypothesis of the study. One important contribution of this research is introducing elements of servant leadership together with transformational leadership in the empirical research and also creating an overall conceptual framework which can be applied

  17. Concept Model For Designing Engaging And Motivating Games For Learning - The Smiley-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    a music learning game that teaches children to play piano using sheet music, and at the same time is fun and engaging. Although the model was originally developed for and through music, it has a more generic nature, and may be relevant for other fields as well. The Smiley-model is a condensed version....... Furthermore, theories about children, culture and media, as well as empirical analysis of the writers' own music-teaching practice were investigated. Motivation and engagement in music learning games was investigated through: 1) an analysis of various theoretical and empirical approaches to implementing...... learning in a learning game, 2) study of motivational theories, 3) analysis of theory of play and existing experiences on dissemination of learning in games in fun ways 4) analysis of motivating and engaging game elements, and 5) analysis of similar music learning games. During an iterative design process...

  18. Bioprinting technologies for disease modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memic, Adnan; Navaei, Ali; Mirani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    challenges of conventional in vitro assays through the development of custom bioinks and patient derived cells coupled with well-defined arrangements of biomaterials. Here, we provide an overview on the technological aspects of 3D bioprinting technique and discuss how the development of bioprinted tissue......There is a great need for the development of biomimetic human tissue models that allow elucidation of the pathophysiological conditions involved in disease initiation and progression. Conventional two-dimensional (2D) in vitro assays and animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate...... the critical characteristics of human physiology. Alternatively, three-dimensional (3D) tissue models are often developed in a low-throughput manner and lack crucial native-like architecture. The recent emergence of bioprinting technologies has enabled creating 3D tissue models that address the critical...

  19. Motivation Monitoring and Assessment Extension for Input-Process-Outcome Game Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a Motivation Assessment-oriented Input-Process-Outcome Game Model (MotIPO), which extends the Input-Process-Outcome game model with game-centred and player-centred motivation assessments performed right from the beginning of the game-play. A feasibility case-study involving 67 participants playing an educational game and…

  20. The effects of motivational factors on car use : a multidisciplinary modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, L; Geurs, K; Ras, M

    2001-01-01

    Current transport models usually do not take motivational factors into account, and if they do, it is only implicitly. This paper presents a modelling approach aimed at explicitly examining the effects of motivational factors on present and future car use in the Netherlands. A car-use forecasting mo

  1. Value-Added Models of Assessment: Implications for Motivation and Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Anderman, Lynley H.; Yough, Michael S.; Gimbert, Belinda G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relations of value-added models of measuring academic achievement to student motivation. Using an achievement goal orientation theory perspective, we argue that value-added models, which focus on the progress of individual students over time, are more closely aligned with research on student motivation than are more…

  2. Motivation Monitoring and Assessment Extension for Input-Process-Outcome Game Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a Motivation Assessment-oriented Input-Process-Outcome Game Model (MotIPO), which extends the Input-Process-Outcome game model with game-centred and player-centred motivation assessments performed right from the beginning of the game-play. A feasibility case-study involving 67 participants playing an educational game and…

  3. Cooperation Models, Motivation and Objectives behind Farm–School Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyg, Pernille Malberg; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2016-01-01

    and teachers. Findings show distinct differences in motivation. Farmers want to create transparency in their production, ensure support for the agricultural profession or promote food and agricultural literacy. The idealistic motivation of teaching children about food and agriculture weighs higher than...... economic incentives. Teachers display academic motives for engaging in farm visits, but also a broader focus on shaping children’s world views, connectedness to food and nature and fostering life skills. The farm can be an important setting for promoting food, agricultural and ecological literacy. We...... people and their ability to understand the food system. Thus, efforts are made to promote food literacy through strengthening of farm–school links. The case-study research from Denmark investigates existing cooperation arrangements in farm–school collaboration and the underlying motivation of the farmers...

  4. Self-determined motivation in sport predicts anti-doping motivation and intention: a perspective from the trans-contextual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D K C; Dimmock, J A; Donovan, R J; Hardcastle, S; Lentillon-Kaestner, V; Hagger, M S

    2015-05-01

    Motivation in sport has been frequently identified as a key factor of young athletes' intention of doping in sport, but there has not been any attempt in scrutinizing the motivational mechanism involved. The present study applied the trans-contextual model of motivation to explain the relationship between motivation in a sport context and motivation and the social-cognitive factors (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention) from the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in an anti-doping context. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Questionnaire data was collected from 410 elite and sub-elite young athletes in Australia (Mean age [17.7±3.9 yr], 55.4% male, Years in sport [9.1±3.2]). We measured the key model variables of study in relation to sport motivation (Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire), and the motivation (adapted version of the Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire) and social cognitive patterns (the theory of planned behavior questionnaire) of doping avoidance. The data was analyzed by variance-based structural equation modeling with bootstrapping of 999 replications. The goodness-of-fit of the hypothesized model was acceptable. The bootstrapped parameter estimates revealed that autonomous motivation and amotivation in sport were positively associated with the corresponding types of motivation for the avoidance of doping. Autonomous motivation, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control in doping avoidance fully mediated the relationship between autonomous motivation in sport and intention for doping avoidance. The findings support the tenets of the trans-contextual model, and explain how motivation in sport is related to athletes' motivation and intention with respect to anti-doping behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Information processing of genetically modified food messages under different motives: an adaptation of the multiple-motive heuristic-systematic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooyoung; Paek, Hye-Jin

    2009-12-01

    Recent risk management research has noted the importance of understanding how the lay public processes and reacts to risk-related information. Guided by the multiple-motive heuristic-systematic model, this study examines (1) how individuals process messages in the context of genetically modified foods to change their attitudes and (2) how the persuasion process varies across types of motives. In the three treatment conditions of accuracy, defense, and impression motives, the respondents changed their attitudes through either the heuristic or the systematic mode, depending on their motives. The accuracy-motive group appeared to use the systematic processing mode, while the impression-motive group seemed to employ the heuristic processing mode. The empirical findings highlight the importance of incorporating motives to improve our understanding of the process of attitude change in risk management and communication contexts.

  6. A game theoretic framework for incentive-based models of intrinsic motivation in artificial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Kathryn E.; Shafi, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivations have recently been considered in reinforcement learning, active learning and supervised learning settings among others. This paper considers game theory as a novel setting for intrinsic motivation. A game theoretic framework for intrinsic motivation is formulated by introducing the concept of optimally motivating incentive as a lens through which players perceive a game. Transformations of four well-known mixed-motive games are presented to demonstrate the perceived games when players' optimally motivating incentive falls in three cases corresponding to strong power, affiliation and achievement motivation. We use agent-based simulations to demonstrate that players with different optimally motivating incentive act differently as a result of their altered perception of the game. We discuss the implications of these results both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents or robots. PMID:24198797

  7. A game theoretic framework for incentive-based models of intrinsic motivation in artificial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Kathryn E; Shafi, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivations have recently been considered in reinforcement learning, active learning and supervised learning settings among others. This paper considers game theory as a novel setting for intrinsic motivation. A game theoretic framework for intrinsic motivation is formulated by introducing the concept of optimally motivating incentive as a lens through which players perceive a game. Transformations of four well-known mixed-motive games are presented to demonstrate the perceived games when players' optimally motivating incentive falls in three cases corresponding to strong power, affiliation and achievement motivation. We use agent-based simulations to demonstrate that players with different optimally motivating incentive act differently as a result of their altered perception of the game. We discuss the implications of these results both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents or robots.

  8. A Game Theoretic Framework for Incentive-Based Models of Intrinsic Motivation in Artificial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Elizabeth Merrick

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivations have recently been considered in reinforcement learning, active learning and supervised learning settings among others. This paper considers game theory as a novel setting for intrinsic motivation. A game theoretic framework for intrinsic motivation is formulated by introducing the concept of optimally motivating incentive as a lens through which players perceive a game. Transformations of four well-known mixed-motive games are presented to demonstrate the perceived games when players’ optimally motivating incentive falls in three cases corresponding to strong power, affiliation and achievement motivation. We use agent-based simulations to demonstrate that players with different optimally motivating incentive act differently as a result of their altered perception of the game. We discuss the implications of these results both for modeling human behavior and for designing artificial agents or robots.

  9. AND BELARUS ON THE BASIS OF GERCHIKOV’S MOTIVATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu, W.Y.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research examined corporate motivation in Belarus and China on the basis of Gerchikov’s motivation theory. We will bring theoretical substantiation for the work and state why we have chosen Gerchikov’s motivation model as foundation for the analysis. On the basis of the results gathered with the help of the research we will propose a suggestion on what peculiarities in the framework of corporate motivation we shall pay special attention in the course of Belarusian and Chinese companies’ cooperation.

  10. Sources of motivation, interpersonal conflict management styles, and leadership effectiveness: a structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Xu, Ye

    2006-02-01

    126 leaders and 624 employees were sampled to test the relationship between sources of motivation and conflict management styles of leaders and how these variables influence effectiveness of leadership. Five sources of motivation measured by the Motivation Sources Inventory were tested-intrinsic process, instrumental, self-concept external, self-concept internal, and goal internalization. These sources of work motivation were associated with Rahim's modes of interpersonal conflict management-dominating, avoiding, obliging, complying, and integrating-and to perceived leadership effectiveness. A structural equation model tested leaders' conflict management styles and leadership effectiveness based upon different sources of work motivation. The model explained variance for obliging (65%), dominating (79%), avoiding (76%), and compromising (68%), but explained little variance for integrating (7%). The model explained only 28% of the variance in leader effectiveness.

  11. Cooperation Models, Motivation and Objectives behind Farm–School Collaboration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyg, Pernille Malberg

    2016-01-01

    economic incentives. Teachers display academic motives for engaging in farm visits, but also a broader focus on shaping children’s world views, connectedness to food and nature and fostering life skills. The farm can be an important setting for promoting food, agricultural and ecological literacy. We......Abstract Children lack an understanding of and connectedness to food and agriculture, while policies are calling for more emphasis on food and nutrition at school. As a result, foodscapes at school are increasingly the focus of public policy. More initiatives are targeting food literacy of young...... and teachers. Findings show distinct differences in motivation. Farmers want to create transparency in their production, ensure support for the agricultural profession or promote food and agricultural literacy. The idealistic motivation of teaching children about food and agriculture weighs higher than...

  12. The Motivational Impact of Wearable Healthy Lifestyle Technologies: A Self-Determination Perspective on Fitbits with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Charlotte; Goodyear, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Considerable numbers of young people are not meeting physical activity guidelines. Wearable fitness devices can provide opportunities for physical activity promotion. Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore whether wearable healthy lifestyle technologies impacted on adolescents' (13- to 14-year-olds) motivation for physical…

  13. Flipped Classroom Adapted to the ARCS Model of Motivation and Applied to a Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiksoy, Gülsüm; Özdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect on the achievement, motivation and self-sufficiency of students of the flipped classroom approach adapted to Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence and Satisfaction) motivation model and applied to a physics course. The study involved 66 students divided into two classes of a physics course. The…

  14. A Descriptive Study of Intrinsic Motivation in Three California Accredited Model Continuation High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dike, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The first purpose of this study was to identify and describe teachers' perceptions of intrinsic motivation in classrooms among at-risk adolescent students in 3 model continuation high schools. The second purpose of this study was to identify and describe teacher practices that promote intrinsic motivation among at-risk adolescent students…

  15. Modeling the Relations among Students' Epistemological Beliefs, Motivation, Learning Approach, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilgunes, Berna; Tekkaya, Ceren; Sungur, Semra

    2009-01-01

    The authors proposed a model to explain how epistemological beliefs, achievement motivation, and learning approach related to achievement. The authors assumed that epistemological beliefs influence achievement indirectly through their effect on achievement motivation and learning approach. Participants were 1,041 6th-grade students. Results of the…

  16. Longitudinal Test of Self-Determination Theory's Motivation Mediation Model in a Naturally Occurring Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyungshim; Kim, Eun Joo; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2012-01-01

    This study provides the first longitudinally designed, classroom-based empirical test of self-determination theory's motivation mediation model. Measures of perceived autonomy support, motivation (autonomy need satisfaction), engagement, and achievement were collected from 500 (257 females, 243 males) 8th-grade students in Korea in a 3-wave…

  17. Broadening the trans-contextual model of motivation: A study with Spanish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cutre, D; Sicilia, Á; Beas-Jiménez, M; Hagger, M S

    2014-08-01

    The original trans-contextual model of motivation proposed that autonomy support from teachers develops students' autonomous motivation in physical education (PE), and that autonomous motivation is transferred from PE contexts to physical activity leisure-time contexts, and predicts attitudes, perceived behavioral control and subjective norms, and forming intentions to participate in future physical activity behavior. The purpose of this study was to test an extended trans-contextual model of motivation including autonomy support from peers and parents and basic psychological needs in a Spanish sample. School students (n = 400) aged between 12 and 18 years completed measures of perceived autonomy support from three sources, autonomous motivation and constructs from the theory of planned behavior at three different points in time and in two contexts, PE and leisure-time. A path analysis controlling for past physical activity behavior supported the main postulates of the model. Autonomous motivation in a PE context predicted autonomous motivation in a leisure-time physical activity context, perceived autonomy support from teachers predicted satisfaction of basic psychological needs in PE, and perceived autonomy support from peers and parents predicted need satisfaction in leisure-time. This study provides a cross-cultural replication of the trans-contextual model of motivation and broadens it to encompass basic psychological needs.

  18. Motivating College Students: A Model Based on Empirical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    1991-01-01

    Students in an educational psychology course were offered the opportunity to earn a grade bonus by writing test items on content to be covered the following week. Results show both internal (student) and external (manipulable) factors had considerable influence on effort and persistence. A classroom procedure to enhance student motivation is…

  19. [The social-cognitive model of achievement motivation in physical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cutre Coll, David; Sicilia Camacho, Alvaro; Moreno Murcia, Juan A

    2008-11-01

    Our objective in this study was to test the new social-cognitive model of achievement motivation in a physical education setting. Research was conducted on a sample of 895 physical education students, ages 12 to 16 years. We measured perception of the motivational climate conveyed by the teacher, implicit beliefs of ability, perceived competence, 2 x 2 achievement goals and self-determined motivation. We carried out structural equation modeling to analyse the relationships among variables. Results showed that task climate positively predicted incremental belief, whereas ego climate positively predicted entity belief. Both climates positively predicted perceived competence. Incremental belief positively predicted mastery-approach goals, performance-approach goals and avoidance goals, whereas entity belief positively predicted performance-approach goals and avoidance goals. Perceived competence positively predicted mastery-approach and performance-approach goals. Mastery-approach goal positively predicted self-determined motivation, whereas performance-approach goal and avoidance goals negatively predicted self-determined motivation.

  20. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  1. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  2. A Theoretical Model of Health Information Technology Usage Behaviour with Implications for Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2009-01-01

    Primary objective: much research and practice related to the design and implementation of information technology in health care has been atheoretical. It is argued that using extant theory to develop testable models of health information technology (HIT) benefits both research and practice. Methods and procedures: several theories of motivation,…

  3. Guiding healthcare technology implementation: a new integrated technology implementation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoville, Rhonda R; Titler, Marita G

    2015-03-01

    Healthcare technology is used to improve delivery of safe patient care by providing tools for early diagnosis, ongoing monitoring, and treatment of patients. This technology includes bedside physiologic monitors, pulse oximetry devices, electrocardiogram machines, bedside telemetry, infusion pumps, ventilators, and electronic health records. Healthcare costs are a challenge for society, and hospitals are pushed to lower costs by discharging patients sooner. Healthcare technology is being used to facilitate these early discharges. There is little understanding of how healthcare facilities purchase, implement, and adopt technology. There are two areas of theories and models currently used when investigating technology: technology adoption and implementation science. Technology adoption focuses mainly on how the end users adopt technology, whereas implementation science describes methods, interventions, and variables that promote the use of evidence-based practice. These two approaches are not well informed by each other. In addition, amplifying the knowledge gap is the limited conceptualization of healthcare technology implementation frameworks. To bridge this gap, an all-encompassing model is needed. To understand the key technology implementation factors utilized by leading healthcare facilities, the prevailing technology adoption and implementation science theories and models were reviewed. From this review, an integrated technology implementation model will be set forth.

  4. De Theatro Motivarum, Motivation : In Search of Essentials. Research on a Theoretical Model of the Process of Motivation and on Critical Determinants of Interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennes, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In using a fundamentally different approach to theory formation, a new Model of Motivation is presented and tested through empirical research in various studies. Motivation is assumed to evolve around an objective and to proceed in twenty-four consecutive ‘stages’ that can be organized according to

  5. De Theatro Motivarum, Motivation : In Search of Essentials. Research on a Theoretical Model of the Process of Motivation and on Critical Determinants of Interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennes, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In using a fundamentally different approach to theory formation, a new Model of Motivation is presented and tested through empirical research in various studies. Motivation is assumed to evolve around an objective and to proceed in twenty-four consecutive ‘stages’ that can be organized according to

  6. A model of motivational orientation for youth sport: some preliminary work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, E H; Bridges, L J

    1995-01-01

    This project was an attempt to test a model of motivational orientation in the youth sport setting. Although previous developmental work in this area had examined a number of intra- and interpersonal variables thought to influence children's motivational orientation, few studies have tested an integrated model. Questionnaires assessing perceived competence, perceived control, competitive trait anxiety, and motivational orientation were completed by 108 boys. Additionally, 12 coaches were observed for two games in order to record coaching behaviors during competition. The model tested demonstrated an excellent fit of data. In particular, the model showed that both coaching behaviors and children's trait anxiety causally influenced perception of control. Moreover, perceived control causally determined both perceived competence and motivational orientation. Lastly, the influence of coaching behavior and trait anxiety on perceived competence were mediated by perceived control. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. Longitudinal Effects of Student-Perceived Classroom Support on Motivation – A Latent Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, Rebecca; Raufelder, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This two-wave longitudinal study examined how developmental changes in students’ mastery goal orientation, academic effort, and intrinsic motivation were predicted by student-perceived support of motivational support (support for autonomy, competence, and relatedness) in secondary classrooms. The study extends previous knowledge that showed that support for motivational support in class is related to students’ intrinsic motivation as it focused on the developmental changes of a set of different motivational variables and the relations of these changes to student-perceived motivational support in class. Thus, differential classroom effects on students’ motivational development were investigated. A sample of 1088 German students was assessed in the beginning of the school year when students were in grade 8 (Mean age = 13.70, SD = 0.53, 54% girls) and again at the end of the next school year when students were in grade 9. Results of latent change models showed a tendency toward decline in mastery goal orientation and a significant decrease in academic effort from grade 8 to 9. Intrinsic motivation did not decrease significantly across time. Student-perceived support of competence in class predicted the level and change in students’ academic effort. The findings emphasized that it is beneficial to create classroom learning environments that enhance students’ perceptions of competence in class when aiming to enhance students’ academic effort in secondary school classrooms.

  8. Autonomous motivation: involvement in physical activity, and perceived sport competence: structural and mediator models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagøien, Tor Egil; Halvari, Hallgeir

    2005-02-01

    Students in upper secondary school (N = 231, M = 16.6 yr., SD = 1.6) were tested on involvement in physical activity, perceived sport competence, using the Perceived Competence Scale of Harter, and motivational regulation on the Self-regulation Questionnaire of Ryan and Connell. Correlations were positive among involvement in physical activity, autonomous motivation, and perceived sport competence. A hypothetical model indicated that autonomous motivation mediates the relation between perceived sport competence and involvement in physical activity. Although LISREL analysis supported this mediation, the best model fit of the data supported a structural model with involvement in physical activity (R2 = .63) to mediate between autonomous motivation and perceived competence (R2 = .47). Results are interpreted and discussed in terms of self-determination theory.

  9. MOTIVATION TO SHARE HOSPITAL BUILDING DESIGN KNOWLEDGE BY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HONG KONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Yi Man LI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospital building design is important as it is the place where bacteria and microorganisms concentrate. Poor ventilation system and layout traps disease causing pathogens, threatens the lives of many frontline workers such as doctors, nurses, and health care assistants. While design knowledge sharing by IT ensures a rapid knowledge sharing among designers from all over the world, what are their motivations? Few or no paper has studied this issue. This paper studies this base on 4 traditional motivation theories: Theory X, Theory Y, Reinforcement theory, Two factor theory. Results show that positive reinforcement theory and motivation factors in two factor theory provide better explanation.

  10. Examining the Relations among Student Motivation, Engagement, and Retention in a MOOC: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Students who are enrolled in MOOCs tend to have different motivational patterns than fee-paying college students. A majority of MOOC students demonstrate characteristics akin more to "tourists" than formal learners. As a consequence, MOOC students’ completion rate is usually very low. The current study examines the relations among student motivation, engagement, and retention using structural equation modeling and data from a Penn State University MOOC. Three distinct types of motivation are examined: intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and social motivation. Two main hypotheses are tested: (a motivation predicts student course engagement; and (b student engagement predicts their retention in the course. The results show that motivation is significantly predictive of student course engagement. Furthermore, engagement is a strong predictor of retention. The findings suggest that promoting student motivation and monitoring individual students’ online activities might improve course retention

  11. Faculty's Acceptance of Computer Based Technology: Cross-Validation of an Extended Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku; Madarsha, Kamal Basha; Zainuddin, Ahmad Marzuki; Ismail, Nik Ahmad Hisham; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2010-01-01

    The first aim of the present study is to validate an extended technology acceptance model (TAME) on the data derived from the faculty members of a university in an ongoing, computer mediated work setting. The study extended the original TAM model by including an intrinsic motivation component--computer self efficacy. In so doing, the study…

  12. Applying an expectancy-value model to study motivators for work-task based information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard, Karen Tølbøl; Skov, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to operationalise and verify a cognitive motivation model that has been adapted to information seeking. The original model was presented within the field of psychology. Design/methodology/approach: An operationalisation of the model is presented based on the ...

  13. Modelling in Medical Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Michel (Bowine)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHealth care is a rapidly developing field in which new technologies are introduced continuously. Not all new technologies have the same impact however: most represent only small changes in existing technologies, whereas only a few - like organ transplants - really are revolutionary new d

  14. School Culture, Basic Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Achievement: Testing a Casual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Badri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture is s common system of believes, values and artifacts that the members of a society use it in their relations, and it transfers from one generation to another. The school culture is a system of norms, meanings and values between school members. One of STD (self-determination theory components is basic psychological needs that emphasizes on Relatedness, Competence and Autonomy to accomplish the motivation. Motivation involves the processes that energize, direct, and sustain behavior. It seems that school culture, basic psychological needs and motivation has immense effect on academic achievement. The purpose of the present research was to examine the relation between students' perceived school culture, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation and academic achievement in a causal model. 296 high school students (159 females and 137 males in Tabriz, north - west of Iran, participated in this research and completed the students' perceived school culture questionnaire based on Hofstede's cultural dimensions (femininity, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism and power distance, basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation. The results of the path analysis showed that fulfillment of basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation has positive effect on academic achievement. Uncertainty avoidance and power distance have also negative effect on fulfillment of psychological needs, but the influence of femininity on this variable was positive. Also, collectivism has no significant effect on it. In general, the findings showed that if school culture supports students' autonomy, they will experience fulfillment of their basic psychological needs, and attain higher intrinsic motivation and academic achievement.

  15. Anxiety and self-disclosure: toward a motivational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshko, K G; Alden, L E

    1993-06-01

    The self-disclosures of socially anxious and nonanxious Ss were compared within the framework of R. M. Arkin's (1981) motivational theory of social anxiety. Ss (N = 84 women) were paired with a confederate who disclosed at either a high or a low level of intimacy (i.e., the classic reciprocity paradigm). Consistent with R. M. Arkin's theory, anxious Ss were concerned with self-protection during the task and disclosed at a moderate level of intimacy regardless of their partner's behavior. In addition, anxious Ss did not reciprocate their partners' disclosures as well as did nonanxious Ss. The self-protective behaviors of the anxious Ss were associated with less liking and more discomfort on the part of their partners. This suggests that the adoption of self-protective strategies may elicit negative interpersonal reactions that maintain self-defeating interpersonal patterns in socially anxious people.

  16. The Motivational Knowledge Management Model: proposal to apply it in the library sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel López-Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In professional environments, attention paid to aspects such as supervisory styles, interpersonal relationships and workers eagerness can have a positive impact on employee motivation and, consequently, on their performance and well-being. To achieve this, knowledge management models such as those presented here can be applied. This model generates diagnoses of motivation and recommendations for improvement, both systematically and scientifically. Consequently, it is especially useful for managers and human resource departments. The proposed model can be adapted to different kinds of professional groups, including those in library and documentation services. The suitability, reliability and usefulness of the proposed model have been empirically checked through case studies with 92 students and 166 professionals. The positive results allow us to conclude that the model is effective and useful for assessing and improving motivation.

  17. Seismic Physical Modeling Technology and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the seismic physical modeling technology in the CNPC Key Lab of Geophysical Exploration. It includes the seismic physical model positioning system, the data acquisition system, sources, transducers,model materials, model building techniques, precision measurements of model geometry, the basic principles of the seismic physical modeling and experimental methods, and two physical model examples.

  18. Enriching the hierarchical model of achievement motivation: autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-12-01

    The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between achievement motives and outcomes. We tested whether mastery approach, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals and their underlying autonomous and controlling reasons would jointly explain the relation between achievement motives (i.e., fear of failure and need for achievement) and learning strategies (Study 1). Additionally, we examined whether the autonomous and controlling reasons underlying learners' dominant achievement goal would account for the link between achievement motives and the educational outcomes of learning strategies and cheating (Study 2). Six hundred and six Greek adolescent students (Mage = 15.05, SD = 1.43) and 435 university students (Mage M = 20.51, SD = 2.80) participated in studies 1 and 2, respectively. In both studies, a correlational design was used and the hypotheses were tested via path modelling. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals mediated, respectively, the relation of need for achievement and fear of failure to aspects of learning outcomes. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals could further explain learners' functioning in achievement settings. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  19. An age structured demographic model of technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mercure, J -F

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of technology transitions lie complex processes of technology choices. Understanding and planning sustainability transitions requires modelling work, which necessitates a theory of technology substitution. A theoretical model of technological change and turnover is presented, intended as a methodological paradigm shift from widely used conventional modelling approaches such as cost optimisation. It follows the tradition of evolutionary economics and evolutionary game theory, using ecological population growth dynamics to represent the evolution of technology populations in the marketplace, with substitutions taking place at the level of the decision-maker. Extended to use principles of human demography or the age structured evolution of species in interacting ecosystems, this theory is built from first principles, and through an appropriate approximation, reduces to a form identical to empirical models of technology diffusion common in the technology transitions literature. Using an age structure...

  20. Motivation in Beyond Budgeting: A Motivational Paradox?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandalgaard, Niels; Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    In this paper we discuss the role of motivation in relation to budgeting and we analyse how the Beyond Budgeting model functions compared with traditional budgeting. In the paper we focus on budget related motivation (and motivation in general) and conclude that the Beyond Budgeting model...... is a motivational paradox....

  1. Science motivation by discussion and controversy (SMDC) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Dina; Mora Ley, César Eduardo; Ramírez Díaz, Mario Humberto

    2017-05-01

    Succeeding theories and empirical investigations have often been built over conceptual understanding to develop talent education. Opportunities provided by society are crucial at every point in the talent-development process. Abilities differ and can vary among boys and girls. Although they have some responsibility for their own growth and development, the educational system and psychosocial variables influence on the successful development of high levels of education. This research explores students’ attitudes to science education to establish why many disengage with the subject in class and what can be done to reverse this trend to produce unimaginable scientific and practical benefits to society. The control group is students from several schools with traditional education in Iran and the experimental group is teams who have taken part in several activities such as national and international tournaments (2005-2013). This research has two parts: 1—how innovation in teaching and 2—discussion and controversy in class can improve science education and cause motivation. The average scores are divided into 5 ranges in both experimental and traditional groups. As shown by Spearman’s correlation rank (ρ) the difference between boys’ and girls’ average scores is about (2.71) in the control group but it has decreased to (0.29) in the experimental group. The main point of discussion is on problems in class which advance a set of interrelated scientific arguments for outstanding achievement.

  2. Mapping explicit social motives of achievement, power, and affiliation onto the five-factor model of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeser, Stefan; Langens, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Previous research has shown that explicit motives are meaningfully related to the five-factor model of personality. The present study extends this research by using different measures of the explicit social motives of achievement, power and affiliation, and by employing measures of both approach and avoidance of these motives. Correlational and factor analyses demonstrated that explicit motives of achievement, power, and affiliation, both approach and avoidance components of these motives, can be consistently mapped onto personality trait measures of the five-factor model. Implications of this general finding, along with some exceptions, are discussed with regard to further research.

  3. Biologically-motivated system identification: application to microbial growth modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinyao; Deller, J R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for identification of system models that are linear in parametric structure, but arbitrarily nonlinear in signal operations. The strategy blends traditional system identification methods with three modeling strategies that are not commonly employed in signal processing: linear-time-invariant-in-parameters models, set-based parameter identification, and evolutionary selection of the model structure. This paper reports recent advances in the theoretical foundation of the methods, then focuses on the operation and performance of the approach, particularly the evolutionary model determination. The method is applied to the modeling of microbial growth by Monod Kinetics.

  4. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  5. A Motivational/Empowerment Model Applied to Students on Academic Probation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hutson, Bryant L.; Amundsen, Scott A.; Atwood, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines a motivational/empowerment model for students on academic probation implemented at The University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG). The model draws from several theoretical orientations, and includes individual and group interaction as well as discussion in four key topic areas: personal responsibility, positive…

  6. ISMS: A New Model for Improving Student Motivation and Self-Esteem in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilay, Yaron; Ghilay, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this study we introduce a new model for primary education called ISMS: Improving Student Motivation and Self-esteem. Following a two-year study undertaken in a primary school (n = 67), the new model was found to be successful. Students who participated in the research, reported that a course based on ISMS principles was very helpful for…

  7. An Application of the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation in Elementary School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntovolis, Yannis; Barkoukis, Vassilis; Michelinakis, Evaggelos; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Elementary school physical education can play a prominent role in promoting children's leisure-time physical activity. The trans-contextual model of motivation has been proven effective in describing the process through which school physical education can affect students' leisure-time physical activity. This model has been tested in secondary…

  8. Modeling and Analysis of the Motivations of Fast Fashion Consumers in Relation to Innovativeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saricam Canan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fast fashion concept is investigated in order to understand the motivations of the consumers that make them adopt these products because of their willingness for the innovativeness. The relationship between the motivational factors which were named as “Social or status image” and “Uniqueness” as expressions of individuality, “Conformity” and the willingness for “Innovativeness” is analyzed using a conceptual model. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to analyze and validate the model. The data used for the study was obtained from 244 people living in Turkey. The findings showed that the motivational factors “Social or status image” and “Uniqueness” as expressions of individuality are influential on the consumers’ willingness for “Innovativeness”.

  9. Modeling the Impact of Motivation, Personality, and Emotion on Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lynn C.; Read, Stephen J.; Zachary, Wayne; Rosoff, Andrew

    Models seeking to predict human social behavior must contend with multiple sources of individual and group variability that underlie social behavior. One set of interrelated factors that strongly contribute to that variability - motivations, personality, and emotions - has been only minimally incorporated in previous computational models of social behavior. The Personality, Affect, Culture (PAC) framework is a theory-based computational model that addresses this gap. PAC is used to simulate social agents whose social behavior varies according to their personalities and emotions, which, in turn, vary according to their motivations and underlying motive control parameters. Examples involving disease spread and counter-insurgency operations show how PAC can be used to study behavioral variability in different social contexts.

  10. A Latent Curve Model of Parental Motivational Practices and Developmental Decline in Math and Science Academic Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Marcoulides, George A.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children's pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic…

  11. A Latent Curve Model of Parental Motivational Practices and Developmental Decline in Math and Science Academic Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Marcoulides, George A.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children's pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic…

  12. Motivation to quit or reduce gambling: Associations between Self-Determination Theory and the Transtheoretical Model of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladyslav; Godinho, Alexandra; Hodgins, David C; Hendershot, Christian S; Cunningham, John A

    2016-01-01

    Motivation for change and recovery from addiction has been commonly assessed using the Transtheoretical Model's stages of change. Analogous to readiness for change, this measure of motivation may not recognize other elements of motivation relevant to successful change. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between stages of change and reasons for change according to the Self-Determination Theory among problem gamblers motivated to quit. Motivations for change were examined for 200 adult problem gamblers with intent to quit in the next 6 months (contemplation stage) or 30 days (preparation stage). Analyses revealed that higher autonomous motivation for quitting gambling predicted greater likelihood of being in the preparation stage, whereas those with higher external motivation for change were less likely to be farther along the stage of change continuum. The findings suggest that autonomous motivations relate to readiness for quitting gambling, and may predict successful resolution from problem gambling.

  13. BARRIERS AND MOTIVATORS IN ENGAGING WITH TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED CARDIAC REHABILITATION: A PATIENT AND HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Walsh

    2015-10-01

    This formative work has outlined key patient and stakeholder concerns regarding engagement with a technology enabled behavior change intervention in CR. Factors that inhibit and promote engagement have been explored using the COM-B framework. Motivational factors related to social interaction were deemed one of the integral aspects for engagement and adherence to PATHway. In terms of capability factors, technology ease- of-use was highlighted among patient and stakeholders as important for uptake and continued use. This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Action under Grant Agreement no. 643491. PATHway: Technology enabled behavioural change as a pathway towards better self-management of CVD (www.pathway2health.eu

  14. An expectancy-value model of emotion regulation: implications for motivation, emotional experience, and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Maya; Bigman, Yochanan E; Rhodes, Emily; Salerno, James; Schreier, Jenna

    2015-02-01

    According to expectancy-value models of self-regulation, people are motivated to act in ways they expect to be useful to them. For instance, people are motivated to run when they believe running is useful, even when they have nothing to run away from. Similarly, we propose an expectancy-value model of emotion regulation, according to which people are motivated to emote in ways they expect to be useful to them, regardless of immediate contextual demands. For instance, people may be motivated to get angry when they believe anger is useful, even when there is nothing to be angry about. In 5 studies, we demonstrate that leading people to expect an emotion to be useful increased their motivation to experience that emotion (Studies 1-5), led them to up-regulate the experience of that emotion (Studies 3-4), and led to emotion-consistent behavior (Study 4). Our hypotheses were supported when we manipulated the expected value of anxiety (Study 1) and anger (Studies 2-5), both consciously (Studies 1-4) and unconsciously (Study 5). We discuss the theoretical and pragmatic implications of the proposed model.

  15. Phenomenological Hints from a Class of String Motivated Model Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Peter Nilles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We use string theory constructions towards the generalisation of the supersymmetric standard model of strong and electroweak interactions. Properties of the models depend crucially on the location of fields in extradimensional compact space. This allows us to extract some generic lessons for the phenomenological properties of the low energy effective action. Within this scheme we present a compelling model based on local grand unification and mirage mediation of supersymmetry breakdown. We analyse the properties of the specific model towards its possible tests at the LHC and the complementarity to direct dark matter searches.

  16. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  17. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  18. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  19. Motivating the Knowledge Worker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Herzberg . The Two - factor Theory asserts that motivators and de-motivators are mutually exclusive sets of factors . This research supports...various theories of motivation and the data collected from this effort, the author developed a two -dimensional model of the factors that motivate... Theory X/ Theory Y Two - factor Theory Cognitive Evaluation Theory Operant Conditioning Protection Motivation Theory

  20. The self-care motivation model: theory and practice in healthy human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, L G

    1985-02-01

    Effective health education and behavior motivation programs are needed to promote the compliance of children and young adults with preventive health care practices. Health promotion and primary prevention programs must consider the entire individual as well as his or her environment if positive behavior changes are to be maintained. This paper introduces an innovative model for self-care motivation curriculum development. The model prescribes the use of value clarification, enhanced physical/cognitive/affective awareness, positive lifestyle choices, and self-reinforcement skills training whereby individuals learn to become self-motivated and reinforcing agents for their own primary preventive health practices. It is theorized that by developing self-care and self-regulation skills, students will achieve and maintain higher levels of wellness, thus improving the quality of their lives and ensuring healthy human development.

  1. Research of Home Information Technology Adoption Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ao Shan; Ren Weiyin; Lin Peishan; Tang Shoulian

    2008-01-01

    The Information Technology at Home has caught the attention of various industries such as IT, Home Appliances, Communication, and Real Estate. Based on the information technology acceptance theories and family consumption behaviors theories, this study summarized and analyzed four key belief variables i.e. Perceived Value, Perceived Risk, Perceived Cost and Perceived Ease of Use, which influence the acceptance of home information technology. The study also summaries three groups of external variables. They axe social, industrial, and family influence factors. The social influence factors include Subjective Norm; the industry factors include the Unification of Home Information Technological Standards, the Perfection of Home Information Industry Value Chain, and the Competitiveness of Home Information Industry; and the family factors include Family Income, Family Life Cycle and Family Educational Level. The study discusses the relationship among these external variables and cognitive variables. The study provides Home Information Technology Acceptance Model based on the Technology Acceptance Model and the characteristics of home information technology consumption.

  2. How absent negativity relates to affect and motivation: an integrative relief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Roland; Smith, Kevin J M; Kordts-Freudinger, Robert; Reichardt, Regina

    2015-01-01

    The present paper concerns the motivational underpinnings and behavioral correlates of the prevention or stopping of negative stimulation - a situation referred to as relief. Relief is of great theoretical and applied interest. Theoretically, it is tied to theories linking affect, emotion, and motivational systems. Importantly, these theories make different predictions regarding the association between relief and motivational systems. Moreover, relief is a prototypical antecedent of counterfactual emotions, which involve specific cognitive processes compared to factual or mere anticipatory emotions. Practically, relief may be an important motivator of addictive and phobic behaviors, self destructive behaviors, and social influence. In the present paper, we will first provide a review of conflicting conceptualizations of relief. We will then present an integrative relief model (IRMO) that aims at resolving existing theoretical conflicts. We then review evidence relevant to distinctive predictions regarding the moderating role of various procedural features of relief situations. We conclude that our integrated model results in a better understanding of existing evidence on the affective and motivational underpinnings of relief, but that further evidence is needed to come to a more comprehensive evaluation of the viability of IRMO.

  3. THE MOTIVATIONAL MODEL OF YOUNG JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS: AFTER GETTING LESSONS BY HOMEROOM TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Adachi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study focuses on Japanese pupils’ motivation with other attitudinal attitudes about learning English. The writer surveyed the 5th and 6th grade pupils’ motivation and its effect factors at an elementary school in Japan at the end of the school year 2007 and 2008. The main focus of this study is to find the relationship between motivation and effect factors using both the 2007 and 2008 data and to examine differences of the pupils’ attitudes between 2007 and 2008. Since the 2008 school year, pupils have received lessons by not only an assistant language teacher (ALT but also their home room teachers (HRTs. The finding showed that the 2008 and 2007 results were similar in most valuables, but the value of “Motivation” increased in 2008 compared to the previous year. Furthermore, “people around the learner” influenced on motivation more positively. Finally, this study presented a model which could be suggested as one of the motivational models of Japanese pupils for English activities. The writer concluded that the involvement of HRTs brought about generally good effects on pupils’ attitudes in this elementary school at this point.

  4. How Absent Negativity Relates to Affect and Motivation: An Integrative Relief Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eDeutsch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concerns the motivational underpinnings and behavioral correlates of the prevention or stopping of negative stimulation – a situation referred to as relief. Relief is of great theoretical and applied interest. Theoretically, it is tied to theories linking affect, emotion and motivational systems (Carver & Scheier, 1990; Gray & McNaughton, 2000; Higgins, 1997; Lang, Bradley, & Cuthbert, 1990. Importantly, these theories make different predictions regarding the association between relief and motivational systems. Moreover, relief is a prototypical antecedent of counterfactual emotions, which involve specific cognitive processes compared to factual or mere anticipatory emotions. Practically, relief may be an important motivator of addictive and phobic behaviors (Mowrer, 1951; Ostafin & Brooks, 2011, self destructive behaviors (Favazza, 1998; Franklin, Lee, Hanna, & Prinstein, 2013, and social influence (Dolinski & Nawrat, 1998. In the present paper, we will first provide a review of conflicting conceptualizations of relief. We will then present an integrative relief model (IRMO that aims at resolving existing theoretical conflicts. We then review evidence relevant to distinctive predictions regarding the moderating role of various procedural features of relief situations. We conclude that our integrated model results in a better understanding of existing evidence on the affective and motivational underpinnings of relief, but that further evidence is needed to come to a more comprehensive evaluation of the viability of IRMO.

  5. Motivational and behavioural models of change: A longitudinal analysis of change among men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, J; Richardson, C; Morris, J; Robinson, G; Schofield, M B

    2017-09-01

    Motivational and behavioural models of adjustment to chronic pain make different predictions about change processes, which can be tested in longitudinal analyses. We examined changes in motivation, coping and acceptance among 78 men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain. Using cross-lagged regression analyses of changes from baseline to 6 months as predictors of changes from 6 to 12 months, with supplementary structural equation modelling, we tested two models in which motivational changes influence behavioural changes, and one in which behavioural changes influence motivational changes. Changes in motivation to self-manage pain influenced later changes in pain coping, consistent with the motivational model of pain self-management, and also influenced later changes in activity engagement, the behavioural component of pain acceptance. Changes in activity engagement influenced later changes in pain willingness, consistent with the behavioural model of pain acceptance. Based on the findings, a combined model of changes in pain self-management and acceptance is proposed, which could guide combined interventions based on theories of motivation, coping and acceptance in chronic pain. This study adds longitudinal evidence about sequential change processes; a test of the motivational model of pain self-management; and tests of behavioural versus motivational models of pain acceptance. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  6. User Acceptance of YouTube for Procedural Learning: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Young; Lehto, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was framed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to identify determinants affecting behavioral intention to use YouTube. Most importantly, this research emphasizes the motives for using YouTube, which is notable given its extrinsic task goal of being used for procedural learning tasks. Our conceptual framework included two…

  7. The role of technology and engineering models in transforming healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Wactlar, Howard D; Hayes, Tamara L; Barkis, Will; Skapik, Julia; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare system is in crisis due to challenges including escalating costs, the inconsistent provision of care, an aging population, and high burden of chronic disease related to health behaviors. Mitigating this crisis will require a major transformation of healthcare to be proactive, preventive, patient-centered, and evidence-based with a focus on improving quality-of-life. Information technology, networking, and biomedical engineering are likely to be essential in making this transformation possible with the help of advances, such as sensor technology, mobile computing, machine learning, etc. This paper has three themes: 1) motivation for a transformation of healthcare; 2) description of how information technology and engineering can support this transformation with the help of computational models; and 3) a technical overview of several research areas that illustrate the need for mathematical modeling approaches, ranging from sparse sampling to behavioral phenotyping and early detection. A key tenet of this paper concerns complementing prior work on patient-specific modeling and simulation by modeling neuropsychological, behavioral, and social phenomena. The resulting models, in combination with frequent or continuous measurements, are likely to be key components of health interventions to enhance health and wellbeing and the provision of healthcare.

  8. Determining Science Teachers' Levels of Motivation and Self-Regulation Regarding Use of Education Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Hülya Aslan; Baysal, Yunus Emre

    2017-01-01

    In line with the growing importance of use of education technologies in the field of education, teachers are increasingly expected to use education technologies in class environment and to provide students with appropriate environments and opportunities to use these technologies. This situation makes it necessary to investigate teachers'…

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Non-Financial Motivators and Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszczak, Gina L.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations depend extensively on Information Technology professionals to drive and deliver technology solutions quickly, efficiently, and effectively to achieve business goals and profitability. It has been demonstrated that professionals with experience specific to the company are valuable assets, and their departure puts technology projects…

  10. Influence of reward preferences in attracting, retaining, and motivating knowledge workers in South African information technology companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bussin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The world of work is evolving and the nature of relationships between knowledge workers and their employers has changed distinctly, leading to a change in the type of rewards they prefer. The nature of these preferences in the South African, industry-specific context is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to deepen understanding of the reward preferences of Information technology (IT knowledge workers in South Africa, specifically as these relate to the attraction, retention and motivation of knowledge workers.Design: The research design included a quantitative, empirical and descriptive study of reward preferences, measured with a self-administered survey and analysed using non-parametric tests for variance between dependent and independent groups and non-parametric analysis of variance.Findings: This study found that there are specific reward preferences in knowledge workers in the IT sector in South Africa and that these preferences apply differently when related to the attraction, retention and motivation of employees. It identified the most important reward components in the competition for knowledge workers and also demonstrated that demographic characteristics play a statistically significant role in determining reward preferences.Practical implications: The study’s findings show that a holistic approach to total rewards is required, failing which, companies will find themselves facing increased turnover and jobhopping. Importantly, the study also highlights that different rewards need to form part of knowledge workers’ relationship with their employer in three different scenarios: attraction, retention and motivation.

  11. Motivation dimensions for running a marathon: A new model emerging from the Motivation of Marathon Scale (MOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Zach

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This study provides a sound and solid framework for studying motivation for physically demanding tasks such as marathon runs, and needs to be similarly applied and tested in studies incorporating physical tasks which vary in mental demands.

  12. Cognitive Elements of Empowerment: An "Interpretive" Model of Intrinsic Task Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kenneth W.; Velthouse, Betty A.

    1990-01-01

    This article presents a cognitive model of empowerment. Here, empowerment is defined as increased intrinsic task motivation, and our subsequent model identifies four cognitions (task assessments) as the basis for worker empowerment: sense of impact, competence, meaningfulness, and choice. Adopting an interpretive perspective, we have used the model also to describe cognitive processes through which workers reach these conclusions. Central to the processes we describe are ...

  13. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Shigeo; Takehira, Rieko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students' learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of 'self-determination' in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen's d= 0.43). Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on 'self-determination' among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  14. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43). Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation. PMID:28167812

  15. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Yamamura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training, 5th (before practical training at clinical sites, and 6th (after all practical training years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation, and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43. Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  16. MOTIVATION TO SHARE HOSPITAL BUILDING DESIGN KNOWLEDGE BY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HONG KONG

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rita Yi Man; Rita PEIHUA Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Hospital building design is important as it is the place where bacteria and microorganisms concentrate. Poor ventilation system and layout traps disease causing pathogens, threatens the lives of many frontline workers such as doctors, nurses, and health care assistants. While design knowledge sharing by IT ensures a rapid knowledge sharing among designers from all over the world, what are their motivations? Few or no paper has studied this issue. This paper studies this base on 4 traditional ...

  17. Testing a self-determination theory model of children’s physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding children’s physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children’s physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. Results The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children’s minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children’s motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is

  18. Testing a self-determination theory model of children's physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R; Edwards, Mark J; Thompson, Janice L

    2013-09-26

    Understanding children's physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children's physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children's minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children's motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is associated with their objectively-assessed physical

  19. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  20. A Dual Process Motivational Model of Ambivalent Sexism and Gender Differences in Romantic Partner Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G.; Overall, Nickola C.

    2011-01-01

    We tested a dual process motivational model of ambivalent sexism and gender differences in intimate partner preferences. Meta-analysis of 32 samples (16 with men, 16 with women; N = 5,459) indicated that Benevolent Sexism (BS) in women was associated with greater preferences for high-resource partners (r = 0.24), whereas Hostile Sexism (HS) in men…

  1. Predicting Stereotype Endorsement and Academic Motivation in Women in Science Programs: A Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Marie-Noelle; Guay, Frederic; Senecal, Caroline; Larose, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a model based on stereotype threat theory. The hypothesis is that women who are exposed to a low percentage of women in a science program are more likely to endorse the gender stereotype that science is a male domain, which will in turn undermine their autonomous academic motivation. A total of 167 women university…

  2. Application of Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling to Evaluate the Academic Motivation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frédéric; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Litalien, David; Valois, Pierre; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors examined the construct validity of scores of the Academic Motivation Scale using exploratory structural equation modeling. Study 1 and Study 2 involved 1,416 college students and 4,498 high school students, respectively. First, results of both studies indicated that the factor structure tested with exploratory…

  3. Structural Equation Modeling towards Online Learning Readiness, Academic Motivations, and Perceived Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horzum, Mehmet Baris; Kaymak, Zeliha Demir; Gungoren, Ozlem Canan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between online learning readiness, academic motivations, and perceived learning was investigated via structural equation modeling in the research. The population of the research consisted of 750 students who studied using the online learning programs of Sakarya University. 420 of the students who volunteered for the research and…

  4. Canonical Correlational Models of Students' Perceptions of Assessment Tasks, Motivational Orientations, and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharusi, Hussain

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at deriving correlational models of students' perceptions of assessment tasks, motivational orientations, and learning strategies using canonical analyses. Data were collected from 198 Omani tenth grade students. Results showed that high degrees of authenticity and transparency in assessment were associated with positive…

  5. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  6. Predictive and Explanatory Relationship Model between Procrastination, Motivation, Anxiety and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpur, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the predictive and explanatory relationship model between procrastination, motivation, anxiety and academic achievement of university students. Research Methods: In this study, a causal research design was used. The study group consisted of 211 participants. In order to determine their motivation…

  7. Using fuzzy logic models to reveal farmers' motives to integrate livestock, fish, and crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Rural extension services have changed paradigm and shifted to more participatory approaches, whereas in common mathematical models of farming systems, farmers’ motivation is solely represented by ‘utility maximisation’. While globally, farmers specialise, in Vietnam the rice-based systems have diver

  8. Technology Transfer: A Policy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    34 Caveman Club-Without Nail." More serious scholars indicate that understand- ing how to start and maintain fires was the first tech- nology transfer of...others. From caveman clubs to hyper- velocity missiles, technology transfer has played a significant military role; it also has assisted imperialis- tic

  9. Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

  10. Reseach of Supply Chain Modeling Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The supply chain modeling technology is research. Firstly, the concept of supply chain and supply chain management is introduced. Secondly, enterprise-modeling methods, such as CIM-OSA, GIM-GRAI, PERA and ARIS, are analyzed and compared. The supply chain modeling technology is studied. Then the ARIS-based supply chain modeling method is proposed and the supply chain operation reference model is set up. Finally, the applications of ARIS-based supply chain modeling method in Shanghai Turbine Generator Co. Ltd. (STGC) is described in detail.

  11. Effect of intrinsic motivation on affective responses during and after exercise: latent curve model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myoungjin; Kim, Inwoo; Kwon, Sungho

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between affect and exercise is helpful in predicting human behavior with respect to exercise participation. The goals of the present study were to investigate individual differences in affective response during and after exercise and to identify the role of intrinsic motivation in affective changes. 30 active male college students (M age = 21.4 yr.) who regularly participated in sports activities volunteered to answer a questionnaire measuring intrinsic motivation toward running activities and performed a 20-min. straight running protocol at heavy intensity (about 70% of VO2max). Participants' affective responses were measured every 5 min. from the beginning of the run to 10 min. after completing the run. Latent curve model analysis indicated that individuals experienced different changes in affective state during exercise, moderated by intrinsic motivation. Higher intrinsic motivation was associated with more positive affect during exercise. There were no significant individual differences in the positive tendency of the participants' affective responses after exercise over time. Intrinsic motivation seems to facilitate positive feelings during exercise and encourages participation in exercise.

  12. Designing motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    are grappling with how to create motivating products, and as a primer for students who want a brief introduction to some of the relevant theories, findings and design interventions in these fields. The editor's introduction raises a number of issues encountered when we try to apply behavioural research......How can products be designed to change our habits for the better? What is some of the leading research that designers can draw on to create new systems that motivate people towards healthier behaviour? Designing Motivation is an edited collection of ‘industrialist cheat sheets’: 22 single......-page summaries of research articles relating to technology design, motivation, and behaviour change. Ranging across the fields of economics, sociology, design research and behavioural science, each summary draws out the design implications of the research. It is intended as a resource for designers who...

  13. Designing motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    are grappling with how to create motivating products, and as a primer for students who want a brief introduction to some of the relevant theories, findings and design interventions in these fields. The editor's introduction raises a number of issues encountered when we try to apply behavioural research......How can products be designed to change our habits for the better? What is some of the leading research that designers can draw on to create new systems that motivate people towards healthier behaviour? Designing Motivation is an edited collection of ‘industrialist cheat sheets’: 22 single......-page summaries of research articles relating to technology design, motivation, and behaviour change. Ranging across the fields of economics, sociology, design research and behavioural science, each summary draws out the design implications of the research. It is intended as a resource for designers who...

  14. A Multilevel Latent Growth Modelling of the Longitudinal Changes in Motivation Regulations in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Jaakkola

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine individual- and classroom-level differences in the longitudinal change in motivational regulations during physical education students’ transition from elementary (Grade 6 across middle school (Grades 7 to 9. A sample of 757 Finnish adolescents (M = 12.71, SD = 0.23 participated in this study. Participants of the study responded to questionnaires collected six times. A multilevel latent growth modelling approach was used to analyze the data. Results showed that motivational regulations in physical education developed at different rates during middle school. More specifically, students’: (a identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9; (b amotivation increased during middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7; and (c introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. The changes in amotivation and introjected regulation were largely due to individual factors, whereas the changes in identified regulation were due to environmental factors.

  15. A motivic approach to phase transitions in Potts models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluffi, Paolo; Marcolli, Matilde

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to the study of phase transitions in Potts models based on an estimate of the complexity of the locus of real zeros of the partition function, computed in terms of the classes in the Grothendieck ring of the affine algebraic varieties defined by the vanishing of the multivariate Tutte polynomial. We give completely explicit calculations for the examples of the chains of linked polygons and of the graphs obtained by replacing the polygons with their dual graphs. These are based on a deletion-contraction formula for the Grothendieck classes and on generating functions for splitting and doubling edges.

  16. Economics as a factor in models of behavioral motivation and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, I D; Atkinson, J S; Trevino, R A

    2000-02-01

    This note first presents a summary of four main behavioral models that are used to explain behavioral motivation and change. Three models are based on psychosocial theory. They are: 1) the Theory of Reasoned Action, 2) the Theory of Planned Behavior, and 3) the Theory of Stages-of-Change. The fourth model is based on economic theory and is known as the Rational Addiction Model. Each model is analyzed for its strengths and weaknesses. The note concludes by arguing for the usefulness of integrating the economic and the psychosocial models to study drug use. Specific examples and suggestions are presented.

  17. Feature Technology in Product Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu; NING Ruxin

    2006-01-01

    A unified feature definition is proposed. Feature is form-concentrated, and can be used to model product functionalities, assembly relations, and part geometries. The feature model is given and a feature classification is introduced including functional, assembly, structural, and manufacturing features. A prototype modeling system is developed in Pro/ENGINEER that can define the assembly and user-defined form features.

  18. The Effects of Embedding Information Technologies within ELT on EFL Learners’ Motivation and Interest

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker Al-Mohammadi; Emira Derbel

    2014-01-01

    In today’s globalised world, technologies have been embedded in every aspect of daily activities and discourses. The field of education made no exception and hence technologies have become an integral part of all educational systems worldwide, but with different levels and layers. The presence of information technology in English language teaching has brought about notable changes for teachers and learners alike. Accordingly, this paper investigates the impact of integrating information techn...

  19. The Impact of Incessant Strike Actions and Industrial Disputes in Cross River University of Technology and Its Effect on Students Motivation to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orok-Duke, Orok Ekpo; Sackey, Jacob; Usiabulu, Michael; Bassey, Okpa Inah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the impact of incessant strike actions and industrial disputes in Cross River University of Technology and its effect on students' motivation to learning. Over the years, a considerable amount of effort has been put on ground in order to run the Cross River University of Technology devoid of financial…

  20. Testing an Integrated Self-Determined Work Motivation Model for People With Disabilities: A Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Timothy N; Iwanaga, Kanako; Bezyak, Jill; Ditchman, Nicole

    2017-05-04

    Individuals with disabilities are more likely to live in poverty, have more health issues, and be less likely to be employed than their same-aged peers. Although these issues may be attenuated by vocational rehabilitation services, amotivation and ambivalence to employment can limit the readiness of persons with disabilities to engage in these services. Drawing on self-efficacy, self-determination, and stages of change theories, the purpose of this study was to develop and test an integrated self-determined work motivation model for people with disabilities. Participants included 277 people with disabilities recruited through vocational rehabilitation agencies across 8 states. Path analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of functional disability, self-determination, and social efficacy variables in a hypothesized integrated self-determined work motivation model. Model estimations used maximum likelihood estimation and model-data fit was examined using several goodness-of-fit indices. The initial path analysis indicated a less than optimal fit between the model and the observed data. Post hoc model modifications were conducted based on examination of the critical ratios and modification indices and theoretical consideration. The respecified integrated self-determined work motivation model fit the data very well, χ2/df = 1.88, CFI = .99, and RMSEA = 0.056. The R2 for the endogenous variables in the model ranged from .19 to .54. Findings from this study support the integrated self-determined work motivation model in vocational rehabilitation as a useful framework for understanding the relationship among functioning levels, self-determination and self-efficacy factors, vocational rehabilitation engagement, and readiness for employment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. MODEL PERILAKU PENGGUNAAN TIK “NR2007” PENGEMBANGAN DARI TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL (TAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila Ramdhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses and criticizes a Technology Acceptance Model which was developed by Fred D. Davis in 1986. TAM was built to predict the way people accept and adopt the technology. TAM was inspired by theory of reasoned action (TRA formulated by Martin Fishbein & Icek Ajzen in 1975, although the model does not completely adopt the TRA model. TAM does not include Subjective Norm as a factor in predicting the use of technology. As a theory, TAM has been used by many researchers to investigate the adoption of information technology. This model has a significant contribution in predicting the use of information communication technology (ICT in many areas. Since ICT users have various motivational backgrounds, some of them have a positive attitude toward ICT, but they do not use ICT. It seems the TAM model need to be improved by including Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavior Control as suggested by Ajzen in the theory of planned behavior (TPB as antecedents of intention to use ICT. Since the personality background of ICT users may also influence the use of ICT, the author proposes TAM‐NR‐2007 model that include personality traits as a background factor of attitude toward the behavior and subjective norms.

  2. Technology Acceptance Model for Wireless Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, June; Yu, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Chang; Yao, James E.

    2003-01-01

    Develops a technology acceptance model (TAM) for wireless Internet via mobile devices (WIMD) and proposes that constructs, such as individual differences, technology complexity, facilitating conditions, social influences, and wireless trust environment determine user-perceived short and long-term usefulness, and ease of using WIMD. Twelve…

  3. Use of Motivational Interview Technique with Transtheoretical Model for Behavioral Change in Smoking Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Smoking addiction is an important problem and disease for public health. Researches show that transtheoretical model which is used as a guide to make behavior change easy is one of guide model which would provide that individuals would understand better the reasons of changing and/or not changing with motivational interviews focused on change steps and would make behavior change easy. The goal of this article is to present sample interview plans as to make core knowledge for researchers/nurse...

  4. Business Model Discovery by Technology Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Muegge

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Value creation and value capture are central to technology entrepreneurship. The ways in which a particular firm creates and captures value are the foundation of that firm's business model, which is an explanation of how the business delivers value to a set of customers at attractive profits. Despite the deep conceptual link between business models and technology entrepreneurship, little is known about the processes by which technology entrepreneurs produce successful business models. This article makes three contributions to partially address this knowledge gap. First, it argues that business model discovery by technology entrepreneurs can be, and often should be, disciplined by both intention and structure. Second, it provides a tool for disciplined business model discovery that includes an actionable process and a worksheet for describing a business model in a form that is both concise and explicit. Third, it shares preliminary results and lessons learned from six technology entrepreneurs applying a disciplined process to strengthen or reinvent the business models of their own nascent technology businesses.

  5. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  6. Causal Models for Safety Assurance Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fulfillment of NASA's System-Wide Safety and Assurance Technology (SSAT) project at NASA requires leveraging vast amounts of data into actionable knowledge. Models...

  7. A merge model with endogenous technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, S.; Bahn, O.

    2002-03-01

    A new version of the MERGE model, called MERGE-ETL, has been developed to consider endogenous technological change in the energy system. The basic formulation of MERGE-ETL as well as some first results are reported here. (author)

  8. Global Health Innovation Technology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Harding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic technology and business process disparities between High Income, Low Middle Income and Low Income (HIC, LMIC, LIC research collaborators directly prevent the growth of sustainable Global Health innovation for infectious and rare diseases. There is a need for an Open Source-Open Science Architecture Framework to bridge this divide. We are proposing such a framework for consideration by the Global Health community, by utilizing a hybrid approach of integrating agnostic Open Source technology and healthcare interoperability standards and Total Quality Management principles. We will validate this architecture framework through our programme called Project Orchid. Project Orchid is a conceptual Clinical Intelligence Exchange and Virtual Innovation platform utilizing this approach to support clinical innovation efforts for multi-national collaboration that can be locally sustainable for LIC and LMIC research cohorts. The goal is to enable LIC and LMIC research organizations to accelerate their clinical trial process maturity in the field of drug discovery, population health innovation initiatives and public domain knowledge networks. When sponsored, this concept will be tested by 12 confirmed clinical research and public health organizations in six countries. The potential impact of this platform is reduced drug discovery and public health innovation lag time and improved clinical trial interventions, due to reliable clinical intelligence and bio-surveillance across all phases of the clinical innovation process.

  9. Global Health Innovation Technology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Harding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic technology and business process disparities between High Income, Low Middle Income and Low Income (HIC, LMIC, LIC research collaborators directly prevent the growth of sustainable Global Health innova‐ tion for infectious and rare diseases. There is a need for an Open Source-Open Science Architecture Framework to bridge this divide. We are proposing such a framework for consideration by the Global Health community, by utiliz‐ ing a hybrid approach of integrating agnostic Open Source technology and healthcare interoperability standards and Total Quality Management principles. We will validate this architecture framework through our programme called Project Orchid. Project Orchid is a conceptual Clinical Intelligence Exchange and Virtual Innovation platform utilizing this approach to support clinical innovation efforts for multi-national collaboration that can be locally sustainable for LIC and LMIC research cohorts. The goal is to enable LIC and LMIC research organizations to acceler‐ ate their clinical trial process maturity in the field of drug discovery, population health innovation initiatives and public domain knowledge networks. When sponsored, this concept will be tested by 12 confirmed clinical research and public health organizations in six countries. The potential impact of this platform is reduced drug discovery and public health innovation lag time and improved clinical trial interventions, due to reliable clinical intelligence and bio-surveillance across all phases of the clinical innovation process.

  10. Women's career choices in chemistry: Motivations, perceptions, and a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Megan L.

    Statistics showing the under-representation of women at all levels within the physical sciences abound, particularly at the graduate and faculty levels. Women chemists choosing an academic career tend to select teaching institutions over research institutions. This study examined women at the graduate and faculty levels through interviews and the construction of participant narratives to better understand why many women opt out of a career in academic research. Specific attention was paid to women's decision-making processes and what motivates women to choose careers, the rewards and challenges associated with different careers, and the perception of different careers contribute to their decisions. The participant narratives were analyzed on a cross-case basis and constructivist grounded theory was used to develop a model about women's decision-making regarding their careers. Additionally, preliminary work has suggested that graduate students have inaccurate perceptions of careers in academia. Interviews with faculty at teaching and research institutions provided a clearer picture of what each type of career entails. Career-choice motivators, rewards, and challenges were identified for each of the faculty groups. It was found that graduate student women have inaccurate perceptions of academic research careers, which affects how they make career decisions. A model of career choice shows interactions between motivation and perception that guide the career decision-making process. By better understanding these women and their motivations, changes can be made to foster inclusion and accommodation for women and other underrepresented groups in academic chemistry.

  11. Two models of nursing practice: a comparative study of motivational characteristics, work satisfaction and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Anja; Pitkänen, Anneli; Paimensalo-Karell, Irmeli; Elovainio, Marko; Aalto, Pirjo

    2016-03-01

    To examine the differences in work-related motivational and stress factors between two nursing allocation models (the primary nursing model and the individual patient allocation model). A number of nursing allocation models are applied in hospital settings, but little is known about the potential associations between various models and work-related psychosocial profiles in nurses. A cross-sectional study using an electronic questionnaire. The data were collected from nurses (n = 643) working in 22 wards. In total, 317 questionnaires were returned (response rate 49.3%). There were no significant differences in motivational characteristics between the different models. The nurses working according to the individual patient allocation model were more satisfied with their supervisors. The work itself and turnover caused more stress to the nurses working in the primary nursing model, whereas patient-related stress was higher in the individual patient allocation model. No consistent evidence to support the use of either of these models over the other was found. Both these models have positive and negative features and more comparative research is required on various nursing practice models from different points of view. Nursing directors and ward managers should be aware of the positive and negative features of the various nursing models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. BUSINESS MODEL PATTERNS FOR DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    BENJAMIN AMSHOFF; CHRISTIAN DÜLME; JULIAN ECHTERFELD; JÜRGEN GAUSEMEIER

    2015-01-01

    Companies nowadays face a myriad of business opportunities as a direct consequence of manifold disruptive technology developments. As a basic characteristic, disruptive technologies lead to a severe shift in value-creation networks giving rise to new market segments. One of the key challenges is to anticipate the business logics within these nascent and formerly unknown markets. Business model patterns promise to tackle this challenge. They can be interpreted as proven business model elements...

  13. ISMS: A New Model for Improving Student Motivation and Self-esteem in Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron GHILAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we introduce a new model for primary education called ISMS: Improving Student Motivation and Self-esteem. Following a two-year study undertaken in a primary school (n=67, the new model was found to be successful. Students who participated in the research, reported that a course based on ISMS principles was very helpful for strengthening their perceived ability and their motivation to make an effort. They became more enthusiastic, responsible, self-confident, optimistic and determined to succeed. The meaning of such findings is that it is possible to improve key variables having vital influence on student learning and academic performance. The ISMS model was found to be applicable to primary education, in particular, but it may be suitable to secondary schools as well.

  14. A motivation model for interaction between parent and child based on the need for relatedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eOgino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In communication between parents and children, various kinds of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations affect the emotions that encourage actions to promote more interactions. This paper presents a motivation model for the interaction between an infant and a caregiver which models relatedness, one of the most important basic psychological needs, as a variable that increases with experiences of emotion sharing. Relatedness is not only an important factor of pleasure but also a meta-factor which affects other factors such as stress and emotion mirroring. In the simulation experiment, two agents, each of which has the proposed motivation model, show emotional communication depending on the relatedness level that is similar to actual human communication. Especially, the proposed model can reproduce a finding described by the "still-face paradigm", in which an infant shows unpleasant emotion when a caregiver suddenly stops facial expressions. The proposed model is implemented in an artificial agent with a recognition system for gestures and facial expressions. The baby-like agent successfully interacts with an actual human and shows reactions comparable to the "still-face paradigm".

  15. A Technology-based Model for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  16. BetterPoints: Motivating behaviour change using technology-driven incentivisation

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Lancaster

    2015-01-01

    Background Conference theme: Using behaviour change theory to create high-quality interventions and products. BetterPoints is a localised behaviour change system that uses incentivisation, recognition and social interaction – all driven by an innovative technology. Our main method of engagement is a proprietary smartphone app. The app is part of a powerful behaviour change technology platform that allows rapid customisation, massive reward flexibility and sophisticated reporting. This...

  17. Perceptions of Online Learning Quality Given Comfort with Technology, Motivation to Learn Technology Skills, Satisfaction, and Online Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Ooms, Ann; Montanez, Marcel; Yan, Yelena L.

    2005-01-01

    Online courses are appearing at a high rate, increasing the competitiveness of the distance learning market. Reluctance to invest in this area is due to cost and quality concerns. This study reports the findings of a survey of 700 professional and graduate education students regarding their comfort with technology, satisfaction with those…

  18. Advances in technology: commercialization models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinakis, Yorgos D.

    2016-01-01

    Through the lens of the philosophy of science, we reconsider things that are currently being taken for granted and locate issues that are not currently being treated. In general, that lens has been more focused on views of scientific theories rather than theories of models. A philosophy of sciencety

  19. Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Filipe, Joaquim; Kacprzyk, Janusz; Pina, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2012 International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications (SIMULTECH 2012) which was sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in Rome, Italy. SIMULTECH 2012 was technically co-sponsored by the Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS), GDR I3, Lionphant Simulation, Simulation Team and IFIP and held in cooperation with AIS Special Interest Group of Modeling and Simulation (AIS SIGMAS) and the Movimento Italiano Modellazione e Simulazione (MIMOS).

  20. Theoretical Model of Steel Continuous Casting Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Gheorghies; I Crudu; C Teletin; C Spanu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model adapted for studying steel continuous casting technology was proposed.The model based on system theory contained input/output,command,and control parameters.The process was divided into five stages,i.e.,tundish,mold,guiding system,guiding-drawing system,and guiding-drawing-soft reduction system.The model can be used to describe the physicoehemical processes,thermal processes,chemical processes,and characteristics of the cast material according to the above-mentioned stages.It can also be applied to other metallurgical technologies and even to other industries (chemistry,food,etc.).

  1. The Trans-Contextual Model of Autonomous Motivation in Education: Conceptual and Empirical Issues and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin S.; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.

    2016-01-01

    The trans-contextual model outlines the processes by which autonomous motivation toward activities in a physical education context predicts autonomous motivation toward physical activity outside of school, and beliefs about, intentions toward, and actual engagement in, out-of-school physical activity. In the present article, we clarify the…

  2. Investigating a New Model of Time-Related Academic Behavior: Procrastination and Timely Engagement by Motivational Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K.

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of time-related academic behavior (i.e., procrastination and timely engagement) in the academic context. Specifically, this study aimed to build a new model for understanding these behaviors in a motivational framework by using motivational orientation to frame these…

  3. A Self-Determination Theory Based Motivational Model on Intentions to Drop out of Vocational Schools in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Bui Thi Thuy; Kaur, Amrita; Nur, Abdul Hamid Busthami

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Student motivation for positive academic outcome and persistence at school is significantly affected by personal and environmental factors. Anchored in self-determination theory, this study tested a motivational model which looked at how support in terms of perceived teacher autonomy and from school administration constituted the key…

  4. Investigating a New Model of Time-Related Academic Behavior: Procrastination and Timely Engagement by Motivational Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K.

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of time-related academic behavior (i.e., procrastination and timely engagement) in the academic context. Specifically, this study aimed to build a new model for understanding these behaviors in a motivational framework by using motivational orientation to frame these…

  5. Mathematical Modeling of the Agriculture Crop Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Drucioc

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The organized structure of computer system for economic and ecological estimation of agriculture crop technologies is described. The system is composed of six interconnected blocks. The linear, non-linear and stochastic mathematical models for machinery sizing and selection in farm-level cropping system is presented in the mathematical model block of computer system.

  6. Endogenizing technological progress: The MESEMET model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter); G.H.A. van Hagen; R.A. de Mooij (Ruud); J. van Sinderen (Jarig)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis paper endogenizes technology and human capital formation in the MESEM model that was developed by van Sinderen (Economic Modelling, 1993, 13, 285-300). Tax allowances for private R&D expenditures and public expenditures on both education and R& D are effective instruments to stimula

  7. Stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol: lessons from rodent and primate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabant, Christian; Guarnieri, Douglas J; Quertemont, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    In several animal species including humans, the acute administration of low doses of alcohol increases motor activity. Different theories have postulated that alcohol-induced hyperactivity is causally related to alcoholism. Moreover, a common biological mechanism in the mesolimbic dopamine system has been proposed to mediate the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol. Numerous studies have examined whether alcohol-induced hyperactivity is related to alcoholism using a great variety of animal models and several animal species. However, there is no review that has summarized this extensive literature. In this article, we present the various experimental models that have been used to study the relationship between the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol in rodents and primates. Furthermore, we discuss whether the theories hypothesizing a causal link between alcohol-induced hyperactivity and alcoholism are supported by published results. The reviewed findings indicate that animal species that are stimulated by alcohol also exhibit alcohol preference. Additionally, the role of dopamine in alcohol-induced hyperactivity is well established since blocking dopaminergic activity suppresses the stimulant effects of alcohol. However, dopamine transmission plays a much more complex function in the motivational properties of alcohol and the neuronal mechanisms involved in alcohol stimulation and reward are distinct. Overall, the current review provides mixed support for theories suggesting that the stimulant effects of alcohol are related to alcoholism and highlights the importance of animal models as a way to gain insight into alcoholism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A motivation-based explanatory model of street drinking among young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción; Fernández-Monroy, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This social marketing study focuses on street drinking behavior among young people. The objective is to divide the market of young people who engage in this activity into segments according to their motivations. For the three segments identified, a behavior model is created using the beliefs, attitudes, behavior, and social belonging of young people who engage in street drinking. The methodology used individual questionnaires filled in by a representative sample of young people. The results show that the behavior model follows the sequence of attitudes-beliefs-behavior and that social belonging influences these three variables. Similarly, differences are observed in the behavior model depending on the segment individuals belong to.

  9. Motivations of Women Participating in a Technology-Based Social Entrepreneurship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzombak, Rachel; Mouakkad, Sally; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs focused on engineering entrepreneurship are growing in number and popularity at American universities. However, the fields of engineering, entrepreneurship and technology-based entrepreneurship struggle to recruit and retain female students: a historic and endemic failure at obtaining gender-balanced participation. Understanding…

  10. Effects of Multimedia Information Technology Integrated Multi-Sensory Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung-Ju; Tai, Yu-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Under the waves of the Internet and the trend of era, information technology is a door connecting to the world to generate the multiplier effect of learning. Students' learning should not be regarded as the tool to cope with school examinations. The frequent contact with computers, networks, and relevant information allow students enjoying the…

  11. Fibonacci Numbers Revisited: Technology-Motivated Inquiry into a Two-Parametric Difference Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovich, Sergei; Leonov, Gennady A.

    2008-01-01

    This article demonstrates how within an educational context, supported by the notion of hidden mathematics curriculum and enhanced by the use of technology, new mathematical knowledge can be discovered. More specifically, proceeding from the well-known representation of Fibonacci numbers through a second-order difference equation, this article…

  12. The Use of Partial Least Squares Path Modeling in Investigating the Relationship between Leadership, Motivation and Rewarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif BULUT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to introduce the partial least squares path modeling which is a new approach to structural equation modeling, representing the joint point between path analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The use of this method was tried to be explained by examining the relationship between leadership, motivation and rewarding. Self-designed questionnaire was used for data collection. A private hospital was taken as the sample of the study. The analysis results conclude that there are statistically significant relationship between leadership and motivation and leadership and rewarding, separately. Additionally, the results show that rewarding has a statistically significant effect on motivation. The study also shows that the concepts that led to the establishment of leadership have an important place in the relationship between leadership and motivation. The positive effect of the fair rewarding system on motivation is also located between the results obtained from this study.

  13. Motivation for Palatable Food Despite Consequences in an Animal Model of Binge-Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kimberly D.; Murdaugh, Donna L.; King, Vinetra L.; Boggiano, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Binge-eating involves an abnormal motivation for highly palatable food in that these foods are repeatedly consumed despite their binge-triggering effects and life-affecting consequences associated with binge-eating. We determined if rats identified as binge-eating prone (BEP) similarly display abnormal motivation for palatable food. Method Food-sated BEP and binge-eating resistant (BER) rats were given voluntary access to palatable food paired with increasing intensity of footshock. Later, they were exposed to a period of cyclic caloric restriction-refeeding. Results BEPs consumed significantly more and tolerated higher levels of footshock for palatable food than BERs. Cyclic restriction-refeeding increased BERs' tolerance of shock for palatable food. Discussion Previously observed parallels of the rat BEP model to human binge-eating can now be extended to include an abnormal motivation for palatable food. This model should prove useful in identifying specific genes that interact with the nutritional environment to mediate binge-eating and may point to novel physiological targets to treat compulsive overeating. PMID:20186718

  14. State-dependent µ-opioid Modulation of Social Motivation – a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guro Engvig Loseth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by µ-opioid transmission. The µ-opioid receptor (MOR system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviours, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the µ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for µ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for µ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account.

  15. A Preliminary Model of Motivation for Pornography Consumption Among Men Participating in Zoophilic Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Aranha E Silva, Renata Almeida; Baltieri, Danilo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Although zoophilic blogs and websites attract the attention of zoophiles and others who are curious about this sexual activity, the motivations for consuming this type of pornography are not clear. This study aimed to confirm the factorial validity of the Pornography Consumption Inventory in an online sample of men with sexual interest in animals, and to construct an association model between motivations for pornography consumption and the following psychological variables: depression, sexual impulsiveness, and strength of sexual interest in animals. In this cross-sectional study, we located a website that catered to a network of people with a sexual interest in animals. Subsequently, a questionnaire was made available online to members of this network. Results support the 4-factor model of the Pornography Consumption Inventory. Depression and strength of sexual interest in animals were negatively and positively correlated with the sexual curiosity factor, respectively. Sexual impulsiveness was positively associated with the emotional avoidance, excitement seeking, and sexual pleasure factors. Depression and sexual impulsiveness were positively correlated. Psychological factors can differently motivate the consumption of pornography among men who visit zoophilic blogs and websites. With these preliminary data, we can identify some characteristics of this population.

  16. Capacity Expansion Modeling for Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Elaine; Stoll, Brady; Mai, Trieu

    2017-04-03

    The Resource Planning Model (RPM) is a capacity expansion model designed for regional power systems and high levels of renewable generation. Recent extensions capture value-stacking for storage technologies, including batteries and concentrating solar power with storage. After estimating per-unit capacity value and curtailment reduction potential, RPM co-optimizes investment decisions and reduced-form dispatch, accounting for planning reserves; energy value, including arbitrage and curtailment reduction; and three types of operating reserves. Multiple technology cost scenarios are analyzed to determine level of deployment in the Western Interconnection under various conditions.

  17. Some challenges for the triadic model for the study of adolescent motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciana, Monica; Segalowitz, Sidney J

    2014-08-01

    Within this special issue, Ernst has provided a comprehensive overview of the triadic neural systems model and its explanatory power for the conceptualization of adolescent development. Within this commentary, we encourage further consideration of several issues as this valuable model is expanded and articulated. These issues include the extent of functional distinctions among the three proposed neural nodes that comprise the triadic framework, the proposed dichotomy between motivation and emotion as linked to approach versus avoidance, the extent to which approach and avoidance can be dissociated on behavioral and neural levels during adolescent development, and how individual difference factors mechanistically interact with broader age-based developmental trends.

  18. The effects of inquiry based ecopedagogy model on pre-service physics teachers' motivation and achievement in environmental physics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napitupulu, Nur Dewi; Munandar, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    Motivation plays a crucial role in learning. Motivation energizes the behavior of the individual. It also directs the behavior towards specific goals. It helps students acquire knowledge, increase initiation, persist in activities, improve achievement, and develop a sense of discipline. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the achievement and motivation of pre-service teacher of the Inquiry based ecopedagogy (In-EcoP) learning process applied to environmental physics instruction. The motivation adapted to Keller's four dimensions, namely attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction. The study involved 66 students which are divided into two classes of an environmental physics instruction. The first class used the traditional lecture format while the In-EcoP model was used in the second. The research data were obtained through the environmental physics concept test and motivation questionnaire. The data analysis was conducted using a quantitative study approach and involved a motivational survey and an academic achievement test. It was found that the experimental group students were achieve more than the students in the control group. An increase in motivation and academic achievement of the students in the experimental group was identified as well. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of the In-EcoP model for enhancing pre-service teacher motivation and academic achievement in environmental physics instruction.

  19. The Effects of Motivation, Technology, and Satisfaction on Student Achievement in Face-to-Face and Online Classes in College Algebra at a College in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amro, Hanan Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Demand for online learning has increased in recent years due to the convenience of course delivery. However, some students appear to have difficulties with online education resulting in lack of completion. The study utilized a quantitative approach with archival data and survey design. The factors of demographics, motivation, technology, and…

  20. The Effects of Motivation, Technology, and Satisfaction on Student Achievement in Face-to-Face and Online Classes in College Algebra at a College in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amro, Hanan Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Demand for online learning has increased in recent years due to the convenience of course delivery. However, some students appear to have difficulties with online education resulting in lack of completion. The study utilized a quantitative approach with archival data and survey design. The factors of demographics, motivation, technology, and…

  1. Toward a Current, Comprehensive, Integrative, and Flexible Model of Motivation for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Miller, Raymond B.

    2006-01-01

    Workplace motivation historically has been an HR function, with ID as a training function. This division produces a split between motivation and training, leaving them isolated from one another. Intervention design needs to include motivation throughout its phases, to maximize motivating opportunities for performance improvement. The current…

  2. Toward a Current, Comprehensive, Integrative, and Flexible Model of Motivation for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Miller, Raymond B.

    2006-01-01

    Workplace motivation historically has been an HR function, with ID as a training function. This division produces a split between motivation and training, leaving them isolated from one another. Intervention design needs to include motivation throughout its phases, to maximize motivating opportunities for performance improvement. The current…

  3. Modeling motivation and habit in driving behavior under lifetime driver's license revocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chien-Ming; Chang, Hsin-Li; Woo, T Hugh

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the motivational factors underlying the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicting the driving behavior of lifetime driving license revoked offenders. Of a total of 639 drivers whose licenses had been permanently revoked, 544 offenders completed a questionnaire constructed to measure attitudes toward behaviors, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intentions (the key constructs of the TPB), and previous driving habit strength. The finding of the study revealed that an offenders' driving behavior after a lifetime license revocation was significantly correlated to behavioral intention (R=0.60, p<0.01), perceived behavioral control (R=0.61, p<0.01), previous driving habit (R=0.44, p<0.01), and attitude (R=0.41, p<0.01). There was no evidence that subjective norms including road regulation, society ethics, and people important to offenders had an influence on driving behavior (R=0.03). Low driving habit strength offenders are motivated to drive because of behavioral intention, whereas strong driving habit strength offenders are motivated to drive because of perceived behavioral control. Previous driving habit strength is a moderator in the intention-behavior relationship. The model appeared successful when previous habits were weak, but less successful when previous habits were strong.

  4. A reciprocal effects model of the temporal ordering of basic psychological needs and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinent, Guillaume; Guillet-Descas, Emma; Moiret, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Using self-determination theory as the framework, we examined the temporal ordering between satisfaction and thwarting of basic psychological needs and motivation. We accomplished this goal by using a two-wave 7-month partial least squares path modeling approach (PLS-PM) among a sample of 94 adolescent athletes (Mage = 15.96) in an intensive training setting. The PLS-PM results showed significant paths leading: (a) from T1 satisfaction of basic psychological need for competence to T2 identified regulation, (b) from T1 external regulation to T2 thwarting and satisfaction of basic psychological need for competence, and (c) from T1 amotivation to T2 satisfaction of basic psychological need for relatedness. Overall, our results suggest that the relationship between basic psychological need and motivation varied depending on the type of basic need and motivation assessed. Basic psychological need for competence predicted identified regulation over time whereas amotivation and external regulation predicted basic psychological need for relatedness or competence over time.

  5. Exemplary Training Models in Industrial Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Michael J., Comp.

    Prepared by Canadian, Chinese Taipei, and Thai educational agencies and based on surveys of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation member nations, this report provides descriptions of 52 exemplary industrial technology training models in Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, the People's Republic…

  6. Participant recruitment and motivation for participation in optical technology for cervical cancer screening research trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhatovich, Olga M; Sharman, Mathilde P; Mirabal, Yvette N; Earle, Nan R; Follen, Michele; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2005-12-01

    In order to improve recruitment for cervical cancer screening trials, it is necessary to analyze the effectiveness of recruitment strategies used in current trials. A trial to test optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of cervical neoplasia recruited 1000 women from the community; the trial evaluated the emerging technology against Pap smears and colposcopically directed biopsies for cervical dysplasia. We have examined women's reasons for participating as well as the effectiveness and efficiency for each recruitment strategy. Reasons for participation were identified and compared between trials. The recruitment method that resulted in the most contacts was newspaper reportorial coverage and advertising, followed by family and friends, then television news coverage. The most cost-effective method for finding eligible women who attend the research appointment is word of mouth from a family member or friend. Recommendations are given for maximizing the efficiency of recruitment for cervical cancer screening trials.

  7. Physics Learning using Inquiry-Student Team Achievement Division (ISTAD and Guided Inquiry Models Viewed by Students Achievement Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Sulistijo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the differences in learning outcomes of between students that are given the Physics learning models of Inquiry-Student Team Achievement Division (ISTAD and guided inquiry, between students who have high achievement motivation and low achievement motivation. This study was an experimental study with a 2x2x2 factorial design. The study population was the students of class X of SMAN 1 Toroh Grobogan of academic year 2016/2017. Samples were obtained by cluster random sampling technique consists of two classes, class X IPA 3 is used as an experimental class using ISTAD model and class X IPA 4 as the control class using guided inquiry model. Data collection techniques using test techniques for learning outcomes, and technical questionnaire to obtain the data of students' achievement motivation. Analysis of data using two-way ANOVA. The results showed that: (1 there is a difference between the learning outcomes of students with the ISTAD Physics models and with the physics model of guided inquiry. (2 There are differences in learning outcomes between students who have high achievement motivation and low achievement motivation. (3 There is no interaction between ISTAD and guided inquiry Physics models learning and achievement motivation of students.

  8. Dynamic reform of public institutions: a model of motivated agents and collective reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Valasek, Justin

    2016-01-01

    State capacity is optimized when public institutions are staffed by individuals with public-service motivation. However, when motivated agents value the collective reputation of their place of employment, steady-state equilibria with both high and low aggregate motivation (reputation) in the mission-oriented sector exist. Reforming a low-motivation institution requires a non-monotonic wage path: since the effect of higher wages on motivation is negative for a highreputation institution, but p...

  9. A structural test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional model of suicidal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Katie; Boduszek, Daniel; O'Connor, Rory C

    2016-05-30

    Suicidal behaviours are highly complex, multi-determined phenomena. Despite this, historically research has tended to focus on bivariate associations between atheoretical demographic and/or psychiatric factors and suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study was to empirically test the Integrated Motivational-Volitional model of suicidal behaviour using structural equation modelling. Healthy adults (N=1809) completed anonymous self-report surveys. The fit of the proposed model was good, and explained 79% of variance in defeat, 83% of variance in entrapment, 61% of variance in suicidal ideation, and 27% of variance in suicide attempts. All proposed paths were significant except for those between goal re-engagement and two factors of suicide resilience (Internal Protective and External Protective) and suicidal ideation; and impulsivity and discomfort intolerance and suicide attempts. These findings represent a preliminary step towards greater clarification of the mechanisms driving suicidal behaviour, and support the utility of basing future research on the Integrated Motivational-Volitional model of suicidal behaviour.

  10. Global biosurveillance: enabling science and technology. Workshop background and motivation: international scientific engagement for global security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Helen H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18

    Through discussion the conference aims to: (1) Identify core components of a comprehensive global biosurveillance capability; (2) Determine the scientific and technical bases to support such a program; (3) Explore the improvement in biosurveillance to enhance regional and global disease outbreak prediction; (4) Recommend an engagement approach to establishing an effective international community and regional or global network; (5) Propose implementation strategies and the measures of effectiveness; and (6) Identify the challenges that must be overcome in the next 3-5 years in order to establish an initial global biosurveillance capability that will have significant positive impact on BioNP as well as public health and/or agriculture. There is also a look back at the First Biothreat Nonproliferation Conference from December 2007. Whereas the first conference was an opportunity for problem solving to enhance and identify new paradigms for biothreat nonproliferation, this conference is moving towards integrated comprehensive global biosurveillance. Main reasons for global biosurveillance are: (1) Rapid assessment of unusual disease outbreak; (2) Early warning of emerging, re-emerging and engineered biothreat enabling reduced morbidity and mortality; (3) Enhanced crop and livestock management; (4) Increase understanding of host-pathogen interactions and epidemiology; (5) Enhanced international transparency for infectious disease research supporting BWC goals; and (6) Greater sharing of technology and knowledge to improve global health.

  11. BetterPoints: Motivating behaviour change using technology-driven incentivisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lancaster

    2015-10-01

    The BetterPoints system is unique in it’s flexibility and ability to draw on multiple behaviour change models to create high quality interventions. Early findings from existing programmes being implemented for Local Authorities in the UK suggest that BetterPoints can demonstrate real-world behaviour change. We would like to work with academic partners to further investigate these real-world changes in behaviour and establish a robust evidence base.

  12. Model of estimation of innovation maturity of organization in the system of entrepreneur motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Yur'evich Isaev

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews basic principles which are used in developing a system of entrepreneurial motivation for top echelon managers. Innovational maturity of the enterprises is used in this system as a constituent component of the evaluation model. The authors give practical advice on the application of this model. Basing on an analytical review of the scientific researches performed by domestic and foreign research scientists, a comparative analysis of structural methodologies for assessing innovational maturity of the enterprises is made. For the purpose of testing the research results, specific examples of indicators that meet the requirements of entrepreneurial motivation were developed. Indicators of innovational maturity model provide those diagnostic tools needed to measure the total of productivity of manufacturing factors and their management. The usage of those diagnostic tools in assessing performance of top echelon managers will really bring together and unite interests of top echelon management and owners, activate the inner entrepreneur in a hired manager as well as harmonize the work of top echelon managers to achieve the current goals and achieve strategic objectives of the company.

  13. FUTURE ENGINEER TRAINING: MOTIVATING TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The motivating techniques for training future engineer are proposed. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations in professional training have been analyzed. The peculiarities of the formation process of students’ motivation in learning language at non-language universities have been systematized. Heuristic training technology based on students’ motivation to cognitive research has been implemented.

  14. Layers And Processes In The Model Of Technological Postal System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucia Madleňáková; Radovan Madleňák; Paweł Droździel; Ivan Kurtev

    2015-01-01

    The paper include important aspects of layer model of postal technological system such as makes the possibility to define rules for regulating, technical and technological requirements and interfaces...

  15. An approach to the hierarchical model of motivation in a classroom: a reply to Rousseau and Vallerand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hirotsugu

    2002-02-01

    Rousseau and Vallerand's comments on our recent article led to the present study of correlations between students' perception of teachers' attitudes, intrinsic-extrinsic motivation, and learning strategy with structural equation modeling. The analysis shows students' perception of teachers' attitudes influences the intrinsic-extrinsic motivation, which as mediator in turn affects students' learning strategies, and the paths were divided into two streams, one with more intrinsic attributes and the other with more extrinsic ones.

  16. Product with service, technology with business model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakao, Tomohiko; McAloone, Tim C.

    2011-01-01

    Looking back over the last decade, the importance of an expanded understanding of engineering design has been shared within the engineering design community. Presented concepts and methods to support such expansion include Functional Product Development, Service Engineering, and Product/Service-S...... promising concept beyond PSS design; via an integrated development of technology and business model. This can be of particular interest for further research, especially due to its high freedom for designers....

  17. Modeling Student Motivation and Students’ Ability Estimates From a Large-Scale Assessment of Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zerpa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available When large-scale assessments (LSA do not hold personal stakes for students, students may not put forth their best effort. Low-effort examinee behaviors (e.g., guessing, omitting items result in an underestimate of examinee abilities, which is a concern when using results of LSA to inform educational policy and planning. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between examinee motivation as defined by expectancy-value theory, student effort, and examinee mathematics abilities. A principal components analysis was used to examine the data from Grade 9 students (n = 43,562 who responded to a self-report questionnaire on their attitudes and practices related to mathematics. The results suggested a two-component model where the components were interpreted as task-values in mathematics and student effort. Next, a hierarchical linear model was implemented to examine the relationship between examinee component scores and their estimated ability on a LSA. The results of this study provide evidence that motivation, as defined by the expectancy-value theory and student effort, partially explains student ability estimates and may have implications in the information that get transferred to testing organizations, school boards, and teachers while assessing students’ Grade 9 mathematics learning.

  18. Motivator-manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Angelic P

    2009-01-01

    The radiologic career field has undergone radical changes in technology, regulatory compliance, and customer expectation.These changes often require dramatic alterations to processes,which can break down communication, create stress, and have a negative effect on department productivity. Motivation itself is a frequently analyzed and reported topic in professional publications. For this purpose, this literature review specifically researches motivation as identified by radiology administrators through Radiology Management. Three key elements surfaced as those with the most impact: (1) motivation is an intrinsic factor which can be influenced but not created, (2) clear attainable goals are an essential component of motivation,and (3) motivation begins with identification of employee needs.

  19. Motivation, Classroom Environment, and Learning in Introductory Geology: A Hierarchical Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, L. A.; Hilpert, J. C.; Van Der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Budd, D.; Jones, M. H.; Matheney, R.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Perkins, D.; Stempien, J. A.; Wirth, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Prior research has indicated that highly motivated students perform better and that learning increases in innovative, reformed classrooms, but untangling the student effects from the instructor effects is essential to understanding how to best support student learning. Using a hierarchical linear model, we examine these effects separately and jointly. We use data from nearly 2,000 undergraduate students surveyed by the NSF-funded GARNET (Geoscience Affective Research NETwork) project in 65 different introductory geology classes at research universities, public masters-granting universities, liberal arts colleges and community colleges across the US. Student level effects were measured as increases in expectancy and self-regulation using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ; Pintrich et al., 1991). Instructor level effects were measured using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, (RTOP; Sawada et al., 2000), with higher RTOP scores indicating a more reformed, student-centered classroom environment. Learning was measured by learning gains on a Geology Concept Inventory (GCI; Libarkin and Anderson, 2005) and normalized final course grade. The hierarchical linear model yielded significant results at several levels. At the student level, increases in expectancy and self-regulation are significantly and positively related to higher grades regardless of instructor; the higher the increase, the higher the grade. At the instructor level, RTOP scores are positively related to normalized average GCI learning gains. The higher the RTOP score, the higher the average class GCI learning gains. Across both levels, average class GCI learning gains are significantly and positively related to student grades; the higher the GCI learning gain, the higher the grade. Further, the RTOP scores are significantly and negatively related to the relationship between expectancy and course grade. The lower the RTOP score, the higher the correlation between change in

  20. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and Students' Motivation toward Physics Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah; Tolla, Ismail; Ali, Muhammad Sidin; Muris

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at describing the effect of cooperative learning model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and motivation toward physics learning outcome. This research was a quasi-experimental research with a factorial design conducted at SMAN 2 Makassar. Independent variables were learning models. They were cooperative learning model of TGT and…

  1. Motivation, strategy, and English as a foreign language vocabulary learning: A structural equation modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yining; Lin, Chin-Hsi; Zhang, Dongbo; Choi, Yunjeong

    2017-03-01

    In spite of considerable advancements in our understanding of the different factors involved in achieving vocabulary-learning success, the overall pattern and interrelationships of critical factors involved in L2 vocabulary learning - particularly, the mechanisms through which learners regulate their motivation and learning strategies - remain unclear. This study examined L2 vocabulary learning, focusing on the joint influence of different motivational factors and learning strategies on the vocabulary breadth of adolescent learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) in China. The participants were 107 tenth graders (68 females, 39 males) in China. The data were collected via two questionnaires, one assessing students' motivation towards English-vocabulary learning and the other their English vocabulary-learning strategies, along with a test measuring vocabulary breadth. Structural equation modelling (SEM) indicated that learning strategy partially mediated the relationship between motivation (i.e., a composite score of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation) and vocabulary learning. Separate SEM analyses for intrinsic (IM) and extrinsic motivation (EM) revealed that there were significant and positive direct and indirect effects of IM on vocabulary knowledge; and while EM's direct effect over and above that of learning strategies did not achieve significance, its indirect effect was significant and positive. The findings suggest that vocabulary-learning strategies mediate the relationship between motivation and vocabulary knowledge. In addition, IM may have a greater influence on vocabulary learning in foreign-language contexts. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  2. The impact of motivation on cognitive performance in an animal model of the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ryan D; Winiger, Vanessa; Higa, Kerin K; Kahn, Julia B; Kandel, Eric R; Balsam, Peter D; Simpson, Eleanor H

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between motivation and cognition are implicated in producing functional impairments and poor quality of life in psychiatric patients. This interaction, however, is not well understood at either the behavioral or neural level. We developed a procedure for mice in which a cognitive measure, sustained attention, is modulated by a motivationally relevant signal that predicts reward probability on a trial-by-trial basis. Using this paradigm, we tested the interaction between motivation and cognition in mice that model the increased striatal D2 receptor activity observed in schizophrenia patients (D2R-OE mice). In control mice, attention was modulated by signaled-reward probability. In D2R-OE mice, however, attention was not modulated by reward-related cues. This impairment was not due to any global deficits in attention or maintenance of the trial-specific information in working memory. Turning off the transgene in D2R-OE mice rescued the motivational modulation of attention. These results indicate that deficits in motivation impair the ability to use reward-related cues to recruit attention and that improving motivation improves functional cognitive performance. These results further suggest that addressing motivational impairments in patients is critical to achieving substantive cognitive and functional gains.

  3. DESIGNING AN EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONAL EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION SYSTEM BASED ON ABCD MODEL FOR HOTEL ESTABLISHMENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onur Çakir; Meryem Akoglan Kozak

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study is to create an organizational motivation system that could provide solutions for low employee motivation problem, which became an organizational pathology for hotel establishments...

  4. Examining whether the information-motivation-behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (Pskills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; Pskills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence.

  5. MODELING AND OPTIMIZATION OF THE AEROCONCRETE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate composition and optimal technological parameters is performed with the help of G-BAT-2011 software programme developed at MSUCE. The software is based on the methodology that is based on complete factorial experiments, experiments based on fractional replicates and testing of all essential statistical hypotheses. Linear, incomplete quadratic and quadratic equations generated as a result of experiments make it possible to design a model that represents natural processes in the adequate manner. The model is analytically optimized and interpreted thereafter.

  6. Command and motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Hvidtved, Johan; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Motivated employees are crucial to organizations, but external interventions such as command systems and financial incentives may decrease motivation. If these external interventions are perceived to be controlling, they are expected to crowd out intrinsic motivation, and this may also apply...... to other types of autonomous motivation such as public service motivation. The perception of external interventions is thus expected to be vital. This article investigates how the perception of a specific command system (obligatory student plans) is associated with intrinsic motivation and public service...... motivation. Using a dataset with 3,230 school teachers in Denmark, a structural equation model shows that the perception of obligatory student plans as controlling is negatively associated with all of the investigated types of employee motivation, supporting that motivation crowding can occur....

  7. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  8. Energy technologies and energy efficiency in economic modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological ...... of renewable energy and especially wind power will increase the rate of efficiency improvement. A technologically based model in this case indirectly makes the energy efficiency endogenous in the aggregate energy-economy model.......This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological...... development are one of the main causes for the very diverging results which have been obtained using bottom-up and top-down models for analysing the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. One of the objectives for studies comparing model results have been to create comparable model assumptions regarding...

  9. Modeling the Dynamic Failure of Railroad Tank Cars Using a Physically Motivated Internal State Variable Plasticity/Damage Nonlocal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazle R. Ahad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a physically motivated internal state variable plasticity/damage model containing a mathematical length scale to idealize the material response in finite element simulations of a large-scale boundary value problem. The problem consists of a moving striker colliding against a stationary hazmat tank car. The motivations are (1 to reproduce with high fidelity finite deformation and temperature histories, damage, and high rate phenomena that may arise during the impact accident and (2 to address the material postbifurcation regime pathological mesh size issues. We introduce the mathematical length scale in the model by adopting a nonlocal evolution equation for the damage, as suggested by Pijaudier-Cabot and Bazant in the context of concrete. We implement this evolution equation into existing finite element subroutines of the plasticity/failure model. The results of the simulations, carried out with the aid of Abaqus/Explicit finite element code, show that the material model, accounting for temperature histories and nonlocal damage effects, satisfactorily predicts the damage progression during the tank car impact accident and significantly reduces the pathological mesh size effects.

  10. Adolescent Decision-Making Processes regarding University Entry: A Model Incorporating Cultural Orientation, Motivation and Occupational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup

    2013-01-01

    This study tested a newly developed model of the cognitive decision-making processes of senior high school students related to university entry. The model incorporated variables derived from motivation theory (i.e. expectancy-value theory and the theory of reasoned action), literature on cultural orientation and occupational considerations. A…

  11. Adolescent Decision-Making Processes regarding University Entry: A Model Incorporating Cultural Orientation, Motivation and Occupational Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup

    2013-01-01

    This study tested a newly developed model of the cognitive decision-making processes of senior high school students related to university entry. The model incorporated variables derived from motivation theory (i.e. expectancy-value theory and the theory of reasoned action), literature on cultural orientation and occupational considerations. A…

  12. Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Tracy L; Homan, Kristin J

    2015-09-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating posits that body acceptance by others facilitates body appreciation and internal body orientation, which contribute to intuitive eating. Two domains of exercise motives (functional and appearance) may also be linked to these variables, and thus were integrated into the model. The model fit the data well for 406 physically active U.S. college students, although some pathways were stronger for women. Body acceptance by others directly contributed to higher functional exercise motives and indirectly contributed to lower appearance exercise motives through higher internal body orientation. Functional exercise motives positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to body appreciation. Whereas body appreciation positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to intuitive eating for women, only the latter association was evident for men. To benefit positive body image and intuitive eating, efforts should encourage body acceptance by others and emphasize functional and de-emphasize appearance exercise motives.

  13. The effects of exposure to muscular male models among men: exploring the moderating role of gym use and exercise motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma; Dittmar, Helga; Orsborn, Amber

    2007-09-01

    This study examines the effects of exposure to the muscular male body ideal on body-focused negative affect among male gym users and non-exercisers. As hypothesized, the impact of media exposure depended on men's exercise status. Non-exercisers (n = 58) reported greater body-focused negative affect after exposure to images of muscular male models than after neutral images (no model controls), whereas gym users (n = 58) showed a tendency for less body-focused negative affect after the model images than after the control images. Furthermore, the extent to which gym users were motivated to increase strength and muscularity moderated these exposure effects; men who reported stronger strength and muscularity exercise motivation reported a greater degree of self-enhancement after exposure to the muscular ideal. The findings are interpreted with respect to likely differences in motives for social comparisons.

  14. The Effects of Educative Software, Based on the Arcs Motivation Model on Student's Academic Success and Permanence in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümmü ÇETİN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, education based on ARCS Motivation Model design principles and traditional education were compared in terms of student success and the continuance of learning. To this end, an educative software suitable to the design principles of ARCS Motivation Model for Microsoft Excels' "statistical functions" theme was prepared.With a pretest of the experimental and control group, the equivalence of the groups were determined. In the control group the laboratory study was performed with the traditional method and in the experimental group ,education was given with the prepared educative software. At the end of the education, a final exam to both groups and a continuance exam after completion of the education program were performed. The findings after the analysis reflect, that the performed education, based on the according to ARCS Motivation Model designed software, compared to the laboratory study with traditional methods, relatively increases the grade of academic success much significantly.

  15. New parameterization of the effective field theory motivated relativistic mean field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bharat; Singh, S. K.; Agrawal, B. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    A new parameter set is generated for finite and infinite nuclear system within the effective field theory motivated relativistic mean field (ERMF) formalism. The isovector part of the ERMF model employed in the present study includes the coupling of nucleons to the δ and ρ mesons and the cross-coupling of ρ mesons to the σ and ω mesons. The results for the finite and infinite nuclear systems obtained using our parameter set are in harmony with the available experimental data. We find the maximum mass of the neutron star to be 2.03M⊙ and yet a relatively smaller radius at the canonical mass, 12.69 km, as required by the available data.

  16. A Motivational Model of Physical Education and Links to Enjoyment, Knowledge, Performance, Total Physical Activity and Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gråstén, Arto; Watt, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The present paper examined the full sequence of the Hierarchical Model of Motivation in physical education (PE) including motivational climate, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation, and related links to contextual enjoyment, knowledge, performance, and total moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Gender differences and correlations with body mass index (BMI) were also analyzed. Cross-sectional data was represented by self-reports and objective assessments of 770 middle school students (52% of girls) in North-East Finland. The results showed that task-involving climate in girls' PE classes was related to enjoyment and knowledge through physical competence and intrinsic motivation, whereas task-involving climate was associated with enjoyment and knowledge via competence and autonomy, and total MVPA via autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and knowledge within boys. This may indicate that girls and boys perceive PE classes in a different way. Graded PE assessments appeared to be essential in motivating both girls and boys to participate in greater total MVPA, whereas BMI was negatively linked with competence and social relatedness only among girls. Although, the current and previous empirical findings supported task-involving teaching methods in PE, in some cases, ego-involving climate should be considered. Therefore, both task- and ego-involving teaching practices can be useful ways of developing preferred behaviors in PE classes.

  17. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to clarify the extension of Technology Acceptance Model. Besides, the application areas are elaborated including electronic service, mobile data service, self-service technology, electronic learning and so on. Finally, the article concluded the conclusions and future research direction.

  18. Industrialized Development Models of Agricultural Scientific and Technological Achievements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanjiang; WANG

    2015-01-01

    Industrialization of agricultural scientific and technological achievements has become an extremely important part in agricultural structural adjustment and agricultural economic development. Basic models for industrialization of China’s agricultural scientific and technological achievements should be:( i) integrating scientific and technological development and production relying on large enterprises;( ii) integrating scientific research and development with agricultural scientific and technological achievements and scientific research institutions as support;( iii) spindle type transformation;( vi) agricultural scientific and technological demonstration area;( v) technology extension network.

  19. Cognitive-motivational model of obesity. Motivational mechanisms and cognitive biases underlying the processing of food-related images by people with excess body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Monika; Kalka, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a constantly escalating problem in all age groups. In the face of ubiquitous images of food, colourful advertisements of high-calorie meals and beverages, it is necessary to examine the role of the memory and attention mechanism in the processing of these stimuli. Knowledge regarding this subject will surely significantly contribute to the improvement of prevention and management of obesity programs designed to prevent secondary psychological difficulties, including depression. This paper presents cognitive-motivational model of obesity, according to which the description of mechanisms of eating disorders occurrence should include not only motivational factors but also the cognitive ones. The paper shows theoretical perspectives on the problem of obesity irrespective of its origin, as well as the latest empirical reports in this field. The presented survey demonstrates the lack of explicit research findings related to the processing of high and low-calorie food images by persons with excess weight. It seems that the knowledge of the basic mechanisms involved in the processing of these stimuli and the exploration of this phenomenon will allow to improve programs whose objective is to prevent obesity.

  20. Cognitive-motivational model of obesity. Motivational mechanisms and cognitive biases underlying the processing of food-related images by people with excess body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pawłowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a constantly escalating problem in all age groups. In the face of ubiquitous images of food, colourful advertisements of high-calorie meals and beverages, it is necessary to examine the role of the memory and attention mechanism in the processing of these stimuli. Knowledge regarding this subject will surely significantly contribute to the improvement of prevention and management of obesity programs designed to prevent secondary psychological difficulties, including depression. This paper presents cognitive-motivational model of obesity, according to which the description of mechanisms of eating disorders occurrence should include not only motivational factors but also the cognitive ones. The paper shows theoretical perspectives on the problem of obesity irrespective of its origin, as well as the latest empirical reports in this field. The presented survey demonstrates the lack of explicit research findings related to the processing of high and low-calorie food images by persons with excess weight. It seems that the knowledge of the basic mechanisms involved in the processing of these stimuli and the exploration of this phenomenon will allow to improve programs whose objective is to prevent obesity.

  1. A Structural Model of Stress, Motivation, and Academic Performance in Medical Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jangho; Chung, Seockhoon; An, Hoyoung; Park, Seungjin; Lee, Chul; Kim, Seong Yoon; Lee, Jae-Dam; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2012-01-01

    .... Psychological parameters were assessed with the Medical Stress Scale, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Academic Motivation Scale...

  2. Bloody robots as emotional design. How emotional structures change culturally motivated expectations of technology use in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    By applying Gilles Fauconnier & Mark Turner’s theory of conceptual blending to a design case I demonstrate how experiencing emotional qualities in technology design may influence the way users cognitively reconstruct standard expectations of use. In so doing, I expand the dominating cognitive...... theory of emotion in design in three central respects: (i) the understanding of mixed emotions is deepened; (ii) a more detailed explanation is given of the specific operations involved in appraisal processes grounded in embodied interaction; (iii) a structural model is proposed for mapping...

  3. The technology acceptance model: its past and its future in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in end users' reactions to health information technology (IT) has elevated the importance of theories that predict and explain health IT acceptance and use. This paper reviews the application of one such theory, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), to health care. We reviewed 16 data sets analyzed in over 20 studies of clinicians using health IT for patient care. Studies differed greatly in samples and settings, health ITs studied, research models, relationships tested, and construct operationalization. Certain TAM relationships were consistently found to be significant, whereas others were inconsistent. Several key relationships were infrequently assessed. Findings show that TAM predicts a substantial portion of the use or acceptance of health IT, but that the theory may benefit from several additions and modifications. Aside from improved study quality, standardization, and theoretically motivated additions to the model, an important future direction for TAM is to adapt the model specifically to the health care context, using beliefs elicitation methods.

  4. An actor-focused model of justice rule adherence and violation: the role of managerial motives and discretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brent A; Colquitt, Jason A; Paddock, E Layne

    2009-05-01

    Research on organizational justice has focused primarily on the receivers of just and unjust treatment. Little is known about why managers adhere to or violate rules of justice in the first place. The authors introduce a model for understanding justice rule adherence and violation. They identify both cognitive motives and affective motives that explain why managers adhere to and violate justice rules. They also draw distinctions among the justice rules by specifying which rules offer managers more or less discretion in their execution. They then describe how motives and discretion interact to influence justice-relevant actions. Finally, the authors incorporate managers' emotional reactions to consider how their actions may change over time. Implications of the model for theory, research, and practice are discussed. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Motivational disturbances and effects of L-dopa administration in neurofibromatosis-1 model mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Wozniak

    Full Text Available Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 frequently have cognitive and behavioral deficits. Some of these deficits have been successfully modeled in Nf1 genetically-engineered mice that develop optic gliomas (Nf1 OPG mice. In the current study, we show that abnormal motivational influences affect the behavior of Nf1 OPG mice, particularly with regard to their response to novel environmental stimuli. For example, Nf1 OPG mice made fewer spontaneous alternations in a Y-maze and fewer arm entries relative to WT controls. However, analysis of normalized alternation data demonstrated that these differences were not due to a spatial working memory deficit. Other reported behavioral results (e.g., open-field test, below suggest that differential responses to novelty and/or other motivational influences may be more important determinants of these kinds of behavior than simple differences in locomotor activity/spontaneous movements. Importantly, normal long-term depression was observed in hippocampal slices from Nf1 OPG mice. Results from elevated plus maze testing showed that differences in exploratory activity between Nf1 OPG and WT control mice may be dependent on the environmental context (e.g., threatening or non-threatening under which exploration is being measured. Nf1 OPG mice also exhibited decreased exploratory hole poking in a novel holeboard and showed abnormal olfactory preferences, although L-dopa (50 mg/kg administration resolved the abnormal olfactory preference behaviors. Nf1 OPG mice displayed an attenuated response to a novel open field in terms of decreased ambulatory activity and rearing but only during the first 10 min of the session. Importantly, Nf1 OPG mice demonstrated investigative rearing deficits with regard to a novel hanging object suspended on one side of the field which were not rescued by L-dopa administration. Collectively, our results provide new data important for evaluating therapeutic treatments aimed at

  6. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chih Chen; Shing-Han Li; Chien-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to ...

  7. Animal models of motivation for drinking in rodents with a focus on opioid receptor neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, George F; Roberts, Amanda J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Heyser, Charles J; Katner, Simon N; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Weiss, Friedbert

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol, like other drugs of abuse, has motivating properties that can be developed as animal models of self-administration. A major strength of the operant approach where an animal must work to obtain ethanol is that it reduces confounds due to palatability and controls for nonspecific malaise-inducing effects. In the domain of opioid peptide systems, limited access paradigms have good predictive validity. In addition, animal models of excessive drinking-either environmentally or genetically induced-also appear sensitive to blockade or inactivation of opioid peptide receptors. Ethanol availability can be predicted by cues associated with positive reinforcement, and these models are sensitive to the administration of opioid antagonists. Perhaps most exciting are the recent results suggesting that the key element in opioid peptide systems that is important for the positive reinforcing effects of ethanol is the mu-opioid receptor. How exactly ethanol modulates mu-receptor function will be a major challenge of future research. Nevertheless, the apparently critical role of the mu receptor in ethanol reinforcement refocuses the neuropharmacology of ethanol reinforcement in the opioid peptide domain and opens a novel avenue for exploring medications for treating alcoholism.

  8. Explaining the CMS excesses, baryogenesis and neutrino masses in $E_{6}$ motivated $U(1)_{N}$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuria, Mansi; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    We study the superstring inspired $E_{6}$ model motivated $U(1)_{N}$ extension of the supersymmetric standard model to explore the possibility of explaining the recent excess CMS events and the baryon asymmetry of the universe in eight possible variants of the model. In light of the hints from short-baseline neutrino experiments at the existence of one or more light sterile neutrinos, we also study the neutrino mass matrices dictated by the field assignments and the discrete symmetries in these variants. We find that all the variants can explain the excess CMS events via the exotic slepton decay, while for a standard choice of the discrete symmetry four of the variants have the feature of allowing high scale baryogenesis (leptogenesis). For one other variant three body decay induced soft baryogenesis mechanism is possible which can induce baryon number violating neutron-antineutron oscillation. We also point out a new discrete symmetry which has the feature of ensuring proton stability and forbidding tree lev...

  9. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system – the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes

  10. Deficient reinforcement learning in medial frontal cortex as a model of dopamine-related motivational deficits in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvetti, Massimo; Wiersema, Jan R; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Verguts, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a pathophysiologically complex and heterogeneous condition with both cognitive and motivational components. We propose a novel computational hypothesis of motivational deficits in ADHD, drawing together recent evidence on the role of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and associated mesolimbic dopamine circuits in both reinforcement learning and ADHD. Based on findings of dopamine dysregulation and ACC involvement in ADHD we simulated a lesion in a previously validated computational model of ACC (Reward Value and Prediction Model, RVPM). We explored the effects of the lesion on the processing of reinforcement signals. We tested specific behavioral predictions about the profile of reinforcement-related deficits in ADHD in three experimental contexts; probability tracking task, partial and continuous reward schedules, and immediate versus delayed rewards. In addition, predictions were made at the neurophysiological level. Behavioral and neurophysiological predictions from the RVPM-based lesion-model of motivational dysfunction in ADHD were confirmed by data from previously published studies. RVPM represents a promising model of ADHD reinforcement learning suggesting that ACC dysregulation might play a role in the pathogenesis of motivational deficits in ADHD. However, more behavioral and neurophysiological studies are required to test core predictions of the model. In addition, the interaction with different brain networks underpinning other aspects of ADHD neuropathology (i.e., executive function) needs to be better understood.

  11. Leveraging open-source technology and adapting open eLearning content to improve the knowledge and motivation of Ghana’s rural nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mwaikambo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to training opportunities is strongly correlated with health workers’ motivation because it enables health workers to take on more challenging duties. Mobile technology can be leveraged for professional development support by providing access to open education resources. Community Health Nurses (CHNs in Ghana are the frontline health workers of the Ghana Health Service (GHS and play a vital role in extending maternal and child health care to rural communities. However, as the lowest credentialed nurses, they are at the bottom of the GHS hierarchy. CHNs have limited opportunities for career advancement and report challenges with isolation and lack of resources. Leveraging open-source technology platforms and open eLearning content, the Care Community Hub (CCH project sought to address these barriers in CHN motivation by developing and deploying a mobile application (app, CHN on the Go, to CHNs in five rural districts. The app supports CHNs through tools for continuous learning, diagnostic decision-making, and improved nurse-supervisor interactions. This paper focuses on the adaptation and use of the open eLearning content to address CHNs’ motivation challenges and, ultimately, improve their knowledge and job performance as a result of having access to open education resources.

  12. Maslow--Move Aside! A Heuristical Motivation Model for Leaders in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroth, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is often used as an example of motivational theory in both practitioner and scholarly journals, yet considerable motivational research is being conducted that is not widely known, nor applied in practical settings. This paper summarizes several of those lines of inquiry and suggests applications for career and technical…

  13. New Perspectives to Study of Student Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning with Bayesian Network Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohotie, Pekka; Nokelainen, Petri; Tirri, Henry; Silander, Tomi

    This study examined the data selection process preceding multivariate analysis for a data set measuring student motivation and self-regulated learning. Data were 138 responses to a questionnaire on motivation and self-regulated learning, adapted for Finnish students. The first goal was to compare the results gained with "gentle" and…

  14. Proactive Personality and Training Motivation among Older Workers: A Mediational Model of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Ilaria; Dordoni, Paola; Piccoli, Beatrice; Bellotto, Massimo; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims at examining the relationship between proactive personality and training motivation among older workers (aged over 55 years) in a context characterized by the growing ageing of the global population. First, the authors hypothesized that proactive personality predicts the motivation to learn among older workers and that…

  15. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  16. Motivation, Satisfaction, and Perceived Freedom: A Tri-Dimensional Model of Leisure among Young Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchua, Michelle M.; Lesage, Deanna M.; Reddon, John R.; Badham, Tania D.

    2003-01-01

    A sample of 84 male young offenders, admitted for inpatient treatment in a psychiatric hospital, was used to examine the relationship between leisure motivation, leisure satisfaction, and perceived freedom in leisure using the Leisure Motivation Scale (LMS), the Leisure Satisfaction Scale (LSS), and the Perceived Freedom in Leisure Scale-Short…

  17. Physical Activity Motivation in Late Adolescence: Refinement of a Recent Multidimensional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research (Martin et al., 2006) presented a new, multidimensional approach to physical activity motivation (using the Physical Activity Motivation Scale [PAMS]) operationalized through four factors: adaptive cognition, adaptive behavior, impeding/maladaptive cognition, and maladaptive behavior. The present study extends this early research…

  18. Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships Do Change and Affect Academic Motivation: A Multilevel Growth Curve Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Bosker, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that the teacher-student interpersonal relationship (TSIR) is important for student motivation. Although TSIR has received a growing interest, there are only few studies that focus on changes and links between TSIR and student academic motivation in a longitudinal fashion in non-Western contexts. Aims: This study…

  19. A Model of How Motivational Strategies Related to the Expectative Component Affect Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Jose Manuel; Fernandez, Ana Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The topic of self-regulated learning has provided very important information about students' acquisition of knowledge and competences. Traditional research has described the importance of several cognitive, metacognitive, resource control and motivational strategies. Nevertheless, motivational strategies have received less attention…

  20. Proactive Personality and Training Motivation among Older Workers: A Mediational Model of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Ilaria; Dordoni, Paola; Piccoli, Beatrice; Bellotto, Massimo; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims at examining the relationship between proactive personality and training motivation among older workers (aged over 55 years) in a context characterized by the growing ageing of the global population. First, the authors hypothesized that proactive personality predicts the motivation to learn among older workers and that…

  1. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  2. Uncertainty modeling process for semantic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel N. Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of uncertainty across application domains generates a need for principled support for uncertainty management in semantically aware systems. A probabilistic ontology provides constructs for representing uncertainty in domain ontologies. While the literature has been growing on formalisms for representing uncertainty in ontologies, there remains little guidance in the knowledge engineering literature for how to design probabilistic ontologies. To address the gap, this paper presents the Uncertainty Modeling Process for Semantic Technology (UMP-ST, a new methodology for modeling probabilistic ontologies. To explain how the methodology works and to verify that it can be applied to different scenarios, this paper describes step-by-step the construction of a proof-of-concept probabilistic ontology. The resulting domain model can be used to support identification of fraud in public procurements in Brazil. While the case study illustrates the development of a probabilistic ontology in the PR-OWL probabilistic ontology language, the methodology is applicable to any ontology formalism that properly integrates uncertainty with domain semantics.

  3. Transformational leadership, intrinsic motivation, and trust: a moderated-mediated model of workplace safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchie, Stacey M

    2013-04-01

    Two studies examine the role of motivation and trust in the relationship between safety-specific transformational leadership and employees' safety behavior. Study 1 tested the prediction that intrinsic and identified regulation motivations mediate the relationship between safety-specific transformational leadership and employees' safety behaviors. Study 2 further explored this relationship by testing the prediction that the mediating role of intrinsic motivation is dependent on employees' level of trust in their leader. Survey data from the U.K. construction industry supported both predictions. However, the mediating role of intrinsic motivation was found only for challenge safety citizenship behaviors (i.e., voice) and not for affiliative safety citizenship behaviors (i.e., helping). These findings suggest that employees' intrinsic motivation is important to the effectiveness of leaders' efforts to promote some but not all forms of safety behavior.

  4. Acceptance model and use of technology in science and technology domain / M.V Tshevhase

    OpenAIRE

    Tshivhase, M V

    2012-01-01

    The research is intended to develop the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the science domain and determine whether it could provide enough explanation of the acceptance in terms of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and attitude towards use and intention of use in the science and technology domain. The study has investigated the contribution to technology acceptance by examining a research model that integrates age, gender, technology competency and the differen...

  5. How is technology accepted by users? A review of technology acceptance models and theories

    OpenAIRE

    Alomary, Azza; Woollard, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a literature review of the popular theories and models of technology acceptance of relevance to today’s technology developments in the 4E context. The original technology acceptance model (TAM) was derived from the theory of reasoned action and has since been developed and extended to include factors of age, gender, prior experience, ability, etc. It provides the framework to measure users’ perceptions of and intentions to use technology within and across organisations. Th...

  6. Preventive Dental Practices Motivational Model for Elementary Teachers in Training Institutions; Dental Health Instruction Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Darwin

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of instruction upon the dental health behavior of university students. The experimental group of 68 subjects, all elementary education majors, were exposed to a three--stage dental health motivational model: Dental Health Skills Instruction (four hours of laboratory instruction), Cognitive…

  7. The Influence of Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors on Academic Performance in General Chemistry Course: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alci, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the predictive and explanatory model in terms of university students' academic performance in "General Chemistry" course and their motivational features. The participants were 169 university students in the 1st grade at university. Of the participants, 132 were female and 37 were male students. Regarding…

  8. Flexible Learning in a Workplace Model: Blended a Motivation to a Lifelong Learner in a Social Network Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na-songkhla, Jaitip

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of learning in a workplace, in which an online course provides flexibility for staff to learn at their convenient hours. A motivation was brought into an account of the success of learning in a workplace program, based upon Behaviorist learning approach--an online mentor and an accumulated learning activities score was…

  9. The Actiotope Model of Giftedness: Its Relationship with Motivation, and the Prediction of Academic Achievement among Turkish Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leana-Tascilar, Marilena Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Actiotope Model of Giftedness (AMG) focuses on person-environment interactions instead of on the personality traits associated with actions. Motivation is a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic forces that are fundamental to the production of actions. Therefore, the resources provided by the environment or person are important for the…

  10. Modelling the Role of Inter-Cultural Contact in the Motivation of Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizer, Kata; Kormos, Judit

    2009-01-01

    The research reported in this paper explores the effect of direct and indirect cross-cultural contact on Hungarian school children's attitudes and motivated behaviour by means of structural equation modelling. Our data are based on a national representative survey of 1,777 13/14-year-old learners of English and German in Hungary; 237 of the…

  11. Longitudinal testing of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model of self-care among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean; Houle, Janie

    2016-11-01

    The study's aim was to test prospective associations between information, motivation, and behavioral skills (IMB model) and self-care behaviors (diet, exercise, and blood glucose testing) among patients with type 2 diabetes. 295 participants were surveyed one (T1), six (T2), and 12 (T3) months after a diabetes course. Cross-lagged panel analyses were performed to test unidirectional and bidirectional relationships between IMB model variables and self-care behaviors. Blood-glucose testing at T1 was positively related to information at T2, which in turn was positively related to blood-glucose testing at T3. Controlled motivation at T1 was positively related to exercise at T2. Autonomous motivation at T2 was positively associated with exercise at T3. There was a positive bidirectional relationship across time between behavioral skills and general diet. Patterns of prospective associations between IMB model variables and diabetes self-care depend on the self-care behavior considered. This model offers an interesting framework for examining how diabetes self-care behaviors evolve. Diabetes education programs should provide information about current health status and promote experiential learning to help patients realize the impact of their behaviors on glycemic control; should foster autonomous motivation for long-term change; and should build on patients' strengths and skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Investigation of Early Parental Motivational Strategies on Mathematics Achievement by Ethnicity: A Latent Curve Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stefanie R.; Ing, Marsha; Marcoulides, George A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the developmental effects of early parental intrinsic and extrinsic motivational strategies on mathematics achievement scores obtained from White students compared to underrepresented minority students. A latent growth curve model was fit to data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY) with mathematics achievement…

  13. The Influence of Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors on Academic Performance in General Chemistry Course: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alci, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the predictive and explanatory model in terms of university students' academic performance in "General Chemistry" course and their motivational features. The participants were 169 university students in the 1st grade at university. Of the participants, 132 were female and 37 were male students. Regarding…

  14. The Actiotope Model of Giftedness: Its Relationship with Motivation, and the Prediction of Academic Achievement among Turkish Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leana-Tascilar, Marilena Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Actiotope Model of Giftedness (AMG) focuses on person-environment interactions instead of on the personality traits associated with actions. Motivation is a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic forces that are fundamental to the production of actions. Therefore, the resources provided by the environment or person are important for the…

  15. Motivation for Achievement and Attitudes toward Mathematics Instruction in a Required Calculus Course at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Sundre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU examines students’ learning goals and attitudes toward mathematics in a first-year calculus course in undergraduate engineering education. Achievement motivation research using the Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ is advanced from current literature with two additions: (1 a course specific context using introductory college calculus students, and (2 participation of Norwegian students.Pre- and posttest measures of attitudes indicate that students do change learning goals over time, unfortunately opposite to the instructors’ aspirations. A significant increase in “Mastery Avoidance” and “Work Avoidance” was accompanied with a drop in “Mastery Approach” and “Performance Approach”. Variables such as value, motivation and enjoyment decreased along with a significant drop in self-confidence.

  16. 国防科技奖励对技术创新的激励作用分析%Motivation of National Defence Science and Technology Award on Technology Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于雪霞; 石春生; 李靖

    2012-01-01

    National defence science and technology award was an important system in the field of national defence technology innovation. And it brought positive motivation to national defence technology innovation. By reviewing its origin and analyzing its essence, the paper put forward the motivation frame of national defence science and technology award on technology innovation, and then analyzed the motivation mechanism. It pointed out that national defence science and technology award played an important role in advancing the national defence technology innovation through inspiring power, stabilizing team, introducing competition and cultivating body.%国防科技奖励是国防技术创新领域中的重要制度形式,它的建立对国防技术创新活动产生了积极的激励作用.回顾国防科技奖励的起源,分析其本质,提出国防科技奖励对国防技术创新的激励作用框架,深入剖析其激励作用机理,指出正是通过不断地激发国防技术创新动力、稳定国防技术创新团队、引入国防技术创新竞争和培育国防技术创新主体等方式,国防科技奖励制度发挥了促进国防技术创新又好又快地发展的作用.

  17. Towards a Model of Technology Adoption: A Conceptual Model Proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Pat; Moreton, Rob

    A conceptual model for Information Communication Technology (ICT) adoption by Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) is proposed. The research uses several ICT adoption models as its basis with theoretical underpinning provided by the Diffusion of Innovation theory and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Taking an exploratory research approach the model was investigated amongst 200 SMEs whose core business is ICT. Evidence from this study demonstrates that these SMEs face the same issues as all other industry sectors. This work points out weaknesses in SMEs environments regarding ICT adoption and suggests what they may need to do to increase the success rate of any proposed adoption. The methodology for development of the framework is described and recommendations made for improved Government-led ICT adoption initiatives. Application of the general methodology has resulted in new opportunities to embed the ethos and culture surrounding the issues into the framework of new projects developed as a result of Government intervention. A conceptual model is proposed that may lead to a deeper understanding of the issues under consideration.

  18. Motives and determinants of volunteering in older adults: an integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio; Zelli, Arnaldo; Violani, Cristiano

    2008-01-01

    The present study focused on changes in volunteering over time among Italian adults and examined a model in which motives from self-determination theory (SDT) were hypothesized to influence a series of social-cognitive processes including self-efficacy judgments and constructs from the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The study was conducted with 312 male (mean age = 66.10; SD = 5.28) and 253 female adults (mean age = 66.67; SD = 5.79) who worked as volunteers in several associations and organizations in Italy. In two occasions over the course of several months, participants respectively completed paper-and-pencil questionnaires and responded to telephone interviews which assessed the study's constructs of interest. Structural equation model analyses provided support for the guiding hypothesis and findings suggested that the more general approach of SDT can be successfully integrated with a social-cognitive framework such as the TPB to provide a better insight onto the origins of the cognitive predictors of intentions in older volunteers.

  19. Testing knowledge sharing effectiveness: trust, motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and social network embedded model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Muhammad Sabbir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this inquiry is to investigate the relationships among the antecedents of knowledge sharing effectiveness under the position of non-academic staff of higher learning institutions through an empirical test of a conceptual model consisting of trust, extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and online social network. This study used the respondents from the non-academic staff of higher learning institutions in Malaysia (n = 200, utilizing a self-administered survey questionnaire. The structural equation modeling approach was used to test the proposed hypotheses. The outcomes indicate that all the antecedents play a substantial function in knowledge sharing effectiveness. In addition, perceived risk plays a mediating role between trust and knowledge sharing effectiveness. On the other hand, this research also proved the communication skill also plays a mediating role between leadership style and knowledge sharing effectiveness. This study contributes to pioneering empirical findings on knowledge sharing literature under the scope of the non-academic staff perspective.

  20. How Users Search the Mobile Web: A Model for Understanding the Impact of Motivation and Context on Search Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study explores how search motivation and context influence mobile Web search behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: We studied 30 experienced mobile Web users via questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, and an online diary tool that participants used to record their daily search activities. SQLite Developer was used to extract data from the users' phone logs for correlation analysis in Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS. Findings: One quarter of mobile search sessions were driven by two or more search motivations. It was especially difficult to distinguish curiosity from time killing in particular user reporting. Multi-dimensional contexts and motivations influenced mobile search behaviors, and among the context dimensions, gender, place, activities they engaged in while searching, task importance, portal, and interpersonal relations (whether accompanied or alone when searching correlated with each other. Research limitations: The sample was comprised entirely of college students, so our findings may not generalize to other populations. More participants and longer experimental duration will improve the accuracy and objectivity of the research. Practical implications: Motivation analysis and search context recognition can help mobile service providers design applications and services for particular mobile contexts and usages. Originality/value: Most current research focuses on specific contexts, such as studies on place, or other contextual influences on mobile search, and lacks a systematic analysis of mobile search context. Based on analysis of the impact of mobile search motivations and search context on search behaviors, we built a multi-dimensional model of mobile search behaviors.

  1. Dissociation of hedonic reaction to reward and incentive motivation in an animal model of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ryan D; Simpson, Eleanor H; Richards, Vanessa L; Deo, Gita; Taylor, Kathleen; Glendinning, John I; Kandel, Eric R; Balsam, Peter D

    2012-06-01

    We previously showed that mice that selectively and reversibly overexpress striatal D2 receptors (D2R-OE) model the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Specifically, D2R-OE mice display a deficit in incentive motivation. The present studies investigated the basis for this deficit. First, we assessed whether hedonic reaction to reward is intact in D2R-OE mice. We assessed licking behavior and video-scored positive hedonic facial reactions to increasing concentrations of sucrose in control and D2R-OE mice. We found no difference between D2R-OE mice and controls in hedonic reactions. To further understand the basis of the motivational deficit, mice were given a choice between pressing a lever for access to a preferred reward (evaporated milk) or consuming a freely available less preferred reward (home-cage chow). D2R-OE mice pressed less for the preferred milk and consumed more of the freely available less preferred chow, indicating that striatal overexpression of postsynaptic D2Rs can alter cost/benefit computations, leading to a motivational deficit. This motivational impairment was ameliorated when the transgene was turned off and D2R levels were normalized. Such a deficit may arise from impaired ability to represent the value of future rewards. To test this, we used operant concurrent schedules and found reduced sensitivity to the value of future outcomes in D2R-OE mice. These results demonstrate for the first time in a transgenic animal model of schizophrenia a dissociation between hedonic reaction to reward and incentive motivation, and show a striking parallel to the proposed neurobiological and psychological mechanisms of impaired incentive motivation in schizophrenia.

  2. A Model of Technological Growth under Emission Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Rovenskaya, E.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest and analyze a model of global technological growth under a prescribed constraint on the annual emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). The model assumes that industrial GHG emission is positively related to the world's production output driven by the development of the "production"technology stock. "Cleaning" technology is developed in parallel to keep the annual GHG emission within a "safety" zone. The ratio between annual investment in "cleaning" technology and annual investment in "...

  3. Concept Model For Designing Engaging And Motivating Games For Learning - The Smiley-Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    a music learning game that teaches children to play piano using sheet music, and at the same time is fun and engaging. Although the model was originally developed for and through music, it has a more generic nature, and may be relevant for other fields as well. The Smiley-model is a condensed version...... that is believed to be an advantage when using learning games in education. In this paper the Smiley-model is presented (figure 1). The model describes which parameters and elements are important when designing a learning game. The present research is a result of a case-based action research study for designing...... of a design manual developed in a Master's thesis (Weitze, 2011), created on the basis of theoretical and empirical analysis, and is currently being applied to other research projects. The research concerning design for learning was carried out with an analysis of specific and general learning theory...

  4. Intrinsic Motivation and Engagement as "Active Ingredients" in Garden-Based Education: Examining Models and Measures Derived from Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Ellen A.; Chi, Una

    2012-01-01

    Building on self-determination theory, this study presents a model of intrinsic motivation and engagement as "active ingredients" in garden-based education. The model was used to create reliable and valid measures of key constructs, and to guide the empirical exploration of motivational processes in garden-based learning. Teacher- and…

  5. Motivating Workers in Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Barg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the motivation of construction workers is limited to a relatively small body of knowledge. Although there is considerable research available regarding motivation and productivity, few researchers have provided a comprehensive analysis on the motivation of construction workers. The research stated that productivity in construction has not improved compared to other industry sectors such as manufacturing. This trend has been echoed in publications throughout the past five decades, and suggested that motivation is one of the key factors impacting productivity. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the published work that directly links the key words—construction and motivation. The findings have been presented in five themes, that is, motivation models, environment and culture, incentives and empowerment, and worker management. This paper concludes with two methods suggested by previous researchers to improve motivation of construction workers: (1 relevant worker incentives (intrinsic or extrinsic and (2 improved management practices, specifically regarding communication with workers.

  6. Enhanced surrogate models for statistical design exploiting space mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziel, Slawek; Bandler, John W.; Mohamed, Achmed S.;

    2005-01-01

    We present advances in microwave and RF device modeling exploiting Space Mapping (SM) technology. We propose new SM modeling formulations utilizing input mappings, output mappings, frequency scaling and quadratic approximations. Our aim is to enhance circuit models for statistical analysis...

  7. Technology Marketing using PCA , SOM, and STP Strategy Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghae Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology marketing is a total processing about identifying and meeting the technological needs of human society. Most technology results exist in intellectual properties like patents. In our research, we consider patent document as a technology. So patent data are analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Self Organizing Map (SOM for STP(Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning strategy modeling. STP is a popular approach for developing marketing strategies. We use STP strategy modeling for technology marketing. Also PCA and SOM are used to analyze patent data in STP modeling. To verify improved performance of our study, we make experiments using patent data from USPTO.

  8. Griffiths phase and long-range correlations in a biologically motivated visual cortex model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi-Schappo, M.; Bortolotto, G. S.; Gonsalves, J. J.; Pinto, L. T.; Tragtenberg, M. H. R.

    2016-07-01

    Activity in the brain propagates as waves of firing neurons, namely avalanches. These waves’ size and duration distributions have been experimentally shown to display a stable power-law profile, long-range correlations and 1/f b power spectrum in vivo and in vitro. We study an avalanching biologically motivated model of mammals visual cortex and find an extended critical-like region – a Griffiths phase – characterized by divergent susceptibility and zero order parameter. This phase lies close to the expected experimental value of the excitatory postsynaptic potential in the cortex suggesting that critical be-havior may be found in the visual system. Avalanches are not perfectly power-law distributed, but it is possible to collapse the distributions and define a cutoff avalanche size that diverges as the network size is increased inside the critical region. The avalanches present long-range correlations and 1/f b power spectrum, matching experiments. The phase transition is analytically determined by a mean-field approximation.

  9. Matching achievement contexts with implicit theories to maximize motivation after failure: a congruence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alayli, Amani

    2006-12-01

    Previous research has shown that matching person variables with achievement contexts can produce the best motivational outcomes. The current study examines whether this is also true when matching entity and incremental beliefs with the appropriate motivational climate. Participants were led to believe that a personal attribute was fixed (entity belief) or malleable (incremental belief). After thinking that they failed a test that assessed the attribute, participants performed a second (related) task in a context that facilitated the pursuit of either performance or learning goals. Participants were expected to exhibit greater effort on the second task in the congruent conditions (entity belief plus performance goal climate and incremental belief plus learning goal climate) than in the incongruent conditions. These results were obtained, but only for participants who either valued competence on the attribute or had high achievement motivation. Results are discussed in terms of developing strategies for optimizing motivation in achievement settings.

  10. Building information modeling based on intelligent parametric technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xudong; TAN Jie

    2007-01-01

    In order to push the information organization process of the building industry,promote sustainable architectural design and enhance the competitiveness of China's building industry,the author studies building information modeling (BIM) based on intelligent parametric modeling technology.Building information modeling is a new technology in the field of computer aided architectural design,which contains not only geometric data,but also the great amount of engineering data throughout the lifecycle of a building.The author also compares BIM technology with two-dimensional CAD technology,and demonstrates the advantages and characteristics of intelligent parametric modeling technology.Building information modeling,which is based on intelligent parametric modeling technology,will certainly replace traditional computer aided architectural design and become the new driving force to push forward China's building industry in this information age.

  11. A game theoretic framework for incentive-based models of intrinsic motivation in artificial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Elizabeth Merrick; Kamran eShafi

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research is focusing on understanding and building artificial systems that can achieve open-ended development influenced by intrinsic motivations. In particular, research in robotics and machine learning is yielding systems and algorithms with increasing capacity for self-directed learning and autonomy. Traditional software architectures and algorithms are being augmented with intrinsic motivations to drive cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Intrinsic motivati...

  12. Using Business Theory to Motivate Undergraduate Students in Goal Attainment: An Empirical Assessment and Model for High Level Motivation and Goal Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul; Griego, Orlando V.; Stevens, Roxanne Helm

    2010-01-01

    Students at a private university in southern California took part in a study focusing on high level motivation and goal commitment. Using path analysis, this study mapped out two-paths. The first path to motivation and, therefore, goal commitment was through self-efficacy. The second path to goal commitment required a more supportive course.…

  13. An Action Research Study Using the Music Model of Academic Motivation to Increase Reading Motivation in a Fourth-Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angela W.

    2013-01-01

    This study involved examination of the processes employed in tailoring fourth-grade reading instruction to increase levels of student motivation. A participatory action research approach was utilized to design and conduct reading instruction that fourth-grade students perceived to be motivating. The reading instructional program was designed using…

  14. Predicting Motivation To Learn and Motivation To Transfer Learning Back to the Job in a Service Organization--A New Systemic Model for Training Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghes, Constantine

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of human resource development (HRD) focuses on an exploratory study that attempted to identify key predictors of motivation to learn during training and motivation to transfer learning back to the workplace, as well as examine the relationship between the two variables. Presents conceptual frameworks for training transfer. (Author/LRW)

  15. Impramine, fluoxetine and clozapine differently affected reactivity to positive and negative stimuli in a model of motivational anhedonia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheggi, S; Pelliccia, T; Ferrari, A; De Montis, M G; Gambarana, C

    2015-04-16

    Anhedonia is a relevant symptom in depression and schizophrenia. Chronic stress exposure induces in rats escape deficit, disrupts the dopaminergic response to palatable food and the competence to acquire sucrose self-administration (SA), thus configuring a possible model of motivational anhedonia. Repeated lithium administration reverts stress effects and brings back to control values the breaking point (BP) score, a measure of reward motivation. In this study, we tested on this model two antidepressants, imipramine and fluoxetine, and two antipsychotics, haloperidol and clozapine. The dopaminergic response to sucrose consumption was studied in non food-deprived rats in terms of dopamine D1 receptor signaling in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcS). More specifically, we studied the modifications in dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000 (DARPP-32) phosphorylation pattern following sucrose consumption. Fluoxetine reverted the escape deficit and showed no effects on dopaminergic response and sucrose SA. Imipramine reverted sucrose SA and dopamine response deficit in half of the rats and the escape deficit in all animals. Haloperidol did not affect stress-induced deficits. Clozapine-treated rats recovered the dopaminergic response to sucrose consumption and the competence to acquire sucrose SA, although they still showed the escape deficit, thus confirming that motivation toward reward may be dissociated from that to punishment escape. These results indicate that imipramine or fluoxetine are not endowed with a rapid onset antianhedonic effect. On the other hand, clozapine treatment showed a motivational antianhedonic activity similar to that observed after lithium treatment.

  16. Building on the Enriched Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Mastery Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Michou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two motivational theories – the Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory – have recently been combined to explain students’ motivation, making it possible to study the “what” and the “why” of learners’ achievement strivings. The present study built on this approach by (a investigating whether the distinction between autonomous or volitional and controlling or pressuring reasons can be meaningfully applied to the adoption of mastery-avoidance goals, (b investigating the concurrent and prospective relations between mastery-avoidance goals and their underlying reasons and learning strategies when mastery-approach goals and their underlying reasons were also considered, and by (c incorporating psychological need experiences as an explanatory variable in the relation between achievement motives (i.e., the motive to succeed and motive to avoid failure and both mastery goals and their underlying reasons. In two Turkish university students samples ('N' = 226, 'Mage '= 22.36; 'N' = 331, 'Mage '= 19.5, autonomous and controlling reasons appeared applicable to mastery-avoidance goals and regression and path analysis further showed that mastery-avoidance goals and their underlying autonomous reasons fail to predicted learning strategies over and above the pursuit of mastery-approach goals and their underlying reasons. Finally, need experiences were established as mediators between achievement motives and both mastery goals and their underlying reasons.

  17. Toward sustainable material usage: evaluating the importance of market motivated agency in modeling material flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaustad, Gabrielle; Olivetti, Elsa; Kirchain, Randolph

    2011-05-01

    Increasing recycling will be a key strategy for moving toward sustainable materials usage. There are many barriers to increasing recycling, including quality issues in the scrap stream. Repeated recycling can compound this problem through the accumulation of tramp elements over time. This paper explores the importance of capturing recycler decision-making in accurately modeling accumulation and the value of technologies intended to mitigate it. A method was developed combining dynamic material flow analysis with allocation of those materials into production portfolios using blending models. Using this methodology, three scrap allocation methods were explored in the context of a case study of aluminum use: scrap pooling, pseudoclosed loop, and market-based. Results from this case analysis suggest that market-driven decisions and upgrading technologies can partially mitigate the negative impact of accumulation on scrap utilization, thereby increasing scrap use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A market-based allocation method for modeling material flows suggests a higher value for upgrading strategies compared to a pseudoclosed loop or pooling allocation method for the scenarios explored.

  18. Sense of coherence and the motivational process of the job-demands-resources model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Katharina; Hakanen, Jari J; Jenny, Gregor J; Bauer, Georg F

    2016-04-01

    This longitudinal study systematically examines the various roles played by the personal resource "sense of coherence" (SoC) in the motivational process described by the job-demands-resources model. SoC captures the extent to which people perceive their life as comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, and there is evidence of its influence in many health-related outcomes. The first aim here was to establish whether a resourceful working environment builds up SoC and whether SoC leads to work engagement. A second aim was to test reverse relationships: how work engagement leads to SoC and how SoC in turn relates to job resources. A third aim was to assess whether SoC boosts the relationship between job resources and work engagement. The study utilized a 3-wave, 3-month panel design, involving 940 employees working in a broad range of occupations and economic sectors. The results of longitudinal structural equation modeling show that job resources predict SoC and SoC predicts work engagement, suggesting a mediating role of SoC. In addition, SoC predicts job resources, suggesting reciprocal relationships between job resources and SoC. No boosting effect of SoC was found. Overall, the present findings support the view that providing employees with a resourceful working environment will help to build their SoC. The effects of SoC on perceptual, appraisal, and behavioral processes may in turn lead to enhanced job resources and positive outcomes such as greater work engagement.

  19. A Descriptive Model of Patient Readiness, Motivators, and Hepatitis C Treatment Uptake among Australian Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Lorraine; Carruthers, Susan; Thompson, Sandra; Cheng, Wendy; Jones, Jocelyn; Simpson, Paul; Richards, Alun; Thein, Hla-Hla; Haber, Paul; Lloyd, Andrew; Butler, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) has a significant global health burden with an estimated 2%–3% of the world's population infected, and more than 350,000 dying annually from HCV-related conditions including liver failure and liver cancer. Prisons potentially offer a relatively stable environment in which to commence treatment as they usually provide good access to health care providers, and are organised around routine and structure. Uptake of treatment of HCV, however, remains low in the community and in prisons. In this study, we explored factors affecting treatment uptake inside prisons and hypothesised that prisoners have unique issues influencing HCV treatment uptake as a consequence of their incarceration which are not experienced in other populations. Method and Findings We undertook a qualitative study exploring prisoners' accounts of why they refused, deferred, delayed or discontinued HCV treatment in prison. Between 2010 and 2013, 116 Australian inmates were interviewed from prisons in New South Wales, Queensland, and Western Australia. Prisoners experienced many factors similar to those which influence treatment uptake of those living with HCV infection in the community. Incarceration, however, provides different circumstances of how these factors are experienced which need to be better understood if the number of prisoners receiving treatment is to be increased. We developed a descriptive model of patient readiness and motivators for HCV treatment inside prisons and discussed how we can improve treatment uptake among prisoners. Conclusion This study identified a broad and unique range of challenges to treatment of HCV in prison. Some of these are likely to be diminished by improving treatment options and improved models of health care delivery. Other barriers relate to inmate understanding of their illness and stigmatisation by other inmates and custodial staff and generally appear less amenable to change although there is potential for

  20. MODELING PROBABILISTIC CONFLICT OF TECHNOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Desyatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently for the study of conflict increasingly used method of mathematical optical modeling. Its importance stems from the fact that experimental research such conflicts rather time-consuming and complex. However, existing approaches to the study of conflict do not take into account the stochastic nature of the systems, suffers from conceptual incompleteness. There is a need to develop models, algorithms and principles, in order to assess the conflict, to choose conflict resolution to ensure that not the worst of conditions. For stochastic technological systems as a utility function, we consider the probability of achieving a given objective. We assume that some system S1 is in conflict with the system S2, (SR2R К SR1R, if q(SR1R,SR2R

  1. DETERMINANTS OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŢÂMPU DIANA LARISA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We live in a world were manner of use of information is crucial in determining the level of performance. Each country around the globe uses a proper way of spreading information and communication. Studies present the Information and Communication Technology (ICT indicator the proper tool to provide an objective evaluation of the countries performance. The question that this research wants to answer is what are the main ways of motivation (extrinsic and intrinsic in countries where ICT Development Index reaches the highest values in the last 2 years. In this way, we want to verify if ICT has different predictors and different possible consequence that depend on human motivation. Thus relying on calculations made by the International Telecommunication Union for ICT and key factors of motivation this paper will present if there is any relationship between citizens motivation and ICT. This hypothesized model will be illustrated with data from thirty developed countries.

  2. Principia designae pre-design, design, and post-design : social motive for the highly advanced technological society

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a broad design purview within the framework of “pre-design, design, and post-design” by focusing on the “motive of design,” which implies an underlying reason for the design of a product. The chapters are comprised of papers based on discussions at the “Design Research Leading Workshop” held in Nara, Japan, in 2013. This book encourages readers to enhance and expand their thinking within a widened design perspective.

  3. Epistemic Motivation and Conceptual Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert A.; And Others

    While the conceptual change model of learning has contributed much to our understanding of how children learn science, recent criticisms of the model point out its lack of attention to motivational issues. This paper examines one such motivational construct of importance to the model: epistemic motivation. After a description of the construct, we…

  4. Extending TAM for Online Learning Systems: An Intrinsic Motivation Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng; ZHAO Jue; TAN Weiwei

    2008-01-01

    To get a better understanding of user behavior towards online learning systems, the technology acceptance model (TAM) was extended to include an intrinsic motivational factor. An online survey posted on a campus BBS was conducted to collect research data with a total of 121 usable responses. The results support the motivational model and show that the explained variance of online learning system use behavior is 71.3% higher than that of the original TAM explanation.

  5. Use of additive technologies for practical working with complex models for foundry technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovik, E.; Butsanets, A. A.; Ageeva, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The article presents the results of research of additive technology (3D printing) application for developing a geometrically complex model of castings parts. Investment casting is well known and widely used technology for the production of complex parts. The work proposes the use of a 3D printing technology for manufacturing models parts, which are removed by thermal destruction. Traditional methods of equipment production for investment casting involve the use of manual labor which has problems with dimensional accuracy, and CNC technology which is less used. Such scheme is low productive and demands considerable time. We have offered an alternative method which consists in printing the main knots using a 3D printer (PLA and ABS) with a subsequent production of castings models from them. In this article, the main technological methods are considered and their problems are discussed. The dimensional accuracy of models in comparison with investment casting technology is considered as the main aspect.

  6. Technology, Demographic Characteristics and E-Learning Acceptance: A Conceptual Model Based on Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Elyas, Tariq; Akour, Mohammad Ali; Al-Salti, Zahran

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop an amalgamated conceptual model of technology acceptance that explains how individual, social, cultural and organizational factors affect the students' acceptance and usage behaviour of the Web-based learning systems. More specifically, the proposed model extends the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to…

  7. Bionic models for new sustainable energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner Inst., Dept. Solare Energetik, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Within the boundary conditions of an abundant, but diluted solar energy supply nature has successfully evolved sophisticated regenerative energy technologies, which are not yet familiar to human engineering tradition. Since until the middle of this century a substantial contribution of renewable energy to global energy consumption is required in order to limit environmental deterioration, bionic technologies may contribute to the development of commercially affordable technical options. Four biological energy technologies have been selected as examples to discuss the challenges, both in scientific and technological terms, as well as the material research aspects involved: photovoltaics based on irreversible kinetics, tensile water technology, solar powered protonic energy circuits, fuel cell catalysis based on abundant transition metals. (orig.)

  8. Rural technology and agribusiness in Argentina. The rationale underpinning the dominant technological model

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel M. Caceres

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses the main characteristics of the technological model fostered by agribusiness in Argentina, discusses its main problems and highlights the need to analyze it within a broader economic and political context. This technology is described as a technological fix and three main attributes are presented: instantaneity, transitoriness, and recurrence. The supposed efficiency of the productive model fostered by agribusiness occurs at the expense of natural capital depletion and at t...

  9. Measuring Technology Acceptance Level of Turkish Pre-Service English Teachers by Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizi, Özkan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate technology acceptance of prospective English teachers by using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in Turkish context. The study is based on Structural Equation Model (SEM). The participants of the study from English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe, Gazi and Baskent Universities. The participants…

  10. Technology Marketing using PCA , SOM, and STP Strategy Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Sunghae Jun

    2011-01-01

    Technology marketing is a total processing about identifying and meeting the technological needs of human society. Most technology results exist in intellectual properties like patents. In our research, we consider patent document as a technology. So patent data are analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Self Organizing Map (SOM) for STP(Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning) strategy modeling. STP is a popular approach for developing marketing strategies. We use STP strategy m...

  11. Influence of Psychosocial Classroom Environment on Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation in Science Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham, Sunitadevi; Aldridge, Jill M.

    2013-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was two-fold: 1) to identify salient psychosocial features of the classroom environment that influence students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning; and 2) to examine the effect of the motivational constructs of learning goal orientation, science task value and self-efficacy in science learning on students' self-regulation in science classrooms. Data collected from 1360 science students in grades 8, 9 and 10 in five public schools in Perth, Western Australia were utilized to validate the questionnaires and to investigate the hypothesized relationships. Structural Equation Modeling analysis suggested that student cohesiveness, investigation and task orientation were the most influential predictors of student motivation and self-regulation in science learning. In addition, learning goal orientation, task value and self-efficacy significantly influenced students' self-regulation in science. The findings offer potential opportunities for educators to plan and implement effective pedagogical strategies aimed at increasing students' motivation and self-regulation in science learning.

  12. Industry-Cost-Curve Approach for Modeling the Environmental Impact of Introducing New Technologies in Life Cycle Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätelhön, Arne; von der Assen, Niklas; Suh, Sangwon; Jung, Johannes; Bardow, André

    2015-07-07

    The environmental costs and benefits of introducing a new technology depend not only on the technology itself, but also on the responses of the market where substitution or displacement of competing technologies may occur. An internationally accepted method taking both technological and market-mediated effects into account, however, is still lacking in life cycle assessment (LCA). For the introduction of a new technology, we here present a new approach for modeling the environmental impacts within the framework of LCA. Our approach is motivated by consequential life cycle assessment (CLCA) and aims to contribute to the discussion on how to operationalize consequential thinking in LCA practice. In our approach, we focus on new technologies producing homogeneous products such as chemicals or raw materials. We employ the industry cost-curve (ICC) for modeling market-mediated effects. Thereby, we can determine substitution effects at a level of granularity sufficient to distinguish between competing technologies. In our approach, a new technology alters the ICC potentially replacing the highest-cost producer(s). The technologies that remain competitive after the new technology's introduction determine the new environmental impact profile of the product. We apply our approach in a case study on a new technology for chlor-alkali electrolysis to be introduced in Germany.

  13. Using a Technology Acceptance Model to Investigate Academic Acceptance of the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napaporn Kripanont

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology has long been a well-known research area, but this changed considerably when the Internet became prominent just over a decade ago. Many researchers have studied and proposed theories and models of Technology Acceptance in order to predict and explain user behaviour with technology to account for rapid change in both technologies themselves and their environments. Each theory or model has been proposed with different sets of determinants and moderators. More importantly, most of the research has been conducted in the U.S. Therefore, it is questioned whether the technology acceptance models and theories that have been developed, modified, and extended in the U.S. can be used in other regions such as South East Asia and more specifically in Thailand. It is questioned whether there might be other determinants and moderators that also play important roles in this specific environment. This research study has seven objectives, of which five have already been achieved. From the findings, despite the fact that academics hardly used the Internet (used a few times a month for teaching in class and providing a personal Web-Base for facilitating teaching, they intended to use it more (a few times a week in the future. On the contrary, at the time of the survey, they used the Internet rather often (five to six times a week for enhancing teaching knowledge, searching information for their research, personal tasks, enhancing personal knowledge, and using email for personal contact. Significantly, no matter how often they currently used the Internet, they all intended to use the Internet more often in all type of tasks in the future. With respect to motivation to make full use of the Internet in their work, they not only ‘quite agree’ that if good facilities were available to support usage (e.g. good computer hardware and software, good communication network etc. this would motivate them, but they also thought that their strong

  14. Big-five personality, social worldviews, and ideological attitudes: further tests of a dual process cognitive-motivational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G; Duckitt, John

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we extended the Dual Process Model of Ideology and Prejudice by incorporating the Five-Factor Model of Personality (N = 924). Disagreeable people tended to view the social world as competitive, which in turn predicted heightened motivations for group-based dominance and superiority (Social Dominance Orientation or SDO), whereas people low in Openness to Experience and high in Conscientiousness directly expressed heightened security-cohesion motivations (Right-Wing Authoritarianism or RWA). Other personality dimensions were weakly associated with RWA, and these effects were mediated by dangerous worldview. Multiple distinct aspects of personality predict SDO and RWA both directly and indirectly through worldviews, but we found little evidence for the possibility that personality alters the extent to which worldviews (once formed) predict SDO and RWA.

  15. Reciprocal inhibitory coupling: Measure and control of chaos on a biophysically motivated model of bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2009-06-01

    Bursting activity is an interesting feature of the temporal organization in many cell firing patterns. This complex behavior is characterized by clusters of spikes (action potentials) interspersed with phases of quiescence. As shown in experimental recordings, concerning the electrical activity of real neurons, the analysis of bursting models reveals not only patterned periodic activity but also irregular behavior 1,2]. The interpretation of experimental results, particularly the study of the influence of coupling on chaotic bursting oscillations, is of great interest from physiological and physical perspectives. The inability to predict the behavior of dynamical systems in presence of chaos suggests the application of chaos control methods, when we are more interested in obtaining regular behavior. In the present article, we focus our attention on a specific class of biophysically motivated maps, proposed in the literature to describe the chaotic activity of spiking-bursting cells [Cazelles B, Courbage M, Rabinovich M. Anti-phase regularization of coupled chaotic maps modelling bursting neurons. Europhys Lett 2001;56:504-9]. More precisely, we study a map that reproduces the behavior of a single cell and a map used to examine the role of reciprocal inhibitory coupling, specially on two symmetrically coupled bursting neurons. Firstly, using results of symbolic dynamics, we characterize the topological entropy associated to the maps, which allows us to quantify and to distinguish different chaotic regimes. In particular, we exhibit numerical results about the effect of the coupling strength on the variation of the topological entropy. Finally, we show that complicated behavior arising from the chaotic coupled maps can be controlled, without changing of its original properties, and turned into a desired attracting time periodic motion (a regular cycle). The control is illustrated by an application of a feedback control technique developed by Romeiras et al. [Romeiras

  16. Predicting Student Grade Point Average at a Community College from Scholastic Aptitude Tests and from Measures Representing Three Constructs in Vroom's Expectancy Theory Model of Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Douglas C.; Michael, William B.

    1981-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether an unweighted linear combination of community college students' scores on standardized achievement tests and a measure of motivational constructs derived from Vroom's expectance theory model of motivation was predictive of academic success (grade point average earned during one quarter of an academic…

  17. Predicting Student Grade Point Average at a Community College from Scholastic Aptitude Tests and from Measures Representing Three Constructs in Vroom's Expectancy Theory Model of Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Douglas C.; Michael, William B.

    1981-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether an unweighted linear combination of community college students' scores on standardized achievement tests and a measure of motivational constructs derived from Vroom's expectance theory model of motivation was predictive of academic success (grade point average earned during one quarter of an academic…

  18. "Soft Technology" and Criticism of the Western Model of Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Alternatives to the capitalistic Western model of develoment are suggested. Three problems afflicting Western society--alienation, resource exploitation, and eviornmental stability--are discussed and a model which advocates both political and technological change is proposed. (SM)

  19. Modeling and simulation technology readiness levels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Robert L.; Shneider, Max S.; Marburger, S. J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to establish a framework for assigning and communicating technology readiness levels (TRLs) for the modeling and simulation (ModSim) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories. This effort was undertaken as a special assignment for the Weapon Simulation and Computing (WSC) program office led by Art Hale, and lasted from January to September 2006. This report summarizes the results, conclusions, and recommendations, and is intended to help guide the program office in their decisions about the future direction of this work. The work was broken out into several distinct phases, starting with establishing the scope and definition of the assignment. These are characterized in a set of key assertions provided in the body of this report. Fundamentally, the assignment involved establishing an intellectual framework for TRL assignments to Sandia's modeling and simulation capabilities, including the development and testing of a process to conduct the assignments. To that end, we proposed a methodology for both assigning and understanding the TRLs, and outlined some of the restrictions that need to be placed on this process and the expected use of the result. One of the first assumptions we overturned was the notion of a ''static'' TRL--rather we concluded that problem context was essential in any TRL assignment, and that leads to dynamic results (i.e., a ModSim tool's readiness level depends on how it is used, and by whom). While we leveraged the classic TRL results from NASA, DoD, and Sandia's NW program, we came up with a substantially revised version of the TRL definitions, maintaining consistency with the classic level definitions and the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) approach. In fact, we substantially leveraged the foundation the PCMM team provided, and augmented that as needed. Given the modeling and simulation TRL definitions and our proposed assignment methodology, we

  20. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  1. Myths and Motives behind STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Education and the STEM-Worker Shortage Narrartive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Heidi J.

    2014-01-01

    The Business Roundtable (2013) website presents a common narrative in regard to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education, "American students are falling behind in math and science. Fewer and fewer students are pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and American students are performing at…

  2. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  3. ABOUT COMPLEX APPROACH TO MODELLING OF TECHNOLOGICAL MACHINES FUNCTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Honcharov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems arise in the process of designing, production and investigation of a complicated technological machine. These problems concern not only properties of some types of equipment but they have respect to regularities of control object functioning as a whole. A technological machine is thought of as such technological complex where it is possible to lay emphasis on a control system (or controlling device and a controlled object. The paper analyzes a number of existing approaches to construction of models for controlling devices and their functioning. A complex model for a technological machine operation has been proposed in the paper; in other words it means functioning of a controlling device and a controlled object of the technological machine. In this case models of the controlling device and the controlled object of the technological machine can be represented as aggregate combination (elements of these models. The paper describes a conception on realization of a complex model for a technological machine as a model for interaction of units (elements in the controlling device and the controlled object. When a control activation is given to the controlling device of the technological machine its modelling is executed at an algorithmic or logic level and the obtained output signals are interpreted as events and information about them is transferred to executive mechanisms.The proposed scheme of aggregate integration considers element models as object classes and the integration scheme is presented as a combination of object property values (combination of a great many input and output contacts and combination of object interactions (in the form of an integration operator. Spawn of parent object descendants of the technological machine model and creation of their copies in various project parts is one of the most important means of the distributed technological machine modelling that makes it possible to develop complicated models of

  4. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  5. Modeling and optimization of the lifetime of technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hritonenko, Natali

    1996-01-01

    Modern economic growth is characterized by structural changes based on the introduction of new technologies into economics. The replacement and renova­ tion of technologies in industrial environments undergoing technical change is clearly one of the key aspects of economic development. The mathematical modeling of evolutionary economics under technical change (TC) has been rigorously considered by many authors during last decades. There is a wide variety of economic approaches and models describing different aspects of technical change. Among these are the models of embodied technical progress [19], [35], [70], [129], endogenous growth models [94], [102], the models of technological innovations [31], [32], [41], and others. The perspective self­ organization evolutionary approach is developed in [20], [38], [122], [123], [124], [126], which unites the aspects of diffusion of new technologies, technological and behavioral diversity of firms, learning mechanisms, age-dependent effects, and other important fea...

  6. Integrated modelling in materials and process technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    Integrated modelling of entire process sequences and the subsequent in-service conditions, and multiphysics modelling of the single process steps are areas that increasingly support optimisation of manufactured parts. In the present paper, three different examples of modelling manufacturing...... processes from the viewpoint of combined materials and process modelling are presented: solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron, integrated modelling of spray forming and multiphysics modelling of friction stir welding. The fourth example describes integrated modelling applied to a failure analysis...

  7. Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model to Guide the Development of an HIV Prevention Smartphone Application for High-Risk MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Negar; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Bakken, Suzanne; Rojas, Marlene; Brown, William; Carry, Monique; Mosley, Jocelyn Patterson; Gelaude, Deborah; Schnall, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    HIV remains a significant public health problem among men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM comprise 2% of the U.S. population, but constitute 56% of persons living with HIV. Mobile health technology is a promising tool for HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to identify the desired content, features and functions of a mobile application (app) for HIV prevention in high-risk MSM. We conducted five focus group sessions with 33 MSM. Focus group recordings were transcribed and coded using themes informed by the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model. Participants identified information needs related to HIV prevention: HIV testing and prophylaxis distribution centers, support groups/peers, and HIV/STI disease/treatment information. Areas of motivation to target for the app included: attitudes and intentions. Participants identified behavioral skills to address with an app: using condoms correctly, negotiating safer sex, recognizing signs of HIV/STI. Findings from this work provide insight into the desired content of a mobile app for HIV prevention in high-risk MSM.

  8. Students Perception towards the Implementation of Computer Graphics Technology in Class via Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binti Shamsuddin, Norsila

    Technology advancement and development in a higher learning institution is a chance for students to be motivated to learn in depth in the information technology areas. Students should take hold of the opportunity to blend their skills towards these technologies as preparation for them when graduating. The curriculum itself can rise up the students' interest and persuade them to be directly involved in the evolvement of the technology. The aim of this study is to see how deep is the students' involvement as well as their acceptance towards the adoption of the technology used in Computer Graphics and Image Processing subjects. The study will be towards the Bachelor students in Faculty of Industrial Information Technology (FIIT), Universiti Industri Selangor (UNISEL); Bac. In Multimedia Industry, BSc. Computer Science and BSc. Computer Science (Software Engineering). This study utilizes the new Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) to further validate the model and enhance our understanding of the adoption of Computer Graphics and Image Processing Technologies. Four (4) out of eight (8) independent factors in UTAUT will be studied towards the dependent factor.

  9. A Proposed Framework to Understand the Intrinsic Motivation Factors on University Students' Behavioral Intention to Use a Mobile Application for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Keyes, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: By integrating a motivational perspective into the Technology Acceptance Model, the goal of this study is to empirically test the causal relationship of intrinsic motivational factors on students' behavioral intention to use (BIU) a mobile application for learning. Background: Although the Technology Acceptance Model is a significant…

  10. Motivated Reinforcement Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Maher, Mary Lou

    2009-01-01

    Motivated learning is a research field in artificial intelligence and cognitive modelling. This book describes how motivated reinforcement learning agents can be used in computer games for the design of non-player characters that can adapt their behaviour in response to unexpected changes in their environment

  11. System Architecture Modeling for Technology Portfolio Management using ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert W.; O'Neil, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    Strategic planners and technology portfolio managers have traditionally relied on consensus-based tools, such as Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in planning the funding of technology development. While useful to a certain extent, these tools are limited in the ability to fully quantify the impact of a technology choice on system mass, system reliability, project schedule, and lifecycle cost. The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) aims to provide strategic planners a decision support tool for analyzing technology selections within a Space Exploration Architecture (SEA). Using ATLAS, strategic planners can select physics-based system models from a library, configure the systems with technologies and performance parameters, and plan the deployment of a SEA. Key parameters for current and future technologies have been collected from subject-matter experts and other documented sources in the Technology Tool Box (TTB). ATLAS can be used to compare the technical feasibility and economic viability of a set of technology choices for one SEA, and compare it against another set of technology choices or another SEA. System architecture modeling in ATLAS is a multi-step process. First, the modeler defines the system level requirements. Second, the modeler identifies technologies of interest whose impact on an SEA. Third, the system modeling team creates models of architecture elements (e.g. launch vehicles, in-space transfer vehicles, crew vehicles) if they are not already in the model library. Finally, the architecture modeler develops a script for the ATLAS tool to run, and the results for comparison are generated.

  12. Modeling the Motivation-Learning Interface in Learning and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Psychology of Learning and Motivation, 47, 213-250. Markman, A. B., Baldwin, G. C, & Maddox, W. T. (2005). The interaction of payoff structure and...Intelligence, 27(3), 197-215. Markman, A. B., & Brendl, C. M. (2000). The influence of goals on value and choice. In The Psychology of Learning and

  13. Implementing the TARGET Model in Physical Education: Effects on Perceived Psychobiosocial and Motivational States in Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bortoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in achievement goal and self-determination theories, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mastery and performance climate interventions on students’ psychobiosocial (PBS states and self-determined motivation. A first study was conducted to determine the validity of the measures. In a second study, two groups of female students (N = 65, 14–15 years of age took part in the investigation. A mastery-performance group participated in eight task-involving lessons and then in another set of eight ego-involving lessons. A performance-mastery group participated in ego-involving lessons and then in task-involving lessons. Findings revealed that the program was effective in changing PBS states and self-determined motivation in the performance-mastery group. In particular, participants in this group reported lower scores on pleasant/functional PBS states and self-determined motivation after the first phase of the intervention. Furthermore, lower levels of self-determined motivation were maintained after the second phase of the intervention, thereby suggesting detrimental carryover effects.

  14. Motives and preferences of general practitioners for new collaboration models with medical specialists : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Annette J.; Benneker, Wim H. G. M.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Klazinga, Niek S.; Schuling, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates GPs to initiate and continue participating w

  15. Relationship between Learning Strategies and Motivation by Using Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Mohamad Azrien Mohamed; Nordin, Mohd Sahari; Ibrahim, Mohd Burhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed at examining the learning strategies constructs and to investigate the relationship between learning strategies and motivation in Arabic courses. The study uses a questionnaire as the information-gathering instrument, and the participants comprised students from two public universities in Peninsular Malaysia who are studying…

  16. Improving English Listening Proficiency: The Application of ARCS Learning-Motivational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Language learning motivation is one of vital factors which strongly correlates to the success in second language acquisition. Listening proficiency, as one of the basic language abilities, is paid much attention in English instruction, but presently the college English listening teaching is a weak link in English language teaching in China, which…

  17. Empirical Support for an Evolutionary Model of Self-Destructive Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. Michael; Brown, Stephanie L.; Johnson, Aron; Olsen, Berit; Melver, Kristen; Sullivan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We tested predictions generated from an evolutionary account of self-destructive motivation in two survey studies of 18-24-year-old university students. As hypothesized, hierarchical regressions showed that the positive relationship between perceived burden to family and suicide ideation was amplified for participants with low measured health and…

  18. Motivational Forces in a Growth-Centered Model of Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruski, Nicholas Aron

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that explored the effects of using an action research process to examine and develop a system of teacher evaluation that leads to real changes in teacher behaviors. The study explored motivational forces and psychological processes related to the change process in adult behaviors. Data were collected by…

  19. Motivations-Attributes-Skills-Knowledge Model as Framework for Leadership Assessment Balanced Scorecards: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of history many leaders have made their mark on society. These leaders have led uprisings, movements, and organizations that have left legacy's in today's society. Leaders such as Martin Luther King, Adolph Hitler, and Jack Welch have displayed behaviors and leadership competencies which motivated their followers. These…

  20. A New Education Model as a Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Shozo

    A new educational program was introduced to our college in 2000. This program based on the extensive knowledge in the engineering and high culture, originally intended to foster young engineers with creativity, diversity, interdisciplinarity, internationality and high practical skills. It also aimed to nourish engineers who would be engaged in developing user-friendly technologies that can coexist with nature and who can flexibly cope with current global issues such as environmental problems, food shortages and energy efficiency. Regrettably, great numbers of students don't seem to be interested in studying. We feel that there is an urgent need to improve the educational program to attract students to learn and encourage their motivations. In this paper, We would like to propose a new education model that is the Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology.

  1. Toward Verifying Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions with the CMAQ Model: Motivation, Model Description and Initial Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2014-03-14

    Motivated by the urgent need for emission verification of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, we have developed regional CO2 simulation with CMAQ over the contiguous U.S. Model sensitivity experiments have been performed using three different sets of inputs for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and two fossil fuel emission inventories, to understand the roles of fossil fuel emissions, atmosphere-biosphere exchange and transport in regulating the spatial and diurnal variability of CO2 near the surface, and to characterize the well-known ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. the interference from the biosphere on the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 observations. It is found that differences in the meteorological conditions for different urban areas strongly contribute to the contrast in concentrations. The uncertainty of NEE, as measured by the difference among the three different NEE inputs, has notable impact on regional distribution of CO2 simulated by CMAQ. Larger NEE uncertainty and impact are found over eastern U.S. urban areas than along the western coast. A comparison with tower CO2 measurements at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) shows that the CMAQ model using hourly varied and high-resolution CO2 emission from the Vulcan inventory and CarbonTracker optimized NEE reasonably reproduce the observed diurnal profile, whereas switching to different NEE inputs significantly degrades the model performance. Spatial distribution of CO2 is found to correlate with NOx, SO2 and CO, due to their similarity in emission sources and transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the power of a state-of-the art CTM in helping interpret CO2 observations and verify fossil fuel emissions. The ability to simulate CO2 in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of the utility of traditionally regulated pollutants and other species as tracers to CO2 source attribution.

  2. Toward verifying fossil fuel CO2 emissions with the CMAQ model: motivation, model description and initial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P; Pinto, Joseph P; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A

    2014-04-01

    Motivated by the question of whether and how a state-of-the-art regional chemical transport model (CTM) can facilitate characterization of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and verify CO2 fossil-fuel emissions, we for the first time applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate CO2. This paper presents methods, input data, and initial results for CO2 simulation using CMAQ over the contiguous United States in October 2007. Modeling experiments have been performed to understand the roles of fossil-fuel emissions, biosphere-atmosphere exchange, and meteorology in regulating the spatial distribution of CO2 near the surface over the contiguous United States. Three sets of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes were used as input to assess the impact of uncertainty of NEE on CO2 concentrations simulated by CMAQ. Observational data from six tall tower sites across the country were used to evaluate model performance. In particular, at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO), a tall tower site that receives urban emissions from Denver CO, the CMAQ model using hourly varying, high-resolution CO2 fossil-fuel emissions from the Vulcan inventory and Carbon Tracker optimized NEE reproduced the observed diurnal profile of CO2 reasonably well but with a low bias in the early morning. The spatial distribution of CO2 was found to correlate with NO(x), SO2, and CO, because of their similar fossil-fuel emission sources and common transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the potential of using a regional CTM to help interpret CO2 observations and understand CO2 variability in space and time. The ability to simulate a full suite of air pollutants in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of their use as tracers for CO2 source attribution. This work serves as a proof of concept and the foundation for more comprehensive examinations of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and various uncertainties in the future. Atmospheric CO2 has long been modeled

  3. A Case for Adapting and Applying Continuance Theory to Education: Understanding the Role of Student Feedback in Motivating Teachers to Persist with Including Digital Technologies in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Noeline

    2015-01-01

    In New Zealand schools, the adoption and persistent use of digital tools to aid learning is a growing but uneven, trend, often linked to the practices of early adopters and/or robust wifi infrastructure. The Technology Adoption Model is used internationally to gauge levels of uptake of technological tools, particularly in commerce and also in…

  4. Effects of Problem-Based Learning Model versus Expository Model and Motivation to Achieve for Student's Physic Learning Result of Senior High School at Class XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayekti

    2016-01-01

    "Problem-based learning" (PBL) is one of an innovative learning model which can provide an active learning to student, include the motivation to achieve showed by student when the learning is in progress. This research is aimed to know: (1) differences of physic learning result for student group which taught by PBL versus expository…

  5. How do dynamic capabilities transform external technologies into firms’ renewed technological resources? – A mediation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Wang, Yuandi; Ning, Lutao

    2016-01-01

    microfoundations of dynamic technological capabilities, mediate the relationship between external technology breadth and firms’ technological innovation performance, based on the resource-based view and dynamic capability view. Using a sample of listed Chinese licensee firms, we find that firms must broadly......How externally acquired resources may become valuable, rare, hard-to-imitate, and non-substitute resource bundles through the development of dynamic capabilities? This study proposes and tests a mediation model of how firms’ internal technological diversification and R&D, as two distinctive...... explore external technologies to ignite the dynamism in internal technological diversity and in-house R&D, which play their crucial roles differently to transform and reconfigure firms’ technological resources....

  6. How do dynamic capabilities transform external technologies into firms’ renewed technological resources? – A mediation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Wang, Yuandi; Ning, Lutao

    2016-01-01

    How externally acquired resources may become valuable, rare, hard-to-imitate, and non-substitute resource bundles through the development of dynamic capabilities? This study proposes and tests a mediation model of how firms’ internal technological diversification and R&D, as two distinctive...... microfoundations of dynamic technological capabilities, mediate the relationship between external technology breadth and firms’ technological innovation performance, based on the resource-based view and dynamic capability view. Using a sample of listed Chinese licensee firms, we find that firms must broadly...... explore external technologies to ignite the dynamism in internal technological diversity and in-house R&D, which play their crucial roles differently to transform and reconfigure firms’ technological resources....

  7. Motivation in Learning English among the Paramedical Sciences Students in Iran: Finding a Job or Grabbing a Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Azabdaftari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present article determines whether or not the undergraduate paramedical students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences of Iran are motivated to learn English; to which orientation of motivation, integrative or instrumental motivation, they incline; and how much their field of study affects increased motivation to learn English.Methods: This study was carried out with the participation of 141 undergraduate paramedical students including four fields of study: Laboratory Sciences, Technology of Radiology, Anesthesia, And Health Information Technology (HIT. The participants were asked to fill two questionnaires to determine their attitude toward learning English. Each questionnaire contained 15 items to estimate the degree of their integrative and instrumental motivation for learning English. The theoretical framework applied was based on Gardner’s socio-educational model of second language acquisition.Results: The undergraduate paramedical students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences of Iran were motivated to learn English. The comparison between integrative and instrumental motivation showed a mean value for integrative motivation as 4.02, and for instrumental motivation as 4.32 with a meaningful difference. Students in the laboratory sciences field showed the highest degree of both types of motivation.Conclusion: Iranian paramedical students are highly motivated in learning English in general; however, there was a difference in the degree of motivation according to the student’s field of study. In general, instrumental motivation was higher than integrative motivation in this study.

  8. THE BIGGS AND MOORE MODEL IN E-LEARNING: The Role of Motivation and Collaboration as Moderators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti J. HAVERILA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a research conducted to evaluate the effect of e-learning experience on students’ perceived learning outcomes, and more specifically the role of motivation and collaboration as moderators between the e-learning experience and the learning outcome. The perceived learning outcome was measured with whether the students perceived to learn more in e-learning vis-à-vis traditional learning context. The participants came from an undergraduate course at Tamk University of Applied Sciences in Tampere, Finland. The Biggs and Moore learning model indicates that the process variables (motivation and collaboration in this study have a mediating role. It was found out in this study, however, that these process variables have a moderating role rather than mediating role. Specific recommendations for the practitioners are provided, and implications for educators are discussed. Finally suggestions for further research on e-learning are provided.

  9. Understanding the impact of technology on firms’ business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalcante, Sergio Andre

    2013-01-01

    of a new business model for the partner companies in the consortium. Practical implications – This paper is important in that it will help companies understand technological impact from a business model perspective, thereby enabling them to manage innovation better by distinguishing between the creation......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of a new global positioning technology on firms’ business models. Design/methodology/approach – The empirical setting was a consortium of Danish organizations, established to develop a positioning-based technology platform as a basis...... for innovative commercial products and/or services. Three of the consortium companies were selected for case-study research. Findings – The main findings were that companies will use the new technology to extend their existing business models, and that the technology platform potentially represents the creation...

  10. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidball, Rick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Bluestein, Joel [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Rodriguez, Nick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Knoke, Stu [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  11. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  12. Analysing Models as a Knowledge Technology in Transport Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Models belong to a wider family of knowledge technologies, applied in the transport area. Models sometimes share with other such technologies the fate of not being used as intended, or not at all. The result may be ill-conceived plans as well as wasted resources. Frequently, the blame for such a ......Models belong to a wider family of knowledge technologies, applied in the transport area. Models sometimes share with other such technologies the fate of not being used as intended, or not at all. The result may be ill-conceived plans as well as wasted resources. Frequently, the blame...... critical analytic literature on knowledge utilization and policy influence. A simple scheme based in this literature is drawn up to provide a framework for discussing the interface between urban transport planning and model use. A successful example of model use in Stockholm, Sweden is used as a heuristic...

  13. A Network Analysis Model for Selecting Sustainable Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsung Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most companies develop technologies to improve their competitiveness in the marketplace. Typically, they then patent these technologies around the world in order to protect their intellectual property. Other companies may use patented technologies to develop new products, but must pay royalties to the patent holders or owners. Should they fail to do so, this can result in legal disputes in the form of patent infringement actions between companies. To avoid such situations, companies attempt to research and develop necessary technologies before their competitors do so. An important part of this process is analyzing existing patent documents in order to identify emerging technologies. In such analyses, extracting sustainable technology from patent data is important, because sustainable technology drives technological competition among companies and, thus, the development of new technologies. In addition, selecting sustainable technologies makes it possible to plan their R&D (research and development efficiently. In this study, we propose a network model that can be used to select the sustainable technology from patent documents, based on the centrality and degree of a social network analysis. To verify the performance of the proposed model, we carry out a case study using actual patent data from patent databases.

  14. Modeling learning technology systems as business systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    The design of Learning Technology Systems, and the Software Systems that support them, is largely conducted on an intuitive, ad hoc basis, thus resulting in inefficient systems that defectively support the learning process. There is now justifiable, increasing effort in formalizing the engineering o

  15. New Metacognitive Model for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Addressing metacognitive functions has been shown to improve performance at the individual, team, group, and organizational levels. Metacognition is beginning to surface as an added cognate discipline for the field of human performance technology (HPT). Advances from research in the fields of cognition and metacognition offer a place for HPT to…

  16. New Metacognitive Model for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Addressing metacognitive functions has been shown to improve performance at the individual, team, group, and organizational levels. Metacognition is beginning to surface as an added cognate discipline for the field of human performance technology (HPT). Advances from research in the fields of cognition and metacognition offer a place for HPT to…

  17. Empirical modeling of information communication technology usage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-11-01

    Nov 1, 2015 ... Information Communication Technology (ICT) usage behavior), based on ... highly integrated ICT schemes with competent personnel, using ICTs in .... skilled business teachers, office administrators and ... management of various aspects of the learning ..... Library, 31(6):792-807. doi: 10.1108/EL-04-2012-.

  18. Modeling learning technology systems as business systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    The design of Learning Technology Systems, and the Software Systems that support them, is largely conducted on an intuitive, ad hoc basis, thus resulting in inefficient systems that defectively support the learning process. There is now justifiable, increasing effort in formalizing the engineering

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE MECHANISM MODELS OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION DIFFUSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiuping; HU Minan

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanism and principle of diffusion of technology diffusion on the basis of quantitative analysis. Then it sets up the diffusion model of innovation incorporating price, advertising and distribution, the diffusion model of innovation including various kinds of consumers, and the substitute model between the new technology and the old one applied systems dynamics, optimization method, probabilistic method and simulation method on computer. Finally this paper concludes with some practical observations from a case study.

  20. Motivated explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Operskalski, Joachim T.; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Although motivation is a well-established field of study in its own right, and has been fruitfully studied in connection with attribution theory and belief formation under the heading of “motivated thinking,” its powerful and pervasive influence on specifically explanatory processes is less well explored. Where one has a strong motivation to understand some event correctly, one is thereby motivated to adhere as best one can to normative or “epistemic” criteria for correct or accurate explanation, even if one does not consciously formulate or apply such criteria. By contrast, many of our motivations to explain introduce bias into the processes involved in generating, evaluating, or giving explanations. Non-epistemic explanatory motivations, or following Kunda's usage, “directional” motivations, include self-justification, resolution of cognitive dissonance, deliberate deception, teaching, and many more. Some of these motivations lead to the relaxation or violation of epistemic norms; others enhance epistemic motivation, so that one engages in more careful and thorough generational and evaluative processes. We propose that “real life” explanatory processes are often constrained by multiple goals, epistemic and directional, where these goals may mutually reinforce one another or may conflict, and where our explanations emerge as a matter of weighing and satisfying those goals. We review emerging evidence from psychology and neuroscience to support this framework and to elucidate the central role of motivation in human thought and explanation. PMID:26528166

  1. Extending the theory of planned behavior as a model of cognitive and motivational influences on academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broonen, Jean Paul

    2001-06-01

    In the theory of planned behavior [1,2], which is a widely applied expectancy-value model of attitude-behavior relationship, the individual's intention to perform a given behavior is central. Intentions are assumed to capture the motivational factors that influence behavior. Intentions are determined by attitude toward the behavior, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control. This paper examines some ways of expanding the model in the specific area of academic performance by the addition of other variables such as implemented intentions and action control. Some exploratory results from a field experiment are presented.

  2. Show them the money? The role of pay, managerial need support, and justice in a self-determination theory model of intrinsic work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsen, Anja H; Halvari, Hallgeir; Forest, Jacques; Deci, Edward L

    2015-08-01

    The link between money and motivation has been a debated topic for decades, especially in work organizations. However, field studies investigating the amount of pay in relation to employee motivation is lacking and there have been calls for empirical studies addressing compensation systems and motivation in the work domain. The purpose of this study was to examine outcomes associated with the amount of pay, and perceived distributive and procedural justice regarding pay in relation to those for perceived managerial need support. Participants were 166 bank employees who also reported on their basic psychological need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation. SEM-analyses tested a self-determination theory (SDT) model, with satisfaction of the competence and autonomy needs as an intervening variable. The primary findings were that amount of pay and employees' perceived distributive justice regarding their pay were unrelated to employees' need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation, but procedural justice regarding pay did affect these variables. However, managerial need support was the most important factor for promoting need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation both directly, indirectly, and as a moderator in the model. Hence, the results of the present organizational field study support earlier laboratory experiments within the SDT framework showing that monetary rewards did not enhance intrinsic motivation. This seems to have profound implications for organizations concerned about motivating their employees.

  3. Technological Discontinuities and Dominant Designs: A Cyclical Model of Technological Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip; Tushman, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Based on longitudinal studies of the cement, glass, and minicomputer industries, this article proposes a technological change model in which a technological breakthrough, or discontinuity, initiates an era of intense technical variation and selection, culminating in a single dominant design and followed by a period of incremental technical…

  4. Perceived Convenience in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model: Mobile Technology and English Learning for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yan, Chi-Fang; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Since convenience is one of the features for mobile learning, does it affect attitude and intention of using mobile technology? The technology acceptance model (TAM), proposed by David (1989), was extended with perceived convenience in the present study. With regard to English language mobile learning, the variables in the extended TAM and its…

  5. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  6. Research on Digital Product Modeling Key Technologies of Digital Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guoping; ZHOU Zude; HU Yefa; ZHAO Liang

    2006-01-01

    With the globalization and diversification of the market and the rapid development of Information Technology (IT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the digital revolution of manufacturing is coming. One of the key technologies in digital manufacturing is product digital modeling. This paper firstly analyzes the information and features of the product digital model during each stage in the product whole lifecycle, then researches on the three critical technologies of digital modeling in digital manufacturing-product modeling, standard for the exchange of product model data and digital product data management. And the potential signification of the product digital model during the process of digital manufacturing is concluded-product digital model integrates primary features of each stage during the product whole lifecycle based on graphic features, applies STEP as data exchange mechanism, and establishes PDM system to manage the large amount, complicated and dynamic product data to implement the product digital model data exchange, sharing and integration.

  7. Teacher, peer and parent autonomy support in physical education and leisure-time physical activity: A trans-contextual model of motivation in four nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Hein, Vello; Soós, István; Karsai, István; Lintunen, Taru; Leemans, Sofie

    2009-07-01

    An extended trans-contextual model of motivation for health-related physical activity was tested in samples from four nations. The model proposes a motivational sequence in which perceived autonomy support from teachers in a physical education (PE) context and from peers and parents in a leisure-time physical activity context predict autonomous motivation, intentions and physical activity behaviour in a leisure-time context. A three-wave prospective correlational design was employed. High-school pupils from Britain, Estonia, Finland and Hungary completed measures of perceived autonomy support from PE teachers, autonomous motivation in both contexts, perceived autonomy support from peers and parents, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), and measures of behaviour and past behaviour in a leisure-time context. Path-analyses controlling for past behaviour supported trans-contextual model hypotheses across all samples. Effects of perceived autonomy support from peers and parents on leisure-time autonomous motivation were small and inconsistent, while effects on TPB variables were stronger. There was a unique effect of perceived autonomy support from PE teachers on leisure-time autonomous motivation. Findings support the model, which provides an explanation of the processes by which perceived autonomy support from different sources affects health-related physical activity motivation across these contexts.

  8. On the Construction of the Motive Power System of Enterprise Technology Innovation under Post- financial Crisis%后金融危机时代企业技术创新动力系统构建研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘国勇; 陈文钧

    2011-01-01

    Under Post -financial crisis era, as the internal and external environment of enterprise has been significantly changed. Improving the technology innovation ability is the fundamental way of enterprise. Base on the influence factors of enterprise technology innovation, the author constructs the motive power system model of enterprise technology innovation and analysis of the current situation. The author puts forward related suggestions.%后金融危机时代,企业的外部环境和内部环境发生了重大变化,加强技术创新是企业应对金融危机的根本途径.结合金融危机背景下企业技术创新的影响因素,构建了企业技术创新动力系统模型,对动力系统建设现状进行了分析,并提出了相关建议.

  9. A Structural Model of Stress, Motivation, and Academic Performance in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jangho; Chung, Seockhoon; An, Hoyoung; Park, Seungjin; Lee, Chul; Kim, Seong Yoon; Lee, Jae-Dam; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was 1) to identify factors that may influence academic stress in medical students and 2) to investigate the causal relationships among these variables with path analysis. Methods One hundred sixty medical students participated in the present study. Psychological parameters were assessed with the Medical Stress Scale, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Academic Motivation Scale. Linea...

  10. Reduced motivation in the BACHD rat model of Huntington disease is dependent on the choice of food deprivation strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Karl Håkan Jansson

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive, psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. Animal models of HD show phenotypes that can be divided into similar categories, with the metabolic phenotype of certain models being characterized by obesity. Although interesting in terms of modeling metabolic symptoms of HD, the obesity phenotype can be problematic as it might confound the results of certain behavioral tests. This concerns the assessment of cognitive function in particular, as tests for such phenotypes are often based on food depriving the animals and having them perform tasks for food rewards. The BACHD rat is a recently established animal model of HD, and in order to ensure that behavioral characterization of these rats is done in a reliable way, a basic understanding of their physiology is needed. Here, we show that BACHD rats are obese and suffer from discrete developmental deficits. When assessing the motivation to lever push for a food reward, BACHD rats were found to be less motivated than wild type rats, although this phenotype was dependent on the food deprivation strategy. Specifically, the phenotype was present when rats of both genotypes were deprived to 85% of their respective free-feeding body weight, but not when deprivation levels were adjusted in order to match the rats' apparent hunger levels. The study emphasizes the importance of considering metabolic abnormalities as a confounding factor when performing behavioral characterization of HD animal models.

  11. Modelling architectures in multi-product oriented technology development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir

    This thesis investigates the use of architecture modelling in a technology development context.This context presents greater uncertainties than more mature new product development. Applications—the use of products based on the technology being developed—are not fully identified and the requiremen...... frameworks in a technology development projectare presented, along with descriptive results on the context of technology development gained through active participation in the case project.......This thesis investigates the use of architecture modelling in a technology development context.This context presents greater uncertainties than more mature new product development. Applications—the use of products based on the technology being developed—are not fully identified and the requirements...... to be fulfilled are not completely defined.The products to be based on the technology are yet to be developed as the foundation for their development will be developed during the technology development. Furthermore, the production of a new technology is not defined as both the technology and derivative products...

  12. Putting theory to the test: examining family context, caregiver motivation, and conflict in the Family Check-Up model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosco, Gregory M; Van Ryzin, Mark; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Dishion, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    This study examined contextual factors (caregiver depression, family resources, ethnicity, and initial levels of youth problem behavior) related to the effectiveness of the Family Check-Up (FCU) and evaluated family processes as a mediator of FCU intervention response and adolescent antisocial behavior. We followed a sample of 180 ethnically diverse youths of families who engaged in the FCU intervention. Family data were collected as part of the FCU assessment, and youth data were collected over 4 years, from sixth through ninth grade. Findings indicated that caregiver depression and minority status predicted greater caregiver motivation to change. In turn, caregiver motivation was the only direct predictor of FCU intervention response during a 1-year period. Growth in family conflict from sixth through eighth grade mediated the link between FCU response and ninth-grade antisocial behavior. This study explicitly tested core aspects of the FCU intervention model and demonstrated that caregiver motivation is a central factor that underlies family response to the FCU. The study also provided support for continued examination of family process mechanisms that account for enduring effects of the FCU and other family-centered interventions.

  13. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  14. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  15. Modelling Benefits-Oriented Costs for Technology Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurillard, Diana

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of technology enhanced learning (TEL) methods changes the deployment of the most important resource in the education system: teachers' and learners' time. New technology promises greater personalization and greater productivity, but without careful modeling of the effects on the use of staff time, TEL methods can easily increase…

  16. Dystechnia: technology deficient model and suggestions for entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Farhadi nahad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lack of interconnection among system components creates a limitation in technology adoption by the reduction or absence of potential users’ perception implying the second-order ignorance state (ignorance of ignorance. Effect of defective or fail in use, extend or logistic technology is dystechnia presenting everywhere and its origin implicitly implies in entrepreneurial opportunity. The identification and exploitation of economic potential by changing the means of economic production and control is called entrepreneurship which strategically allocate economic resource from present approach to innovative one again. Technology Adoption Model is a theoretical construct of the relationship between potential users’ perception and behavioral intentions resulting in actual technology adoption. The attention of Technology Adoption Model is assumes a practical or technological system, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use determining the intention to use adjusting the actual acceptance respectively. This is the start of entrepreneurial solutions as an option to the dystechnic status upon which Technology Adoption Model is worked. The aim of present study is considering dystechnia phenomenon anticipating Technology Adoption Model as well as entrepreneurial mechanisms which the phenomenon is cured.

  17. How large-scale energy-environment models represent technology and technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    In the process of selecting measures against global warming, it is important to consider the introduction of technological innovations into the models, and studies were made in this connection. An induced technical change model has to be an economically total model that represents various incentives involving the form of profits from innovations; profits from cost functions, research-and-development production functions, and abstract profits from empirical estimates; and the dimensions in which technological change is assumed to progress. Under study at the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum is how to represent various technological assumptions and development, which is necessary to predict the cost for dealing with global warming. At the conference of February 2001, 10 cases of preliminary model scenarios were discussed. In one case, for instance, a carbon tax of $25/ton in 2010 is raised $25 every decade to be $100/ton in 2040. Three working groups are engaged in the study of long-run economy/technology baseline scenarios, characterization of current and potential future technologies, and ways of modeling technological change. (NEDO)

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS MODELING AIMING TO IMPROVE ITS OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mihajlović

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modeling procedure of one real technological system. In this study, thecopper extraction from the copper flotation waste generated at the Bor Copper Mine (Serbia, werethe object of modeling. Sufficient data base for statistical modeling was constructed using theorthogonal factorial design of the experiments. Mathematical model of investigated system wasdeveloped using the combination of linear and multiple linear statistical analysis approach. Thepurpose of such a model is obtaining optimal states of the system that enable efficient operationsmanagement. Besides technological and economical, ecological parameters of the process wereconsidered as crucial input variables.

  19. The technology acceptance model: predicting nurses' intention to use telemedicine technology (eICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine factors and predictors that influence nurses' intention to use the eICU technology, to examine the applicability of the Technology Acceptance Model in explaining nurses' intention to use the eICU technology in healthcare settings, and to provide psychometric evidence of the measurement scales used in the study. The study involved 117 participants from two healthcare systems. The Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model was developed based on the original Technology Acceptance Model that was initially developed by Fred Davis in 1986. The eICU Acceptance Survey was used as an instrument for the study. Content validity was examined, and the reliability of the instrument was tested. The results show that perceived usefulness is the most influential factor that influences nurses' intention to use the eICU technology. The principal factors that influence perceived usefulness are perceived ease of use, support from physicians, and years working in the hospital. The model fit was reasonably adequate and able to explain 58% of the variance (R = 0.58) in intention to use the eICU technology with the nursing sample.

  20. Risk Management Technologies With Logic and Probabilistic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Solozhentsev, E D

    2012-01-01

    This book presents intellectual, innovative, information technologies (I3-technologies) based on logical and probabilistic (LP) risk models. The technologies presented here consider such models for structurally complex systems and processes with logical links and with random events in economics and technology.  The volume describes the following components of risk management technologies: LP-calculus; classes of LP-models of risk and efficiency; procedures for different classes; special software for different classes; examples of applications; methods for the estimation of probabilities of events based on expert information. Also described are a variety of training courses in these topics. The classes of risk models treated here are: LP-modeling, LP-classification, LP-efficiency, and LP-forecasting. Particular attention is paid to LP-models of risk of failure to resolve difficult economic and technical problems. Amongst the  discussed  procedures of I3-technologies  are the construction of  LP-models,...

  1. A DYNAMICAL SYSTEM APPROACH IN MODELING TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Husniah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a mathematical model of two parties technology transfer from a leader to a follower. The model is reconstructed via dynamical system approach from a known standard Raz and Assa model and we found some important conclusion which have not been discussed in the original model. The model assumes that in the absence of technology transfer from a leader to a follower, both the leader and the follower have a capability to grow independently with a known upper limit of the development. We obtain a rich mathematical structure of the steady state solution of the model. We discuss a special situation in which the upper limit of the technological development of the follower is higher than that of the leader, but the leader has started earlier than the follower in implementing the technology. In this case we show a paradox stating that the follower is unable to reach its original upper limit of the technological development could appear whenever the transfer rate is sufficiently high.  We propose a new model to increase realism so that any technological transfer rate could only has a positive effect in accelerating the rate of growth of the follower in reaching its original upper limit of the development.

  2. An Improved Valuation Model for Technology Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ako Doffou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates some of the parameters of the Schwartz and Moon (2001 model using cross-sectional data. Stochastic costs, future financing, capital expenditures and depreciation are taken into account. Some special conditions are also set: the speed of adjustment parameters are equal; the implied half-life of the sales growth process is linked to analyst forecasts; and the risk-adjustment parameter is inferred from the company’s observed stock price beta. The model is illustrated in the valuation of Google, Amazon, eBay, Facebook and Yahoo. The improved model is far superior to the Schwartz and Moon (2001 model.

  3. Motivation and library management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Likar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with motivation, its relation to management and its role and use in librarianship in our country and abroad. The countries where librarianship is well developed started to deal with library management and questions of motivation of library workers decades ago, whereas elsewhere the subject is at its start. The prerequisite for modern policy making is attention to the elements of modern library management. Librarians, library managers and directors of libraries should create a work environment providing long term satisfaction with work by means of certain knowledge and tools. The level of motivation of the staff is influenced by the so called higher factors deriving from the work process itself and related to work contents: achieve¬ment, recognition, trust and work itself. Extrinsic factors (income, interpersonal relations, technology of administration, company policy, working conditions, work con¬trol, personal security, job security and position... should exercise lesser impact on the level of motivation.

  4. Polymer Matrix Composites using Fused Deposition Modeling Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing technology that allows fabrication of complex three-dimensional geometries layer-by-layer. The goal of...

  5. Plasma Modeling Enabled Technology Development Empowered by Fundamental Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Technology development increasingly relies on modeling to speed the innovation cycle. This is particularly true for systems using low temperature plasmas (LTPs) and their role in enabling energy efficient processes with minimal environmental impact. In the innovation cycle, LTP modeling supports investigation of fundamental processes that seed the cycle, optimization of newly developed technologies, and prediction of performance of unbuilt systems for new applications. Although proof-of-principle modeling may be performed for idealized systems in simple gases, technology development must address physically complex systems that use complex gas mixtures that now may be multi-phase (e.g., in contact with liquids). The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering, and radiation transport data (FSRD) required for this modeling increases as the innovation cycle progresses, while the accuracy required of that data depends on the intended outcome. In all cases, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSRD. Modeling and technology development are, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSRD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSRD in the innovation cycle enabled by plasma modeling will be discussed using results from multidimensional and global models. Examples of fundamental studies and technology optimization will focus on microelectronics fabrication and on optically pumped lasers. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  6. Study on Modeling Technology in Digital Reactor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓平; 罗月童; 童莉莉

    2004-01-01

    Modeling is the kernel part of a digital reactor system. As an extensible platform for reactor conceptual design, it is very important to study modeling technology and develop some kind of tools to speed up preparation of all classical computing models. This paper introduces the background of the project and basic conception of digital reactor. MCAM is taken as an example for modeling and its related technologies used are given. It is an interface program for MCNP geometry model developed by FDS team (ASIPP & HUT), and designed to run on windows system. MCAM aims at utilizing CAD technology to facilitate creation of MCNP geometry model. There have been two ways for MCAM to utilize CAD technology:(1) Making use of user interface technology in aid of generation of MCNP geometry model;(2) Making use of existing 3D CAD model to accelerate creation of MCNP geometry model. This paper gives an overview of MCAM's major function. At last, several examples are given to demonstrate MCAM's various capabilities.

  7. Motivated Explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard ePatterson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although motivation is a well-established field of study in its own right, and has been fruitfully studied in connection with attribution theory and belief formation under the heading of motivated thinking, its powerful and pervasive influence on explanatory processes is less well explored. Where one has a strong motivation to understand some event correctly, one is thereby motivated to adhere as best one can to normative or epistemic criteria for correct or accurate explanation, even if one does not consciously formulate or apply such criteria. By contrast, many of our motivations to explain introduce bias into the processes involved in generating, evaluating, or giving of explanations. Non-epistemic explanatory motivations, or (following Kunda’s usage, directional motivations, include self-justification, resolution of cognitive dissonance, deliberate deception, teaching, and many more. Some of these motivations lead to the relaxation or violation of epistemic norms, combined with an effort to preserve the appearance of accuracy; others enhance epistemic motivation, so that one engages in more careful and thorough generational and evaluative processes. In short, real life explanatory processes are often constrained by multiple goals, epistemic and directional, where these goals may mutually reinforce one another or may conflict, and where our explanations emerge as a matter of weighing and satisfying those goals. Our proposals are largely programmatic, although we do review a good deal of relevant behavioral and neurological evidence. Specifically, we recognize five generative processes, some of which cover further sub-processes, and six evaluative processes. All of these are potential points of entry for the influence of motivation. We then suggest in some detail how specific sorts of explanatory motivation interact with specific explanatory processes.

  8. The Technological Barriers of Using Video Modeling in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Desha; Myck-Wayne, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to identify the technological barriers teachers encounter when attempting to implement video modeling in the classroom. Video modeling is an emerging evidence-based intervention method used with individuals with autism. Research has shown the positive effects video modeling can have on its recipients. Educators…

  9. Modeling Recycling Asphalt Pavement Processing Technologies in Asphalt Mixing Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Simonas Tamaliūnas; Henrikas Sivilevičius

    2011-01-01

    The article presents reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) processing technologies and equipment models used in the asphalt mixing plant (AMP). The schematic model indicating all possible ways to process RAP in AMP is shown. The model calculating the needed temperature of mineral materials used for heating RAP is given and an example of such calculation is provided.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Modeling Recycling Asphalt Pavement Processing Technologies in Asphalt Mixing Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonas Tamaliūnas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP processing technologies and equipment models used in the asphalt mixing plant (AMP. The schematic model indicating all possible ways to process RAP in AMP is shown. The model calculating the needed temperature of mineral materials used for heating RAP is given and an example of such calculation is provided.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Data integration technologies to support integrated modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapen, M.J.R.; Roosenschoon, O.R.; Lokers, R.M.; Janssen, S.J.C.; Randen, van Y.; Verweij, P.J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the recent years the scientific activities of our organisation in large research projects show a shifting priority from model integration to the integration of data itself. Our work in several large projects on integrated modelling for impact assessment studies has clearly shown the importance

  12. Data integration technologies to support integrated modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapen, M.J.R.; Roosenschoon, O.R.; Lokers, R.M.; Janssen, S.J.C.; Randen, van Y.; Verweij, P.J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the recent years the scientific activities of our organisation in large research projects show a shifting priority from model integration to the integration of data itself. Our work in several large projects on integrated modelling for impact assessment studies has clearly shown the importance

  13. Rural technology and agribusiness in Argentina. The rationale underpinning the dominant technological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Caceres

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the main characteristics of the technological model fostered by agribusiness in Argentina, discusses its main problems and highlights the need to analyze it within a broader economic and political context. This technology is described as a technological fix and three main attributes are presented: instantaneity, transitoriness, and recurrence. The supposed efficiency of the productive model fostered by agribusiness occurs at the expense of natural capital depletion and at the costs internalized by other social actors. This is happening either via accumulation by dispossession, or through the socialization and temporal deferment of its negative externalities. Its strength largely transcends the technological domains. To bring this model into question would imply not only to object its visible head (i.e., agribusiness, but also to question the institutions (scientific, educative, juridical, and administrative and the political structures that support it. Finally, the paper discusses some alternatives and suggests to develop a political agronomy for Latin America. 

  14. Numerical modeling in photonic crystals integrated technology: the COPERNICUS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguti, Stefania; Armaroli, Andrea; Bellanca, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project.......Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project....

  15. Numerical modeling in photonic crystals integrated technology: the COPERNICUS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguti, Stefania; Armaroli, Andrea; Bellanca, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project.......Photonic crystals will play a fundamental role in the future of optical communications. The relevance of the numerical modeling for the success of this technology is assessed by using some examples concerning the experience of the COPERNICUS Project....

  16. Predicting nurses' use of healthcare technology using the technology acceptance model: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Gillian

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of healthcare technologies can only be attained if nurses accept and intend to fully use them. One of the most common models utilized to understand user acceptance of technology is the Technology Acceptance Model. This model and modified versions of it have only recently been applied in the healthcare literature among nurse participants. An integrative literature review was conducted on this topic. Ovid/MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and CINAHL were searched yielding a total of 982 references. Upon eliminating duplicates and applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the review included a total of four dissertations, three symposium proceedings, and 13 peer-reviewed journal articles. These documents were appraised and reviewed. The results show that a modified Technology Acceptance Model with added variables could provide a better explanation of nurses' acceptance of healthcare technology. These added variables to modified versions of the Technology Acceptance Model are discussed, and the studies' methodologies are critiqued. Limitations of the studies included in the integrative review are also examined.

  17. Situating Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Susan Bobbitt; Horn, Ilana Seidel; Ward, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a situative approach to studying motivation to learn in social contexts. We begin by contrasting this perspective to more prevalent psychological approaches to the study of motivation, describing epistemological and methodological differences that have constrained conversation between theoretical groups. We elaborate on…

  18. Role of Travel Motivations, Perceived Risks and Travel Constraints on Destination Image and Visit Intention in Medical Tourism: Theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad J; Chelliah, Shankar; Haron, Mahmod S; Ahmed, Sahrish

    2017-02-01

    Travel motivations, perceived risks and travel constraints, along with the attributes and characteristics of medical tourism destinations, are important issues in medical tourism. Although the importance of these factors is already known, a comprehensive theoretical model of the decision-making process of medical tourists has yet to be established, analysing the intricate relationships between the different variables involved. This article examines a large body of literature on both medical and conventional tourism in order to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework of medical tourism decision-making. Many facets of this complex phenomenon require further empirical investigation.

  19. Role of Travel Motivations, Perceived Risks and Travel Constraints on Destination Image and Visit Intention in Medical Tourism; Theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Travel motivations, perceived risks and travel constraints, along with the attributes and characteristics of medical tourism destinations, are important issues in medical tourism. Although the importance of these factors is already known, a comprehensive theoretical model of the decision-making process of medical tourists has yet to be established, analysing the intricate relationships between the different variables involved. This article examines a large body of literature on both medical and conventional tourism in order to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework of medical tourism decision-making. Many facets of this complex phenomenon require further empirical investigation.

  20. Surveying and Modeling Students' Motivation and Learning Strategies for Mobile-Assisted Seamless Chinese Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ching Sing; Wong, Lung-Hsiang; King, Ronnel B.

    2016-01-01

    Seamless language learning promises to be an effective learning approach that addresses the limitations of classroom-only language learning. It leverages mobile technologies to facilitate holistic and perpetual learning experiences that bridge different locations, times, technologies or social settings. Despite the emergence of studies on seamless…

  1. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H;

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to investigate whether motivational interviewing increases weight loss among obese or overweight women prior to fertility treatment. Women with body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2) approaching the Fertility Clinic, Regional Hospital Skive, were given advice about diet...... and physical activity with the purpose of weight loss. In addition, they were asked if they wanted to receive motivational interviewing. Among other data, age, height and weight were obtained. Main outcomes were weight loss measured in kg and decrease in BMI. We studied 187 women: 110 received sessions...... of motivational interviewing (intervention group, n = 110), 64 received motivational support by phone or e-mail only and 13 women did not wish any motivational support (control group, n = 77). The mean weight loss and decrease in BMI was greater in the intervention group compared with the control group (9.3 kg...

  2. Diversity and Inclusion in Information Technology from an Age Perspective: Motivating and Managing Information Technology Professionals across Multiple Generations in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Smalls, Yottie Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate diversity and inclusion from an age perspective among information technology (IT) professionals that were categorized as 4 different generations in the workforce today: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. At the same time, this study sought to examine motivational…

  3. Diversity and Inclusion in Information Technology from an Age Perspective: Motivating and Managing Information Technology Professionals across Multiple Generations in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Smalls, Yottie Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate diversity and inclusion from an age perspective among information technology (IT) professionals that were categorized as 4 different generations in the workforce today: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. At the same time, this study sought to examine motivational…

  4. The effects of motivation on response rate: a hidden semi-Markov model analysis of behavioral dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Eran; Morris, Genela; Niv, Yael

    2011-09-30

    A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural dynamics bring about the dynamics of behavior. However, neural and behavioral measures are noisy, requiring averaging over trials and subjects. Unfortunately, averaging can obscure the very dynamics that we are interested in, masking abrupt changes and artificially creating gradual processes. We develop a hidden semi-Markov model for precisely characterizing dynamic processes and their alteration due to experimental manipulations. This method takes advantage of multiple trials and subjects without compromising the information available in individual events within a trial. We apply our model to studying the effects of motivation on response rates, analyzing data from hungry and sated rats trained to press a lever to obtain food rewards on a free-operant schedule. Our method can accurately account for punctate changes in the rate of responding and for sequential dependencies between responses. It is ideal for inferring the statistics of underlying response rates and the probability of switching from one response rate to another. Using the model, we show that hungry rats have more distinct behavioral states that are characterized by high rates of responding and they spend more time in these high-press-rate states. Moreover, hungry rats spend less time in, and have fewer distinct states that are characterized by a lack of responding (Waiting/Eating states). These results demonstrate the utility of our analysis method, and provide a precise quantification of the effects of motivation on response rates.

  5. A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K.; WALSH, STEVE; MCWHORTER,PAUL J.; CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C.; WILLIAMS,W. DAVID; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.

    2000-05-17

    Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Many firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories

  6. A Systematic Evaluation Model for Solar Cell Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fu Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuels, including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and nuclear energy, are the primary electricity sources currently. However, with depletion of fossil fuels, global warming, nuclear crisis, and increasing environmental consciousness, the demand for renewable energy resources has skyrocketed. Solar energy is one of the most popular renewable energy resources for meeting global energy demands. Even though there are abundant studies on various solar technology developments, there is a lack of studies on solar technology evaluation and selection. Therefore, this research develops a model using interpretive structural modeling (ISM, benefits, opportunities, costs, and risks concept (BOCR, and fuzzy analytic network process (FANP to aggregate experts' opinions in evaluating current available solar cell technology. A case study in a photovoltaics (PV firm is used to examine the practicality of the proposed model in selecting the most suitable technology for the firm in manufacturing new products.

  7. From Concepts of Motivation to Its Application in Instructional Design: Reconsidering Motivation from an Instructional Design Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Te

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the concepts of motivation, including extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. It describes how motivation becomes a major concern in the field of instructional design (ID). Furthermore, a motivation model--the ARCS model--is identified and discussed. Finally, it provides an example of how to apply the motivational design…

  8. From Concepts of Motivation to Its Application in Instructional Design: Reconsidering Motivation from an Instructional Design Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Te

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the concepts of motivation, including extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. It describes how motivation becomes a major concern in the field of instructional design (ID). Furthermore, a motivation model--the ARCS model--is identified and discussed. Finally, it provides an example of how to apply the motivational design…

  9. Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ) revisited. Suggestions for the development of an enhanced general food motivation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, Christos; Krystallis, Athanasios; Vassallo, Marco; Pagiaslis, Anastasios

    2009-02-01

    Recognising the need for a more statistically robust instrument to investigate general food selection determinants, the research validates and confirms Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ's) factorial design, develops ad hoc a more robust FCQ version and tests its ability to discriminate between consumer segments in terms of the importance they assign to the FCQ motivational factors. The original FCQ appears to represent a comprehensive and reliable research instrument. However, the empirical data do not support the robustness of its 9-factorial design. On the other hand, segmentation results at the subpopulation level based on the enhanced FCQ version bring about an optimistic message for the FCQ's ability to predict food selection behaviour. The paper concludes that some of the basic components of the original FCQ can be used as a basis for a new general food motivation typology. The development of such a new instrument, with fewer, of higher abstraction FCQ-based dimensions and fewer items per dimension, is a right step forward; yet such a step should be theory-driven, while a rigorous statistical testing across and within population would be necessary.

  10. Going beyond efficiency: including altruistic motives in behavioral models for sustainability transitions to address sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Schäpke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability transitions require altered individual behaviors. Policies aimed at changing people’s consumption behavior are designed according to efficiency, consistency, and sufficiency principles. Taking into account shortcomings of the first two principles, this paper specifically addresses the sufficiency principle. Sufficiency policies are not very popular due to the fear that they may impede quality of life. This fear might be eased when highlighting the motivational side of sustainable behavior, such as the wish to care for future generations and the world’s poor. This article uses the capability approach (CA, developed primarily by Nobel-laureate economist Amartya Sen (1987a and philosopher Martha Nussbaum (1993, 2000, to a include the differentiation between self- and other-oriented goals and behavior, b build on its demonstrated success in assessing quality of life, and c assess the sustainability of behavior and policies. These three facets make CA suitable to analyze the effectiveness of sufficiency policies on sustainability and quality of life. To better understand the motivational side of sustainable behavior, CA is here for the first time enriched through approaches from environmental psychology. This enables us to highlight the idea of intrinsic empowerment as a building block for sufficiency policies. We close the article by highlighting further avenues for research.

  11. Spatio-temporal modelling of electrical supply systems to optimize the site planning process for the "power to mobility" technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Florian; Zink, Roland

    2016-04-01

    The transformation of the energy sector towards decentralized renewable energies (RE) requires also storage systems to ensure security of supply. The new "Power to Mobility" (PtM) technology is one potential solution to use electrical overproduction to produce methane for i.e. gas vehicles. Motivated by these fact, the paper presents a methodology for a GIS-based temporal modelling of the power grid, to optimize the site planning process for the new PtM-technology. The modelling approach is based on a combination of the software QuantumGIS for the geographical and topological energy supply structure and OpenDSS for the net modelling. For a case study (work in progress) of the city of Straubing (Lower Bavaria) the parameters of the model are quantified. The presentation will discuss the methodology as well as the first results with a view to the application on a regional scale.

  12. Empirical links between instruction with teaching tools and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in a Korean college tennis class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myoungjin; Kwon, Sungho

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the sequential process (i.e., social factors→mediators→motivation→consequences) underlying the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation at the contextual level in instruction using three teaching tools, modified balls, a high net, and colored balls and cones in a college-level tennis class in South Korea. 126 students enrolled in a 15-week tennis class participated in the study. The results indicate that the three teaching tools positively affected students' perceived competence, with perceived competence's beta on intrinsic motivation equal to 0.45. Intrinsic motivation was found to reduce negative affect further by -0.33, thereby demonstrating the sequential process of the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation.

  13. A quantitative model of technological catch-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Gholizadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a quantitative model for the analysis of technological gap. The rates of development of technological leaders and followers in nanotechnology are expressed in terms of coupled equations. On the basis of this model (first step comparative technological gap and rate of that will be studied. We can calculate the dynamics of the gap between leader and follower. In the Second step, we estimate the technology gap using the metafrontier approach. Then we test the relationship between the technology gap and the quality of dimensions of the Catch-up technology which were identified in previous step. The usefulness of this approach is then demonstrated in the analysis of the technological gap of nanotechnology in Iran, the leader in Middle East and the world. We shall present the behaviors of the technological leader and followers. At the end, analyzing Iran position will be identified and implying effective dimension of catch-up Suggestions will be offered which could be a fundamental for long-term policies of Iran.

  14. 國小學童科學學習動機、父母創意教養與科技創造力關聯之研究 Science Learning Motivation and Creative Parenting Effects on Student Technological Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    蕭佳純 Chia-Chun Hsiao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 本研究以1,808名國小四至六年級學童為研究樣本進行分析,以瞭解科學學習動機、創造力傾向、父母創意教養與創意生活經驗等因素對科技創造力的直接影響,以及科學學習動機透過創造力傾向的中介、父母創意教養透過創意生活經驗的中介,對科技創造力所造成的間接影響,並以結構方程模式加以檢驗。經由結構方程模式統計檢定後,整體模式所獲得的指數顯示模式可被接受。對整體效果的分析顯示,創造力傾向、父母創意教養以及創意生活經驗對科技創造力具直接影響;科學學習動機透過創造力傾向對科技創造力間產生間接影響;以及父母創意教養透過創意生活經驗對科技創造力產生間接影響。最後,針對分析結果,本研究提出相關的討論與建議。 This study uses data from 1,808 student participants. We explore the relationships among creative parenting, science learning motivation, creativity intention, creative life experience, and technological creativity. The study uses the structural equation model to show that creative parenting, creativity intention, and creative life experience affect technological creativity. Creativity intention also has a significant mediating effect on the relationship between science learning motivation and technological creativity. Creative life experience has a significant mediating effect on the relationship between creative parenting and technological creativity. We discuss these results and provide suggestions for future research.

  15. Mathematical modeling courses for Media technology students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses curriculum development for Mathematical Modeling course at Medialogy education. Medialogy as a study line was established in 2002 at Faculty for Engineering and Natural Sciences at Aalborg University, and mathematics curriculum has already been revised three times, Mathematic...

  16. Technology Transition a Model for Infusion and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Vernotto C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has as part of its charter the mission of transferring technologies developed for the space program into the private sector for the purpose of affording back to the American people the economical and improved quality of life benefits associated with the technologies developed. In recent years considerable effort has been made to use this program for not only transitioning technologies out of the NASA Mission Directorate Programs, but also to transfer technologies into the Mission Directorate Programs and leverage the impact of government and private sector innovation. The objective of this paper is to outline an approach and the creation of a model that brings together industry, government, and commercialization strategies. When these elements are integrated, the probability of successful technology development, technology infusion into the Mission Programs, and commercialization into the private sector is increased. This model primarily addresses technology readiness levels between TRL 3 and TRL 6. This is typically a gap area known as the valley of death. This gap area is too low for commercial entities to invest heavily and not developed enough for major programs to actively pursue. This model has shown promise for increasing the probably of TRL advancement to an acceptable level for NASA programs and/or commercial entities to afford large investments toward either commercialization or infusion.

  17. Technology diffusion in energy-economy models: The case of Danish vintage models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. This paper examines the effect on aggregate energy efficiency of using technological vintage models to describe technology diffusion. The focus is on short- to medium-term issues. Three different models of Danish energy supply and demand are used to illustrate......Technological progress is an important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological progress and diffusion of new technologies are among the reasons for diverging results obtained using bottom-up and top-down models for analyzing...... of residential heat demand, fuel price increases are found to accelerate diffusion by increasing replacement rates for heating equipment....

  18. Theoretic models for recommendation and implementation of assistive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina de Jesus Alves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The latest international researches seek to understand the factors affecting the successful use of assistive technology devices through studies regarding the assessments systematizing; abandonment of devices; or theoric models that consider the aspects of those devices implementation. In Brazil the researches are focused on developing new technologies and there are still not sufficient studies related to the successful use of devices and ways of assistive technology implementation. Objective: To identify conceptual models used for indication and implementation of assistive technology devices. Method: Literature review. The survey was conducted in six databases: CINAHAL, Eric, GALE, LILACS, MEDLINE e PsycInfo. A critical analysis described by Grant and Booth was used. Results: There are no records of a Brazilian survey and among 29 selected articles, 17 conceptual models used in the area of AT were found; of these, 14 were specific to AT. The results showed that the new conceptual models of TA are under development and the conceptual model “Matching Person and Technology – MPT” was the most mentioned. Conclusion: We can observe that the practices related to TA area in international context shows a correlation with conceptual models, thus, we hope this study might have the capacity to contribute for the propagation of this precepts at national level

  19. Simulating motivated cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1991-01-01

    A research effort to develop a sophisticated computer model of human behavior is described. A computer framework of motivated cognition was developed. Motivated cognition focuses on the motivations or affects that provide the context and drive in human cognition and decision making. A conceptual architecture of the human decision-making approach from the perspective of information processing in the human brain is developed in diagrammatic form. A preliminary version of such a diagram is presented. This architecture is then used as a vehicle for successfully constructing a computer program simulation Dweck and Leggett's findings that relate how an individual's implicit theories orient them toward particular goals, with resultant cognitions, affects, and behavior.

  20. Modeling Technology in Traveling-Wave Fault Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jinrui

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical research and equipment development of traveling-wave fault location seriously depend on digital simulation. Meanwhile, the fault-generated transient traveling wave must be transferred through transmission line, mutual inductor and secondary circuit before it is used. So this paper would maily analyze and summarize the modeling technology of transmission line and mutual inductor on the basis of the research achievement. Firstly several models of transmission line (multiple Π or T line model, Bergeron line model and frequency-dependent line model are compared in this paper with analysis of wave-front characteristics and characteristic frequency of traveling wave. Then modeling methods of current transformer, potential transformer, capacitive voltage transformer, special traveling-wave sensor and secondary cable are given. Finally, based on the difficult and latest research achievements, the future trend of modeling technology in traveling-wave fault location is prospected.