WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling student knowledge

  1. High School Students' Meta-Modeling Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortus, David; Shwartz, Yael; Rosenfeld, Sherman

    2016-12-01

    Modeling is a core scientific practice. This study probed the meta-modeling knowledge (MMK) of high school students who study science but had not had any explicit prior exposure to modeling as part of their formal schooling. Our goals were to (A) evaluate the degree to which MMK is dependent on content knowledge and (B) assess whether the upper levels of the modeling learning progression defined by Schwarz et al. (2009) are attainable by Israeli K-12 students. Nine Israeli high school students studying physics, chemistry, biology, or general science were interviewed individually, once using a context related to the science subject that they were learning and once using an unfamiliar context. All the interviewees displayed MMK superior to that of elementary and middle school students, despite the lack of formal instruction on the practice. Their MMK was independent of content area, but their ability to engage in the practice of modeling was content dependent. This study indicates that, given proper support, the upper levels of the learning progression described by Schwarz et al. (2009) may be attainable by K-12 science students. The value of explicitly focusing on MMK as a learning goal in science education is considered.

  2. From Knowledge Sharing to Knowledge Creation: A Blended Knowledge-Management Model for Improving University Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-chu; Yeh, Yi-ling; Chen, Yu-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Creativity and knowledge management are both important competences that university students need to strive to develop. This study therefore developed and evaluated an instructional program for improving university students' creativity based on a blended knowledge-management (KM) model that integrates e-learning and three core processes of KM:…

  3. From Knowledge Sharing to Knowledge Creation: A Blended Knowledge-Management Model for Improving University Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-chu; Yeh, Yi-ling; Chen, Yu-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Creativity and knowledge management are both important competences that university students need to strive to develop. This study therefore developed and evaluated an instructional program for improving university students' creativity based on a blended knowledge-management (KM) model that integrates e-learning and three core processes of KM:…

  4. A Fuzzy Knowledge Representation Model for Student Performance Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    Knowledge representation models based on Fuzzy Description Logics (DLs) can provide a foundation for reasoning in intelligent learning environments. While basic DLs are suitable for expressing crisp concepts and binary relationships, Fuzzy DLs are capable of processing degrees of truth/completene....../completeness about vague or imprecise information. This paper tackles the issue of representing fuzzy classes using OWL2 in a dataset describing Performance Assessment Results of Students (PARS)....

  5. A Probabilistic Model of Student Nurses' Knowledge of Normal Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, David Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Vocational and technical education researchers need to be aware of the uses and limits of various statistical models. The author reviews the Rasch Model and applies it to results from a nutrition test given to student nurses. (Author)

  6. Translation of overlay models of student knowledge for relative domains based on domain ontology mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovsky, Sergey; Dolog, Peter; Henze, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of an adaptive educational system in many respects depends on the precision of modeling assumptions it makes about a student. One of the well-known challenges in student modeling is to adequately assess the initial level of student's knowledge when s/he starts working with a sys...

  7. Translation of overlay models of student knowledge for relative domains based on domain ontology mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovsky, Sergey; Dolog, Peter; Henze, Nicola;

    2007-01-01

    argue that the implementation of underlying knowledge models in a sharable format, as domain ontologies - along with application of automatic ontology mapping techniques for model alignment - can help to overcome the "new-user" problem and will greatly widen opportunities for student model translation....... Moreover, it then becomes possible for systems from relevant domains to rely on knowledge transfer and reuse those portions of the student models that are related to overlapping concepts....

  8. University Student Knowledge of Alcohol: A Collaborative Model of Assessment and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatoya, Lydia Yuriko; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed college students' (N=180) knowledge of the effects of alcohol. The collaborative effort between a university counseling center and health center showed that while 70 percent of the students rated themselves as informed drinkers, their answers were less accurate. The study also provided a model of innovative collaboration. (JAC)

  9. Using the Mixture Rasch Model to Explore Knowledge Resources Students Invoke in Mathematic and Science Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Orrill, Chandra; Campbell, Todd

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mixture Rasch models followed by qualitative item-by-item analysis of selected Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) mathematics and science items offered insight into knowledge students invoke in mathematics and science separately and combined. The researchers administered an…

  10. Effective Civic Education: An Educational Effectiveness Model for Explaining Students' Civic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isac, Maria Magdalena; Maslowski, Ralf; van der Werf, Greetje

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive educational effectiveness model is tested in relation to student's civic knowledge. Multilevel analysis was applied on the dataset of the IEA Civic Education Study (CIVED; Torney-Purta, Lehmann, Oswald, & Schulz, 2001), which was conducted among junior secondary-school students (age 14), their schools, and their…

  11. How students learn to coordinate knowledge of physical and mathematical models in cellular physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew

    This dissertation explores the Knowledge in Pieces (KiP) theory to account for how students learn to coordinate knowledge of mathematical and physical models in biology education. The KiP approach characterizes student knowledge as a fragmented collection of knowledge elements as opposed to stable and theory-like knowledge. This dissertation sought to use this theoretical lens to account for how students understand and learn with mathematical models and representations, such as equations. Cellular physiology provides a quantified discipline that leverages concepts from mathematics, physics, and chemistry to understand cellular functioning. Therefore, this discipline provides an exemplary context for assessing how biology students think and learn with mathematical models. In particular, the resting membrane potential provides an exemplary concept well defined by models of dynamic equilibrium borrowed from physics and chemistry. In brief, membrane potentials, or voltages, "rest" when the electrical and chemical driving forces for permeable ionic species are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. To assess students' understandings of this concept, this dissertation employed three studies: the first study employed the cognitive clinical interview to assess student thinking in the absence and presence of equations. The second study employed an intervention to assess student learning and the affordances of an innovative assessment. The third student employed a human-computer-interaction paradigm to assess how students learn with a novel multi-representational technology. Study 1 revealed that students saw only one influence--the chemical gradient--and that students coordinated knowledge of only this gradient with the related equations. Study 2 revealed that students benefited from learning with the multi-representational technology and that the assessment detected performance gains across both calculation and explanation tasks. Last, Study 3 revealed how students

  12. Measuring and modeling physics students' conceptual knowledge structures through term association times

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, I D; Gerace, W J; Beatty, Ian D.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Gerace, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Traditional problem-based exams are not efficient instruments for assessing the "structure" of physics students' conceptual knowledge or for providing diagnostically detailed feedback to students and teachers. We present the Free Term Entry task, a candidate assessment instrument for exploring the connections between concepts in a student's understanding of a subject. In this task, a student is given a general topic area and asked to respond with as many terms from the topic area as possible in a given time; the "thinking time" between each term-entry event is recorded along with the response terms. The task was given to students from two different introductory physics classes. Response term thinking times were found to correlate with the strength of the association between two concepts. In addition, sets of thinking times from the task show distinct, characteristic patterns which might prove valuable for student assessment. We propose a quantitative dynamical model named the Matrix Walk Model which is able t...

  13. Leveraging students' prior knowledge in attaining deep structural understanding of domain general models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Hillary Lucille

    The Next Generation Science Standards charge U.S. teachers with the task of including patterns, as a crosscutting concept, in their science curricula. This study explores the learning processes and outcomes of a pattern-based curriculum that engages middle school students in the construction of models of particular patterns. These patterns are general behaviors or processes that can be found in a range of phenomena; examples of such patterns include threshold, equilibration, and oscillation. The study investigates 1) the development of students' pattern models in response to instruction, 2) the productivity of prior knowledge in students' construction of pattern models and 3) the features of instruction that support the process of pattern model construction. It addresses research questions through analysis of data collected during the implementation of a pattern-based curriculum. Findings show that students have a wealth of prior knowledge that can be leveraged by instruction toward their construction of models of threshold, equilibration, and oscillation patterns. These findings contribute to literatures concerned with deep structural and domain-general knowledge, the productive role of prior knowledge in conceptual change, and the design of constructivist instruction.

  14. Effective civic education : an educational effectiveness model for explaining students' civic knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isac, Maria Magdalena; Maslowski, Ralf; van der Werf, Greetje

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive educational effectiveness model is tested in relation to student's civic knowledge. Multilevel analysis was applied on the dataset of the IEA Civic Education Study (CIVED; Torney-Purta, Lehmann, Oswald, & Schulz, 2001), which was conducted among junior secondary-school

  15. Knowledge Extraction for Discriminating Male and Female in Logical Reasoning from Student Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. E. ElAlfi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The learning process is a process of communication and interaction between the teacher and his students on one side and between the students and each others on the other side. Interaction of the teacher with his students has a great importance in the process of learning and education. The pattern and style of this interaction is determined by the educational situation, trends and concerns, and educational characteristics. Classroom interaction has an importance and a big role in increasing the efficiency of the learning process and raising the achievement levels of students. Students need to learn skills and habits of study, especially at the university level. The effectiveness of learning is affected by several factors that include the prevailing patterns of interactive behavior in the classroom. These patterns are reflected in the activities of teacher and learners during the learning process. The effectiveness of learning is also influenced by the cognitive and non cognitive characteristics of teacher that help him to succeed, the characteristics of learners, teaching subject, and the teaching methods. This paper presents a machine learning algorithm for extracting knowledge from student model. The proposed algorithm utilizes the inherent characteristic of genetic algorithm and neural network for extracting comprehensible rules from the student database. The knowledge is used for discriminating male and female levels in logical reasoning as a part of an expert system course.

  16. The Dissertation House Model: Doctoral Student Experiences Coping and Writing in a Shared Knowledge Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Veale, Wendy Y; Tull, Renetta G; Rutledge, Janet C; Joseph, Lenisa N

    2016-01-01

    The problem of PhD attrition, especially at the dissertation-writing stage, is not solely related to mentoring, departments, or disciplines; it is a problem that affects the entire institution. As such, solutions require collaborative efforts for student success. Building on Yeatman's master-apprentice model, which assumes mastering disciplinary writing in singular advisor-student contexts, and Burnett's collaborative cohort model, which introduced doctoral dissertation supervision in a collaborative-learning environment with several faculty mentors in a single discipline, the Dissertation House model (DHM) introduces a model of doctoral dissertation supervision that involves multiple mentors across several disciplines. On the basis of more than 200 students' reflections, we find that challenges in completing the dissertation extend beyond departmental and disciplinary boundaries. The DHM's multidisciplinary approach preserves the traditional master-apprentice relationship between faculty and students within academic departments while providing an additional support mechanism through interdisciplinary collaborative cohorts. Using Thoits's coping assistance theory and data from DH students over a 10-year period, the DHM incorporates Hoadley's concept of knowledge communities to establish a successful dissertation-writing intervention for graduate students across doctoral programs. Using propensity score analysis, we provide in this study an empirical assessment of the benefits and efficacy of the DHM.

  17. You Are Your Words: Modeling Students' Vocabulary Knowledge with Natural Language Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Laura K.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigates the degree to which the lexical properties of students' essays can inform stealth assessments of their vocabulary knowledge. In particular, we used indices calculated with the natural language processing tool, TAALES, to predict students' performance on a measure of vocabulary knowledge. To this end, two corpora were…

  18. Working with Students' Ideas in Physical Geography: A Model of Knowledge Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rod; Coutts, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in science education have for some time recognised the need for teachers to develop an awareness of students' common alternative conceptions--a key element of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK)--and use this knowledge to develop student understanding (Morrison & Lederman, 2003). Less attention, however, has been devoted to the…

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and uptake in college students: Implications from the Precaution Adoption Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Marie; George, Phillis; Perryman, Mandy L; Wolff, Lori A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and uptake in college students and to identify factors associated with vaccination status utilizing the Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM). The sample included 383 undergraduates from a public university who participated in February and March 2015. Students were emailed an anonymous online survey assessing knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions related to HPV and HPV vaccination, as well as their stage in the PAPM regarding vaccination completion. Significantly more females (47.3%) than males (15.8%) were vaccinated. While most students had basic knowledge of HPV, they had low perceptions of their susceptibility to contract HPV. Most unvaccinated students were in the early stages of decision-making related to vaccination. Campus health centers have an opportunity to increase HPV vaccination rates. This study indicates that students need prompts from providers, as well as education regarding susceptibility to HPV.

  20. Knowledge Transposition from Tropical Fish Serum Proteins to Fundamental Education Students Through Biochemical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V.M. Maciel de Carvalho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The subject was represented and discussed at The National Week of Science and Technology, UFPE, an initiative from The Ministry of Science and Technology to encourage children and people in science and technology activities. The work aimed to renew the importance to transmit knowledge from simple, imaginative, biochemical models and interactive teaching. The stand tool contained an aquarium with fishes, five scale models showing peptide bond, carbohydrate inhibited lectin molecule, hemagglutination reaction, lectin-bacterium surface interaction and enzyme-substract-inhibitor. Posters described tropical fish importance and methods applied to obtain fish serum and organs to purify lectins and protein inhibitors as well as to extract tissue DNA; notions were transmitted on fish immunology and diseases. The students were attracted and impressed with the exotic fishes most cultivated in Brazil; they asked if it is necessary to kill the fish to extract lectin and about lectin importance. Students were also interested to know if all fish enzyme/inhibitors are favorable to the own fish organism. The work succeeded to inform and stimulate future scientists in the field and to awake their scientific curiosity.

  1. Knowledge Model: Project Knowledge Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter; Grolin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Knowledge model for project management serves several goals:Introducing relevant concepts of project management area for software development (Section 1). Reviewing and understanding the real case requirements from the industrial perspective. (Section 2). Giving some preliminary suggestions f...

  2. Knowledge Model: Project Knowledge Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter; Grolin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Knowledge model for project management serves several goals:Introducing relevant concepts of project management area for software development (Section 1). Reviewing and understanding the real case requirements from the industrial perspective. (Section 2). Giving some preliminary suggestions...

  3. Effect of Modeling Instruction on Concept Knowledge Among Ninth Grade Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmore, Devin Alan

    A basic knowledge of physics concepts is the gateway to success through high-paying careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Many students show little understanding of concepts following traditional physics instruction. As an alternative to current lecture-based approaches for high school physics instruction, Piaget's theory of cognitive development supports using real scientific experiences to lead learners from concrete to formal understanding of complex concepts. Modeling instruction (MI) is a pedagogy that guides learners through genuine scientific experiences. This project study analyzed the effects of MI on 9th grade physics students' gains on the test measuring mastery of physics concepts, Force Concept Inventory (FCI). A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the FCI scores of a traditional lecture-taught control group to a treatment group taught using MI. A t test t(-.201) = 180.26, p = .841 comparing the groups and an analysis of variance F(2,181) = 5.20 comparing female to male students indicated MI had no significant positive effect on students. A partial eta squared of the effect size showed that 5.4% of the variance in FCI gains was accounted for by gender, favoring female participants for both groups. The significant relationship between content and gender bears further inquiry. A lesson plan guide was designed to help teachers use computer simulation technology within the MI curriculum. The project promotes positive social change by exploring further ways to help adolescents experience success in physics at the beginning of high school, leading to future success in all STEM areas.

  4. Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning.…

  5. Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning.…

  6. Towards Representation and Validation of Knowledge in Students' Learning Pathway Using Variability Modeling Technique

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    Elfaki, Abdelrahman Osman; Aik, Kevin Loo Teow; Fong, Sim Liew; Bachok, Ruzi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, E-learning system is considered as one of the main pillars in the learning system. Mainly, E-Learning system is designed to serve different types of students. Thus, providing different learning pathways are a must. In this paper, we introduce the variability technique to represent the knowledge in E-learning system. This representation provides different learning pathways which supports the students' diversity. Moreover, we validate the selection of learning pathway by introducing First Order Logic (FOL) rules. Keywords Learning Pathway ; Variability and knowledge representation ; IJCSI

  7. Exploring students' epistemological knowledge of models and modelling in science: results from a teaching/learning experience on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasquier, Giulia; Levrini, Olivia; Dillon, Justin

    2016-03-01

    The scientific community has been debating climate change for over two decades. In the light of certain arguments put forward by the aforesaid community, the EU has recommended a set of innovative reforms to science teaching such as incorporating environmental issues into the scientific curriculum, thereby helping to make schools a place of civic education. However, despite these European recommendations, relatively little emphasis is still given to climate change within science curricula. Climate change, although potentially engaging for students, is a complex topic that poses conceptual difficulties and emotional barriers, as well as epistemological challenges. Whilst the conceptual and emotional barriers have already been the object of several studies, students' reactions to the epistemological issues raised by climate changes have so far been rarely explored in science education research and thus are the main focus of this paper. This paper describes a study concerning the implementation of teaching materials designed to focus on the epistemological role of 'models and the game of modelling' in science and particularly when dealing with climate change. The materials were implemented in a course of 15 hours (five 3-hour lessons) for a class of Italian secondary-school students (grade 11; 16-17 years old). The purpose of the study is to investigate students' reactions to the epistemological dimension of the materials, and to explore if and how the material enabled them to develop their epistemological knowledge on models.

  8. A Comparison of Student Skill Knowledge Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Elizabeth; Nugent, Rebecca; Dean, Nema

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental goal of educational research is identifying students' current stage of skill mastery (complete/partial/none). In recent years a number of cognitive diagnosis models have become a popular means of estimating student skill knowledge. However, these models become difficult to estimate as the number of students, items, and skills grows.…

  9. Differential Effects of Three Professional Development Models on Teacher Knowledge and Student Achievement in Elementary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Joan I.; Daehler, Kirsten R.; Wong, Nicole; Shinohara, Mayumi; Miratrix, Luke W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify links among professional development, teacher knowledge, practice, and student achievement, researchers have called for study designs that allow causal inferences and that examine relationships among features of interventions and multiple outcomes. In a randomized experiment implemented in six states with over 270 elementary teachers…

  10. Modeling the Relations Among Morphological Awareness Dimensions, Vocabulary Knowledge, and Reading Comprehension in Adult Basic Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Elizabeth L; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study extended the findings of Tighe and Schatschneider (2015) by investigating the predictive utility of separate dimensions of morphological awareness as well as vocabulary knowledge to reading comprehension in adult basic education (ABE) students. We competed two- and three-factor structural equation models of reading comprehension. A three-factor model of real word morphological awareness, pseudoword morphological awareness, and vocabulary knowledge emerged as the best fit and accounted for 79% of the reading comprehension variance. The results indicated that the constructs contributed jointly to reading comprehension; however, vocabulary knowledge was the only potentially unique predictor (p = 0.052), accounting for an additional 5.6% of the variance. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a latent variable modeling approach to examine individual differences in the reading comprehension skills of ABE students. Further, this study replicates the findings of Tighe and Schatschneider (2015) on the importance of differentiating among dimensions of morphological awareness in this population.

  11. Modeling the Relations Among Morphological Awareness Dimensions, Vocabulary Knowledge, and Reading Comprehension in Adult Basic Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Elizabeth L.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study extended the findings of Tighe and Schatschneider (2015) by investigating the predictive utility of separate dimensions of morphological awareness as well as vocabulary knowledge to reading comprehension in adult basic education (ABE) students. We competed two- and three-factor structural equation models of reading comprehension. A three-factor model of real word morphological awareness, pseudoword morphological awareness, and vocabulary knowledge emerged as the best fit and accounted for 79% of the reading comprehension variance. The results indicated that the constructs contributed jointly to reading comprehension; however, vocabulary knowledge was the only potentially unique predictor (p = 0.052), accounting for an additional 5.6% of the variance. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a latent variable modeling approach to examine individual differences in the reading comprehension skills of ABE students. Further, this study replicates the findings of Tighe and Schatschneider (2015) on the importance of differentiating among dimensions of morphological awareness in this population. PMID:26869981

  12. Using the Deficit Model, Public Debate Model and Co-Production of Knowledge Models to Interpret Points of View of Students Concerning Citizens' Participation in Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    In the first part of this article I propose a conceptual framework--based on the deficit, public debate and co-production of knowledge models articulated by (Callon, 1999)--with which to examine students' appropriation of de socioscientific issues (SSI). The second part of this article presents the way a group of three…

  13. How does epistemological knowledge on modelling influence students' engagement in the issue of climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasquier, Giulia

    2016-05-01

    Involvement in climate change has been proven to be hindered by emotional and social barriers, as well as by conceptual difficulties that students may encounter in dealing with scientific content related to particular issues such as the greenhouse effect. In this study, we start from the conjecture that behind many conceptual difficulties and emotional barriers lie particular epistemological obstacles related to a naive and stereotypical view of science. These include, in particular, the belief that science still has the role and power to provide a unique, unquestionable, and certain explanation of events and processes. Such a naive idea clashes strongly with the intrinsic complexity of climate science. This paper sets out to investigate if and how the improvement of epistemological knowledge can influence behavioural habits and foster students' engagement in climate change. In order to explore such an issue, we focus on five interviews collected at the end of a teaching experience on climate change, carried out with secondary school students (grade 11; 16-year olds). This study is a follow-up of other two analytical studies aimed at investigating, respectively, the impact of the experience on students' epistemological knowledge and on their behavioural habits.

  14. Knowledge creation and transfer among postgraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreeson Naicker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The skill shortages, hyper-competitive economic environments and untapped economies have created a great deal of focus on knowledge. Thus, continuously creating and transferring knowledge is critical for every organisation.Objectives: This article reports on an exploratory study undertaken to ascertain how knowledge is created and transferred amongst post-graduate (PG students, using the knowledge (socialisation, externalisation, combination, internalisation [SECI] spiral model.Method: After reviewing relevant literature, a personally administered standardised questionnaire was used to collect data from a convenience sample of PG students in the School of Management, IT and Governance at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The data was analysed to determine if it fit the model based on the four modes of knowledge conversion.Results: Although the School of Management, IT and Governance has mechanisms in place to facilitate knowledge creation and transfer, it nevertheless tends to focus on the four modes of knowledge conversion to varying degrees.Conclusion: The study confirmed that PG students utilise the ‘socialisation’ and ‘externalisation’ modes of knowledge conversion comprehensively; ‘internalisation’ plays a significant role in their knowledge creation and transfer activities and whilst ‘combination’ is utilised to a lesser extent, it still plays a role in PG students’ knowledge creation and transfer activities. PG students also have ‘space’ that allows them to bring hunches, thoughts, notions, intuition or tacit knowledge into reality. Trust and dedication are common amongst PG students. With socialisation and externalisation so high, PG students are aware of each other’s capabilities and competencies, and trust each other enough to share knowledge.

  15. Knowledge creation and transfer among postgraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreeson Naicker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The skill shortages, hyper-competitive economic environments and untapped economies have created a great deal of focus on knowledge. Thus, continuously creating and transferring knowledge is critical for every organisation. Objectives: This article reports on an exploratory study undertaken to ascertain how knowledge is created and transferred amongst post-graduate (PG students, using the knowledge (socialisation, externalisation, combination, internalisation [SECI] spiral model. Method: After reviewing relevant literature, a personally administered standardised questionnaire was used to collect data from a convenience sample of PG students in the School of Management, IT and Governance at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The data was analysed to determine if it fit the model based on the four modes of knowledge conversion. Results: Although the School of Management, IT and Governance has mechanisms in place to facilitate knowledge creation and transfer, it nevertheless tends to focus on the four modes of knowledge conversion to varying degrees. Conclusion: The study confirmed that PG students utilise the ‘socialisation’ and ‘externalisation’ modes of knowledge conversion comprehensively; ‘internalisation’ plays a significant role in their knowledge creation and transfer activities and whilst ‘combination’ is utilised to a lesser extent, it still plays a role in PG students’ knowledge creation and transfer activities. PG students also have ‘space’ that allows them to bring hunches, thoughts, notions, intuition or tacit knowledge into reality. Trust and dedication are common amongst PG students. With socialisation and externalisation so high, PG students are aware of each other’s capabilities and competencies, and trust each other enough to share knowledge.

  16. Social work knowledge of community-based services for older adults: an educational model for social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Noell L; Faul, Anna C; Birkenmaier, Julie; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn

    2011-02-01

    Social workers are often the key link between older adults, their families and community-based services. Thus, knowledge about older adults and community-based care is imperative for social work practice. Evaluation data are provided on a national multisite effort (N = 353) from 35 schools to assure graduate social work student's competency related to community services for older adults. Results suggest that the educational model as described in this article sets forth positive outcomes in the education of aging savvy social workers. Ongoing social work education is needed to meet the burgeoning needs of the geriatric population.

  17. Knowledge Extraction for Discriminating Male and Female in Logical Reasoning from Student Model

    CERN Document Server

    Elalfi, A E E; Asem, Y M

    2009-01-01

    The learning process is a process of communication and interaction between the teacher and his students on one side and between the students and each others on the other side. Interaction of the teacher with his students has a great importance in the process of learning and education. The pattern and style of this interaction is determined by the educational situation, trends and concerns, and educational characteristics. Classroom interaction has an importance and a big role in increasing the efficiency of the learning process and raising the achievement levels of students. Students need to learn skills and habits of study, especially at the university level. The effectiveness of learning is affected by several factors that include the prevailing patterns of interactive behavior in the classroom. These patterns are reflected in the activities of teacher and learners during the learning process. The effectiveness of learning is also influenced by the cognitive and non cognitive characteristics of teacher that...

  18. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  19. Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Hu, Kaiyan; Chen, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge and application of model play an important role in students' development of modeling ability and scientific literacy. In this study, we investigated Chinese chemistry teachers' knowledge and application of models. Data were collected through test questionnaire and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The result indicated…

  20. Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Hu, Kaiyan; Chen, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge and application of model play an important role in students' development of modeling ability and scientific literacy. In this study, we investigated Chinese chemistry teachers' knowledge and application of models. Data were collected through test questionnaire and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The result indicated…

  1. Make a Drawing. Effects of Strategic Knowledge, Drawing Accuracy, and Type of Drawing on Students' Mathematical Modelling Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rellensmann, Johanna; Schukajlow, Stanislaw; Leopold, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Drawing strategies are widely used as a powerful tool for promoting students' learning and problem solving. In this article, we report the results of an inferential mediation analysis that was applied to investigate the roles that strategic knowledge about drawing and the accuracy of different types of drawings play in mathematical modelling…

  2. Knowledge of Chlamydial Infection among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David M.; Felts, W. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study designed to assess knowledge about chlamydial infection among university students (N=258) revealed serious gaps in knowledge. Data suggests that students held several misconceptions, or had no knowledge, regarding symptoms, transmission, treatment, and testing for chlamydial infection. (IAH)

  3. The Didactic Model "LdL" (Lernen Durch Lehren) as a Way of Preparing Students for Communication in a Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzega, Joachim; Schoner, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Based on studies in learning psychology, biology and education, the original technique "Lernen durch Lehren" ("LdL)" (German for "learning by teaching") has been elaborated into a meta-model ("Meta") "LdL" that aims at giving students a platform to acquire the competencies considered necessary for knowledge societies. Ninety-seven former students…

  4. An Assessment of Student Computer Ergonomic Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Melody W.

    1997-01-01

    Business students (n=254) were assessed on their knowledge of computers, health and safety, radiation, workstations, and ergonomic techniques. Overall knowledge was low in all categories. In particular, they had not learned computer-use techniques. (SK)

  5. The synthesis map is a multidimensional educational tool that provides insight into students' mental models and promotes students' synthetic knowledge generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A; Brame, Cynthia J

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping, which utilizes embedding to layer information within concepts. Prezi's zooming user interface lets the author of the presentation use both depth as well as distance to show connections between data, ideas, and concepts. Students in the class Biology of Cancer created synthesis maps to illustrate their knowledge of tumorigenesis. Students used multiple organizational schemes to build their maps. We present an analysis of student work, placing special emphasis on organization within student maps and how the organization of knowledge structures in student maps can reveal strengths and weaknesses in student understanding or instruction. We also provide a discussion of best practices for instructors who would like to implement synthesis mapping in their classrooms. © 2015 R. A. Ortega and C. J. Brame et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Standard model of knowledge representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge representation is the core of artificial intelligence research. Knowledge representation methods include predicate logic, semantic network, computer programming language, database, mathematical model, graphics language, natural language, etc. To establish the intrinsic link between various knowledge representation methods, a unified knowledge representation model is necessary. According to ontology, system theory, and control theory, a standard model of knowledge representation that reflects the change of the objective world is proposed. The model is composed of input, processing, and output. This knowledge representation method is not a contradiction to the traditional knowledge representation method. It can express knowledge in terms of multivariate and multidimensional. It can also express process knowledge, and at the same time, it has a strong ability to solve problems. In addition, the standard model of knowledge representation provides a way to solve problems of non-precision and inconsistent knowledge.

  7. Product Knowledge Modelling and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.; MacCallum, K. J.; Duffy, Alex

    1996-01-01

    The term, Product Knowledge is used to refer to two related but distinct concepts; the knowledge of a specific product (Specific Product Knowledge) and the knowledge of a product domain (Product Domain Knowledge). Modelling and managing Product Knowlege is an essential part of carrying out design...... function-oriented design. Both Specific Product Knowledge and Product Domain Knowledge are modelled at two levels, a meta-model and an information-level.Following that, a computer-based scheme to manage the proposed product lknowledge models within a dynamically changing environment is presented....

  8. Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers’ Knowledge of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Kılıç

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the nature of preservice secondary mathematics teachers’ knowledge of students as emerged from a study investigating the development of their pedagogical content knowledge in a methods course and its associated field experience. Six preservice teachers participated in the study and the data were collected in the forms of observations, interviews and written documents. Knowledge of students is defined as teachers’ knowledge of what mathematical concepts are difficult for students to grasp, which concepts students typically have misconceptions about, possible sources of students’ errors, and how to eliminate those difficulties and misconceptions. The findings revealed that preservice teachers had difficulty in both identifying the source of students’ misconceptions, and errors and generating effective ways different than telling the rules or procedures to eliminate such misconceptions. Furthermore, preservice teachers’ knowledge of students was intertwined with their knowledge of subject matter and knowledge of pedagogy. They neither had strong conceptual knowledge of mathematics nor rich repertoire of teaching strategies. Therefore, they frequently failed to recognize what conceptual knowledge the students were lacking and inclined to address students’ errors by telling how to carry out the procedure or apply the rule to solve the given problem correctly.

  9. 浅析培养学生阅读探究能力的教学模式%Raises the Student Reading Knowledge the Educational Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车红霞

    2009-01-01

    In middle school language teaching, reading is the student knowledge acquisition main channel only then raises student's reading in-quisition ability, can cause the student "the academic society to study", the inquisition type educational model has the modem education zetetic, the independency and the independent characteristic, reads the inquisition ability to the student have the enormous significance.%在中学语文教学中,阅读是学生获取知识信息的主渠道,只有培养学生的阅读探究能力,才能使学生"学会学习",探究式教学模式具有现代教育的探究性、自主性和独立性的特点,对学生阅读探究能力的培养及其知识的自主建构有极大的意义.

  10. Product Knowledge Modelling and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.; MacCallum, K. J.; Duffy, Alex

    1996-01-01

    The term, Product Knowledge is used to refer to two related but distinct concepts; the knowledge of a specific product (Specific Product Knowledge) and the knowledge of a product domain (Product Domain Knowledge). Modelling and managing Product Knowlege is an essential part of carrying out design...... function-oriented design. Both Specific Product Knowledge and Product Domain Knowledge are modelled at two levels, a meta-model and an information-level.Following that, a computer-based scheme to manage the proposed product lknowledge models within a dynamically changing environment is presented........A scheme is presented in this paper to model, i.e. classify, structure and formalise the product knowledge for the purpose of supporting function-oriented design. The product design specification and four types of required attributes of a specific product have been identified to form the Specific Product...

  11. KNOWLEDGE OF VACCINATION AMONG THE NURSING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protection of children is a task of every health care provider and must be taken up with a high priority. Majority of the mortality and morbidity can be averted by simple measures like appropriate vaccination, hygienic measures and good nutrition. OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nursing students about vaccines and vaccination. METHODOLOGY: This pilot study was conducted among the nursing students in a tertiary care hospital. A questionnaire with multiple choice answers was administered to the students and any doubts regarding the questions were clarified before they started answering. RESULTS: In our study out of the 60 students who participated in the study none of them scored even fifty percent. The basic knowledge about vaccines example BCG vaccine itself was surprisingly too low. Only 11.6% i.e. 07 out of 60 students knew the correct dose, site and route of administration of BCG vaccine. In the present study it was noted that the awareness and knowledge about the adverse reactions and its management was uniformly low. Surprisingly only 2 students out of 60 knew about the specific diseases prevented by the specific vaccines. CONCLUSION: The results of the data analyzed from this pilot study shows that there is a dearth of knowledge about vaccines among the nursing students. Hence emphasis should be laid on the need for adequate and right knowledge about vaccines and immunization schedule along with the hands on experience of the nursing students during their teaching curriculum and training period itself

  12. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  13. [Patient safety culture - knowledge and knowledge needs of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennessen, B; Swart, E; Marx, Y

    2013-12-01

    Ten years after the publication of "To Err is Human" in November1999, the development of patient safety efforts has been summa-rised in the statement "Ten years later, a million lives lost, billions of dollars wasted." This leads to the question why, despite evidence-based mea-sures for greater patient safety, they are not implemented or only implemented on a small scale. One approach to promote patient safety is the implementation of a safety culture. Such a safety culture is based on knowledge of employees about safe behaviour and their willingness to implement it. In this context it is interesting to explore the knowledge and the needs of medical students concerning patient safety. At the University of -Magdeburg 354 medical students in their clinical semesters were asked about their knowledge of specific recommendations on patient safety and about their attitude to patient safety and risk man-agement as well as their subjective need for knowledge on this subject. Only 16.7 % of the PJ (practical year) students and 11.7 % of students in all other clinical semester indicated to know the recommenda-tions for patient safety. This correlated with the answers to questions about single recommenda-tions. The importance of risk management during medical education was considered to be important by 53.3 % of the students of all clinical semesters and in particular 80.6 % of the surveyed PJ students. The answers to most questions showed a high demand for general information on patient safety. This is seen throughout all questions, especially with increasing clinical experience, and the need for information on single recommendations, such as critical incident reporting systems (CIRS), or Team Time Out. The establishment of a safety culture is described as a useful way to fewer patient injuries. This includes knowledge on recommendations for patient safety, which may contribute to the implementation of a safety culture to reduce medical errors. Our survey shows the

  14. Examining Factors That Affect Students' Knowledge Sharing within Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxia; Gunter, Glenda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that might impact student knowledge sharing within virtual teams through online discussion boards. These factors include: trust, mutual influence, conflict, leadership, and cohesion. A path model was developed to determine whether relationships exist among knowledge sharing from asynchronous group…

  15. Nutritional knowledge and attitudes of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietz, C L; Fryer, B A; Fryer, H C

    1980-03-01

    The nutritional knowledge and attitudes of 230 dental students were studied. The students answered 68.6% of the nutritional knowledge questions currectly, but the test scores were low because they were adversely affected by the degree of certainty. First-year students scored significantly higher than fourth-year students. There was no significant difference between scores of men and women. Knowledge scores were highest for questions on nutrition and oral health and lowest for those on nutritional assessment. Dental students generally expressed favorable attitudes toward nutrition and nutritional care of patients. They agreed that dentists were vital members of the health team and had a responsibility to become involved in health screening and nutrition education of patients. Dietitians were seen as valuable resources to be consulted about nutrition education of the dental patient. More first-year students supported the idea that dentists should prescribe nutritoinal supplements for patients, whereas more fourth-year students were undecided about this matter. There were no differences in nutrition attitude scores attributable to gender of the student or year in dental school. In this study, nutritional knowledge scores did not correlate with nutrition attitude scores.

  16. Core Knowledge Confusions among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Svedholm, Annika M.; Takada, Mikito; Lonnqvist, Jan-Erik; Verkasalo, Markku

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that university students hold several paranormal beliefs and that paranormal beliefs can be best explained with core knowledge confusions. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent university students confuse the core ontological attributes of lifeless material objects (e.g. a house, a stone), living…

  17. A Knowledge Engineering Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for Improving Students' Differentiating Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Sung, Han-Yu; Hung, Chun-Ming; Yang, Li-Hsueh; Huang, Iwen

    2013-01-01

    Educational computer games have been recognized as being a promising approach for motivating students to learn. Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that without proper learning strategies or supportive models, the learning achievement of students might not be as good as expected. In this study, a knowledge engineering approach is proposed…

  18. Students' Conceptions of Controversial Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John G.; Nelson, J. Ron

    1992-01-01

    Five boys and five girls each in grades one through six (n=60 students) asked controversial questions in interviews, recognized the lack of social consensus on the controversial topics and made subtle distinctions between controversial and noncontroversial topics. Implications for discussion of controversial issues in the classroom are discussed.…

  19. [Knowledge about sexuality in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P; Alvarado, R

    1989-01-01

    This study explores the level of sexual knowledge among chilean university students in 4 different professions, compares their responses and verifies them with selected socio-demographic variables. 813 university students were interviewed in 1st and 3rd year medical school, law and engineering from the University of Chile and in education, from the Superior Blas Canas Institute of Pedagogy. The group is equally divided between each of the 4 professions; 64.7% are men with 95.5% single and 84.7% are between 17.22; only 37.5% attended a mixed school; 73.1% are Catholic. The survey aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) but this article only analyzes the attitudes of students through 6 variables: anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery, contraception, venereal diseases, sources claimed by the interviewee to receive information and self-evaluation of actual levels of knowledge. Results demonstrated knowledge about anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery and venereal diseases, but great disparity with contraception. Students are not learning about methods of contraception in school, possibly due to fear on the part of the faculty or their own lack of information. 3 factors influenced levels of knowledge: 1) formal education; 2) experience; and 3) personal interest. The highest results were from students of medicine with the lowest being students in engineering and education. Those that were in their 3rd year of school or married appeared more knowledgeable possibly due to more sexual experience and the need to prevent pregnancies. The females in all variables scored higher due to their own interest in preventing pregnancies, and because women are socialized in interpersonal relations and maternity issues. More than 1/2 the students gave themselves bad evaluations concerning their levels of sexual knowledge.

  20. Impact of Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Practices on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2008-10-01

    Professional development programs promoting inquiry-based teaching are challenged with providing teachers content knowledge and using pedagogical approaches that model standards based instruction. Inquiry practices are also important for undergraduate students. This paper focuses on the evaluation of an extensive professional development program for chemistry teachers that included chemistry content tests for students and the teachers and the impact of undergraduate research experiences on college students' attitudes towards chemistry. Baseline results for the students showed that there were no gender differences on the achievement test but white students scored significantly higher than non-white students. However, parent/adult involvement with chemistry homework and projects, was a significant negative predictor of 11th grade students' test chemistry achievement score. This paper will focus on students' achievement and attitude results for teachers who are mid-way through the program providing evidence that on-going, sustained professional development in content and pedagogy is critical for improving students' science achievement.

  1. Possibilistic networks for uncertainty knowledge processing in student diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina COCU

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a possibilistic network implementation for uncertain knowledge modeling of the diagnostic process is proposed as a means to achieve student diagnosis in intelligent tutoring system. This approach is proposed in the object oriented programming domain for diagnosis of students learning errors and misconception. In this expertise domain dependencies between data exist that are encoded in the structure of network. Also, it is available qualitative information about these data which are represented and interpreted with qualitative approach of possibility theory. The aim of student diagnosis system is to ensure an adapted support for the student and to sustain the student in personalized learning process and errors explanation.

  2. University students' knowledge and attitudes towards leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano-Machuca, Omar; Velarde-de la Cruz, Erandi Enif; Ramirez-Dueñas, Maria Guadalupe; Alvarado-Navarro, Anabell

    2013-09-16

    Patients with leprosy may be affected psychologically and socially by the negative attitude of society toward leprosy, caused by widespread ignorance and prevailing stereotypes surrounding the disease. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitudes toward leprosy among students at the University of Guadalajara. This descriptive cross-sectional study included 1,300 students over 18 years of age from various Thematic University Centres in Guadalajara. Students' degree subjects included the health sciences, humanities, exact sciences (i.e., chemistry, physics), arts, biological-agricultural sciences, and administration. Students were randomly selected regardless of gender and all students were enrolled in either the first, second, or third year of their undergraduate studies. Overall, students showed an intermediate level of knowledge of leprosy. Results showed that 67% correctly responded that leprosy is an infectious disease, 64% knew of the presence of skin lesions, and 60% knew that a microbe causes the disease. Furthermore, 45% correctly responded that leprosy is a disease associated with poverty and 40% responded that leprosy is disabling. Only 31% stated that leprosy is curable. Negative attitudes were evident regarding the question of employing a leprosy patient (57%) and having a leprosy patient as a spouse or partner (30%). The results revealed that there is insufficient knowledge of and poor attitudes toward leprosy among students at the University of Guadalajara. It is necessary to improve current health education measures by using updated educational strategies to reduce the stigma of leprosy and the segregation of leprosy patients and their families.

  3. Instructor and student knowledge of study strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, Kayla; Rhodes, Matthew G; DeLozier, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Students' self-reported study skills and beliefs are often inconsistent with empirically supported (ES) study strategies. However, little is known regarding instructors' beliefs about study skills and if such beliefs differ from those of students. In the current study, we surveyed college students' and instructors' knowledge of study strategies and had both groups evaluate the efficacy of learning strategies described in six learning scenarios. Results from the survey indicated that students frequently reported engaging in methods of studying that were not optimal for learning. Instructors' responses to the survey indicated that they endorsed a number of effective study skills but also held several beliefs inconsistent with research in learning and memory (e.g., learning styles). Further, results from the learning scenarios measure indicated that instructors were moderately more likely than students to endorse ES learning strategies. Collectively, these data suggest that instructors exhibited better knowledge of effective study skills than students, although the difference was small. We discuss several notable findings and argue for the improvement of both students' and instructors' study skill knowledge.

  4. A Knowledge Tree Model for Managing Organizational Knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Zhen-qiang; WANG Ning-sheng

    2002-01-01

    According to the relation of organizational knowledge, this paper analyzes the structure of organizational knowledge at first. A concept of knowledge tree is introduced and a process model of knowledge management is described by a knowledge tree. In this paper a definition of value of knowledge is given and the life cycle of a knowledge tree is analyzed. Finally, some principles for knowledge management are presented.

  5. Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Mathematical Modelling Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang Soon; Ang, Keng Cheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper posits that teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in mathematical modelling instruction can be demonstrated in the crafting of action plans and expected teaching and learning moves via their lesson images (Schoenfeld, 1998). It can also be developed when teachers shape appropriate teaching moves in response to students' learning…

  6. Knowledge of nursing students on dysthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Costa Matos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the knowledge of nursing students about the dysthanasia as a process of human intervention in terminally ill patients. Methods: a qualitative study with 28 nursing students from a public higher education institution. Data analysis of the interviews was through thematic content analysis. Results: it was found that most students do not understand the meaning of dysthanasia, though living with situations involving this practice in their training. Those who defined the term described it as the excessive prolongation of life or death suffered from much pain, aggressive treatment that only prolongs the process of dying. Conclusion: it was evidenced that nursing students have insufficient knowledge of the dysthanasia and it is necessary to broaden the discussion spaces during the graduate course and conduct studies on the subject relating it to the death and dying process, for the preparation of future health professionals.

  7. [Nursing students knowledge about alcohol and drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Miriam Vargas; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; da Silva, Edilaine Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the knowledge of nursing students regarding the use of alcohol and other drugs, particularly addiction, tolerance, withdrawal and intoxication, the reasons students give for drug addiction and commencement, and personal interest in the issue of drug use. A descriptive-exploratory design was used, with a sample of 44 students, by applying a semi-structured questionnaire, constructed by the researchers based on the objectives, with open and closed questions, totaling 24 points. Ethical procedures were followed and data were submitted to exploratory descriptive analysis. It was shown that students knowledge is still limited, comprehension about a patients reasons for using and becoming addicted is incomplete and the interest is current.

  8. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  9. Models: repositories of knowledge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oswald, Sascha E; Kolditz, Olaf; Attinger, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    ... that. More than ever, models are means to integrate information from different and manifold sources, allowing a better conceptual view of systems as a whole and improving understanding of them, i.e...

  10. Student Teachers' Knowledge about Chemical Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Vahide; Bernholt, Sascha; Parchmann, Ilka

    2017-01-01

    Chemical representations serve as a communication tool not only in exchanges between scientists but also in chemistry lessons. The goals of the present study were to measure the extent of student teachers' knowledge about chemical representations, focusing on chemical formulae and structures in particular, and to explore which factors related to…

  11. Gaps in Alzheimer's Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the disease, it appears that there may be a need for increased education for formal and family caregivers of those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today's college students will be asked to fill both of these roles in the future. This study examined the level of knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among…

  12. Gaps in Alzheimer's Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the disease, it appears that there may be a need for increased education for formal and family caregivers of those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today's college students will be asked to fill both of these roles in the future. This study examined the level of knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among…

  13. Showing Automatically Generated Students' Conceptual Models to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A student conceptual model can be defined as a set of interconnected concepts associated with an estimation value that indicates how well these concepts are used by the students. It can model just one student or a group of students, and can be represented as a concept map, conceptual diagram or one of several other knowledge representation…

  14. [Factors determining students' knowledge on wild mushrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Parnicki, Florian; Cisoń-Apanasewicz, Urszula; Potok, Halina; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted among students of university schools in Nowy Sacz, Biała Podlaska and Zamość to determine the guidelines of mushroom poisoning prevention. The study included 580 people. The dependence of knowledge about mushrooms from the place of origin of students, frequency of participation in mushrooming, preferred sources of information about mushrooms, major of study and self-competence in discsriminating of mushrooms was determined. Mushrooms gathered nearly 80% of respondents. Residents of large cities more often that those living in villages and small towns have difficulites in distinguishing the edible and poisonous mushrooms. People often participating in mushrooming retain proper habits during the harvesting and processing of mushrooms. Irrational ways of distinguishing edible mushrooms from poisonous are often rejected by inexperienced people than by frequently gathering mushrooms. Nearly 20% of respondents, regardless of their own experience and self-assessment of their competence in discriminating mushrooms belive that after culinary preparation can by safely consume even deadly poisonous species. The primary source of knowledge on mushrooms for the majority of responents are parents. There was no correlation between the preferred source of information about mushrooms and belief in the myths about them. Knowledge on the mushrooms of medical students (nursing, emergency medical service) is not greater than students other courses.

  15. Integrating knowledge seeking into knowledge management models and frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Lottering

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A striking feature of the knowledge management (KM literature is that the standard list of KM processes either subsumes or overlooks the process of knowledge seeking. Knowledge seeking is manifestly under-theorised, making the need to address this gap in KM theory and practice clear and urgent.Objectives: This article investigates the theoretical status of the knowledge-seeking process in extant KM models and frameworks. It also statistically describes knowledge seeking and knowledge sharing practices in a sample of South African companies. Using this data, it proposes a KM model based on knowledge seeking.Method: Knowledge seeking is traced in a number of KM models and frameworks with a specific focus on Han Lai and Margaret Graham’s adapted KM cycle model, which separates knowledge seeking from knowledge sharing. This empirical investigation used a questionnaire to examine knowledge seeking and knowledge sharing practices in a sample of South African companies.Results: This article critiqued and elaborated on the adapted KM cycle model of Lai and Graham. It identified some of the key features of knowledge seeking practices in the workplace. It showed that knowledge seeking and sharing are human-centric actions and that seeking knowledge uses trust and loyalty as its basis. It also showed that one cannot separate knowledge seeking from knowledge sharing.Conclusion: The knowledge seeking-based KM model elaborates on Lai and Graham’s model. It provides insight into how and where people seek and share knowledge in the workplace. The article concludes that it is necessary to cement the place of knowledge seeking in KM models as well as frameworks and suggests that organisations should apply its findings to improving their knowledge management strategies. 

  16. Knowledge of drug prescription in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán-Álvarez R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available R Guzmán-Álvarezv,1 M Medeiros,2,3 LI Reyes Lagunes,4 AE Campos-Sepúlveda11Pharmacology Department, UNAM School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mexico City, 2Pharmacology Clinical Seminar, UNAM School of Medicine, Mexico City, 3Medical Sciences Department, Mexico Federico Gómez Children's Hospital, Mexico City, 4Measuring and Evaluation Unit, UNAM School of Psychology, Mexico City, MexicoBackground: Students in schools of dentistry attend to patients with illnesses, and often prescribe medication. Because students are still learning, they are influenced by a variety of factors: the different teaching approaches of the professors at the clinics and in the pharmacology course, fellow students, and even the information provided by the pharmaceutical industry.Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the prescription knowledge and common mistakes in fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Methods: In March 2010, a survey was conducted among 66 fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry, applying a previously validated questionnaire consisting of six open-ended questions The following factors were assessed: the most frequent illness requiring dental prescription; the most prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics; the most frequent errors; sources of information used for prescribing drugs; and whether the students knew and followed the World Health Organization Guide to Good Prescribing.Results: The most frequent response for each question was considered the most significant. The most common reason for prescribing medication was infection (n = 37, 56%, followed by pain (n = 24, 38%; the most used painkillers were ibuprofen and acetaminophen at equal levels (n = 25, 37.8%, followed by ketorolac (n = 7, 10.6%, naproxen (n = 6, 9.1%, diclofenac (n = 2, 3%, and aspirin (n = 1, 1.5%; the most widely prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (n = 52, 78

  17. HOLISTIC MODEL OF KNOWLEDGE WORKER AND MARKET KNOWLEDGE VENTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telemtaev Marat Makhmetovich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is the creation of model of knowledge of the worker of the enterprise and the concept of the market of knowledge of the enterprise and the market of knowledge of a society of knowledge. To purpose achievement it is applied complete-approach of Telemtaev M.M. The contradiction between the market in environment of the enterprise and absence of the market in the internal environment of the enterprise is shown. The role of capitalization of knowledge is shown. A number of new results is received. The general model of knowledge of the worker of the enterprise, and three private models of knowledge of the worker entering into it are developed. The Principle of complete-thinking and practice of the worker and the Principle of the organic replenishments of knowledge of the worker are formulated. It is established that a kernel of complete model of knowledge of the worker is set «ability and skill». The concept of technology of the market of knowledge of the enterprise is developed. As a methodological basis of technology of the market of knowledge the Law of industrialization of knowledge, the Law of mechanization of knowledge, the Law technologization knowledge, the Principle of enrichment of knowledge are formulated. Conditions of interaction of the worker and knowledge - PMK-literacy of the worker and FPI-availability of knowledge are established. The received results are sufficient for construction of base models of knowledge of workers and the concept of the market of knowledge of the concrete enterprise that allows the enterprise to create strategy of effective application of knowledge of workers and to develop advancing strategy of occurrence in the market of a society of knowledge.

  18. Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Hu, Kaiyan; Chen, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge and application of model play an important role in students' development of modeling ability and scientific literacy. In this study, we investigated Chinese chemistry teachers' knowledge and application of models. Data were collected through test questionnaire and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The…

  19. How Accurate Are Our Assumptions about Our Students' Background Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovick, Allen A.; Michael, Joel A.; Modell, Harold I.; Bruce, David S.; Horwitz, Barbara; Adamson, Thomas; Richardson, Daniel R.; Silverthorn, Dee U.; Whitescarver, Shirley A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study of the background knowledge of students in respiratory physiology courses. Finds that instructors tended to both overestimate and underestimate students' knowledge by large margins on individual questions. (Author/WRM)

  20. How to Diagnose At-Risk Students in Chemistry: The Case of Prior Knowledge Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailikari, Telle Katriina; Nevgi, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between different types of prior knowledge and student achievement in an introductory chemistry course. Student achievement was regarded as the pace of completing the course as well as the final grade. A model of prior knowledge is proposed; this distinguishes between different types of prior knowledge and…

  1. Students' Metacomprehension Knowledge: Components That Predict Comprehension Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabrucky, Karen M.; Moore, DeWayne; Agler, Lin-Miao Lin; Cummings, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed students' metacomprehension knowledge and examined the components of knowledge most related to comprehension of expository texts. We used the Revised Metacomprehension Scale (RMCS) to investigate the relations between students' metacomprehension knowledge and comprehension performance. Students who evaluated and…

  2. Students' Knowledge Sources and Knowledge Sharing in the Design Studio--An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Hsiao

    2010-01-01

    Architectural design is a knowledge-intensive activity; however, students frequently lack sufficient knowledge when they practice design. Collaborative learning can supplement the students' insufficient expertise. Successful collaborative learning relies on knowledge sharing between students. This implies that the peers are a considerable design…

  3. Comparison of Basic Science Knowledge Between DO and MD Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Glenn E; Gayer, Gregory G

    2017-02-01

    With the coming single accreditation system for graduate medical education, medical educators may wonder whether knowledge in basic sciences is equivalent for osteopathic and allopathic medical students. To examine whether medical students' basic science knowledge is the same among osteopathic and allopathic medical students. A dataset of the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-CA student records from the classes of 2013, 2014, and 2015 and the national cohort of National Board of Medical Examiners Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (NBME-CBSE) parameters for MD students were used. Models of the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA) Level 1 scores were fit using linear and logistic regression. The models included variables used in both osteopathic and allopathic medical professions to predict COMLEX-USA outcomes, such as Medical College Admission Test biology scores, preclinical grade point average, number of undergraduate science units, and scores on the NBME-CBSE. Regression statistics were studied to compare the effectiveness of models that included or excluded NBME-CBSE scores at predicting COMLEX-USA Level 1 scores. Variance inflation factor was used to investigate multicollinearity. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to show the effectiveness of NBME-CBSE scores at predicting COMLEX-USA Level 1 pass/fail outcomes. A t test at 99% level was used to compare mean NBME-CBSE scores with the national cohort. A total of 390 student records were analyzed. Scores on the NBME-CBSE were found to be an effective predictor of COMLEX-USA Level 1 scores (Pdifference was found in performance on the NBME-CBSE between osteopathic and allopathic medical students (P=.322). As an examination constructed to assess the basic science knowledge of allopathic medical students, the NBME-CBSE is effective at predicting performance on COMLEX-USA Level 1. In addition, osteopathic medical students performed the same as

  4. Assessment of Nutritional Status and Knowledge of Students from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Nutritional Status and Knowledge of Students from Selected ... school students in Nigeria attending Federal Government College and State ... The overall performance of the female students was significantly higher (χ2 = 46.386; ...

  5. Knowledge Growth: Applied Models of General and Individual Knowledge Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkina, Galina Iu.; Bakanova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the mathematical models of the growth and accumulation of scientific and applied knowledge since it is seen as the main potential and key competence of modern companies. The problem is examined on two levels--the growth and evolution of objective knowledge and knowledge evolution of a particular individual. Both processes are…

  6. The Effects of Two Instructional Models--Tactical and Skill Teaching--On Skill Development and Game Play, Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Student Perceptions in Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joyce M.; Blakemore, Connie L.; Richards, Robert P.; Oliver, Jon; Wilkinson, Carol; Fellingham, Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Skill Teaching and Tactical approaches on skill development, game play, knowledge, and self-efficacy for 169 high- and low-skilled players of 182 beginning university Volleyball students. Three instructors each taught one Tactical and one Skill Teaching class two days a week for 16 weeks. A random coefficients…

  7. Developing Learning Analytics Design Knowledge in the "Middle Space": The Student Tuning Model and Align Design Framework for Learning Analytics Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Alyssa Friend; Vytasek, Jovita Maria; Hausknecht, Simone; Zhao, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a relatively unexplored area in the field of learning analytics: how analytics are taken up and used as part of teaching and learning processes. Initial steps are taken towards developing design knowledge for this "middle space," with a focus on students as analytics users. First, a core set of challenges for…

  8. Factors Influencing Knowledge Sharing among Undergraduate Students: A Malaysian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hway-Boon; Yeap, Peik-Foong; Tan, Siow-Hooi; Chong, Lee-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge sharing can enhance learning and help to build the knowledge workforce. This paper reports on a study of knowledge sharing behaviour among undergraduate students in Malaysia. Knowledge sharing was found to be influenced by the mechanisms used, various barriers to communication and the motivations behind knowledge sharing. The mechanisms…

  9. Knowledge of European orthodontic postgraduate students on biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore; Taoufik, Konstantina; Papadopoulos, Moschos A; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the level of knowledge in biostatistics of orthodontic postgraduate students. A four-section questionnaire, which included a knowledge test/quiz on biostatistics and epidemiology, was developed. This questionnaire was distributed to postgraduate programme directors of European universities to be delivered to students for completion under mock examination conditions (in-class session). The frequency distributions of demographic characteristics were examined, the percentages of participants who agreed or strongly agreed with each attitudinal statement were calculated, and the percentages of participants who felt fairly to highly confident for each statement were determined. Knowledge scores were calculated by the percentage of correct answers; missing values were counted as incorrect answers. The Student's t-test or one-way analysis of variance, where appropriate, was utilized to determine the participants' characteristics associated with mean knowledge scores. Data were further analysed with multiple linear regression modelling to determine the adjusted/unconfounded effect of possible knowledge score predictors. A two-tailed P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant with a 95 percent confidence interval (CI). One hundred and twenty seven from a total of 129 orthodontic students who replied completed the questionnaire. The mean correct answers of the participants were 43.8 percent with a 95 percent CI of 40.2-47.3 percent. This score was not influenced by gender, years elapsed from graduation, other advanced degree, or year of study; the sole parameter, which seemed to influence this score was attendance at a biostatistics/epidemiology course (51.9 versus 39.5 percent score of participants who had previously taken a course versus those who had not, Porthodontic postgraduate students in Europe is only influenced by previous relevant education.

  10. The Synthesis Map Is a Multidimensional Educational Tool That Provides Insight into Students' Mental Models and Promotes Students' Synthetic Knowledge Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping,…

  11. The Synthesis Map Is a Multidimensional Educational Tool That Provides Insight into Students' Mental Models and Promotes Students' Synthetic Knowledge Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ryan A.; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Concept mapping was developed as a method of displaying and organizing hierarchical knowledge structures. Using the new, multidimensional presentation software Prezi, we have developed a new teaching technique designed to engage higher-level skills in the cognitive domain. This tool, synthesis mapping, is a natural evolution of concept mapping,…

  12. Primary health care models: medical students’ knowledge and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-03-01

    To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models.

  13. Do Knowledge Arrangements Affect Student Reading Comprehension of Genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Yi; Tung, Yu-Neng; Hwang, Bi-Chi; Lin, Chen-Yung; Che-Di, Lee; Chang, Yung-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Various sequences for teaching genetics have been proposed. Three seventh-grade biology textbooks in Taiwan share similar key knowledge assemblages but have different knowledge arrangements. To investigate the influence of knowledge arrangements on student understanding of genetics, we compared students' reading comprehension of the three texts…

  14. Do Knowledge Arrangements Affect Student Reading Comprehension of Genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Yi; Tung, Yu-Neng; Hwang, Bi-Chi; Lin, Chen-Yung; Che-Di, Lee; Chang, Yung-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Various sequences for teaching genetics have been proposed. Three seventh-grade biology textbooks in Taiwan share similar key knowledge assemblages but have different knowledge arrangements. To investigate the influence of knowledge arrangements on student understanding of genetics, we compared students' reading comprehension of the three…

  15. Do Knowledge Arrangements Affect Student Reading Comprehension of Genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Yi; Tung, Yu-Neng; Hwang, Bi-Chi; Lin, Chen-Yung; Che-Di, Lee; Chang, Yung-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Various sequences for teaching genetics have been proposed. Three seventh-grade biology textbooks in Taiwan share similar key knowledge assemblages but have different knowledge arrangements. To investigate the influence of knowledge arrangements on student understanding of genetics, we compared students' reading comprehension of the three texts…

  16. High School Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Murat; Erdogan, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet; Prokop, Pavol

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate high school students' knowledge and attitudes regarding biotechnology and its various applications. In addition, whether students' knowledge and attitudes differed according to age and gender were also explored. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ) with 16 items and the Biotechnology Attitude…

  17. College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors regarding Sex and Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Michelle L.; Yazedjian, Ani

    2012-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in college students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviors of 1,004 predominantly heterosexual students. Results indicated that students had limited knowledge about contraceptives and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Females had a more positive view about contraceptives and males had more…

  18. What Knowledge Is of Most Worth? Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John G.

    Researchers generally seek to improve student motivation without input from students concerning subject matter and teaching methods. Yet students make conceptual distinctions among different forms of knowledge, concerns, and contexts regarding knowledge. One distinction is between intellectual conventions (such as spelling) and matters of…

  19. The Framing Discussion: Connecting Student Experience with Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, John E.; Balong, Megan

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the framing discussion, an informal discussion of a mathematical problem that takes place at the beginning of a lesson or unit. The purpose of the framing discussion is to assess student knowledge, motivate student interest, and to serve as a basis for guiding students to more formal mathematical knowledge. The article…

  20. Exploring Secondary Students' Knowledge and Misconceptions about Influenza: Development, validation, and implementation of a multiple-choice influenza knowledge scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, William L.; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Folk, William R.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding infectious diseases such as influenza is an important element of health literacy. We present a fully validated knowledge instrument called the Assessment of Knowledge of Influenza (AKI) and use it to evaluate knowledge of influenza, with a focus on misconceptions, in Midwestern United States high-school students. A two-phase validation process was used. In phase 1, an initial factor structure was calculated based on 205 students of grades 9-12 at a rural school. In phase 2, one- and two-dimensional factor structures were analyzed from the perspectives of classical test theory and the Rasch model using structural equation modeling and principal components analysis (PCA) on Rasch residuals, respectively. Rasch knowledge measures were calculated for 410 students from 6 school districts in the Midwest, and misconceptions were verified through the χ 2 test. Eight items measured knowledge of flu transmission, and seven measured knowledge of flu management. While alpha reliability measures for the subscales were acceptable, Rasch person reliability measures and PCA on residuals advocated for a single-factor scale. Four misconceptions were found, which have not been previously documented in high-school students. The AKI is the first validated influenza knowledge assessment, and can be used by schools and health agencies to provide a quantitative measure of impact of interventions aimed at increasing understanding of influenza. This study also adds significantly to the literature on misconceptions about influenza in high-school students, a necessary step toward strategic development of educational interventions for these students.

  1. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  2. How accurate are our assumptions about our students' background knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovick, A A; Michael, J A; Modell, H I; Bruce, D S; Horwitz, B; Adamson, T; Richardson, D R; Silverthorn, D U; Whitescarver, S A

    1999-06-01

    Teachers establish prerequisites that students must meet before they are permitted to enter their courses. It is expected that having these prerequisites will provide students with the knowledge and skills they will need to successfully learn the course content. Also, the material that the students are expected to have previously learned need not be included in a course. We wanted to determine how accurate instructors' understanding of their students background knowledge actually was. To do this, we wrote a set of multiple-choice questions that could be used to test students' knowledge of concepts deemed to be essential for learning respiratory physiology. Instructors then selected 10 of these questions to be used as a prerequisite knowledge test. The instructors also predicted the performance they expected from the students on each of the questions they had selected. The resulting tests were administered in the first week of each of seven courses. The results of this study demonstrate that instructors are poor judges of what beginning students know. Instructors tended to both underestimate and overestimate students' knowledge by large margins on individual questions. Although on the average they tended to underestimate students' factual knowledge, they overestimated the students' abilities to apply this knowledge. Hence, the validity of decisions that instructors make, predicated on the basis of their students having the prerequisite knowledge that they expect, is open to question.

  3. Erciyes University students' knowledge about AIDS: differences between students of natural and social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşci, Sultan; Başer, Mürüvvet; Mucuk, Salime; Bayat, Meral; Zincir, Handan; Sungur, Gönül

    2008-01-01

    The authors' goal in this study was to assess differences in knowledge about AIDS between students of natural science (NS) and social science (SS). The authors surveyed 542 students at Erciyes University in Kayseri, Turkey, regarding their knowledge of AIDS. Some differences in knowledge about AIDS (eg, regarding the virus that causes AIDS, the diagnostic test, risk factors) existed between NS and SS students. NS students were more knowledgeable about AIDS than were SS students.

  4. Using Partial Credit and Response History to Model User Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Inwegen, Eric G.; Adjei, Seth A.; Wang, Yan; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2015-01-01

    User modelling algorithms such as Performance Factors Analysis and Knowledge Tracing seek to determine a student's knowledge state by analyzing (among other features) right and wrong answers. Anyone who has ever graded an assignment by hand knows that some answers are "more wrong" than others; i.e. they display less of an understanding…

  5. Knowledge and practice of university female students toward breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S Al-Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Students′ knowledge and practice toward breast cancer was inadequate. There is a need for national campaigns for the public and university female students to improve their knowledge regarding breast cancer and encourage them for practicing BSE.

  6. Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted infections among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsuami, M. Jacques; Sanders, Ladatra S.; Taylor, Stephanie N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has not been determined conclusively whether greater knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is associated with lower rates of STIs. Purpose: This study sought to determine STI knowledge among high school students and factors associated with such knowledge, and to determine whether poor STI knowledge is associated with…

  7. Preferences and Motivating Factors for Knowledge Sharing by Students

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen Majid; Cendana Desiree Idio; Shuang Liang; Wen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to explore students' perceptions of knowledge sharing, their preference for participation in face-to-face and online discussion boards, motivating factors, and barriers to knowledge sharing. A questionnaire was used for data collection and 154 graduate students from two public universities in Singapore participated in this study. It was found that over one-half of the students preferred face-to-face knowledge sharing, 26% preferred participation in study-r...

  8. Students' Perceptions of Their Science Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Lilia; Abdullah, Sharifah Intan Sharina Syed; Meerah, T. Subahan Mohd

    2014-04-01

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is a type of teacher knowledge to be developed by a teacher. PCK is said to contribute to effective teaching. Most studies investigated the development of PCK and its influence on students' learning from the teachers' perspectives. Only a limited number of studies have investigated the components of science teachers' PCK that helped students' learning from the perspective of students. Thus, it is the aim of this study to investigate the level of science teachers' PCK from students' perspective, in particular whether or not students of different achieving ability had different views of teachers' PCK in assisting their learning and understanding. Based on the PCK research literature, six components of PCK have been identified, which were as follows: (1) subject matter knowledge, (2) knowledge of teaching strategies, (3) knowledge of concept representation, (4) knowledge of teaching context, (5) knowledge of students, and (6) knowledge of assessment in learning science. A questionnaire consisting of 56 items on a five-point Likert-type scale were used for data collection from 316 Form Four students (16 years old). One-way analysis of variance revealed that the differences in science teachers' PCK identified by students of different achieving abilities were statistically significant. Overall, students of various academic achieving abilities considered all the components of PCK as important. The low-achieving students viewed all the components of PCK as being less important compared to the high and moderate achievers. In particular, low-achieving students do not view `knowledge of concept representation' as important for effective teaching. They valued the fact that teachers should be alert to their needs, such as being sensitive to students' reactions and preparing additional learning materials. This study has revealed that PCK of science teachers should be different for high and low-achieving students and knowledge of students

  9. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Medical Students Regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appropriate practice toward infectious, occupational risks of. HBV. ... Keywords: Attitudes, Hepatitis B, Knowledge, Medical students, Saudi Arabia ..... this is a relatively small scale study among medical students .... Conflict of Interest: None.

  10. Impact of Prior Knowledge of Behavioural Objectives on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of Prior Knowledge of Behavioural Objectives on Students' Academic ... AFRREV STECH: An International Journal of Science and Technology ... significant difference in achievement between male and female students with the females ...

  11. Student-centred Learning, Knowledge and the New Zealand Qualifications Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepke, Nick

    1997-01-01

    A student-centered and transformative perspective on learning acknowledges different forms of knowledge and methods of knowledge construction. It is incompatible with competency-based models such as the New Zealand Qualifications framework, which has a narrow utilitarian view, ignores connections between knowledge and power, and obscures…

  12. From information to knowledge: charting and measuring changes in students' knowledge of a curriculum topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J Todd

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This research sought to investigate how school students build on their existing knowledge of a curriculum topic and transform found information into personal knowledge, and how their knowledge of this topic changes. Method. The qualitative study involved 574 students from Grades 6 to 12 in 10 New Jersey schools. The context for data collection was an instructional programme framed by Kuhlthau's information search process. Analysis. Data were collected through surveys at the initiation, midpoint and conclusion of the instructional programme. The instruments sought to measure changes in knowledge, specifically in relation to substance of knowledge, structure of knowledge, amount of knowledge, estimate of extent of knowledge, and label of knowledge. Results. It was possible to operationalise knowledge change in terms of substance, amount and structure of knowledge, and user-centreed perceptions of knowledge growth. Additive and integrative approaches to knowledge development were identified. Conclusion. Students came to know more about their topics, and perceived that they knew more as they progressed through the task. However, students seemed more oriented to gathering facts and knowing a set of facts, and accumulating these in an additive manner, rather than building complex, integrated and abstract knowledge representations.

  13. Developing students' understanding of scientific modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christine Virginia

    Teaching students to create and use scientific models as well as to understand their nature has become an increasingly important goal in science education. This thesis reports on the evaluation of the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum, a ten and a half week physics curriculum designed to develop students' understanding of scientific modeling. In the curricular trials, eight classes of seventh grade students participated in model-oriented activities such as creating non-Newtonian computer microworlds to embody their conceptual models of force and motion, evaluating the accuracy and plausibility of their models, and reflecting on the nature of models. Analysis of pre- and post-curricular assessments as well as student research books, project reports, and in-depth interviews indicate that students had a significantly better understanding of the nature and utility of models after completing the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum. Students also gained an understanding of a number of processes for developing and evaluating models. While interacting with the software and engaging in reflective discussions about the nature of models, students learned that models can include abstract representations and that models are useful for predicting events and testing ideas. Students also demonstrated sophisticated understanding of models in their interviews several months after the curriculum, particularly about the nature and. utility of models. Further, the curriculum developed students' conceptual models of force and motion as well as their inquiry skills and epistemological beliefs about the nature of scientific knowledge and learning. Correlations among the four pre/post curricular assessments suggest that modeling knowledge may play a role in the acquisition of the other types of knowledge. These results indicate that, while modeling knowledge may be difficult to develop, progress can be made by engaging students in generating and reflecting on the nature of models

  14. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two…

  15. Threat, Intimidation, and Student Financial Market Knowledge: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew W.; Devoto, Steve; Kent, Daniel W.; Harrison, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Threat emanating from financial markets may intimidate college students to some degree. In this article, the authors considered the influence of such intimidation on student financial market knowledge. They hypothesized a negative relationship between intimidation and market knowledge. An empirical study of over 150 undergraduate business school…

  16. Drawing on Dynamic Local Knowledge through Student-Generated Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles-Ritchie, Marilee; Monson, Bayley; Moses, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors explored how teachers using student-generated photography draw on local knowledge. The study draws on the framework of funds of knowledge to highlight the assets marginalized students bring to the classroom and the need for culturally relevant pedagogy to address the needs of a diverse public school population. The…

  17. Drawing on Dynamic Local Knowledge through Student-Generated Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles-Ritchie, Marilee; Monson, Bayley; Moses, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors explored how teachers using student-generated photography draw on local knowledge. The study draws on the framework of funds of knowledge to highlight the assets marginalized students bring to the classroom and the need for culturally relevant pedagogy to address the needs of a diverse public school population. The…

  18. Threat, Intimidation, and Student Financial Market Knowledge: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew W.; Devoto, Steve; Kent, Daniel W.; Harrison, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Threat emanating from financial markets may intimidate college students to some degree. In this article, the authors considered the influence of such intimidation on student financial market knowledge. They hypothesized a negative relationship between intimidation and market knowledge. An empirical study of over 150 undergraduate business school…

  19. Chinese Students' Knowledge and Thinking about America and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yali; Zhou, Xiaoguang; Huang, Lihong

    2008-01-01

    The authors interviewed more than one hundred high school students in three regions of China about their knowledge and perceptions of the United States and China. The authors' findings suggest the following: (1) students possess extensive knowledge about the United States in terms of its history, geography, socioeconomic system, and education, and…

  20. Combating Ageism: Change in Student Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Nate R.; Glover, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the ability of a lifespan course to create positive change in both knowledge of, and attitudes toward, aging of undergraduate students. Additionally, we questioned whether students define the point at which one is considered to be old in similar ways. Findings indicated positive change in both knowledge and attitudes, but…

  1. Mingling with Our Friends: The Kinesiology Student and Pedagogy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I discuss why pedagogy knowledge and skills may be appropriate for kinesiology students who are not in teacher education programs. After briefly reviewing the changes that have occurred in undergraduate kinesiology and physical education programs, a case is made that students with a degree in kinesiology should have some knowledge of…

  2. Students' Wisdom Related Knowledge as Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavšic, Marlena; Ambrosi-Randic, Neala

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom, as a form of cognitive functioning, includes different types of knowledge and values, and it seems that increasing the knowledge about the world and different experiences may facilitate their development. School system usually pays more attention to accumulation of knowledge, but little related to wisdom. In this study wisdom…

  3. Diagnostic reasoning and underlying knowledge of students with preclinical patient contacts in PBL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemers, Agnes D; van de Wiel, Margje W J; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Baarveld, Frank; Dolmans, Diana H J M

    2015-12-01

    Medical experts have access to elaborate and integrated knowledge networks consisting of biomedical and clinical knowledge. These coherent knowledge networks enable them to generate more accurate diagnoses in a shorter time. However, students' knowledge networks are less organised and students have difficulties linking theory and practice and transferring acquired knowledge. Therefore we wanted to explore the development and transfer of knowledge of third-year preclinical students on a problem-based learning (PBL) course with real patient contacts. Before and after a 10-week PBL course with real patients, third-year medical students were asked to think out loud while diagnosing four types of paper patient problems (two course cases and two transfer cases), and explain the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of the patient features. Diagnostic accuracy and time needed to think through the cases were measured. The think-aloud protocols were transcribed verbatim and different types of knowledge were coded and quantitatively analysed. The written pathophysiological explanations were translated into networks of concepts. Both the concepts and the links between concepts in students' networks were compared to model networks. Over the course diagnostic accuracy increased, case-processing time decreased, and students used less biomedical and clinical knowledge during diagnostic reasoning. The quality of the pathophysiological explanations increased: the students used more concepts, especially more model concepts, and they used fewer wrong concepts and links. The findings differed across course and transfer cases. The effects were generally less strong for transfer cases. Students' improved diagnostic accuracy and the improved quality of their knowledge networks suggest that integration of biomedical and clinical knowledge took place during a 10-week course. The differences between course and transfer cases demonstrate that transfer is complex and time-consuming. We

  4. Robustness of a Distributed Knowledge Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Kühn; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1999-01-01

    specific for each actor in the network in recognition of actor role differences. The article analyses the conditions for the model to generate symmetric incentives between different actor roles. The model is proposed for business networks like supply chains and networks like replacement, maintenance......Knowledge management based on symmetric incentives is rarely found in literature. A knowledge exchange model relies upon a double loop knowledge conversion with symmetric incentives in a network. The model merges specific knowledge with knowledge from other actors into a decision support system...... and services industries....

  5. Robustness of a Distributed Knowledge Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Kühn; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge management based on symmetric incentives is rarely found in literature. A knowledge exchange model relies upon a double loop knowledge conversion with symmetric incentives in a network. The model merges specific knowledge with knowledge from other actors into a decision support system...... specific for each actor in the network in recognition of actor role differences. The article analyses the conditions for the model to generate symmetric incentives between different actor roles. The model is proposed for business networks like supply chains and networks like replacement, maintenance...

  6. Knowledge and Attitude of Nursing Students toward Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nitasha; Ghai, Sandhya; Grover, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the commonly used treatment modalities for patients with severe mental disorders. However, acceptance of ECT by the patient and relatives often depends on how the health-care professionals themselves present the treatment modality to the patients and their relatives. There is a lack of information about the knowledge and attitude toward ECT among health professionals. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge about and attitude toward ECT among nursing students. Methodology: Knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among nursing students were assessed using ECT knowledge and attitude questionnaires. Results: The study included 183 nursing students. Majority (n = 62; 60.8%) of the participants obtained information about ECT from media (movies, television, print media, etc.). None of the students had full knowledge about ECT. Although a significant proportion of students had knowledge about the ECT procedure and consent procedure, majority of them had poor knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitudes were also highly prevalent, with more than two-thirds of the participants having negative attitudes toward ECT on more than half of the attitude items of the scale. Total knowledge score positively correlated with total attitude score, suggesting that higher knowledge was associated with more positive attitude. Conclusions: Although nursing students have knowledge about basic ECT procedure and consent, they lack knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitude toward ECT is also highly prevalent among nursing students. Accordingly, there is a need to improve the knowledge and address the negative attitude of nursing students, which may ultimately lead to better acceptance of the treatment. PMID:28936064

  7. Knowledge-creation in student software-development teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mzwandile M. Shongwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge-creation is a field of study that has gained popularity in recent times.Knowledge-creation is the creation of new ideas or new innovations. In computing, software development is regarded as knowledge-creation. This is because software-development involves the creation of a new innovation (software. Knowledge-creation studies in this field tend to focus mainly on knowledge-creation activities in business organisations. They use experienced, professional software-development teams as subjects, largely ignoring novice student development teams. This has denied the field of computing valuable knowledge about how novice teams create knowledge.Objectives: The study addressed this gap in the literature by investigating knowledge-creation in student software teams.Method: An ethnographic study was conducted on six student teams developing software in a management-information systems (MIS course. They were conducting a systems development project at a university during a term of study. Data were collected over a period of four months through participant observation and interviews.Results: The results reveal knowledge-creation activities such as problem definition,brainstorming, programming and system documentation. Students use the Internet, books,class notes, class presentations, senior students and professional software developers as sources of information. Mobile phones and BlackBerry devices facilitate knowledge-creation.Challenges to knowledge-creation are the lack of material and financial resources,a lack of technical skills, a lack of time, students staying off-campus and ambivalent team members.Conclusion: The conclusion drawn from this study is that student teams are capable of creating knowledge (a working system just like professional teams, but the knowledge-creation process is slightly different.

  8. College students' knowledge about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, Christiane; Johnson, Mark E; Metzger, Jesse S; Dewane, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) are the leading known preventable birth defects in North America. Knowledge surveys about FASD have been conducted with various health and allied healthcare providers and have proven useful in identifying gaps in knowledge and differences among provider groups to support prevention efforts. To date, no research has been conducted exploring FASD knowledge among college students. This study explored FASD knowledge in a sample of college students, a group at particularly high risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Findings are compared to professionals in several healthcare and affiliated professional groups who were previously surveyed with the same FASD-related items. Surveys from 1,035 college students at a northwestern university were analyzed. Included with the ACHA-National College Health Assessment II were questions regarding FASD. College students' knowledge was compared with that of professionals in key healthcare and affiliated positions to define their relative awareness of FASD risk. Overall, findings revealed adequate FASD knowledge among college students. Although minor differences emerged when comparing students and professionals' responses, most respondent groups answered with an 85% accuracy rate or higher. College students demonstrated adequate knowledgeable about FASD. Future research must explore whether such knowledge translates into lower risk behavior and consequent reduction in alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

  9. Development of a malaria knowledge test for student travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartjes, Laurie B; Baumann, Linda C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a malaria knowledge test (MKT) developed to evaluate a web-based game for students who increasingly travel to malaria-risk regions of the world. The 18-item MKT was structured according to the dimensions of the self-regulation model (SRM) to measure the accuracy of students' beliefs about malaria. An experimental design was used to compare three game versions. Students (N=482) participated in 2010 by completing a pre-test, playing a Web-based game simulating student travel to malaria-endemic destinations, and completing a post-test. Study data support the validity and reliability of the MKT for the evaluation of malaria education interventions and for student self-assessment. Use of the MKT to evaluate an educational game about malaria revealed a strong overall learning effect and discrimination by game version, travel experience, and SRM dimension. This 5-min test may also be adapted for educational outreach purposes among health care providers globally, residents of malaria-endemic regions, and other high risk travel groups (e.g., elderly, chronic health conditions, pregnant, or returning to malaria-endemic regions to visit friends/relatives).

  10. Assessment of Metacognitive Knowledge in Students with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Marion; Lockl, Kathrin; Heydrich, Jana; Weinert, Sabine; Artelt, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether and, if so, how metacognitive knowledge can be assessed validly in students with special educational needs in a large-scale assessment like the German National Educational Panel Study. In total, 804 sixth-grade students including both regular school students attending the lowest track of secondary education…

  11. Objective and Subjective Knowledge and HIV Testing among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Su-I

    2004-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the knowledge domain specifically related to HIV testing among college students. Students (age 18-24) were recruited from a major university in the southeastern United States to participate in a Web-based survey during spring 2003 (N=440). About 21% of the students reported previous voluntary HIV tests.…

  12. Drawing on Student Knowledge of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Tara N.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Montplaisir, Lisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Drawings are an underutilized assessment format in Human Anatomy and Physiology (HA&P), despite their potential to reveal student content understanding and alternative conceptions. This study used student-generated drawings to explore student knowledge in a HA&P course. The drawing tasks in this study focused on chemical synapses between…

  13. Robustness of a Distributed Knowledge Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Kuhn; Holm Larsen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    ) and contractbasedknowledge exchange do not obtain networkeffectiveness because of prohibitive transaction costs inreducing uncertainty, we suggest a robust model for peerproduced knowledge within a distributed setting. Thepeer produced knowledge exchange model relies upon adouble loop knowledge conversion...... with symmetricincentives in a network since the production of actorspecific knowledge makes any knowledge appropriationby use of property rights by the actors irrelevant. Withoutproperty rights in knowledge the actor network generatesopportunity for incentive symmetry over a period of time.The model merges specific...... knowledge with knowledgefrom other actors into a decision support system specificfor each actor in the network in recognition of actor roledifferences. The article suggests a set of 9 static and 5dynamic propositions for the model to maintainsymmetric incentives between different actor networks.The model...

  14. Probing physics students' conceptual knowledge structures through term association

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, I D; Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional tests are not effective tools for diagnosing the content and structure of students' knowledge of physics. As a possible alternative, a set of term-association tasks (the "ConMap" tasks) was developed to probe the interconnections within students' store of conceptual knowledge. The tasks have students respond spontaneously to a term or problem or topic area with a sequence of associated terms; the response terms and timeof- entry data are captured. The tasks were tried on introductory physics students, and preliminary investigations show that the tasks are capable of eliciting information about the stucture of their knowledge. Specifically, data gathered through the tasks is similar to that produced by a hand-drawn concept map task, has measures that correlate with inclass exam performance, and is sensitive to learning produced by topic coverage in class. Although the results are preliminary and only suggestive, the tasks warrant further study as student-knowledge assessment instruments and sources...

  15. An Expedient Study on Back-Propagation (BPN) Neural Networks for Modeling Automated Evaluation of the Answers and Progress of Deaf Students' That Possess Basic Knowledge of the English Language and Computer Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrettaros, John; Vouros, George; Drigas, Athanasios S.

    This article studies the expediency of using neural networks technology and the development of back-propagation networks (BPN) models for modeling automated evaluation of the answers and progress of deaf students' that possess basic knowledge of the English language and computer skills, within a virtual e-learning environment. The performance of the developed neural models is evaluated with the correlation factor between the neural networks' response values and the real value data as well as the percentage measurement of the error between the neural networks' estimate values and the real value data during its training process and afterwards with unknown data that weren't used in the training process.

  16. Students' Conceptions of Knowledge, Information, and Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patricia A.; Winters, Fielding I.; Loughlin, Sandra M.; Grossnickle, Emily M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, everyday conceptions of knowledge, information, and truth were investigated as 161 US undergraduates completed three online tasks that investigated understandings of these foundational constructs. For the first task, respondents graphically represented the interrelations of knowledge, information, and truth; the second task required…

  17. Students' Conceptions of Knowledge, Information, and Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patricia A.; Winters, Fielding I.; Loughlin, Sandra M.; Grossnickle, Emily M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, everyday conceptions of knowledge, information, and truth were investigated as 161 US undergraduates completed three online tasks that investigated understandings of these foundational constructs. For the first task, respondents graphically represented the interrelations of knowledge, information, and truth; the second task required…

  18. Students' conceptual knowledge of energy and momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We investigate student understanding of energy and momentum concepts at the level of introductory physics by designing and administering a 25-item multiple choice test and conducting individual interviews. We find that most students have difficulty in qualitatively interpreting basic principles related to energy and momentum and in applying them in physical situations. The test development process and a summary of results are presented.

  19. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  20. Automated Student Model Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  1. Breast and cervical cancer knowledge and awareness among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Birsen; Avci, Ilknur Aydin; Rizalar, Selda; Oz, Hatice; Meral, Damla

    2015-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are the most common types of cancer in women worldwide. Previous studies in Asia have shown that related knowledge and awareness is low among female university students. The goal of this study was to assess breast and cervical cancer knowledge, practices, and awareness among female university students in Samsun,Turkey. This research was a cross-sectional survey of female university students using a self-administered. questionnaire to investigate participant awareness and knowledge of breast and cervical cancer. A total of 301 female university students participated. Descriptive statistics and chi square tests were used for data analysis. The mean age of the participants in this study was 22.0 ± 5.91 years. Regarding family history, 89.7 % of the students had no known familial history of breast cancer. Students (65.4%) had knowledge about breast self examination and 52.2 % of them had performed breast self examinationm while 55.1% of them had knowledge about prevention of cervical cancer. Although the results are preliminary, the study points to an insufficient knowledge of university students in Samsun about breast and cervical cancer.

  2. Knowledge Management through the Equilibrium Pattern Model for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarirete, Akila; Noble, Elizabeth; Chikh, Azeddine

    Contemporary students are characterized by having very applied learning styles and methods of acquiring knowledge. This behavior is consistent with the constructivist models where students are co-partners in the learning process. In the present work the authors developed a new model of learning based on the constructivist theory coupled with the cognitive development theory of Piaget. The model considers the level of learning based on several stages and the move from one stage to another requires learners' challenge. At each time a new concept is introduced creates a disequilibrium that needs to be worked out to return back to its equilibrium stage. This process of "disequilibrium/equilibrium" has been analyzed and validated using a course in computer networking as part of Cisco Networking Academy Program at Effat College, a women college in Saudi Arabia. The model provides a theoretical foundation for teaching especially in a complex knowledge domain such as engineering and can be used in a knowledge economy.

  3. Erciyes University Students' Knowledge about AIDS: Differences between Students of Natural and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasci, Sultan; Baser, Muruvvet; Mucuk, Salime; Bayat, Meral; Zincir, Handan; Sungur, Gonul

    2008-01-01

    The authors' goal in this study was to assess differences in knowledge about AIDS between students of natural science (NS) and social science (SS). The authors surveyed 542 students at Erciyes University in Kayseri, Turkey, regarding their knowledge of AIDS. Some differences in knowledge about AIDS (eg, regarding the virus that causes AIDS, the…

  4. College biology students' conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge: Implications for conceptual change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameny, Gloria Millie Apio

    Adequate understanding of the nature of science is a major goal of science education. Understanding of the evolutionary nature of biological knowledge is a means of reinforcing biology students' understanding of the nature of science. It provides students with the philosophical basis, explanatory ideals, and subject matter-specific views of what counts as a scientifically-acceptable biological explanation. This study examined 121 college introductory biology and advanced zoology students for their conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge. A 60-item Likert-scale questionnaire called the Nature of Biological Knowledge Scale and student interviews were used as complementary research instruments. Firstly, the study showed that 80--100% of college biology students have an adequate understanding of scientific methods, and that a similar percentage of students had learned the theory of evolution by natural selection in their biology courses. Secondly, the study showed that at least 60--80% of the students do not understand the importance of evolution in biological knowledge. Yet the study revealed that a statistically significant positive correlation exist among students' understanding of natural selection, divergent, and convergent evolutionary models. Thirdly, the study showed that about 20--58% of college students hold prescientific conceptions which, in part, are responsible for students' lack of understanding of the nature of biological knowledge. A statistically significant negative correlation was found among students' prescientific conceptions about basis of biological knowledge and nature of change in biological processes, and their understanding of natural selection and evolutionary models. However, the study showed that students' characteristics such as gender, age, major, or years in college have no statistically significant influence on students' conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge. Only students' depth of biological

  5. A knowledge generation model via the hypernetwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Guang-Yong; Hu, Zhao-Long

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the statistical properties of the network on the knowledge diffusion has been extensively studied. However, the structure evolution and the knowledge generation processes are always integrated simultaneously. By introducing the Cobb-Douglas production function and treating the knowledge growth as a cooperative production of knowledge, in this paper, we present two knowledge-generation dynamic evolving models based on different evolving mechanisms. The first model, named "HDPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the hyperdegree preferential attachment mechanisms. The second model, named "KSPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the knowledge stock preferential attachment mechanisms. We investigate the effect of the parameters (α,β) on the total knowledge stock of the two models. The hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model can be theoretically analyzed by the mean-field theory. The analytic result indicates that the hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model obeys the power-law distribution and the exponent is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we present the distributions of the knowledge stock for different parameters (α,β). The findings indicate that our proposed models could be helpful for deeply understanding the scientific research cooperation.

  6. A knowledge generation model via the hypernetwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Liu

    Full Text Available The influence of the statistical properties of the network on the knowledge diffusion has been extensively studied. However, the structure evolution and the knowledge generation processes are always integrated simultaneously. By introducing the Cobb-Douglas production function and treating the knowledge growth as a cooperative production of knowledge, in this paper, we present two knowledge-generation dynamic evolving models based on different evolving mechanisms. The first model, named "HDPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the hyperdegree preferential attachment mechanisms. The second model, named "KSPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the knowledge stock preferential attachment mechanisms. We investigate the effect of the parameters (α,β on the total knowledge stock of the two models. The hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model can be theoretically analyzed by the mean-field theory. The analytic result indicates that the hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model obeys the power-law distribution and the exponent is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we present the distributions of the knowledge stock for different parameters (α,β. The findings indicate that our proposed models could be helpful for deeply understanding the scientific research cooperation.

  7. Students inadequate knowledge about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondahl, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Little consideration is given to personal relationships and sexuality issues in medical care education and little if any time is allocated to non-heterosexual aspects. The present study uses a descriptive, comparative design, and a modified version of the Knowledge about Homosexuality Questionnaire to investigate nursing and medical students' knowledge on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons. The participants were students at a Swedish university in semester 6 of their education programs, and the response rate was 92% (n=124). The aim of the study was to look at the students' access to knowledge concerning LGBT. Shortcomings in LGBT knowledge were seen in the student groups surveyed irrespective of education program, gender or religious belief. Accordingly, it is likely that heteronormativity will continue to project its undemocratic spirit in all communication, treatment and care if something is not done with immediate effect.

  8. Undergraduate students' knowledge about the prevention of breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freitas, Catia Regina Pirhardt; Terra, Karina Lemos; das Mercês, Nen Nalú Alves

    2011-01-01

    .... Conclusions indicate that the level of students' knowledge about factors that can prevent breast cancer, in an interdisciplinary perspective, is important to rethink the inclusion of health education as an essential curriculum content to promote a healthy university.

  9. Students' Knowledge of and Expected Impact from Sustainable Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David L.

    2000-01-01

    High school agricultural students in Iowa (n=386) rated their knowledge of sustainable agriculture as limited. They expected it to have high impact environmentally and socially. Results provide a basis for curriculum development in this area. (SK)

  10. Knowledge and Perception of Sexuality Education among Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and Perception of Sexuality Education among Students of a Rural ... give sexuality a central role in negotiating the transition from child to adult. ... aged between 10-18 years had never discussed about sex with their parents.

  11. Modeling Didactic Knowledge by Storyboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Rainer; Sakurai, Yoshitaka; Tsuruta, Setsuo; Jantke, Klaus P.

    2010-01-01

    University education often suffers from a lack of an explicit and adaptable didactic design. Students complain about the insufficient adaptability to the learners' needs. Learning content and services need to reach their audience according to their different prerequisites, needs, and different learning styles and conditions. A way to overcome such…

  12. Knowledge and Attitude of University Students Towards Premarital Screening Program

    OpenAIRE

    Rahma Al Kindi; Salha Al Rujaibi; Maya Al Kendi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program.Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at the students’ clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students’ knowledge about...

  13. The Virtual Workplace Ethnography: Positioning Student Writers as Knowledge Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Workplace Ethnography is a first-year composition assignment that positions students as knowledge makers by requiring them to apply a theoretical lens ("Working Knowledge") to a video representation of a workplace. The lens provides multiple terms for analysis of workplace behaviors in context, providing a scaffolding for…

  14. Osteoporosis Knowledge of Students in Relevant Healthcare Academic Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu H. Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For healthcare professionals who treat individuals with osteoporosis, it is vital that they receive adequate education on osteoporosis to ensure sufficient knowledge of osteoporosis to properly treat individuals with the disease. To test for adequate osteoporosis education, a study was conducted to measure osteoporosis knowledge in 206 students in relevant healthcare academic programs, such as nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and dietetics. The study showed that differences existed in osteoporosis knowledge in general between the programs and between different years of students in the same programs. There were also discrepancies in specific areas of osteoporosis knowledge between the classes of students, and the average scores of correctly answered items were only as high as 24.40 (76.3% out of 32 items on osteoporosis knowledge. This study shows that students have osteoporosis knowledge and that it is not completely inadequate; however, osteoporosis knowledge could still be more sufficient, and results demonstrate the need to increase osteoporosis education in the curriculum for these healthcare academic programs to increase osteoporosis knowledge and better prepare graduates and professionals to treat individuals with the disease.

  15. Effects of Continuing Professional Development on Urban Elementary Students' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; McCaughtry, Nathan; Martin, Jeffrey; Cothran, Donetta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine one urban school district's attempt to revise their elementary school physical education offerings to promote student gains in healthy living knowledge. Specifically, the authors sought to determine if children's physical activity/fitness knowledge increased when taught by teachers engaged in a…

  16. Influencing University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes toward Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Jan; Boivin, Meghan; Rice, Desiree.; McGraw, Katie; Munson, Elin; Walter, Katherine Corcoran; Bloch, Mary K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Spending a few minutes reading about the benefits of breastfeeding had a significant, positive effect on university students' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding on post-surveys and follow-up surveys one month later. Since lactation duration is correlated with both knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, implications of these…

  17. Examining Factors that Affect Knowledge Sharing and Students' Attitude toward Their Learning Experience within Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined factors that might impact student knowledge sharing within virtual teams through online discussion boards. These factors included: trust, mutual influence, conflict, leadership, and cohesion. A path model was developed to determine whether relationships exist among knowledge sharing from asynchronous group discussion and the…

  18. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  19. The Effect of Knowledge Linking Levels in Biology Lessons upon Students' Knowledge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadouh, Julia; Liu, Ning; Sandmann, Angela; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge structure is an important aspect for defining students' competency in biology learning, but how knowledge structure is influenced by the teaching process in naturalistic biology classroom settings has scarcely been empirically investigated. In this study, 49 biology lessons in the teaching unit "blood and circulatory system" in…

  20. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students (n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student…

  1. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  2. Learning knowledge as an integral part of competencies in higher education: Effects on students' knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bommel, Marijke; Boshuizen, Els; Kwakman, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    Van Bommel, M., Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Kwakman, K. (2010, 25-27 August). Learning knowledge as an integral part of competencies in higher education: Effects on students' knowledge. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14 Learning and Professional Development, Munich, Germany.

  3. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students (n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student…

  4. Student knowledge and pedagogical work of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Comas Acuñas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available it is broken down into several points collected quo beliefs that a group of students having academic class of the event, with the use of the WCC and Posac The PAP and programs. In this we include the description of the methodological design of the different stages of the investigation. The central objective of this work is to record the views of a group of students on academic class, subsequent interpretation of the results and the construction of the substantive theory.

  5. Students Integrate Knowledge Acquisition and Practical Work in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E. I.; Sánchez-Hermosín, P.; Díz-Pérez, J.; Tovar, P.; Camacho, R.; Escribano, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in…

  6. Turkish School Counsellors and Counselling Students' Knowledge of Adolescent Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyez, Digdem Müge; Bas, Asli Uz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the knowledge of Turkish high school counsellors and counselling students about adolescence suicide. The sample consisted of 71 school counsellors and 82 third and fourth year psychology counselling students who completed the Adolescent Suicide Behavior Questionnaire. The results showed that although…

  7. Knowledge and Attitudes toward Hookah Usage among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Babinski, Dara; Merlo, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Hookah smoking is a popular form of tobacco use on university campuses. This study documented use, attitudes, and knowledge of hookah smoking among college students. Participants: The sample included 943 university students recruited between February 2009 and January 2010. Respondents ("M" age = 20.02) included 376 males, 533…

  8. Entrepreneurial Knowledge and Aspirations of Dentistry Students in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brijlal, Pradeep; Brijlal, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the intentions and knowledge of entrepreneurship of final-year university dentistry students is reported, with particular regard to the factors of gender and race. A questionnaire survey was used with final-year dentistry students, over two years, at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. The findings show that…

  9. Knowledge of Global Climate Change: View of Iranian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sadegh; Nejad, Zahra Pazuki; Mahmoudi, Hossein; Burkart, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This article assesses students' understanding of global climate change (GCC) and social factors affecting it. It was hypothesized that students who demonstrate pro-environmental attitudes are more likely to possess higher knowledge of GCC. It was further hypothesized that trust and personal efficiency would have a positive effect on the knowledge…

  10. Assessing the Food Safety Knowledge of University of Maine Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferk, Chelsea C.; Calder, Beth L.; Camire, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne illness is a global public health issue. Young adults may work in foodservice while they are university students, and their habits may later shape the practices and well-being of their children. The objective of this study was to establish baseline data and assess the food safety knowledge of 18- to 26-year-old Univ. of Maine students.…

  11. Supervised Agricultural Experience: An Examination of Student Knowledge and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) knowledge and participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Students completed a questionnaire assessing…

  12. Astrobiology undergraduate education: students' knowledge and perceptions of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jamie S; Drew, Jennifer C

    2009-04-01

    With the field of astrobiology continually evolving, it has become increasingly important to develop and maintain an educational infrastructure for the next generation of astrobiologists. In addition to developing more courses and programs for students, it is essential to monitor the learning experiences and progress of students taking these astrobiology courses. At the University of Florida, a new pilot course in astrobiology was developed that targeted undergraduate students with a wide range of scientific backgrounds. Pre- and post-course surveys along with knowledge assessments were used to evaluate the students' perceived and actual learning experiences. The class incorporated a hybrid teaching platform that included traditional in-person and distance learning technologies. Results indicate that undergraduate students have little prior knowledge of key astrobiology concepts; however, post-course testing demonstrated significant improvements in the students' comprehension of astrobiology. Improvements were not limited to astrobiology knowledge. Assessments revealed that students developed confidence in science writing as well as reading and understanding astrobiology primary literature. Overall, student knowledge of and attitudes toward astrobiological research dramatically increased during this course, which demonstrates the ongoing need for additional astrobiology education programs as well as periodic evaluations of those programs currently underway. Together, these approaches serve to improve the overall learning experiences and perceptions of future astrobiology researchers.

  13. Knowledge of nursing students towards HIV/AIDS in Nepal

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    Sita Parajulee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims First case of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS in Nepal was reported in the year 1988. Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare system and should be knowledgeable in providing care to AIDS patients. This study assessed the knowledge of nursing students towards HIV/AIDS, and the association (if any between the knowledge scores of the nursing students with their selected demographic variables. Materials and methods A cross sectional study was conducted evaluating the nursing student knowledge using a self designed questionnaire. The correct answers were given a score of ‘1’ and wrong answers were given a score of ‘0’ (total possible maximum score ‘18’. Results Among the total 165 nursing students, 121 of them filled the questionnaire (response rate of 73.33% and all of them were females. The mean ± SD age of the respondents was 18.3 ±1.75 years. The median (IQR of the overall total scores was 13.0 (11.5-15.0. There was an association between the knowledge scores of the respondents with ‘age’ (p=000, ‘course of the study’ (p=0.001. However, there was no statistically significant association between the knowledge scores with the ‘year of study’ of the respondents (p=0.109, ‘mode of finance’ (0.611 and ‘native’ of the students (0.173. Conclusion The study suggested that nursing students have a poor overall knowledge on AIDS and especially areas such as post exposure prophylaxis.The findings also suggested the need for providing adequate knowledge to the students during their regular class room teaching and clinical postings. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2012, Vol-8, No-4, 27-33 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i4.8697

  14. Preservice Elementary School Teachers' Knowledge of Fractions: A Mirror of Students' Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenbrugge, H.; Lesage, E.; Valcke, M.; Desoete, A.

    2014-01-01

    This research analyses preservice teachers' knowledge of fractions. Fractions are notoriously difficult for students to learn and for teachers to teach. Previous studies suggest that student learning of fractions may be limited by teacher understanding of fractions. If so, teacher education has a key role in solving the problem. We first reviewed…

  15. The Effect of Coping Knowledge on Emergency Preparedness in Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kang, So-Ra; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Ah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of coping knowledge for emergency preparedness in Korean elementary school students. A school-based coping education program was provided seven times to 271 fourth- and fifth-grade students in two urban schools by researchers with the school nurses. The Process Model of Stress and Coping and…

  16. Student Affairs Professionals' Self-Report of Multicultural Competence: Understanding Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Jeanett; Gloria, Alberta M.; Mayorga, Melissa M.; Salas, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Pope and Reynolds' (1997) theoretical model of multicultural competence for student affairs was empirically tested with 100 student affairs professionals. The domain subscales of awareness, knowledge, and skills revealed high internal consistency and intercorrelation. Males reported significantly higher multicultural awareness in their…

  17. Improving the quantum mechanics content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge of physics graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Emily Megan

    Many physics graduate students face the unique challenge of being both students and teachers concurrently. To succeed in these roles, they must develop both physics content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. My research focuses on improving both the content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge of first year graduate students. To improve their content knowledge, I have focused on improving graduate students' conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics covered in upper-level undergraduate courses since our earlier investigations suggest that many graduate students struggle in developing a conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. Learning tools, such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorials (QuILTs) that I have developed, have been successful in helping graduate students improve their understanding of Dirac notation and single photon behavior in the context of a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer. In addition, I have been involved in enhancing our semester long course professional development course for teaching assistants (TAs) by including research-based activities. In particular, I have been researching the implications of graduate TAs' reflections on the connections between their grading practices and student learning, i.e., the development of introductory physics students' content knowledge and problem-solving, reasoning, and metacognitive skills. This research involves having graduate students grade sample student solutions to introductory physics problems. Afterward, the graduate TAs discuss with each other the pros and cons of different grading rubrics on student learning and formulate a joint grading rubric to grade the problem. The graduate TAs are individually asked to reformulate a rubric and grade problems using the rubric several months after the group activity to assess the impact of the intervention on graduate TAs. In addition to the intervention focusing on grading sample student solutions, graduate TAs are also asked to answer

  18. Global warming: knowledge and views of Iranian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Salehpour, Sousan; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Boyes, Eddie; Stanisstreet, Martin; Attarchi, Mirsaeed

    2013-04-06

    Study of students' knowledge about global warming can help authorities to have better imagination of this critical environmental problem. This research examines high school students' ideas about greenhouse effect and the results may be useful for the respective authorities to improve cultural and educational aspects of next generation. In this cross-sectional study, a 42 question questionnaire with mix of open and closed questions was used to evaluate high school students' view about the mechanism, consequences, causes and cures of global warming. To assess students' knowledge, cognitive score was also calculated. 1035 students were randomly selected from 19 educational districts of Tehran. Sampling method was multi stage. Only 5.1% of the students could explain greenhouse effect correctly and completely. 88.8% and 71.2% respectively believed "if the greenhouse effect gets bigger the Earth will get hotter" and "incidence of more skin cancers is a consequence of global warming". 69.6% and 68.8% respectively thought "the greenhouse effect is made worse by too much carbon dioxide" and "presence of ozone holes is a cause of greenhouse effect". 68.4% believed "not using cars so much is a cure for global warming". While a student's 'cognitive score' could range from -36 to +36, Students' mean cognitive score was equal to +1.64. Mean cognitive score of male students and grade 2 & 3 students was respectively higher than female ones (P<0.01) and grade 1 students (P<0.001) but there was no statistically significant difference between students of different regions (P>0.05). In general, students' knowledge about global warming was not acceptable and there were some misconceptions in the students' mind, such as supposing ozone holes as a cause and more skin cancer as a consequence of global warming. The Findings of this survey indicate that, this important stratum of society have been received no sufficient and efficient education and sensitization on this matter.

  19. [Nutrition knowledge of Sardinian and Corsican university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccia, F; Lantini, T; Luciani, A; Carcassi, A M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the knowledge of Dietary Guidelines of university students in Sardinia and in Corsica. A nutrition knowledge questionnaire was administered to 566 university students, 141 from Corte University and 425 from Cagliari University. Sardinian students scored higher on the sections of the questionnaire about the recommended food intake, the sources of nutrients and the links between diet and disease, the best food choices to keep and to promote health. Corsican students were more trained to specify the best food choices to reduce the amount of fat, salt and sugar. In both countries females scored higher than males did, showing a greater nutrition knowledge. Obtained results from this work confirm the need of a wider and deeper diffusion of the Dietary Guidelines for a healthy diet, so that it is possible to reach more healthful dietary choices and to plan the aimed educative interventions to bridge the gaps.

  20. Emergency contraception: knowledge and attitudes of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Lorrane Carneiro Veloso

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the knowledge and attitude towards emergency contraception among nursing students from a public university in Goiás - a state in Brazil. A descriptive and analytical research methodology with a quantitative approach was used, applying, from February to May 2011 a questionnaire on the sexual knowledge and attitude of students regarding emergency contraception. 178 students participated in the study. Knowledge was confirmed through the high frequency of correct answers to the questions, especially those concerning the correct time and the instructions for use (between 86% - 96%. Although many students use this method, there are still some doubts about the mechanism of action, side effects and access availability (frequency of correct answers lower than 50%. We noticed the need to develop educational policies that encourage the promotion of sex education in schools and universities.

  1. KNOWLEDGE AND BEHAVIOR OF REGULAR STUDENTS TOWARD STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN INCLUSIVE SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Grahita Kusumastuti; Abdul Salim Choiri

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to determine the relation between knowledge levels of inclusive education and social behavior of regular students to students with special needs. Method of this research used survey by using sample of 34 students who have students with disabilities as their peers in their class. Data was collected by using questionnaire to determine the relation between knowledge levels of inclusive education and social behavior. Data was analyzed by using bivariate analysis statistic techn...

  2. Knowledge of nursing students about central venous catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlinar Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Central venous catheters (CVC are at the crucial importance, particulary in the intensive therapy units. In order to handle a CVC safely, nursing students need to acquire theoretical and practical knowledge during the course of their studies. The aim of the study was to establish theoretical knowledge of nursing students about the procedures of nurses in placing and removing a central venous catheter (CVC, dressing the catheter entry point, the reasons for measuring central venous pressure (CVP, possible complications and risk factors for developing infections related to CVC. Methods. The questionnaire developed specifically for this cross-sectionl study was handed out to 87 full-time students and 57 part-time students. Results. The results show that all the surveyed nursing students know why chest radiography is carried out when inserting a catheter, have relatively good knowledge of CVC insertion points, procedures carried out in case of a suspected catheter sepsis and complications and risk factors for the development of infections related to CVC. However, the study show that the majority of students have insufficient knowledge of the procedures accompanying insertion of a catheter, signs that indicate correct functioning of CVC, frequency of flushing a catheter when it is not in use and the reasons for introducing an implanted CVC. Conclusion. Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that the second-year nursing students have insufficient knowledge of CVC. In order to correctly and safely handle a CVC, good theoretical knowledge and relevant practical experience are needed. The authors therefore believe that, in future, the classes should be organized in smaller groups with step-by-step demonstrations of individual procedures in handling a CVC, and the students encouraged to learn as actively as possible.

  3. Student Knowledge, Attitudes, and Use of Evidence-Based Concepts Following an Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manspeaker, Sarah A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Turocy, Paula S.; Pribesh, Shana; Hankemeier, Dorice

    2011-01-01

    Context: While evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts are being taught in health profession education programs, models of instruction and effectiveness of these models are not evident in athletic training. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Evidence-Based Teaching Model (EBTM) in increasing student knowledge, attitudes, and use of…

  4. [Undergraduate students' knowledge about the prevention of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Catia Regina Pirhardt; Terra, Karina Lemos; das Mercês, Nen Nalú Alves

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to identify what undergraduate students know of factors for breast cancer prevention. This was a quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study, developed in a University in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil with 50 students enrolled in nursing, physiotherapy and psychology programs in the first semester of 2008. The data were collected from February to April 2008. A semi-structured questionnaire and descriptive statistics were used. Results showed that students of nursing and physiotherapy demonstrated greater knowledge about the issue than the psychology students. Mentioned prevention factors: consumption of vegetables, greens and fruits, physical exercises and breastfeeding. Conclusions indicate that the level of students' knowledge about factors that can prevent breast cancer, in an interdisciplinary perspective, is important to rethink the inclusion of health education as an essential curriculum content to promote a healthy university.

  5. Knowledge about HIV/AIDS among secondary school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS has emerged as the single most formidable challenge to public health. School children of today are exposed to the risk of HIV/AIDS. Aims: The study was conducted to determine the knowledge among secondary school students regarding HIV/AIDS and provide suggestions for HIV/AIDS education in schools. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among students of tenth to twelfth standard in the intermediate schools of Lucknow, India, from July to October 2011. A total of 215 students, both boys and girls, were enrolled in the study. Results: In this study, for majority of the students (85%, the source of information about HIV/AIDS was the television. Regarding knowledge about modes of transmission of HIV/AIDS among girl students, 95.1% of them told that it is through unprotected sex. A total of 75.8% students said that it was transmitted from mother to child. Conclusion: It was observed that the knowledge of the school students was quite satisfactory for most of the variables like modes of transmission, including mother-to-child transmission of the disease. However, schools should come forward to design awareness campaigns for the benefit of the students.

  6. Assessing oral cancer knowledge in Romanian undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, A L; Ibric, S; Ibric-Cioranu, V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the level of Romanian dental students' knowledge regarding the oral cancer risk and non-risk factors as well as oral cancer signs, symptoms, and diagnostic signs. A total of 192 first- to sixth-year undergraduate dental students (mean age 22.20 ± 2.94 years) who consented to participate in the study filled in a questionnaire enquiring about their knowledge of oral cancer. A score of the oral cancer knowledge was calculated for each participant based on their correct answers. Regarding the knowledge of oral cancer risk factors, the vast majority of the students correctly recognized tobacco (96.8 %), having a prior oral cancer lesion (85.1 %), the consumption of alcohol (77.7 %), and older age (64.2 %). Respectively, 87.7 and 54.3 % knew the tongue and the floor of mouth to be the most common oral cancer sites. Of the students, 71.3 % agreed that oral cancer examinations for those 20 years of age and older should be provided during regular periodic health examinations, 92.9 % considered that patients with suspicious oral lesions should be referred to specialists, and 84.6 % agreed that oral cancer examinations should be a routine part of a comprehensive oral examination. A significant association was found between the year of study in the dental school, age, and knowledge of the oral cancer knowledge scores. Although students' knowledge increased with academic year, there is a clear need to enhance the dental curricula in oral cancer clinical training in oral cancer prevention and examination for dental students.

  7. Hepatitis B Knowledge Levels of Turkish Nursing and Midwifery Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ozer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine knowledge levels of students in School of Health, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, and examine the influence of various factors on hepatitis B knowledge levels. Method: The study was conducted in the School of Health of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University between April and June 2009. All of the 296 students in the school were planned to be included in the study. Survey forms; prepared in the light of the data reported in the literature by investigators, and composed of 37 questions, were delivered to the students and they were asked to fill them out. 18.2% of the students couldn’t be reached. Thus, only 242 students (81.8% were included in the study. Results: While 87.2% of the students expressed sexual intercourse as a transmission route of HBV, 67.4% mentioned perinatal route, 96.7% expressed blood and blood products, 79.8% mentioned use of common goods such as towel and toothbrush. 78.1% of the students did not consider breast milk as a transmission route for HPV, whereas fecal-oral route, handshake-hugging, and kissing were not known to be a way of transmission for HPV in 65.7%, 86.8%, and 56.2% of the study population, respectively. Mean level of hepatitis B knowledge among students was 69.8±19.4. Knowledge score of nursing students was 1.1 points higher than that of midwifery students and the difference between them was not significant. As the college year elevated, hepatitis B knowledge scores increased as well. Conclusion: Hepatitis B knowledge score of undergraduate students in Nursing and Midwifery Departments of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, was 69.8±19.4. Since hepatitis B knowledge score raises parallel to the elevation of college year, hepatitis B education should be provided in the first year. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 139-144

  8. Investigating Mathematics Student Teachers’ Pedagogical Content Knowledge in the Context of Knowledge of Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş BAŞTÜRK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the components of Pedagogical Content Knowledge is the Knowledge of Assessment. Knowledge of Assessment includes that teacher knows the purposes and strategies of assessment and possess the abilities to construct and implement them. The new secondary mathematics curriculum asks teachers to adopt the constructivist approach in their teaching and assessment methods. In this study, the purpose is to determine student teachers‟ knowledge of assessment related to the limit and continuity concept. First, Content Knowledge Questionnaire on the limit and continuity concepts was administered to 37 student teachers and then 4 of them who had different levels of subject matter were selected taking into account of the results of the questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with these student teachers, and they asked to prepare a lesson plan of the limit and continuity concepts and then teach it through micro-teaching. Obtained data shows that the student teachers‟ knowledge of assessment was limited and consisted of traditional assessment methods such as written and oral examination.

  9. Pharmacy students' knowledge and attitudes about antibiotics in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejza, Albina; Kryeziu, Zeqir; Kadrija, Kushtrim; Musa, Malbora

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude among Pharmacy students of the University of Prishtina in regards to the antibiotics. 144 pharmacy students at the University of Prishtina were recruited in this study to complete a self-administered questionnaire. The total number of questions in this questionnaire was eight (8), covering two (2) major themes: self-report of the current and past antibiotic use and behavior; and anticipated prescription behavior of antibiotics upon graduation. The data was statistically analyzed through using SPSS for Windows. Descriptive analysis was employed, and the results were expressed in frequency and percentages. The results showcased a good knowledge of antibiotic among students. The most common answer of students' knowledge about antibiotics was good or moderate (82 %), while 63.2% of the subjects used antibiotics by self-decision, most of them (45 %) for sore throat. Upon graduation, 56.9 % of the students will not sell antibiotics without prescription and 85.4% think that module for rational use of antibiotics is very necessary to be inside the pharmacy syllabus. The study showed good and moderate knowledge of pharmacy students regarding the antibiotics. Half of them use antibiotics by self-decision but the majority of them stated that they will not serve the antibiotics without medical prescription. Specific modules and training for proper antibiotic use should be implemented within the Pharmacy program in The Faculty of Medicine.

  10. Knowledge Map: Mathematical Model and Dynamic Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Zhuge; Xiang-Feng Luo

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge representation and reasoning is a key issue of the Knowledge Grid. This paper proposes a Knowledge Map (KM) model for representing and reasoning causal knowledge as an overlay in the Knowledge Grid. It extends Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCMs) to represent and reason not only simple cause-effect relations, but also time-delay causal relations, conditional probabilistic causal relations and sequential relations. The mathematical model and dynamic behaviors of KM are presented. Experiments show that, under certain conditions, the dynamic behaviors of KM can translate between different states. Knowing this condition, experts can control or modify the constructed KM while its dynamic behaviors do not accord with their expectation. Simulations and applications show that KM is more powerful and natural than FCM in emulating real world.

  11. A knowledge management model for graduate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bustos Farías

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a model for administrative knowledge management for the Graduate Support Division of the Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN. This administrative unit is important because it is responsible for managing the institution’s academic services at graduate level. A qualitative methodology was used based on in-depth interviews with graduate-level directors, experts in knowledge management and members of the institution. The results obtained support the use of administrative management tools based on Information Technology (IT, such as the design of a comprehensive dashboard, and the proposal that knowledge management processes be automated with digital repositories. The model identifies factors such as the relationships between people, technology, administrative knowledge and knowledge management processes, and is formed with innovative administrative contributions.

  12. Model-based explanation of plant knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuskonen, P.J. [VTT Electronics, Oulu (Finland). Embedded Software

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with computer explanation of knowledge related to design and operation of industrial plants. The needs for explanation are motivated through case studies and literature reviews. A general framework for analysing plant explanations is presented. Prototypes demonstrate key mechanisms for implementing parts of the framework. Power plants, steel mills, paper factories, and high energy physics control systems are studied to set requirements for explanation. The main problems are seen to be either lack or abundance of information. Design knowledge in particular is found missing at plants. Support systems and automation should be enhanced with ways to explain plant knowledge to the plant staff. A framework is formulated for analysing explanations of plant knowledge. It consists of three parts: 1. a typology of explanation, organised by the class of knowledge (factual, functional, or strategic) and by the target of explanation (processes, automation, or support systems), 2. an identification of explanation tasks generic for the plant domain, and 3. an identification of essential model types for explanation (structural, behavioural, functional, and teleological). The tasks use the models to create the explanations of the given classes. Key mechanisms are discussed to implement the generic explanation tasks. Knowledge representations based on objects and their relations form a vocabulary to model and present plant knowledge. A particular class of models, means-end models, are used to explain plant knowledge. Explanations are generated through searches in the models. Hypertext is adopted to communicate explanations over dialogue based on context. The results are demonstrated in prototypes. The VICE prototype explains the reasoning of an expert system for diagnosis of rotating machines at power plants. The Justifier prototype explains design knowledge obtained from an object-oriented plant design tool. Enhanced access mechanisms into on-line documentation are

  13. Knowledge of HIV and AIDS among tertiary students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Bellal; Kabir, Alamgir; Ferdous, Hasina

    To examine the levels and predictors of knowledge on HIV and AIDS, a survey was conducted among 392 tertiary level students in the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Students demonstrated a high knowledge of transmission and prevention of HIV and AIDS yet with considerable misconception. All students said that unprotected sex with an HIV-positive man or woman can transmit the HIV virus to a negative man or woman but at the same time 43.6% of students believed that there is a preventive vaccine for HIV and 39.8% understood that HIV can be cured if it is diagnosed early. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the students who had more knowledge on HIV and AIDS were: older boys, fathers having more income, business or service as father's occupation, having more mass media exposure, being senior students, living in a university dormitory, and being students of faculty of arts, social sciences, and science. The findings of this study suggest that a special course on health education, including risk perceptions of HIV and AIDS and issues related to sexual and other high risk behavior, should be included in the course curricula irrespective of disciplines at tertiary levels.

  14. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students' Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Nabilou

    Full Text Available Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students' perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0, using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students' attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively. F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety.

  15. Knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation among medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation amongst medical students in Karachi- Pakistan. Methods Data of this cross sectional study was collected by self administered questionnaire from MBBS students of Ziauddin University from 2010 to 2011. Sample size of 158 (83 First years and 75 Fourth years) were selected by convenient sampling and those students who were present and gave consent were included in the study. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results A total of 158 participants from Ziauddin Medical University filled out the questionnaire out of which 83(52.5%) were first years and 75(47.5%) were fourth year medical students. Mean age of sample was 20 ± 1.7. Majority of students were aware about organ donation with print and electronic media as the main source of information. 81.6% agreed that it was ethically correct to donate an organ. In the students’ opinion, most commonly donated organs and tissues were kidney, cornea, blood and platelet. Ideal candidates for donating organ were parents (81%). Regarding list of options for preference to receive an organ, most of the students agreed on young age group patients and persons with family. Willingness to donate was significantly associated with knowledge of allowance of organ donation in religion (P=0.000). Conclusion Both 1st year and 4th year students are aware of Organ Donation, but there is a significant lack of knowledge regarding the topic. PMID:24070261

  16. Educating DNP students about critical appraisal and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Elizabeth R; Watters, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Consumers expect that health care providers will use the best evidence when assisting them in making decisions about treatment options. Nurses at all educational levels report that they lack knowledge to critically appraise research studies and the skills to effectively implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in their clinical settings. Organizational culture and management support of innovation are critical factors in the adoption of EBP. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) graduates can have a pivotal role in the transfer of knowledge to practice, yet critical appraisal and EBP competencies for DNP and Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) students have not been well differentiated in nursing curricula. Also students' attitudes toward EBP, self-efficacy beliefs, utilization, and knowledge gaps are rarely evaluated before courses are designed. This article reports on the development of a DNP-level EBP course to help students evaluate and apply research findings to clinical practice.

  17. Medication Administration and Knowledge Retention in Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Treister

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A quality improvement project was undertaken in order to assist the undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students in knowledge retention for medication administration during their senior semester in nursing school. Two specific changes in curriculum were implemented in order to assist these undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at a suburban private university in New York. Simulation and the incorporation of competency by rubrics were implemented in the spring semester of junior year, which led to an increased knowledge retention during the fall semester of the senior year. This article discusses the advantages and challenges of using technology, how change occurred in the junior year semester and the effects it had on the senior nursing student's retention of medication administration knowledge.

  18. Understanding Student Computational Thinking with Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Burk, John B; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". Students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than obs...

  19. Osteoporosis Knowledge of Students in Relevant Healthcare Academic Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Vu H; Ze Wang

    2012-01-01

    For healthcare professionals who treat individuals with osteoporosis, it is vital that they receive adequate education on osteoporosis to ensure sufficient knowledge of osteoporosis to properly treat individuals with the disease. To test for adequate osteoporosis education, a study was conducted to measure osteoporosis knowledge in 206 students in relevant healthcare academic programs, such as nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and dietetics. The study showed that differences existed in ost...

  20. South African university student knowledge of eye protection against sunlight

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Oduntan; A. Carelson; P. Clarke-Farr; R. Hansraj

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has been associated with several ocular conditions such as cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and conjunctival neoplasm. Knowledge of protective modalities and good behavioural practice involving eye protection is essential to prevent adverse effects of sunlight. The purpose of this study was to establish knowledge amongst randomly selected university students in South Africa, of prevention modalities against the adverse effects of sunlight. A questionnaire relat...

  1. Pharmacy Students' Knowledge Assessment of Naegleria fowleri Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Sadia; Iffat, Wajiha; Khan, Madeeha

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to August 2015 to assess the knowledge of pharmacy students towards Naegleria fowleri infection. A questionnaire was distributed to senior pharmacy students in different private and public sector universities of Karachi. Descriptive statistics were used to demonstrate students' demographic information and their responses to the questionnaire. Pearson chi-square test was adopted to assess the relationship between independent variables and responses of students. The study revealed that pharmacy students were having adequate awareness of Naegleria fowleri infection and considered it as a serious health issue that necessitates instantaneous steps by the government to prevent the general public from the fatal neurological infection. The students recommended that appropriate methods should be projected in the community from time to time that increases public awareness about the associated risk factors.

  2. Surveying students' conceptual knowledge of electricity and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, David P.; O'Kuma, Thomas L.; Hieggelke, Curtis J.; Van Heuvelen, Alan

    2001-07-01

    The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) was developed to assess students' knowledge about topics in electricity and magnetism. The survey is a 32-question, multiple-choice test that can be used as both a pretest and posttest. During four years of testing and refinement, the survey has been given in one form or another to more than 5000 introductory physics students at 30 different institutions. Typical pretest results are that students in calculus-based courses get 31% of the questions correct and student's in algebra/trigonometry-based courses average 25% correct. Posttest correct results only rise to 47% and 44%, respectively. From analysis of student responses, a number of student difficulties in electricity and magnetism are indicated.

  3. Cancer control knowledge, attitudes, and perceived skills among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, J G; Luckmann, R; Sulsky, S I; Goins, K V; Bigelow, C; Mazor, K; Quirk, M

    2000-01-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Education (CPACE) program aims to strengthen and coordinate curriculum offerings in cancer prevention and control for medical, graduate nursing and public health students. Students were surveyed on cancer-related knowledge and confidence as part of needs assessment and evaluation efforts. The students completed self-administered surveys (response rate 78%). Descriptive and stratified analysis and ANOVA were conducted. Knowledge and confidence generally increased with each successive class year, but confidence varied markedly across specific counseling scenarios and by gender. While the students overall reported greater confidence in performing an examination than in interpreting the results, confidence varied significantly across specific types of examinations. Understanding of basic information about common cancers was disappointing. Confidence to perform and interpret examinations could be higher, especially for opposite-gender screening examinations. Implications of the findings for CPACE curriculum development are discussed.

  4. Dental students' knowledge and attitudes toward patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassona, Yazan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Abd Al-Aziz; Ryalat, Soukaina M; Sawair, Faleh A

    2014-07-01

    Inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy can affect the provision of health services for patients with epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy among clinical dental students in Jordan. The study was conducted using a 21-item questionnaire to assess professional experience with epilepsy, knowledge about epilepsy, social tolerance, and willingness to care for patients with epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. More than one-third of dental students believed that epilepsy is due to insanity or mental illness. Only 45% were able to identify convulsion or shaking as a sign of epilepsy, and more than one-third did not know how to act in case of an epileptic seizure in the dental clinic. Disappointingly, 43.4% of the respondents were of the opinion that people with epilepsy should not have children, and only 38.6% thought that people with epilepsy should be employed at the same jobs as other people. About 50% indicated that their families would be concerned about them treating patients with epilepsy, and 30% believed that knowing that patients with epilepsy were treated in their clinic might make other patients reluctant to continue their treatment there. The results revealed an inadequate level of knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. There is an urgent need to educate dental students about epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge of nutritional concepts among 6th grade students

    OpenAIRE

    Finc, Irena

    2015-01-01

    A proper understanding of nutritional concepts that are used in primary nutritional education is important in assessing the quality of nutritional knowledge in primary school. It is crucial that nutritional concepts used in different educational stages of primary education are adjusted to specific stage of student´s cognitive development. Purpose of my thesis is to identify how students understand nutritional concepts. Nutritional education has namely a positive impact on children's nutri...

  6. Graphic Organizers: Toward Organization and Complexity of Student Content Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Carol Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within the current national atmosphere of accountability and high-stakes testing, many teachers are changing their instruction to return to more traditional strategies that emphasize rote memorization. As a result, classroom curriculum and student learning are narrowing. This study sought to explore the potential of graphic organizers as an instructional strategy to expand student content knowledge beyond rote memorization to include more organized, complex, meaningful learning. ...

  7. Assessing oral cancer knowledge among dental students in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannick, Gabrielle F; Horowitz, Alice M; Drury, Thomas F; Reed, Susan G; Day, Terry A

    2005-03-01

    Because South Carolina has the fourth highest mortality rate for oral cancer among the 50 states, dental students in the state must be knowledgeable about prevention and early detection of the disease. In 2002, the authors surveyed 163 students using a written questionnaire (response rate, 79.1 percent). The questionnaire included questions about oral cancer risk and nonrisk factors as well as oral cancer diagnostic signs, symptoms and examination procedures. The authors performed univariate and bivariate analyses (alpha students replied that tobacco, alcohol and previous oral cancer lesions were risk factors. One hundred six students (65 percent) knew that the most likely site for oral cancer is the ventrolateral border of the tongue. Students differed in their overall knowledge of risk factors (P = .002), nonrisk factors (P students' level of knowledge increased with academic year, educators and policy-makers need to place greater emphasis on oral cancer education and training in dental schools. Morbidity and mortality are likely to be reduced if dentists know how to prevent and detect oral cancer.

  8. Breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambanje, Martha Nyanungo; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2012-01-01

    The high breast cancer mortality rate in Sub-Saharan Africa has been attributed to a lack of public awareness of the disease which often leads to late diagnosis of the disease. Little is known about the level of knowledge and awareness of breast cancer in Angola. Previous studies have shown that breast cancer awareness is higher among well-educated people. The goal of this study was to assess breast cancer knowledge and awareness among university students in Angola. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of university students using a self-administered questionnaire to investigate participants' awareness and knowledge of breast cancer. A total of 595 university students in medical and non-medical programs successfully completed the survey. Our results showed insufficient knowledge of breast cancer among university students in Angola irrespective of whether they were in medical or non-medical programs. The majority of the participants were not aware of some of the early signs of breast cancer such as change in color or shape of the nipple, even though they appreciated the need for monthly breast self-examination. Overall most of the participants indicated the need for increased breast cancer awareness among university students. The study points to the insufficient knowledge of university students in Angola about breast cancer. We expect that our results may provide useful data that may be used by the department of health in Angola and other African countries to formulate health education programs aimed at increasing awareness and promote screening and early detection of breast cancer in the continent.

  9. A light knowledge model for linguistic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, R H; Lovis, C; Ruch, P; Rassinoux, A M

    2001-01-01

    Content extraction from medical texts is achievable today by linguistic applications, in so far as sufficient domain knowledge is available. Such knowledge represents a model of the domain and is hard to collect with sufficient depth and good coverage, despite numerous attempts. To leverage this task is a priority in order to benefit from the awaited linguistic tools. The light model is designed with this goal in mind. Syntactic and lexical information are generally available with large lexicons. A domain model should add the necessary semantic information. The authors have designed a light knowledge model for the collection of semantic information on the basis of the recognized syntactical and lexical attributes. It has been tailored for the acquisition of enough semantic information in order to retrieve terms of a controlled vocabulary from free texts, as for example, to retrieve Mesh terms from patient records.

  10. Information modelling and knowledge bases XXV

    CERN Document Server

    Tokuda, T; Jaakkola, H; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    Because of our ever increasing use of and reliance on technology and information systems, information modelling and knowledge bases continue to be important topics in those academic communities concerned with data handling and computer science. As the information itself becomes more complex, so do the levels of abstraction and the databases themselves. This book is part of the series Information Modelling and Knowledge Bases, which concentrates on a variety of themes in the important domains of conceptual modeling, design and specification of information systems, multimedia information modelin

  11. Socioeconomic and Demographic Disparities in Knowledge of Reproductive Healthcare among Female University Students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nazrul Islam Mondal, PhD,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproductive health (RH is a critical component of women’s health and overall well-being around the world, especially in developing countries. We examine the factors that determine knowledge of RH care among female university students in Bangladesh. Methods: Data on 300 female students were collected from Rajshahi University, Bangladesh through a structured questionnaire using purposive sampling technique. The data were used for univariate analysis, to carry out the description of the variables; bivariate analysis was used to examine the associations between the variables; and finally, multivariate analysis (binary logistic regression model was used to examine and fit the model and interpret the parameter estimates, especially in terms of odds ratios. Results: The results revealed that more than one-third (34.3% respondents do not have sufficient knowledge of RH care. The X2 -test identified the significant (p < 0.05 associations between respondents’ knowledge of RH care with respondents’ age, education, family type, watching television; and knowledge about pregnancy, family planning, and contraceptive use. Finally, the binary logistic regression model identified respondents’ age, education, family type; and knowledge about family planning, and contraceptive use as the significant (p < 0.05 predictors of RH care. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Knowledge of RH care among female university students was found unsatisfactory. Government and concerned organizations should promote and strengthen various health education programs to focus on RH care especially for the female university students in Bangladesh.

  12. Knowledge of and attitudes toward electroconvulsive therapy among medical students, psychology students, and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Ozlem Erden; Ak, Sertac; Sonmez, Yunus Emre; Demir, Basaran

    2013-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is safe and effective for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Despite being a well-known treatment method among health care professionals, lay people generally have a negative opinion of ECT. The present study aimed to examine knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among medical students, psychology students, and the general public. Psychology students were included because they are among the important groups in mental health care in Turkey. A Likert-type questionnaire was administered to fifth-year medical students (n = 28), master of science and doctor of philosophy clinical psychology students (n = 35), and a sample of the general public (n = 26). The questionnaire included questions about the general principles of and indications for ECT, and sources of knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT. The medical students were the most knowledgeable about ECT, as expected. The medical students also had a more positive attitude toward ECT than the other 2 groups. More psychology students had negative attitudes on some aspects than general public sample, despite being more knowledgeable. Medical school theoretical and practical training in ECT played an important role in increasing the level of knowledge of and decreasing the prevalence of negative attitudes toward ECT among the medical students; similar training for psychology students is required to achieve similar results.

  13. Correlating student knowledge and confidence using a graded knowledge survey to assess student learning in a general microbiology classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazzo, Lacey; Willford, John D; Watson, Rachel M

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge surveys are a type of confidence survey in which students rate their confidence in their ability to answer questions rather than answering the questions. These surveys have been discussed as a tool to evaluate student in-class or curriculum-wide learning. However, disagreement exists as to whether confidence is actually an accurate measure of knowledge. With the concomitant goals of assessing content-based learning objectives and addressing this disagreement, we present herein a pretest/posttest knowledge survey study that demonstrates a significant difference correctness on graded test questions at different levels of reported confidence in a multi-semester timeframe. Questions were organized into Bloom's taxonomy, allowing for the data collected to further provide statistical analyses on strengths and deficits in various levels of Bloom's reasoning with regard to mean correctness. Collectively, students showed increasing confidence and correctness in all levels of thought but struggled with synthesis-level questions. However, when students were only asked to rate confidence and not answer the accompanying test questions, they reported significantly higher confidence than the control group which was asked to do both. This indicates that when students do not attempt to answer questions, they have significantly greater confidence in their ability to answer those questions. Additionally, when students rate only confidence without answering the question, resolution across Bloom's levels of reasoning is lost. Based upon our findings, knowledge surveys can be an effective tool for assessment of both breadth and depth of knowledge, but may require students to answer questions in addition to rating confidence to provide the most accurate data.

  14. Advancing information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme.

  15. Rough – Granular Computing knowledge discovery models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Eissa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical domain has become one of the most important areas of research in order to richness huge amounts of medical information about the symptoms of diseases and how to distinguish between them to diagnose it correctly. Knowledge discovery models play vital role in refinement and mining of medical indicators to help medical experts to settle treatment decisions. This paper introduces four hybrid Rough – Granular Computing knowledge discovery models based on Rough Sets Theory, Artificial Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithm and Rough Mereology Theory. A comparative analysis of various knowledge discovery models that use different knowledge discovery techniques for data pre-processing, reduction, and data mining supports medical experts to extract the main medical indicators, to reduce the misdiagnosis rates and to improve decision-making for medical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed models utilized two medical datasets: Coronary Heart Disease dataset and Hepatitis C Virus dataset. The main purpose of this paper was to explore and evaluate the proposed models based on Granular Computing methodology for knowledge extraction according to different evaluation criteria for classification of medical datasets. Another purpose is to make enhancement in the frame of KDD processes for supervised learning using Granular Computing methodology.

  16. Influence of different modalities of cooperative work forms on adopting declarative and procedural knowledge in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miščević-Kadijević Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of papers on cooperative learning so far have discussed the variables of affective domain, and research within the cognitive domain, especially when it comes to different forms of knowledge, has not been conducted very much. Within the cognitive-developmental approach, Piaget's genetic-epistemological theory and Vygotsky's socio-cultural theory have the biggest importance for understanding cooperative learning and the topic we deal with. The influence of the three models of cooperative work in the instruction of Basic Science and Social Studies on the adoption of declarative and procedural knowledge of students is experimentally tested in the paper. The basis for formation of the applied models is grouping students within small homogenous, i.e. heterogeneous groups. The sample of respondents consisted of 259 students from 11 classes of the fourth grade of primary school. The experiment with parallel groups was applied. The results indicated that in students from experimental group the adoption of declarative and procedural knowledge in final measurement was better than in students from the control group, as well as that in final measurement there were no statistically significant differences with respect to adoption of the studied knowledge among the three subgroups in which different cooperative work models were applied. The obtained findings indicated that cooperative instruction yields good results when its theoretical assumptions are carefully operationalised, along with exhibiting patience and gradualism in working with students previously prepared for cooperation with peers.

  17. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  18. Motivational activities based on previous knowledge of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. A.; Gómez-Robledo, L.; Huertas, R.; Perales, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Academic results depend strongly on the individual circumstances of students: background, motivation and aptitude. We think that academic activities conducted to increase motivation must be tuned to the special situation of the students. Main goal of this work is analyze the students in the first year of the Degree in Optics and Optometry in the University of Granada and the suitability of an activity designed for those students. Initial data were obtained from a survey inquiring about the reasons to choose this degree, their knowledge of it, and previous academic backgrounds. Results show that: 1) the group is quite heterogeneous, since students have very different background. 2) Reasons to choose the Degree in Optics and Optometry are also very different, and in many cases were selected as a second option. 3) Knowledge and motivations about the Degree are in general quite low. Trying to increase the motivation of the students we designed an academic activity in which we show different topics studied in the Degree. Results show that students that have been involved in this activity are the most motivated and most satisfied with their election of the degree.

  19. Vocabulary Knowledge of Deaf and Hearing Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchet, Thomastine; Marschark, Marc; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Sapere, Patricia; Dirmyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Deaf children generally are found to have smaller English vocabularies than hearing peers, although studies involving children with cochlear implants have suggested that the gap may decrease or disappear with age. Less is known about the vocabularies of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) postsecondary students or how their vocabulary knowledge relates…

  20. Knowledge and Regulation of Cognition in College Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanaei, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    The research focused on three issues in college science students: whether there was empirical support for the two factor (knowledge of cognition and regulation of cognition) view of metacognition, whether the two factors were related to each other, and whether either of the factors was related to empirical measures of cognitive and metacognitive…

  1. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

  2. Knowledge and Attitude of clinical level dental students concerning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and Attitude of clinical level dental students concerning HIV/AIDS. ... high- risk groups, common oral manifestations and prevention of HIV/AIDS. ... that they did not have any reservations dealing with patients with HIV/AIDS while 55 ...

  3. Teacher Listening: The Role of Knowledge of Content and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Estrella M. S.; Larsen, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    In this research report we consider the kinds of knowledge needed by a mathematician as she implemented an inquiry-oriented abstract algebra curriculum. Specifically, we will explore instances in which the teacher was unable to make sense of students' mathematical struggles in the moment. After describing each episode we will examine the…

  4. Multilingualism in an EFL Practicum: Increasing Student Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, María Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Research in second language teacher education has demonstrated that novice teachers have difficulty in using their pedagogical knowledge, which partly results from a heavy focus on theory offered in teacher training programs (e.g., Bartels, 2005, 2009; Tarone & Allwright, 2005). In order to better equip student teachers with the knowledge…

  5. Teacher Listening: The Role of Knowledge of Content and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Estrella M. S.; Larsen, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    In this research report we consider the kinds of knowledge needed by a mathematician as she implemented an inquiry-oriented abstract algebra curriculum. Specifically, we will explore instances in which the teacher was unable to make sense of students' mathematical struggles in the moment. After describing each episode we will examine the…

  6. Knowledge and Regulation of Cognition in College Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanaei, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    The research focused on three issues in college science students: whether there was empirical support for the two factor (knowledge of cognition and regulation of cognition) view of metacognition, whether the two factors were related to each other, and whether either of the factors was related to empirical measures of cognitive and metacognitive…

  7. University Students' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Joel W.; Franken, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    Assessed university students' knowledge about homosexuality in relation to their degree of homonegativism, i.e., physical, social, and emotional distancing from homosexuals, and selected personal variables. Respondents who were better informed about homosexuality proved less homonegative, particularly those with homosexual friend or family member.…

  8. Gaps in Alzheimer's Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the disease, it appears that there may be a need for increased education for formal and family caregivers of those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today's college students will be asked to fill both of these roles in the future. This study examined the level of knowledge of Alzheimer's…

  9. Cancer Knowledge and Examination Frequency in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craun, Ann M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated whether the personality construct of repression-sensitization could identify which college students would or would not practice regular examinations for breast, cervical, or testicular cancer. Although knowledge of cancer increased after the lecture, no change was found in the frequency of breast self-examination while…

  10. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

  11. Student Knowledge of Statistics: To Know Is To Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beins, Bernard C.

    Students in a college introductory statistics class were evaluated with conceptual and computational tests and the relationship between their levels of knowledge on the two forms of testing was assessed. There were significant correlations between their abilities to perform computations and to answer more conceptual questions on individual tests…

  12. Digging Deep: Exploring College Students' Knowledge of Macroevolutionary Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catley, Kefyn M.; Novick, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Some ability to comprehend deep time is a prerequisite for understanding macroevolution. This study examines students' knowledge of deep time in the context of seven major historical and evolutionary events (e.g., the age of the Earth, the emergence of life, the appearance of a pre-modern human, "Homo habilis"). The subjects were 126…

  13. Medication Administration: Measuring Associate Degree Nursing Student Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The American Nurse Association's (ANA) provisions outline the commitment expected of nurses to protect the community from harm. Medication administration coincides with patient safety as a compelling obligation in nursing practice. The study's purpose was to examine retention of medication safety knowledge among first year nursing students, after…

  14. Cancer Knowledge and Examination Frequency in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craun, Ann M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated whether the personality construct of repression-sensitization could identify which college students would or would not practice regular examinations for breast, cervical, or testicular cancer. Although knowledge of cancer increased after the lecture, no change was found in the frequency of breast self-examination while…

  15. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Knowledge of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Wood, Charles L.; Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.

    2012-01-01

    Instruction about goal setting can increase students' self-determination and reduce problem behavior. Computer-assisted instruction could offer teachers another format for teaching goal setting and self-determination. This study used a multiple probes across participants design to examine the effects of computer-assisted instruction on students'…

  16. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Knowledge of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Wood, Charles L.; Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.

    2012-01-01

    Instruction about goal setting can increase students' self-determination and reduce problem behavior. Computer-assisted instruction could offer teachers another format for teaching goal setting and self-determination. This study used a multiple probes across participants design to examine the effects of computer-assisted instruction on students'…

  17. Healthcare students' knowledge and opinions about the Argentinean abortion law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano-Castro, Belén; Oizerovich, Silvia; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2016-03-01

    Abortion is legally restricted in Argentina. Although this law is almost 100 years old, most women who meet the criteria for legal abortion are not informed of or offered this possibility within the healthcare system. Healthcare students' knowledge and opinions on abortion may influence their future practice. They may deny a woman with an unwanted pregnancy a practice to which she is legally entitled, resulting in an unsafe abortion. This study assessed knowledge and personal opinions on the abortion law among first year healthcare students in order to design adequate educational strategies. In this descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional study, structured self-administered questionnaires were administered to 781 first year medical, nursing, midwifery, and other healthcare students from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires from 2011 to 2013. Data were recorded anonymously in SPSS 20. Student samples were adjusted for gender and fields of study using the University statistics. Of the students, 48.8% did not know the current regulations. Most of the students thought abortion was legally restricted and failed to recognize the circumstances in which it is allowed. Over 75% of the students were pro-abortion, especially those with sexual experience. Students lack sound knowledge on the abortion law that may affect their personal lives and influence their future professional practice. It is crucial that medical schools include sexual and reproductive health issues in their curricula in order to ensure better quality healthcare services in the future. In Argentina, approximately 400,000 abortions are performed every year, many under unsafe conditions, resulting in one third of the maternal deaths for the past decade. High quality sexual and reproductive healthcare services are a key strategy to improve adolescents' and women's health, thereby lowering maternal mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Global Warming: Knowledge and Views of Iranian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Yazdanparast, Sousan Salehpour, Mohammad Reza Masjedi, Seyed Mohammad Seyedmehdi, Eddie Boyes, Martin Stanisstreet, Mirsaeed Attarchi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Study of students’ knowledge about global warming can help authorities to have better imagination of this critical environmental problem. This research examines high school students' ideas about greenhouse effect and the results may be useful for the respective authorities to improve cultural and educational aspects of next generation. In this cross-sectional study, a 42 question questionnaire with mix of open and closed questions was used to evaluate high school students' view about the mechanism, consequences, causes and cures of global warming. To assess students’ knowledge, cognitive score was also calculated. 1035 students were randomly selected from 19 educational districts of Tehran. Sampling method was multi stage. Only 5.1% of the students could explain greenhouse effect correctly and completely. 88.8% and 71.2% respectively believed “if the greenhouse effect gets bigger the Earth will get hotter” and “incidence of more skin cancers is a consequence of global warming”. 69.6% and 68.8% respectively thought “the greenhouse effect is made worse by too much carbon dioxide” and “presence of ozone holes is a cause of greenhouse effect”. 68.4% believed “not using cars so much is a cure for global warming”. While a student’s ‘cognitive score’ could range from -36 to +36, Students' mean cognitive score was equal to +1.64. Mean cognitive score of male students and grade 2 & 3 students was respectively higher than female ones (P0.05. In general, students' knowledge about global warming was not acceptable and there were some misconceptions in the students’ mind, such as supposing ozone holes as a cause and more skin cancer as a consequence of global warming. The Findings of this survey indicate that, this important stratum of society have been received no sufficient and efficient education and sensitization on this matter.

  19. Students integrate knowledge acquisition and practical work in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E I; Sánchez-Hermosín, P; Díz-Pérez, J; Tovar, P; Camacho, R; Escribano, B M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in Reproduction course) at University of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain. The design of the project's application methodology consisted of establishing a way in which problems would be tackled in the practical classes. For this purpose, the different tasks were set up so that students could relate them to the concepts learned in the theory classes. On the first day of class, the project was presented to the students. Groups of two to three students worked in the laboratory and set up an outline of the protocol of the practical work that they had done. This outline was performed individually and sent to the lecturers through a learning management system (Moodle). The teachers gave feedback and assessed student submissions. Upon finishing the course, students completed a survey. The project-based learning method promotes practical self-learning on the part of students. This methodology demonstrated to us that it stimulates a critical and self-critical capacity in students, both individually and in groups, and that writing didactic practical material helped students to enhance their theory knowledge. The experiment was a success in view of the scores obtained upon finishing the subject. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  20. Eating behavior and nutrition knowledge among musical theatre students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Karin; Endres, Eva; Koch, Franziska; Groneberg, David A; Quarcoo, David; Wanke, Eileen; Mache, Stefanie

    2013-03-01

    Eating is a central part in human (social) life. Athletic performance and physical attractiveness are linked to appropriate nutritional behavior, especially for performing artists. Eating behavior and nutrition knowledge have not been examined in musical theatre students so far, which this study aims to analyze. We administered a cross-sectional questionnaire study to 37 musical theatre students. Results for the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) showed non-pathological values for 92% of all participants, but 81% of participants answered correctly on only 30-59% of questions on the General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ). Our study results reveal the need for specific nutritional knowledge transfer programs for this target group.

  1. Baccalaureate nursing students' breastfeeding knowledge: a descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2006-05-01

    This descriptive survey study assessed the breastfeeding knowledge of junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students (N=80) who had successfully completed their obstetric nursing course. With a possible perfect knowledge score of 100, participants' scores ranged from 35 to 85 with a sample mean score of 60. Surprisingly, most (85%) did not know that breastfeeding is recommended for the first year of an infant's life, and only five participants knew the proper management of mastitis. Well over one third (41.3%) of the participants opposed breastfeeding in public. Findings reveal the need to strengthen both the didactic and clinical components of the obstetric course curriculum. The acquisition of breastfeeding knowledge at the student level will better equip novice nurses to provide more effective breastfeeding counsel and support for childbearing women and to promote the achievement of the breastfeeding objectives of both the United States and the World Health Organization.

  2. Knowledge construction in high school physics: A study of student/teacher interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Warren Edward

    students showed a variety of attempts at constructing the concept. They did not appear to understand the complex process of mathematical representation during the study even when they were instructed about the process. Students confused the meanings of equal and balanced which led to mistakes in writing vector equations representing relationships between forces. They did not seem to understand why vector mathematics had to be used in solving problems even when they correctly employed them in calculations. Transfer of knowledge from mathematics classes to physics classes was almost non-existent. In the final chapter recommendations for changes to physics curriculum and instructional strategies are presented. Student difficulty in applying vector mathematics to physics problem is explained in terms of student difficulty in understanding direction as a characteristic of some physics concepts and in representing physics concepts using mathematical models. Suggestions for future research include development of instruction to facilitate student understanding of mathematical representation and metacognitive skill development by students.

  3. A multivalued knowledge-base model

    CERN Document Server

    Achs, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    The basic aim of our study is to give a possible model for handling uncertain information. This model is worked out in the framework of DATALOG. At first the concept of fuzzy Datalog will be summarized, then its extensions for intuitionistic- and interval-valued fuzzy logic is given and the concept of bipolar fuzzy Datalog is introduced. Based on these ideas the concept of multivalued knowledge-base will be defined as a quadruple of any background knowledge; a deduction mechanism; a connecting algorithm, and a function set of the program, which help us to determine the uncertainty levels of the results. At last a possible evaluation strategy is given.

  4. Sport Education and Direct Instruction Units: Comparison of Student Knowledge Development in Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José; Araújo, Rui; Farias, Cláudio; Bessa, Cristiana; Mesquita, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    This study conducted a comparative analysis of students' knowledge development on athletics in Sport Education and in a Direct Instruction unit taking into account sex and initial skill level. The participants were an experienced Physical Education teacher and two sixth-grade classes totaling 47 students (25 boys and 22 girls). Each class was randomly placed in either Sport Education or Direct Instruction classes and participated in 20, 45-minutes lessons focused on shot put, hurdles and triple jump. Knowledge on athletics was assessed through a 25-items written and video-based test. The inter-group differences and improvements across time in the knowledge test were analyzed through the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, respectively. There were significant knowledge improvements in both instructional approaches irrespective of students' gender and skill level. In Direct Instruction, the type of task organization, the high rates of repetition of movement patterns and feedback by the teacher were beneficial to student learning. In Sport Education, the autonomy granted to students in the control of the pace of task transitions by making on-going judgments on achievement of performance criteria, implicated students affectively and cognitively with the learning content. It was further supported that several models and teaching strategies should be taken into consideration when teaching Physical Education. Different approaches should be perceived as alternatives and teachers should retain the best in each according with the moment in the unit, student developmental stage, and the specific learning objectives in the task.

  5. Evolutionary model with intelligence and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Q. H.; Yu, B. L.; He, M. F.

    2005-12-01

    An evolutionary model based on Bit-String with intelligence and learning is constructed. Each individual is represented by five bit strings. Four of them relate to genes and the other denotes the knowledge from learning. The four strings relative to genes will be divided into two parts — Bit-String A and Bit-String B. Bit-String A denotes the health of an individual, at the same time Bit-String B can describe intelligence. For an individual, the cross reproduction method is used in this model. After that we explain how knowledge is represented in our model. The probability of learning is affected by intelligence. In order to study how the accumulated knowledge influences the survival process by the effect of food and space restrictions, we modify the Verhulst factor. Then, we present the results of our simulations and discuss the evolution of population, intelligence and knowledge respectively. In addition, an equation to calculate the intelligence quotient is given based on intelligence and knowledge. We discuss the distribution of intelligence quotient.

  6. Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Sarah M; Majowicz, Shannon E; Dubin, Joel A

    2016-11-09

    Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between 'overall knowledge score' and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 %) lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education. Supporting improved hand hygiene, in particular clarifying hand

  7. Knowledge Encapsulation Framework for Collaborative Social Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-03-24

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable knowledge inputs (relevant, domain-specific facts) to modeling and simulation projects, as well as other domains that require effective collaborative workspaces for knowledge-based task. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., trusted material such as journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (covering both trusted and social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks. The novelty in this approach lies in the combination of automatically tagged and user-vetted resources, which increases user trust in the environment, leading to ease of adoption for the collaborative environment.

  8. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  9. An analysis of science conceptual knowledge in journals of students with disabilities and normally achieving students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Gail S.

    Science education reforms of the last two decades have focused on raising the bar for ALL students which includes students with mild to moderate disabilities. Formative assessment can be used to assess the progress of these students to inquire, understand scientific concepts, reason scientifically, make decisions, and communicate effectively in science. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of science journals as a formative assessment in a guided inquiry unit of study for students with learning disabilities. Two normally achieving students (NA) and five students with learning disabilities (SLD) participated in a study of mammals that utilized journals to record the development of student knowledge through the course of study. Students were interviewed after the lessons were complete using the same prompts required in the journals. Themes were developed from the student writings and their verbal discourse using Grounded Theory. Journals and verbal discourse were rated following the themes of Knowledge Telling (KT) and Knowledge Transformation (KTR). Concept maps were developed for the Pre and Post test lessons (written and verbal discourses) by the raters in an attempt to further explain the knowledge that the students conveyed. The results of this study suggest that SLD are able to demonstrate knowledge about mammals better through verbal discourse than written discourse. While the NA students wrote more and used more technical discourse than did their SLD peers, the conceptual understanding of the topic by the SLD was no less inclusive than their NA peers when accessed verbally. The journals demonstrated limited conceptual growth for the SLD. Further, while lexical density is important to the development of knowledge in science, this study suggests the "conceptual density" may be another important indicator to examine.

  10. "The evil virus cell": Students' knowledge and beliefs about viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K; Enzinger, Sonja M; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics, and possibly lead to potentially dangerous neglect concerning vaccination. The effectiveness of newly developed virus-related teaching units and material could be tested with the instrument used here.

  11. Influence of Implemented Courseware on Students Knowledge Acquirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Gelu APOSTOL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of the courseware stages developed for an economic faculty with teaching in foreign languages with learning on campus through an assisted instruction approach based on a collaborative platform. The implementation of the conceptualization, construction and dialogue stages on the university platform dedicated to students in the first year is explained. We analyze the correlation between the accesses of didactic technologies on the educational platform and the results obtained at the final exam in order to see how the implementation of courseware technologies influenced the knowledge acquirement by students.

  12. [Knowledge and attitudes of medical students on decriminalized induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Roa, Eliana M; Ochoa-Vera, Miguel E

    2015-12-01

    Objective To explore if the academic exposure to legal abortion affects the knowledge and attitudes of medical students. Method To asses this relationship, both qualitative and quantitative approaches were performed. We analyzed a medical student cohort enrolled in gynecology and obstetrics at two accredited universities in Bucaramanga, Colombia during the second half of 2011. Students were invited to participate in two anonymous surveys. One survey was conducted in the first three weeks of the semester, and the second was done in the last three weeks. A quantitative approach was taken by a group interview of two random groups of participants. One group was composed of medical students of gynecology and obstetrics (fourth year of medicine), and the other group was composed of medical students in their last year (internal medical students). Results The items pregnancy with risk to the mother´s life, or affected by a non-viable fetal malformation, or result of rape were recognized and accepted. 46% of the participants changed their attitude about legal abortion at the end of the semester. Three out of every four participants changed their attitude to accept the decriminalized conditions, while one out of every four people had the opposite change of opinion. Medical student´s don´t believe that general practitioners are trained to advice patients in these cases. Conclusions Educating and training general practitioners in issues related to legal abortion may decrease the risk of inadequate medical assessment in cases of legal abortion.

  13. Students' Production of Curricular Knowledge: Perspectives on Empowerment in Financial Capability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Valerie; Davis, Pauline; Kalambouka, Afroditi; Ralph, Susan; Shi, Xin; Farrell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to extend our understanding of the relationship between knowledge of personal finance and empowerment. The analysis is based on interview data obtained as part of a longitudinal study of students, aged 16-19, who completed a financial capability course in the UK. The analysis presents a set of cultural models or…

  14. Effects of a Multimedia Goal-Setting Intervention on Students' Knowledge of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Preadolescence is a critical time in the life of children because during this time individuals experience increased social pressure and make decisions that lead to lasting peer relationships (Farmer et al., 2008). Students at-risk for, or with, emotional disturbance during preadolescence struggle to adjust socially, behaviorally, and academically,…

  15. Effects of Multimedia Goal-Setting Instruction on Students' Knowledge of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.; Wood, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Students at risk for, or with, emotional disturbance during preadolescence struggle to adjust socially, behaviorally, and academically and often make choices about relationships that support problem behaviors. Research suggests explicitly teaching self-determination skills as early as preschool may prevent referral to special education with a…

  16. Effects of Multimedia Goal-Setting Instruction on Students' Knowledge of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.; Wood, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Students at risk for, or with, emotional disturbance during preadolescence struggle to adjust socially, behaviorally, and academically and often make choices about relationships that support problem behaviors. Research suggests explicitly teaching self-determination skills as early as preschool may prevent referral to special education with a…

  17. Evaluating female nursing students' knowledge and attitudes regarding breast self-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Rekleiti, Maria; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Chaliou, Mikaella; Xenofontos, Maria; Savva, Marilena

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate female nursing students' knowledge and attitudes regarding breast self-examination (BSE). The sample consisted of 175 nursing students from a university in Cyprus. We collected data via a questionnaire that included the Greek version of the Champion Health Belief Model scale and questions regarding the participants' demographic characteristics. More than half of the participants (58.3%) said that they were knowledgeable about BSE and 29.1% of them had been taught about it during their studies. Nevertheless, 59.9% reported never having performed BSE, while 40.1% had performed it at least once. Only 10.9% of the students performed BSE every month for more than a year. Self-confidence had a positive and significant correlation (0.86) with BSE frequency. Also, we found quite a low level of BSE knowledge and practice levels, and this highlights the need for establishing breast cancer prevention programs.

  18. Knowledge of Physicial Education Students on Sports Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Vasiljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sports nutrition has a direct impact on the present physical condition of the body or the physical preparation of the athletes depends on the nutritional status of athletes engaged. The sample was composed of 18 students of specialized postgraduate studies of Physical Culture Faculty of Sports and Physical Education from Niksic. When we consider the results as a whole, it can be concluded that the students' knowledge of sports nutrition at a very satisfactory level, especially when comparing results with previous research knowledge athletes and coaches on sports nutrition. From a total of 360 responses was achieved 310 correct answers, or 86.1%. No matter how talented athletes in the sport they practice or train, motivated and well trained, the line between defeat and victory is usually very thin, and as the most important link imposes a sports nutrition. Results of an athlete and that you can depend on quality, quantity and time entries diet.

  19. Towards an Integrative Model of Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Heslop, Ben

    This paper aims to contribute towards the advancement of an efficient architecture of a single market for knowledge through the development of an integrative model of knowledge transfer. Within this aim, several points of departure can be singled out. One, the article builds on the call...... business and academia, and implementing the respective legislature are enduring. The research objectives were to explore (i) the process of knowledge transfer in universities, including the nature of tensions, obstacles and incentives, (ii) the relationships between key stakeholders in the KT market...... and (iii) the meaning/reality that is construed as a result of these relationships. To address the above research objectives, grounded theory research was undertaken in four universities in the UK and one in Australia. Coding of the data revealed thirteen constructs, which became the building blocks...

  20. Socioscientific Issues-Based Instruction: An Investigation of Agriscience Students' Content Knowledge Based on Student Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Myers, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous researchers in science education have reported student improvement in areas of scientific literacy resulting from socioscientific issues (SSI)-based instruction. The purpose of this study was to describe student agriscience content knowledge following a six-week SSI-based instructional unit focusing on the introduction of cultured meat…

  1. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching: experiential versus biomedical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group interviews. Analysis was based on a prior developed model of the characteristics of learning from patient instructors. The authors used this model as sensitizing concepts for the analysis of data while at the same time being open to new insights by constant comparison of old and new findings. Results showed a negotiation both between and within the students of the importance of patients' experiential knowledge versus scientific biomedical knowledge. On one hand students appreciated the experiential learning environment offered in the PI-led sessions representing a patient-centred approach, and acknowledged the importance of the PIs' individual perspectives and experiential knowledge. On the other hand, representing the scientific biomedical perspective and traditional step-by step teaching, students expressed unfamiliarity with the unstructured experiential learning and scepticism regarding the credibility of the patients' knowledge. This study contributes to the understanding of the complexity of involving patients as teachers in healthcare education and initiates a discussion on how to complement faculty-led teaching with patient-led teaching involving varying degrees of patient autonomy in the planning and delivering of the teaching.

  2. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Procter, Paula M.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their profes...

  3. Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight.

  4. An exploration of knowledge and practice of patient handling among undergraduate occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Grath, Margaret; Taaffe, Ciara; Gallagher, Aideen

    2015-01-01

    To explore knowledge and practice relating to patient handling among final year occupational therapy students in the Republic of Ireland. We conducted a survey of final year students in three out of four occupational therapy programs in the Republic of Ireland (n = 81). The survey measured students' knowledge of manual handling principles and techniques and explored their experiences and ability to apply this knowledge to clinical situations. All students (n = 81) had undertaken training in patient handling. Just under half of students (n = 35, 43.2%) had received additional training outside of the university setting. Overall knowledge of safe patient handling principles techniques and risk assessment was low (Mean Score = 15.71/28; SD = 3.81). Participants who received additional training achieved a lower mean total score (M = 13.89, SD = 3.54) than those who only undertook university-based training (M = 18.11; SD = 2.66; t(79) = -5.87; p occupational therapy students in Ireland receive training in safe patient handling they appear to have limited knowledge of best practice and experience difficulties in applying their learning to clinical situations. There is an urgent need to consider the effectiveness of current educational strategies in this area. Implications for Rehabilitation Safe patient handling is a key component in preventing musculoskeletal injury among rehabilitation professionals The extent to which pre-professional training prepares rehabilitation professionals to practice safe patient handling is unclear Occupational therapy students in this study had limited knowledge of safe patient handling and had difficulty applying their learning to clinical practice Alternative education models are required to support development of safe patient handling skills. Educators may wish to consider how safe patient handling can be embedded across curricula to avoid the challenges of once off instruction and massed practice.

  5. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours: Eating habits among students of nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To value in which proportion the nutrition knowledge guarantees in keeping with a healthy diet pattern behaviours. Method: Descriptive, transversal study, carried out with 50 second-year students belonging to the career in Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Seville (Spain, all of them females, with mean age of 21.16 years old. The collection of data related to the daily food ingestion was made following the 24-hours-recount technique and using two tables of food composition for the calculation of the contribution. Students have followed matters such as basic nutrition and life cycle, bromatology, nutrition education and dietetics. Results: There is an absolute fast from breakfast till lunch in more than half of the cases, 16% of the students do not eat anything during the evening, either; and in 20% of the cases the daily food consists in breakfast, lunch and dinner. From an energetic point of view, there is an hypocaloric pattern and, concerning macronutrients, an ingestion excess of fats and proteins. Fibre ingestion remains under current recommendations and iron -in an almost 60%-, calcium and folic acid ingestion are also deficient. Conclusions: It seems as if social pressure and feeding fashions had more weight at the time of determining the attitudes and behaviours in front of food than the fact of owning suitable knowledge on the matter. It is not likely that having that knowledge, even as in our sample, at a technical level, can guarantee proper behaviours and therefore a healthful feeding behaviour.

  7. Knowledge and attitudes of physiotherapy students towards obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Awotidebe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been recognised as a risk factor for non-communicable diseases, with more than one billion adults worldwide who are overweight, of which approximately 300 million are obese. Obesity puts an individual in danger of a shorter life expectancy and at risk for developing chronic diseases of life style, which includediabetes, cardio vascular disease and musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis and back pain. Wide spread negative attitudes towards obese people have been observed which are equally prevalent among health care professionals.  This study was based on the need to determine the knowledge and attitudes towards obese people among physiotherapy students, as they are well suited to address theintricacies of obesity and its related conditions. One hundred and seventy five students from a university in the Western Cape, South Africa, completed a structured, self-administered questionnaire that was adopted from the Obesity Risk Knowledge and Fat Phobia Scale. The study sample demonstrated average levels of knowledge regarding obesity with scores ranging from 3 to 9 on a scale of 10 with a mean score of 6.05. A n overwhelming majority of the participants(> 80% viewed obesity as largely a behavioural problem while nearly all the participants (97.6% characterised obese people as lazy, unattractive, insecure and with lower self-esteem. This study has reinforced the need for a morefocussed approach to the education of physiotherapy students around obesity and obesity-related conditions, as well asthe management thereof.

  8. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  9. [Knowledge and truths about nursing: discourse of new students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; Eidt, Olga Rosaria; Canabarro, Simone; Corbellini, Valéria Lamb; Creutzberg, Marion

    2008-01-01

    It is a study with a qualitative approach that proposes to analyze truths regimes that pass by and along Nursing as a profession, as manifested by students entering in the Graduate Course 2004/2, 2005/1 and 2005/2. The Discourse Analysis has been used as a methodological option for analyzing the data, under Michel Foucault's approaches. Three great themes have come out of such context of analysis and discussion: the traversing of gender knowledges in Nursing practice; Nursing as a knowledge made hierarchical; making as a might in Nursing's academic and professional day-by-day. Social conceptions became self evident, going through invisible knowledges that legitimate health and nursing practices, making them unquestionable.

  10. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior of Nigerian Students Toward Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M; Randhawa, G

    2017-10-01

    The Nigerian transplantation program is evolving but is currently over-reliant on living donors. If deceased donation is to be viable in Nigeria, it is important to ascertain the views of the public. The objective of the study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of Nigerian international students toward organ donation. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Nigerian international students of the University of Bedfordshire through the use of a modified self-administered questionnaire. The participants were recruited by means of purposive sampling. Of the 110 questionnaires distributed, 103 were returned fully completed (response rate = 93.6%). A significant majority (93.2%) of the participants are aware of organ donation, and 76.7% have a good knowledge on the subject. Furthermore, more than half (52.8%) of the participants have a positive attitude toward organ donation, and less than half (42.8%) have favorable behavior toward it. Higher knowledge does not correlate to either positive attitude or behavior, but a positive attitude is correlated with favorable behavior toward donation. The attitudes and behavior of the respondents toward organ donation is not commensurate with the level of knowledge they possess. This highlights the urgent need for well-structured educational programs on deceased organ donation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge Management Model on Educational Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsina Ferdinandus

    2015-12-01

    Key Words: model, knowledge management, educational organizations Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan mendeskripsikan proses knowledge management yang dilakukan pada SMA Negeri 1 Pulau-pulau Aru dan SMA Yos Sudarso Dobo di Kabupaten Kepulauan Aru. Penelitian ini menggunakan jenis penelitian kualitatif dengan rancangan studi multi kasus. Data dikumpulkan dengan teknik observasi, wawancara mendalam dan dokumentasi kemudian dianalisis dengan teknik analisis data kasus individu dan analisis data lintas kasus. Temuan penelitian ini menggambarkan (1 guru-guru sudah melakukan transformasi pengetahuan explicit to tacit dengan baik ketika melakukan persiapan pembelajaran, transformasi pengetahuan tacit to explicit belum dilakukan dengan baik, dan transformasi pengetahuan tacit to tacit sudah dilakukan dengan baik; (2  sosialisasi dilakukan dengan baik, namun belum maksimal; (3  kepala sekolah SMA Negeri 1 Pulau-pulau Aru lebih demokratis dan kepala sekolah SMA Yos Sudarso Dobo lebih paternalistis; (4 peningkatan berupa upaya memasukan pengetahuan dari luar sekolah sudah dilakukan oleh kedua sekolah; dan (5  proses knowledge capture di kedua sekolah sudah berjalan dengan baik. Kata kunci: model, knowledge management, organisasi pendidikan

  12. Systematic Approach to Remediation in Basic Science Knowledge for Preclinical Students: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Francis

    Remediation of pre-clerkship students for deficits in basic science knowledge should help them overcome their learning deficiencies prior to clerkship. However, very little is known about remediation in basic science knowledge during pre-clerkship. This study utilized the program theory framework to collect and organize mixed methods data of the remediation plan for pre-clerkship students who failed their basic science cognitive examinations in a Canadian medical school. This plan was analyzed using a logic model narrative approach and compared to literature on the learning theories. The analysis showed a remediation plan that was strong on governance and verification of scores, but lacked: clarity and transparency of communication, qualified remedial tutors, individualized diagnosis of learner's deficits, and student centered learning. Participants admitted uncertainty about the efficacy of the remediation process. A remediation framework is proposed that includes student-centered participation, individualized learning plan and activities, deliberate practice, feedback, reflection, and rigorous reassessment.

  13. Biological evolution and Brazilian students: knowledge and acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela da Silva Oliveira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify topics of the biological evolution theory Brazilian students affirm to know and their relation with variables such as sex, age, geographical localization, socioeconomical aspects, religion and science. 2.404 high school students (55.1% girls enrolled in 78 Brazilian schools took part of the research. The data was generated through a questionnaire and analyzed using the software Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 18.0. The results point out that the knowledge of topics about evolution is low among students and influenced by the variables tested, the associations identified happened in a diversified way, and in lower or higher intensity according to the context studied.

  14. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  15. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  16. Wrong capital? Problems with recognition of knowledge presented by non-native students in international education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    This paper presents research on problems of knowledge recognition among students of various nationalities at an international organisation......This paper presents research on problems of knowledge recognition among students of various nationalities at an international organisation...

  17. Virtual Business Collaboration Conceptual Knowledge Model (VBCKM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous Massoud Yassa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of virtual business collaboration modeling, many pervious works have been accepted to consider some essential virtual business collaborative models. A practical dynamic virtual organization may be a combination of those models and some other elemental features with some modifications to meet the business opportunity requirements. Therefore, some guidelines and rules are needed to help in constructing a practical collaboration model. This work aims to determine the essential features that must be considered in order to automate the creation of dynamic virtual organization. By integrate “Select-and-Modify” approach with “CommonKADS” methodology, the work of this paper propose a strategy-driven approach for virtual business collaboration modeling construction. Also, some generic knowledge-based components have been designed to support this creation, which can increase the flexibility of the knowledge-based approach facilitates future integration. This paper is considered as integration and extension to the recent work “New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM”, which has proposed an integrated framework that combines the existed collaborative-networked organization perspectives, as well as, proposes new.

  18. Features of Knowledge Building in Biology: Understanding Undergraduate Students' Ideas about Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Katelyn; Wince, Tyler; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that teaching and learning in molecular and cellular biology (MCB) is difficult. We used a new lens to understand undergraduate reasoning about molecular mechanisms: the knowledge-integration approach to conceptual change. Knowledge integration is the dynamic process by which learners acquire new ideas, develop connections between ideas, and reorganize and restructure prior knowledge. Semistructured, clinical think-aloud interviews were conducted with introductory and upper-division MCB students. Interviews included a written conceptual assessment, a concept-mapping activity, and an opportunity to explain the biomechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Student reasoning patterns were explored through mixed-method analyses. Results suggested that students must sort mechanistic entities into appropriate mental categories that reflect the nature of MCB mechanisms and that conflation between these categories is common. We also showed how connections between molecular mechanisms and their biological roles are part of building an integrated knowledge network as students develop expertise. We observed differences in the nature of connections between ideas related to different forms of reasoning. Finally, we provide a tentative model for MCB knowledge integration and suggest its implications for undergraduate learning.

  19. Knowledge and attitude of university students towards premarital screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kindi, Rahma; Al Rujaibi, Salha; Al Kendi, Maya

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program. A cross-sectional study conducted at the students' clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students' knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program. Most of the participants (n=469; 79%) were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%), media (n=209; 35%), family and friends (n=197; 33%), and/or health services (n=181, 31%). The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92%) thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53%) favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36%) favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results. Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program.

  20. Socio-optics: optical knowledge applied in modeling social phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisleag, Radu; Chisleag Losada, Ioana-Roxana

    2011-05-01

    The term "Socio-optics" (as a natural part of Socio-physics), is rather not found in literature or at Congresses. In Optics books, there are not made references to optical models applied to explain social phenomena, in spite of Optics relying on the duality particle-wave which seems convenient to model relationships among society and its members. The authors, who have developed a few models applied to explain social phenomena based on knowledge in Optics, along with a few other models applying, in Social Sciences, knowledge from other branches of Physics, give their own examples of such optical models, f. e., of relationships among social groups and their sub-groups, by using kowledge from partially coherent optical phenomena or to explain by tunnel effect, the apparently impossible penetration of social barriers by individuals. They consider that the term "Socio-optics" may come to life. There is mentioned the authors' expertise in stimulating Socio-optics approach by systematically asking students taken courses in Optics to find applications of the newly got Wave and Photon Optics knowledge, to model social and even everyday life phenomena, eventually engaging in such activities other possibly interested colleagues.

  1. Sport Education and Direct Instruction Units: Comparison of Student Knowledge Development in Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José; Araújo, Rui; Farias, Cláudio; Bessa, Cristiana; Mesquita, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study conducted a comparative analysis of students’ knowledge development on athletics in Sport Education and in a Direct Instruction unit taking into account sex and initial skill level. The participants were an experienced Physical Education teacher and two sixth-grade classes totaling 47 students (25 boys and 22 girls). Each class was randomly placed in either Sport Education or Direct Instruction classes and participated in 20, 45-minutes lessons focused on shot put, hurdles and triple jump. Knowledge on athletics was assessed through a 25-items written and video-based test. The inter-group differences and improvements across time in the knowledge test were analyzed through the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, respectively. There were significant knowledge improvements in both instructional approaches irrespective of students’ gender and skill level. In Direct Instruction, the type of task organization, the high rates of repetition of movement patterns and feedback by the teacher were beneficial to student learning. In Sport Education, the autonomy granted to students in the control of the pace of task transitions by making on-going judgments on achievement of performance criteria, implicated students affectively and cognitively with the learning content. It was further supported that several models and teaching strategies should be taken into consideration when teaching Physical Education. Different approaches should be perceived as alternatives and teachers should retain the best in each according with the moment in the unit, student developmental stage, and the specific learning objectives in the task. Key points The results in this study showed that regardless of students’ sex, both DI and SE were efficient in the promotion of improvements in students’ content knowledge of athletics. Both boys and girls improved from the pre-test to the post-test in SE and DI. SE was particularly beneficial to lower skill-level. On the contrary, in the DI unit

  2. Do large-scale assessments measure students' ability to integrate scientific knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-03-01

    Large-scale assessments are used as means to diagnose the current status of student achievement in science and compare students across schools, states, and countries. For efficiency, multiple-choice items and dichotomously-scored open-ended items are pervasively used in large-scale assessments such as Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS). This study investigated how well these items measure secondary school students' ability to integrate scientific knowledge. This study collected responses of 8400 students to 116 multiple-choice and 84 open-ended items and applied an Item Response Theory analysis based on the Rasch Partial Credit Model. Results indicate that most multiple-choice items and dichotomously-scored open-ended items can be used to determine whether students have normative ideas about science topics, but cannot measure whether students integrate multiple pieces of relevant science ideas. Only when the scoring rubric is redesigned to capture subtle nuances of student open-ended responses, open-ended items become a valid and reliable tool to assess students' knowledge integration ability.

  3. Student Teachers' Knowledge about Children with ADHD and Depression and Its Relations to Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikas, Eve; Timoštšuk, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Student teachers' knowledge about children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression and its relations to reporting experiencing emotions during teaching practice were studied. The participants were 186 teacher education students in Estonia. Student teachers' general knowledge and confidence in knowledge varied a lot.…

  4. INTELLECTUAL INDEPENDENCE OF STUDENTS IN THE PROCESS OF GAINING KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvezdan Arsić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main task of teaching at the present stage of social development that is characterized by the rapid development of science and technology should be directed towards ensuring that students are in the process of gaining knowledge as more independent. Learning in the modern conditions of life and work more focused on finding new information and acquiring skills that they interpret, judge, critically analyze and find their practical application. Individual learning is a process in which students do their own activities, and the school should primarily be to develop pupils' skills and habits for independent work, or to enable them to actively come to know and own efforts. With a program of independent activities of children in the process of acquiring knowledge in teaching should begin already at a younger age in order to further their education existed during the constant rise of autonomy and independence. Individual learning in the classroom requires thought flexibility, critical thinking, individual work and intellectual independence, creativity and productivity, motivation and interest, as well as a partnership of teachers and students in the realization of educational tasks.

  5. Neither Basic Life Support knowledge nor self-efficacy are predictive of skills among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, C; Ho, J D; Guerin, S; Yeoh, Y L; Mohamed Medhat, M; Doody, K; Hwang, S; Hania, M; Boggs, S; Nolan, A; Nunn, J

    2017-08-01

    Basic life support (BLS) is considered a core competence for the graduating dentist. This study aimed to measure BLS knowledge, self-efficacy and skills of undergraduate dental students in Dublin. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey measuring BLS knowledge and self-efficacy, accompanied by a directly observed BLS skills assessment in a subsample of respondents. Data were collected in January 2014. Bivariate correlations between descriptive and outcome variables (knowledge, self-efficacy and skills) were tested using Pearson's chi-square. We included knowledge and self-efficacy as predictor variables, along with other variables showing association, into a binary logistic regression model with BLS skills as the outcome measure. One hundred and thirty-five students participated. Almost all (n = 133, 98.5%) participants had BLS training within the last 2 years. One hundred and four (77%) felt that they were capable of providing effective BLS (self-efficacy), whilst only 46 (34.1%) scored >80% of knowledge items correct. Amongst the skills (n = 85) subsample, 38.8% (n = 33) were found to pass the BLS skills assessment. Controlling for gender, age and skills assessor, the regression model did not identify a predictive relationship between knowledge or self-efficacy and BLS skills. Neither knowledge nor self-efficacy was predictive of BLS skills. Dental students had low levels of knowledge and skills in BLS. Despite this, their confidence in their ability to perform BLS was high and did not predict actual competence. There is a need for additional hands-on training, focusing on self-efficacy and BLS skills, particularly the use of AED. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of an Advanced Cardiac Life Support Simulation Laboratory Experience on Pharmacy Student Confidence and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Whitney D; Mohorn, Phillip L; Haney, Jason S; Phillips, Cynthia M; Lu, Z Kevin; Clark, Kimberly; Corboy, Alex; Ragucci, Kelly R

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To assess the impact of an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) simulation on pharmacy student confidence and knowledge. Design. Third-year pharmacy students participated in a simulation experience that consisted of team roles training, high-fidelity ACLS simulations, and debriefing. Students completed a pre/postsimulation confidence and knowledge assessment. Assessment. Overall, student knowledge assessment scores and student confidence scores improved significantly. Student confidence and knowledge changes from baseline were not significantly correlated. Conversely, a significant, weak positive correlation between presimulation studying and both presimulation confidence and presimulation knowledge was discovered. Conclusions. Overall, student confidence and knowledge assessment scores in ACLS significantly improved from baseline; however, student confidence and knowledge were not significantly correlated.

  7. Playful strategies that increase the knowledge of students on gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Katherine Sánchez-Peña

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to formulate and implement playful strategies to increase the level of knowledge in a group of students about gingivitis associated with bacterial plaque and its prevention, this project was developed in Pereira city at Alfonso Jaramillo Gutiérrez high school. The studio started from assuming that traditional teaching methodologies have proved to be highly ineffective and considering that playful strategies strengthen the active participation of the subject community of intervention. A qualitative approach was adopted, this methodology is characterized by its dialogic nature where beliefs, myths, prejudices and feelings are accepted as elements of analysis to produce knowledge. The research method chosen was the Action Research and teaching workshops and focus groups were used as investigation techniques. It was proved that the initial level of knowledge of these teenagers was low. Most of them were totally unfamiliar with the gingivitis associated with dental plaque and through the playful strategies they increased their knowledge, obtained meaningful learning and achieved an active participation.

  8. Conceptual Resources in Self-developed Explanatory Models: The importance of integrating conscious and intuitive knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Brown, David E.

    2010-11-01

    This study explores the spontaneous explanatory models children construct, critique, and revise in the context of tasks in which children need to predict, observe, and explain phenomena involving magnetism. It further investigates what conceptual resources students use, and in what ways they use them, to construct explanatory models, and the obstacles preventing them from constructing a useful explanatory model. Our findings indicate that several of the children were able to construct explanatory models. However, of the six children interviewed multiple times (three third-graders and three sixth-graders), only one was consistently able to critique and revise her models to arrive at a consistent, coherent, and sophisticated explanatory model. Connecting intuitive knowledge and abstract knowledge was important in her construction of a coherent and sophisticated explanatory model. Students who relied only on intuitive knowledge constructed tentative and non-sophisticated explanatory models. Students who relied only on verbal-symbolic knowledge at an abstract level without connection with their intuition also did not construct coherent and sophisticated models. These results indicate that instruction should help students to become meta-conceptually aware and connect their verbal-symbolic knowledge and intuition in order to construct explanatory models to make sense of abstract scientific knowledge.

  9. Middle Grades Students' Situation Definitions: Development of a Knowledge-Linking Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Kathy L.; Kuo, Yi-Lung; Knupp, Tawnya L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Student Knowledge Linking Instrument (SKLI), an inventory for middle grades students that seeks to understand student knowledge construction processes. This study included 461 fifth and sixth grade students and follows from a series of qualitative studies that were used as a foundation for development…

  10. Knowledge of Dental Health and Oral Hygiene Practices of Taiwanese Visually Impaired and Sighted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chien-Huey Sophie; Shih, Yeng-Hung

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the dental health knowledge and oral hygiene practices of 95 students with visual impairments and 286 sighted students in Taiwan. It found that the students with visual impairments were less knowledgeable about dental health and less frequently completed oral hygiene practices than did the sighted students.

  11. How architecture students gain and apply knowledge of sustainable architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Holder, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This paper will reflect on understandings of architectural pedagogy and the integration of sustainability into architectural design education. This is framed within an understanding of the construction industry’s role in the production of waste. Despite the complexity of global environmental crises...... teaching is partially integrated within the design studio courses. We compare the institution’s philosophy for sustainability with pedagogical approaches as practiced within the school. An empirical study was made of 2nd year architecture student experiences of a one-month introduction course to ‘Reuse...... and materials’. Within this, the students’ baseline knowledge of sustainable architecture was compared with their subsequent understandings and the opinions they formed. Our findings emphasise the importance of students’ personal critical reflection and active engagement but also the need for students...

  12. Modeling missing data in knowledge space theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chiusole, Debora; Stefanutti, Luca; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2015-12-01

    Missing data are a well known issue in statistical inference, because some responses may be missing, even when data are collected carefully. The problem that arises in these cases is how to deal with missing data. In this article, the missingness is analyzed in knowledge space theory, and in particular when the basic local independence model (BLIM) is applied to the data. Two extensions of the BLIM to missing data are proposed: The former, called ignorable missing BLIM (IMBLIM), assumes that missing data are missing completely at random; the latter, called missing BLIM (MissBLIM), introduces specific dependencies of the missing data on the knowledge states, thus assuming that the missing data are missing not at random. The IMBLIM and the MissBLIM modeled the missingness in a satisfactory way, in both a simulation study and an empirical application, depending on the process that generates the missingness: If the missing data-generating process is of type missing completely at random, then either IMBLIM or MissBLIM provide adequate fit to the data. However, if the pattern of missingness is functionally dependent upon unobservable features of the data (e.g., missing answers are more likely to be wrong), then only a correctly specified model of the missingness distribution provides an adequate fit to the data.

  13. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-10-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly expanding technology, genetic engineering, to food production. The results indicated significant difference in understanding of concepts related with genetically engineered food stuffs between teachers and students. The most common ideas about genetically modified food were that cross bred plants and genetically modified plants are not same, GM organisms are produced by inserting a foreign gene into a plant or animal and are high yielding. More teachers thought that genetically engineered food stuffs were unsafe for the environment. Both teachers and students showed number of misconceptions, for example, the pesticidal proteins produced by GM organisms have indirect effects through bioaccumulation, induces production of allergic proteins, genetic engineering is production of new genes, GM plants are leaky sieves and that transgenes are more likely to introgress into wild species than mutated species. In general, more students saw benefits while teachers were cautious about the advantages of genetically engineered food stuffs.

  14. Relationship among Food-Safety Knowledge, Beliefs, and Risk-Reduction Behavior in University Students in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sayaka; Akamatsu, Rie; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Marui, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify whether university students who have both food-safety knowledge and beliefs perform risk-reduction behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional research using a questionnaire that included food-safety knowledge, perceptions, risk-reduction behavior, stages for the selection of safer food based on the Transtheoretical Model, and…

  15. Relationship among Food-Safety Knowledge, Beliefs, and Risk-Reduction Behavior in University Students in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sayaka; Akamatsu, Rie; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Marui, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify whether university students who have both food-safety knowledge and beliefs perform risk-reduction behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional research using a questionnaire that included food-safety knowledge, perceptions, risk-reduction behavior, stages for the selection of safer food based on the Transtheoretical Model, and…

  16. An instructional design process based on expert knowledge for teaching students how mechanisms are explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M; Anderson, Trevor R; Pelaez, Nancy J

    2016-06-01

    In biology and physiology courses, students face many difficulties when learning to explain mechanisms, a topic that is demanding due to the immense complexity and abstract nature of molecular and cellular mechanisms. To overcome these difficulties, we asked the following question: how does an instructor transform their understanding of biological mechanisms and other difficult-to-learn topics so that students can comprehend them? To address this question, we first reviewed a model of the components used by biologists to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms: the MACH model, with the components of methods (M), analogies (A), context (C), and how (H). Next, instructional materials were developed and the teaching activities were piloted with a physical MACH model. Students who used the MACH model to guide their explanations of mechanisms exhibited both improvements and some new difficulties. Third, a series of design-based research cycles was applied to bring the activities with an improved physical MACH model into biology and biochemistry courses. Finally, a useful rubric was developed to address prevalent student difficulties. Here, we present, for physiology and biology instructors, the knowledge and resources for explaining molecular and cellular mechanisms in undergraduate courses with an instructional design process aimed at realizing pedagogical content knowledge for teaching. Our four-stage process could be adapted to advance instruction with a range of models in the life sciences.

  17. Knowledge-based geometric modeling in construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonev, Martin; Hvam, Lars

    2012-01-01

    a considerably high amount of their recourses is required for designing and specifying the majority of their product assortment. As design decisions are hereby based on knowledge and experience about behaviour and applicability of construction techniques and materials for a predefined design situation, smart...... tools need to be developed, to support these activities. In order to achieve a higher degree of design automation, this study proposes a framework for using configuration systems within the CAD environment together with suitable geometric modeling techniques on the example of a Danish manufacturer...

  18. Using the Health Belief Model to Examine the Link between HPV Knowledge and Self-Efficacy for Preventive Behaviors of Male Students at a Two-Year College in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace-Leitch, Lisa; Shneyderman, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common and easily transmitted sexually transmitted infections in the United States; infected individuals are frequently unaware that they are carriers, and transmission occurs unknowingly. Infection can lead to genital warts or cervical, penile, anal, or oral cancer. The object of this study was to examine the link between HPV knowledge and self-efficacy for preventive behaviors among college students as well as HPV vaccine acceptability. A cross-sectional survey of students at a two-year college in New York City was conducted electronically. The current study focuses on male students (N = 120). We found that HPV knowledge was low among this sample, but that self-efficacy and vaccine acceptability were high. Self-efficacy and perceived susceptibility to HPV predicted vaccine acceptability, but not condom use. The challenge for health care practitioners and health educators is to provide focused, comprehensive education about HPV without causing undue fear.

  19. Exploring prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretation of student thinking through analysing students' work in modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-09-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that embodied solutions of mathematical modelling tasks. The data were collected from 25 prospective mathematics teachers enrolled in an undergraduate course through four 2-week-long cycles. Analysis of data revealed that the prospective teachers interpreted students' thinking in four ways: describing, questioning, explaining, and comparing. Moreover, whereas some of the prospective teachers showed a tendency to increase their attention to the meaning of students' ways of thinking more while they engaged in students' work in depth over time and experience, some of them continued to focus on only judging the accuracy of students' thinking. The implications of the findings for understanding and developing prospective teachers' ways of interpreting students' thinking are discussed.

  20. A vertically integrated geriatric curriculum improves medical student knowledge and clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Mark A; Fitzgerald, James T; Hall, Karen E; Halter, Jeffrey B

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a vertically integrated curriculum intervention on the geriatric knowledge and performance in clinical skills of third-year medical students. This observational cohort study conducted at the University of Michigan Medical School evaluates the performance of 622 third-year medical students from the graduating class years of 2004 through 2007. An integrated curriculum intervention was developed and implemented for the class of 2006. Its elements included identification and tracking of geriatric learning outcomes in an individualized Web-based student portfolio, integration of geriatric content into preclinical courses, development of a geriatric functional assessment standardized patient instructor, and an experience in a geriatrics clinic during the ambulatory component of the third-year internal medicine clerkship. Medical student performance was assessed on a geriatric knowledge test and during a geriatric functional assessment station administered during an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the beginning of the fourth year. Student performance on the geriatric functional assessment OSCE station progressively improved from pre-intervention performance (mean performance+/-standard deviation 43+/-15% class of 2005, 62 + 15% class of 2006, 78+/-10% class of 2007; analysis of variance, P<.001). Similarly, student performance on the geriatric knowledge test was significantly better for the classes of 2006 and 2007 than for the class of 2005 (model F ratio=4.72; P<.001). In conclusion, an integrated approach to incorporating new educational geriatric objectives into the medical school curriculum leads to significant improvements in medical student knowledge and in important clinical skills in the functional assessment of older patients.

  1. The Effect of Prior Knowledge and Feedback Type Design on Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Introductory Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of student prior knowledge and feedback type on student achievement and satisfaction in an introductory managerial accounting course using computer-based formative assessment tools. The study involved a redesign of the existing Job Order Costing unit using the ADDIE model of instructional design. The…

  2. World Knowledge in Computational Models of Discourse Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan L.; Koppen, Mathieu; Noordman, Leo G. M.; Vonk, Wietske

    2008-01-01

    Because higher level cognitive processes generally involve the use of world knowledge, computational models of these processes require the implementation of a knowledge base. This article identifies and discusses 4 strategies for dealing with world knowledge in computational models: disregarding world knowledge, "ad hoc" selection, extraction from…

  3. Integration PCK: Modeling the Knowledge(s) Underlying a World Language Teacher's Implementation of CBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Francis J.; Cammarata, Laurent; Martel, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This case study enabled researchers to understand the knowledge embedded in a world language teacher's enactment of content-based instruction (CBI) through the lens of a theoretical model inspired by Shulman's (1987) construct of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The model, called integration pedagogical content knowledge (I-PCK), represents an…

  4. Reproductive Health Knowledge Level of High School and University Students in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-hua LOU; Quan ZHAO; Er-sheng GAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To understand the sexual and reproductive health knowledge level of high school and university students in Shanghai.Methods A total of 628 high school students and 709 college students were surveyed with anonymous self-administrated questionnaire in Shanghai.Results The median knowledge scores of students from colleges and high schools were 58 and 39, respectively. Those who had surfed the Internet, had browsed websites on reproductive health, or had communicated sex-related issues with fathers/classmates/friends had more reproductive health knowledge. In addition, the percentage of college students who had surfed the Internet, had browsed websites on reproductive health or had communicated sex-related issues with classmates/friends was higher than that of high school students.Conclusion The knowledge scores of respondents were rather low. Compared with the high school students, the college students had more reproductive health knowledge and sought the knowledge more actively.

  5. Using Doubly Latent Multilevel Analysis to Elucidate Relationships between Science Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Daniela; Großschedl, Jörg; Harms, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Teachers make a difference for the outcome of their students in science classrooms. One focus in this context lies on teachers' professional knowledge. We describe this knowledge according to three domains, namely (1) content knowledge (CK), (2) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and (3) curricular knowledge (CuK). We hypothesise a positive…

  6. Geoethics: Master's Students Knowledge and Perception of Its Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, António; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2015-12-01

    In the 1990s, the field of geoethics started its development, associated with a set of ethical principles that regulate the profession of geologists in their relationship with society and with nature. Given the importance of this field, but also its youth, 36 higher education students attending a Master's of Geology course were surveyed (20 were from an educational branch and 16 were from a scientific branch). The questionnaire applied to them aimed to achieve the following goals: (a) to identify the knowledge of the respondents about this new field and to verify their position about the inclusion of geoethics in the curriculum, (b) to understand how they consider the importance of geological knowledge in political decisions and (c) to investigate possible differences in the thinking of the respondents, given the specificities of their educational branches. The study concluded that the field of geoethics is unknown to the majority of the respondents. However, the recognition of its importance was also verified, after getting familiar with the definition of the concept, as well as the need for its inclusion in formal education. The respondents also considered relevant the creation of a deontological code that could provide geologists with ethical guidance. They also considered that geology should influence political decisions, but they did not consistently recognise the limits of its influence, which seems to reveal the need of a deeper understanding of the specific nature of geological knowledge when compared with other sciences. Almost all the results were similar in both groups, but the students from the educational branch offered more elaborate answers about the issues present in the questionnaire.

  7. Knowledge and Attitude of University Students Towards Premarital Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Al Kindi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitude of Sultan Qaboos University students towards premarital screening program.Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at the students’ clinic from January to April 2011. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 590 unmarried Omani students of both genders. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts; the first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students’ knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program.Results: Most of the participants (n=469; 79% were aware about the availability of premarital screening program in Oman. The main sources of information were: school/college (n=212; 36%, media (n=209; 35%, family and friends (n=197; 33%, and/or health services (n=181, 31%. The vast majority of the participants (n=540; 92% thought it is important to carry out premarital screening and agreed to do it. Around half of the participants (n=313; 53% favored having premarital screening as an obligatory procedure before marriage and about one third (n=212; 36% favored making laws and regulation to prevent marriage in case of positive results.Conclusion: Even though the majority of the participants thought it is important to carry out premarital screening; only half favored making it obligatory before marriage and one third favored making laws and regulations to prevent marriage in case of positive results. This reflects the importance of health education as a keystone in improving knowledge and attitude towards premarital screening program.

  8. South African university student knowledge of eye protection against sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Oduntan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to sunlight has been associated with several ocular conditions such as cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and conjunctival neoplasm. Knowledge of protective modalities and good behavioural practice involving eye protection is essential to prevent adverse effects of sunlight. The purpose of this study was to establish knowledge amongst randomly selected university students in South Africa, of prevention modalities against the adverse effects of sunlight. A questionnaire relating to the knowledge of preventive modalities was completed by randomly selected students from four universities selected by convenience sampling.  Questionnaires completed by one thousand, eighthundred and thirty two (N =1832 subjects were analysed with descriptive statistics using Stata version 10.  The participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 55 years (mean = 21.03 ± 3.4 years.  They included 43.7% males and 56.3% females.  They were 68.3% Blacks, 20.0% Whites, 3.4% Indians and 7.4% Coloureds. Many (82.3% of them knew that excessive exposure to sunlight can adversely affect the eyes. Only 28.5% reported that they often wore sunglasses outdoors. Only 38.5% of the participants knew that not all spectacles or contact lenses could protect eyes from ultraviolet radiation. However, many, 87.7% and 69.5% respectively knew that sunglasses and spectacles could be specifically designed to block UVR from entering the eye. Just over half (52.7% knew that contact lenses can be specifically designed to block the UVR. Many, (68.4% agreed that wearing hats with brims could protect the eyes against harmful radiation from the sun and the majority, 95.8% agreed that there was a need for awareness campaigns about the effects of the sun on the eye and against excessive exposure. Female respondents had more knowledge of preventive modalities than the males.  Knowledge of preventive modalities among the respondents varied significantly with the type of questions and was

  9. Knowledge of Oral Health of Students from Professorship Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Morano Júnior

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the knowledge and perceptions in oral health of students attending Professorship Courses at schools located in the São Paulo state, Brazil.Method: The sample was composed by 559 students from two Professorship Courses located in the city of Avaré (São Paulo state, and the data collection instrument was a semi-structured questionnaire with 8 questions. All responses were tabulated using the SPSS software (version 10.0 and analyzed by descriptive statistics from their absolute and relative frequencies.Results: Most (98.0% interviewees affirmed to have received some kind of information on oral health, and 73.4% of these reported that the school was the main source of this type of information (45.4%, followed by the dentist (16.1% and television (15.4%. Although 64.2% of the respondents informed to have studied in schools with dental assistance, only 58.7% had access to some kind of intervention on oral health education at the school they attended. In those cases, lectures were the most frequently used instrument during the activities. Most respondents (76.9% reported to know the importance of fluoride to the teeth, but only 4.1% clearly described its importance. Regarding dental avulsion, 57.2% of the interviewees answered correctly on how to manage these cases. As much as 99.1% of the participants affirmed that it is important that students from Professorship Courses receive information on prevention in oral health.Conclusion: There should be greater interaction between health and education professionals in order to improve oral health knowledge and practice of future educators.

  10. Knowledge Representation Using Multilevel Flow Model in Expert System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenlin; Yang, Ming [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2015-05-15

    As for the knowledge representation, of course, there are a great many methods available for knowledge representation. These include frames, causal models, and many others. This paper presents a novel method called Multilevel Flow Model (MFM), which is used for knowledge representation in G2 expert system. Knowledge representation plays a vital role in constructing knowledge bases. Moreover, it also has impact on building of generic fault model as well as knowledge bases. The MFM is particularly useful to describe system knowledge concisely as domain map in expert system when domain experts are not available.

  11. The Effect of the Green Class Model on Environmental Knowledge and Its Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Naim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of an applied environmental education project carried out using the green-class model on students' environmental knowledge and its retention. 101 7th grade students attending Nazim Akcan Primary School in the Altindag Province of Ankara participated in the study. The study was carried out in…

  12. Knowledge about the 'Greenhouse Effect': have college students improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Helen; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2001-02-01

    The prevalence of the ideas of Year I undergraduate biology students about the consequences, causes and cures of the 'greenhouse effect' was determined using a closed-form questionnaire, and the results compared with a parallel study undertaken nearly 10 years ago. Many of the students in the present study were unaware of the potential effect of global warming on the distribution of crop pests, or that ground level ozone acts as a 'greenhouse gas'. Prevalent misconceptions were that global warming is caused by increased penetration of solar radiation, that it is connected with holes in the ozone layer, that it would result in increased skin cancer, and that use of unleaded petrol would reduce it. There appeared to be a general conflation of thinking about global warming and ozone layer depletion. Despite an increased certainty about the existence and effects of global warming among experts, the results are broadly similar to, and certainly no better than, those obtained with an equivalent group of students in a previous study, suggesting that despite media publicity and inclusion of the issue of global warming in the formal curriculum, insecure knowledge and misconceptions persist.

  13. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives.

  14. Enriching the Student Experience Through a Collaborative Cultural Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy; Metcalfe, Sharon; Garner, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a knowledge and understanding of an international, collaborative, cultural learning model for students from the United States and Scotland. Internationalizing the student experience has been instrumental for student learning for the past eight years. Both countries have developed programs that have enriched and enhanced the overall student learning experience, mainly through the sharing of evidence-based care in both hospital and community settings. Student learning is at the heart of this international model, and through practice learning, leadership, and reflective practice, student immersion in global health care and practice is immense. Moving forward, we are seeking new opportunities to explore learning partnerships to provide this collaborative cultural learning experience.

  15. A methodology for acquiring qualitative knowledge for probabilistic graphical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Uffe Bro; Madsen, Anders L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model developm......We present a practical and general methodology that simplifies the task of acquiring and formulating qualitative knowledge for constructing probabilistic graphical models (PGMs). The methodology efficiently captures and communicates expert knowledge, and has significantly eased the model...

  16. Analysis of the effect of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrosse, Peggy

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding. Students might be able to formally recite a definition for a term without actually having understood the meaning of the term and its connection to other terms or to related concepts. Researchers (Cassels & Johnstone, 1983; Gabel, 1999; Johnstone, 1991) have been studying the difficulty students have in learning science, particularly chemistry. Gabel (1999) suggests that, "while research into misconceptions (also known as alternative conceptions) and problem-solving has dominated the field for the past 25 years, we are no closer to a solution that would improve the teaching and learning of chemistry" (P. 549). Gabel (1999) relates the difficulty in learning chemistry to use of language. She refers to student difficulty both with words that have more than one meaning in English and with words that are used to mean one idea in chemistry and another idea in every day language. The Frayer Model, a research-based teaching strategy, is a graphic organizer which students use to create meaningful definitions for terms in context (Frayer, Frederick, & Klausmeier, 1969). It was used as the treatment---the specific vocabulary instruction---in this research study. The researcher collected and analyzed data to answer three research questions that focused on the effect of using the Frayer model (a graphic organizer) on high school students' knowledge and understanding of academic language used in chemistry. The research took place in a New England high school. Four intact chemistry classes provided the student participants; two classes were assigned to the treatment group (TG) and two classes were assigned to the control group (CG). The TG received vocabulary instruction on 14 chosen terms using the Frayer Model. The CG received traditional vocabulary instruction with no special attention to the 14 terms selected for this study

  17. Model Knowledge Management Di Perguruan Tinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Budiastuti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Business conditions change quickly, pushing companies to change the way they compete. The Era of knowledge-based economy provides challenges for collaboration, innovation, adaptation, technological mastery and market, as well as intellectual assets management company. Relying on existing core competencies does not guarantee the company able to create competitive advantages. To face the challenges of existing companies must be able to manage the knowledge that having through the application of Knowledge Management (KM.Similarly with colleges based on human capital, the need to manage organizations that encourage the formation of cultural knowledge creation, knowledge sharing, and knowledge utilization through the application of Knowledge Management. With Knowledge Management, recognition quality of a lecturer is not based only on seniority but on the extent to which lecturers are acts as a general user, specialist, solution communities, as well as professional.

  18. High School Biology Students' Knowledge and Certainty about Diffusion and Osmosis Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Arthur L.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' understanding about scientifically acceptable content knowledge by exploring the relationship between knowledge of diffusion and osmosis and the students' certainty in their content knowledge. Data was collected from a high school biology class with the Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test…

  19. Food Safety Knowledge and Decision-making Process among College Students in Lanzhou, Western China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Tao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study, a questionnaire survey containing three parts (general characteristics of the study sample, 15 food safety knowledge questions and 3 questions about decision-making process on food safety problems was conducted among college students in Lanzhou City. The results indicated that food safety knowledge levels was closely related to engaged major and sex of college students. Food safety knowledge scores of students in food science major were higher than ones of liberal arts and engineering students. Female college students gained higher scores in food safety knowledge than male students and male students are more concerned about food safety cases and easily inclined to participate in solving these problems about food safety. Moreover, the results revealed that the levels of food safety knowledge for college students in China were low and there is an urgent need for more food safety education.

  20. Attitudes towards and knowledge about homosexuality among medical students in Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovac, Igor; Abramović, Marija; Komlenović, Gordana; Milosević, Milan; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether students in their fifth and sixth years of medical school in Zagreb have homophobic attitudes and assess their knowledge about homosexuality. A survey was conducted among fifth and sixth year medical students during the 2009/2010 academic year. The survey consisted of general demographic data, two validated questionnaires--"Knowledge about Homosexuality Questionnaire" and "Heterosexual Attitudes towards Homosexuality Scale"--and questions about personal experiences created for this study. The mean knowledge scores were X = 14.8 out of 20. Furthermore, gender differences in attitudes were observed, indicating less negative attitudes among the female participants. The regression model was significant (ANOVA: Sum of Squares = 38.065; df = 17, Mean Square= 2239, F = 10.6; p homosexuality score were female gender (beta= -0.14, p = 0.015), sixth year of study (beta = -0.16, p = 0.009) and more knowledge about homosexuality (beta = -0.48, p < 0.001). Negative attitudes are present among the students; therefore, educational efforts should be included in the curricula of medical schools to diminish the negative perceptions of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

  1. The impact of ecolabel knowledge to purchase decision of green producton biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigit, Diana Vivanti; Fauziah, Rizky; Heryanti, Erna

    2017-08-01

    The world needs real solutions to reduce the impact of environmental damages. Students as agents of changes have a role to overcome these problems. One of the important solution is to be a critical consumer who has purchase decisions in a green product. To show the quality of an environmental friendly product, it is then required an ecolabel on the green product which indicates that the product has been through the production processed and come from environmental friendly substances. The research aimed at finding out whether there was an impact of ecolabel knowledge with purchase decision of green product on biology students. This research was conducted in Biology Department. This research used a survey descriptive method. The population used was biology students of Universitas Negeri Jakarta while the sampling technique was done through simple random sampling technique with 147 respondents. Instrument used were ecolabel knowledge test and a questionnaire of green product purchase decision. The result of prerequisite test showed that the data was normally distributed and homogenous variance. The regression model obtained was Ŷ=77.083+ 0.370X. Meanwhile, the determinant coefficient (r2) obtained was 0.047 or 4.7% that mean ecolabel knowledge just contributed 4,71% to the green product purchase decision. These implied that many factors contributed in the purchase decision of green product instead of ecolabel knowledge.

  2. Effect of simulation on knowledge of advanced cardiac life support, knowledge retention, and confidence of nursing students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Loai I; Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of simulation on nursing students' knowledge of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), knowledge retention, and confidence in applying ACLS skills. An experimental, randomized controlled (pretest-posttest) design was used. The experimental group (n = 40) attended an ACLS simulation scenario, a 4-hour PowerPoint presentation, and demonstration on a static manikin, whereas the control group (n = 42) attended the PowerPoint presentation and a demonstration only. A paired t test indicated that posttest mean knowledge of ACLS and confidence was higher in both groups. The experimental group showed higher knowledge of ACLS and higher confidence in applying ACLS, compared with the control group. Traditional training involving PowerPoint presentation and demonstration on a static manikin is an effective teaching strategy; however, simulation is significantly more effective than traditional training in helping to improve nursing students' knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, and confidence about ACLS.

  3. Improving students' long-term knowledge retention through personalized review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Robert V; Shroyer, Jeffery D; Pashler, Harold; Mozer, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Human memory is imperfect; thus, periodic review is required for the long-term preservation of knowledge and skills. However, students at every educational level are challenged by an ever-growing amount of material to review and an ongoing imperative to master new material. We developed a method for efficient, systematic, personalized review that combines statistical techniques for inferring individual differences with a psychological theory of memory. The method was integrated into a semester-long middle-school foreign-language course via retrieval-practice software. Using a cumulative exam administered after the semester's end, we compared time-matched review strategies and found that personalized review yielded a 16.5% boost in course retention over current educational practice (massed study) and a 10.0% improvement over a one-size-fits-all strategy for spaced study.

  4. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brittany; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students' perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest…

  5. Students' Perceptions of Vocabulary Knowledge and Learning in a Middle School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick L.; Concannon, James P.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated eighth-grade science students' (13-14-year-olds) perceptions of their vocabulary knowledge, learning, and content achievement. Data sources included pre- and posttest of students' perceptions of vocabulary knowledge, students' perceptions of vocabulary and reading strategies surveys, and a content achievement test.…

  6. The Impact of Physics Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Motivation on Students' Achievement and Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Melanie M.; Neumann, Knut; Fischer, Hans E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines students' achievement and interest and the extent to which they are predicted by teacher knowledge and motivation. Student achievement and interest are both considered desirable outcomes of school instruction. Teacher pedagogical content knowledge has been identified a major predictor of student achievement in previous…

  7. Development of a Diagnostic System Using a Testing-Based Approach for Strengthening Student Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2011-01-01

    Students learn new instructions well by building on relevant prior knowledge, as it affects how instructors and students interact with the learning materials. Moreover, studies have found that good prior knowledge can enable students to attain better learning motivation, comprehension, and performance. This suggests it is important to assist…

  8. Economic Thinking in China: Economic Knowledge and Attitudes of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ruth; Shen, T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a study of economic knowledge and attitudes of 873 upper secondary school, Chinese students. Finds that Chinese students performed better than northern California students on the Test of Economic Literacy. Concludes that the relatively high level of economic knowledge and the impact of Western economic ideas will encourage further…

  9. The Effect of MSW Education on Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Substance Abusing Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senreich, Evan; Straussner, Shulamith Lala A.

    2013-01-01

    Entering ("n"?=?475) and graduating ("n"?=?454) students at 3 master's of social work programs in the northeast were compared regarding their knowledge and attitudes concerning working with substance abusing clients. In comparison to entering students, graduating students demonstrated modestly higher levels of knowledge, role…

  10. Knowledge-reuse-oriented Product Modeling and Knowledge Management in Digital Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jinsong

    2006-01-01

    Mostly product design knowledge and experience exists in design handbook or expert's brain. During design process, designer has to refer to many handbooks and design materials, and design solution is hard to be reused. In order to deal with these deficiencies in digital design, this paper focuses on knowledge-reuse-oriented product modeling and knowledge management. Design knowledge is used to guide design process, and it is embedded into product model along with design process. Through analyzing design process, mechanical product knowledge is classified into four basic types that include calculation formula, design rule, engineering check and parameter spectrum etc. In order to manage and encapsulate design knowledge the concept of knowledge component(KCOM) is proposed. Design knowledge base can be organized as a hierarchy tree of KCOM. Knowledge reuse in KCOM level is the reuse of whole object in knowledge base, and knowledge reuse in item level is the reuse of basic knowledge type. Finally knowledge reuse approaches between knowledge base and CAD system is presented.

  11. The relationship between vocabulary knowledge and the reading and science achievement of fifth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jennifer Dawn

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between vocabulary knowledge and the reading and science achievement of fifth-grade students. Models were developed and tested using multiple linear regression (MLR) to determine whether vocabulary knowledge is a statistically significant predictor of reading and science. A model was tested for reading achievement, and a model was tested for science achievement. Other independent variables in the models included socioeconomic status, ethnicity, gender, status as an English-language learner, status as a special education student, classification as gifted/talented, history of retention, and migrant status. Archival data from fifth-grade students in a large, urban public school district were used in the analyses. Both models were found to be statistically significant (p vocabulary was a statistically significant predictor for both reading achievement (B = .571, p vocabulary to reading achievement confirmed past research. The role of reading vocabulary in science achievement revealed a significant, if modest, relationship. In addition, findings pointed out the significance of variables such as history of retention, gender, and status as an English-language learner. Conclusions from the study, pedagogical implications, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  12. Knowledge vs. Action: Discrepancies in University Students' Knowledge about and Self-Reported Use of Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerst, Nora M.; Klug, Julia; Jöstl, Gregor; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    University students are supposed to be autonomous learners, able to adapt to an educational environment significantly less guided than school. Entering higher education poses a challenge of self-regulation, in which beginning students are often not prepared with self-regulation strategies needed. Since there are many studies assessing self-regulated learning (SRL) via classical self-reports, we know a lot about how students generally self-assess their SRL strategies. However, SRL and performance do not always correlate highly in these studies. The aim of the present study is to determine whether there are discrepancies between students' knowledge about SRL and their action in applying adequate SRL strategies in relevant learning situations. We also want to know whether such discrepancies generalize across domains and what the reasons for discrepancies are. The situation-specific Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire for Action and Knowledge (SRL-QuAK) was used in a sample of 408 psychology and economic sciences students. Descriptive data analysis was conducted to determine potential discrepancies between SRL knowledge and action and differences between the study domains in an explorative way. The reasons for not using SRL-strategies were derived via qualitative content analysis. The results showed that although students had quite advanced knowledge of SRL strategies, they did not put this knowledge into action. This dissonance between SRL knowledge and action was found in both domains. In terms of reasons, students stated that they (a) lacked the time to use SRL strategies, (b) would not benefit from SRL strategies in the given situation, (c) would not be able to put the strategies to use effectively or (d) found it too arduous to use SRL strategies. The implications of these results will be discussed, e.g., the consequences for measures to overcome students' dissonance between knowledge and action and therefore to promote academic performance and well-being. PMID

  13. Understanding indigenous knowledge: Bridging the knowledge gap through a knowledge creation model for agricultural development

    OpenAIRE

    Edda T. Lwoga; Patrick Ngulube; Christine Stilwell

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the management of agricultural indigenous knowledge (IK) in developing countries, with a specific focus on Tanzania. It provides background details on IK and its importance for agricultural development. It introduces various knowledge management (KM) concepts and discusses their application in managing IK in the developing world by placing Nonaka’s knowledge creation theory (Nonaka 1991; Nonaka & Takeuchi 1995; Nonaka, Toyama & Konno 2000) in the context of the ...

  14. Factors affecting the impact of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice, student outcomes & efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ingvarson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines effects of structural and process features of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice and efficacy. It is based on four recent (2002-2003 studies undertaken through the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme, designed to enhance teacher quality. The total data set for the survey study includes 3,250 teachers who had participated in eighty individual professional development1 activities within these studies. Teachers were surveyed at least three months after participating in an activity, which provided them with the opportunity to gauge the impact of programs on their practice. To investigate factors affecting impact, a theoretical model was developed based on recent research into the characteristics of effective professional development and tested using blockwise regression analysis. The model included contextual factors (e.g., school support, structural features of programs (e.g. ,length, process features (e.g., emphasis on content; active learning; examination of student work; feedback; follow-up, a mediating variable (level of professional community generated, and four outcome measures (knowledge; practice; student learning and efficacy. Consistent significant direct effects were found across the four studies for the impact of content focus, active learning, and follow-up on knowledge and professional community. Feedback was rarely incorporated into program design. Impact on efficacy was strongly related to the perceived impact of activities on teachers' practice and student learning outcomes.

  15. Product Modeling Based on Knowledge Fusion in Virtual Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹湘军; 孙健; 何汉武

    2004-01-01

    Following researches on the knowledge-based product design, product modeling based on knowledge fusion is studied in a virtual environment. Knowledge fusion is the energy sources of product innovation designs. Because a knowledge representation method is the main content of knowledge fusion, production rule way, semantic network, predicate, object-oriented and case-based representations are discussed. Using agents with object-oriented method, the knowledge can be represented as a set. The product knowledge set is divided into two subset: text knowledge and knowledge of engineering graphics that is a different form. Manipulation of the subset knowledge and fusion method is described. The paper also describes a six-tuple function in an agent data structure. A virtual environment computation model is proposed, and a practical example given.

  16. Knowledge, Internal, and Environmental Factors on Environmental Care Behaviour among Aboriginal Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Norshariani Abd

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the contribution of predictor factors (i.e. knowledge about the environment as well as internal and environmental factors) on environmental care behaviour among aboriginal students. The knowledge about the environment that was investigated in this research includes environmental knowledge and environmental action knowledge.…

  17. Semantic techniques for enabling knowledge reuse in conceptual modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, J.; Liem, J.; Lozano, E.; Corcho, O.; Trna, M.; Gómez-Pérez, A.; Bredeweg, B.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual modelling tools allow users to construct formal representations of their conceptualisations. These models are typically developed in isolation, unrelated to other user models, thus losing the opportunity of incorporating knowledge from other existing models or ontologies that might enrich

  18. Food Safety Knowledge and Decision-making Process among College Students in Lanzhou, Western China

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Tao; Su Dan; Zhang Bing-Yun; Wang Ya

    2015-01-01

    In the study, a questionnaire survey containing three parts (general characteristics of the study sample, 15 food safety knowledge questions and 3 questions about decision-making process on food safety problems) was conducted among college students in Lanzhou City. The results indicated that food safety knowledge levels was closely related to engaged major and sex of college students. Food safety knowledge scores of students in food science major were higher than ones of liberal arts and engi...

  19. A Model for Teaching Electronic Commerce Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard C. Woodard

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of information technology in an ever-changing world at universities presents a challenge. Are courses taught as concepts, while ignoring hands-on courses, leaving the hands-on classes to the technical colleges or trade schools? Does this produce the best employees for industry or give students the knowledge and skills necessary to function in a high-tech world? At GeorgiaCollege & StateUniversity (GC&SU a model was developed that combines both concepts and practical hands-on skill to meet this challenge. Using this model, a program was developed that consists of classroom lecture of concepts as well as practical hands-on exercises for mastering the knowledge and developing the skills necessary to succeed in the high-tech world of electronic commerce. The students become productive day one of a new job assignment. This solves the problem of students having the "book knowledge" but not knowing how to apply what has been learned.

  20. Student Models of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Shambaugh, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Mental models are one way that humans represent knowledge (Markman, 1999). Instructional design (ID) is a conceptual model for developing instruction and typically includes analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (i.e., ADDIE model). ID, however, has been viewed differently by practicing teachers and instructional designers…

  1. Bayesian Student Modeling and the Problem of Parameter Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Eva; Agosta, John Mark; Perez de la Cruz, Jose Luis

    2001-01-01

    Discusses intelligent tutoring systems and the application of Bayesian networks to student modeling. Considers reasons for not using Bayesian networks, including the computational complexity of the algorithms and the difficulty of knowledge acquisition, and proposes an approach to simplify knowledge acquisition that applies causal independence to…

  2. A Framework for Understanding Physics Students' Computational Modeling Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon Robert

    With the growing push to include computational modeling in the physics classroom, we are faced with the need to better understand students' computational modeling practices. While existing research on programming comprehension explores how novices and experts generate programming algorithms, little of this discusses how domain content knowledge, and physics knowledge in particular, can influence students' programming practices. In an effort to better understand this issue, I have developed a framework for modeling these practices based on a resource stance towards student knowledge. A resource framework models knowledge as the activation of vast networks of elements called "resources." Much like neurons in the brain, resources that become active can trigger cascading events of activation throughout the broader network. This model emphasizes the connectivity between knowledge elements and provides a description of students' knowledge base. Together with resources resources, the concepts of "epistemic games" and "frames" provide a means for addressing the interaction between content knowledge and practices. Although this framework has generally been limited to describing conceptual and mathematical understanding, it also provides a means for addressing students' programming practices. In this dissertation, I will demonstrate this facet of a resource framework as well as fill in an important missing piece: a set of epistemic games that can describe students' computational modeling strategies. The development of this theoretical framework emerged from the analysis of video data of students generating computational models during the laboratory component of a Matter & Interactions: Modern Mechanics course. Student participants across two semesters were recorded as they worked in groups to fix pre-written computational models that were initially missing key lines of code. Analysis of this video data showed that the students' programming practices were highly influenced by

  3. KNOWLEDGE SCIENCES AND NANATSUDAKI: A NEW MODEL OF KNOWLEDGE CREATION PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej P.WIERZBICKI; Yoshiteru NAKAMORI

    2007-01-01

    The paper starts from a discussion of the concepts of knowledge management versus technology management,and the emergence of knowledge sciences.This is followed be a summary of recent results in the theory of knowledge creation.Most of them concern diverse spirals of creative interplay between rational (explicit) and intuitive or emotional (tacit) aspects of knowledge.Some of them concentrate on organizational (market or purpose-oriented) knowledge creation,other describe academic (research-oriented) knowledge creation.The problem addressed in this paper is how to integrate diverse spirals of knowledge creation into a prescriptive or exemplar model that would help to overcome the differences between organizational (market-oriented) and normal academic knowledge creation.As such prescriptive approach,the JAIST Nanatsudaki Model of knowledge creation is proposed.It consists of seven spirals,known from other studies,but integrated in a sequence resulting from the experience of authors in practical management of research activities.Not all of these spirals have to be fully utilized,depending on a particular application,but all of them relate to some essential aspects of either academic or organizational knowledge creation.The paper presents Nanatsudaki Model in detail with comments on consecutive spirals.The results of a survey of opinions about creativity conditions at JAIST indicate the importance of many spirals constituting the Nanatsudaki Model.Directions of further testing the Nanatsudaki Model are indicated.

  4. Student Perceived and Determined Knowledge of Biology Concepts in an Upper-Level Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Students who lack metacognitive skills can struggle with the learning process. To be effective learners, students should recognize what they know and what they do not know. This study examines the relationship between students’ perception of their knowledge and determined knowledge in an upper-level biology course utilizing a pre/posttest approach. Significant differences in students’ perception of their knowledge and their determined knowledge exist at the beginning (pretest) and end (posttest) of the course. Alignment between student perception and determined knowledge was significantly more accurate on the posttest compared with the pretest. Students whose determined knowledge was in the upper quartile had significantly better alignment between their perception and determined knowledge on the pre- and posttest than students in the lower quartile. No difference exists between how students perceived their knowledge between upper- and lower-quartile students. There was a significant difference in alignment of perception and determined knowledge between males and females on the posttest, with females being more accurate in their perception of knowledge. This study provides evidence of discrepancies that exist between what students perceive they know and what they actually know. PMID:26086662

  5. A comparison of medical and pharmacy students' knowledge and skills of pharmacology and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; de Wildt, Dick J; Custers, Eugene J F M; Ten Cate, Olle Th J; Hazen, Ankie C M; Jansen, Paul A F

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacotherapy might be improved if future pharmacists and physicians receive a joint educational programme in pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics. This study investigated whether there are differences in the pharmacology and pharmacotherapy knowledge and skills of pharmacy and medical students after their undergraduate training. Differences could serve as a starting point from which to develop joint interdisciplinary educational programmes for better prescribing. In a cross-sectional design, the knowledge and skills of advanced pharmacy and medical students were assessed, using a standardized test with three domains (basic pharmacology knowledge, clinical or applied pharmacology knowledge and pharmacotherapy skills) and eight subdomains (pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, interactions and side-effects, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification groups, prescribing, prescribing for special groups, drug information, regulations and laws, prescription writing). Four hundred and fifty-one medical and 151 pharmacy students were included between August 2010 and July 2012. The response rate was 81%. Pharmacy students had better knowledge of basic pharmacology than medical students (77.0% vs. 68.2% correct answers; P pharmacology (73.8% vs. 72.2%, P = 0.124, δ = 0.15). Pharmacy students have better knowledge of basic pharmacology, but not of the application of pharmacology knowledge, than medical students, whereas medical students are better at writing prescriptions. Professional differences in knowledge and skills therefore might well stem from their undergraduate education. Knowledge of these differences could be harnessed to develop a joint interdisciplinary education for both students and professionals. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Understanding indigenous knowledge: Bridging the knowledge gap through a knowledge creation model for agricultural development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda T. Lwoga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the management of agricultural indigenous knowledge (IK in developing countries, with a specific focus on Tanzania. It provides background details on IK and its importance for agricultural development. It introduces various knowledge management (KM concepts and discusses their application in managing IK in the developing world by placing Nonaka’s knowledge creation theory (Nonaka 1991; Nonaka & Takeuchi 1995; Nonaka, Toyama & Konno 2000 in the context of the local communities. Data from focus groups were used to triangulate with data from interviews in order to validate, confirm and corroborate quantitative results with qualitative findings. The study findings showed that knowledge creation theory can be used to manage IK in the local communities, however, adequate and appropriate resources need to be allocated for capturing and preserving IK before it disappears altogether. For sustainable agricultural development, the communities have to be placed within a knowledge-creating setting that continuously creates, distributes and shares knowledge within and beyond the communities’ boundaries and integrates it with new agricultural technologies, innovations and knowledge.

  7. Emotional Intelligence, Pain Knowledge, and Attitudes of Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Hamamura, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Research on nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes is limited. Although emotions play a role in pain assessment, no study has examined the associations between emotional intelligence and pain knowledge and the attitudes of nursing students. This cross-sectional quantitative study aimed to address this research gap by assessing the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students in Hong Kong and examining associations between emotional intelligence and the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students. A total of 104 postgraduate nursing students (45 Year 1 students and 59 Year 3 students) completed a questionnaire that included demographic information, the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS) and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP). Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, chi-square test and t-tests. The pain knowledge and attitudes of both Year 1 students (M = 20.40, SD = 3.78) and Year 3 students (M = 21.36, SD = 3.15) were suboptimal, t(102) = -1.41, p = .16. Year 1 students had higher emotional intelligence (M = 122.44, SD = 8.90) than Year 3 students (M = 117.71, SD = 14.34), t(98.35) = 2.07, p = .04. For Year 1 students, emotional intelligence was negatively correlated with pain knowledge and attitudes, but the correlation was not significant (r = -.15, p = .33). For Year 3 students, emotional intelligence, pain knowledge and attitudes were negatively correlated, but the correlation was significant (r = -.31, p = .02). These results suggest that nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes could be improved. Implications for nurse educators to enhance emotional intelligence and pain education for nursing students are discussed.

  8. [Knowledge about viral hepatitis in a sample of Brazilian students from Vale do Araguaia, Legal Amazonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Carlos K B; Savazzi, Kamirri; Honorio-França, Adenilda C; Ferrari, Graziele S L; França, Eduardo L

    2012-06-01

    Viral and non-viral hepatitis are of great concern among developing nations because of their pathogenicity and virulence, and also their wide spreading by contaminated blood, food or water. The objective of this work was to evaluate the knowledge about hepatitis of academic students from three life/health sciences courses and also students from the last year of high school To measure the students' knowledge on hepatitis an instrument containing 22 questions was applied. Surprinsingly, it was verified that 41.9% of students had poor knowledge of viral hepatitis. Among the high school students, 31.8% ignored that viral hepatitis are infectious and transmissible diseases. Considering hepatitis symptomatology, just 18% of high school students declared knowledge of the symptons, but none of those cited the ictericia. Among the academic students, 75.9% of nursing students had adequate knowledge of hepatitis, followed by pharmacy (51.3%), and biology students (18.2%). Nursing students had also higher scores of right answers regarding viral hepatitis and chronic disease. On contrary, biology and high school students had poor knowledge of that matter (37% and 44.5%, respectively). Less than 15% of nursing and pharmacy students did not know that viral hepatitis are sexually transmissible, whereas 78.6% of the 3rd year and 52.4% of the 4th year biology course ignored the sexual transmission of viral hepatitis. Still considering the same question, 54.5% of the high school students also ignored that viral hepatitis are sexually transmitted diseases. Important conclusions can be drawn from this study, since the higher hepatitis knowledge scores were found among nursing students, followed by pharmacy academics. However, biology students, which will serve as high school teachers, had poor and insufficient knowledge on hepatitis. This finding could explain the same poor disease knowledge among high school pupils.

  9. Assessment of nutrition knowledge and related aspects among first-year Kuwait University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabban, Farouk; Badr, Hanan E

    2011-01-01

    Assessing nutrition knowledge of populations assists in drawing strategies for education programs. Nutrition-related problems are common in Kuwait, thus data on nutrition knowledge are needed. This study involved administration of a questionnaire to 1,037 first-year Kuwait University students. The overall nutrition knowledge score was rated as fair, with deficiency in specific areas of knowledge. Students' dietary habits, attitudes, and interest in nutrition information were assessed as fair. Our findings will aid in building a nutrition knowledge database in Kuwait. A simplified course on aspects of healthy nutrition and lifestyle to all Kuwait University students is highly recommended.

  10. The Effectiveness of the GeoGebra Software: The Intermediary Role of Procedural Knowledge on Students' Conceptual Knowledge and Their Achievement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulnaidi, Hutkemri; Zamri, Sharifah Norul Akmar Syed

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effects of GeoGebra software on students' conceptual and procedural knowledge and the achievement of Form Two students in Mathematics particularly on the topic Function. In addition, this study determined the role of procedural knowledge as a mediator between conceptual knowledge and students' achievement.…

  11. Why Knowledge Modeling is Important for Business and for a Danish Terminology and Knowledge Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdman Thomsen, Hanne; Madsen, Bodil Nistrup

    2011-01-01

    Businesses and organizations, including public authorities, have a growing need for organizing and handling large amounts of data. In order to manage complex knowledge, knowledge must be modeled and structured. One very powerful method used for structuring knowledge is the use of ontologies....... Businesses and organizations need efficient tools for building domain-specific ontologies and systems for managing knowledge. Most medium-sized and large Danish businesses and organizations operate in a bilingual or multilingual environment, where knowledge is transferred and stored in Danish and/or English...... the foundation for a national terminology and knowledge bank. Furthermore, I will briefly introduce our plans for teaching within the field of knowledge modeling at Copenhagen Business School, CBS....

  12. Exploring the Relationship between Student Engagement and Common Business Knowledge: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Chris; Yates, Dan; Song, Joon

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which student engagement is associated with a traditional assessment of student knowledge. In this study, ETS Business Major Field Test (MFT) scores were compared to student's self-reported survey responses to specific questions on the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Areas of the NSSE survey such as…

  13. [The knowledge about "date rape drugs" among Polish students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuban', Agata; Ratecka, Anna; Brzyski, Piotr; Foryś, Zofia; Gomółka, Ewa; Ogonowska, Dorota

    2009-01-01

    The Main Department of Police in Poland notes about 2000 rapes a year. Some of the crimes are performed with "Date Rape Drugs". The term means substances helping comitting a rape such as GHB (gamma hydroxybutyric acid), ketamine, flunitrazepam and other benzodiazepines derivatives, MDMA ("ecstasy"), marihuana, amphetamine. The substances are often joined with alcohol. The victims are usually young women, and not all the cases are recorded by the police or physicians, because the victims often do not remember details of the event. The toxicological analysis of blood or urine would be helpful to explain the circumstances of the case and to prove using "Date Rape Drug". The samples for toxicological determinations should be collected as soon as possible (24 to 72 hours after admission). Preventing violence with "Date Rape Drugs" include wide education by media, police, teachers and parents. The purpose of the research was to check the level of knowledge about "Date Rape Drugs". The consciousness of risk behavior when the kind of substances is used and the ways of preventing the risk of being a sexual victim were checked. Material for the research were the results of questionnaire prepared by The Department of Medicine Sociology Collegium Medicum Jagiellonian University in Krakow, carried out on 740 students. Most of respondents (77%) were women. The age of respondents was between 19-36 years (mean 21.41; SD - 1.29). The results of the research showed, that respondents didn't have completed knowledge about "Date Rape Drugs". They did not know the ways of recognizing and preventing the risk of being given this kind of substances. The main source of information about "Date Rape Drugs" were internet and colleagues. There is a need to start education about "Date Rape Drugs" by serious institutions such as the police and schools in Poland. This is the best way to prevent young people against a risk of being given "Date Rape Drugs" and being a victim of sexual crimes.

  14. KNOWLEDGE LEVEL OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Camargo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergency contraception is a hormonal measure adopted to prevent undesired pregnancy after unprotected sexual relation or when it occurs a flaw in the conventional method. The method is inserted in the policy of Sexual and Reproductive Rightsof Brazilian Health Ministry since 1996 with the purpose of preventing undesired pregnancy and consequently reducing the illegal abortion rate and maternal mortality. This study has as objective to seek the degree of knowledge of women, female health care college students of Centro Universitário Padre Anchieta, Jundiaí-SP, who make use of this contraceptive method. To perform the survey a questionnaire was elaborated and approved by the Human Ethics Committee, number 30407014.9.0000.5386. A survey of 11 closed questions and 3 open questions were applied to the volunteers after they had signed the TCLE. Sixty- five (65 women ranging from 18 to 35 years old were interviewed, of those 76,92% have active sexual life and 33,85% are married. The most cited contraceptive method was the hormonal contraceptive (46.15% and 43.08% have used emergency contraceptive. Among the respondents 49.23 % said they did not know the side effects of the EC. The results allowed us to evaluate that this method of contraception is not used by fully satisfactory way with these students that will be future health professionals, this is a worrying fact because many do not know how to use in yourself, which may reflect in the information provided to their future patients.

  15. BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING: A FOUNDATION FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Bosilj-Vukšić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management (KM is increasingly recognised as a strategic practice of knowledge-intensive companies, becoming an integral part of an organisation's strategy to improve business performance. This paper provides an overview of business process modelling applications and analyses the relationship between business process modelling and knowledge management projects. It presents the case study of Croatian leading banks and the insurance company, discussing its practical experience in conducting business process modelling projects and investigating the opportunity for integrating business process repository and organisational knowledge as the foundation for knowledge management system development.

  16. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  17. HIV/AIDS Knowledge Scores and Perceptions of Risk Among African American Students Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Madeline Y.; Hardnett, Felicia P.; Wright, Pierre; Wahi, Sagina; Pathak, Sonal; Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Objective African American young adults are disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic and often unaware of their personal risk for HIV. Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) enroll 25% of college-educated African American young adults and can play an important role in HIV prevention. We examined HIV/AIDS knowledge of students at HBCUs to inform and strengthen our HIV prevention efforts at HBCUs. Methods African American undergraduate HBCU students completed online surveys assessing HIV/AIDS knowledge and behaviors, and we analyzed data to assess their knowledge and behaviors. Results A total of 1,051 of 1,230 surveys completed (85.4%) were analyzable. Eighty-two percent of students had average/high HIV knowledge scores. Seventy-nine percent of students surveyed perceived themselves to be at low risk for HIV infection; 64% of those who had at least two or more sex partners had not used a condom at last sex encounter. In the final model, significant independent effects were identified for average/high knowledge of HIV risk, including agreeing with assessing a potential partner's HIV risk by all of the five actions listed (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7, 4.3) and never using a needle to inject drugs (AOR=5.6, 95% CI 3.2, 9.7). Conclusions Educating students about effectively assessing sex partner risk will improve HIV knowledge and prevention efforts at HBCUs. PMID:21886325

  18. Sports Nutrition Knowledge among Mid-Major Division I University Student-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Andrews

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletes have goals to optimize performance and to maintain healthy body composition. Sports nutrition is a component of training programs often overlooked by student-athletes and their coaches. The purpose of this study was to examine student-athletes’ sports nutrition knowledge across sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Participants included 123 mid-major Division I university student-athletes (47 females and 76 males from baseball, softball, men’s soccer, track and field, and tennis. The student-athletes completed a survey questionnaire to determine adequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean ≥ 75%. The overall mean sports nutrition knowledge score for the student-athletes was 56.9% which was considered inadequate sports nutrition knowledge (mean < 75%. Only 12 student-athletes achieved adequate sports nutrition knowledge score of 75% or higher. There were no differences by sex, class level, team, and completion of prior nutrition coursework. Student-athletes’ inadequate sports nutrition knowledge may place them at nutrition risk, lead to impaired performance, and affect their lean body mass and energy levels. Athletics personnel should not assume student-athletes have adequate sports nutrition knowledge. Athletic departments may make available a board certified Sports Dietitian or Registered Dietitian and offer classroom or online courses facilitating student-athletes to optimize nutrition knowledge and behaviors.

  19. Assessment of weight status, dietary habits and beliefs, physical activity, and nutritional knowledge among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Najat; Wang, Daniel; Rapley, Melyssa; Dey, Rajarshi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess weight status, dietary habits, physical activity, dietary beliefs, and nutrition knowledge among a sample of students from Central Michigan University. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a sample of undergraduate students in Fall 2011 and Spring 2012 at Central Michigan University. Participating students completed an online questionnaire that included questions related to their eating habits, physical activity and lifestyle, dietary beliefs, and nutritional knowledge. Weight, height, and waist circumference were measured. Percentage body fat and visceral fat score were determined using a Tanita body composition analyser (SC-331S). Outcomes of this study indicated that 78% of female students were within the healthy weight range compared to 52% of male students. Visceral body fat and waist circumference scores were higher in males than in females. Most students showed 'satisfactory' dietary habits. Almost half of the students reported drinking two glasses of milk and consuming two cups of fruits and vegetables daily. Physical activity and lifestyle score indicated that most of the students were not physically active. Only 7% of students reported having a very active lifestyle, and 4% had quite good nutritional knowledge. The majority of students, particularly females, were within the healthy body weight range. Students' dietary habits were satisfactory. However, physical activity, students' knowledge of healthy and unhealthy diet habits, and nutritional knowledge needed improvement. Developing gender-specific programmes for promoting healthy lifestyle behaviours among students is recommended. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  20. High School Teachers and Students Knowledge and Views about Climate Change, a Nice NASA Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, R. E.; Lambert, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    One factor for some Americans being confused about climate change is their lack of understanding its underlying science concepts (Somerville & Hassol, 2011). In spite of this, climate change has been under-emphasized in school curricula (Bardsley & Bardsley, 2007). This is an important challenge for science educators, especially given the increasing public awareness of climate change impacts in their everyday lives (NCADAC, 2013).One way to address this challenge is to involve teachers in professional learning projects with the expectation that their enhanced content and pedagogical knowledge about climate change will transfer into more effective instruction resulting in increased student learning. For teacher educators, this translates into providing vibrant professional learning activities that energize and engage science teachers to develop interesting lessons that stimulate their students to learn important science concepts and develop positive attitudes to science. This study examined content knowledge and views about climate change of 33 high school science teachers and their1050 students who participated in lessons developed in a NASA-funded professional learning project. The teachers participated in a seven-day climate change summer institute and received in-classroom follow-up support throughout the school year. Teacher data sources included a background survey (undergraduate majors, number of years teaching science), science teaching self-efficacy (STEBI-A) scores, Climate Science Inventory of Knowledge (CSIK), and Six-America's Views on Climate Change. Student data included journal entries, and pre-post measures using the CSIK and Six-Americas instruments. T-tests and ANOVA showed that both students and their teachers increased in climate science knowledge. Teachers' views about climate change were more aligned to climate scientists' views. Teachers also increased in their science teaching self-efficacy and those with higher self-efficacy demonstrated

  1. SYSTEMS METHODOLOGY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiteru NAKAMORI

    2003-01-01

    This paper first introduces a new discipline knowledge science and the role of systems science inits development. Then, after the discussion on current trend in systems science, the paper proposes anew systems methodology for knowledge management and creation. Finally, the paper discussesmathematical modeling techniques to represent and manage human knowledge that is essentiallyvague and context-dependent.

  2. Education Knowledge System Combination Model Based on the Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lei; LI Dehua; LI Xiaojian; WU Chunxiang

    2007-01-01

    Resources are the base and core of education information, but current web education resources have no structure and it is still difficult to reuse them and make them can be self assembled and developed continually. According to the knowledge structure of course and text, the relation among knowledge points, knowledge units from three levels of media material, we can build education resource components, and build TKCM (Teaching Knowledge Combination Model) based on resource components. Builders can build and assemble knowledge system structure and make knowledge units can be self assembled, thus we can develop and consummate them continually. Users can make knowledge units can be self assembled and renewed, and build education knowledge system to satisfy users' demand under the form of education knowledge system.

  3. Knowledge about Hepatitis B and Predictors of Hepatitis B Vaccination among Vietnamese American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Huang, Chih-Hsun; Yi, Jenny K.

    2008-01-01

    Asian American college students are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV). Participants and Methods: Vietnamese American students completed a questionnaire assessing HBV knowledge and attitudes. The authors performed statistical analyses to examine the relationship between HBV knowledge and participant characteristics. They also performed…

  4. High School and University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology: A Turkish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Prokop, Pavol; Ozel, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Biotechnology has a considerable importance in Turkish biology curriculum. This study was designed to explore or indicate Turkish high school and university students' knowledge and attitudes toward biotechnology. A total number of 352 high school and 276 university students were invited to the study. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ)…

  5. Health-Related Fitness Knowledge and Physical Activity of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela; Hannon, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if health-related fitness (HRF) knowledge is related to self-reported physical activity (PA) of high school students. Students (N=165) enrolled in physical education from two schools in the Southwestern U.S participated. A 100-point HRF knowledge test was assembled, focusing on the HRF concepts of…

  6. Dynamic Knowledge for Students in Classrooms--It's Self-Inspection Time for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Jerald

    This paper advances the thesis that high level thinking in classrooms happens when students become conscious of experience and knowledge realities and decide to pursue them flexibly and creatively. The specific research focuses on the author's conviction that effective stimulators of student reflection will accommodate knowledge encounters that…

  7. HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among College Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Chen; Hu, Jie; Efird, Jimmy Thomas; Yu, Liping; Su, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes, sources of HIV information and behaviours related to HIV, and to explore the difference in the HIV knowledge and attitudes between genders and school years among college students in China. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional. Setting: 475 college students from two universities in China. Method: Data…

  8. Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Todd; Swanson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of "Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes" is to more clearly articulate the student assessment knowledge, skills and attributes expected under the Teaching Quality Standard Ministerial Order of applicants for Alberta interim professional teacher certification. The…

  9. Building Word Knowledge: Opportunities for Direct Vocabulary Instruction in General Education for Students with Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzek, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Direct vocabulary instruction is 1 critical component of reading instruction. Although most students in the elementary grades need to continue building their vocabulary knowledge, students with reading difficulties are at the greatest risk of falling further behind each year in vocabulary and concept knowledge without effective instruction. This…

  10. HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among College Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Chen; Hu, Jie; Efird, Jimmy Thomas; Yu, Liping; Su, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes, sources of HIV information and behaviours related to HIV, and to explore the difference in the HIV knowledge and attitudes between genders and school years among college students in China. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional. Setting: 475 college students from two universities in China. Method: Data…

  11. Change in Knowledge and Attitudes among Students in an Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Non-parent college students enrolled in a lifespan developmental psychology course were assessed at two time points (beginning of the semester and shortly after midterm) on knowledge and attitudes that would likely to be useful for the transition to parenthood. Students reported perceived change in knowledge and attitudes, and repeated measures…

  12. A New Student Performance Analysing System Using Knowledge Discovery in Higher Educational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruler, Huseyin; Istanbullu, Ayhan; Karahasan, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge discovery is a wide ranged process including data mining, which is used to find out meaningful and useful patterns in large amounts of data. In order to explore the factors having impact on the success of university students, knowledge discovery software, called MUSKUP, has been developed and tested on student data. In this system a…

  13. The Relation between Prior Knowledge and Students' Collaborative Discovery Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijlers, Hannie; de Jong, Ton

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigate how prior knowledge influences knowledge development during collaborative discovery learning. Fifteen dyads of students (pre-university education, 15-16 years old) worked on a discovery learning task in the physics field of kinematics. The (face-to-face) communication between students was recorded and the interaction…

  14. Knowledge about Hepatitis B and Predictors of Hepatitis B Vaccination among Vietnamese American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Huang, Chih-Hsun; Yi, Jenny K.

    2008-01-01

    Asian American college students are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV). Participants and Methods: Vietnamese American students completed a questionnaire assessing HBV knowledge and attitudes. The authors performed statistical analyses to examine the relationship between HBV knowledge and participant characteristics. They also performed…

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  16. Changes in College Student Drinking and Alcohol Knowledge: A Decade of Progress, 1981-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Broughton, Elizabeth A.

    1994-01-01

    Compared drinking patterns and level of alcohol knowledge in two samples of college students who visited Daytona Beach, Florida, during their spring breaks in 1981 and 1991 (n=3,368). Found significant reductions between 1981 and 1991 in number of students who were drinkers and amount they consumed. Significant increases in alcohol knowledge were…

  17. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge: Analysis and Representation of Student Conceptions Concerning Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Mariana G.

    Problems concerning conceptual change from existing knowledge (accumulated from everyday experiences or earlier teaching) to new scientific knowledge concerning natural phenomena are fundamentally the same for Western and non-Western students. However, difficulties experienced by non-Western students are magnified by factors such as their cultural…

  18. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Children with Special Needs by Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousouli, Maria; Kokaridas, Dimitrios; Angelopoulou-Sakadami, Nicoletta; Aristotelous, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the knowledge and attitudes of physical education undergraduate students towards children with special needs. A questionnaire of seven questions was submitted to 140 physical education students. Questions concerned the knowledge about the different kinds of disability, the acceptance of children with…

  19. Knowledge of Normal and Pathological Memory Aging in College Students, Social Workers, and Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Allen, Priscilla D.; Jackson, Erin M.; Hawley, Karri S.; Brigman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) measures laypersons' knowledge of normal memory changes and pathological memory deficits in adulthood. In Experiment 1, undergraduate and graduate social work students and social work practitioners completed the KMAQ. Social workers and graduate students were more accurate on the pathological than…

  20. Breast Cancer Screening Knowledge and Skills of Students upon Entering and Exiting a Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, P. Elizabeth; Lane, Dorothy S.

    1998-01-01

    A study compared the breast cancer screening knowledge of 27 medical students in first and fourth years. In the fourth year additional questions were asked about training and training needs. Although students performed significantly better on knowledge-based questions in the fourth year, considerable room for improvement remained. Most students…

  1. Geographic Affiliation and Sense of Place: Influences on Incoming Online Students' Geological and Meteorological Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrall, Jeanne Lambert; Clary, Renee; Watson, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Knowing an individual's geographic affiliation may be useful in evaluating a student's previous knowledge. To test this hypothesis, students in an online master's program were given presurveys to evaluate their previous knowledge in meteorology and geology, as well as geological and meteorological sense-of-place surveys.

  2. Participation and Common Knowledge in a Case Study of Student Blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Richard; Larusson, Johann Ari

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between participation and the emergence of common knowledge is the subject matter of this paper. A case study of a single class provides the focal point of analysis. During the semester the students participated in a blogging activity. As a result of their participation, the students create and distribute knowledge. The online…

  3. The Knowledge-Based Economy and the Triple Helix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01

    1. Introduction - the metaphor of a "knowledge-based economy"; 2. The Triple Helix as a model of the knowledge-based economy; 3. Knowledge as a social coordination mechanism; 4. Neo-evolutionary dynamics in a Triple Helix of coordination mechanism; 5. The operation of the knowledge base; 6. The restructuring of knowledge production in a KBE; 7. The KBE and the systems-of-innovation approach; 8. The KBE and neo-evolutionary theories of innovation; 8.1 The construction of the evolving unit; 8.2 User-producer relations in systems of innovation; 8.3 'Mode-2' and the production of scientific knowledge; 8.4 A Triple Helix model of innovations; 9. Empirical studies and simulations using the TH model; 10. The KBE and the measurement; 10.1 The communication of meaning and information; 10.2 The expectation of social structure; 10.3 Configurations in a knowledge-based economy

  4. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  5. Development of a Model for Maaging Organizational Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, B.; Smith, K.

    1999-05-05

    We created three models to represent a comprehensive knowledge model: · Stages of Knowledge Management Model (Forrester) · Expanded Life-Cycle Information Management Model · Organizational Knowledge Management Model. In building a series of models, we started with an attempt to create a graphical model that illustrates the ideas outlined in the Forrester article (Leadership Strategies, Vol. 3, No. 2, November/December 1997). We then expanded and detailed a life-cycle model. Neither of these effectively reflected how to manage the complexities involved in weaving local, enterprise, and global information into an easily navigated resource for end users. We finally began to synthesize these ideas into an Organizational Knowledge Management Model. This model acknowledges the relevance of life-cycle management for different granularities of information collections and places it in the context of the integrating infrastructure needed to assist end users.

  6. Drawing on student knowledge in human anatomy and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Tara Nicole

    Prior to instruction, students may have developed alternative conceptions about the mechanics behind human physiology. To help students re-shape these ideas into correct reasoning, the faulty characteristics reinforcing the alternative conceptions need to made explicit. This study used student-generated drawings to expose alternative conceptions Human Anatomy and Physiology students had prior to instruction on neuron physiology. Specifically, we investigated how students thought about neuron communication across a synapse (n=355) and how neuron activity can be modified (n=311). When asked to depict basic communication between two neurons, at least 80% of students demonstrated incorrect ideas about synaptic transmission. When targeting spatial and temporal summation, only eleven students (3.5%) were able to accurately depict at least one form of summation. In response to both drawing questions, student drawings revealed multiple alternative conceptions that resulted in a deeper analysis and characterization of the wide variation of student ideas.

  7. College students' knowledge of risk and screening recommendations for breast, cervical, and testicular cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Christine Makosky

    2007-01-01

    There is a gap in the literature regarding the knowledge of college students about breast, cervical, and testicular cancers. I surveyed 3362 college students were surveyed about their knowledge of risk factors and screening recommendations for these 3 cancers during the 2002-2003 school year at a large public university in the Northeast. Students knew approximately 50% of the information about risk factors and screening recommendations for these 3 cancers. CONCLUSIONS. Based on these results, college students appear to have limited knowledge about breast, cervical, and testicular cancers and need education about them.

  8. Medical student intrauterine device knowledge and attitudes: an assessment of clerkship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Deborah; Tang, Jennifer; Maurer, Rie; Janiak, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    Studies demonstrate that many clinician populations have poor knowledge of and harbor negative attitudes towards intrauterine devices (IUDs). We set out to assess the impact of the clinical clerkship in obstetrics and gynecology on medical student IUD knowledge and attitudes. In this prospective cohort study, students at seven diverse US medical schools were surveyed at the start and completion of their obstetrics and gynecology clinical clerkships regarding IUD exposure, knowledge and attitudes. Subject responses were compared pre- and postclerkship. One hundred six students returned completed paired surveys (response rate 82%). The preclerkship mean knowledge percent correct (54%, SD 17%) increased significantly at postclerkship assessment (72%, SD 18%) (p<.0001). The mean attitudes score also increased significantly from pre- (34%, SD 31%) to postclerkship (59%, SD 26%) (p<.0001). US medical student IUD knowledge and attitudes are significantly improved through the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. However, significant gaps in knowledge persist postclerkship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterizing and Representing Student's Conceptual Knowledge of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Fortus, David

    2012-01-01

    Chemical bonding knowledge is fundamental and essential to the understanding of almost every topic in chemistry, but it is very difficult to learn. While many studies have characterized some of the central elements of knowledge of this topic, these elements of knowledge have not been systematically organized. We describe the development and…

  10. Analysis of first-year college chemistry students' knowledge about and usage of text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Thomas Crawford

    This study analyzed the usage of textbooks by 58 students in a first-year college chemistry course, the students' approaches to studying, and their knowledge about science reading. Student success in the course was measured by the final exam score. To analyze students' textbook usage the Science Reading Strategy Survey (SRSS) was developed. The SRSS allowed students' usage of the textbook to be categorized into one of three groups: methodical/linear use, efficient use, and making connections/deep use. Seventy-one percent of chemistry students were categorized as using the textbook in a deep/making connections manner, while 15% reported text usage that was categorized as efficient and 11% reported a methodical/linear approach to text use. The students' approaches to studying were determined by using the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ). The internal structure of the SPQ was confirmed by factor analysis. Forty-three percent of students adopted an achieving approach and 41% approached their studies with a surface approach. Only 7.1% of students had a deep approach to learning. The disconnect between approach (SPQ) and reading strategies (SRSS) could be due to the students finding their general chemistry textbook a valuable resource for getting through a difficult subject they are not strongly motivated to learn. Student's knowledge about reading science text was measured by the Index of Science Reading Awareness (ISRA). This was the first time this instrument had been used with college students. The ISRA was analyzed and the instrument was used to measure students' knowledge about science reading strategies and their general knowledge about science reading and text. The majority, 62%, of first-year chemistry students possess comprehensive knowledge about science reading strategies and science text. The remainder of students had surface knowledge and no students in this study were found to have an incomplete knowledge. There was no correlation between the student

  11. Data Mining and Knowledge Management: A System Analysis for Establishing a Tiered Knowledge Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Willett, Terrence

    This paper discusses data mining--an end-to-end (ETE) data analysis tool that is used by researchers in higher education. It also relates data mining and other software programs to a brand new concept called "Knowledge Management." The paper culminates in the Tier Knowledge Management Model (TKMM), which seeks to provide a stable…

  12. Assessment of college students' awareness and knowledge about conditions relevant to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Najat; Brown, Carrie; Rapley, Melyssa; Chung, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome among young adults, little is known about the awareness level of college students about this condition. The purpose of this study was to assess students' level of awareness and knowledge about conditions relevant to metabolic syndrome (MetS). A self-reported online questionnaire was administered to 243 students attending Central Michigan University. Questions were divided into seven conditions: diabetes, adiposity, hypertension, high serum cholesterol, arteriosclerosis, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Students' responses were scored and interpreted as follows: poor knowledge if ≤50% of students answered the question correctly; fair knowledge if between 51-80% of students answered the question correctly; and good knowledge if between 81-100% of students answered the question correctly. Anthropometric measurements including height, weight, waist circumference, percentage body fat, and visceral fat score were measured. Fisher's exact test was used to test the differences in students' responses. A p value difference. More than 80% of students correctly identified symptoms and complications of diabetes, hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke, and 92% identified adiposity as a risk factor for heart disease. There were few false beliefs held by students on questionnaire items. For example, 58% of male students falsely believed that individuals with diabetes may only eat special kinds of sweets compared to 39% of females (p Science major, and year in school were found to be positively associated with more knowledge. The findings in this study suggest that students' knowledge about conditions relevant to metabolic syndrome can be improved. In this essence, raising awareness about MetS based on students' pre-existing knowledge is essential to enhance students' wellness.

  13. Deepening Understanding of Prior Knowledge: What Diverse First-Generation College Students in the U.S. Can Teach Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Montoya, Milagros

    2017-01-01

    Educational research indicates that teachers revealing and utilizing students' prior knowledge supports students' academic learning. Yet, the variation in students' prior knowledge is not fully known. To better understand students' prior knowledge, I drew on sociocultural learning theories to examine racially and ethnically diverse college…

  14. Gender differences in oral health knowledge and behavior of the health science college students in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Jassem M; Honkala, Sisko

    2007-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal diseases have been declining in most industrialized countries, but this positive trend has not been seen in the Middle East. This study aimed to determine oral health knowledge and behavior of the students at the Health Sciences College in Kuwait as well as possible associated factors. This study was first conducted at the college of the male students (n = 153) during the autumn semester in 2001. A similar questionnaire study was then conducted at the college of the female students (n = 547) during the spring semester in 2002. The samples were merged for this study, for a total sample of 700 students. The response rate was 84% (n = 128) among the male students and 73% (n = 400) among the female students. Most of the students had visited a dentist during the past year, and quite a high proportion was seen for an examination or prevention. Female students reported twice-a-day tooth-brushing frequency much more often than did male students. They also used fluoride toothpaste more often than male students. Oral health knowledge (as a summary variable) was statistically significantly higher among the female students than among the male students. It was also strongly associated with the older age among the female students. The knowledge and oral health behavior of the Health Sciences College students in Kuwait, especially among the male students, seems to be poor and calls for an urgent improvement of health education programs.

  15. Pharmacology and biochemistry undergraduate students'concern for a healthy diet and nutrition knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardes Spexoto, Maria Claudia [UNESP; Ferin, Giovana Garcia [UNESP; Duarte Bonini Campos, Juliana Alvares [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the concern for a healthy diet and the nutrition knowledge of undergraduate students of a pharmacology and biochemistry program and their associations with the variables of interest.Methods: This cross-sectional study administered the Nutrition Knowledge Scale and the How is your diet? questionnaire to 381 students. The associations between concern for a healthy diet and nutrition knowledge and between these two factors and the demographic variables were measured by the...

  16. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Beliefs among College Students in the USA and China

    OpenAIRE

    M. Allison Ford; Martha Bass; Yan Zhao; Jin-Bing Bai; Yue Zhao

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated differences in osteoporosis knowledge, self-efficacy, and health beliefs among Chinese and American college students. Information obtained will be used in developing osteoporosis prevention programs for younger adults. Methods. Chinese ( = 4 0 9 ) and US ( = 4 0 8 ) college students completed the Osteoporosis Health Belief, Self-Efficacy, and Knowledge Tests. Results. Differences were seen in osteoporosis knowledge ( u s = 1 4 . 5 2 , C h i n e s e = 1 1 . 8 2 ...

  17. Strategy Knowledge and Perceived Strategy Use: Singaporean Students' Awareness of Listening and Speaking Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donglan; Goh, Christine C. M.

    2006-01-01

    The past three decades have seen a growing body of research into language learner metacognitive knowledge, strategy use, and the relationship between them. However, the correlation between knowledge about strategies and strategy use in ESL listening and speaking has not been explored. This study investigates 278 Singaporean students' knowledge and…

  18. Exploring the Malaysian Rural School Teachers' Professional Local Knowledge in Enhancing Students' Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Hazri; Arbaa, Rohani; Ahmad, Mohamad Zohir

    2017-01-01

    This paper discussed a qualitative research findings on the case of Malaysian teachers employed their professional local knowledge for enhancing students' thinking skills in classroom practices. In this paper, a teacher's professional local knowledge is viewed as a teacher's professional knowledge and skills developed through the combination of…

  19. The Development of Teacher Knowledge in Support of Student Mathematical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavit, David; Lesseig, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Applying the Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching framework, we discuss the components of teacher knowledge that might be useful in supporting mathematical inquiry, and examine ways in which we strive to develop this knowledge within a middle grades mathematics program for undergraduate students who are prospective teachers. Using sample activities…

  20. Exploring Students' Knowledge Construction Strategies in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Discussions Using Sequential Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukor, N.B.A.; Tasir, Z.; Meijden, H.A.T. van der; Harun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Online collaborative learning allows discussion to occur at greater depth where knowledge can be constructed remotely. However students were found to construct knowledge at low-level where they discussed by sharing and comparing opinions; those are inadequate for new knowledge creation. As such,

  1. Specialised Content Knowledge: Evidence of Pre-Service Teachers' Appraisal of Student Errors in Proportional Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnappan, Mohan; White, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    That the quality of teachers' knowledge has direct impact on students' engagement and learning outcomes in mathematics is now well established. But questions about the nature of this knowledge and how to characterise that knowledge are important for mathematics educators. In the present study, we examine a strand of "Specialised Content…

  2. The Knowledge About Drugs, Attitudes Towards Them And Drug Use Rates Of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, Dianne; Smart, Reginald G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of attitudes towards drugs, knowledge about them and the use of alcohol, tobacco, illicit and psychoactive drugs was conducted among 4,693 high school students. Knowledge level and permissive attitudes tended to increase with grade level. Knowledge scores also increased, but attitudes became less permissive with increasing academic…

  3. The Use of Metacognitive Knowledge in Essay Writing among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surat, Shahlan; Rahman, Saemah; Mahamod, Zamri; Kummin, Saadiah

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports part of a bigger project aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of metacognitive strategies on students' performance in essay writing. The aspects of metacognitive strategies considered in this study include the use of declarative knowledge, conditional knowledge, and procedural knowledge. The focus of this paper is on the use of…

  4. Knowledge Creation and Innovation in a Civil Engineering Course for the First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmisto, Alpo; Nokelainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the application of knowledge creation learning and innovation to higher education in construction. The objectives are to demonstrate the application of the course based on knowledge creation learning to mass teaching and to analyse whether knowledge creation learning improves student motivation and learning. The empirical…

  5. Useful and Dangerous Discourse: Deconstructing Racialized Knowledge about African-American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.; Brown, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from Michel Foucault's notion of "useful" and "dangerous" discourse coupled with the theory of racial knowledge, this article examines how two common counter-discourses about African-American students operate and create racial knowledge in education practice. By "counter-discourse", the authors refer to knowledge, theories, and histories…

  6. Didactic strategy for university students to develop competence in searching mathematic knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes de Oca, Nancy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is intended to describe a didactic strategy to favor the development of the competence for searching mathematics’ knowledge in university students. The strategy is based on a theoretical model explaining the relationships between the operating subsystems of the educative process, as well as the development of the referred competence in the learning process of math. Examples are included. The evaluation of the results was conducted by means of peer evaluation and a pedagogical experiment in the teaching of Probabilities and Statistics for engineers.

  7. A Sport Education Fitness Season's Impact on Students' Fitness Levels, Knowledge, and In-Class Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeffery Kurt; Hastie, Peter A; Wadsworth, Danielle D; Foote, Shelby; Brock, Sheri J; Hollett, Nikki

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a sport education season of fitness could provide students with recommended levels of in-class moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) while also increasing students' fitness knowledge and fitness achievement. One hundred and sixty-six 5th-grade students (76 boys, 90 girls) participated in a 20-lesson season called "CrossFit Challenge" during a 4-week period. The Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run, push-ups, and curl-ups tests of the FITNESSGRAM® were used to assess fitness at pretest and posttest, while fitness knowledge was assessed through a validated, grade-appropriate test of health-related fitness knowledge (HRF). Physical activity was measured with Actigraph GT3X triaxial accelerometers. Results indicated a significant time effect for all fitness tests and the knowledge test. Across the entire season, the students spent an average of 54.5% of lesson time engaged in MVPA, irrespective of the type of lesson (instruction, free practice, or competition). The results suggest that configuring the key principles of sport education within a unit of fitness is an efficient model for providing students with the opportunity to improve fitness skill and HRF knowledge while attaining recommended levels of MVPA.

  8. Knowledge and Experience of Medical Students with Male Urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    instruction in this technique to avoid devastating consequences of performing it poorly. ... Medical students in our medical school spend four weeks in urology unit. .... Preparation of short teaching video to be shown to all medical students.

  9. A Knowledge Representation Model for Video—Based Animation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    劳志强; 潘云鹤

    1998-01-01

    In this paper,a brief survey on knowledge-based animation techniques is given.Then a VideoStream-based Knowledge Representation Model(VSKRM)for Joint Objects is presented which includes the knowledge representation of :Graphic Object,Action and VideoStream.Next a general description of the UI framework of a system is given based on the VSKRM model.Finally,a conclusion is reached.

  10. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and quantitative analyses, this study revealed that those students with more extended and better-organized knowledge structures, as well as those who more frequently used higher-order information processing modes, were more oriented towards achieving a higher-level informal reasoning quality. The regression analyses further showed that the "richness" of the students' knowledge structures explained 25 % of the variation in their rebuttal construction, an important indicator of reasoning quality, indicating the significance of the role of students' sophisticated knowledge structure in SSI reasoning. Besides, this study also provides some initial evidence for the significant role of the "core" concept within one's knowledge structure in one's SSI reasoning. The findings in this study suggest that, in SSI-based instruction, science instructors should try to identify students' core concepts within their prior knowledge regarding the SSI, and then they should try to guide students to construct and structure relevant concepts or ideas regarding the SSI based on their core concepts. Thus, students could obtain extended and well-organized knowledge structures, which would then help them achieve better learning transfer in dealing with SSIs.

  11. Model Analysis Assessing the dynamics of student learning

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, L; Bao, Lei; Redish, Edward F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a method of modeling and analysis that permits the extraction and quantitative display of detailed information about the effects of instruction on a class's knowledge. The method relies on a congitive model that represents student thinking in terms of mental models. Students frequently fail to recognize relevant conditions that lead to appropriate uses of their models. As a result they can use multiple models inconsistently. Once the most common mental models have been determined by qualitative research, they can be mapping onto a multiple choice test. Model analysis permits the interpretation of such a situation. We illustrate the use of our method by analyzing results from the FCI.

  12. Environmental Knowledge and Behavioural Outcomes of Tourism Students in Australia: Towards Testing a Range of Mediation and Moderated Mediation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Johra Kayeser; Khan, Habib Zaman; Goh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines the environmental knowledge (EK) and behavioural outcomes of students studying ecotourism in Sydney, Australia. Three competing models were tested to examine the relationships between EK, participation intention (PI) in ecotourism programs, landscape likeability (LL) and social interactions (SI); and the study also tested the…

  13. Environmental Knowledge and Behavioural Outcomes of Tourism Students in Australia: Towards Testing a Range of Mediation and Moderated Mediation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Johra Kayeser; Khan, Habib Zaman; Goh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines the environmental knowledge (EK) and behavioural outcomes of students studying ecotourism in Sydney, Australia. Three competing models were tested to examine the relationships between EK, participation intention (PI) in ecotourism programs, landscape likeability (LL) and social interactions (SI); and the study also tested the…

  14. Exploring College Students' Cultural View from a Knowledge Creation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Guo-Tsai; Hong, Huang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate college students' cultural views. To this end, an exploratory study was implemented, and data mainly came from students' essay writing (via individual reflective activities) and focused group discussion (via collective reflective activities). The participants were 176 college students taking a…

  15. Using Students' Prior Knowledge to Teach Social Penetration Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chornet-Roses, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Bransford, Brown, and Cocking argue that acknowledging students' prior ideas and beliefs about a subject and incorporating them into the classroom enhances student learning. This article presents an activity which serves to hone three student learning outcomes: analysis of communication, inductive reasoning, and self-reflection. The goal of this…

  16. Mixed Method Study Examines Undergraduate Student Researchers’ Knowledge and Perceptions About Scholarly Communication Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Goertzen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Riehle, C. F., & Hensley, M. K. (2017. What do undergraduate students know about scholarly communication?: A mixed methods study. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 17(1, 145–178. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/pla.2017.0009 Abstract Objective – To examine undergraduate student researchers’ perception and understanding of scholarly communication practices and issues. Design – Mixed method study involving a survey and semi-structured interviews. Setting – Two major undergraduate universities in the Midwest region of the United States. Subjects – Undergraduate students who participated in or had completed undergraduate research experiences with faculty mentors. Method – The method was first approved by Institutional Review Board offices at both campuses involved in the study. Then, students received invitations to participate in a survey via email (Campus 1 = 221 students; Campus 2 = 345 students. Identical online surveys ran separately on each campus; both remained open for a period of three weeks. All respondents received a reminder email one week before the survey closed. Participants answered twelve questions related to demographics and scholarly communication practices. The survey examined knowledge and experience across five areas: the peer review process, author and publisher rights, publication and access models, impact of research, and data management. All students who completed the survey were entered in a drawing for a $50 Amazon card. The response rates were 34.8% (Campus 1 and 18.6% (Campus 2. Surveys on both campuses were administered using different software: campus 1 utilized Qualtrics survey software while campus 2 used an institution-specific survey software. Data sets were normed and merged later in the study to enable comparison and identify broad themes. Survey respondents were also invited to participate in a 15 to 20 minute follow-up interview and were compensated with a $20 Amazon gift card. The

  17. Online Knowledge-Based Model for Big Data Topic Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Taimoor; Durrani, Mehr; Khalid, Shehzad; Aziz, Furqan

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong machine learning (LML) models learn with experience maintaining a knowledge-base, without user intervention. Unlike traditional single-domain models they can easily scale up to explore big data. The existing LML models have high data dependency, consume more resources, and do not support streaming data. This paper proposes online LML model (OAMC) to support streaming data with reduced data dependency. With engineering the knowledge-base and introducing new knowledge features the learning pattern of the model is improved for data arriving in pieces. OAMC improves accuracy as topic coherence by 7% for streaming data while reducing the processing cost to half.

  18. Online Knowledge-Based Model for Big Data Topic Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Taimoor; Durrani, Mehr; Khalid, Shehzad; Aziz, Furqan

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong machine learning (LML) models learn with experience maintaining a knowledge-base, without user intervention. Unlike traditional single-domain models they can easily scale up to explore big data. The existing LML models have high data dependency, consume more resources, and do not support streaming data. This paper proposes online LML model (OAMC) to support streaming data with reduced data dependency. With engineering the knowledge-base and introducing new knowledge features the learning pattern of the model is improved for data arriving in pieces. OAMC improves accuracy as topic coherence by 7% for streaming data while reducing the processing cost to half. PMID:27195004

  19. Students (ages 6, 10, and 15 years in six countries knowledge of animals

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    Patricia Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the knowledge students (ages 6, 10, and 15 years have of animals from a cross-cultural perspective. Students from six countries (Brazil, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, and the United States of America were asked to free-list as many animals as possible and state where they had seen or learned about the animals. The results were analyzed and they indicate that 1 Students are aware of animals. 2 Students are more aware of mammals as examples of animals. 3 There is a globally shared folk biological knowledge of animals. 4 Students learn about animals during sociocultural interactions. The educational implications are discussed.

  20. Were Knowledge Management Abilities of University Students Enhanced after Creating Personal Blog-Based Portfolios?

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    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Tseng, Ju-Shih; Chen, To-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The effect of creating blog-based portfolios on knowledge management (KM) abilities among university students was examined in the present study. Participants included 43 students majoring in Multimedia and Game Science at a University in Taiwan. Students spent nine weeks creating their personal portfolios by using a blog. The "t"-test…

  1. Were Knowledge Management Abilities of University Students Enhanced after Creating Personal Blog-Based Portfolios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Tseng, Ju-Shih; Chen, To-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The effect of creating blog-based portfolios on knowledge management (KM) abilities among university students was examined in the present study. Participants included 43 students majoring in Multimedia and Game Science at a University in Taiwan. Students spent nine weeks creating their personal portfolios by using a blog. The "t"-test…

  2. The Relationship Between Nutritional Knowledge and Eating Habits of Selected College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patsy; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional knowledge and eating habits of college students. Data were collected from 1,930 college juniors and seniors on 69 college and university campuses in 25 states. The students were members of the national home economics honor society and non-home economics students, male…

  3. Doctoral Student Learning Patterns: Learning about Active Knowledge Creation or Passive Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral studies are about learning to create new knowledge and to become a researcher. Yet surprisingly little is known about the individual learning patterns of doctoral students. The study aims to explore learning patterns among natural science doctoral students. The participants included 19 doctoral students from a top-level natural science…

  4. Assessment of Professional Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures.

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    Bond, Mary Lou; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2001-01-01

    The Ethnic Attitude Scale and Transcultural Questionnaire were administered to 152 bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students, registered nurses in transition to BSN, and masters's students. All three groups had low knowledge about cultural groups. The only significant difference was BSN students' understanding of such concepts as…

  5. Higher Education and International Student Mobility in the Global Knowledge Economy: Revised and Updated Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruz, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    Students and scholars leaving their homes in search of education and knowledge is not a new phenomenon. An indispensable resource for understanding the international mobility of students, this book reveals how the global mobility of such students, scholars, programs, and institutions of higher education have evolved over time. Kemal Guruz explores…

  6. Assessment of Professional Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary Lou; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2001-01-01

    The Ethnic Attitude Scale and Transcultural Questionnaire were administered to 152 bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students, registered nurses in transition to BSN, and masters's students. All three groups had low knowledge about cultural groups. The only significant difference was BSN students' understanding of such concepts as…

  7. Knowledge Types Used by Eighth Grade Gifted Students While Solving Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Serdal; Yildiz, Avni; Güven, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine how primary school eighth grade (14 years old) gifted students use knowledge types while solving problems. In the context, the data were collected through clinical interviews conducted with three gifted students. The students' voice recordings during problem solving and the solutions they wrote on the paper formed the…

  8. The Effects of Explicit Teaching of Metastrategic Knowledge on Low- And High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Anat; Peled, Bracha

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of explicit teaching of metastrategic knowledge (MSK) on gains of low-achieving (LA) and high-achieving (HA) 5th grade students (N=41). Gains in reasoning scores of students from the Experimental group (compared to students from the control group) were obtained on the strategic and on the metastrategic level. Gains…

  9. Improving Reading Comprehension and Social Studies Knowledge among Middle School Students with Disabilities

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    Swanson, Elizabeth; Wanzek, Jeanne; Vaughn, Sharon; Roberts, Greg; Fall, Ana-Mari

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a content knowledge and reading comprehension treatment implemented by eighth-grade general education social studies teachers among students with disabilities included in the classes. Data on students with disabilities across 2 years of study were combined for the analysis presented here. Students in…

  10. Explaining Differences in Civic Knowledge: Multi-Level Regression Analysis of Student Data from 27 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wolfram

    Differences in student knowledge about democracy, institutions, and citizenship and students skills in interpreting political communication were studied through multilevel regression analysis of results from the second International Education Association (IEA) Study. This study provides data on 14-year-old students from 28 countries in Europe,…

  11. Higher Education and International Student Mobility in the Global Knowledge Economy: Revised and Updated Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruz, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    Students and scholars leaving their homes in search of education and knowledge is not a new phenomenon. An indispensable resource for understanding the international mobility of students, this book reveals how the global mobility of such students, scholars, programs, and institutions of higher education have evolved over time. Kemal Guruz explores…

  12. Elementary Students' Retention of Environmental Science Knowledge: Connected Science Instruction versus Direct Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar; DeFranco, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 3rd-grade elementary students' gain and retention of science vocabulary over time in two different classes--"connected science instruction" versus "direct instruction." Data analysis yielded that students who received connected science instruction showed less gain in science knowledge in the short term compared to students who…

  13. Soy Protein and Coronary Heart Disease: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Theresa A.; Bakhiet, Raga M.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed how knowledge of soy protein and its relationship to heart disease influences the attitudes and practices of college students. Results showed that family members, schools, and newspapers were the primary sources of students' nutritional information. One fourth of the participating students answered at least four nutrition…

  14. Students' Pre-Knowledge as a Guideline in the Teaching of Introductory Thermal Physics at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Risto; Rasanen, Esa; Asikainen, Mervi; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2009-01-01

    This study concentrates on analysing university students' pre-knowledge of thermal physics. The students' understanding of the basic concepts and of the adiabatic compression of an ideal gas was studied at the start of an introductory level course. A total of 48 students participated in a paper-and-pencil test, and analysis of the responses…

  15. The Influence of Teachers' Knowledge on Student Learning in Middle School Physical Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Coyle, Harold P.; Cook-Smith, Nancy; Miller, Jaimie L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between teacher knowledge and student learning for 9,556 students of 181 middle school physical science teachers. Assessment instruments based on the National Science Education Standards with 20 items in common were administered several times during the school year to both students and their teachers. For items…

  16. Scientific and Cultural Knowledge in Intercultural Science Education: Student Perceptions of Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Mzamose; Longnecker, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    There is no consensus in the science education research community on the meanings and representations of western science and indigenous knowledge or the relationships between them. How students interpret these relationships and their perceptions of any connections has rarely been studied. This study reports student perceptions of the meaning and relationship between scientific and cultural knowledge. Personal meaning maps adapted for small groups were conducted in seven culturally diverse schools, school years 7-9 (with students aged 12-15 years) ( n = 190), with six schools in Western Australia and one school in Malawi, Africa. Of the six Australian school groups, two comprised Australian Aboriginal students in an after-school homework programme and the other four schools had a multicultural mix of students. Students in this study identified connections between scientific and cultural knowledge and constructed connections from particular thematic areas—mainly factual content knowledge as opposed to ideas related to values, attitudes, beliefs and identity. Australian Aboriginal students made fewer connections between the two knowledge domains than Malawian students whose previous science teacher had made explicit connections in her science class. Examples from Aboriginal culture were the most dominant illustrations of cultural knowledge in Australian schools, even in school groups with students from other cultures. In light of our findings, we discuss the construction of common ground between scientific knowledge and cultural knowledge and the role of teachers as cultural brokers and travel agents. We conclude with recommendations on creating learning environments that embrace different cultural knowledges and that promote explicit and enquiring discussions of values, attitudes, beliefs and identity associated with both knowledge domains.

  17. Model Based Fuzzy Expert System for Measuring Organization Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang Taghizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model based on fuzzy set theory for determining the score of knowledge management in organization. The introduced model has five stages. In the first stage, input and output variable of model are characterized by available theories. Inputs are as follows: knowledge acquisition, knowledge storage, knowledge creation, knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer. The output is as follow score of knowledge management in organization. In the second stage, the input and output are converted into fuzzy numbers after classification. Inference rules are explained in the third stage. In the fourth stage, defuzzification is performed, and in the fifth stage, the devised system is tested. The test result shows that the presented model has high validity. Ultimately, by using the designed model, the score of knowledge management for Tabriz Kar machinery industry was calculated. The statistical population consists of 50 members of this organization. All the population has been studied. A questionnaire was devised, and its validity and reliability were confirmed. The result indicated that the score of knowledge management in Tabriz Kar machinery industry with the membership rank of 0.924 was at an average level and with the membership rank of 0.076 was at a high

  18. Self-reports on students' learning processes are academic metacognitive knowledge

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    Cristiano Mauro Assis Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study postulates that students' self-reported perceptions on their academic processes are a type of metacognition: academic metacognitive knowledge (AMcK. We investigated, using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM, three hypotheses: (a AMcK explains the variance of factor scores of students' learning approaches (SLA and academic motivation (AM; (b AMcK is distinct from working metacognition (WMC; and (c AMcK has incremental validity, beyond WMC, on the explanation of general academic achievement (GAA variance. Two tests (indicators of WMC and two scales (indicators of AMcK were administered to 684 ten-to-eighteen-year-old Brazilian children and adolescents. Annual grades in Math, Portuguese, Geography and History were used as indicators of GAA. The results show that none of the three hypotheses can be refuted.

  19. Developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension: a latent change score modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M; Wagner, Richard K; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, Mage = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension to test for the presence of leading and lagging influences. Univariate models indicated growth in vocabulary knowledge, and reading comprehension was determined by two parts: constant yearly change and change proportional to the previous level of the variable. Bivariate models indicated previous levels of vocabulary knowledge acted as leading indicators of reading comprehension growth, but the reverse relation was not found. Implications for theories of developmental relations between vocabulary and reading comprehension are discussed.

  20. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweya, Mussa N; Msuya, Sia E; Mahande, Michael J; Manongi, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of 18 years of age. Hence, advocacy for adolescent reproductive health education to promote the use of the available contraceptive services among university students is needed.

  1. Student Modelling in Adaptive E-Learning Systems

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    Clemens Bechter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Most e-Learning systems provide web-based learning so that students can access the same online courses via the Internet without adaptation, based on each student's profile and behavior. In an e-Learning system, one size does not fit all. Therefore, it is a challenge to make e-Learning systems that are suitably “adaptive”. The aim of adaptive e-Learning is to provide the students the appropriate content at the right time, means that the system is able to determine the knowledge level, keep track of usage, and arrange content automatically for each student for the best learning result. This study presents a proposed system which includes major adaptive features based on a student model. The proposed system is able to initialize the student model for determining the knowledge level of a student when the student registers for the course. After a student starts learning the lessons and doing many activities, the system can track information of the student until he/she takes a test. The student’s knowledge level, based on the test scores, is updated into the system for use in the adaptation process, which combines the student model with the domain model in order to deliver suitable course contents to the students. In this study, the proposed adaptive e-Learning system is implemented on an “Introduction to Java Programming Language” course, using LearnSquare software. After the system was tested, the results showed positive feedback towards the proposed system, especially in its adaptive capability.

  2. A Novice-Expert Study of Modeling Skills and Knowledge Structures about Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Lin, Li-Fen; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Lee, Dai-Ying; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2012-01-01

    This study compared modeling skills and knowledge structures of four groups as seen in their understanding of air quality. The four groups were: experts (atmospheric scientists), intermediates (upper-level graduate students in a different field), advanced novices (talented 11th and 12th graders), and novices (10th graders). It was found that when…

  3. Mathematical Knowledge of Non-mathematics Students and Their Beliefs about Mathematics

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    Ljerka Jukic Matic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics is tightly interwoven with science and engineering, where it has numerous applications. In the educational context, there is an ongoing debate who should teach mathematics to non-mathematicians and how this mathematics should be taught. The knowledge gained in mathematics course is used in another course (mathematics, science or engineering, hence students should retain core concepts some time after learning. Beliefs that students have about mathematics significantly influence on their learning, and consequently on the retained knowledge. We investigated retained calculus knowledge and beliefs about mathematics in two groups of first year students coming from the science and engineering study programs. The results showed that both groups of students showed better procedural knowledge than conceptual. Also they showed positive beliefs about mathematics in their study program, but were not certain where this knowledge will be used later. However they differed in the perception of mathematics as being exciting discipline. The educational implications of these findings are also discussed.

  4. Exploring hurdles to transfer : student experiences of applying knowledge across disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Jouni; Rosqvist, Juho

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores the ways students perceive the transfer of learned knowledge to new situations - often a surprisingly difficult prospect. The novel aspect compared to the traditional transfer studies is that the learning phase is not a part of the experiment itself. The intention was only to activate acquired knowledge relevant to the transfer target using a short primer immediately prior to the situation where the knowledge was to be applied. Eight volunteer students from either mathematics or computer science curricula were given a task of designing an adder circuit using logic gates: a new context in which to apply knowledge of binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra. The results of a phenomenographic classification of the views presented by the students in their post-experiment interviews are reported. The degree to which the students were conscious of the acquired knowledge they employed and how they applied it in a new context emerged as the differentiating factors.

  5. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  6. Influence of using challenging tasks in biology classrooms on students' cognitive knowledge structure: an empirical video study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawani, Jigna; Rixius, Julia; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2016-08-01

    Empirical analysis of secondary biology classrooms revealed that, on average, 68% of teaching time in Germany revolved around processing tasks. Quality of instruction can thus be assessed by analyzing the quality of tasks used in classroom discourse. This quasi-experimental study analyzed how teachers used tasks in 38 videotaped biology lessons pertaining to the topic 'blood and circulatory system'. Two fundamental characteristics used to analyze tasks include: (1) required cognitive level of processing (e.g. low level information processing: repetiition, summary, define, classify and high level information processing: interpret-analyze data, formulate hypothesis, etc.) and (2) complexity of task content (e.g. if tasks require use of factual, linking or concept level content). Additionally, students' cognitive knowledge structure about the topic 'blood and circulatory system' was measured using student-drawn concept maps (N = 970 students). Finally, linear multilevel models were created with high-level cognitive processing tasks and higher content complexity tasks as class-level predictors and students' prior knowledge, students' interest in biology, and students' interest in biology activities as control covariates. Results showed a positive influence of high-level cognitive processing tasks (β = 0.07; p observed effect of higher content complexity tasks on students' cognitive knowledge structure. Presented findings encourage the use of high-level cognitive processing tasks in biology instruction.

  7. Perceptions of motherhood: The effect of experience and knowledge on midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Diane M; Hughes, Anita J

    2009-06-01

    to explore the factors that influence student midwives' constructs of childbearing, before and during their undergraduate midwifery programme. a naturalistic, qualitative study. a university in the East Midlands, UK. 58 women registered on a 3-year midwifery education programme. focus groups were conducted at programme commencement and at 9-12 monthly intervals with two cohorts of midwifery students who were separated into groups of mothers and non-mothers (32 focus groups in total). This paper draws on data from the nine focus groups held at the start of the students' programme. the main themes that emerged from the data were in relation to image during pregnancy, expectations/experiences of childbirth and parenting. In particular, students believed that pregnancy and childbirth should be special. They suggested that a lack of knowledge about sexuality and choice options affected women's ability to be in control. Although normality was the students' expectation of childbirth, they also assumed that hospital birth was the norm. They were unsure whether the baby's father was the best birth partner. Their mothers were suggested as likely to be more supportive, but there was lack of agreement regarding whether they were the best parenting role models. Students also said that there was a lack of positive images of breast feeding. The overall motivation to become midwives was 'to make a difference'. students need to be facilitated early in their programme to explore their belief systems and constructs of childbearing critically so that they are equipped to support parents to have a positive experience, whether childbirth is normal or complex, and so that they can cope with any dissonance between their own expectations and the uncertainties and realities of practice.

  8. [The discussion of the infiltrative model of mathematical knowledge to genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Pei-Gao

    2011-11-01

    Genetics, the core course of biological field, is an importance major-basic course in curriculum of many majors related with biology. Due to strong theoretical and practical as well as abstract of genetics, it is too difficult to study on genetics for many students. At the same time, mathematics is one of the basic courses in curriculum of the major related natural science, which has close relationship with the establishment, development and modification of genetics. In this paper, to establish the intrinsic logistic relationship and construct the integral knowledge network and to help students improving the analytic, comprehensive and logistic abilities, we applied some mathematical infiltrative model genetic knowledge in genetics teaching, which could help students more deeply learn and understand genetic knowledge.

  9. Reproductive health: knowledge and opinions of university students in Erzurum, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inandi, T; Tosun, A; Guraksin, A

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess knowledge of reproductive health and the opinions of university students towards reproductive health education and family planning services. A questionnaire about reproductive health knowledge and the opinions of students was submitted to 673 systematically and randomly selected students at Ataturk University. A set of 39 questions was used to determine the level of knowledge of reproductive health. The level of reproductive health knowledge was below the theoretical mean value. An association was found between gender, residential area, parents' education and sibling number with the reproductive health knowledge score. Most of the students approved of formal reproductive health education (88.4%). Approval of family planning services was lower than that of reproductive health education (71.6%). The percentage of men who support family planning services and reproductive health education was lower than that of women. Students who had graduated from Islamic religious schools had more negative opinions towards family planning services. University students lack knowledge about reproductive health and most of them agree that reproductive health education should be given in schools. Knowledge about reproductive health differs significantly depending on some sociodemographic variables. Some students have negative opinions towards family planning services and reproductive health education.

  10. The Students\\' Knowledge, Attitude and Performance about Prevention of Using of Ecstasy

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    Mitra Zolfaghari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades because of stimulant and hallucinogenic properties of ecstasy, it has been found so many users among adolescent and youth people. The aim of present study was the study of students' knowledge, attitude and performance related to prevention of using of ecstasy. Method: This descriptive – analytic study has done in 400 female students of government schools of zone no. 17. The sample selected by clustering random sampling and their knowledge, attitude, and performance measured by using of researchers developed questionnaire which shown sufficient level of validity and reliability. Results: The results showed that the majority of students (41% had low knowledge, 56% had positive attitude, and 55.1% had good performance related to prevention of using of ecstasy. Also, there was positive relationship between students' knowledge and attitude also attitude and performance. There was also positive relationship between some of the demographic characteristics and the students' knowledge, attitude and performance related to prevention of using of ecstasy. Conclusion: Finding of the research showed that the students' knowledge related to use of ecstasy is low, therefore appropriate instructional intervention in order to promote the students' knowledge is necessary.

  11. Transfer in chemistry: a study of students' abilities in transferring mathematical knowledge to chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Richard A.; Finlayson, Odilla E.; Nolan, Brien C.

    2013-01-01

    It is recognized that there is a mathematics problem in chemistry, whereby, for example, undergraduate students appear to be unable to utilize basic calculus knowledge in a chemistry context - calculus knowledge - which would have been taught to these students in a mathematics context. However, there appears to be a scarcity of literature addressing the possible reasons for this problem. This dearth of literature has spurred the following two questions: (1) Can students transfer mathematical knowledge to chemistry?; and (2) What are the possible factors associated with students being able to successfully transfer mathematical knowledge to a chemistry context? These questions were investigated in relation to the basic mathematical knowledge which chemistry students need for chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, using the traditional view of the transfer of learning. Two studies were undertaken amongst two samples of undergraduate students attending Dublin City University. Findings suggest that the mathematical difficulties which students encounter in a chemistry context may not be because of an inability to transfer the knowledge, but may instead be due to insufficient mathematical understanding and/or knowledge of mathematical concepts relevant to chemical kinetics and thermodynamics.

  12. The Application of School Watching Method to Increase the Earthquake Disaster Knowledge of Primary School Students

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    Sri Adelila Sari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study entitled "The Application of School Watching to Increase the Earthquake Disaster Knowledge of Primary School Students, MIN Blang Mancung, Aceh" was aimed to describe the students' knowledge of the different dangerous objects in the face of an earthquake. The approach used in this study was qualitative and quantitative. The type of study was descriptive. Subjects used were as many as 30 students MIN Blang Mancung, Aceh. The method used was an experimental, which was divided into two classes, namely the experimental and control classes. Data collection technique was using questionnaires, which included the questions about common dangerous objects, dangerous objects in the class and also in the school yard. The results showed that there was a significant effect on students' knowledge before and after the implementation of the method School Watching. In addition, the knowledge of students toward the dangerous objects was found to be significant different between control and experimental class.

  13. Using knowledge management to improve learning experience of first-trimester students

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    Nelson K. Y. Leung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To address the lack of insights into the engagement of tertiary students to manage knowledge at a course level, a knowledge management approach is proposed to allow students to interact with lecturers inside and outside a large lecture hall to create, disseminate, use and evaluate knowledge. The proposed approach was applied to an undergraduate business computing related course conducted at the offshore campus of an Australian university in the third trimester of 2012. The proposed KM approach was evaluated using quantitative analysis. The findings show that the majority of the students agreed that the computerized tool (Facebook could enhance their learning experience by allowing students to ask for, share, discuss, and extend knowledge. In particular, the KM approach provided additional channels and platforms for the first-trimester students who were passive and preferred not to seek help from lecturers directly for cultural reasons.

  14. Knowledge and attitude of senior dental students towards HIV/AIDS

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    Jafari A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The objective of the present study was to investigate knowledge and attitude of senior dental students towards HIV/AIDS. Its result could help in promotion of education. Materials and Methods: This educational research was carried out in two state dental schools in Tehran. The senior dental students in Tehran and Shaheed Beheshti dental schools were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire regarding their age, gender, parents' job, knowledge and attitudes towards treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Autumn semester 2007. Fifty five dental students (83% including 27% male and 73% female in Shaheed Beheshti and fifty five dental students (85% including 34% male and 66% female in Tehran dental schools were participated. The score for knowledge and attitude of the students were calculated separately. The data were analyzed using Independent sample t-test. Results: The mean percentage of knowledge and attitude scores were 76.5% (at rang 1-3 and 50% (at range 1-5, respectively. Nearly all of the students believed that all patients should be considered as HIV positive in dental practice, while 49% preferred to refer HIV positive patients. Knowledge and attitude of students were not significantly associated with the gender and knowing HIV positive person (P>0.05. Conclusion: There is a need to improve knowledge and attitudes of dental students towards HIV/AIDS. It is suggested to emphasize on this subject in dental schools curriculum in Iran.

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices towards Medication Use among Health Care Students in King Saud University

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    Abdullah T. Eissa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences students are expected to have appropriate knowledge and attitudes toward medication use. However, literary evidence of such expertise among health sciences students of King Saud University is unknown. This study was completed to assess the knowledge about medicines and behavior of health science students towards safe use of medications. It also aims to assess the health knowledge, attitude and practices of the students. Methods: This cross-sectional study used a questionnaire consisting of 24 questions. This was administered by the researcher between October and December 2009 in the colleges of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, applied medical science and nursing of the King Saud University. The survey consisted of three parts: Ten questions assessed the students’ knowledge on drug safety (Part 1. Four questions assessed student attitude toward medication consultations by the pharmacist (Part 2 and ten questions involved medication use practices and consultation with pharmacists (Part 3. A stratified sampling method was used to select participants. Results: Pharmacy students had better medication knowledge compared to other health sciences students especially regarding antihypertensive drugs, antibiotics, paracetamol and antacids (p<0.05. Pharmacy students showed a positive attitude regarding the trustworthiness of a pharmacist to give a consultation. Nearly all other health science students showed a negative attitude about dispensing and consultation concerning nutritional supplements by a pharmacist. All health sciences students had a similar perception toward medication use and practice. Conclusion Pharmacy students had better knowledge about medication practice compared to other health sciences students. All other health sciences students lacked the appropriate attitude and practice related to the safe use of medications.

  16. Female international students and sexual health - a qualitative study into knowledge, beliefs and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Adrienne; Laurence, Caroline; Stocks, Nigel

    2011-10-01

    International students make up an increasing proportion of university students in Australia. Research suggests that they have poor sexual health knowledge compared with local students. Thematic analysis was undertaken on focus groups carried out at the University of Adelaide (South Australia), with 21 female international students from Malaysia and China. Four themes were identified: poor sexual health knowledge; complex attitudes about premarital sex; difficulty accessing sexual health information, and poor understanding the role of general practitioners in this area; and ideas about future education. Participants believed that international students have insufficient sexual health education when they arrive in Australia. They were concerned that some students may become more sexually active in Australia, and may not have adequate access to health services and information. All participants felt it was necessary for international students to receive better sexual health education. International students are important to Australian universities, and it should be mandatory to ensure that culturally appropriate sex education is made available to this group.

  17. Knowledge and attitude regarding mercury handling and disposal in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shruti; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R; Murarka, Shiva; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    The present cross-sectional study was carried out in higher secondary schools of the science specialty in Ahmedabad. A total of 653 students (196 taught in English, 395 taught in Gujarati and 62 taught in Hindi) from seven schools were included. The interview technique was used for data collection using a predesigned questionnaire. A total of 457 (70%) were boys and 196 (30%) were girls. About two-thirds of the study participants had handled mercury at sometime in their life and home was the common place where it was handled. More than half of the Hindi-taught students did not know about its physical appearance. The majority of the Gujarati-taught students knew that mercury is harmful to health whereas one-third of the English- and Hindi-taught students considered mercury to be harmless. A total of 46% of the Gujarati-taught and 44% of the English-taught students had encountered spilled mercury at sometime in their life and 21.6% of English-taught and 25% of Hindi-taught students had either smelled or played with spilled mercury. More than two-thirds of the English- and Hindi-taught students recommended the usual cleaning method whereas 81.8% of Gujarati-taught students suggested a special method should be used for the disposal of spilled mercury. The majority of the students did not know whether mercury could be substituted by a harmless substance.

  18. Role Modeling for FNP Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jane Ehlinger

    1980-01-01

    A model is described in which student nurses' preceptors are the joint-appointee nurse practitioners, with physicians providing consultation and serving as team participants. Key points that are examined are program development at the University of Illinois, how the program actually operated, and some of the problems encountered. (CT)

  19. [The discussion of the infiltrative model of chemical knowledge stepping into genetics teaching in agricultural institute or university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Luo, Pei-Gao

    2010-05-01

    Chemistry is an important group of basic courses, while genetics is one of the important major-basic courses in curriculum of many majors in agricultural institutes or universities. In order to establish the linkage between the major course and the basic course, the ability of application of the chemical knowledge previously learned in understanding genetic knowledge in genetics teaching is worthy of discussion for genetics teachers. In this paper, the authors advocate to apply some chemical knowledge previously learned to understand genetic knowledge in genetics teaching with infiltrative model, which could help students learn and understand genetic knowledge more deeply. Analysis of the intrinsic logistic relationship among the knowledge of different courses and construction of the integral knowledge network are useful for students to improve their analytic, comprehensive and logistic abilities. By this way, we could explore a new teaching model to develop the talents with new ideas and comprehensive competence in agricultural fields.

  20. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF HEALTH CARE SCIENCE STUDENTS TOWARD OLDER PEOPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Simin, Dragana; Kacavendić, Jelena; Turkulov, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Education of health science students in geriatrics is important in order to provide optimal care for the growing number of elderly people because it is the attitudes of health professionals toward the elderly that play the key role in the quality of care provided. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care science students towards ageing and care for the elderly. The present cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 130 students (medical, nursing and special education and rehabilitation) of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad. The students were divided into two groups. The first group (E) included students having been taught geriatrics and nursing older adults and the other group (C) included students who had not been trained in this subject. The authors used Palmore's facts on Ageing Quiz for the knowledge evaluation and Kogan's Attitude toward Older People Scale for the attitude evaluation. The results of Facts on Aging Quiz showed the average level of students' knowledge and statistically significant difference between E and C group. The analysis of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale showed that both groups had neutral attitudes toward older people. Furthermore, a positive correlation between students' knowledge and attitudes was found. There is increasing evidence on the correlation between education, knowledge and attitudes toward older people which suggests that by acquiring better insights into all aspects of ageing through their education the students develop more positive attitudes and interest in working with older adults.

  1. HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Assessment of Chinese Students: A Questionnaire Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Xie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess students' knowledge, attitudes and practices on HIV and AIDS. A questionnaire was administered to a cross section of 259 Chinese undergraduates. Respondents were asked to provide information about knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS. Study results indicated that the majority of undergraduates had a moderate level of HIV and AIDS knowledge, acceptance and attitudes towards people with HIV and AIDS. Boys had more acceptance and positive attitudes towards people with HIV and AIDS than girls. Students majoring in medicine performed better (more knowledgeable and accepting than non-medical students. Differences between students with various monthly expenditures were found-- 6.2% of students had 3-5 sexual partners which has rarely been found in Chinese students; most students did not know HIV VCT centers and most students did not show their confidence for controlling of HIV and AIDS in China. In conclusion, students’ knowledge about HIV/AIDS was uneven. A peer educational program to talk about self esteem, healthy sexual attitudes, being human-accepting and loving should be developed in the near future.

  2. Knowledge modeling of coal mining equipments based on ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baolong; Wang, Xiangqian; Li, Huizong; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2017-06-01

    The problems of information redundancy and sharing are universe in coal mining equipment management. In order to improve the using efficiency of knowledge of coal mining equipments, this paper proposed a new method of knowledge modeling based on ontology. On the basis of analyzing the structures and internal relations of coal mining equipment knowledge, taking OWL as ontology construct language, the ontology model of coal mining equipment knowledge is built with the help of Protégé 4.3 software tools. The knowledge description method will lay the foundation for the high effective knowledge management and sharing, which is very significant for improving the production management level of coal mining enterprises.

  3. Knowledge of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary intervention among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Aysha; Hameed, Aamir; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo

    2008-10-01

    To elucidate knowledge of coronary artery disease (CAD) risks factors and coronary intervention in adult students of Karachi East. To calculate the mean knowledge score about CAD risk factors among them. A multi center crossectional study was conducted in Universities and colleges of Karachi East from April-September 2005. Questionnaires were distributed to 200 adult students of different non-medical universities and colleges. The questionnaire contained assessment of knowledge of risk factors on CAD and awareness about coronary angiography. Those belonging to medical colleges and universities were excluded from the study. Knowledge was assessed as a continuous variable. Risk factors for CAD were taken as categorical variables The mean age of students was 20 yrs +/- 2.2 years and 62% were females. The mean score of knowledge about risk factors of CAD was 11.47 +/- 2.37. Sixty percent students thought that heart diseases are the number one cause of death in our population. Twenty five percent students graded smoking as the top most risk factor for CAD. Twenty five percent students refused to quit smoking for CAD prevention. Forty eight percent students correctly defined coronary angiography. Eighty five percent students thought that cost is the major hindrance in getting timely treatment. Knowledge of fifty percent students was based on personal and family experience of heart disease. Students graded smoking as the topmost risk factor for CAD and cost as the major hindrance in getting timely treatment for heart disease. Only half of the students were aware about coronary angiography. The mean knowledge score among them was above the median score but not up to the mark.

  4. Learning Styles: Impact on Knowledge and Confidence in Nursing Students in Simulation and Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Jane D; White, Anne; Long, Janice

    2016-08-24

    Nurse Educators must develop nursing curriculum with engaging learning strategies that promote the knowledge and confidence needed for safe, effective nursing practice. Faculty should explore new methods of teaching that consider how students learn. Studies have shown mixed results regarding student learning styles, academic achievement, and development of confidence in nursing practice. An experimental study using Felder and Soloman's (2004). Index of learning styles instrument was conducted to examine nursing student learning styles and their impact on confidence and knowledge in traditional and high fidelity simulation settings. Findings revealed students were more likely to have active, visual, sensing, and sequential learning styles. Student confidence or knowledge did not significantly differ among the learning styles in either simulation or traditional classroom methods. Awareness of learning styles may aid faculty in adapting engaging teaching strategies. Further research is needed with larger samples to identify best approaches to enhance student learning within the context of learning styles.

  5. From biology to mathematical models and back: teaching modeling to biology students, and biology to math and engineering students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiel, Hillel J; McManus, Jeffrey M; Shaw, Kendrick M

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of a course to teach modeling and mathematical analysis skills to students of biology and to teach biology to students with strong backgrounds in mathematics, physics, or engineering. The two groups of students have different ways of learning material and often have strong negative feelings toward the area of knowledge that they find difficult. To give students a sense of mastery in each area, several complementary approaches are used in the course: 1) a "live" textbook that allows students to explore models and mathematical processes interactively; 2) benchmark problems providing key skills on which students make continuous progress; 3) assignment of students to teams of two throughout the semester; 4) regular one-on-one interactions with instructors throughout the semester; and 5) a term project in which students reconstruct, analyze, extend, and then write in detail about a recently published biological model. Based on student evaluations and comments, an attitude survey, and the quality of the students' term papers, the course has significantly increased the ability and willingness of biology students to use mathematical concepts and modeling tools to understand biological systems, and it has significantly enhanced engineering students' appreciation of biology.

  6. From Biology to Mathematical Models and Back: Teaching Modeling to Biology Students, and Biology to Math and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jeffrey M.; Shaw, Kendrick M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of a course to teach modeling and mathematical analysis skills to students of biology and to teach biology to students with strong backgrounds in mathematics, physics, or engineering. The two groups of students have different ways of learning material and often have strong negative feelings toward the area of knowledge that they find difficult. To give students a sense of mastery in each area, several complementary approaches are used in the course: 1) a “live” textbook that allows students to explore models and mathematical processes interactively; 2) benchmark problems providing key skills on which students make continuous progress; 3) assignment of students to teams of two throughout the semester; 4) regular one-on-one interactions with instructors throughout the semester; and 5) a term project in which students reconstruct, analyze, extend, and then write in detail about a recently published biological model. Based on student evaluations and comments, an attitude survey, and the quality of the students' term papers, the course has significantly increased the ability and willingness of biology students to use mathematical concepts and modeling tools to understand biological systems, and it has significantly enhanced engineering students' appreciation of biology. PMID:20810957

  7. Kinds of Knowledge-Telling: Modeling early writing development

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The thesis of this article is that Bereiter and Scardamalia's (1987) knowledge-telling strategy may be viewed as a family of strategies. In particular, when young writers compose expository themes from their own knowledge, they may use one of three writing strategies: a flexible-focus strategy, a fixed-topic strategy, or a topic-elaboration strategy, all of which may be viewed as kinds of knowledge-telling. The article then proposes models to characterize the organization of cognitive process...

  8. Knowledge Transfer in B-O-R-N Model to Enhance Computer Learners' Learning Outcomes in Knowledge and Cognitive Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangchant, Shatchaya; Kiattikomol, Paiboon; Kaewkuekool, Sittichai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The process of knowledge transfer under the B-O-R-N Model is based on the concepts of knowledge transfer and change of knowledge patterns to create new knowledge. It stimulates learners to learn under the process of knowledge transfer during the learning with an aim to allow learners to achieve the learning outcomes.…

  9. Framework for product knowledge and product related knowledge which supports product modelling for mass customization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jesper; Hansen, Benjamin Loer; Hvam, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The article presents a framework for product knowledge and product related knowledge which can be used to support the product modelling process which is needed for developing IT systems. These IT systems are important tools for many companies when they aim at achieving mass customization and pers......The article presents a framework for product knowledge and product related knowledge which can be used to support the product modelling process which is needed for developing IT systems. These IT systems are important tools for many companies when they aim at achieving mass customization...... on experience from product modelling projects in several companies. Among them for example companies manufacturing electronic switchboards, spray dryer systems and air conditioning equipment. The framework is divided into three views: the product knowledge view, the life phase system view and the transformation...... process view (“the meeting”). The persons (rolls) involved in the product modelling process are for example: domain experts, change managers, model managers, project leaders, technical facilitators, process managers and software programmers. They need a framework during the product modelling process...

  10. Knowledge about the 'Greenhouse Effect': Have College Students Improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Helen; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2001-01-01

    The ideas of Year I undergraduate biology students about the consequences, causes, and cures of the 'greenhouse effect' was determined using a closed-form questionnaire, and results were compared with a parallel study undertaken nearly 10 years ago. Many of the students in the present survey were unaware of the potential effect of global warming…

  11. Knowledge about the 'Greenhouse Effect': Have College Students Improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Helen; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2001-01-01

    The ideas of Year I undergraduate biology students about the consequences, causes, and cures of the 'greenhouse effect' was determined using a closed-form questionnaire, and results were compared with a parallel study undertaken nearly 10 years ago. Many of the students in the present survey were unaware of the potential effect of global warming…

  12. Measuring Student Knowledge and Skills: A New Framework for Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Andreas

    The new program of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), the International Programme for Student Assessment (PISA), represents a commitment by governments of the OECD countries to monitor the outcomes of education in terms of student achievement within a common international framework. The focus will be on students…

  13. Fabricating Expert Knowledge of the Behaviour of Problematic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Anne; Lanas, Maija

    2016-01-01

    This article examines what constitutes students' disruptive and good behaviour, as described and defined by teachers. Teachers are viewed as professional experts who produce official information regarding their students. The present study analysed the overarching features of behaviour descriptions provided by teachers in official statements…

  14. Faculty Attitudes and Knowledge Regarding College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniatecki, Jessica L.; Perry, Holly B.; Snell, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of students with disabilities (SWD) at colleges and universities in the United States has increased significantly in recent years, yet many of these students continue to encounter significant barriers that can have a profound impact on their college experience. Salient factors that contribute to the challenging climate for SWD include…

  15. Affix Meaning Knowledge in First through Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Kenn; Henbest, Victoria Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We examined grade-level differences in 1st- through 3rd-grade students' performance on an experimenter-developed affix meaning task (AMT) and determined whether AMT performance explained unique variance in word-level reading and reading comprehension, beyond other known contributors to reading development. Method: Forty students at each…

  16. Assessing secondary science students' knowledge of molecule movement, concentration gradients, and equilibrium through multiple contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Background: Studies have shown that students' knowledge of osmosis and diffusion and the concepts associated with these processes is often inaccurate. This is important to address, as these concepts not only provide the foundation for more advanced topics in biology and chemistry, but are also threaded throughout both state and national science standards. Purpose: In this study, designed to determine the completeness and accuracy of three specific students' knowledge of molecule movement, concentration gradients, and equilibrium, I sought to address the following question: Using multiple evaluative methods, how can students' knowledge of molecule movement, concentration gradients, and equilibrium be characterized? Sample: This study focuses on data gathered from three students - Emma, Henry, and Riley - all of whom were gifted/honors ninth-grade biology students at a suburban high school in the southeast United States. Design and Methods: Using various qualitative data analysis techniques, I analyzed multiple sources of data from the three students, including multiple-choice test results, written free-response answers, think-aloud interview responses, and student drawings. Results: Results of the analysis showed that students maintained misconceptions about molecule movement, concentration gradients, and equilibrium. The conceptual knowledge students demonstrated differed depending on the assessment method, with the most distinct differences appearing on the multiple-choice versus the free-response questions, and in verbal versus written formats. Conclusions: Multiple levels of assessment may be required to obtain an accurate picture of content knowledge, as free-response and illustrative tasks made it difficult for students to conceal any misconceptions. Using a variety of assessment methods within a section of the curriculum can arguably help to provide a deeper understanding of student knowledge and learning, as well as illuminate misconceptions that may have

  17. Reusing knowledge in embedded system modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marincic, J.; Mader, Angelika H.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Lucas, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Model-based design is a promising technique to improve the quality of software and the efficiency of the software development process. We are investigating how to efficiently model embedded software and its environment to verify the requirements for the system controlled by the software. The softwar

  18. Effect of a short structured session on medical student breast cancer screening knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Atul K; Colbert, Patrizia M; Beech, Bettina; Beech, Derrick J

    2003-01-01

    Formalized instruction in breast cancer screening during medical school may help improve early breast cancer detection and survival. Physicians-in-training must be proficient in skills relating to breast cancer screening. This study investigates the baseline breast cancer screening knowledge of medical students, the benefit of a structured lecture session, and its effect on improving medical students' knowledge of cancer screening. A self-administrated questionnaire relating to breast cancer screening was given to third-year medical students. A 60-minute structured lecture session was given to the medical students regarding breast cancer screening. A postintervention survey was administered immediately following the session. A total of 27 medical students were evaluated. There was a statistically significant improvement following the formalized teaching session (84% to 93%; p students (15%) reported having previous instruction in cancer screening, most students (96%) felt that a formal session should be offered during medical school. While medical student knowledge of breast cancer screening may be adequate, formalized instruction in breast cancer health practices can improve medical student knowledge. Most students had limited previous instruction in breast cancer prevention and welcomed the opportunity for structured training in breast cancer prevention, education, and detection. Until a formal course becomes a fundamental aspect of medical education, a short structured session should be instituted.

  19. The Use of Clinical Interviews to Develop Inservice Secondary Science Teachers' Nature of Science Knowledge and Assessment of Student Nature of Science Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    To fully incorporate nature of science knowledge into classrooms, teachers must be both proficient in their own nature of science knowledge, but also skillful in translating their knowledge into a learning environment which assesses student knowledge. Twenty-eight inservice teachers enrolled in a graduate course which in part required a clinical…

  20. The Use of Clinical Interviews to Develop Inservice Secondary Science Teachers' Nature of Science Knowledge and Assessment of Student Nature of Science Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    To fully incorporate nature of science knowledge into classrooms, teachers must be both proficient in their own nature of science knowledge, but also skillful in translating their knowledge into a learning environment which assesses student knowledge. Twenty-eight inservice teachers enrolled in a graduate course which in part required a clinical…

  1. A comparison of the hand hygiene knowledge, beliefs and practices of Italian nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van De Mortel, Thea F; Kermode, Stephen; Progano, Tomaso; Sansoni, Julita

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports a study examining the hand hygiene knowledge, beliefs and practices of Italian nursing and medical students with the aim of informing undergraduate curricula. In comparison with registered nurses, physician status is a risk factor for non-compliance with hand hygiene guidelines. Little research has been conducted to determine if differences between the professions in relation to hand hygiene are apparent at the undergraduate level. Cross-disciplinary studies that may provide an insight into this topic are lacking. A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 117 nursing and 119 medical students in a large university in Rome, Italy, to determine their hand hygiene knowledge, beliefs and practices. The data were collected in 2007-2008. Nursing students' hand hygiene knowledge (F = 9·03(1,230); P = 0·003), percentage compliance (Z = 6·197; P students. There were no statistically significant differences between hand hygiene beliefs. Mean scores on the knowledge questions were low for both groups, reflecting primarily a knowledge deficit in relation to the use of alcohol-based hand rubs to decontaminate hands in the healthcare setting. Statistically significant disciplinary differences in hand hygiene knowledge and self-reported practices were apparent among undergraduate Italian healthcare students. Further research is needed to determine the causative factors. The overall low scores on the knowledge items indicate that these students require further education on hand hygiene, particularly in relation to the use of alcohol-based hand rubs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Why biosecurity matters: students' knowledge of biosecurity and implications for future engagement with biosecurity initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Rajesh; France, Bev; Birdsall, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research on biosecurity is important as New Zealand's agricultural export-driven economy is susceptible to biosecurity threats. Because New Zealand is reliant on the primary industries to drive its economy, bovine diseases such as foot and mouth could have a devastating effect on the economy. Purpose: Making sure that the general public are aware of the importance of maintaining biosecurity is crucial in order to protect New Zealand's economy, human health, the environment, and social and cultural values. New Zealand Year 9 students' knowledge of biosecurity was gauged as these students represented the next generation of individuals tasked to maintain biosecurity in New Zealand. Design: A qualitative approach using the interpretive mode of inquiry was used to investigate the knowledge about biosecurity with New Zealand Year 9 students. Questionnaires and interviews were the data collection tools. Sample: One hundred and seventy-one students completed a questionnaire that consisted of Likert-type questions and open-ended questions. Nine students were interviewed about their knowledge. Results: The findings showed that New Zealand Year 9 students lacked specific knowledge about unwanted plants, animals and microorganisms. These students saw illicit drug plants as unwanted plants and mainly saw possums as unwanted animals in New Zealand. Their knowledge about unwanted microorganisms in New Zealand was dominated by human-disease-causing microbes. A lack of knowledge of biosecurity issues in New Zealand was seen as the major factor in these students limited understanding of biosecurity. Conclusions: Based on these findings, it can be said that knowledge of an issue is critical in enabling individuals to develop an understanding about biosecurity. Explicit teaching of biosecurity-related curriculum topics could provide New Zealand Year 9 students with an opportunity to develop knowledge about biosecurity in New Zealand.

  3. Students' Attitudes toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Alana D.; Zientek, Linda R.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students' science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Because of the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students' content…

  4. Oral Health Knowledge and Practices of Secondary School Students, Tanga, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Lorna Carneiro; Msafiri Kabulwa; Mathias Makyao; Goodluck Mrosso; Ramadhani Choum

    2011-01-01

    A good quality of life is possible if students maintain their oral health and become free of oral disease. A structured questionnaire assessed 785 students' level of oral health knowledge and practices. About 694 (88.4%) students had adequate level of knowledge on causes, prevention, and signs of dental caries, 760 (96.8%) on causes and prevention of periodontal diseases, 695 (88.5%) on cigarette smoking as cause of oral cancer, and 770 (98.1%) students on importance of dental checkups. Major...

  5. KNOWLEDGE, BEHAVIOUR AND ATTITUDES REGARDING HIV/AIDS AMONG UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN AN IRISH UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASHAM CHOUDHARY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in an Irish University among undergraduate students in 2012. A web questionnaire consisted of items related to HIV/AIDS knowledge, behaviour and attitudes was sent to all undergraduate students aged 18 years or above. Despite the fact that majority of students were aware about the transmission of HIV/AIDS, this study showed that students were less likely to translate their knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission into healthy behaviour. In addition, they engaged in risky sexual behaviour which increases the likelihood of acquiring HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.

  6. Elementary teachers' use of content knowledge to evaluate students' thinking in the life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Jaime L.; Forbes, Cory T.; Flynn, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    Science learning environments should provide opportunities for students to make sense of and enhance their understanding of disciplinary concepts. Teachers can support students' sense-making by engaging and responding to their ideas through high-leverage instructional practices such as formative assessment (FA). However, past research has shown that teachers may not understand FA, how to implement it, or have sufficient content knowledge to use it effectively. Few studies have investigated how teachers gather information to evaluate students' ideas or how content knowledge factors into those decisions, particularly within the life science discipline. We designed a study embedded in a multi-year professional development program that supported elementary teachers' development of disciplinary knowledge and FA practices within science instruction. Study findings illustrate how elementary teachers' life science content knowledge influences their evaluation of students' ideas. Teachers with higher levels of life science content knowledge more effectively evaluated students' ideas than teachers with lower levels of content knowledge. Teachers with higher content exam scores discussed both content and student understanding to a greater extent, and their analyses of students' ideas were more scientifically accurate compared to teachers with lower scores. These findings contribute to theory and practice around science teacher education, professional development, and curriculum development.

  7. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.MSc,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medical Sciences and all the 250 students studying at nursing, medical, and paramedical schools were participated in it. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was used to determine the knowledge about and attitude toward solid waste recycling. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, Pearson correlation and independent T test. Findings The knowledge of students was the highest about the definition of recycling (84.4% and lowest about delivery of recycled materials to badgers (23.6%. Most medical (55.1% and paramedical (75.3% students had “weak” and most nursing students (47.1% had “moderate” knowledge about solid waste recycling. 69.2% of paramedical, 27.3% of medical and 25.5% of nursing students stated that “there is no information about recycling in the university courses”. Conclusion Most of the students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences have weak knowledge regarding to solid waste recycling and their knowledge are different among schools.

  8. School students' knowledge and understanding of the Global Solar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Global Solar Ultraviolet Index (UVI) is a health communication tool used to ... and questions aimed at probing their understanding of this measure. ... knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. ..... advice was related to the scale at a later stage.

  9. Assessing the knowledge and perceptions of medical students from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-05

    Apr 5, 2011 ... access to knowledge and new information, especially in ... generation.4 ... implementation of the MDG in South Africa is important and that more needs to be done in .... the Health Research Ethics Committee, Faculty of Health.

  10. Models of Lifelong Learning and the "Knowledge Society"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Many of the current policy debates in Europe focus on what kind of "knowledge economy" or "knowledge society" would be best in the future if it is to combine both economic competitiveness and social cohesion. Should European economies move increasingly towards the so-called Anglo-Saxon model of flexible labour markets and high…

  11. Alphabet Knowledge in Preschool: A Rasch Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Horner, Sherri L.; Sondergeld, Toni A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used Rasch model analyses to examine (1) the unidimensionality of the alphabet knowledge construct and (2) the relative difficulty of different alphabet knowledge tasks (uppercase letter recognition, names, and sounds, and lowercase letter names) within a sample of preschoolers (n=335). Rasch analysis showed that the four…

  12. Models of Lifelong Learning and the "Knowledge Society"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Many of the current policy debates in Europe focus on what kind of "knowledge economy" or "knowledge society" would be best in the future if it is to combine both economic competitiveness and social cohesion. Should European economies move increasingly towards the so-called Anglo-Saxon model of flexible labour markets and high employment…

  13. The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumtuma, Chamnan; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Yeamsang, Theerawat

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand was created by research and development. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected via the following steps: a participatory workshop meeting, the formation of a team according to knowledge base, field study, brainstorming, group discussion, activities carried out…

  14. A New Model for the Organizational Knowledge Life Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Lella, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Actual organizations, in particular the ones which operate in evolving and distributed environments, need advanced frameworks for the management of the knowledge life cycle. These systems have to be based on the social relations which constitute the pattern of collaboration ties of the organization. We demonstrate here, with the aid of a model taken from the theory of graphs, that it is possible to provide the conditions for an effective knowledge management. A right way could be to involve the actors with the highest betweeness centrality in the generation of discussion groups. This solution allows the externalization of tacit knowledge, the preservation of knowledge and the raise of innovation processes.

  15. Exploration of student's creativity by integrating STEM knowledge into creative products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayasari, Tantri; Kadarohman, Asep; Rusdiana, Dadi; Kaniawati, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Creativity is an important capability that should be held to competitive standards in the 21st century in entering the era of information and knowledge. It requires a creative generation that is able to innovate to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex future. This study examines the student's creativity level by integrating STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) knowledge to make creative products in renewable energy (solar energy). Total respondents in this study were 29 students who take applied science course. This research used qualitative and quantitative method (mixed methods), and used "4P" dimension of creativity to assess student's creativity level. The result showed a creative product is influenced by STEM knowledge that can support student's creativity while collaborating an application of knowledge, skills, and ability to solve daily problems associated with STEM.

  16. Students' Knowledge Concerning the Correct Squat and the Elements of the Methodology of Teaching It

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czaprowski, Dariusz; Kędra, Agnieszka; Biernat, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    ... are simultaneously indicated.The aim of the work was to define the knowledge of students concerning the methodology of teaching the correct squat and to present methodological fundamentals in this field.Material/Methods...

  17. Correlation study of knowledge and behavior regarding breast care among female undergraduate students in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Meng-Xue; Li, Jian; Geng, Yun-Long; Wang, Yan-Chun; Li, Jie; Chen, Yu-Juan; Ali, Gholam; Tarver, Siobhan L; Wen, Yu-Feng; Sun, Wen-Jie

    This study aimed to understand the relationship between knowledge level and behavior on breast care in Chinese students, so as to provide strategies for improving the health education of breast care...

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of prevention for cervical cancer and breast cancer among medical students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pablo Rodriguez Feria; Luis Jorge Hernández-Florez; Daniela Rodriguez-Feria

    2016-01-01

      Objective To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of medical students for health promotion, primary prevention and early detection of breast neoplasm and uterine cervical neoplasm, as well...

  19. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of dental students towards obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Awan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Obesity-related education should be implemented as a formal component of dental student training. Oral health practitioners should also provide their patients with information about how weight loss is beneficial to both general and oral health.

  20. Seeing Students' Knowledge of Fractions: Candace's Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Candace; Tierney, Cornelia; Storeygard, Judy

    2007-01-01

    A fifth-grade teacher describes what she learned from closely observing two students with different learning styles and kinds of understandings as they solve traditional fraction problems using a clock face. (Contains 5 figures.)