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Sample records for modeling solute transport

  1. Stochastic dynamics modeling solute transport in porous media modeling solute transport in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Kulasiri, Don

    2002-01-01

    Most of the natural and biological phenomena such as solute transport in porous media exhibit variability which can not be modeled by using deterministic approaches. There is evidence in natural phenomena to suggest that some of the observations can not be explained by using the models which give deterministic solutions. Stochastic processes have a rich repository of objects which can be used to express the randomness inherent in the system and the evolution of the system over time. The attractiveness of the stochastic differential equations (SDE) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE) come from the fact that we can integrate the variability of the system along with the scientific knowledge pertaining to the system. One of the aims of this book is to explaim some useufl concepts in stochastic dynamics so that the scientists and engineers with a background in undergraduate differential calculus could appreciate the applicability and appropriateness of these developments in mathematics. The ideas ...

  2. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous ..... Clay (0.40). Analytical solution. Numerical solution. Figure 3. Comparison of concentration distribution for sinu- soidal velocity pattern for boundary condition c0. 2 1 ю sec wt р. Ю.

  3. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  4. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or

  5. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Abstract. In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous semi-infinite porous medium. The dispersion coefficient is assumed to be initial dispersion and velocity is assumed to be temporally dependent with initial seepage velocity. Also ...

  6. Analytic solution of a five-direction radiation transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test certain spatial and angular dependent Monte Carlo biasing techniques, a one-dimensional, one energy, two-media, five-direction radiation transport model has been devised for which an analytic solution exists. Although this solution is too long to be conveniently expressed in an explicit form, it can be easily evaluated on the smallest of computers. This solution is discussed in this paper. 1 ref

  7. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux...

  8. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin X. Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM. It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots – apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs, which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic. Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle. The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2-4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute...... concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped...

  10. Mathematical modeling of fluid and solute transport in peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Waniewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of peritoneal dialysis schedule and dialysis fluid composition needs, among others, methods for quantitative assessment of fluid and solute transport. Furthermore, an integrative quantitative description of physiological processes within the tissue, which contribute to the net transfer of fluid and solutes, is necessary for interpretation of the data and for predictions of the outcome of possible intervention into the peritoneal transport system. The current pro...

  11. Assessment of applications of transport models on regional scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Fogg, G. E.; Henri, C.; Pauloo, R.

    2017-12-01

    Regional scale transport models are needed to support the long-term evaluation of groundwater quality and to develop management strategies aiming to prevent serious groundwater degradation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capacity of previously-developed upscaling approaches to accurately describe main solute transport processes including the capture of late-time tails under changing boundary conditions. Advective-dispersive contaminant transport in a 3D heterogeneous domain was simulated and used as a reference solution. Equivalent transport under homogeneous flow conditions were then evaluated applying the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) model. The random walk particle tracking method was used for both heterogeneous and homogeneous-MRMT scenarios under steady state and transient conditions. The results indicate that the MRMT model can capture the tails satisfactorily for plume transported with ambient steady-state flow field. However, when boundary conditions change, the mass transfer model calibrated for transport under steady-state conditions cannot accurately reproduce the tailing effect observed for the heterogeneous scenario. The deteriorating impact of transient boundary conditions on the upscaled model is more significant for regions where flow fields are dramatically affected, highlighting the poor applicability of the MRMT approach for complex field settings. Accurately simulating mass in both mobile and immobile zones is critical to represent the transport process under transient flow conditions and will be the future focus of our study.

  12. Ground-water solute transport modeling using a three-dimensional scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crider, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Scaled models are used extensively in current hydraulic research on sediment transport and solute dispersion in free surface flows (rivers, estuaries), but are neglected in current ground-water model research. Thus, an investigation was conducted to test the efficacy of a three-dimensional scaled model of solute transport in ground water. No previous results from such a model have been reported. Experiments performed on uniform scaled models indicated that some historical problems (e.g., construction and scaling difficulties; disproportionate capillary rise in model) were partly overcome by using simple model materials (sand, cement and water), by restricting model application to selective classes of problems, and by physically controlling the effect of the model capillary zone. Results from these tests were compared with mathematical models. Model scaling laws were derived for ground-water solute transport and used to build a three-dimensional scaled model of a ground-water tritium plume in a prototype aquifer on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Model results compared favorably with field data and with a numerical model. Scaled models are recommended as a useful additional tool for prediction of ground-water solute transport

  13. Upscaling nonreactive solute transport

    OpenAIRE

    LLERAR MEZA, GERÓNIMO

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on solute transport upscaling. Upscaling of solute transport is usually required to obtain computationally efficient numerical models in many field applications such as, remediation of aquifers, environmental risk to groundwater resources or the design of underground repositories of nuclear waste. The non-Fickian behavior observed in the field, and manifested by peaked concentration profiles with pronounced tailing, has questioned the use of the classical advection-dispers...

  14. New methods For Modeling Transport Of Water And Solutes In Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Per

    Recent models for water and solute transport in unsaturated soils have been mechanistically based but numerically very involved. This dissertation concerns the development of mechanistically-based but numerically simple models for calculating and analyzing transport of water and solutes in soil s...

  15. Development of solute transport models in YMPYRÄ framework to simulate solute migration in military shooting and training areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsta, L.; Karvonen, T.

    2017-12-01

    There are currently 25 shooting and training areas in Finland managed by The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF), where military activities can cause contamination of open waters and groundwater reservoirs. In the YMPYRÄ project, a computer software framework is being developed that combines existing open environmental data and proprietary information collected by FDF with computational models to investigate current and prevent future environmental problems. A data centric philosophy is followed in the development of the system, i.e. the models are updated and extended to handle available data from different areas. The results generated by the models are summarized as easily understandable flow and risk maps that can be opened in GIS programs and used in environmental assessments by experts. Substances investigated with the system include explosives and metals such as lead, and both surface and groundwater dominated areas can be simulated. The YMPYRÄ framework is composed of a three dimensional soil and groundwater flow model, several solute transport models and an uncertainty assessment system. Solute transport models in the framework include particle based, stream tube and finite volume based approaches. The models can be used to simulate solute dissolution from source area, transport in the unsaturated layers to groundwater and finally migration in groundwater to water extraction wells and springs. The models can be used to simulate advection, dispersion, equilibrium adsorption on soil particles, solubility and dissolution from solute phase and dendritic solute decay chains. Correct numerical solutions were confirmed by comparing results to analytical 1D and 2D solutions and by comparing the numerical solutions to each other. The particle based and stream tube type solute transport models were useful as they could complement the traditional finite volume based approach which in certain circumstances produced numerical dispersion due to piecewise solution of the

  16. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  17. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Modeling of Solute transport in a fractured rock zone at KURT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Jae Kwang; Baik, Min Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-01-01

    A solute transport model has developed to simulate migration of tracers which has tested in KURT. KAERI built an underground research laboratory so called KURT, which stands for Korea Underground Research Tunnel. Dipole tests has performed with some nonradioactive conservative tracers in a fractured zone which having a single fracture at KURT. The objectives of this study are not only developing a migration model of solutes for in-situ open environments but also validating the model by comparing and estimating experimental results

  19. Stochastic forward and inverse groundwater flow and solute transport modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: calibration, inverse modeling, stochastic modeling, nonlinear biodegradation, stochastic-convective, advective-dispersive, travel time, network design, non-Gaussian distribution, multimodal distribution, representers

    This thesis offers three new approaches that contribute

  20. Exact and Numerical Solutions of a Spatially-Distributed Mathematical Model for Fluid and Solute Transport in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model for solute and fluid transport induced by the osmotic pressure of glucose and albumin with the dependence of several parameters on the hydrostatic pressure is described. In particular, the fractional space available for macromolecules (albumin was used as a typical example and fractional fluid void volume were assumed to be different functions of hydrostatic pressure. In order to find non-uniform steady-state solutions analytically, some mathematical restrictions on the model parameters were applied. Exact formulae (involving hypergeometric functions for the density of fluid flux from blood to tissue and the fluid flux across tissues were constructed. In order to justify the applicability of the analytical results obtained, a wide range of numerical simulations were performed. It was found that the analytical formulae can describe with good approximation the fluid and solute transport (especially the rate of ultrafiltration for a wide range of values of the model parameters.

  1. Review and Application of Time Nonlocal Transport Models to Capture Solute Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    LU, B.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, H.; Green, C. T.; Wei, S.; Qian, J.

    2016-12-01

    Multiple time nonlocal transport models had long been used to capture solute retention in natural geologic media with intrinsic physical and chemical heterogeneity, but systematical comparison of these models was rather rare. This presentation reviewed four major time nonlocal transport models, which are the matrix diffusion (MD) model, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) framework, the multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model, and the time fractional advection-dispersion (fADE) model, by focusing on the physical description and parameter correlation The four models were then applied to quantify solute transport observed in laboratory sand columns to further evaluate their data needs and ability to represent real-world non-Fickian dispersion due to retention process.

  2. A Control Volume Model of Solute Transport in a Single Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Lennox, William C.

    1995-02-01

    A control volume model of solute transport through a single fracture in a porous matrix is developed. Application to problems of contaminant transport through fractured clay demonstrates several strong features of the method. The control volume approach inherently conserves mass and treats dispersivity at interfaces in a physically correct manner. By employing an upstream weighting scheme, based on the exact solution to the one-dimensional steady state advection-dispersion equation, the model proves to be more efficient than previous single-fracture models. The significance of matrix diffusion in the direction parallel to the fracture axis is investigated. For the transport of a nonreactive tracer through a 20-micrometer-wide fracture in clay material, analytical solutions based on one-dimensional matrix diffusion are erroneous for flow velocities of less than 1 m/day. The influence of boundary conditions on two-dimensional matrix diffusion is considered, and the clean-up of a contaminated fracture is simulated.

  3. Modeling of water and solute transport under variably saturated conditions: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappala, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the equations used in deterministic models of mass and energy transport in variably saturated porous media. Analytic, quasi-analytic, and numerical solution methods to the nonlinear forms of transport equations are discussed with respect to their advantages and limitations. The factors that influence the selection of a modeling method are discussed in this paper; they include the following: (1) the degree of coupling required among the equations describing the transport of liquids, gases, solutes, and energy; (2) the inclusion of an advection term in the equations; (3) the existence of sharp fronts; (4) the degree of nonlinearity and hysteresis in the transport coefficients and boundary conditions; (5) the existence of complex boundaries; and (6) the availability and reliability of data required by the models

  4. Preliminary modeling for solute transport in a fractured zone at the Korea underground research tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Jaek Wang; Baik, Min Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2012-01-01

    Migration tests were performed with conservative tracers in a fractured zone that had a single fracture of about 2.5 m distance at the KURT. To interpret the migration of the tracers in the fractured rock, a solute transport model was developed. A two dimensional variable aperture channel model was adopted to describe the fractured path and hydrology, and a particle tracking method was used for solute transport. The simulation tried not only to develop a migration model of solutes for open flow environments but also to produce ideas for a better understanding of solute behaviours in indefinable fracture zones by comparing them to experimental results. The results of our simulations and experiments are described as elution and breakthrough curves, and are quantified by momentum analysis. The main retardation mechanism of nonsorbing tracers, including matrixdiffusion, was investigated.

  5. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2009-11-20

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical-chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into "mobile" and "immobile" flow regions with first-order mass transfer between these two regions (i.e, "physical" nonequilibrium or PNE). Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases can either proceed as an equilibrium or a first-order process (i.e, "chemical" nonequilibrium or CNE) for both the mobile and immobile regions. An analytical solution for the PCNE model is obtained using iterated Laplace transforms. This solution complements earlier semi-analytical and numerical approaches to model solute transport with the PCNE model. The impact of selected model parameters on solute breakthrough curves is illustrated. As is well known, nonequilibrium results in earlier solute breakthrough with increased tailing. The PCNE model allows greater flexibility to describe this trend; for example, a closer resemblance between solute input and effluent pulse. Expressions for moments and transfer functions are presented to facilitate the analytical use of the PCNE model. Contours of mean breakthrough time, variance, and spread of the colloid breakthrough curves as a function of PNE and CNE parameters demonstrate the utility of a model that accounts for both physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. The model is applied to describe representative colloid breakthrough curves in Ottawa sands reported by Bradford et al. (2002). An equilibrium model provided a good description of breakthrough curves for the bromide tracer but could not adequately describe the colloid data. A considerably better description was provide by the simple CNE model but the best description, especially for the larger 3.2-microm colloids, was provided by the PCNE model.

  6. CFD modeling of fluid flow and solute transport in a µXCT scanned natural fracture: Impact of fracture geometry on solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F. M.; Enzmann, F.; Wenka, A.; Dentz, M.; Schaefer, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid flow and solute transport through fractures are a key process in both industrial and scientific issues ranging from e.g. geothermal energy production to the disposal of nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the various interdependent processes governing fluid flow and solute transport in fractures over a broad range of length and time scales is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have shown the importance of fracture geometry on flow and solute transport. More recently, significance of so called recirculation zones which are accessible for solutes and colloids through hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion have been identified [1,2] which can be responsible for pronounced late time solute breakthrough (tailing). Unfortunately, these studies are mostly focused on 2D. Thus, the intention of the prevailing study is to investigate the influence of fracture geometry on solute transport under a broad range of flow conditions (Pe number from 0.1 up to 1000) and as a function of flow direction (that is, reversed flow direction) both in 2D and 3D. We present µXCT measurements with a spatial resolution of 80 µm of a natural single fracture in a diorite drill core from Äspö, Sweden, which serves as direct input for computational mesh generation in order to obtain a realistic 3D model. Besides, a 2D model was produced by projecting the 3D mesh into the x-y-plane to completely exclude the fracture aperture information. Computational fluid dynamic simulations in 2D and 3D have been conducted to study fluid flow and conservative tracer (HTO) transport by means of the finite volume code FLUENT. The natural fracture exhibits a very complex geometry with asperities, rough side walls and a heterogenous aperture distribution. Furthermore, the µXCT data clearly shows that the fracture is not filled with fault gauge material. Simulation results confirm the impact of fracture geometry/roughness on fluid flow causing

  7. Pore-network modeling of solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Chao Zhong; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a pore-network (PN) model for solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media was developed. Compared to previous studies of biofilm growth, it has two new features. First, the constructed pore network gives a better representation of a porous medium. Second, instead of using a

  8. Modeling water flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone inside NSRAWD project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, A.; Diaconu, D.; Bucur, C.; Genty, A.

    2015-01-01

    The NSRAWD project (2010-2013) - Numerical Simulations for Radioactive Waste Disposal was initiated under a collaboration agreement between the Institute for Nuclear Research and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The context of the project was favorable to combine the modeling activities with an experimental part in order to improve and validate the numerical models used so far to simulate water flow and solute transport at Saligny site, Romania. The numerical models developed in the project were refined and validated on new hydrological data gathered between 2010-2012 by a monitoring station existent on site which performs automatic determination of soil water content and matrix potential, as well as several climate parameters (wind, temperature and precipitations). Water flow and solute transport was modeled in transient conditions, by taking into consideration, as well as neglecting the evapotranspiration phenomenon, on the basis of a tracer test launched on site. The determination of dispersivities for solute transport was targeted from the solute plume. The paper presents the main results achieved in the NSRAWD project related to water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated area of the Saligny site. The results indicated satisfactory predictions for the simulation of water flow in the unsaturated area, in steady state and transient conditions. In the case of tracer transport modeling, dispersivity coefficients could not be finally well fitted for the data measured on site and in order to obtain a realistic preview over the values of these parameters, further investigations are recommended. The article is followed by the slides of the presentation

  9. Solutes transport in unsaturated double-porosity medium. Modelling by homogenization and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Ngoc, T.D.

    2008-07-01

    This Ph.D thesis presents the development of the solute transport models in unsaturated double-porosity medium, by using the asymptotic homogenization method. The obtained macroscopic models concern diffusion, diffusion-convection and dispersion-convection, according to the transport regime which is characterized by the non-dimensional numbers. The models consist of two coupled equations that show the local non-equilibrium of concentrations. The double-porosity transport models were numerically implemented using the code COMSOL Multiphysics (finite elements method), and compared with the solution of the same problem at the fine scale. The implementation allows solving the coupled equations in the macro- and micro-porosity domains (two-scale computations). The calculations of the dispersion tensor as a solution of the local boundary value problems, were also conducted. It was shown that the dispersivity depends on the saturation, the physical properties of the macro-porosity domain and the internal structure of the double-porosity medium. Finally, two series of experiments were performed on a physical model of double-porosity that is composed of a periodic assemblage of sintered clay spheres in Hostun sand HN38. The first experiment was a drainage experiment, which was conducted in order to validate the unsaturated flow model. The second series was a dispersion experiment in permanent unsaturated water flow condition (water content measured by gamma ray attenuation technique). A good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental observations allows the validation of the developed models. (author)

  10. Simulation of solute transport in a mountain pool-and-riffle stream: A transient storage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencala, Kenneth E.; Walters, Roy A.

    1983-01-01

    The physical characteristics of mountain streams differ from the uniform and conceptually well- defined open channels for which the analysis of solute transport has been oriented in the past and is now well understood. These physical conditions significantly influence solute transport behavior, as demonstrated by a transient storage model simulation of solute transport in a very small (0.0125 m3s−1) mountain pool-and-riffle stream. The application is to a carefully controlled and intensively monitored chloride injection experiment. The data from the experiment are not explained by the standard convection-dispersion mechanisms alone. A transient storage model, which couples dead zones with the one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation, simulates the general characteristics of the solute transport behavior and a set of simulation parameters were determined that yield an adequate fit to the data. However, considerable uncertainty remains in determining physically realistic values of these parameters. The values of the simulation parameters used are compared to values used by other authors for other streams. The comparison supports, at least qualitatively, the determined parameter values.

  11. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ryan D; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-01-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  12. A lattice Boltzmann model for solute transport in open channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongda; Cater, John; Liu, Haifei; Ding, Xiangyi; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model of advection-dispersion problems in one-dimensional (1D) open channel flows is developed for simulation of solute transport and pollutant concentration. The hydrodynamics are calculated based on a previous lattice Boltzmann approach to solving the 1D Saint-Venant equations (LABSVE). The advection-dispersion model is coupled with the LABSVE using the lattice Boltzmann method. Our research recovers the advection-dispersion equations through the Chapman-Enskog expansion of the lattice Boltzmann equation. The model differs from the existing schemes in two points: (1) the lattice Boltzmann numerical method is adopted to solve the advection-dispersion problem by meso-scopic particle distribution; (2) and the model describes the relation between discharge, cross section area and solute concentration, which increases the applicability of the water quality model in practical engineering. The model is verified using three benchmark tests: (1) instantaneous solute transport within a short distance; (2) 1D point source pollution with constant velocity; (3) 1D point source pollution in a dam break flow. The model is then applied to a 50-year flood point source pollution accident on the Yongding River, which showed good agreement with a MIKE 11 solution and gauging data.

  13. On the Dagan Model of Solute Transport in Groundwater: Foundational Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Garrison; Barry, D. A.

    1987-10-01

    The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) developed by Dagan [1984] to predict the ensemble-average concentration of a conservative solute in groundwater has been used successfully to interpret recent tracer experiments in a sand aquifer at the Borden site in Canada. This successful application encouraged further investigation of the Dagan model in respect to its physical basis and predictive characteristics. It is shown in the present paper, which deals with the first topic, that the Dagan model CDE can be derived through an extension of the cumulant expansion technique applied previously by Chu and Sposito [1980] to develop a mean CDE for solute transport in homogeneous porous media. This technique also leads directly to the mean CDE developed by Gelhar and Axness [1983] as an asymptotic (large time) limit and to model dispersion coefficients derived by Mather on and de Marsily [1980] and Güven and MoIz [1986]. The Dagan CDE then is considered in detail in respect to which conceptualization of the solute concentration, resident or flux, the model may utilize in predictive applications. General mathematical expressions relating the two conceptualizations are derived for an arbitrary solute transport problem and then are applied to the Dagan model for point and prism source inputs. Finally, the Dagan model is interpreted physically using data from the recent tracer experiments of Roberts and Mackay [1986] at the Borden site. It is shown that model predictions of resident and flux concentrations are numerically indistinguishable on any time scale over which field solute concentration measurements typically are made. The model prediction of dispersion coefficients, on the other hand, leads to dramatic differences in predicted plume behavior depending on whether finite time expressions or their asymptotic limits are used. According to the Dagan model, the asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficient cannot replace the time-dependent coefficient on any realistic time

  14. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  15. Modeling study of solute transport in the unsaturated zone: Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, E.P.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1987-04-01

    Issues addressed were the adequacy of the data for the various models, effectiveness of the models to represent the data, particular information provided by the models, the role of caisson experiments in providing fundamental knowledge of porous-media water flow and solute transport, and the importance of geochemistry to the transport of nonconservative tracers. These proceedings include the presentations made by each of the modelers; the summary document written by the panel; and a transcript of the discussions, both the discussions that followed individual presentations and the general discussion held on the second day. This publication completes the series on the workshop. Volume I in the series (NUREG/CR-4615, Vol. I) contains background information and the data sets provided each modeler

  16. Dual-permeability model for water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Gerke, Horst; Comegna, Alessandro; Basile, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    A dual-permeability approach was extended to describe preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils. In the approach, the soil is treated as a dual-permeability bulk porous medium consisting of dynamic interacting matrix and fractures pore domains. Water flow and solute transport in both the domains are described by the Richards' equation and advection-dispersion equation, respectively. In the model the contributions of the two regions to water flow and solute transport is changed dynamically according to the shrinkage characteristic exhibited under soil drying. Aggregate deformation during wetting/drying cycles is assumed to change only the relative proportions of voids in the fractures and in the aggregates, while the total volume of pores (and thus the layer thickness) remains unchanged. Thus, the partial contributions of the fracture and aggregate domains, are now a function of the water content (or the pressure head h), while their sum, the bulk porosity, is assumed to be constant. Any change in the aggregate contribution to total porosity is directly converted into a proportional change in the fracture porosity. This means that bulk volume change during shrinkage is mainly determined by change in crack volume rather than by change in layer thickness. This simplified approach allows dealing with an expansive soil as with a macroscopically rigid soil. The model was already tested by investigating whether and how well hydraulic characteristics obtained under the assumption of "dynamic" dual-permeability hydraulic parameterizations, or, alternatively, assuming the rigidity of the porous medium, reproduced measured soil water contents in a shrinking soil. Here we will discuss theoretical implications of the model in terms of relative importance of the parameters involved. The relative importance will be evaluated for different flow and transport processes and for different initial and top boundary conditions. Key words: Preferential flow and

  17. Constructing Soliton and Kink Solutions of PDE Models in Transport and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod A. Vladimirov

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of our recent works directed towards discovery of a periodic, kink-like and soliton-like travelling wave solutions within the models of transport phenomena and the mathematical biology. Analytical description of these wave patterns is carried out by means of our modification of the direct algebraic balance method. In the case when the analytical description fails, we propose to approximate invariant travelling wave solutions by means of an infinite series of exponential functions. The effectiveness of the method of approximation is demonstrated on a hyperbolic modification of Burgers equation.

  18. Regional flow and solute transport modeling for site suitability. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.; Miller, I.

    1979-12-01

    The nature of regional flow systems in large sedimentary basins will largely determine the effectiveness of regional flow as a barrier to radionuclide escape from deep geologic repositories. The purpose of the work reported herein and the proposed future work is to develop a methodology for evaluating regional flow barriers by using numerical models. The Williston Basin was chosen as an archetype case for the regional modeling study. However, due to the simplified nature of the study, the results are not meant to represent the behavior of a repository actually placed within the Williston Basin. The major components of this Phase I study are: (1) assembly and reduction of available data; (2) formulation of a simplified geohydrologic model; (3) computer simulation of fluid flow; and (4) computer simulation of solute transport. As of this report, the first two items are essentially completed. Computer simulation of fluid flow will require some revision and further study, which will be done in the second phase of this study. Computer simulation of solute transport has been considered only on a very preliminary basis. Important conclusions of this Phase I study are as follows. Assembly and reduction of data require an extensive work effort. Generally, the parameters describing fluid flow are poorly known on a regional basis and those describing solute transport are unknown

  19. On the Dagan Model of solute transport in groundwater: Application to the Borden Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D. A.; Coves, J.; Sposito, Garrison

    1988-10-01

    In the first part of this study, Sposito and Barry (1987) derived an ensemble-mean convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for tracer solute transport subject to a random velocity field. It was shown that the model dispersion coefficients originally presented by Dagan (1984) could be derived from the general expression for the dispersion coefficients in this mean CDE. Under the assumption of ergodicity, the Dagan model is used in this paper to predict chloride and bromide concentrations in the well-documented Borden aquifer experiment reported by Roberts and Mackay (1986). Because of a possible influence on the solute from the upper aquifer boundary, it was appropriate to apply the two-dimensional form of the model. A number of steps was necessary to reduce the three-dimensional raw data to a two-dimensional form, the main ones being integration over the vertical axis and the use of a gridding algorithm to form a two-dimensional solute concentration surface. Incomplete sampling of the solute plume during the early sampling sessions, as well as the assumptions made with respect to the data analysis, produce a rather large degree of uncertainty in the specification of the initial solute plume. These factors hinder a thorough experimental evaluation of the Dagan model. Data from some of the later sampling sessions were more complete, however, and the model predictions appeared to agree well with the field concentration data, especially in the preasymptotic region for the longitudinal dispersion coefficient.

  20. Evaluation of bacteria-facilitated cadmium transport in gravel columns using the HYDRUS colloid-facilitated solute transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Å Imå¯Nek, Jirka

    2006-12-01

    The colloid-facilitated solute transport model, based on HYDRUS-1D, was evaluated using the column experimental data of Pang et al. (2005) for cadmium (Cd) transport facilitated by B. subtilis spores or E. coli in saturated coarse alluvial gravels. We simulated Cd transport involving convection, dispersion, kinetic adsorption/desorption to/from the aquifer media and to/from mobile/immobile bacteria, and kinetic attachment/detachment of the bacteria to/from the aquifer media. To reduce the number of parameters to be optimized, we independently estimated Cd sorption/desorption rates to mobile bacteria from a batch study. The model described the collected experimental data reasonably well. Extensive sensitivity analysis to various reaction parameters was carried out to obtain an understanding of the relative importance of individual model parameters on model predictions. Our modeling results suggest that the rates of Cd sorption or desorption differ not only between different bacterial species but also between unattached and deposited bacteria. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that the Cd sorption rate to unattached bacteria had a significantly greater impact on the model results than its sorption rate to deposited bacteria. For the experimental system investigated here, model results were most sensitive to parameters describing interactions between Cd-aquifer media, bacteria-aquifer media, and Cd-mobile bacteria, and they were less sensitive to interactions between Cd-immobile bacteria and desorption rate from mobile bacteria.

  1. Benchmarking the invariant embedding method against analytical solutions in model transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, Wahlberg; Imre, Pazsit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the invariant embedding method in a series of model transport problems, for which it is also possible to obtain an analytical solution. Due to the non-linear character of the embedding equations, their solution can only be obtained numerically. However, this can be done via a robust and effective iteration scheme. In return, the domain of applicability is far wider than the model problems investigated in this paper. The use of the invariant embedding method is demonstrated in three different areas. The first is the calculation of the energy spectrum of reflected (sputtered) particles from a multiplying medium, where the multiplication arises from recoil production. Both constant and energy dependent cross sections with a power law dependence were used in the calculations. The second application concerns the calculation of the path length distribution of reflected particles from a medium without multiplication. This is a relatively novel and unexpected application, since the embedding equations do not resolve the depth variable. The third application concerns the demonstration that solutions in an infinite medium and a half-space are interrelated through embedding-like integral equations, by the solution of which the reflected flux from a half-space can be reconstructed from solutions in an infinite medium or vice versa. In all cases the invariant embedding method proved to be robust, fast and monotonically converging to the exact solutions. (authors)

  2. Modeling particle-facilitated solute transport using the C-Ride module of HYDRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, Jiri; Bradford, Scott A.

    2017-04-01

    Strongly sorbing chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, and/or explosives) in soils are associated predominantly with the solid phase, which is commonly assumed to be stationary. However, recent field- and laboratory-scale observations have shown that, in the presence of mobile colloidal particles (e.g., microbes, humic substances, clays and metal oxides), the colloids could act as pollutant carriers and thus provide a rapid transport pathway for strongly sorbing contaminants. Such transport can be further accelerated since these colloidal particles may travel through interconnected larger pores where the water velocity is relatively high. Additionally, colloidal particles have a considerable adsorption capacity for other species present in water because of their large specific surface areas and their high concentrations in soil-water and groundwater. As a result, the transport of contaminants can be significantly, sometimes dramatically, enhanced when they are adsorbed to mobile colloids. To address this problem, we have developed the C-Ride module for HYDRUS-1D. This one-dimensional numerical module is based on the HYDRUS-1D software package and incorporates mechanisms associated with colloid and colloid-facilitated solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This numerical model accounts for both colloid and solute movement due to convection, diffusion, and dispersion in variably-saturated soils, as well as for solute movement facilitated by colloid transport. The colloids transport module additionally considers processes of attachment/detachment to/from the solid phase, straining, and/or size exclusion. Various blocking and depth dependent functions can be used to modify the attachment and straining coefficients. The module additionally considers the effects of changes in the water content on colloid/bacteria transport and attachment/detachment to/from solid-water and air-water interfaces. For example, when the air

  3. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques and their effect on sensitivity analysis and inverse modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques for solving the advection-dispersion equation (finite difference, predictor corrector, total variation diminishing, method of characteristics, and modified method of characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using discrete, randomly distributed, homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an opportunity to compare the solution techniques: the heterogeneous hydraulic-conductivity distribution of known structure can be accurately represented by a numerical model, and detailed measurements can be compared with simulated concentrations and total flow through the tank. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results - simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values - change in this heterogeneous situation given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The breakthrough curves show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied between the techniques because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity-analysis results revealed: (1) a high correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity given the concentration and flow observations used, so that both could not be estimated; and (2) that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information to estimate individual values of dispersivity for the five sands. This study demonstrates that the choice of assigned dispersivity and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique influence estimated hydraulic conductivity values to a surprising degree.

  4. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : SWAP model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies = [Waterstroming en transport van opgeloste stoffen op veldschaal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale

  5. Modelling The Transport Of Solutes And Colloids In The Grimsel Migration Shear Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosakowski, G.; Smith, P

    2005-02-01

    This report describes modelling of the transport of solutes and colloids in an experimental system comprising an artificial dipole flow field in a water-conducting shear zone at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the central Swiss Alps. The modelling work forms part of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), which includes a series of field transport experiments and a supporting laboratory programme, as well as modelling studies. Four independent groups representing different organisations or research institutes have conducted the modelling, with each group employing its own modelling approach or approaches. Only the work conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is described in the present report. The modelling approaches used in the present study may not be directly applicable to safety assessment problems and the direct implications of the results of this study for safety assessment are limited. It can, however, be said that the study has demonstrated the high degree of mobility of bentonite and other colloids in a system that is at least in some ways comparable to those of interest in safety assessment, and has shown that bentonite colloids can at least potentially affect the transport of some safety relevant radionuclides over longer temporal and spatial scales than those addressed here. (author)

  6. Numerical modelling of solute transport at Forsmark with MIKE SHE. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran; Sassner, Mona (DHI Sverige AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Bosson, Emma (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is performing site investigations at two different locations in Sweden, referred to as the Forsmark and Laxemar areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for high-level radioactive waste. Data from the site investigations are used in a variety of modelling activities. This report presents model development and results of numerical transport modelling based on the numerical flow modelling of surface water and near-surface groundwater at the Forsmark site. The numerical modelling was performed using the modelling tool MIKE SHE and is based on the site data and conceptual model of the Forsmark areas. This report presents solute transport applications based on both particle tracking simulations and advection-dispersion calculations. The MIKE SHE model is the basis for the transport modelling presented in this report. Simulation cases relevant for the transport from a deep geological repository have been studied, but also the pattern of near surface recharge and discharge areas. When the main part of the modelling work presented in this report was carried out, the flow modelling of the Forsmark site was not finalised. Thus, the focus of this work is to describe the sensitivity to different transport parameters, and not to point out specific areas as discharge areas from a future repository (this is to be done later, within the framework of the safety assessment). In the last chapter, however, results based on simulations with the re-calibrated MIKE SHE flow model are presented. The results from the MIKE SHE water movement calculations were used by cycling the calculated transient flow field for a selected one-year period as many times as needed to achieve the desired simulation period. The solute source was located either in the bedrock or on top of the model. In total, 15 different transport simulation cases were studied. Five of the simulations were particle tracking simulations, whereas the rest

  7. An Integrated Numerical Hydrodynamic Shallow Flow-Solute Transport Model for Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, N. A.; Mohd Sidek, L.

    2016-03-01

    The rapidly changing on land profiles in the some urban areas in Malaysia led to the increasing of flood risk. Extensive developments on densely populated area and urbanization worsen the flood scenario. An early warning system is really important and the popular method is by numerically simulating the river and flood flows. There are lots of two-dimensional (2D) flood model predicting the flood level but in some circumstances, still it is difficult to resolve the river reach in a 2D manner. A systematic early warning system requires a precisely prediction of flow depth. Hence a reliable one-dimensional (1D) model that provides accurate description of the flow is essential. Research also aims to resolve some of raised issues such as the fate of pollutant in river reach by developing the integrated hydrodynamic shallow flow-solute transport model. Presented in this paper are results on flow prediction for Sungai Penchala and the convection-diffusion of solute transports simulated by the developed model.

  8. Benchmarking the invariant embedding method against analytical solutions in model transport problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahlberg Malin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the invariant embedding method in a few model transport problems for which it is also possible to obtain an analytical solution. The use of the method is demonstrated in three different areas. The first is the calculation of the energy spectrum of sputtered particles from a scattering medium without absorption, where the multiplication (particle cascade is generated by recoil production. Both constant and energy dependent cross-sections with a power law dependence were treated. The second application concerns the calculation of the path length distribution of reflected particles from a medium without multiplication. This is a relatively novel application, since the embedding equations do not resolve the depth variable. The third application concerns the demonstration that solutions in an infinite medium and in a half-space are interrelated through embedding-like integral equations, by the solution of which the flux reflected from a half-space can be reconstructed from solutions in an infinite medium or vice versa. In all cases, the invariant embedding method proved to be robust, fast, and monotonically converging to the exact solutions.

  9. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical modeling of solute transport in deformable unsaturated layered soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil stratification was studied through numerical investigation based on the coupled model of solute transport in deformable unsaturated soil. The theoretical model implied two-way coupled excess pore pressure and soil deformation based on Biot's consolidation theory as well as a one-way coupled volatile pollutant concentration field developed from the advection-diffusion theory. Embedded in the model, the degree of saturation, fluid compressibility, self-weight of the soil matrix, porosity variance, longitudinal dispersion, and linear sorption were computed. Based on simulation results of a proposed three-layer landfill model using the finite element method, the multi-layer effects are discussed with regard to the hydraulic conductivity, shear modulus, degree of saturation, molecular diffusion coefficient, and thickness of each layer. Generally speaking, contaminants spread faster in a stratified field with a soft and highly permeable top layer; soil parameters of the top layer are more critical than the lower layers but controlling soil thicknesses will alter the results. This numerical investigation showed noticeable impacts of stratified soil properties on solute migration results, demonstrating the importance of correctly modeling layered soil instead of simply assuming the averaged properties across the soil profile.

  11. A Solution Methodology and Computer Program to Efficiently Model Thermodynamic and Transport Coefficients of Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    A solution methodology has been developed to efficiently model multi-specie, chemically frozen, thermally perfect gas mixtures. The method relies on the ability to generate a single (composite) set of thermodynamic and transport coefficients prior to beginning a CFD solution. While not fundamentally a new concept, many applied CFD users are not aware of this capability nor have a mechanism to easily and confidently generate new coefficients. A database of individual specie property coefficients has been created for 48 species. The seven coefficient form of the thermodynamic functions is currently used rather then the ten coefficient form due to the similarity of the calculated properties, low temperature behavior and reduced CPU requirements. Sutherland laminar viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients were computed in a consistent manner from available reference curves. A computer program has been written to provide CFD users with a convenient method to generate composite specie coefficients for any mixture. Mach 7 forebody/inlet calculations demonstrated nearly equivalent results and significant CPU time savings compared to a multi-specie solution approach. Results from high-speed combustor analysis also illustrate the ability to model inert test gas contaminants without additional computational expense.

  12. Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) model: Formulation and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Cole, C.R.; Kincaid, C.T.; Monti, A.M.

    1987-10-01

    The CFEST (Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport) code has been developed to analyze coupled hydrologic, thermal, and solute transport processes. It treats single-pahse Darcy ground-water flow in a horizontal or vertical plane, or in fully three-dimensional space under nonisothermal conditions. The code has the capability to model discontinuous and continuous layering, time-dependent and constant sources/sinks, and transient as well as steady-stae ground-water flow. The code offers a wide choice of boundary conditions such as precsribed heads, nodal injection or withdrawal, constant or spatially varying infiltration rates, and welemental source/sink. Initial conditions for the flow analysis can be prescribed pressure or hydraulic head. The heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and porosity can be described by geologic unit or explicity for given elements. Three-dimensional elelments are generated from user-defined well logs at each surface node. To facilitate interaction between disciplines, support programs are provided to plot the finite element grid, well logs, contour maps of input and output parameters, and vertical cross sections. Ground-water travel paths and times and volumetric rates from a specified point can be determined from support programs. This report includes governing partial differential equations, finite element formulation, a use's manual, verification test examples, sample problems, and source listings. 36 refs., 121 figs., 36 tabs

  13. Evaluation of unsaturated-zone solute-transport models for studies of agricultural chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Bayless, E. Randall; Green, Christopher T.; Garg, Sheena; Voss, Frank D.; Lampe, David C.; Barbash, Jack E.; Capel, Paul D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Seven unsaturated-zone solute-transport models were tested with two data sets to select models for use by the Agricultural Chemical Team of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data sets were from a bromide tracer test near Merced, California, and an atrazine study in the White River Basin, Indiana. In this study the models are designated either as complex or simple based on the water flux algorithm. The complex models, HYDRUS2D, LEACHP, RZWQM, and VS2DT, use Richards' equation to simulate water flux and are well suited to process understanding. The simple models, CALF, GLEAMS, and PRZM, use a tipping-bucket algorithm and are more amenable to extrapolation because they require fewer input parameters. The purpose of this report is not to endorse a particular model, but to describe useful features, potential capabilities, and possible limitations that emerged from working with the model input data sets. More rigorous assessment of model applicability involves proper calibration, which was beyond the scope of this study.

  14. Generic Procedure for Coupling the PHREEQC Geochemical Modeling Framework with Flow and Solute Transport Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, L. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Computer simulations of water availability and quality play an important role in state-of-the-art water resources management. However, many of the most utilized software programs focus either on physical flow and transport phenomena (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, FEFLOW, HYDRUS) or on geochemical reactions (e.g., MINTEQ, PHREEQC, CHESS, ORCHESTRA). In recent years, several couplings between both genres of programs evolved in order to consider interactions between flow and biogeochemical reactivity (e.g., HP1, PHWAT). Software coupling procedures can be categorized as ‘close couplings’, where programs pass information via the memory stack at runtime, and ‘remote couplings’, where the information is exchanged at each time step via input/output files. The former generally involves modifications of software codes and therefore expert programming skills are required. We present a generic recipe for remotely coupling the PHREEQC geochemical modeling framework and flow and solute transport (FST) simulators. The iterative scheme relies on operator splitting with continuous re-initialization of PHREEQC and the FST of choice at each time step. Since PHREEQC calculates the geochemistry of aqueous solutions in contact with soil minerals, the procedure is primarily designed for couplings to FST’s for liquid phase flow in natural environments. It requires the accessibility of initial conditions and numerical parameters such as time and space discretization in the input text file for the FST and control of the FST via commands to the operating system (batch on Windows; bash/shell on Unix/Linux). The coupling procedure is based on PHREEQC’s capability to save the state of a simulation with all solid, liquid and gaseous species as a PHREEQC input file by making use of the dump file option in the TRANSPORT keyword. The output from one reaction calculation step is therefore reused as input for the following reaction step where changes in element amounts due to advection

  15. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-01

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (cryopreservation for practical applications.

  16. Qualitatively Modeling solute fate and transport across scales in an agricultural catchment with diverse lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayman, C. R.; Russo, T. A.; Li, L.; Forsythe, B.; Hoagland, B.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO) project, we have collected geochemical and hydrological data from several subcatchments and four monitoring sites on the main stem of Shaver's Creek, in Huntingon county, Pennsylvania. One subcatchment (0.43 km2) is under agricultural land use, and the monitoring locations on the larger Shaver's Creek (up to 163 km2) drain watersheds with 0 to 25% agricultural area. These two scales of investigation, coupled with advances made across the SSHCZO on multiple lithologies allow us to extrapolate from the subcatchment to the larger watershed. We use geochemical surface and groundwater data to estimate the solute and water transport regimes within the catchment, and to show how lithology and land use are major controls on ground and surface water quality. One area of investigation includes the transport of nutrients between interflow and regional groundwater, and how that connectivity may be reflected in local surface waters. Water and nutrient (Nitrogen) isotopes, will be used to better understand the relative contributions of local and regional groundwater and interflow fluxes into nearby streams. Following initial qualitative modeling, multiple hydrologic and nutrient transport models (e.g. SWAT and CYCLES/PIHM) will be evaluated from the subcatchment to large watershed scales. We will evaluate the ability to simulate the contributions of regional groundwater versus local groundwater, and also impacts of agricultural land management on surface water quality. Improving estimations of groundwater contributions to stream discharge will provide insight into how much agricultural development can impact stream quality and nutrient loading.

  17. Numerical modeling of solute transport in a sand tank physical model under varying hydraulic gradient and hydrological stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlabachew, Abunu; Shu, Longcang; Wu, Peipeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Xu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This laboratory study improves the understanding of the impacts of horizontal hydraulic gradient, artificial recharge, and groundwater pumping on solute transport through aquifers. Nine experiments and numerical simulations were carried out using a sand tank. The variable-density groundwater flow and sodium chloride transport were simulated using the three-dimensional numerical model SEAWAT. Numerical modelling results successfully reproduced heads and concentrations observed in the sand tank. A higher horizontal hydraulic gradient enhanced the migration of sodium chloride, particularly in the groundwater flow direction. The application of constant artificial recharge increased the spread of the sodium chloride plume in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. In addition, groundwater pumping accelerated spreading of the sodium chloride plume towards the pumping well. Both higher hydraulic gradient and pumping rate generated oval-shaped plumes in the horizontal plane. However, the artificial recharge process produced stretched plumes. These effects of artificial recharge and groundwater pumping were greater under higher hydraulic gradient. The concentration breakthrough curves indicated that emerging solutions never attained the concentration of the originally injected solution. This is probably because of sorption of sodium chloride onto the silica sand and/or the exchange of sodium chloride between the mobile and immobile liquid domains. The fingering and protruding plume shapes in the numerical models constitute instability zones produced by buoyancy-driven flow. Overall, the results have substantiated the influences of hydraulic gradient, boundary condition, artificial recharge, pumping rate and density differences on solute transport through a homogeneous unconfined aquifer. The implications of these findings are important for managing liquid wastes.

  18. A stochastic model of reactive solute transport with time-varying velocity in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Z. J.; Sposito, Garrison

    1991-03-01

    The cumulant expansion method, used previously by Sposito and Barry (1987) to derive an ensemble average transport equation for a tracer moving in a heterogeneous aquifer, is generalized to the case of a reactive solute that can adsorb linearly and undergo first-order decay. In the process we also generalize the Van Kampen (1987) result for the cumulant expansion of a multiplicative stochastic differential equation containing a time-dependent sure matrix. The resulting partial differential equation exhibits terms with field-scale coefficients that are analogous to those in the corresponding nonstochastic local-scale transport equation. There are also new terms in the third- and fourth-order spatial derivatives of the ensemble average concentration. It is demonstrated that the effective solute velocity for the aqueous concentration, not that for the total concentration (aqueous plus sorbed), is relevant for a field-scale description of solute transport. The field-scale effective solute velocity, dispersion coefficient, retardation factor, and first-order decay parameters, unlike their local-scale counterparts, are time-dependent because of autocorrelations and cross correlations among the random local solute velocity, retardation factor, and first-order decay constant. It is shown also that negative cross correlations between the random tracer solute velocity and the inverse of the local retardation factor may produce both enhanced dispersion and a temporal growth in the field-scale retardation factor. These effects are possible in any heterogeneous aquifer for which a stochastic description of aquifer spatial variability is appropriate.

  19. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  20. Concepts and dimensionality in modeling unsaturated water flow and solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.; Rooij, de G.H.; Heinen, M.; Stagnitti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Many environmental studies require accurate simulation of waterand solute fluxes in the unsaturated zone. This paper evaluatesone- and multi-dimensional approaches for soil water flow as wellas different spreading mechanisms to model solute behavior atdifferent scales. For quantification of soil

  1. Modeling reactive transport in non-ideal aqueous-solid solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Haibing, E-mail: haibing.shao@ufz.de [UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department Environmental Informatics, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)] [Applied Environmental System Analysis, TU Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Dmytrieva, Svitlana V. [SSC Technocentre, Nauky Prosp. 46, 03650 Kyiv (Ukraine)] [Laboratory for Waste Management, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kolditz, Olaf [UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department Environmental Informatics, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)] [Applied Environmental System Analysis, TU Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Pfingsten, Wilfried; Kosakowski, Georg [Laboratory for Waste Management, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-07-15

    The numerical simulation of reactive mass transport processes in complex geochemical environments is an important tool for the performance assessment of future waste repositories. A new combination of the multi-component mass transport code GeoSys/RockFlow and the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) equilibrium solver GEM-Selektor is used to calculate the accurate equilibrium of multiple non-ideal solid solutions which are important for the immobilization of radionuclides such as Ra. The coupled code is verified by a widely used benchmark of dissolution-precipitation in a calcite-dolomite system. A more complex application shown in this paper is the transport of Ra in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository. Depending on the initial inventories of Sr, Ba and sulfate, non-ideal sulfate and carbonate solid solutions can fix mobile Ra cations. Due to the complex geochemical interactions, the reactive transport simulations can describe the migration of Ra in a much more realistic way than using the traditional linear K{sub D} approach only.

  2. A proposed strategy for the validation of ground-water flow and solute transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.A.; Goodrich, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-water flow and transport models can be thought of as a combination of conceptual and mathematical models and the data that characterize a given system. The judgment of the validity or invalidity of a model depends both on the adequacy of the data and the model structure (i.e., the conceptual and mathematical model). This report proposes a validation strategy for testing both components independently. The strategy is based on the philosophy that a model cannot be proven valid, only invalid or not invalid. In addition, the authors believe that a model should not be judged in absence of its intended purpose. Hence, a flow and transport model may be invalid for one purpose but not invalid for another. 9 refs

  3. Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

    2000-01-01

    A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

  4. Modeling solute transport through saturated zone ground water at 10 km scale: Example from the Yucca Mountain license application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Sharad; Ding, Mei; Chu, Shaoping; Robinson, Bruce A.; Arnold, Bill; Meijer, Arend; Eddebbarh, Al-Aziz

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a study of solute transport through ground water in the saturated zone and the resulting breakthrough curves (BTCs), using a field-scale numerical model that incorporates the processes of advection, dispersion, matrix diffusion in fractured volcanic formations, sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport. Such BTCs at compliance boundaries are often used as performance measures for a site. The example considered here is that of the saturated zone study prepared for the Yucca Mountain license application. The saturated zone at this site occurs partly in volcanic, fractured rock formations and partly in alluvial formations. This paper presents a description of the site and the ground water flow model, the development of the conceptual model of transport, model uncertainties, model validation, and the influence of uncertainty in input parameters on the downstream BTCs at the Yucca Mountain site.

  5. State-of-the-art in modeling solute and sediment transport in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    This overview is structured around a comprehensive general model based on the conservation of mass principle as applied to dissolved and particulate constituents in rivers, with a few restricted but more specific examples that illustrate the state-of-the-art in modeling typical physical, chemical, and biological processes undergone by selected constituents in rivers. These examples include: simplified one- and two-dimensional formulations focusing on the hydrodynamic advection and dispersion mechanisms; a two-dimensional biochemial oxygen demand-dissolved oxygen model; a one-dimensional polychlorinated biphenyl model that includes uptake and release of constituent by suspended sediment, and deposition and erosion of contaminated particles; and a one-dimensional sediment transport model that accounts for interactions between the flow and the bed, and is capable of tracking dispersing slugs of sediment through cycles of erosion, entrainment, transport in suspension and as bed load, and burial and storage in the bed

  6. Solute carrier transporters: Pharmacogenomics research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghogho

    2010-12-27

    -binding cassette) transporters, which include MDR1, a protein that pumps xenobiotics from cells, and the SLC (solute carrier) trans- porters, which take up neurotransmitters, nutrients, heavy metals, and other substrates into ...

  7. Laplace transform solutions for solute transport in fissured aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. A.

    The main processes affecting the migration of a solute in a fissured aquifer will be advection and dispersion in the fissures, diffusion into the porous matrix; and adsorption. This paper considers solute transport in an idealized fissured aquifer consisting of slabs of saturated rock-matrix separated by equally spaced, planar fissures. The solution of the transport equations is developed as far as Laplace transforms of the solute concentrations in the fissure and matrix water. Numerical inversion of the transforms is used to investigate characteristic behaviour of the model for a number of special cases.

  8. Development and applications of the channel network model for simulations of flow and solute transport in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gylling, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Channel Network model and its computer implementation, the code CHAN3D, for simulations of fluid flow and transport of solutes have been developed. The tool may be used for performance and safety assessments of deep lying repositories in fractured rocks for nuclear and other hazardous wastes, e.g. chemical wastes. It may also be used to simulate and interpret field experiments of flow and transport in large or small scale. Fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media are of interest in the performance assessment of a repository for hazardous waste, located at depth in crystalline rock, with potential release of solutes. Fluid flow in fractured rock is found to be very unevenly distributed due to the heterogeneity of the medium. The water will seek the easiest path, channels, under a prevailing pressure gradient. Solutes in the flowing water may be transported through preferential paths and migrate from the water in the fractures into the stagnant water in the rock matrix. There, sorbing solutes may be sorbed on the micro surfaces within the matrix. The diffusion into the matrix and the sorption process may significantly retard the transport of species and increase the time available for radionuclide decay. Channelling and matrix diffusion contribute to the dispersion of solutes in the water. Important for performance assessment is that channeling may cause a portion of the solutes to arrive much faster than the rest of the solutes. Simulations of field experiments at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory using the Channel Network model have been performed. The application of the model to the site and the simulation results of the pumping and tracer tests are presented. The results show that the model is capable of describing the hydraulic gradient and of predicting flow rates and tracer transport obtained in the experiments. The data requirements for the Channel Network model have been investigated to determine which data are the most important for predictions

  9. Development and applications of the channel network model for simulations of flow and solute transport in fractured rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gylling, B

    1997-12-31

    The Channel Network model and its computer implementation, the code CHAN3D, for simulations of fluid flow and transport of solutes have been developed. The tool may be used for performance and safety assessments of deep lying repositories in fractured rocks for nuclear and other hazardous wastes, e.g. chemical wastes. It may also be used to simulate and interpret field experiments of flow and transport in large or small scale. Fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media are of interest in the performance assessment of a repository for hazardous waste, located at depth in crystalline rock, with potential release of solutes. Fluid flow in fractured rock is found to be very unevenly distributed due to the heterogeneity of the medium. The water will seek the easiest path, channels, under a prevailing pressure gradient. Solutes in the flowing water may be transported through preferential paths and migrate from the water in the fractures into the stagnant water in the rock matrix. There, sorbing solutes may be sorbed on the micro surfaces within the matrix. The diffusion into the matrix and the sorption process may significantly retard the transport of species and increase the time available for radionuclide decay. Channelling and matrix diffusion contribute to the dispersion of solutes in the water. Important for performance assessment is that channeling may cause a portion of the solutes to arrive much faster than the rest of the solutes. Simulations of field experiments at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory using the Channel Network model have been performed. The application of the model to the site and the simulation results of the pumping and tracer tests are presented. The results show that the model is capable of describing the hydraulic gradient and of predicting flow rates and tracer transport obtained in the experiments. The data requirements for the Channel Network model have been investigated to determine which data are the most important for predictions

  10. Volume-weighted particle-tracking method for solute-transport modeling; Implementation in MODFLOW–GWT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Richard B.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2018-02-16

    In the traditional method of characteristics for groundwater solute-transport models, advective transport is represented by moving particles that track concentration. This approach can lead to global mass-balance problems because in models of aquifers having complex boundary conditions and heterogeneous properties, particles can originate in cells having different pore volumes and (or) be introduced (or removed) at cells representing fluid sources (or sinks) of varying strengths. Use of volume-weighted particles means that each particle tracks solute mass. In source or sink cells, the changes in particle weights will match the volume of water added or removed through external fluxes. This enables the new method to conserve mass in source or sink cells as well as globally. This approach also leads to potential efficiencies by allowing the number of particles per cell to vary spatially—using more particles where concentration gradients are high and fewer where gradients are low. The approach also eliminates the need for the model user to have to distinguish between “weak” and “strong” fluid source (or sink) cells. The new model determines whether solute mass added by fluid sources in a cell should be represented by (1) new particles having weights representing appropriate fractions of the volume of water added by the source, or (2) distributing the solute mass added over all particles already in the source cell. The first option is more appropriate for the condition of a strong source; the latter option is more appropriate for a weak source. At sinks, decisions whether or not to remove a particle are replaced by a reduction in particle weight in proportion to the volume of water removed. A number of test cases demonstrate that the new method works well and conserves mass. The method is incorporated into a new version of the U.S. Geological Survey’s MODFLOW–GWT solute-transport model.

  11. An analytical discrete-ordinates solution for an improved one-dimensional model of three-dimensional transport in ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An improved 1-D model of 3-D particle transport in ducts is studied. • The cases of isotropic and directional incidence are treated with the ADO method. • Accurate numerical results are reported for ducts of circular cross section. • A comparison with results of other authors is included. • The ADO method is found to be very efficient. - Abstract: An analytical discrete-ordinates solution is developed for the problem of particle transport in ducts, as described by a one-dimensional model constructed with two basis functions. Two types of particle incidence are considered: isotropic incidence and incidence described by the Dirac delta distribution. Accurate numerical results are tabulated for the reflection probabilities of semi-infinite ducts and the reflection and transmission probabilities of finite ducts. It is concluded that the developed solution is more efficient than commonly used numerical implementations of the discrete-ordinates method.

  12. Solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock: a simple analytical solution and its extension for modeling velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars; Shahkarami, Pirouz; Meng, Shuo; Moreno, Luis

    2018-02-01

    A simple and robust solution is developed for the problem of solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock. The solution is referred to as the solution to the single-flow-path model and takes the form of a convolution of two functions. The first function is the probability density function of residence-time distribution of a conservative solute in the fracture-only system as if the rock matrix is impermeable. The second function is the response of the fracture-matrix system to the input source when Fickian-type dispersion is completely neglected; thus, the effects of Fickian-type dispersion and matrix diffusion have been decoupled. It is also found that the solution can be understood in a way in line with the concept of velocity dispersion in fractured rocks. The solution is therefore extended into more general cases to also account for velocity variation between the channels. This leads to a development of the multi-channel model followed by detailed statistical descriptions of channel properties and sensitivity analysis of the model upon changes in the model key parameters. The simulation results obtained by the multi-channel model in this study fairly well agree with what is often observed in field experiments—i.e. the unchanged Peclet number with distance, which cannot be predicted by the classical advection-dispersion equation. In light of the findings from the aforementioned analysis, it is suggested that forced-gradient experiments can result in considerably different estimates of dispersivity compared to what can be found in natural-gradient systems for typical channel widths.

  13. A compartment model for solute transport in the near field of a repository for radioactive waste (calculations for Pu-239)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1991-10-01

    Radionuclides released from a damaged canister for spent fuel will leak through a damage in the canister wall and spread into the surrounding backfill. They will further migrate into water bearing fractures in the rock, through the backfill into the damaged zone around the drift and into the drift itself. Some substances may also diffuse through the rock to adjacent fracture zones. The nuclides will sorb on the materials along the transport paths. This very complex and variable transport geometry has been modelled using a compartment model which is based on simplifying a full three dimensional integrated finite difference model. The simplifications are supplemented by introducing analytical and semianalytical solutions at sensitive locations such as entrances and exits from holes and fractures and in the flowing water. (au)

  14. Solute carrier transporters: Pharmacogenomics research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the solute carrier transporters and highlights the fact that there is much to be learnt from characterizing human genomic variation in South Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, especially with regards to health applications. Genomic diversity in this region is indeed relatively under-studied despite being home to ...

  15. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik, E-mail: soumik.banerjee@wsu.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  16. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  17. BUILDING CONCEPTUAL AND MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR WATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT KOSNICA SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanko Ružičić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual model of flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone at Kosnica site, which is the basis for modeling pollution migration through the unsaturated zone to groundwater, is set up. The main characteristics of the unsaturated zone of the Kosnica site are described. Detailed description of investigated profile of unsaturated zone, with all necessary analytical results performed and used in building of conceptual models, is presented. Experiments that are in progress and processes which are modeled are stated. Monitoring of parameters necessary for calibration of models is presented. The ultimate goal of research is risk assessment of groundwater contamination at Kosnica site that has its source in or on unsaturated zone.

  18. Geochemical and numerical modelling of interactions between solid solutions and an aqueous solution. Extension of a reactive transport computer code called Archimede and application to reservoirs diagenesis; Modelisation geochimique et numerique des interactions entre des solutions solides et une solution aqueuse: extension du logiciel de reaction-transport archimede et application a la diagenese des reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nourtier-Mazauric, E.

    2003-03-15

    This thesis presents a thermodynamic and kinetic model of interactions between a fluid and ideal solid solutions represented by several end-members. The reaction between a solid solution and the aqueous solution results from the competition between the stoichiometric dissolution of the initial solid solution and the co-precipitation of the least soluble solid solution in the fluid at considered time. This model was implemented in ARCHIMEDE, a computer code of reactive transport in porous media, then applied to various examples. In the case of binary solid solutions, a graphical method allowed to determine the compositions of the precipitating solid solutions, with the aid of the end-member chemical potentials. The obtained program could be used to notably model the diagenesis of clayey or carbonated oil reservoirs, or the ground pollutant dispersion. (author)

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media with conduits to estimate macroscopic continuous time random walk model parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, S.; Cortis, A.; Sukop, M.

    2008-10-20

    Lattice Boltzmann models simulate solute transport in porous media traversed by conduits. Resulting solute breakthrough curves are fitted with Continuous Time Random Walk models. Porous media are simulated by damping flow inertia and, when the damping is large enough, a Darcy's Law solution instead of the Navier-Stokes solution normally provided by the lattice Boltzmann model is obtained. Anisotropic dispersion is incorporated using a direction-dependent relaxation time. Our particular interest is to simulate transport processes outside the applicability of the standard Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) including eddy mixing in conduits. The ADE fails to adequately fit any of these breakthrough curves.

  20. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  1. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport in heterogeneous formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2017-01-01

    and concentration within a block is not resolved and the combined spreading effect is approximated using resolved quantities and macroscopic parameters. This applies whether the formation is modeled as homogeneous or discretized into homogeneous blocks but the emphasis here being on the latter. The process...... parameterization is valid. We compute the relaxation time or memory of the system; changes in time with periods larger than the relaxation time are gradually leading to a condition of local equilibrium under which dispersion is Fickian. The method we use requires the solution of a steady-state advection...... investigate the impact of heterogeneity, both in degree and structure, on the longitudinal dispersion coefficient and then discuss the role of local dispersion and mass transfer limitations, i.e., the exchange of mass between the permeable matrix and the low permeability inclusions. We illustrate the physical...

  2. Evaluating Hydrologic Transience in Watershed Delineation, Numerical Modeling and Solute Transport in the Great Basin. Clayton Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underdown, C. G.; Boutt, D. F.; Hynek, S. A.; Munk, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Importance of transience in managed groundwater systems is generally determined by timeframe of management decisions. Watersheds with management times shorter than the aquifer (watershed) response time, or the time it takes a watershed to recover from a change in hydrologic state, would not include the new state and are treated as steady-state. However, these watersheds will experience transient response between hydrologic states. Watershed response time is a function of length. Therefore flat, regional watersheds characteristic of the Great Basin have long response times. Defining watershed extents as the area in which the water budget is balanced means inputs equal outputs. Steady-state budgets in the Great Basin have been balanced by extending watershed boundaries to include more area for recharge; however, the length and age of requisite flow paths are poorly constrained and often unrealistic. Inclusion of stored water in hydrologic budget calculations permits water balance within smaller contributing areas. As groundwater flow path lengths, depths, and locations differ between steady-state and transient systems, so do solute transport mechanisms. To observe how transience affects response time and solute transport, a refined (transient) version of the USGS steady-state groundwater flow model of the Great Basin is evaluated. This model is used to assess transient changes in contributing area for Clayton Valley, a lithium-brine producing endorheic basin in southwestern Nevada. Model runs of various recharge, discharge and storage bounds are created from conceptual models based upon historical climate data. Comparing results of the refined model to USGS groundwater observations allows for model validation and comparison against the USGS steady-state model. The transient contributing area to Clayton Valley is 85% smaller than that calculated from the steady-state solution, however several long flow paths important to both water and solute budgets at Clayton Valley

  3. Correspondence Between One- and Two-Equation Models for Solute Transport in Two-Region Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2012-07-26

    In this work, we study the transient behavior of homogenized models for solute transport in two-region porous media. We focus on the following three models: (1) a time non-local, two-equation model (2eq-nlt). This model does not rely on time constraints and, therefore, is particularly useful in the short-time regime, when the timescale of interest (t) is smaller than the characteristic time (τ 1) for the relaxation of the effective macroscale parameters (i. e., when t ≤ τ 1); (2) a time local, two-equation model (2eq). This model can be adopted when (t) is significantly larger than (τ 1) (i.e., when t≫τ 1); and (3) a one-equation, time-asymptotic formulation (1eq ∞). This model can be adopted when (t) is significantly larger than the timescale (τ 2) associated with exchange processes between the two regions (i. e., when t≫τ 2). In order to obtain insight into this transient behavior, we combine a theoretical approach based on the analysis of spatial moments with numerical and analytical results in several simple cases. The main result of this paper is to show that there is only a weak asymptotic convergence of the solution of (2eq) towards the solution of (1eq ∞) in terms of standardized moments but, interestingly, not in terms of centered moments. The physical interpretation of this result is that deviations from the Fickian situation persist in the limit of long times but that the spreading of the solute is eventually dominating these higher order effects. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Getting the tail to wag the dog: Incorporating groundwater transport into catchment solute transport models using rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water hydrologic models are increasingly used to analyze the transport of solutes through the landscape, such as nitrate. However, many of these models cannot adequately capture the effect of groundwater flow paths, which can have long travel times and accumulate legacy contaminants, releasing them to streams over decades. If these long lag times are not accounted for, the short-term efficacy of management activities to reduce nitrogen loads may be overestimated. Models that adopt a simple 'well-mixed' assumption, leading to an exponential transit time distribution at steady state, cannot adequately capture the broadly skewed nature of groundwater transit times in typical watersheds. Here I will demonstrate how StorAge Selection functions can be used to capture the long lag times of groundwater in a typical subwatershed-based hydrologic model framework typical of models like SWAT, HSPF, HBV, PRMS and others. These functions can be selected and calibrated to reproduce historical data where available, but can also be fitted to the results of a steady-state groundwater transport model like MODFLOW/MODPATH, allowing those results to directly inform the parameterization of an unsteady surface water model. The long tails of the transit time distribution predicted by the groundwater model can then be completely captured by the surface water model. Examples of this application in the Chesapeake Bay watersheds and elsewhere will be given.

  5. Modelling of present and future hydrology and solute transport at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosson, Emma (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stocholm (Sweden)); Sassner, Mona; Sabel, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    Radioactive waste from nuclear power plants in Sweden is managed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB. SKB has performed site investigations at two different locations in Sweden, referred to as the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for high-level radioactive waste. In 2009 a decision was made to focus on the Forsmark site. This decision was based on a large amount of empirical evidence suggesting Forsmark to be more suitable for a geological repository /SKB 2010b/. This report presents model results of numerical flow and transport modelling of surface water and near-surface groundwater at the Forsmark site for present and future conditions. Both temperate and periglacial climates have been simulated. Also different locations of the shoreline have been applied to the model, as well as different models of vegetation and Quaternary deposits. The modelling was performed using the modelling tool MIKE SHE and was based on the SDM-Site Forsmark MIKE SHE model (presented by Bosson et al. in SKB report R-08-09). The present work is a part of the biosphere modelling performed for the SR-Site safety assessment. The Forsmark area has a flat, small-scale topography. The study area is almost entirely below 20 m.a.s.l. (metres above sea level). There is a strong correlation between the topography of the ground surface and the ground water level in the Quaternary deposits (QD); thus, the surface water divides and the groundwater divides for the QD can be assumed to coincide. No major water courses flow through the catchment. Small brooks, which often dry out in the summer, connect the different sub-catchments with each other. The main lakes in the area, Lake Bolundsfjaerden, Lake Fiskarfjaerden, Lake Gaellsbotraesket and Lake Eckarfjaerden, all have sizes of less than one km2. The lakes are in general shallow. Approximately 70% of the catchment areas are covered by forest. Agricultural land is only present in

  6. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-07-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  7. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moeys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedotransfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved.

    Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42. Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = −0.26 due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72. Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is

  8. Description of transdermal transport of hydrophilic solutes during low-frequency sonophoresis based on a modified porous pathway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-02-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we sought to determine a theoretical description of transdermal transport of hydrophilic permeants induced by low-frequency sonophoresis. Parameters such as pore size distribution, absolute porosity, and dependence of effective tortuosity on solute characteristics were investigated. Pig skin was exposed to low-frequency ultrasound at 58 kHz to achieve different skin resistivities. Transdermal delivery of four permeants [mannitol, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), inulin, dextran] in the presence and absence of ultrasound was measured. The porous pathway model was modified to incorporate the permeant characteristics into the model and to achieve a detailed understanding of the pathways responsible for hydrophilic permeant delivery. The slopes of the log kp(p) versus log R graphs for individual solutes changed with solute molecular area, suggesting that the permeability-resistivity correlation for each permeant is related to its size. The tortuosity that a permeant experiences within the skin also depends on its size, where larger molecules experience a less tortuous path. With the modified porous pathway model, the effective tortuosities and skin porosity were calculated independently. The results of this study show that low-frequency sonophoresis creates pathways for permeant delivery with a wide range of pore sizes. The optimum pore size utilized by solutes is related to their molecular radii. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association J Pharm Sci 92:381-393, 2003

  9. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  10. Exploring challenges and solutions for container transportation using rail: A modelling and simulation gaming study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurapati, S.; Kourounioti, I.; Lukosch, H.; Tavaszzy, L.; Verbraeck, A.; Veen, L. van; Nuland, B. van; Smit, T.

    2017-01-01

    Rail is a cost-effective and environment friendly freight transport modality when used efficiently. Stakeholders around Dutch ports are discouraged to choose rail due to uncertain train schedules and the dispersed nature of freight flows across terminals in the port. To understand the challenges and

  11. Comparison of the performance of traditional advection-dispersion equation and mobile-immobile model for simulating solute transport in heterogeneous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haizhu HU,Xiaomin MAO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional advection-dispersion equation (ADE and the mobile-immobile model (MIM are widely used to describe solute transport in heterogeneous porous media. However, the fitness of the two models is case-dependent. In this paper, the transport of conservative, adsorbing and degradable solutes through a 1 m heterogeneous soil column under steady flow condition was simulated by ADE and MIM, and sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results show that MIM tends to prolong the breakthrough process and decrease peak concentration for all three solutes, and tailing and skewness are more pronounced with increasing dispersivity. Breakthrough curves of the adsorbing solute simulated by MIM are less sensitive to the retardation factor compared with the results simulated by ADE. The breakthrough curves of degradable solute obtained by MIM and ADE nearly overlap with a high degradation rate coefficient, indicating that MIM and ADE perform similarly for simulating degradable solute transport when biochemical degradation prevails over the mass exchange between mobile and immobile zones. The results suggest that the physical significance of dispersivity should be carefully considered when MIM is applied to simulate the degradable solute transport and/or ADE is applied to simulate the adsorbing solute transport in highly dispersive soils.

  12. Overall evaluation of the modelling of the TRUE-1 tracer tests - Task 4. The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschall, Paul [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland); Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-09-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. The task was carried out in 1995-2000 and consisted of several modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests, including predictive modelling where experimental results were not available beforehand. This report presents an overall evaluation of the achievements of Task 4. The specific objectives of the overall evaluation were to highlight innovative and successful modelling approaches developed, to assess the stages of the task which proved most beneficial for conceptual understanding of transport processes at the TRUE-1 site and to assess the success of various steering tools. A concise summary of scientific achievements is given and conclusions drawn with respect to unresolved technical issues. Recommendations are presented that can optimise the management of future modelling tasks.

  13. Linearization in ASM1 model for the solution of pollutants transport equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neyva Maria Lopes Romeiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed to reduce the complexity existing in non-linear BIOMOC and ASM1 models using Taylor’s frst-order series expansion in the terms whose reactive processes are non-linear. One of the advantages of linear models is the conservation of non-linear model variables. However, the main characteristic of this methodology refers to the computational time obtained in the numeral simulations, which is much shorter than that concerning the non-linear model results. Numerical results are presented, showing the effciency, precision and solidity of the proposed technique in well-known cases in the literature, using the semi-discrete method of finite elements.

  14. Modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in Olkiluoto. Update 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loefman, J.; Pitkaenen, P.; Meszaros, F.; Keto, V.; Ahokas, H.

    2009-10-01

    Posiva Oy is preparing for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the crystalline bedrock in Finland. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki has been selected as the primary site for the repository, subject to further detailed characterisation which is currently focused on the construction of an underground rock characterisation and research facility (the ONKALO). An essential part of the site investigation programme is analysis of the deep groundwater flow by means of numerical flow modelling. This study is the latest update concerning the site-scale flow modelling and is based on all the hydrogeological data gathered from field investigations by the end of 2007. The work is divided into two separate modelling tasks: 1) characterization of the baseline groundwater flow conditions before excavation of the ONKALO, and 2) a prediction/outcome (P/O) study of the potential hydrogeological disturbances due to the ONKALO. The flow model was calibrated by using all the available data that was appropriate for the applied, deterministic, equivalent porous medium (EPM) / dual-porosity (DP) approach. In the baseline modelling, calibration of the flow model focused on improving the agreement between the calculated results and the undisturbed observations. The calibration resulted in a satisfactory agreement with the measured pumping test responses, a very good overall agreement with the observed pressures in the deep drill holes and a fairly good agreement with the observed salinity. Some discrepancies still remained in a few single drill hole sections, because the fresh water infiltration in the model tends to dilute the groundwater too much at shallow depths. In the P/O calculations the flow model was further calibrated by using the monitoring data on the ONKALO disturbances. Having significantly more information on the inflows to the tunnel (compared with the previous study) allowed better calibration of the model, which allowed it to capture very well the observed inflow, the

  15. Task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Task 5 Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhen, Ingvar [SWECO VIAK AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-02-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden, some 35 km north of Oskarshamn. Construction of the underground laboratory commenced in 1990 and was completed in 1995, consisting of a 3.6 km. long tunnel excavated in crystalline rock to a depth of approximately 460 m. Prior to, during and subsequent to completion, research concerning the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in fractured crystalline rock has been carried out. Central to this research has been the characterisation of the groundwater flow system and the chemistry of the groundwaters at Aespoe prior to excavation (Pre-investigation Phase) and subsequently to monitor changes in these parameters during the evolution of laboratory construction (Construction Phase). The principle aim of the Aespoe Task 5 modelling exercise has been to compare and ultimately integrate hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology using the input data from the pre-investigation and construction phases. The main objectives were: to assess the consistency of groundwater-flow models and hydrogeochemical mixing-reaction models through integration and comparison of hydraulic and hydrogeochemical data obtained before and during tunnel construction, and to develop a procedure for integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical information which could be used for disposal site assessments. Task 5 commenced in 1998 and was finalised in 2002. Participating modelling teams in the project represented ANDRA (France; three modelling teams - ANTEA, ITASCA, CEA), BMWi/BGR (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), JNC (Japan), CRIEPI (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden; two modelling teams - CFE and Intera (now GeoPoint)). Experience from Task 5 has highlighted several important aspects for site investigations facilitating the possibilities for mathematically integrated modelling and consistency checks that should be taken into account for future repository performance assessments. Equally important is that Task 5 has

  16. Task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Task 5 Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhen, Ingvar; Smellie, John

    2003-02-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden, some 35 km north of Oskarshamn. Construction of the underground laboratory commenced in 1990 and was completed in 1995, consisting of a 3.6 km. long tunnel excavated in crystalline rock to a depth of approximately 460 m. Prior to, during and subsequent to completion, research concerning the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in fractured crystalline rock has been carried out. Central to this research has been the characterisation of the groundwater flow system and the chemistry of the groundwaters at Aespoe prior to excavation (Pre-investigation Phase) and subsequently to monitor changes in these parameters during the evolution of laboratory construction (Construction Phase). The principle aim of the Aespoe Task 5 modelling exercise has been to compare and ultimately integrate hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology using the input data from the pre-investigation and construction phases. The main objectives were: to assess the consistency of groundwater-flow models and hydrogeochemical mixing-reaction models through integration and comparison of hydraulic and hydrogeochemical data obtained before and during tunnel construction, and to develop a procedure for integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical information which could be used for disposal site assessments. Task 5 commenced in 1998 and was finalised in 2002. Participating modelling teams in the project represented ANDRA (France; three modelling teams - ANTEA, ITASCA, CEA), BMWi/BGR (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), JNC (Japan), CRIEPI (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden; two modelling teams - CFE and Intera (now GeoPoint)). Experience from Task 5 has highlighted several important aspects for site investigations facilitating the possibilities for mathematically integrated modelling and consistency checks that should be taken into account for future repository performance assessments. Equally important is that Task 5 has

  17. Simultaneous transport of water and solutes under transient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 4. Simultaneous transport of water and solutes under transient unsaturated flow conditions – A case study ... Keywords. Hydraulic conductivity; infiltration; leaching; Malaprabha; modeling; permeability; salinity; solute transport; SWIM model; water flow.

  18. Calibration and Uncertainty Analysis of Water and Solute Transport Models Within Vegetated Soils Using a Detailed Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B.; Wheater, H.; Butler, A.

    2006-12-01

    Appropriate models predicting the fate and transport of water and dissolved chemicals in vegetated soils are required for a wide range of applications. Substantial uncertainty is present due to measurement errors, parametric uncertainty, and structural issues related to model conceptualisation. Due to the costs and intrusiveness of subsurface measurements there are limited datasets available to interrogate models against. Furthermore, the models are typically computationally intensive, making it difficult to fully explore parametric and other uncertainty spaces. Hence there are two pressing needs which must be met to improve the utility of models: more data and constraints are needed to quantify the interactions between different uncertainties and their overall impact on the reliability and robustness of model outputs, and efficient methodologies to explore sensitivities and uncertainties are also called for. This paper presents a combined analysis of a particularly detailed dataset and models of water and solute movement, using both simple random search and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Data was collected from an outdoor vegetated lysimeter facility over a duration of close to a year, with soil matric potential, moisture content and temperature at 10 cm depth intervals, along with rainfall and other meteorological variables, logged in four instrumented lysimeters at a time interval of 0.01 days. Three radionuclides (Na-22, Cl-36 and Cs-137) were supplied through the base of the lysimeters using an automated water table control system. Periodic soil cores and plant cuttings provided information on their migration and uptake. The integrity of the experimental data is examined, with uncertainty associated with outputs discussed and quantified. To interpret the data, a Richards' equation model coupled to a dynamic plant water model is linked to an advection-dispersion model with additional process representations of sorption, radioactive decay and root uptake

  19. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6A, 6B and 6B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgkinson, David; Black, John

    2005-03-01

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to solute transport in fractured rock. The present report is concerned solely with Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b which relate to the transport of tracers on a 5-metre scale in Feature A at the TRUE-1 site. The task objectives, specifications and individual modelling team results are summarised and reviewed, and an evaluation of the overall exercise is presented. The report concludes with assessments of what has been learnt, the implications for the Task 6 objectives, and some possible future directions

  20. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkinson, David [Quintessa, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom); Black, John [In Situ Solutions, East Bridgford (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to solute transport in fractured rock. The present report is concerned solely with Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b which relate to the transport of tracers on a 5-metre scale in Feature A at the TRUE-1 site. The task objectives, specifications and individual modelling team results are summarised and reviewed, and an evaluation of the overall exercise is presented. The report concludes with assessments of what has been learnt, the implications for the Task 6 objectives, and some possible future directions.

  1. Using PHREEQC to simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, David S; McCray, John E; Thyne, Geoffrey D

    2007-01-01

    The geochemical computer model PHREEQC can simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock aquifers that can be conceptualized as dual-porosity flow systems subject to one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in the bedrock fractures and diffusive transport in the bedrock matrix. This article demonstrates how the physical characteristics of such flow systems can be parameterized for use in PHREEQC, it provides a method for minimizing numerical dispersion in PHREEQC simulations, and it compares PHREEQC simulations with results of an analytical solution. The simulations assumed a dual-porosity conceptual model involving advective-reactive-dispersive transport in the mobile zone (bedrock fracture) and diffusive-reactive transport in the immobile zone (bedrock matrix). The results from the PHREEQC dual-porosity transport model that uses a finite-difference approach showed excellent agreement compared with an analytical solution.

  2. Urban Transportation: Issue and Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryati Shafii

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Generally, quality of life of urban population is heavily dependent on social facilities provided within the environment. One of the most important facilities is transportations. Study on transportation mode in an urban area is especially very important because for almost every individual living in a large and densely populated area, mobility is one of the most crucial issues in everyday life. Enhance mobility, faster journey to work and less pollution from petrol-propelled vehicles can increase the quality of life, which in turn lead to a sustainable urban living. The study present transportation mode usage issues faced by community related to quality of life in an urban area. This study identifies several issues of transportation mode in urban areas and its impact on the quality of life. The study areas are Putrajaya, Kuala Lumpur and Bandar Kajang, Selangor. The methodology used in this research is secondary and primary data. The questionnaires for the survey were distributed from May 2008 to Jun 2008. These researches were conducted on 144 respondents for to evaluate their perception of transportation mode correlated to the quality of life. The collected data were then analyzed using “Statistical Packages for the Social Science” (SPSS. The respondents comprise of 61 males and 84 females from the age group of 18 to 57 years. This study identifies the percentage of public transportation mode usage in urban area, such as buses (16.7%, train (ERL, monorail and commuter-6.4%; which is very low compared to owning personal car (45.8% and motorcycle (25.4%.The result shows owning personal car is the highest (45.8% in three study areas and monorail and taxi are the lowest (1.4%. The Chi Square Test shows that among the mode transportation with traffic jam is quite difference in Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya and Kajang. Analysis of the Chi Square Test shows the result is 0.000 (two sides to respondent answering “yes” and analysis of Spearman

  3. Model Simulations of a Field Experiment on Cation Exchange-affected Multicomponent Solute Transport in a Sandy Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ammentorp, Hans Christian; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale and long-term field experiment on cation exchange in a sandy aquifer has been modelled by a three-dimensional geochemical transport model. The geochemical model includes cation-exchange processes using a Gaines-Thomas expression, the closed carbonate system and the effects of ionic...... by batch experiments and by the composition of the cations on the exchange complex. Potassium showed a non-ideal exchange behaviour with K&z.sbnd;Ca selectivity coefficients indicating dependency on equivalent fraction and K+ concentration in the aqueous phase. The model simulations over a distance of 35 m...

  4. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S. R.; Ford, I. J.; Saffari, N.

    2018-01-01

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  5. Transport phenomena in a model cheese: the influence of the charge and shape of solutes on diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J V C; Peixoto, P D S; Lortal, S; Floury, J

    2013-10-01

    During cheese ripening, microorganisms grow as immobilized colonies, metabolizing substrates present in the matrix and generating products from enzymatic reactions. Local factors that limit the rates of diffusion, either within the general cheese matrix or near the colonies, may influence the metabolic activity of the bacteria during ripening, affecting the final quality of the cheese. The objective of this study was to determine the diffusion coefficients of solutes as a function of their different physicochemical characteristics (size, charge, and shape) in an ultrafiltrate (UF) model cheese (based on ultrafiltered milk) to enable better understanding of the ripening mechanisms. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans (4 kDa to 2 MDa) and FITC-labeled dairy proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) were measured using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This study showed that macromolecules up to 2 MDa and proteins could diffuse through the UF model cheese. The larger FITC-dextrans were not more hindered by the structure of the UF model cheese compared with the smaller ones. Any decrease in the diffusion coefficients of solutes was related only to their hydrodynamic radii. The FITC-dextran diffusion data were fitted to an obstruction model, resulting in a constant obstruction factor (k ~0.42). Diffusion in the model cheese was sensitive to the physicochemical characteristics of the solute. The FITC-dairy proteins studied (rigid and negatively charged molecules) were hindered to a greater degree than the FITC-dextrans (flexible and charge-neutral molecules) in the UF model cheese. The existence of steric and electrostatic interactions between the protein matrix of the UF model cheese and the FITC-dairy proteins could explain the decrease in diffusion compared with FITC-dextrans. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  7. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkinson, David (Quintessa, Henley-on-Thames (GB))

    2007-09-15

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to modelling solute transport in fractured rock. The objectives of Task 6 are: To assess simplifications used in Performance Assessment (PA) models. To determine how, and to what extent, experimental tracer and flow experiments can constrain the range of parameters used in PA models. To support the design of Site Characterisation (SC) programmes to ensure that the results have optimal value for performance assessment calculations. To improve the understanding of site-specific flow and transport behaviour at different scales using site characterisation models. The present report is concerned with Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2. It follows on from two previous reviews of Tasks 6A, 6B and 6B2, and Task 6C. In Task 6D the transport of tracers through a fracture network is modelled using the conditions of the C2 TRUE-Block Scale tracer test, based on the synthetic structural model developed in Task 6C. Task 6E extends the Task 6D transport calculations to a reference set of PA time scales and boundary conditions. Task 6F consists of a series of 'benchmark' studies on single features from the Task 6C hydrostructural model in order to improve the understanding of differences between the participating models. Task 6F2 utilises models set up for Tasks 6E and 6F to perform additional sensitivity studies with the aim of increasing the understanding of how models behave, the reason for differences in modelling results, and the sensitivity of models to various assumptions and parameter values. Eight modelling teams representing five organisations participated in this exercise using Discrete Fracture Network (DFN), continuum and channel network concepts implemented in a range of different

  8. One-dimensional spatially dependent solute transport in semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is an attempt to describe analytical solution of spatially dependent solute transport in one-dimensional semiinfinite homogeneous porous domain. In this mathematical model the dispersion coefficient is considered spatially dependent while seepage velocity is considered exponentially decreasing function ...

  9. One-dimensional spatially dependent solute transport in semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is an attempt to describe analytical solution of spatially dependent solute transport in one-dimensional semi- infinite homogeneous porous domain. In this mathematical model the dispersion coefficient is considered spatially dependent while seepage velocity is considered exponentially decreasing ...

  10. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  11. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  12. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang [Univ. Da Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  13. System Convergence in Transport Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Cantarella, Guilio E.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental premise of most applied transport models is the existence and uniqueness of an equilibrium solution that balances demand x(t) and supply t(x). The demand consists of the people that travel in the transport system and on the defined network, whereas the supply consists of the resulting...... level-of-service attributes (e.g., travel time and cost) offered to travellers. An important source of complexity is the congestion, which causes increasing demand to affect travel time in a non-linear way. Transport models most often involve separate models for traffic assignment and demand modelling...

  14. Groundwater flow and solute transport modelling from within R: Development of the RMODFLOW and RMT3DMS packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogiers, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Since a few years, an increasing number of contributed R packages is becoming available, in the field of hydrology. Hydrological time series analysis packages, lumped conceptual rainfall-runoff models, distributed hydrological models, weather generators, and different calibration and uncertainty estimation methods are all available. Also a few packages are available for solving partial differential equations. Subsurface hydrological modelling is however still seldomly performed in R, or with codes interfaced with R, despite the fact that excellent geostatistical packages, model calibration/inversion options and state-of-the-art visualization libraries are available. Moreover, other popular scientific programming languages like matlab and python have packages for pre- and post-processing files of MODFLOW (Harbaugh 2005) and MT3DMS (Zheng 2010) models. To fill this gap, we present here the development versions of the RMODFLOW and RMT3DMS packages, which allow pre- and post-processing MODFLOW and MT3DMS input and output files from within R. File reading and writing functions are currently available for different packages, and plotting functions are foreseen making use of the ggplot2 package (plotting system based on the grammar of graphics; Wickham 2009). The S3 generic-function object oriented programming style is used for this. An example is provided, making modifications to an existing model, and visualization of the model output. References Harbaugh, A. (2005). MODFLOW-2005: The US Geological Survey Modular Ground-water Model--the Ground-water Flow Process, U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 6-A16 (p. 253). Wickham, H. (2009). ggplot2: elegant graphics for data analysis. Springer New York, 2009. Zheng, C. (2010). MT3DMS v5.3, a modular three-dimensional multispecies transport model for simulation of advection, dispersion and chemical reactions of contaminants in groundwater systems. Supplemental User's Guide. (p. 56).

  15. Analytical reconstruction scheme for the coarse-mesh solution generated by the spectral nodal method for neutral particle discrete ordinates transport model in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Ricardo C.; Filho, Hermes Alves; Platt, Gustavo M.; Oliveira, Francisco Bruno S.; Militao, Damiano S.

    2010-01-01

    Coarse-mesh numerical methods are very efficient in the sense that they generate accurate results in short computational time, as the number of floating point operations generally decrease, as a result of the reduced number of mesh points. On the other hand, they generate numerical solutions that do not give detailed information on the problem solution profile, as the grid points can be located considerably away from each other. In this paper we describe two steps for the analytical reconstruction of the coarse-mesh solution generated by the spectral nodal method for neutral particle discrete ordinates (S N ) transport model in slab geometry. The first step of the algorithm is based on the analytical reconstruction of the coarse-mesh solution within each discretization cell of the grid set up on the spatial domain. The second step is based on the angular reconstruction of the discrete ordinates solution between two contiguous ordinates of the angular quadrature set used in the S N model. Numerical results are given so we can illustrate the accuracy of the two reconstruction techniques, as described in this paper.

  16. Cellular neural network to the spherical harmonics approximation of neutron transport equation in x-y geometry. Part I: Modeling and verification for time-independent solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirouzmand, Ahmad; Hadad, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes the solution of time-independent neutron transport equation. → Using a novel method based on cellular neural networks (CNNs) coupled with P N method. → Utilize the CNN model to simulate spatial scalar flux distribution in steady state. → The accuracy, stability, and capabilities of CNN model are examined in x-y geometry. - Abstract: This paper describes a novel method based on using cellular neural networks (CNN) coupled with spherical harmonics method (P N ) to solve the time-independent neutron transport equation in x-y geometry. To achieve this, an equivalent electrical circuit based on second-order form of neutron transport equation and relevant boundary conditions is obtained using CNN method. We use the CNN model to simulate spatial response of scalar flux distribution in the steady state condition for different order of spherical harmonics approximations. The accuracy, stability, and capabilities of CNN model are examined in 2D Cartesian geometry for fixed source and criticality problems.

  17. Modelling of Transport Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    K., Itoh; S.-I., Itoh; A., Fukuyama

    1993-01-01

    In this review article, we discuss key features of the transport phenomena and theoretical modelling to understand them. Experimental observations have revealed the nature of anomalous transport, i.e., the enhancement of the transport coefficients by the gradients of the plasma profiles, the pinch phenomena, the radial profile of the apomalous transport coefficients, the variation of the transport among the Bohm diffusion, Pseudo-classical confinement, L-mode and variety of improved confineme...

  18. Transient solute transport with sorption in Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sorption onto the wall has been observed to both increase [Lungu and Moffatt, 1982] and decrease the average solute transport velocity [Golay, 1958], relative to the mean flow velocity. Similarly, opposite conclusion have been reached for the effect of sorption on dispersion. In this work, we study transient solute transport in Poiseuille flow with sorptive boundary and initial transversely uniform distribution (linear release) to reconcile the two different views on solute transport (figure 1) with sorption. Two-dimensional simulations in figure 2 show that there is a transition from fast transport dominated by a fast-moving pulse in the middle of the channel at early times, to slow transport at late times once desorption from the walls becomes important. A set of series solutions for zeroth, first and second longitudinal moment have been derived and we show that the zeroth-order term in the solution corresponds to the slow transport in the late regime, while the first-order term corresponds to the fast transport in the early regime (figure 3). Based on the analytical solution, the time scales for early regime and late regimes of both the velocity and the dispersion coefficient have been determined for an equilibrium sorption model and a kinetic linear sorption model. Furthermore, we give approximated analytical solution when both adsorption and desorption are slow. References M.J.E. Golay. Theory of chromatography in open and coated tubular columns iwth round and rectangular cross-sections. In D.H.Desty, editor, Gas Chromatography, pages 36-53, New York, 1958. Academic Press Inc. E.M. Lungu and H.K. Moffatt. the effect of wall conductance on heat diffusion in duct flow. Journal of Engineering Mathematics, 1692 ;121-136, 1982.

  19. Reexamining ultrafiltration and solute transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C. E.; Person, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Geologic ultrafiltration—slowing of solutes with respect to flowing groundwater—poses a conundrum: it is consistently observed experimentally in clay-rich lithologies, but has been difficult to identify in subsurface data. Resolving this could be important for clarifying clay and shale transport properties at large scales as well as interpreting solute and isotope patterns for applications ranging from nuclear waste repository siting to understanding fluid transport in tectonically active environments. Simulations of one-dimensional NaCl transport across ultrafiltering clay membrane strata constrained by emerging data on geologic membrane properties showed different ultrafiltration effects than have often been envisioned. In relatively high-permeability advection-dominated regimes, salinity increases occurred mostly within membrane units while their effluent salinity initially fell and then rose to match solute delivery. In relatively low-permeability diffusion-dominated regimes, salinity peaked at the membrane upstream boundary and effluent salinity remained low. In both scenarios, however, only modest salinity changes (up to ˜3 g L-1) occurred because of self-limiting tendencies; membrane efficiency declines as salinity rises, and although sediment compaction increases efficiency, it is also decreases permeability and allows diffusive transport to dominate. It appears difficult for ultrafiltration to generate brines as speculated, but widespread and less extreme ultrafiltration effects in the subsurface could be unrecognized. Conditions needed for ultrafiltration are present in settings that include topographically-driven flow systems, confined aquifer systems subjected to injection or withdrawal, compacting basins, and accretionary complexes.

  20. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  1. Murt user's guide: A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element model of multiple-pore-region solute transport through subsurface media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; Yeh, G.T.; Wilson, G.V.

    1995-04-01

    Matrix diffusion, a diffusive mass transfer process,in the structured soils and geologic units at ORNL, is believe to be an important subsurface mass transfer mechanism; it may affect off-site movement of radioactive wastes and remediation of waste disposal sites by locally exchanging wastes between soil/rock matrix and macropores/fractures. Advective mass transfer also contributes to waste movement but is largely neglected by researchers. This report presents the first documented 2-D multiregion solute transport code (MURT) that incorporates not only diffusive but also advective mass transfer and can be applied to heterogeneous porous media under transient flow conditions. In this report, theoretical background is reviewed and the derivation of multiregion solute transport equations is presented. Similar to MURF (Gwo et al. 1994), a multiregion subsurface flow code, multiplepore domains as suggested by previous investigators (eg, Wilson and Luxmoore 1988) can be implemented in MURT. Transient or steady-state flow fields of the pore domains can be either calculated by MURF or by modelers. The mass transfer process is briefly discussed through a three-pore-region multiregion solute transport mechanism. Mass transfer equations that describe mass flux across pore region interfaces are also presented and parameters needed to calculate mass transfer coefficients detailed. Three applications of MURT (tracer injection problem, sensitivity analysis of advective and diffusive mass transfer, hillslope ponding infiltration and secondary source problem) were simulated and results discussed. Program structure of MURT and functions of MURT subroutiness are discussed so that users can adapt the code; guides for input data preparation are provided in appendices

  2. Coupling diffusion and high-pH precipitation/dissolution in the near field of a HLW repository in clay by means of reactive solute transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, J.; Font, I.; Yang, C.; Montenegro, L.

    2004-12-01

    The reference concept for a HLW repository in clay in Spain includes a 75 cm thick bentonite buffer which surrounds canisters. A concrete sustainment 20 cm thick is foreseen between the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. The long term geochemical evolution of the near field is affected by a high-pH hyperalkaline plume induced by concrete. Numerical models of multicomponent reactive transport have been developped in order to quantify the evolution of the system over 1 Ma. Water flow is negligible once the bentonite buffer is saturated after about 20 years. Therefore, solute transport occurs mainly by diffusion. Models account for aqueous complexation, acid-base and redox reactions, cation exchange, and mineral dissolution precipitation in the bentonite, the concrete and the clay formation. Numerical results obtained witth CORE2D indicate that the high-pH plume causes significant changes in porewater chemistry both in the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. Porosity changes caused by mineral dissolution/precipitation are extremely important. Therefore, coupled modes of diffusion and reactive transport accounting for changes in porosity caused by mineral precipitation are required in order to obtain realistic predictions.

  3. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  4. A Collaborative GIS Solution for Public Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Adrian COTFAS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent years brought forward a large number of solutions for automating route finding given the increased availability of geographical data. However, such solutions rarely focus on mass transit or involve the user in submitting information in a collaborative manner to further improve the available dataset and provide additional services. The system presented here intends to fully address these issues by providing a modular, extensible collaborative one-stop-shop for public transport needs based on multi-source collaborative data inputs from both official and user-submitted sources with the usage of a flexible, genetic-algorithms based route-finding application. Implementation wise, the solution is based on an open-ended system of collaborative web-services with front-ends available on mobile, desktop and web platforms. The proposed solution will not only provide users with a powerful technical solution, but will address the theoretical concern by which the increase of available GIS data is solely used for last-mile, map-like solutions

  5. Accounting for sub-resolution pores in models of water and solute transport in soils based on computed tomography images: Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveye, Philippe C.; Pot, Valérie; Garnier, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade, X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become widely used to characterize the geometry and topology of the pore space of soils and natural porous media. Regardless of the resolution of CT images, a fundamental problem associated with their use, for example as a starting point in simulation efforts, is that sub-resolution pores are not detected. Over the last few years, a particular type of modeling method, known as ;Grey; or ;Partial Bounce Back; Lattice-Boltzmann (LB), has been adopted by increasing numbers of researchers to try to account for sub-resolution pores in the modeling of water and solute transport in natural porous media. In this short paper, we assess the extent to which Grey LB methods indeed offer a workable solution to the problem at hand. We conclude that, in spite of significant computational advances, a major experimental hurdle related to the evaluation of the penetrability of sub-resolution pores, is blocking the way ahead. This hurdle will need to be cleared before Grey LB can become a credible option in the microscale modeling of soils and sediments. A necessarily interdisciplinary effort, involving both modelers and experimentalists, is needed to clear the path forward.

  6. Stochastic analysis of transport of conservative solutes in caisson experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted in the past a series of experiments of transport of conservative and reactive solutes. The experimental setup and the experimental results are presented in a series of reports. The main aim of the experiments was to validate models of transport of solutes in unsaturated flow at the caisson intermediate scale, which is much larger than the one pertaining to laboratory columns. First attempts to analyze the experimental results were by one-dimensional convective-dispersion models. These models could not explain the observed solute breakthrough curves and particularly the large solute dispersion in the caisson effluent Since there were some question marks about the uniformity of water distribution at the caisson top, the transport experiments were repeated under conditions of saturated flow. In these experiments constant heads were applied at the top and the bottom of the caisson and the number of concentration monitoring stations was quadrupled. The analysis of the measurements by the same one-dimensional model indicated clearly that the fitted dispersivity is much larger than the pore-sole dispersivity and that it grows with the distance in an approximately linear fashion. This led to the conclusion, raised before, that transport in the caisson is dominated by heterogeneity effects, i.e. by spatial variability of the material Such effects cannot be captured by traditional one-dimensional models. In order to account for the effect of heterogeneity, the saturated flow experiments have been analyzed by using stochastic transport modeling. The apparent linear growth of dispersivity with distance suggested that the system behaves like a stratified one. Consequently, the model of Dagan and Bresier has been adopted in order to interpret concentration measurements. In this simple model the caisson is viewed as a bundle of columns of different permeabilities, which are characterized by a p.d.f. (probability denasity function)

  7. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2017-06-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (<10 year) flow paths. By better understanding the differences between pathogen and solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  8. Nonrelativistic grey Sn-transport radiative-shock solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that this monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2,3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel'dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel'dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibrium-diffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Finally, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.

  9. An analytical discrete ordinates solution for a nodal model of a two-dimensional neutron transport problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, J. F. P. [Institute de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Av. Italia, s/n, 96203-900 Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Barichello, L. B. [Institute de Matematica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an analytical discrete ordinates method is used to solve a nodal formulation of a neutron transport problem in x, y-geometry. The proposed approach leads to an important reduction in the order of the associated eigenvalue systems, when combined with the classical level symmetric quadrature scheme. Auxiliary equations are proposed, as usually required for nodal methods, to express the unknown fluxes at the boundary introduced as additional unknowns in the integrated equations. Numerical results, for the problem defined by a two-dimensional region with a spatially constant and isotropically emitting source, are presented and compared with those available in the literature. (authors)

  10. Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport

  11. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  12. Transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, S.P.; Leblanc, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. A nonreactive tracer, bromide, and two reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse in July 1985 and monitored in three dimensions for 3 years as they moved 280 meters downgradient through an array of multilevel samplers. The tracer transport was quantified using spatial moments. The calculated total mass of bromide for each sampling date varied from 86 to 105 percent of the injected mass, and the center of mass moved at a nearly constant horizontal velocity of 0.42 meters per day. The bromide cloud also moved downward about 4 meters, probably because of density-induced sinking and accretion of areal recharge from precipitation. After 200 meters of transport, the bromide cloud was more than 80 meters long but only 14 meters wide and 6 meters thick. The change in longitudinal dispersivity had reached a constant value (0.96 meters). The transverse horizontal and transverse vertical dispersivities were much smaller (1.8 centimeters and 1.5 millimeters, respectively) than the longitudinal value. The lithium and molybdate clouds followed the same path as the bromide cloud, but a significant amount of their mass was adsorbed onto the aquifer sediments, and their rates of movement were retarded about 50 percent relative to the bromide movement. (Author) (5 figs., 23 refs.)

  13. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water-heat-solute

  14. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  15. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  16. A stochastic solution of the advective transport equation with uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1991-01-01

    A model has been developed for calculating the transport of water-borne radionuclides through layers of porous materials, such as rock or clay. The model is based upon a purely advective transport equation, in which the fluid velocity is a random variable, thereby simulating dispersion in a more realistic manner than the ad hoc introduction of a dispersivity. In addition to a random velocity field, which is an observable physical phenomenon, allowance is made for uncertainty in our knowledge of the parameters which enter the equation, e.g. the retardation coefficient. This too, is assumed to be a random variable and contributes to the stochasticity of the resulting partial differential equation of transport. The stochastic differential equation can be solved analytically and then ensemble averages taken over the associated probability distribution of velocity and retardation coefficient. A method based upon a novel form of the central limit theorem of statistics is employed to obtain tractable solutions of a system consisting of many serial legs of varying properties. One interesting conclusion is that the total flux out of a medium is significantly underestimated by using the deterministic solution with an average transit time compared with that from the stochastically averaged solution. The theory is illustrated numerically for a number of physically relevant cases. (author) 8 figs., 4 tabs., 7 refs

  17. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero Huguet, J.

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  18. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero Huguet, J.

    2001-06-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  19. Mathematical description of adsorption and transport of reactive solutes in soil: a review of selected literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1978-10-01

    This report reviews selected literature related to the mathematical description of the transport of reactive solutes through soil. The primary areas of the literature reviewed are (1) mathematical models in current use for description of the adsorption-desorption interaction between the soil solution and the soil matrix and (2) analytic solutions of the differential equations describing the convective-dispersive transport of reactive solutes through soil

  20. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Svensson, Haakan [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  1. Two-point model for divertor transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    Plasma transport along divertor field lines was investigated using a two-point model. This treatment requires considerably less effort to find solutions to the transport equations than previously used one-dimensional (1-D) models and is useful for studying general trends. It also can be a valuable tool for benchmarking more sophisticated models. The model was used to investigate the possibility of operating in the so-called high density, low temperature regime

  2. The Grimsel radionuclide migration experiment - a contribution to raising confidence in the validity of solute transport models used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, U.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to provide confidence that the predictive models utilized are applicable for the specific repository systems. Nagra has carried out radionuclide migration experiments at the Grimsel underground test site (Switzerland) for testing of currently used methodologies, data bases, conceptual approaches and codes for modeling radionuclide transport through fractured host rocks. Specific objectives included: identification of the relevant transport processes, to test the extrapolation of laboratory sorption data to field conditions, and to demonstrate the applicability of currently used methodology for conceptualizing or building realistic transport models. Field tests and transport modeling work are complemented by an extensive laboratory program. The field experimental activities focused predominantly on establishing appropriate conditions for identifying relevant transport mechanisms on the scale of a few meters, aiming at full recovery of injected tracers, simple geometry and long-term stability of induced dipole flow fields. A relatively simple homogeneous, dual-porosity advection/diffusion model was built with input from a state of the art petrographic characterisation of the water conducting feature. It was possible to calibrate the model from conservative tracer breakthrough curves. (J.S.). 21 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Use of a multi-species reactive transport model to simulate chloride ingress in mortar exposed to NaCl solution or sea-water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; De Weerdt, K.; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of ion ingress in Portland cement mortar using a multi-species reactive mass transport model are compared with experimental test results. The model is an extended version of the Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations, accounting for chemical equilibrium. Saturated mortar samples were exposed...

  4. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L., E-mail: xiz@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  5. Transport phenomena during nanofiltration of concentrated solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bargeman, Gerrald

    2016-01-01

    In most scientific studies on nanofiltration either the development of new membrane materials or the characterization of membranes is reported. In the latter case most studies use single solute salt or sugar solutions and/or investigate nanofiltration of solutions with mixtures of ions at low

  6. Temporal moment analysis of solute transport in a coupled fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Study on fluid flow and transport of solute through fractures has been an area of great interest among hydro-geologists during past few ... affect the solute transport through fracture are advection, dispersion, matrix diffusion, sorption and degradation. Among the ...... α0 = Local fracture dispersivity, [L]; ρs = Bulk density of the ...

  7. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of 3 H-inulin and 14 C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients

  8. Smooth solutions for the dyadic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbato, David; Morandin, Francesco; Romito, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dyadic model, which is a toy model to test issues of well-posedness and blow-up for the Navier–Stokes and Euler equations. We prove well-posedness of positive solutions of the viscous problem in the relevant scaling range which corresponds to Navier–Stokes. Likewise we prove well-posedness for the inviscid problem (in a suitable regularity class) when the parameter corresponds to the strongest transport effect of the nonlinearity

  9. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, multiprocess non-equilibrium transport equation has been used, which accounts for both physical and chemical non-equilibrium for reactive transport through porous media. An asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity is used to embrace the concept of scale-dependent dispersion for solute transport in ...

  10. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging and dipole tests with conservative tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4C and 4D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-05-01

    The `Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes` is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4C and 4D is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the radially converging tracer tests and dipole tracer tests performed within the TRUE-1 tests using non-sorbing tracers. The tests were performed between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). These tests are to a great extent preparatory steps for the subsequent tests with sorbing radioactive tracers. In Tasks 4E and 4F of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force predictive modelling of the sorbing tracer tests is performed. Eight modelling teams representing seven organisations have performed predictive modelling using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation and data on the experimental set-up of the tracer tests. Based on this information model predictions were performed of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. The performed predictions shows that the concept of Feature A as a singular well-connected feature with limited connectivity to its surroundings is quite adequate for predictions of drawdown in boreholes and conservative tracer breakthrough. Reasonable estimates were obtained using relatively simple models. However, more elaborate models with calibration or conditioning of transmissivities and transport apertures are required for more accurate predictions. The general flow and transport processes are well understood, but the methodology to derive the

  11. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  12. Reactive transport modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) pilot to assess long-term water quality improvements and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, E.A.; Stuijfzand, P.J.; van Breukelen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    This reactive transport modeling study presents a follow up to the mass balance-based identification and quantification of the main hydrogeochemical processes that occurred during an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) trial in an anoxic sandy aquifer (Herten, the Netherlands). Kinetic rate

  13. Solute transport across a contact interface in deformable porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-04-05

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://www.febio.org). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport Visualization for Studying Mass Transfer and Solute Transport in Permeable Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Haggerty

    2004-01-01

    first such experiments that show mass transfer in porous media in great detail. Experimental and theoretical work in media with pore-scale heterogeneity showed the temporal scale-dependency of mass transfer. Extension of the work into reactive transport, where mass transfer is very important to mixing, suggests a number of promising research directions for constructing better models of reactive transport and provides the experimental tools to develop and test these models. In particular, it is important to determine how the different solute spreading mechanisms in heterogeneous conductivity fields affect the rate and spatial pattern of chemical reaction. The project was conducted collaboratively between Oregon State University, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While each institution is submitting a copy of this final report for administrative purposes, the report is the largely the same since the project was a joint effort. This final report will outline the results of work completed and summarize publications and presentations. Manuscripts published or in press are attached, and subsequent publications will follow once published

  15. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2001-12-20

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada.

  16. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada

  17. Ensuring sustainability of the city transportation system: problems and solutions (ICSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Irina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ways to increase sustainability of the city transportation system and, particularly, measures to promote safe public transport and non-motorized means of transport are considered in the article. Analysis of the existing positive experience shows that complex decisions for a sustainable development of the city transportation system are necessary. Technical and organizational ways to increase the transportation system’s sustainability and safety are studied. The results of solution of separate tasks, aimed at completing the goal, are presented: defining transport preferences of the citizens of Naberezhnye Chelny, perspective model of bus route network, a model of an adaptive smart-bicycle. It is shown that the proposed solutions for strategic and operational management will help to enhance efficiency and safety of transportation system.

  18. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ber of processes and porous media properties including convective transport with flowing water, molecular ... focus of experimental and theoretical research on solute transport through porous media. The essence of ...... Moench M 1991 Social issues in Western U.S. groundwater management: An overview. Oakland: Pacific.

  19. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, multiprocess non-equilibrium transport equation has been used, which accounts for both physical and chemical non-equilibrium for reactive transport through porous media. An asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity is used to embrace the concept of scale-dependent dispersion for solute ...

  20. Challenges in the Application of Fractional Derivative Models in Capturing Solute Transport in Porous Media: Darcy-Scale Fractional Dispersion and the Influence of Medium Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous media consisting of segregated flow regions are fractional-order systems, where the regional-scale anomalous diffusion can be described by the fractional derivative model (FDM. The standard FDM, however, first, cannot characterize the Darcy-scale dispersion through repacked sand columns, and second, the link between medium properties and model parameters remains unknown. To fill these two knowledge gaps, this study applies a tempered fractional derivative model (TFDM to capture bromide transport through laboratory repacked sand. Column transport experiments are conducted first, where glass beads and silica sand with different diameters are repacked individually. Late-time tails are observed in the breakthrough curves (BTC of bromide even in relatively homogeneous glass beads. The TFDM can capture the observed subdiffusion, especially the late-time BTC with a transient declining rate. Results also show that both the size distribution of repacked sand and the magnitude of fluid velocity can affect subdiffusion. In particular, a wider sand size distribution or a smaller flow rate can enhance the subdiffusion, leading to a smaller time index and a higher truncation parameter in the TFDM. Therefore, the Darcy-scale dispersion follows the tempered stable law, and the model parameters might be related to the soil size and flow conditions.

  1. Fluid and solute transport in a network of channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1991-09-01

    A three-dimensional channel network model is presented. The fluid flow and solute transport are assumed to take place through a network of connected channels. The channels are generated assuming that the conductances are lognormally distributed. The flow is calculated resolving the pressure distribution and the sole transport is calculated by using a particle tracking technique. The model includes diffusion into the rock matrix and sorption within the matrix in addition to advection along the channel network. Different approaches are used to describe the channel volume and its relation to the conductivity. To quantify the diffusion into the rock matrix the size of the flow wetted surface (contact surface between the channel and the rock) is needed in addition to the diffusion properties and the sorption capacity of the rock. Two different geometries were simulated: regional parallel flow and convergent flow toward a tunnel. In the generation of the channel network, it is found that its connectivity is reduced when the standard deviation in conductances is increased. For large standard deviations, the water conducting channels are found to be few. Standard deviations for the distribution of the effluent channel flowrates were calculated. Comparisons were made with experimental data from drifts and tunnels as well as boreholes as a means to validate the model. (au) (31 refs.)

  2. One-dimensional unsteady solute transport along unsteady flow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The one-dimensional linear advection–diffusion equation is solved analytically by using the Laplace integral transform. The solute transport as well as the flow field is considered to be unsteady, both of independent patterns. The solute dispersion occurs through an inhomogeneous semi-infinite medium. Hence, velocity is ...

  3. SutraPrep, a pre-processor for SUTRA, a model for ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Alden M.

    2002-01-01

    SutraPrep facilitates the creation of three-dimensional (3D) input datasets for the USGS ground-water flow and transport model SUTRA Version 2D3D.1. It is most useful for applications in which the geometry of the 3D model domain and the spatial distribution of physical properties and boundary conditions is relatively simple. SutraPrep can be used to create a SUTRA main input (?.inp?) file, an initial conditions (?.ics?) file, and a 3D plot of the finite-element mesh in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) format. Input and output are text-based. The code can be run on any platform that has a standard FORTRAN-90 compiler. Executable code is available for Microsoft Windows.

  4. Sustainable freight transport in South Africa:Domestic intermodal solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Havenga

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid deregulation of freight transport in South Africa two decades ago, and low historical investment in rail (with resultant poor service delivery, an integrated alternative to road and rail competition was never developed. High national freight logistics costs, significant road infrastructure challenges and environmental impact concerns of a road-dominated freight transport market have, however, fuelled renewed interest in intermodal transport solutions. In this article, a high-level business case for domestic intermodal solutions in South Africa is presented. The results demonstrate that building three intermodal terminals to connect the three major industrial hubs (i.e. Gauteng, Durban and Cape Town through an intermodal solution could reduce transport costs (including externalities for the identified 11.5 million tons of intermodalfriendly freight flows on the Cape and Natal corridors by 42% (including externalities.

  5. Hierarchical Adaptive Solution of Radiation Transport Problems on Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Cassiano R. E de Oliveira

    2008-06-30

    Computational radiation transport has steadily gained acceptance in the last decade as a viable modeling tool due to the rapid advancements in computer software and hardware technologies. It can be applied for the analysis of a wide range of problems which arise in nuclear reactor physics, medical physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics and other areas of engineering physics. However, radiation transport is an extremely chanllenging computational problem since the governing equation is seven-deimensional (3 in space, 2 in direction, 1 in energy, and 1 in time) with a high degree of coupleing betwen these variables. If not careful, this relatively large number of independent variables when discretized can potentially lead to sets of linear equations of intractable size. Though parallel computing has allowed the solution of very large problems, avaliable computational resources will always be finite due to the fact that every more sophisticated multiphysics models are being demanded by industry. There is thus the pressing requirement to optimize the discretizations so as to minimize the effort and maximize the accuracy.

  6. SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR ARDL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae-Marius JULA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available VAR type models can be used only for stationary time series. Causality analyses through econometric models need that series to have the same integrated order. Usually, when constraining the series to comply these restrictions (e.g. by differentiating, economic interpretation of the outcomes may become difficult. Recent solution for mitigating these problems is the use of ARDL (autoregressive distributed lag models. We present implementation in E-Views of these models and we test the impact of exchange rate on consumer price index.

  7. VS2DRTI: Simulating Heat and Reactive Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W; Haile, Sosina S; Parkhurst, David L; Charlton, Scott R

    2018-01-29

    Variably saturated groundwater flow, heat transport, and solute transport are important processes in environmental phenomena, such as the natural evolution of water chemistry of aquifers and streams, the storage of radioactive waste in a geologic repository, the contamination of water resources from acid-rock drainage, and the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Up to now, our ability to simulate these processes simultaneously with fully coupled reactive transport models has been limited to complex and often difficult-to-use models. To address the need for a simple and easy-to-use model, the VS2DRTI software package has been developed for simulating water flow, heat transport, and reactive solute transport through variably saturated porous media. The underlying numerical model, VS2DRT, was created by coupling the flow and transport capabilities of the VS2DT and VS2DH models with the equilibrium and kinetic reaction capabilities of PhreeqcRM. Flow capabilities include two-dimensional, constant-density, variably saturated flow; transport capabilities include both heat and multicomponent solute transport; and the reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of geochemical reactions of PHREEQC. The graphical user interface includes a preprocessor for building simulations and a postprocessor for visual display of simulation results. To demonstrate the simulation of multiple processes, the model is applied to a hypothetical example of injection of heated waste water to an aquifer with temperature-dependent cation exchange. VS2DRTI is freely available public domain software. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Fluid transport with time on peritoneal dialysis: the contribution of free water transport and solute coupled water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coester, Annemieke M.; Smit, Watske; Struijk, Dirk G.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafiltration in peritoneal dialysis occurs through endothelial water channels (free water transport) and together with solutes across small pores: solute coupled water transport. A review is given of cross-sectional studies and on the results of longitudinal follow-up

  9. Multi-compartment Aerosol Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Joshua Allen; Santarpia, Joshua; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Omana, Michael Alexis; Rivera, Danielle; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony

    2017-06-01

    A simple aerosol transport model was developed for a multi-compartmented cleanroom. Each compartment was treated as a well-mixed volume with ventilating supply and return air. Gravitational settling, intercompartment transport, and leakage of exterior air into the system were included in the model. A set of first order, coupled, ordinary differential equations was derived from the conservation equations of aerosol mass and air mass. The system of ODEs was then solved in MATLAB using pre-existing numerical methods. The model was verified against cases of (1) constant inlet-duct concentration, and (2) exponentially decaying inlet-duct concentration. Numerical methods resulted in normalized error of less than 10 -9 when model solutions were compared to analytical solutions. The model was validated against experimental measurements from a single field test and showed good agreement in the shape and magnitude of the aerosol concentration profile with time.

  10. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  11. Review of data requirements for groundwater flow and solute transport modelling and the ability of site investigation methods to meet these requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.J.; Chapman, N.A.; Robinson, P.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the data requirements for the codes that may be used in the modelling of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport during the assessment of a Nirex site for the deep disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste and also the site investigation methods that exist to supply the data for these codes. The data requirements for eight codes are reviewed, with most emphasis on three of the more significant codes, VANDAL, NAMMU and CHEMTARD. The largest part of the report describes and discusses the site investigation techniques and each technique is considered in terms of its ability to provide the data necessary to characterise the geological and hydrogeological environment around a potential repository. (author)

  12. Goods Transport Modelling, Vol 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Steen (red.); Kristiansen, Jørgen

    The report is a study of data requirements and methodologies for goods transport. The study is intended to provide the basis for general discussion about the application of goods transport models in Denmark. The report provides an overview of different types of models and data availability....

  13. New numerical method for solving the solute transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, B.; Koplik, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    The solute transport equation can be solved numerically by approximating the water flow field by a network of stream tubes and using a Green's function solution within each stream tube. Compared to previous methods, this approach permits greater computational efficiency and easier representation of small discontinuities, and the results are easier to interpret physically. The method has been used to study hypothetical sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste

  14. Effect of river excavation on a bank filtration site - assessing transient surface water - groundwater interaction by 3D heat and solute transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Oswald, S. E.; Munz, M.; Strasser, D.

    2017-12-01

    Bank filtration is widely used either as main- or pre-treatment process for water supply. The colmation of the river bottom as interface to groundwater plays a key role for hydraulic control of flow paths and location of several beneficial attenuation processes, such as pathogen filtration, mixing, biodegradation and sorption. Along the flow path, mixing happens between the `young' infiltrated water and ambient `old' groundwater. To clarify the mechanisms and their interaction, modelling is often used for analysing spatial and temporal distribution of the travelling time, quantifying mixing ratios, and estimating the biochemical reaction rates. As the most comprehensive tool, 2-D or 3-D spatially-explicit modelling is used in several studies, and for area with geological heterogeneity, the adaptation of different natural tracers could constrain the model in respect to model non-uniqueness and improve the interpretation of the flow field. In our study, we have evaluated the influence of a river excavation and bank reconstruction project on the groundwater-surface water exchange at a bank filtration site. With data from years of field site monitoring, we could include besides heads and temperature also the analysis of stable isotope data and ions to differentiate between infiltrated water and groundwater. Thus, we have set up a 3-D transient heat and mass transport groundwater model, taking the strong local geological heterogeneity into consideration, especially between river and water work wells. By transferring the effect of the river excavation into a changing hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed, model could be calibrated against both water head and temperature time-series observed. Finally, electrical conductivity dominated by river input was included as quasi-conservative tracer. The `triple' calibrated, transient model was then used to i) understand the flow field and quantify the long term changes in infiltration rate and distribution brought by the

  15. Uranium Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO 2 2+ ) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range ∼ 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases

  16. Reactive solute transport in an asymmetrical fracture-rock matrix system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Zhan, Hongbin

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of reactive solute transport in a single fracture-rock matrix system is the foundation of studying transport behavior in the complex fractured porous media. When transport properties are asymmetrically distributed in the adjacent rock matrixes, reactive solute transport has to be considered as a coupled three-domain problem, which is more complex than the symmetric case with identical transport properties in the adjacent rock matrixes. This study deals with the transport problem in a single fracture-rock matrix system with asymmetrical distribution of transport properties in the rock matrixes. Mathematical models are developed for such a problem under the first-type and the third-type boundary conditions to analyze the spatio-temporal concentration and mass distribution in the fracture and rock matrix with the help of Laplace transform technique and de Hoog numerical inverse Laplace algorithm. The newly acquired solutions are then tested extensively against previous analytical and numerical solutions and are proven to be robust and accurate. Furthermore, a water flushing phase is imposed on the left boundary of system after a certain time. The diffusive mass exchange along the fracture/rock matrixes interfaces and the relative masses stored in each of three domains (fracture, upper rock matrix, and lower rock matrix) after the water flushing provide great insights of transport with asymmetric distribution of transport properties. This study has the following findings: 1) Asymmetric distribution of transport properties imposes greater controls on solute transport in the rock matrixes. However, transport in the fracture is mildly influenced. 2) The mass stored in the fracture responses quickly to water flushing, while the mass stored in the rock matrix is much less sensitive to the water flushing. 3) The diffusive mass exchange during the water flushing phase has similar patterns under symmetric and asymmetric cases. 4) The characteristic distance

  17. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockhold, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a ''blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration

  18. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems

  19. Transport-Constrained Extensions of Collision and Track Length Estimators for Solutions of Radiative Transport Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track lengh estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional ) estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems.

  20. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive

  1. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  2. One-dimensional unsteady solute transport along unsteady flow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    face water pollution and groundwater pollution. Its source may be natural or anthropogenic. One type of source ... Groundwater pollution occurs due to infiltra- tion of wastes through rainwater, from garbage dis- ...... of upscaling methods for solute transport in heteroge- neous porous media; J. Hydrol. 362 150–176. Golz W J ...

  3. dispersion equation parameters of solute transport in agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-31

    Aug 31, 2011 ... 1School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi'an 710055,. China. ... In this paper, a simple method was proposed to estimate both D and R, and the validity was verified by ... One-dimensional transient solute transport through a homogeneous ...

  4. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  5. Simultaneous transport of water and solutes under transient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Simultaneous transport of water and solutes under transient unsaturated flow conditions – A case study. B K Purandara. ∗. , N Varadarajan and B Venkatesh. National Institute of Hydrology, Hard Rock Regional Center, Belgaum 590 001, Karnataka, India. ∗ e-mail: purandarabk@yahoo.com. The imbalance between ...

  6. Probabilistic transport models for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Sanchez, R.

    2005-01-01

    A generalization of diffusive (Fickian) transport is considered, in which particle motion is described by probability distributions. We design a simple model that includes a critical mechanism to switch between two transport channels, and show that it exhibits various interesting characteristics, suggesting that the ideas of probabilistic transport might provide a framework for the description of a range of unusual transport phenomena observed in fusion plasmas. The model produces power degradation and profile consistency, as well as a scaling of the confinement time with system size reminiscent of the gyro-Bohm/Bohm scalings observed in fusion plasmas, and rapid propagation of disturbances. In the present work we show how this model may also produce on-axis peaking of the profiles with off-axis fuelling. It is important to note that the fluid limit of a simple model like this, characterized by two transport channels, does not correspond to the usual (Fickian) transport models commonly used for modelling transport in fusion plasmas, and behaves in a fundamentally different way. (author)

  7. Prolonged river water pollution due to variable-density flow and solute transport in the riverbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guangqiu; Tang, Hongwu; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    A laboratory experiment and numerical modeling were used to examine effects of density gradients on hyporheic flow and solute transport under the condition of a solute pulse input to a river with regular bed forms. Relatively low-density gradients due to an initial salt pulse concentration of 1.55 kg m-3 applied in the experiment were found to modulate significantly the pore-water flow and solute transport in the riverbed. Such density gradients increased downward flow and solute transport in the riverbed by factors up to 1.6. This resulted in a 12.2% increase in the total salt transfer from the water column to the riverbed over the salt pulse period. As the solute pulse passed, the effect of the density gradients reversed, slowing down the release of the solute back to the river water by a factor of 3.7. Numerical modeling indicated that these density effects intensified as salt concentrations in the water column increased. Simulations further showed that the density gradients might even lead to unstable flow and result in solute fingers in the bed of large bed forms. The slow release of solute from the bed back to the river led to a long tail of solute concentration in the river water. These findings have implications for assessment of impact of pollution events on river systems, in particular, long-term effects on both the river water and riverbed due to the hyporheic exchange.

  8. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Xie,1,2 Xiao Yan Zhu,1,2 Lu Ming Liu,1,2 Zhi Qiang Meng1,2 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible

  9. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes

  10. Transport properties site descriptive model. Guidelines for evaluation and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Sten; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2004-04-01

    transport properties, and hence the guidelines in this report, involve two main categories of parameters: Parameters that characterise the retention properties of geologic materials. These parameters quantify the diffusion and sorption properties of intact and altered rock, fracture coatings and fracture-filling materials, and are described within the framework of the 3D geometric models devised by Geology. Parameters that characterise solute transport along flow paths (flow-related transport parameters). These parameters include the 'F-parameter' and 'water travel time', tw, and parameters that account for spatial variability in diffusion and sorption. The flow-related parameters are obtained by means of particle tracking simulations in groundwater flow models

  11. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  12. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models

  13. Application of PHREEQC on solute transport in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, X.-M.; Liu, X.; Barry, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    With increasing groundwater contamination, the study of contaminant transport is becoming more and more important. Since chemical reactions occur simultaneously with contaminant transfer, these two aspects should be coupled in one model. PHREEQC is a simulation software package for modeling chemically reactive transport processes in natural and underground water bodies. PHREEQC was applied to simulate the processes of cation exchange and kinetic redox transformations with 1D gro...

  14. An experimental study of solute transport in mudstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilling, D.; Jefferies, N.L.; Lineham, T.R.

    1987-12-01

    Aqueous phase mass transport is considered to be the most likely means by which radionuclides released from an underground radioactive waste repository may return to man and to the environment. One of the options that has been considered by UK Nirex Ltd. for the disposal of radioactive waste is burial in clay-rich sedimentary formations. This report describes experimental techniques developed for the measurement of diffusivity, hydraulic conductivity and solute-accessible porosity in mudstones. In addition, these parameters have been determined for London Clay and the relative importance of diffusive and convective transport in this formation is discussed. (author)

  15. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, S.G.; Saulnier, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used ground-water solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occuring in the aquifer. Model simulations of ground-water pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of ground-water movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in ground-water quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the ground-water quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the ground-water quality. (USGS)

  16. Parameter estimation in six numerical models of transperitoneal transport of potassium in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Joffe, P

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of transperitoneal potassium transport during peritoneal dialysis were evaluated by validation of different mathematical models. The models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective and lymphatic convective solute transport....... Experimental results were obtained from 26 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The validation procedure demonstrated that models including both diffusive and non-lymphatic convective solute transport were superior to the other models. Lymphatic convective solute transport was not identifiable...

  17. Transport processes in space physics and astrophysics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dosch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

     This is the problems and solution manual for the graduate text with the same title and published as Lecture Notes in Physics Vol 877 which provides the necessary mathematical and physics background to understand the transport of gases, charged particle gases, energetic charged particles, turbulence, and radiation in an astrophysical and space physics context. The very detailed and self-contained problems and solutions will be an essential part of the training of any graduate student wishing to enter and pursuing research in this field. .

  18. Mass transfer processes and field-scale transport of organic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusseau, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer processes, such as sorption/desorption and mass transfer between immiscible liquids and water, on the transport of organic solutes is discussed. Rate-limited sorption of organic solutes caused by a diffusion-constrained mechanism is shown to be significant under laboratory conditions. The significance of the impact of nonequilibrium sorption on field-scale transport is scale dependent. The impact of organic liquids on mass transfer and transport of organic solutes depends upon the nature of the solute and the nature and form of the organic liquid. For example, while retardation of nonionic solutes is decreased in mixed-solvent systems, (i.e. systems comprised of water and a miscible organic liquid or an immiscible liquid present in concentrations below phase separation), the retardation of organic acids may, in some cases, increase with addition of a cosolvent. While the presence of an immiscible liquid existing as a mobile phase will reduce retention of organic solutes, the presence of residual saturation of an immiscible liquid can significantly increase retention. A model is presented that incorporates the effects of retention resulting from residual saturation, as well as nonequilibrium sorption, on the transport of organic solutes. (Author) (70 refs., 3 figs.)

  19. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  20. The separation of radionuclide migration by solution and particle transport in LLRW repository buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.; Woods, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory-scale lysimeter experiments were performed with simulated waste forms placed in candidate buffer materials which have been chosen for a low-level radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide releases into the effluent water and radionuclide capture by the buffer material were determined. The results could not be explained by traditional solution transport mechanisms, and transport by particles released from the waste form and/or transport by buffer particles were suspected as the dominant mechanism for radionuclide release from the lysimeters. To elucidate the relative contribution of particle and solution transport, the waste forms were replaced by a wafer of neutron-activated buffer soaked with selected soluble isotopes. Particle transport was determined by the movement of gamma-emitting neutron-activation products through the lysimeter. Solution transport was quantified by comparing the migration of soluble radionuclides relative to the transport of neutron activation products. The new approach for monitoring radionuclide migration in soil is presented. It facilitates the determination of most of the fundamental coefficients required to model the transport process

  1. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  2. Modeling of capacitated transportation systems for integral scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Hurink, Johann L.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by a planned automated cargo transportation network, we consider transportation problems in which the finite capacity of resources has to be taken into account. We present a flexible modeling methodology which allows to construct, evaluate, and improve feasible solutions. The modeling is

  3. Modeling of capacitated transportation systems for integral scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Hurink, Johann L.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by a planned automated cargo transportation network, we consider transportation problems in which the finite capacity of resources has to be taken nto account. We present a flexible modeling methodology which allows to construct, evaluate, and improve feasible solutions. The modeling is

  4. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  5. Geological entropy and solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Pedretti, Daniele

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel approach to link solute transport behavior to the physical heterogeneity of the aquifer, which we fully characterize with two measurable parameters: the variance of the log K values (σY2), and a new indicator (HR) that integrates multiple properties of the K field into a global measure of spatial disorder or geological entropy. From the results of a detailed numerical experiment considering solute transport in K fields representing realistic distributions of hydrofacies in alluvial aquifers, we identify empirical relationship between the two parameters and the first three central moments of the distributions of arrival times of solute particles at a selected control plane. The analysis of experimental data indicates that the mean and the variance of the solutes arrival times tend to increase with spatial disorder (i.e., HR increasing), while highly skewed distributions are observed in more orderly structures (i.e., HR decreasing) or at higher σY2. We found that simple closed-form empirical expressions of the bivariate dependency of skewness on HR and σY2 can be used to predict the emergence of non-Fickian transport in K fields considering a range of structures and heterogeneity levels, some of which based on documented real aquifers. The accuracy of these predictions and in general the results from this study indicate that a description of the global variability and structure of the K field in terms of variance and geological entropy offers a valid and broadly applicable approach for the interpretation and prediction of transport in heterogeneous porous media.

  6. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  7. Next Generation Transport Phenomenology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Douglas J.; Knight, Harold; Evans, J. Scott

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in Quarter 3 of Contract Year 3 on the development of Aeronomy Phenomenology Modeling Tool (APMT), an open-source, component-based, client-server architecture for distributed modeling, analysis, and simulation activities focused on electron and photon transport for general atmospheres. In the past quarter, column emission rate computations were implemented in Java, preexisting Fortran programs for computing synthetic spectra were embedded into APMT through Java wrappers, and work began on a web-based user interface for setting input parameters and running the photoelectron and auroral electron transport models.

  8. An Experimental Study on Solute Transport in One-Dimensional Clay Soil Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaheer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solute transport in low-permeability media such as clay has not been studied carefully up to present, and we are often unclear what the proper governing law is for describing the transport process in such media. In this study, we composed and analyzed the breakthrough curve (BTC data and the development of leaching in one-dimensional solute transport experiments in low-permeability homogeneous and saturated media at small scale, to identify key parameters controlling the transport process. Sodium chloride (NaCl was chosen to be the tracer. A number of tracer tests were conducted to inspect the transport process under different conditions. The observed velocity-time behavior for different columns indicated the decline of soil permeability when switching from tracer introducing to tracer flushing. The modeling approaches considered were the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE, Two-Region Model (TRM, Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW, and Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation (FADE. It was found that all the models can fit the transport process very well; however, ADE and TRM were somewhat unable to characterize the transport behavior in leaching. The CTRW and FADE models were better in capturing the full evaluation of tracer-breakthrough curve and late-time tailing in leaching.

  9. Analytical solution of electrohydrodynamic flow and transport in rectangular channels: inclusion of double layer effects

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.

    2013-01-25

    Upscaling electroosmosis in porous media is a challenge due to the complexity and scale-dependent nonlinearities of this coupled phenomenon. "Pore-network modeling" for upscaling electroosmosis from pore scale to Darcy scale can be considered as a promising approach. However, this method requires analytical solutions for flow and transport at pore scale. This study concentrates on the development of analytical solutions of flow and transport in a single rectangular channel under combined effects of electrohydrodynamic forces. These relations will be used in future works for pore-network modeling. The analytical solutions are valid for all regimes of overlapping electrical double layers and have the potential to be extended to nonlinear Boltzmann distribution. The innovative aspects of this study are (a) contribution of overlapping of electrical double layers to the Stokes flow as well as Nernst-Planck transport has been carefully included in the analytical solutions. (b) All important transport mechanisms including advection, diffusion, and electromigration have been included in the analytical solutions. (c) Fully algebraic relations developed in this study can be easily employed to upscale electroosmosis to Darcy scale using pore-network modeling. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  10. Methods for testing transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data

  11. Eolian transport, saline lake basins, and groundwater solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Warren W.; Sanford, Ward E.

    1995-01-01

    Eolian processes associated with saline lakes are shown to be important in determining solute concentration in groundwater in arid and semiarid areas. Steady state mass balance analyses of chloride in the groundwater at Double Lakes, a saline lake basin in the southern High Plains of Texas, United States, suggest that approximately 4.5 × 105 kg of chloride is removed from the relatively small (4.7 km2) basin floor each year by deflation. This mass enters the groundwater down the wind gradient from the lake, degrading the water quality. The estimates of mass transport were independently determined by evaluation of solutes in the unsaturated zone and by solute mass balance calculations of groundwater flux. Transport of salts from the lake was confirmed over a short term (2 years) by strategically placed dust collectors. Results consistent with those at Double Lake were obtained from dune surfaces collected upwind and downwind from a sabkha near the city of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The eolian transport process provides an explanation of the degraded groundwater quality associated with the 30–40 saline lake basins on the southern half of the southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico and in many other arid and semiarid areas.

  12. Modelling pollutant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    An attempt has been made here to present a brief outline of the major processes and problems in the environmental modelling with special reference to radionuclide migration in surface waters. The intention has been only to provide a bird's eye view of this fertile and socially relevant area of scientific pursuit. (author). 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Solvable Model for Dynamic Mass Transport in Disordered Geophysical Media

    KAUST Repository

    Marder, M.

    2018-03-29

    We present an analytically solvable model for transport in geophysical materials on large length and time scales. It describes the flow of gas to a complicated absorbing boundary over long periods of time. We find a solution to this model using Green\\'s function techniques, and apply the solution to three absorbing networks of increasing complexity.

  14. Brine transport in porous media self-similar solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. van Duijn (Hans); L.A. Peletier (Bert); R.J. Schotting (Ruud)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyze a model for brine transport in porous media, which includes a mass balance for the fluid, a mass balance for salt, Darcy's law and an equation of state, which relates the fluid density to the salt mass fraction. This model incorporates the effect of local volume

  15. Reactionary - electrodiffusion equations of transport processes of electrolyte solutions of radioelements through porous clayey structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.Shymchuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model of the water solution of radioactive elements and the porous clayey matrix is proposed. The generalized transport equations for the description of diffusion, sorption,radiative processes and chemical reactions are obtained taking into account the electromagnetic processes.

  16. Semianalytical Solutions for Transport in Aquifer and Fractured Clay Matrix System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional mathematical model that describes transport of contaminant in a horizontal aquifer with simultaneous diffusion into a fractured clay formation is proposed. A group of analytical solutions is derived based on specific initial and boundary conditions as well as ...

  17. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkaer

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+-2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral...... permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion......, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions...

  18. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  19. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  20. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, N.; Deville, E.; Bary, B.; Trotignon, L.; Hedde, T.; Cochepin, B.; Stora, E.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  1. Monte Carlo methods for flux expansion solutions of transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanier, J.

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive Monte Carlo methods, based on the use of either correlated sampling or importance sampling, to obtain global solutions to certain transport problems have recently been described. The resulting learning algorithms are capable of achieving geometric convergence when applied to the estimation of a finite number of coefficients in a flux expansion representation of the global solution. However, because of the nonphysical nature of the random walk simulations needed to perform importance sampling, conventional transport estimators and source sampling techniques require modification to be used successfully in conjunction with such flux expansion methods. It is shown how these problems can be overcome. First, the traditional path length estimators in wide use in particle transport simulations are generalized to include rather general detector functions (which, in this application, are the individual basis functions chosen for the flus expansion). Second, it is shown how to sample from the signed probabilities that arise as source density functions in these applications, without destroying the zero variance property needed to ensure geometric convergence to zero error

  2. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  3. Pore-scale analysis on the effects of compound-specific dilution on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter

    , a transient flux-related dilution index that allows quantifying the evolution of solute dilution at a given position along the main flow direction. For the different solute transport scenarios we obtained dilution breakthrough curves that complement and add important information to traditional solute......Compound-specific diffusivities significantly impact solute transport and mixing at different scales. Although diffusive processes occur at the small pore scale, their effects propagate and remain important at larger macroscopic scales [1]. In this pore-scale modeling study in saturated porous...... media we show that compound-specific effects are important not only at steady-state and for the lateral displacement of solutes with different diffusivities but also for transient transport and solute breakthrough [2]. We performed flow and transport simulations in two-dimensional pore-scale domains...

  4. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L; Miller, Richard S

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Finite-Difference Solution of Solute Transport through a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a theoretical analysis of the transport of solutes through a fixed-film membrane bioreactor (MBR, immobilised with an active biocatalyst. The dimensionless convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients was solved analytically and numerically for concentration profiles of the solutes through the MBR. The analytical solution makes use of regular perturbation and accounts for radial convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate species. The Michaelis-Menten (or Monod rate equation was assumed for the sink term, and the perturbation was extended up to second-order. In the analytical solution only the first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation was considered; hence the linearized equation was solved. In the numerical solution, however, this restriction was lifted. The solution of the nonlinear, elliptic, partial differential equation was based on an implicit finite-difference method (FDM. An upwind scheme was employed for numerical stability. The resulting algebraic equations were solved simultaneously using the multivariate Newton-Raphson iteration method. The solution allows for the evaluation of the effect on the concentration profiles of (i the radial and axial convective velocity, (ii the convective mass transfer rates, (iii the reaction rates, (iv the fraction retentate, and (v the aspect ratio.

  6. Influence of pore structure on solute transport in degraded and undegraded fen peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kleimeier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In peat soils, decomposition and degradation reduce the proportion of large pores by breaking down plant debris into smaller fragments and infilling inter-particle pore spaces. This affects water flow and solute migration which, in turn, influence reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this study we conducted flow-through reactor experiments to investigate the interplay between pore structure and solute transport in samples of undegraded and degraded peat collected in Canada and Germany, respectively. The pore size distributions and transport parameters were characterised using the breakthrough curve and two-region non-equilibrium transport model analyses for a non-reactive solute. The results of transport characterisation showed a higher fraction of immobile pores in the degraded peat with higher diffusive exchanges of solutes between the mobile and immobile pores associated with the dual-porosity structure. The rates of steady-state potential nitrate reduction were compared with pore fractions and exchange coefficients to investigate the influence of pore structure on the rates of nitrate reduction. The results indicated that the degraded peat has potential to provide the necessary boundary conditions to support nitrate removal and serves as a favourable substrate for denitrification, due to the nature of its pore structure and its lower organic carbon content compared to undegraded peat.

  7. Modeling the sorption kinetic of metsulfuron-methyl on Andisols and Ultisols volcanic ash-derived soils: kinetics parameters and solute transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Lizethly; Escudey, Mauricio; Fuentes, Edwar; Báez, María E

    2010-07-15

    Metsulfuron-methyl sorption kinetic was studied in Andisol and Ultisol soils in view of their distinctive physical and chemical properties: acidic pH and variable surface charge. Different kinetic models were applied to the experimental results. The pseudo-second-order model fitted sorption kinetics data better than the pseudo-first-order model. The rate constant and the initial rate constant values obtained through this model demonstrated the different behavior of metsulfuron-methyl in both kinds of soils, both parameters being the highest for Andisol. The application of Elovich equation, intraparticle diffusion model and a two-site nonequilibrium model (TSNE) allowed to conclude that: (i) the high organic matter content is the governing factor for Andisols where mass transfer across the boundary layer, and in a lesser degree, intraparticle diffusion were the two processes controlling sorption kinetic and (ii) the mineral composition was more relevant in Ultisols where rate was controlled almost exclusively by intraparticle diffusion into macropores and micropores. The slower sorption rate on Ultisols, the mechanism involved and the lower sorption capacity of this kind of soils must be taken into account to assess leaching behavior of this herbicide. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A solution of the neutron transport equation using spherical harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    A solution of the neutron transport equation is obtained by expanding the flux as a series. Preliminary investigations in one dimension indicated that the first-order differential equations resulting for the unknown coefficients or moments could be solved by eliminating terms with odd L (L = order of Legendre polynomial) to give a second-order system. FORTRAN subroutines have been written to calculate the necessary coefficients and specify the relevant differentials. A finite-difference or finite-element approximation can then be used. (U.K.)

  9. QCD effective actions from the solutions of the transport equations

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, C; Manuel, Cristina; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2003-01-01

    We solve the collisionless transport equations of a quark-gluon plasma interacting through mean chromodynamic fields. The system is assumed to be translation invariant in one or more space-time directions. We present exact solutions that hold if the vector gauge fields in the direction of the translation invariance commute with their covariant derivatives. We also solve the equations perturbatively when the commutation condition is relaxed. Further, we derive the color current and the associated effective action. For the static quasi-equilibrium system, our results reproduce the full one-loop effective action of QCD in the presence of constant background fields, where the above mentioned commutation condition is satisfied.

  10. Implementation of Solute Transport in the Vadose Zone into the `HYDRUS Package for MODFLOW'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, J.; Beegum, S.; Szymkiewicz, A.; Sudheer, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The 'HYDRUS package for MODFLOW' was developed by Seo et al. (2007) and Twarakavi et al. (2008) to simultaneously evaluate transient water flow in both unsaturated and saturated zones. The package, which is based on the HYDRUS-1D model (Šimůnek et al., 2016) simulating unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone, was incorporated into MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al., 2000) simulating saturated groundwater flow. The HYDRUS package in the coupled model can be used to represent the effects of various unsaturated zone processes, including infiltration, evaporation, root water uptake, capillary rise, and recharge in homogeneous or layered soil profiles. The coupled model is effective in addressing spatially-variable saturated-unsaturated hydrological processes at the regional scale, allowing for complex layering in the unsaturated zone, spatially and temporarily variable water fluxes at the soil surface and in the root zone, and with alternating recharge and discharge fluxes (Twarakavi et al., 2008). One of the major limitations of the coupled model was that it could not be used to simulate at the same time solute transport. However, solute transport is highly dependent on water table fluctuations due to temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge. This is an important concern when the coupled model is used for analyzing groundwater contamination due to transport through the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study is to integrate the solute transport model (the solute transport part of HYDRUS-1D for the unsaturated zone and MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2009) for the saturated zone) into an existing coupled water flow model. The unsaturated zone component of the coupled model can consider solute transport involving many biogeochemical processes and reactions, including first-order degradation, volatilization, linear or nonlinear sorption, one-site kinetic sorption, two-site sorption, and two-kinetic sites sorption (Šimůnek and van Genuchten, 2008

  11. Particle-tracking code (track3d) for convective solute transport modelling in the geosphere: Description and user`s manual; Programme de reperage de particules (track3d) pour la modelisation du transport par convection des solutes dans la geosphere: description et manuel de l`utilisateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, B.W.; Chan, T.

    1994-12-01

    A deterministic particle-tracking code (TRACK3D) has been developed to compute convective flow paths of conservative (nonreactive) contaminants through porous geological media. TRACK3D requires the groundwater velocity distribution, which, in our applications, results from flow simulations using AECL`s MOTIF code. The MOTIF finite-element code solves the transient and steady-state coupled equations of groundwater flow, solute transport and heat transport in fractured/porous media. With few modifications, TRACK3D can be used to analyse the velocity distributions calculated by other finite-element or finite-difference flow codes. This report describes the assumptions, limitations, organization, operation and applications of the TRACK3D code, and provides a comprehensive user`s manual.

  12. Used Fuel Logistics: Decades of Experience with transportation and Interim storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, G.; Shelton, C.

    2015-07-01

    Used fuel inventories are growing worldwide. While some countries have opted for a closed cycle with recycling, numerous countries must expand their interim storage solutions as implementation of permanent repositories is taking more time than foreseen. In both cases transportation capabilities will have to be developed. AREVA TN has an unparalleled expertise with transportation of used fuel. For more than 50 years AREVA TN has safely shipped more than 7,000 used fuel transport casks. The transportation model that was initially developed in the 1970s has been adapted and enhanced over the years to meet more restrictive regulatory requirements and evolving customer needs, and to address public concerns. The numerous “lessons learned” have offered data and guidance that have allowed for also efficient and consistent improvement over the decades. AREVA TN has also an extensive experience with interim dry storage solutions in many countries on-site but also is working with partners to developed consolidated interim storage facility. Both expertise with storage and transportation contribute to safe, secure and smooth continuity of the operations. This paper will describe decades of experience with a very successful transportation program as well as interim storage solutions. (Author)

  13. Interpretation and nonuniqueness of CTRW transition distributions: Insights from an alternative solute transport formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian

    2014-12-01

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) has both an elegant mathematical theory and a successful record at modeling solute transport in the subsurface. However, there are some interpretation ambiguities relating to the relationship between the discrete CTRW transition distributions and the underlying continuous movement of solute that have not been addressed in existing literature. These include the exact definition of ;transition;, and the extent to which transition probability distributions are unique/quantifiable from data. Here, we present some theoretical results which address these uncertainties in systems with an advective bias. Simultaneously, we present an alternative, reduced parameter CTRW formulation for general advective transport in heterogeneous porous media, which models early- and late-time transport by use of random transition times between sparse, imaginary planes normal to flow. We show that even in the context of this reduced-parameter formulation there is nonuniqueness in the definitions of both transition lengths and waiting time distributions, and that neither may be uniquely determined from experimental data. For practical use of this formulation, we suggest Pareto transition time distributions, leading to a two-degree-of-freedom modeling approach. We then demonstrate the power of this approach in fitting two sets of existing experimental data. While the primary focus is the presentation of new results, the discussion is designed to be pedagogical and to provide a good entry point into practical modeling of solute transport with the CTRW.

  14. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkaer

    2002-07-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+-2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral flows of water across the epithelium with recirculation of the diffusible ions maintained by a 1Na+-1K+-2Cl- cotransporter in the plasma membrane facing the serosal compartment. With intracellular non-diffusible anions and compliant plasma membranes, the model describes the dependence on membrane permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions. The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward uphill water flux, or an electroneutral Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter.

  15. Semi-analytical solution of land-derived solute transport under tidal fluctuation in a confined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heejun

    2017-11-01

    A one-dimensional semi-analytical solution of land-derived solute transport, subject to tidal fluctuation in a coastal confined aquifer, was derived using the generalized integral-transform technique (GITT). To investigate the plume migration of land-derived contaminants within a tidally influenced aquifer, both spatially and temporally varying expressions of the Darcy velocity and dispersion coefficients obtained from the analytical solution of the groundwater head response, which were subject to sinusoidal boundary conditions due to tidal fluctuation, were considered. This new semi-analytical solution was verified against a numerical solution, as well as the peak location trajectory obtained using the Predictor-Corrector method. Sensitivity analyses of tidal amplitude, hydraulic conductivity, and storage coefficient using the proposed solution were performed to understand plume behavior with regard to plume shape, plume spatial moments, and macrodispersion coefficients to gain a better understanding of the transport mechanisms. As the tidal amplitude, hydraulic conductivity, and storage coefficient were increased, the peaks were travelled faster, and peak concentrations were decreased. In addition, an increase in tidal amplitude, hydraulic conductivity, and storage coefficient caused an increase in variance as well as the macrodispersion coefficient. It was observed that negative macrodispersion appeared when the storage coefficient was largest, as well as when the difference between landward-directed advective velocity at the leading and trailing edges of the plume was greatest. This newly developed semi-analytical solution provides a useful mathematical tool for validating numerical models and understanding the physical mechanism of the migration of plume discharge to the sea or estuaries within a tidally influenced aquifer.

  16. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of devices that rely on cross-flow filtration, such as those used in water purification, irrigation devices, field-flow fractionation, and hollow-fibre bioreactors for tissue-engineering applications. Motivated by these applications, a radially averaged model for fluid and solute transport in a tube with thin porous walls is derived by developing the classical ideas of Taylor dispersion. The model includes solute diffusion and advection via both radial and axial flow components, and the advection, diffusion, and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The effect of wall permeability, slip, and pressure differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a given solute distribution is derived. The theory is applied to the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor, where a uniform delivery of nutrient across the membrane walls to the extra-capillary space is required to promote spatially uniform cell growth. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    tests (e.g. Garcia-Gutierrez et al. 2006, Soler et al. 2008, van Loon et al. 2004, Wu et al. 2009) and numerical modeling (de Windt et al. 2003; 2006), the effects of THMC processes on radionuclide transport are not fully investigated. The objectives of the research activity documented in this report are to improve a modeling capability for coupled THMC processes and to use it to evaluate the THMC impacts on radionuclide transport. This research activity addresses several key Features, Events and Processes (FEPs), including FEP 2.2.08, Hydrologic Processes, FEP 2.2.07, Mechanical Processes and FEP 2.2.09, Chemical Process— Transport, by studying near-field coupled THMC processes in clay/shale repositories and their impacts on radionuclide transport. This report documents the progress that has been made in FY12. Section 2 discusses the development of THMC modeling capability. Section 3 reports modeling results of THMC impacts on radionuclide transport. Planned work for the remaining months of FY12 and proposed work for FY13 are presented in Section 4.

  18. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  19. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sho, Shohiro, E-mail: shoshohiro@gmail.com [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Odanaka, Shinji [Computer Assisted Science Division, Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  20. Climate and Hydrological Data Analysis for hydrological and solute transport modelling purposes in the Muriaé River basin, Atlantic Forest Biome, SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juliana; Künne, Annika; Kralisch, Sven; Fink, Manfred; Brenning, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The Muriaé River basin in SE Brazil has been experiencing an increasing pressure on water resources, due to the population growth of the Rio de Janeiro urban area connected with the growth of the industrial and agricultural sector. This leads to water scarcity, riverine forest degradation, soil erosion and water quality problems among other impacts. Additionally the region has been suffering with seasonal precipitation variations leading to extreme events such as droughts, floods and landslides. Climate projections for the near future indicate a high inter-annual variability of rainfall with an increase in the frequency and intensity of heavy rainfall events combined with a statistically significant increase in the duration of dry periods and a reduced duration of wet periods. This may lead to increased soil erosion during the wet season, while the longer dry periods may reduce the vegetation cover, leaving the soil even more exposed and vulnerable to soil erosion. In consequence, it is crucial to understand how climate affects the interaction between the timing of extreme rainfall events, hydrological processes, vegetation growth, soil cover and soil erosion. In this context, physically-based hydrological modelling can contribute to a better understanding of spatial-temporal process dynamics in the Earth's system and support Integrated Water Resourses Management (IWRM) and adaptation strategies. The study area is the Muriaé river basin which has an area of approx. 8000 km² in Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro States. The basin is representative of a region of domain of hillslopes areas with the predominancy of pasture for livestock production. This study will present some of the relevant analyses which have been carried out on data (climate and streamflow) prior to using them for hydrological modelling, including consistency checks, homogeneity, pattern and statistical analyses, or annual and seasonal trends detection. Several inconsistencies on the raw data were

  1. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  2. Modeling in transport phenomena a conceptual approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Modeling in Transport Phenomena, Second Edition presents and clearly explains with example problems the basic concepts and their applications to fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, chemical reaction engineering and thermodynamics. A balanced approach is presented between analysis and synthesis, students will understand how to use the solution in engineering analysis. Systematic derivations of the equations and the physical significance of each term are given in detail, for students to easily understand and follow up the material. There is a strong incentive in science and engineering to

  3. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This contract stipulated separate pieces of work to consider mass transport in the far-field of a repository, and more detailed geochemical modelling of the groundwater in the near-field. It was envisaged that the far-field problem would be tackled by numerical solutions to the classical advection-diffusion equation obtained by the finite element method. For the near-field problem the feasibility of coupling existing geochemical equilibrium codes to the three dimensional groundwater flow codes was to be investigated. This report is divided into two sections with one part devoted to each aspect of this contract. (author)

  4. Electrochemical gate-controlled charge transport in graphene in ionic liquid and aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Qing, Quan; Xia, Jilin; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2009-07-29

    We have studied the electron transport behavior of electrochemically gated graphene transistors in different solutions. In an ionic liquid, we have determined the electron and hole carrier densities and estimated the concentration of charged impurities to be (1-10) x 10(12) cm(-2). The minimum conductivity displays an exponential decrease with the density of charged impurities, which is attributed to the impurity scattering of the carriers. In aqueous solutions, the position of minimum conductivity shifts negatively as the ionic concentration increases. The dependence of the transport properties on ionic concentration is important for biosensor applications, and the observation is modeled in terms of screening for impurity charges by the ions in solutions.

  5. Solutions to Improve Person Transport System in the Pitesti City by Analyzing Public Transport vs. Private Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela, Istrate; Alexandru, Boroiu; Viorel, Nicolae; Ionel, Vieru

    2017-10-01

    One of the major problems facing the Pitesti city is the road congestion that occurs in the central area of the city during the peak hours. With all the measures taken in recent years - the widening of road arteries, increasing the number of parking spaces, the creation of overground road passages - it is obvious that the problem can only be solved by a new philosophy regarding urban mobility: it is no longer possible to continue through solutions to increase the accessibility of the central area of the city, but it is necessary, on the contrary, to promote a policy of discouraging the penetration of vehicles in the city center, coupled with a policy of improving the connection between urban public transport and county public transport. This new approach is also proposed in the new Urban Mobility Plan of Pitesti city, under development. The most convincing argument for the necessity of this new orientation in the Pitesti city mobility plan is based on the analysis of the current situation of passenger transport on the territory of Pitesti city: the analysis of “public transport versus private transport” reveals a very low occupancy rate for cars and the fact that the road surface required for a passenger (the dynamic area) is much higher in the case of private transport than in the case of public transport. Measurements of passenger flows and vehicle flows on the 6 penetration ways in the city have been made and the calculations clearly demonstrate the benefits of an urban public transport system connected by “transshipment buses” to be made at the edge of the city, to the county public transport system. In terms of inter-county transport, it will continue to be connected to the urban public transport system by existing bus Station, within the city: South Bus Station and North Bus Station. The usefulness of the paper is that it identifies the solutions for sustainable mobility in Pitesti city and proposes concrete solutions for the development of the

  6. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  7. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  8. A study on the adsorption and subsurface transport of radioactive solutes in the presence of chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Min Hoon

    1994-02-01

    In this study, adsorption and transport models were developed to analyze the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and subsurface transport of radioactive solutes. The effect of chelating agents on the adsorption of radioactive solutes was analyzed by developing an adsorption model based upon the extended concept of distribution coefficient reflecting the presence of chelating agents. Also, a batch adsorption experiment was conducted in order to validate the developed adsorption model and to investigate the effect of chelating agent on the adsorption of radioactive metal solutes. In this experiment, a Cobalt(II)/EDTA/Bentonite system was considered as a representative chelation/adsorption system. It was found from the results that the presence of chelating agents significantly reduced the adsorbing capacity of geologic media such as clay minerals and soils. Thus it was concluded that the presence of chelating agents even in a small amount could contribute to the mobilization of radioactive solutes from radioactive waste burial sites by reducing the adsorbing capacity of geologic media. The effect of chelating agents on the transport of radioactive solutes in subsurface porous media was analyzed by formulating an advective-dispersive transport model which incorporated chelate formation, adsorption, decay, and degradations and by introducing the concept of a tenad. Particularly the governing equation for the tenad of radioactive solutes, M, was presented as a linear partial differential form by introducing the extended distribution coefficient, K D . The calculated results from the model showed that the transport rate of the chelated radionuclides was much greater than that of the free ionic radionuclides. This much faster transport of the chelated radionuclides was found to be due to the lower retardation factor of the chelated radionuclides than the free ionic radionuclides. The effect of parameters on the transport of radioactive solutes was also analyzed

  9. Effect of viscoelastic relaxation on moisture transport in foods. Part I: solution of general transport equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan P; Maier, Dirk E; Cushman, John H; Haghighi, Kamyar; Corvalan, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of continuum mechanics, Singh et al. developed an integro-differential equation, which applies to both Darcian (Fickian) and non-Darcian (non-Fickian) modes of fluid transport in swelling biological systems. A dimensionless form of the equation was obtained and transformed from moving Eulerian to the stationary Lagrangian coordinates. Here a solution scheme for the transport equation is developed to predict moisture transport and viscoelastic stresses in spheroidal biopolymeric materials. The equation was solved numerically and results used for predicting drying and sorption curves, moisture profiles, and viscoelastic stresses in soybeans. The Lagrangian solution was obtained by assembling together several schemes: the finite element method was used to discretize the equation in space; non-linearity was addressed using the Newton-Raphson method; the Volterra term was handled via a time integration scheme of Patlashenko et al. and the Galerkin rule was used to solve the time-differential term. The solution obtained in Lagrangian coordinates was transformed back to the Eulerian coordinates. In part II of this sequence we present the numerical results.

  10. Transport Models for Inland and Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter

    This proceedings volume originates from a symposium held at Berkeley, California, in August 1980. The purpose of the symposium was to assess the ability of models to predict surface water flow and the transport of dissolved substances in natural systems. The authors were invited, after an initial call for papers, by a Scientific Committee of the International Association for Hydraulic Research.In this context, predictive modeling is limited to hydrodynamic and transport models as applied to rivers, estuaries, shallow coastal waters, lakes, and reservoirs. This is a large subject, though evidently not the whole story on predictive techniques applied to natural water bodies, and many different models are described with applications to a wide variety of natural systems. There is relatively little overlap of material between chapters. It is noteworthy that 21 out of 24 authors of the chapters are affiliated with institutions outside the United States, and many of these are from large European hydraulic laboratories. A number of the chapters summarize numerical modeling studies undertaken by these institutions and so provide the U.S. reader with valuable references to the European open literature and laboratory technical reports. The latter are not usually readily available in the United States. This bias reflects a greater willingness of European engineers to employ sophisticated hydrodynamic numerical models as tools for the solution of engineering and environmental problems of natural water bodies.

  11. Study of reactive solutes transport and PAH migration in unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujisaite, V.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gujisaite, V.; Morel, J.L.; Ouvrard, S.; Simonnot, M.O.; Gaudet, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental studies about solute transport in soil have most of the time been conducted under saturated conditions, whereas studies with unsaturated media are usually limited to hydrodynamic analysis. Those are mainly concerning the prediction of water flow, which is the main vector for the transport of contaminants in soil. Only a few studies have made the link between unsaturated flow and physical, chemical and biological interactions, which are controlling the availability of pollutants. However, the presence of a gaseous phase in soil can modify not only the movement of soil solution, but also chemical interactions and exchanges between soil aggregates and solution. Study of reactive solute transport in the vadose zone seems thus to be a necessary stage to predict contaminant fate in natural soils, for risk assessment as well as for the design of effective processes for the remediation of contaminated soils. This question is the main objective of the present work developed in the frame of our French Scientific Interest Group Industrial Wastelands called 'GISFI' (www.gisfi.prd.fr), based around a scientific and technological project dedicated to acquisition of knowledge for sustainable requalification of degraded sites polluted by past industrial activities. We will focus here on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which are among the most widely discussed environmental contaminants because of their toxicity for human health and ecosystems. They are present in large quantities in soils polluted by former industrial activities, especially in relation to the coal extraction, exploitation and treatment. An experimental system has been specifically designed at the laboratory scale to carry out experiments under controlled conditions, with an unsaturated steady-state flow. The first experiments are performed on model soils, in order to investigate unsaturated steady-state flow in relation to interactions mechanisms. We have thus chosen to use a sandy

  12. Effects of isotope selection on solution convergence in HZE transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1994-01-01

    A fragmenting iron ion produces hundreds of isotopes during nuclear reactions. These isotopes are represented in the solution of the transport problem. A reduced set of isotopes is selected to minimize the computational burden but introduces error in the final result. A minimum list of 122 isotopes is required for adequate representation of the mass and charge distributions of the secondary radiation fields. A reduced set of 80 isotopes is sufficient to represent the charge distribution alone and represents reasonably well the linear energy transfer properties of the iron beam. Because iron fragmentation produces nearly every isotope lighter than iron, the resulting 122-isotope list should be adequate for ion beams with charges equal to or less than 26.

  13. The quasi-diffusive approximation in transport theory: Local solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celaschi, M.; Montagnini, B.

    1995-01-01

    The one velocity, plane geometry integral neutron transport equation is transformed into a system of two equations, one of them being the equation of continuity and the other a generalized Fick's law, in which the usual diffusion coefficient is replaced by a self-adjoint integral operator. As the kernel of this operator is very close to the Green function of a diffusion equation, an approximate inversion by means of a second order differential operator allows to transform these equations into a purely differential system which is shown to be equivalent, in the simplest case, to a diffusion-like equation. The method, the principles of which have been exposed in a previous paper, is here extended and applied to a variety of problems. If the inversion is properly performed, the quasi-diffusive solutions turn out to be quite accurate, even in the vicinity of the interface between different material regions, where elementary diffusion theory usually fails. 16 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J; Morrow, Liam C

    2015-05-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems.

  15. The use of non-dimensional representation of the solute transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, J.-M.

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the results obtained in a pilot investigation into the use of non-dimensional representations of the solute transport equations, so as to improve the efficiency of the PRA codes used by the DoE and its contractors. A reduced set of parameters was obtained for a single layer transport model. As expected, the response was shown to be highly sensitive on the new parameters. A faster convergence of the system was observed when the sampling technique used was changed to take into account the properties of the new parameters, such that uniform coverage of the reduced parameter hyperspace was achieved. (author)

  16. Hydro-dynamic Solute Transport under Two-Phase Flow Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K; Joekar-Niasar, Vahid; Brizuela, Omar Godinez

    2017-07-26

    There are abundant examples of natural, engineering and industrial applications, in which "solute transport" and "mixing" in porous media occur under multiphase flow conditions. Current state-of-the-art understanding and modelling of such processes are established based on flawed and non-representative models. Moreover, there is no direct experimental result to show the true hydrodynamics of transport and mixing under multiphase flow conditions while the saturation topology is being kept constant for a number of flow rates. With the use of a custom-made microscope, and under well-controlled flow boundary conditions, we visualized directly the transport of a tracer in a Reservoir-on-Chip (RoC) micromodel filled with two immiscible fluids. This study provides novel insights into the saturation-dependency of transport and mixing in porous media. To our knowledge, this is the first reported pore-scale experiment in which the saturation topology, relative permeability, and tortuosity were kept constant and transport was studied under different dynamic conditions in a wide range of saturation. The critical role of two-phase hydrodynamic properties on non-Fickian transport and saturation-dependency of dispersion are discussed, which highlight the major flaws in parametrization of existing models.

  17. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerr, R. Joseph; Azmy, Yousry Y.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution time by up to 10´ when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing cases are optically thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block pre conditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient pre conditioner. (author)

  18. Water flow and solute transport through fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, J.E.; Bourke, P.J.; Pascoe, D.M.; Watkins, V.M.B.; Kingdon, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In densely fractured slate at the Nirex research site in Cornwall, the positions, orientations and hydraulic conductivities of the 380 fractures intersecting a drill hole between 9 and 50 m depth have been individually measured. These data have been used: to determine the dimensions of statistically representative volumes of the network of fractures and to predict, using discrete flow path modelling and the NAPSAC code, the total flows into the fractures when large numbers are simultaneously pressurised along various lengths of the hole. Corresponding measurements, which validated the NAPSAC code to factor of two accuracy for the Cornish site, are reported. Possibilities accounting for this factor are noted for experimental investigation, and continuing, more extensive, inter hole flow and transport measurements are outlined. The application of this experimental and theoretical approach for calculating radionuclide transport in less densely fractured rock suitable for waste disposal is discussed. (Author)

  19. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport

  20. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J.; Bastein, L.; Price, P.N.

    2010-02-19

    This review examines current approximations and approaches that underlie the evaluation of transport properties for combustion modeling applications. Discussed in the review are: the intermolecular potential and its descriptive molecular parameters; various approaches to evaluating collision integrals; supporting data required for the evaluation of transport properties; commonly used computer programs for predicting transport properties; the quality of experimental measurements and their importance for validating or rejecting approximations to property estimation; the interpretation of corresponding states; combination rules that yield pair molecular potential parameters for unlike species from like species parameters; and mixture approximations. The insensitivity of transport properties to intermolecular forces is noted, especially the non-uniqueness of the supporting potential parameters. Viscosity experiments of pure substances and binary mixtures measured post 1970 are used to evaluate a number of approximations; the intermediate temperature range 1 < T* < 10, where T* is kT/{var_epsilon}, is emphasized since this is where rich data sets are available. When suitable potential parameters are used, errors in transport property predictions for pure substances and binary mixtures are less than 5 %, when they are calculated using the approaches of Kee et al.; Mason, Kestin, and Uribe; Paul and Warnatz; or Ern and Giovangigli. Recommendations stemming from the review include (1) revisiting the supporting data required by the various computational approaches, and updating the data sets with accurate potential parameters, dipole moments, and polarizabilities; (2) characterizing the range of parameter space over which the fit to experimental data is good, rather than the current practice of reporting only the parameter set that best fits the data; (3) looking for improved combining rules, since existing rules were found to under-predict the viscosity in most cases; (4

  1. THE IMPORTANCE OF LIMIT SOLUTIONS & TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL SCALES IN THE TEACHING OF TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁVIO LEANDRO BERTOLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the engineering courses the field of Transport Phenomena is of significant importance and it is in several disciplines relating to Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer. In these disciplines, problems involving these phenomena are mathematically formulated and analytical solutions are obtained whenever possible. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the possibility of extending aspects of the teaching-learning in this area by a method based on time scales and limit solutions. Thus, aspects relative to the phenomenology naturally arise during the definition of the scales and / or by determining the limit solutions. Aspects concerning the phenomenology of the limit problems are easily incorporated into the proposed development, which contributes significantly to the understanding of physics inherent in the mathematical modeling of each limiting case studied. Finally the study aims to disseminate the use of the limit solutions and of the time scales in the general fields of engineering.

  2. Directions in Radiation Transport Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nicholas Smith

    2016-12-01

    More exciting advances are on the horizon to increase the power of simulation tools. The advent of high performance computers is allowing bigger, higher fidelity models to be created, if the challenges of parallelization and memory management can be met. 3D whole core transport modelling is becoming possible. Uncertainty quantification is improving with large benefits to be gained from more accurate, less pessimistic estimates of uncertainty. Advanced graphical displays allow the user to assimilate and make sense of the vast amounts of data produced by modern modelling tools. Numerical solvers are being developed that use goal-based adaptivity to adjust the nodalisation of the system to provide the optimum scheme to achieve the user requested accuracy on the results, thus removing the need to perform costly convergence studies in space and angle etc. More use is being made of multi-physics methods in which radiation transport is coupled with other phenomena, such as thermal-hydraulics, structural response, fuel performance and/or chemistry in order to better understand their interplay in reactor cores.

  3. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  4. FASTREACT – An efficient numerical framework for the solution of reactive transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchero, Paolo; Molinero, Jorge; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Berglund, Sten; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a tool for the efficient solution of reactive transport problems. • The tool is used to simulate radionuclide transport in a two-dimensional medium. • The results are successfully compared with those obtained using an Eulerian approach. • A large-scale application example is also solved. • The results show that the proposed tool can efficiently solve large-scale models. - Abstract: In the framework of safety assessment studies for geological disposal, large scale reactive transport models are powerful inter-disciplinary tools aiming at supporting regulatory decision making as well as providing input to repository engineering activities. Important aspects of these kinds of models are their often very large temporal and spatial modelling scales and the need to integrate different non-linear processes (e.g., mineral dissolution and precipitation, adsorption and desorption, microbial reactions and redox transformations). It turns out that these types of models may be computationally highly demanding. In this work, we present a Lagrangian-based framework, denoted as FASTREACT, that aims at solving multi-component-reactive transport problems with a computationally efficient approach allowing complex modelling problems to be solved in large spatial and temporal scales. The tool has been applied to simulate radionuclide migration in a synthetic heterogeneous transmissivity field and the results have been successfully compared with those obtained using a standard Eulerian approach. Finally, the same geochemical model has been coupled to an ensemble of realistic three-dimensional transport pathways to simulate the migration of a set of radionuclides from a hypothetical repository for spent nuclear fuel to the surface. The results of this modelling exercise, which includes key processes such as the exchange of mass between the conductive fractures and the matrix, show that FASTREACT can efficiently solve large-scale reactive transport models

  5. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance.

  7. Up-gradient transport in a probabilistic transport model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of particles or heat against the driving gradient is studied by employing a probabilistic transport model with a characteristic particle step length that depends on the local concentration or heat gradient. When this gradient is larger than a prescribed critical value, the standard....... These results supplement recent works by van Milligen [Phys. Plasmas 11, 3787 (2004)], which applied Levy distributed step sizes in the case of supercritical gradients to obtain the up-gradient transport. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailagic, A.

    1981-08-01

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  9. Parameter optimization for surface flux transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitbread, T.; Yeates, A. R.; Muñoz-Jaramillo, A.; Petrie, G. J. D.

    2017-11-01

    Accurate prediction of solar activity calls for precise calibration of solar cycle models. Consequently we aim to find optimal parameters for models which describe the physical processes on the solar surface, which in turn act as proxies for what occurs in the interior and provide source terms for coronal models. We use a genetic algorithm to optimize surface flux transport models using National Solar Observatory (NSO) magnetogram data for Solar Cycle 23. This is applied to both a 1D model that inserts new magnetic flux in the form of idealized bipolar magnetic regions, and also to a 2D model that assimilates specific shapes of real active regions. The genetic algorithm searches for parameter sets (meridional flow speed and profile, supergranular diffusivity, initial magnetic field, and radial decay time) that produce the best fit between observed and simulated butterfly diagrams, weighted by a latitude-dependent error structure which reflects uncertainty in observations. Due to the easily adaptable nature of the 2D model, the optimization process is repeated for Cycles 21, 22, and 24 in order to analyse cycle-to-cycle variation of the optimal solution. We find that the ranges and optimal solutions for the various regimes are in reasonable agreement with results from the literature, both theoretical and observational. The optimal meridional flow profiles for each regime are almost entirely within observational bounds determined by magnetic feature tracking, with the 2D model being able to accommodate the mean observed profile more successfully. Differences between models appear to be important in deciding values for the diffusive and decay terms. In like fashion, differences in the behaviours of different solar cycles lead to contrasts in parameters defining the meridional flow and initial field strength.

  10. Business Models For Transport eBusiness

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Cisic; Ivan Franciskovic; Ana Peric

    2003-01-01

    In this paper authors are presenting expectations from electronic commerce and its connotations on transport logistics. Based on trends, the relations between the companies in the international transport have to be strengthened using Internet business models. In the paper authors are investigating e-business information models for usage in transport

  11. Multiscale Roughness Influencing on Transport Behavior of Passive Solute through a Single Self-affine Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Z.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the influence of multi-scale roughness on transport behavior of the passive solute through the self-affine fracture was investigated. The single self-affine fracture was constructed by the successive random additions (SRA) and the fracture roughness was decomposed into two different scales (i.e. large-scale primary roughness and small-scale secondary roughness) by the Wavelet analysis technique. The fluid flow in fractures, which was characterized by the Forchheimer's law, showed the non-linear flow behaviors such as eddies and tortuous streamlines. The results indicated that the small-scale secondary roughness was primarily responsible for the non-linear flow behaviors. The direct simulations of asymptotic passive solute transport represented the Non-Fickian transport characteristics (i.e. early arrivals and long tails) in breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions (RTDs) with and without consideration of the secondary roughness. Analysis of multiscale BTCs and RTDs showed that the small-scale secondary roughness played a significant role in enhancing the Non-Fickian transport characteristics. We found that removing small-scale secondary roughness led to the lengthening arrival and shortening tail. The peak concentration in BTCs decreased as the secondary roughness was removed, implying that the secondary could also enhance the solute dilution. The estimated BTCs by the Fickian advection-dispersion equation (ADE) yielded errors which decreased with the small-scale secondary roughness being removed. The mobile-immobile model (MIM) was alternatively implemented to characterize the Non-Fickian transport. We found that the MIM was more capable of estimating Non-Fickian BTCs. The small-scale secondary roughness resulted in the decreasing mobile domain fraction and the increasing mass exchange rate between immobile and mobile domains. The estimated parameters from the MIM could provide insight into the inherent mechanism of roughness

  12. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  13. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Transportation Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pamela W.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Marshall's effort to sustain space transportation solutions through product lines that include: 1) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 2) Life Support Systems; and 3) and Earth and Space Science Spacecraft Systems, and Operations.

  14. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  15. Use of Models in Urban Transportation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    The report describes the most commonly used models in urban transportation planning. A background on urban transportation planning is given including changes in planning objectives and the effects of Federal legislation. General concepts and problems...

  16. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  17. The quantum Rabi model: solution and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Qiongtao; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong; Batchelor, Murray T

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent developments on various aspects of the quantum Rabi model. Particular emphasis is given on the exact analytic solution obtained in terms of confluent Heun functions. The analytic solutions for various generalisations of the quantum Rabi model are also discussed. Results are also reviewed on the level statistics and the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model. The article concludes with an introductory overview of several experimental realisations of the quantum Rabi model. An outlook towards future developments is also given. (topical review)

  18. New constructive solutions for building of transport construction facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babayev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New structural systems for civil and transport engineering were examined. The basis for the formation of the proposed reinforced concrete structures is the ideology of reducing its dead weight, with a given bearing capacity, the realization of which is accomplished by burial during concreting large-sized liners of a given shape and manufactured from lightweight, inexpensive composite materials. The process of erecting these systems is presented in two forms: for flat structures - using self-tightening concrete, and for curvilinear ones - by using shotcrete technologies. The second direction is presented by steel-reinforced concrete structures. These structural systems were created on the basis of innovative component and methods of rationalization of parameters. The basis of the above methods is a compiler which includes the finite element method, adaptive evolution method and special iterative procedures. Experimental verification of structural solutions and formation procedures for suggested systems was performed. Comparison between theoretical and experimental data is given. Suggested systems were implemented in a number of building companies.

  19. Technology in rural transportation. Simple solution #5, traveler information using fax machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This application was identified as a promising rural Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) solution under a project sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the ENTERPRISE program. This summary describes the solution as well as o...

  20. Technology in rural transportation. Simple solution #14, public service weather radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This application was identified as a promising rural Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) solution under a project sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the ENTERPRISE program. This summary describes the solution as well as o...

  1. Modelling the transport system in China and evaluating the current strategies towards the sustainable transport development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wen; Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2013-01-01

    Transport is one of the most challenge sectors when addressing energy security and climate change due to its high reliance on oil products and lack of the alternative fuels. This paper explores the ability of three transport strategies to contribute to the development of a sustainable transport in China. With this purpose in mind, a Chinese transport model has been created and three current transport strategies which are high speed railway (HSR), urban rail transit (URT) and electric vehicle (EV) were evaluated together with a reference transport system in 2020. As conservative results, 13% of the energy saving and 12% of the CO 2 emission reduction can be attained by accomplishing three strategies compared with the reference transport system. However, the energy demand of transport in 2020 with the implementation of three strategies will be about 1.7 times as much as today. The three strategies show the potential of drawing the transport demand to the more energy efficient vehicles; however, more initiatives are needed if the sustainable transport is the long term objective, such as the solutions to stabilise the private vehicle demands, to continuously improve the vehicle efficiency and to boost the alternative fuels produced from the renewable energy sources. - Highlights: • A Chinese transport model was created and three transport strategies were evaluated • Transport is the biggest driver of the oil demand in China not the industry • The energy demand of transport in 2020 will be twice as much as today • Strategies contribute 13% energy saving and 12% CO 2 emission reduction • More initiatives are needed if a sustainable transport is the long-term objective

  2. Modelling of Transport Projects Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way of handling the uncertainties present in transport decision making based on infrastructure appraisals. The paper suggests to combine the principle of Optimism Bias, which depicts the historical tendency of overestimating transport related benefits and underestimating......-based graphs which function as risk-related decision support for the appraised transport infrastructure project....

  3. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  4. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  5. Applied Integer Programming Modeling and Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Der-San; Dang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    An accessible treatment of the modeling and solution of integer programming problems, featuring modern applications and software In order to fully comprehend the algorithms associated with integer programming, it is important to understand not only how algorithms work, but also why they work. Applied Integer Programming features a unique emphasis on this point, focusing on problem modeling and solution using commercial software. Taking an application-oriented approach, this book addresses the art and science of mathematical modeling related to the mixed integer programming (MIP) framework and

  6. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network with spatially or temporally variable transport and decay coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heejun

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients involving distinct retardation factors. This proposed approach was developed to overcome the limitation reported by Suk (2013) regarding the identical retardation values for all reactive species, while maintaining the extensive capability of the previous Suk method involving spatially variable or temporally variable coefficients of transport, general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retardation values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in three verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  7. Water flow and multicomponent solute transport in drip-irrigated lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raij, Iael; Šimůnek, Jiří; Ben-Gal, Alon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2016-08-01

    Controlled experiments and modeling are crucial components in the evaluation of the fate of water and solutes in environmental and agricultural research. Lysimeters are commonly used to determine water and solute balances and assist in making sustainable decisions with respect to soil reclamation, fertilization, or irrigation with low-quality water. While models are cost-effective tools for estimating and preventing environmental damage by agricultural activities, their value is highly dependent on the accuracy of their parameterization, often determined by calibration. The main objective of this study was to use measured major ion concentrations collected from drip-irrigated lysimeters to calibrate the variably saturated water flow model HYDRUS (2D/3D) coupled with the reactive transport model UNSATCHEM. Irrigation alternated between desalinated and brackish waters. Lysimeter drainage and soil solution samples were collected for chemical analysis and used to calibrate the model. A second objective was to demonstrate the potential use of the calibrated model to evaluate lower boundary design options of lysimeters with respect to leaching fractions determined using drainage water fluxes, chloride concentrations, and overall salinity of drainage water, and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) in the profile. The model showed that, in the long term, leaching fractions calculated with electrical conductivity values would be affected by the lower boundary condition pressure head, while those calculated with chloride concentrations and water fluxes would not be affected. In addition, clear dissimilarities in ESP profiles were found between lysimeters with different lower boundary conditions, suggesting a potential influence on hydraulic conductivities and flow patterns.

  8. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ

  9. Solute transport in shale and shale-derived soils at the Shale Hills CZO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, B. W.; Singha, K.

    2009-12-01

    Interpreting the operation of parameters controlling solute transport is challenging in shales and shale-derived soils because of complex chemical and physical heterogeneity. Quantifying solute transport processes in the weathered shale and soils of the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SH-CZO) is important in interpreting the residence times of ions in the groundwater system, and consequently weathering rates and age of groundwater. In three 10-cm diameter undisturbed soil columns from the SH-CZO (spanning the intervals from 0-15, 20-35, and 40-50 cm) as well as consolidated shale cores, we are evaluating physical heterogeneity, as well as solute transport parameters such as (1) mobile/immobile porosity, (2) mass-transfer rate between domains, and (3) the behavior of exchangeable ions within the system as material properties shift from soil to consolidated rock. Soil samples change with respect to color and biogenic fabric or structure with depth, and the frequency of shale bedrock fragments within in the soil increases with depth. Constant flow experiments in the soil provide a hydraulic conductivity of 10-6 m/s at 0-15 cm depth. Field-scale hydraulic conductivities from slug and pumping tests of the fractured shale at depth are approximately the same: 10-5 to 10-6 m/s. A hydraulic test in a triaxial compression chamber places the hydraulic conductivity of the shale matrix, however, at less than 10-15 m/s, indicating that fractures control permeable pathways within the shale bedrock. Taken collectively, such observations indicate high physical heterogeneity within the subsurface material that could be controlling flow and transport behavior. Concentration histories from a conservative sodium bromide tracer test carried out on the uppermost soil column exhibit long tailing behavior, indicative of non-equilibrium transport. Numerical modeling with Comsol indicates that a mobile porosity of 0.3 and an immobile porosity of 0.35 coupled by a mass-transfer rate of

  10. Logistics and Transport - a conceptual model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Per Homann; Drewes, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how the freight transport sector is influenced by logistical principles of production and distribution. It introduces new ways of understanding freight transport as an integrated part of the changing trends of mobility. By introducing a conceptual model for understanding...... the interaction between logistics and transport, it points at ways to over-come inherent methodological difficulties when studying this relation...

  11. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen

    2007-12-01

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  12. Radial Continuous Time Random Walks for Non-Fickian Solute Transport under Forced Flow Conditions and Different Heterogeneity Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-04-01

    Solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is characterized by features that do not conform to advection-dispersion models characterized by equivalent transport parameters. This has been observed in tracer experiments under forced and natural flow conditions. Key questions are (i) how non-Fickian solute transport can be quantified under radial flow conditions, and (ii) how different heterogeneity sources of non-Fickian behavior manifest in non-Fickian radial transport models. In order to approach these questions, we develop a radial continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulation for the quantification and interpretation of non-Fickian solute transport under forced flow conditions and different heterogeneity scenarios. The derived radial CTRW approaches model anomalous behavior induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and mobile-immobile mass transfer processes (matrix diffusion). We start by establishing a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates on the basis of the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The evolution of solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation. Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. We then derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. We analyze the transport signatures for the distinct CTRW models in terms of solute breakthrough curves and their dependence on the heterogeneity scenarios.

  13. Modelling of Transport Projects Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way of handling the uncertainties present in transport decision making based on infrastructure appraisals. The paper suggests to combine the principle of Optimism Bias, which depicts the historical tendency of overestimating transport related benefits and underestimating......-based graphs which functions as risk-related decision support for the appraised transport infrastructure project. The presentation of RSF is demonstrated by using an appraisal case concerning a new airfield in the capital of Greenland, Nuuk....

  14. Hyporheic less-mobile porosity and solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    MahmoodPoorDehkordy, F.; Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Scruggs, C.; Singha, K.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Bagtzoglou, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    Solute transport and reactive processes are strongly influenced by hydrodynamic exchange with the hyporheic zone. Contaminant transport and redox zonation in the hyporheic zone and near-stream aquifer can be impacted by the exchange between mobile and less-mobile porosity zones in heterogeneous porous media. Less-mobile porosity zones can be created by fine materials with tight pore throats (e.g. clay, organics) and in larger, well-connected pores down gradient of flow obstructions (e.g. sand behind cobbles). Whereas fluid sampling is primarily responsive to the more-mobile domain, tracking solute tracer dynamics by geoelectrical methods provides direct information about both more- and less-mobile zones. During tracer injection through porous media of varied pore connectivity, a lag between fluid and bulk electrical conductivity is observed, creating a hysteresis loop when plotted in conductivity space. Thus, the combination of simultaneous fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements enables a much improved quantification of less-mobile solute dynamics compared to traditional fluid-only sampling approaches. We have demonstrated the less-mobile porosity exchange in laboratory-scale column experiments verified by simulation models. The experimental approach has also been applied to streambed sediments in column and reach-scale field experiments and verified using numerical simulation. Properties of the resultant hysteresis loops can be used to estimate exchange parameters of less-mobile porosity. Our integrated approach combining field experiments, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling provides new insights into the effect of less-mobile porosity on solute transport in the hyporheic zone.

  15. Biological transportation networks: Modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2015-09-15

    We present a model for biological network formation originally introduced by Cai and Hu [Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 138701]. The modeling of fluid transportation (e.g., leaf venation and angiogenesis) and ion transportation networks (e.g., neural networks) is explained in detail and basic analytical features like the gradient flow structure of the fluid transportation network model and the impact of the model parameters on the geometry and topology of network formation are analyzed. We also present a numerical finite-element based discretization scheme and discuss sample cases of network formation simulations.

  16. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  17. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Rohman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of ion transport in electrodialysis process is reviewed and their basics concept is discussed. Three scales of ion transport reviewed are: 1 ion transport in the membrane, where two approaches are used, the irreversible thermodynamics and modeling of the membrane material; 2 ion transport in a three-layer system composed of a membrane with two adjoining diffusion layers; and 3 coupling with hydraulic flow system in an electrodialysis 2D and 3D cell, where the differential equation of convectivediffusion is used. Most of the work carried out in the past implemented NP equations since relatively easily coupled with other equations describing hydrodynamic conditions and ion transport in the surrounding solutions, chemical reactions in the solutions and the membrane, boundary and other conditions. However, it is limited to point ionic transport in homogenous and uniformly - grainy phases of structure. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 21 January 2008, Accepted: 10 March 2008][How to Cite: F.S. Rohman, N. Aziz (2008. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3(1-3: 3-8. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7122 ] 

  18. A Sediment Transport Model for Sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Ole; Larsson, Johan; Larsen, Torben

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for transport processes in sewers. The model consists of three sub models, a surface model for the description of the buildup and the washoff of sediment particles from the surface area, a morphological model and an advection-dispersion model. The model...

  19. Solute transport by groundwater flow to wetland ecosystems : the environmental impact of human activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis deals with solute transport by groundwater flow and the way in which solute transport is affected by human activities. This in relation to wetland ecosystems. Wetlands in the eastern part of the Vecht river plain in The Netherlands are historically renown for their great variety of

  20. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    , however, the approximation of equilibrium chemistry is assumed to be sufficient for order of magnitude predictions when a constant inflow of radionuclides is considered. A first sensitivity analysis of the model is performed in which different model parameters have been varied. At the time for the model development, almost no detailed site-specific information about e.g. channel geometry or sediment characteristics were available. Simulations were therefore performed for a hypothetical case, where the ranges of possible parameter values was based on literature information, generalizations from other stream systems and some site-specific information such as large-scale information of the morphology at the present sites. For order of magnitude predictions of the concentration or amount of radionuclides in the different parts of the stream ecosystem, a yearly mean value of the water flow was assumed to be sufficient. Therefore, the further sensitivity analyses were performed for constant flow conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that the main retention along the stream is due to uptake within the sediment. Initially, the uptake will cause a retardation of the solute transport. The sediment capacity is however limited and after saturation, the outflow of radionuclides in the longitudinal direction will be completely determined by the inflow to the system. The time for reaching this equilibrium and the equilibrium concentration in the sediment varies however with different conditions and radionuclides, e.g. due to sorption characteristics, sedimentation velocity and advective velocity within the sediment. The degree of variation caused by different factors is, however, different. In the simulations performed in this study, the time for reaching equilibrium ranges from less than a year to a couple of hundred years. For predictions of the dose to humans, the accumulated amount in the sediment should also be considered and not only the concentration in the stream water

  1. A boundary element-Random walk model of mass transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemblowski, M.

    1986-01-01

    A boundary element solution to the convective mass transport in groundwater is presented. This solution produces a continuous velocity field and reduces the amount of data preparation time and bookkeeping. By combining this solution and the random walk procedure, a convective-dispersive mass transport model is obtained. This model may be easily used to simulate groundwater contamination problems. The accuracy of the boundary element model has been verified by reproducing the analytical solution to a two-dimensional convective mass transport problem. The method was also used to simulate a convective-dispersive problem. ?? 1986.

  2. Numerical solution of time dependent neutron transport equation. An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Dalton Ellery Girao

    2000-01-01

    In this work we show a simple method to solve numerically the time-dependent neutron transport equation which is a simple extension of the numerical methods used to solve the time-independent static transport equation. This is possible because the time-discretized transport equation has the same form as the time-independent transport equation, with only some additional terms. A general outline of the method is given and used to evaluate the neutron flux in a microexplosion calculation of a highly compressed micro fissile system composed by DT-Pu-Be microsphere. (author)

  3. A transport model with color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, S.

    1997-01-01

    First the mostly important properties of QCD are dealt with. It is made plausible, how the QCD vacuum generates a screening of color charges and is by this responsible for the quark confinement in color singlets. in the following the behaviour of classical color charges and color fields is studied and it is concluded that by this approximation, the neglection of quantum-mechanical fluctuation, the quark confinement cannot be explained, because the mean-field approximation leads to a screening of the color charges. Motivated by this result the Friedberg-Lee soliton model is presented, in which the the color confinement and all further nonperturbative QCD effects are phenomenologically modelled by means of a scalar field. Thereafter a derivation of the transport equations for quarks in the framework of the Wigner-function is presented. An extension of the equation to the Friedberg-Lee model is explained. As results the ground-state properties of the model are studied. Mesonic and baryonic ground-state solutions (soliton solutions) of the equations are constructed, whereby the constituents are both light quarks and heavy quarks. Furthermore the color coupling constant of QCD is fixed by means of the string tension by dynamical separation of the quarks of the meson. The flux tubes formed dynamically in this way are applied, in order to study the interaction of two strings and to calculate a string-string potential. Excited states of the meson (isovectorial modes) are presented as well as the influence of the color confinement on the quark motion. Finally the dynamical formation and the break-up of a string by the production of light and heavy quark pairs is described

  4. Affordable Freight Logistics Transport Information Management Optimisation and Asset Tracking Solution Using Smartphone GPS Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muna, Joseph T.; Prescott, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Traditionally, freight transport and telematics solutions that exploit the GPS capabilities of in- vehicle devices to provide innovative Location Based Services (LBS) including track and trace transport systems have been the preserve of a select cluster of transport operators and organisations with the financial resources to develop the requisite custom software and hardware on which they are deployed. The average cost of outfitting a typical transport vehicle or truck with the latest Intelligent Transport System (ITS) increases the cost of the vehicle by anything from a couple to several thousand Euros, depending on the complexity and completeness of the solution. Though this does not generally deter large fleet transport owners since they typically get Return on Investment (ROI) based on economies of scale, it presents a barrier for the smaller independent entities that constitute the majority of freight transport operators [1].The North Sea Freight Intelligent Transport Solution (NS FRITS), a project co-funded by the European Commission Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme, aims to make acquisition of such transport solutions easier for those organisations that cannot afford the expensive, bespoke systems used by their larger competitors.The project addresses transport security threats by developing a system capable of informing major actors along the freight logistics supply chain, of changing circumstances within the region's major transport corridors and between transport modes. The project also addresses issues of freight volumes, inter-modality, congestion and eco-mobility [2].

  5. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Grace Woan-chee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  6. Numerical Modeling for the Solute Uptake from Groundwater by Plants-Plant Uptake Package

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Amr A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented to describe solute transport in groundwater coupled to sorption by plant roots, translocation into plant stems, and finally evapotranspiration. The conceptual model takes into account both Root Concentration Factor, RCF, and Transpiration Stream Concentration Factor, TSCF for chemicals which are a function of Kow. A similar technique used to simulate the solute transport in groundwater to simulate sorption and plant uptake is used. The mathematical equation is s...

  7. Finite medium Green's function solutions to nuclide transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oston, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    Current analytical techniques for predicting the transport of nuclides in porous materials center on the Green's function approach - i.e., determining the response characteristics of a geologic pathway to an impulse function input. To data, the analyses all have set the boundary conditions needed to solve the 1-D transport equation as though each pathway were infinite in length. The purpose of this work is to critically examine the effect that this infinite pathway assumption has on Green's function models of nuclide transport in porous media. The work described herein has directly attacked the more difficult problem of obtaining suitable Green's functions for finite pathways whose dimensions, in fact, may not be much greater than the diffusion length. Two different finite media Green's functions describing the nuclide mass flux have been determined, depending on whether the pathway is terminated by a high or a low flow resistance at the outlet end. Pulse shapes and peak amplitudes have been computed for each Green's function over a wide range of geohydrologic parameters. These results have been compared to both infinite and semi-infinite medium solutions. It was found that predicted pulse shapes are quite sensitive to selection of a Green's function model for short pathways only. For long pathways all models tend toward a symmetric Gaussian flux-time history at the outlet. Thus, the results of our previous waste transport studies using the infinite pathway assumption are still generally valid because they always included at least one long pathway. It was also found that finite medium models offer some unique computational advantages for evaluating nuclide transport in a series of connecting pathways

  8. The european Trans-Tools transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, T. van; Burgess, A.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the use of ArcGIS in the Transtools Transport Model, TRANS-TOOLS, created by an international consortium for the European Commission. The model describe passenger as well as freight transport in Europe with all medium and long distance modes (cars, vans, trucks, train, inland

  9. A Mercury Model of Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Alex B. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chodash, Perry A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Procassini, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Using the particle transport code Mercury, accurate models were built of the two sources used in Operation BREN, a series of radiation experiments performed by the United States during the 1960s. In the future, these models will be used to validate Mercury’s ability to simulate atmospheric transport.

  10. Dileptons from transport and hydrodynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huovinen, P.; Koch, V.

    2000-01-01

    Transport and hydrodynamical models used to describe the expansion stage of a heavy-ion collision at the CERN SPS give different dilepton spectrum even if they are tuned to reproduce the observed hadron spectra. To understand the origin of this difference we compare the dilepton emission from transport and hydrodynamical models using similar initial states in both models. We find that the requirement of pion number conservation in a hydrodynamical model does not change the dilepton emission. Also the mass distribution from the transport model indicates faster cooling and longer lifetime of the fireball

  11. Mixing-cell boundary conditions and apparent mass balance errors for advective dispersive solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, Thomas; Flühler, Hannes

    1998-09-01

    In many field or laboratory situations, well-mixed reservoirs like, for instance, injection or detection wells and gas distribution or sampling chambers define boundaries of transport domains. Exchange of solutes or gases across such boundaries can occur through advective or diffusive processes. First we analyzed situations, where the inlet region consists of a well-mixed reservoir, in a systematic way by interpreting them in terms of injection type. Second, we discussed the mass balance errors that seem to appear in case of resident injections. Mixing cells (MC) can be coupled mathematically in different ways to a domain where advective-dispersive transport occurs: by assuming a continuous solute flux at the interface (flux injection, MC-FI), or by assuming a continuous resident concentration (resident injection). In the latter case, the flux leaving the mixing cell can be defined in two ways: either as the value when the interface is approached from the mixing-cell side (MC-RI-), or as the value when it is approached from the column side (MC-RI+). Solutions of these injection types with constant or—in one case—distance-dependent transport parameters were compared to each other as well as to a solution of a two-layer system, where the first layer was characterized by a large dispersion coefficient. These solutions differ mainly at small Péclet numbers. For most real situations, the model for resident injection MC-RI+ is considered to be relevant. This type of injection was modeled with a constant or with an exponentially varying dispersion coefficient within the porous medium. A constant dispersion coefficient will be appropriate for gases because of the Eulerian nature of the usually dominating gaseous diffusion coefficient, whereas the asymptotically growing dispersion coefficient will be more appropriate for solutes due to the Lagrangian nature of mechanical dispersion, which evolves only with the fluid flow. Assuming a continuous resident concentration at

  12. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen (Dept. of Physical Geography, Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  13. Optimal transportation networks models and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bernot, Marc; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The transportation problem can be formalized as the problem of finding the optimal way to transport a given measure into another with the same mass. In contrast to the Monge-Kantorovitch problem, recent approaches model the branched structure of such supply networks as minima of an energy functional whose essential feature is to favour wide roads. Such a branched structure is observable in ground transportation networks, in draining and irrigation systems, in electrical power supply systems and in natural counterparts such as blood vessels or the branches of trees. These lectures provide mathematical proof of several existence, structure and regularity properties empirically observed in transportation networks. The link with previous discrete physical models of irrigation and erosion models in geomorphology and with discrete telecommunication and transportation models is discussed. It will be mathematically proven that the majority fit in the simple model sketched in this volume.

  14. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  15. Electric transport properties of alkali polymethacrylates in alkali bromide solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drift, W.P.J.T. van der; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    Electric mobilities of polyions, bromide ions, and alkali ions have been determined in solutions of Li, Na, and K salts of polymethacrylic acid (PMA) in aqueous solutions of the corresponding bromide of concentrations varying from 0.001 to 0.1 M. The Hittorf method was used for the determination of

  16. Solution approach for a large scale personnel transport system for a large company in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo-Arturo Garzón-Garnica

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper focuses on the modelling and solution of a large-scale personnel transportation system in Mexico where many routes and vehicles are currently used to service 525 points. The routing system proposed can be applied to many cities in the Latin-American region. Design/methodology/approach: This system was modelled as a VRP model considering the use of real-world transit times, and the fact that routes start at the farthest point from the destination center. Experiments were performed on different sized sets of service points. As the size of the instances was increased, the performance of the heuristic method was assessed in comparison with the results of an exact algorithm, the results remaining very close between both.  When the size of the instance was full-scale and the exact algorithm took too much time to solve the problem, then the heuristic algorithm provided a feasible solution. Supported by the validation with smaller scale instances, where the difference between both solutions was close to a 6%, the full –scale solution obtained with the heuristic algorithm was considered to be within that same range. Findings: The proposed modelling and solving method provided a solution that would produce significant savings in the daily operation of the routes. Originality/value: The urban distribution of the cities in Latin America is unique to other regions in the world. The general layout of the large cities in this region includes a small town center, usually antique, and a somewhat disordered outer region. The lack of a vehicle-centered urban planning poses distinct challenges for vehicle routing problems in the region. The use of a heuristic VRP combined with the results of an exact VRP, allowed the obtention of an improved routing plan specific to the requirements of the region.

  17. Solution approach for a large scale personnel transport system for a large company in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzón-Garnica, Eduardo-Arturo; Caballero-Morales, Santiago-Omar; Martínez-Flores, José-Luis

    2017-07-01

    The present paper focuses on the modelling and solution of a large-scale personnel transportation system in Mexico where many routes and vehicles are currently used to service 525 points. The routing system proposed can be applied to many cities in the Latin-American region. Design/methodology/approach: This system was modelled as a VRP model considering the use of real-world transit times, and the fact that routes start at the farthest point from the destination center. Experiments were performed on different sized sets of service points. As the size of the instances was increased, the performance of the heuristic method was assessed in comparison with the results of an exact algorithm, the results remaining very close between both. When the size of the instance was full-scale and the exact algorithm took too much time to solve the problem, then the heuristic algorithm provided a feasible solution. Supported by the validation with smaller scale instances, where the difference between both solutions was close to a 6%, the full –scale solution obtained with the heuristic algorithm was considered to be within that same range. Findings: The proposed modelling and solving method provided a solution that would produce significant savings in the daily operation of the routes. Originality/value: The urban distribution of the cities in Latin America is unique to other regions in the world. The general layout of the large cities in this region includes a small town center, usually antique, and a somewhat disordered outer region. The lack of a vehicle-centered urban planning poses distinct challenges for vehicle routing problems in the region. The use of a heuristic VRP combined with the results of an exact VRP, allowed the obtention of an improved routing plan specific to the requirements of the region.

  18. Solution approach for a large scale personnel transport system for a large company in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzón-Garnica, Eduardo-Arturo; Caballero-Morales, Santiago-Omar; Martínez-Flores, José-Luis

    2017-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the modelling and solution of a large-scale personnel transportation system in Mexico where many routes and vehicles are currently used to service 525 points. The routing system proposed can be applied to many cities in the Latin-American region. Design/methodology/approach: This system was modelled as a VRP model considering the use of real-world transit times, and the fact that routes start at the farthest point from the destination center. Experiments were performed on different sized sets of service points. As the size of the instances was increased, the performance of the heuristic method was assessed in comparison with the results of an exact algorithm, the results remaining very close between both. When the size of the instance was full-scale and the exact algorithm took too much time to solve the problem, then the heuristic algorithm provided a feasible solution. Supported by the validation with smaller scale instances, where the difference between both solutions was close to a 6%, the full –scale solution obtained with the heuristic algorithm was considered to be within that same range. Findings: The proposed modelling and solving method provided a solution that would produce significant savings in the daily operation of the routes. Originality/value: The urban distribution of the cities in Latin America is unique to other regions in the world. The general layout of the large cities in this region includes a small town center, usually antique, and a somewhat disordered outer region. The lack of a vehicle-centered urban planning poses distinct challenges for vehicle routing problems in the region. The use of a heuristic VRP combined with the results of an exact VRP, allowed the obtention of an improved routing plan specific to the requirements of the region.

  19. Green transportation logistics: the quest for win-win solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -down, pop-up”, where in a change in one aspect of a problem can cause another troubling aspect to arise. For example, speed reduction in maritime transportation can reduce emissions and fuel costs, but could require additional ships and could raise in-transit inventory costs. Or, regulations to reduce......This book examines the state of the art in green transportation logistics from the perspective of balancing environmental performance in the transportation supply chain while also satisfying traditional economic performance criteria. Part of the book is drawn from the recently completed European...... Union project Super Green, a three-year project intended to promote the development of European freight corridors in an environmentally friendly manner. Additional chapters cover both the methodological base and the application context of green transportation logistics. Individual chapters look...

  20. An approximate analytical solution for describing surface runoff and sediment transport over hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wanghai; Wang, Quanjiu; Lin, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Soil and water loss from farmland causes land degradation and water pollution, thus continued efforts are needed to establish mathematical model for quantitative analysis of relevant processes and mechanisms. In this study, an approximate analytical solution has been developed for overland flow model and sediment transport model, offering a simple and effective means to predict overland flow and erosion under natural rainfall conditions. In the overland flow model, the flow regime was considered to be transitional with the value of parameter β (in the kinematic wave model) approximately two. The change rate of unit discharge with distance was assumed to be constant and equal to the runoff rate at the outlet of the plane. The excess rainfall was considered to be constant under uniform rainfall conditions. The overland flow model developed can be further applied to natural rainfall conditions by treating excess rainfall intensity as constant over a small time interval. For the sediment model, the recommended values of the runoff erosion calibration constant (cr) and the splash erosion calibration constant (cf) have been given in this study so that it is easier to use the model. These recommended values are 0.15 and 0.12, respectively. Comparisons with observed results were carried out to validate the proposed analytical solution. The results showed that the approximate analytical solution developed in this paper closely matches the observed data, thus providing an alternative method of predicting runoff generation and sediment yield, and offering a more convenient method of analyzing the quantitative relationships between variables. Furthermore, the model developed in this study can be used as a theoretical basis for developing runoff and erosion control methods.

  1. Flow and solute transport in backfilled tunnel and collapsed backfill - possible extension of Comp32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars

    2006-09-01

    In the Swedish deep geological final repository for spent fuel the tunnels will be filled with a backfill with low permeability. However, some flow may take place in the backfill. Nuclides released from a leaking canister could diffuse up to the flowing water in the backfill and be transported downstream in the tunnel. At an intersection of the tunnel with a fracture zone the contaminated water might flow out into the zone.This report addresses the transport mechanisms and rate of transport from a leaking canister up through the buffer and backfill in the deposition hole, further into the backfill in the tunnel and the transport along the tunnel. Spreading by diffusion in the buffer and backfill as well as retardation of sorbing nuclides is accounted for.The transport mechanisms and rates of transport are described and some simple models with analytical solutions are used to quantify the processes. These simple solutions are used to gain insights into when different transport mechanisms are important. The simple solutions are used to simulate a base case example where a non-sorbing nuclide (iodide) and a sorbing nuclide (radium) move in the backfill by diffusion and by advective flow. The simple sample calculations show that it would take thousands of years for iodide to move 20 m along the tunnel and that a release pulse would spread out considerably over time. The sorbing nuclide 226 Ra with a half life of 1,600 years would be strongly retarded by sorption and would decay to insignificance during its migration along the tunnel. The consequences of a collapse of backfill leaving a channel above the backfill is also studied by a simple analytical model that accounts for water flowing in the collapsed part of the backfill at the ceiling of the tunnel. A nuclide that diffuses up to the flowing channel will flow with the ('rapidly' flowing) water but will be retarded by diffusion down into the backfill again. This down diffusion retards the nuclide migration

  2. Application of preconditioned GMRES to the numerical solution of the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, B.W.; Holloway, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method with right preconditioning is examined as an alternative to both standard and accelerated transport sweeps for the iterative solution of the diamond differenced discrete ordinates neutron transport equation. Incomplete factorization (ILU) type preconditioners are used to determine their effectiveness in accelerating GMRES for this application. ILU(τ), which requires the specification of a dropping criteria τ, proves to be a good choice for the types of problems examined in this paper. The combination of ILU(τ) and GMRES is compared with both DSA and unaccelerated transport sweeps for several model problems. It is found that the computational workload of the ILU(τ)-GMRES combination scales nonlinearly with the number of energy groups and quadrature order, making this technique most effective for problems with a small number of groups and discrete ordinates. However, the cost of preconditioner construction can be amortized over several calculations with different source and/or boundary values. Preconditioners built upon standard transport sweep algorithms are also evaluated as to their effectiveness in accelerating the convergence of GMRES. These preconditioners show better scaling with such problem parameters as the scattering ratio, the number of discrete ordinates, and the number of spatial meshes. These sweeps based preconditioners can also be cast in a matrix free form that greatly reduces storage requirements

  3. Solute and colloid transport in karst conduits under low- and high-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2008-01-01

    Solute and colloid transport in karst aquifers under low and high flows was investigated by tracer tests using fluorescent dyes (uranine) and microspheres of the size of pathogenic bacteria (1 microm) and Cryptosporidium cysts (5 microm), which were injected into a cave stream and sampled at a spring 2.5 km away. The two types of microspheres were analyzed using an epifluorescence microscope or a novel fluorescence particle counter, respectively. Uranine breakthrough curves (BTCs) were regular shaped and recovery approached 100%. Microsphere recoveries ranged between 27% and 75%. During low flow, the 1-microm spheres displayed an irregular BTC preceding the uranine peak. Only a very few 5-microm spheres were recovered. During high flow, the 1-microm-sphere BTC was regular and more similar to the uranine curve. BTCs were modeled analytically with CXTFIT using a conventional advection dispersion model (ADM) and a two-region nonequilibrium model (2RNE). The results show that (1) colloids travel at higher velocities than solutes during low flow; (2) colloids and solutes travel at similar velocities during high flow; (3) higher maximum concentrations occur during high flow; and (4) the 2RNE achieves a better fit, while the ADM is more robust, as it requires less parameters.

  4. Analytical solutions for solute transport in groundwater and riverine flow using Green's Function Method and pertinent coordinate transformation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanskrityayn, Abhishek; Suk, Heejun; Kumar, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    In this study, analytical solutions of one-dimensional pollutant transport originating from instantaneous and continuous point sources were developed in groundwater and riverine flow using both Green's Function Method (GFM) and pertinent coordinate transformation method. Dispersion coefficient and flow velocity are considered spatially and temporally dependent. The spatial dependence of the velocity is linear, non-homogeneous and that of dispersion coefficient is square of that of velocity, while the temporal dependence is considered linear, exponentially and asymptotically decelerating and accelerating. Our proposed analytical solutions are derived for three different situations depending on variations of dispersion coefficient and velocity, respectively which can represent real physical processes occurring in groundwater and riverine systems. First case refers to steady solute transport situation in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient and velocity are only spatially dependent. The second case represents transient solute transport in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient is spatially and temporally dependent while the velocity is spatially dependent. Finally, the third case indicates transient solute transport in unsteady flow in which both dispersion coefficient and velocity are spatially and temporally dependent. The present paper demonstrates the concentration distribution behavior from a point source in realistically occurring flow domains of hydrological systems including groundwater and riverine water in which the dispersivity of pollutant's mass is affected by heterogeneity of the medium as well as by other factors like velocity fluctuations, while velocity is influenced by water table slope and recharge rate. Such capabilities give the proposed method's superiority about application of various hydrological problems to be solved over other previously existing analytical solutions. Especially, to author's knowledge, any other solution doesn

  5. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alan R.; May, Sylvio

    2014-03-01

    Ionic mixtures, such as electrolyte and polyelectrolyte solutions, have attracted much attention recently for their rich and challenging combination of electrostatic and non-electrostatic interparticle forces and their practical importance, from battery technologies to biological systems. Hydration of ions in aqueous solutions is known to entail ion-specific effects, including variable solubility of organic molecules, as manifested in the classic Hofmeister series for salting-in and salting-out of proteins. The physical mechanism by which the solvent (water) mediates effective interactions between ions, however, is still poorly understood. Starting from a microscopic model of a polyelectrolyte solution, we apply a perturbation theory to derive a coarse-grained model of ions interacting through both long-range electrostatic and short-range solvent-induced pair potentials. Taking these effective interactions as input to molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous ionic solutions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  6. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Coupled models in porous media: reactive transport and fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, L.

    2008-12-01

    This thesis deals with numerical simulation of coupled models for flow and transport in porous media. We present a new method for coupling chemical reactions and transport by using a Newton-Krylov method, and we also present a model of flow in fractured media, based on a domain decomposition method that takes into account the case of intersecting fractures. This study is composed of three parts: the first part contains an analysis, and implementation, of various numerical methods for discretizing advection-diffusion problems, in particular by using operator splitting methods. The second part is concerned with a fully coupled method for modeling transport and chemistry problems. The coupled transport-chemistry model is described, after discretization in time, by a system of nonlinear equations. The size of the system, namely the number of grid points times the number a chemical species, precludes a direct solution of the linear system. To alleviate this difficulty, we solve the system by a Newton-Krylov method, so as to avoid forming and factoring the Jacobian matrix. In the last part, we present a model of flow in 3D for intersecting fractures, by using a domain decomposition method. The fractures are treated as interfaces between sub-domains. We show existence and uniqueness of the solution, and we validate the model by numerical tests. (author)

  9. Cellular automaton model of coupled mass transport and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mass transport, coupled with chemical reactions, is modelled as a cellular automaton in which solute molecules perform a random walk on a lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔c and a + b →c, where we observe interesting macroscopic effects resulting from microscopic fluctuations and spatial correlations between molecules. We also simulate autocatalytic reaction schemes displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. Finally, we propose and discuss the limitations of a simple model for mineral-solute interaction. (author) 5 figs., 20 refs

  10. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  11. Modeling biogechemical reactive transport in a fracture zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing, and Zhang, Guoxiang; Guoxiang, Zhang

    2005-01-14

    A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes in biochemical parameters.

  12. Modeling biogeochemical reactive transport in a fracture zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing; Zhang, Guoxiang; Guoxiang, Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes in biochemical parameters

  13. UrbanTransport Solution An Experience From Prague | Jeremiah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the urban transport problems in Prague in Czech Republic. Based on the result of the research conducted, it was found that with the collapsed of Communism in Czech Republic, there was an upsurge in the use of private cars which was not possible during communism because the law does not ...

  14. Concept Layout Model of Transportation Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ya Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation terminal is the key node in transport systems. Efficient terminals can improve operation of passenger transportation networks, adjust the layout of public transportation networks, provide a passenger guidance system, and regulate the development of commercial forms, as well as optimize the assembly and distribution of modern logistic modes, among others. This study aims to clarify the relationship between the function and the structure of transportation terminals and establish the function layout design. The mapping mechanism of demand, function, and structure was analyzed, and a quantitative relationship between function and structure was obtained from a design perspective. Passenger demand and terminal structure were decomposed into several demand units and structural elements following the principle of reverse engineering. The relationship maps between these two kinds of elements were then analyzed. Function-oriented concept layout model of transportation terminals was established using the previous method. Thus, a technique in planning and design of transportation structures was proposed. Meaningful results were obtained from the optimization of transportation terminal facilities, which guide the design of the functional layout of transportation terminals and improve the development of urban passenger transportation systems.

  15. Solute transport in a well under slow-purge and no-purge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, M. A.; Britt, S. L.; Martin-Hayden, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    than when vertical flow velocities are assumed uniform. The second study was conducted to explain results of a recent laboratory experiment (Britt, 2005) that indicated that vertical transport of solute in a well, perpendicular to the groundwater flow direction, can be much faster than horizontal advection and that a solute may also mix rapidly in the direction opposite its net buoyant force. We replicate much of the vertical mixing simply by incorporating the Boussinesq approximation in the incompressible Navier Stokes equations, and offer several possible explanations for the latter behavior. The third study examines the thermally driven free convection in a well through comparison of numerical model simulations with detailed temperature measurements from inside and outside a pipe installed in shallow groundwater. Such studies are useful because the dimensionless numbers that indicate when onset of free convection should occur do not provide information about the scale or magnitude of that convection, and thus do not aid in estimating effects on solute redistribution. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for interpretation of groundwater sampling data and provide recommendations for passive and low-flow groundwater sampling methods.

  16. Highway and interline transportation routing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important issues to shippers, carriers, and the general public. Since transportation routes are a central characteristic in most of these issues, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward the resolution of these issues. In addition, US Department of Transportation requirements (HM-164) mandate specific routes for shipments of highway controlled quantities of radioactive materials. In response to these needs, two routing models have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These models have been designated by DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Transportation Management Division (DOE/EM) as the official DOE routing models. Both models, HIGHWAY and INTERLINE, are described

  17. Multimodal transportation best practices and model element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report provides guidance in developing a multimodal transportation element of a local government comprehensive : plan. Two model elements were developed to address differences in statutory requirements for communities of different : sizes and pl...

  18. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  19. TLC scheme for numerical solution of the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    A new triangular linear characteristic TLC scheme for numerically solving the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes has been developed. This scheme uses the analytic solution of the transport equation in the triangle as its basis. The data on edges of the triangle are assumed linear as is the source representation. A characteristic approach or nodal approach is used to obtain the analytic solution. Test problems indicate that the new TLC is superior to the widely used DITRI scheme for accuracy

  20. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  1. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10 20 /m 3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%

  2. Computer-based modelling and optimization in transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    This volume brings together works resulting from research carried out by members of the EURO Working Group on Transportation (EWGT) and presented during meetings and workshops organized by the Group under the patronage of the Association of European Operational Research Societies in 2012 and 2013. The main targets of the EWGT include providing a forum to share research information and experience, encouraging joint research and the development of both theoretical methods and applications, and promoting cooperation among the many institutions and organizations which are leaders at national level in the field of transportation and logistics. The primary fields of interest concern operational research methods, mathematical models and computation algorithms, to solve and sustain solutions to problems mainly faced by public administrations, city authorities, public transport companies, service providers and logistic operators. Related areas of interest are: land use and transportation planning, traffic control and ...

  3. One-dimensional analytical solution for hydraulic head and numerical solution for solute transport through a horizontal fracture for submarine groundwater discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cairong; Wang, Tongke; Zhao, Zhixue; Hao, Yonghong; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J; Zhan, Hongbin

    2017-11-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been recognized as a major pathway of groundwater flow to coastal oceanic environments. It could affect water quality and marine ecosystems due to pollutants and trace elements transported through groundwater. Relations between different characteristics of aquifers and SGD have been investigated extensively before, but the role of fractures in SGD still remains unknown. In order to better understand the mechanism of groundwater flow and solute transport through fractures in SGD, one-dimensional analytical solutions of groundwater hydraulic head and velocity through a synthetic horizontal fracture with periodic boundary conditions were derived using a Laplace transform technique. Then, numerical solutions of solute transport associated with the given groundwater velocity were developed using a finite-difference method. The results indicated that SGD associated with groundwater flow and solute transport was mainly controlled by sea level periodic fluctuations, which altered the hydraulic head and the hydraulic head gradient in the fracture. As a result, the velocity of groundwater flow associated with SGD also fluctuated periodically. We found that the pollutant concentration associated with SGD oscillated around a constant value, and could not reach a steady state. This was particularly true at locations close to the seashore. This finding of the role of fracture in SGD will assist pollution remediation and marine conservation in coastal regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. One-dimensional analytical solution for hydraulic head and numerical solution for solute transport through a horizontal fracture for submarine groundwater discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cairong; Wang, Tongke; Zhao, Zhixue; Hao, Yonghong; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Zhan, Hongbin

    2017-11-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been recognized as a major pathway of groundwater flow to coastal oceanic environments. It could affect water quality and marine ecosystems due to pollutants and trace elements transported through groundwater. Relations between different characteristics of aquifers and SGD have been investigated extensively before, but the role of fractures in SGD still remains unknown. In order to better understand the mechanism of groundwater flow and solute transport through fractures in SGD, one-dimensional analytical solutions of groundwater hydraulic head and velocity through a synthetic horizontal fracture with periodic boundary conditions were derived using a Laplace transform technique. Then, numerical solutions of solute transport associated with the given groundwater velocity were developed using a finite-difference method. The results indicated that SGD associated with groundwater flow and solute transport was mainly controlled by sea level periodic fluctuations, which altered the hydraulic head and the hydraulic head gradient in the fracture. As a result, the velocity of groundwater flow associated with SGD also fluctuated periodically. We found that the pollutant concentration associated with SGD oscillated around a constant value, and could not reach a steady state. This was particularly true at locations close to the seashore. This finding of the role of fracture in SGD will assist pollution remediation and marine conservation in coastal regions.

  5. Core2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  6. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  7. Reactive transport in a partially molten system with binary solid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Melt extraction from the Earth's mantle through high-porosity channels is required to explain the composition of the oceanic crust. Feedbacks from reactive melt transport are thought to localize melt into a network of high-porosity channels. Recent studies invoke lithological heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle to seed the localization of partial melts. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the reaction fronts that form as melt flows across the lithological interface of a heterogeneity and the background mantle. Simplified melting models of such systems aide in the interpretation and formulation of larger scale mantle models. Motivated by the aforementioned facts, we present a chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport across lithological boundaries, using theory for hyperbolic conservation laws. This is an extension of well-known linear trace element chromatography to the coupling of major elements and energy transport. Our analysis allows the prediction of the feedbacks that arise in reactive melt transport due to melting, freezing, dissolution and precipitation for frontal reactions. This study considers the simplified case of a rigid, partially molten porous medium with binary solid solution. As melt traverses a lithological contact-modeled as a Riemann problem-a rich set of features arise, including a reacted zone between an advancing reaction front and partial chemical preservation of the initial contact. Reactive instabilities observed in this study originate at the lithological interface rather than along a chemical gradient as in most studies of mantle dynamics. We present a regime diagram that predicts where reaction fronts become unstable, thereby allowing melt localization into high-porosity channels through reactive instabilities. After constructing the regime diagram, we test the one-dimensional hyperbolic theory against two-dimensional numerical experiments. The one-dimensional hyperbolic theory is sufficient for predicting the

  8. Ground-water transport model selection and evaluation guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines are being developed to assist potential users with selecting appropriate computer codes for ground-water contaminant transport modeling. The guidelines are meant to assist managers with selecting appropriate predictive models for evaluating either arid or humid low-level radioactive waste burial sites. Evaluation test cases in the form of analytical solutions to fundamental equations and experimental data sets have been identified and recommended to ensure adequate code selection, based on accurate simulation of relevant physical processes. The recommended evaluation procedures will consider certain technical issues related to the present limitations in transport modeling capabilities. A code-selection plan will depend on identifying problem objectives, determining the extent of collectible site-specific data, and developing a site-specific conceptual model for the involved hydrology. Code selection will be predicated on steps for developing an appropriate systems model. This paper will review the progress in developing those guidelines. 12 references

  9. Model for cadmium transport and distribution in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, T.L.; Turner, J.E.; Williams, M.W.; Cook, J.S.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    A compartmental model is developed to study the transport and distribution of cadmium in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of central importance to the model is the role played by sequestering components which bind free Cd/sup 2 +/ ions. The most important of these is a low-molecular-weight protein, metallothionein, which is produced by the cells in response to an increase in the cellular concentration of Cd/sup 2 +/. Monte Carlo techniques are used to generate a stochastic model based on existing experimental data describing the intracellular transport of cadmium between different compartments. This approach provides an alternative to the usual numerical solution of differential-delay equations that arise in deterministic models. Our model suggests subcellular structures which may be responsible for the accumulation of cadmium and, hence, could account for cadmium detoxification. 4 figures, 1 table.

  10. Analytical modelling of hydrogen transport in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    A versatile computational model of hydrogen transport in nuclear plant containment buildings is developed. The background and significance of hydrogen-related nuclear safety issues are discussed. A computer program is constructed that embodies the analytical models. The thermofluid dynamic formulation spans a wide applicability range from rapid two-phase blowdown transients to slow incompressible hydrogen injection. Detailed ancillary models of molecular and turbulent diffusion, mixture transport properties, multi-phase multicomponent thermodynamics and heat sink modelling are addressed. The numerical solution of the continuum equations emphasizes both accuracy and efficiency in the employment of relatively coarse discretization and long time steps. Reducing undesirable numerical diffusion is addressed. Problem geometry options include lumped parameter zones, one dimensional meshs, two dimensional Cartesian or axisymmetric coordinate systems and three dimensional Cartesian or cylindrical regions. An efficient lumped nodal model is included for simulation of events in which spatial resolution is not significant. Several validation calculations are reported

  11. Coupling Solute and Fine Particle Transport with Sand Bed Morphodynamics within a Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Ortiz, C. P.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Fine suspended particles are typically considered to pass through streams and rivers as wash load without interacting with the bed, however experiments have demonstrated that hyporheic flow causes advective exchange of fine particles with the stream bed, yielding accumulation of fine particle deposits within the bed. Ultimately, understanding river morphodynamics and ecosystem dynamics requires coupling both fine particle and solute transport with bed morphodynamics. To better understand the coupling between these processes we analyze a novel dataset from a controlled field experiment conducted on Clear Run, a 2nd order sand bed stream located within the North Carolina coastal plain. Data include concentrations of continuously injected conservative solutes and fine particulate tracers measured at various depths within the stream bed, overhead time lapse images of bed forms, stream discharge, and geomorphological surveys of the stream. We use image analysis of bed morphodynamics to assess exchange, retention, and remobilization of solutes and fine particles during constant discharge and a short duration experimental flood. From the images, we extract a time series of bedform elevations and scour depths for the duration of the experiment. The high-resolution timeseries of bed elevation enables us to assess coupling of bed morphodynamics with both the solute and fine particle flux during steady state mobile bedforms prior to the flood and to changing bedforms during the flood. These data allow the application of a stochastic modeling framework relating bed elevation fluctuations to fine particle residence times. This combined experimental and modeling approach ultimately informs our ability to predict not only the fate of fine particulate matter but also associated nutrient and carbon dynamics within streams and rivers.

  12. Dopamine transporter SPECT imaging of the peroral addicts of compound codeine phosphate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Taotao; Hu Shu; Jia Shaowei; Chen Qing; Fan Rong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the damage to striatum in patients perorally addicted to compound codeine phosphate solution by using the brain dopamine transporter SPECT imaging. Methods: Patients perorally addicted to compound codeine phosphate solution (n = 29) and addicted to heroin (n = 27), as well as healthy volunteers (n = 31) were included in the study. Each of them underwent dopamine transporter (DAT) SPECT imaging with 99 Tc m -2β-[N, N'-bis-( 2- mercaptoethyl ) ethylenediamino] methyl, 3β-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane ( 99 Tc m -TRODAT-1). The striatum volume (V, cm 3 ), mass (m, g) and radioactivity ratio (Ra) of striatum to whole brain were calculated using physio-mathematical modeling method. Results: Bilateral striatum of healthy volunteers showed typical 'panda eyes' pattern and the distribution of DAT was uniform and symmetrical. Bilateral striatum of patients addicted to compound codeine phosphate showed impaired tracer uptake, similar to those addicted to heroin. The V, m and Ra of bilateral striatum of patients addicted to compound codeine phosphate were (23.68±4.94) cm 3 , (24.87±5.19) g and (5.01±0.88) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of healthy controls: (35.39 ±4.42) cm 3 ,(37.16±4.64) g and (7.93±0.86)% (t =-9.69, -9.69, - 13.01, all P =0.000), but significantly higher than those addicted to heroin: (18.87±4.66) cm 3 , (19.81±4.90) g and (4.26±1.02) % (t =3.74, 3.74, 2.96, P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.005). Conclusion: Long-term peroral intake of compound codeine phosphate solution may damage the function of cerebral striatum, which is someway similar to though less severe than, the impairment caused by heroin. (authors)

  13. Uncertainty associated with selected environmental transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Miller, C.W.

    1979-11-01

    A description is given of the capabilities of several models to predict accurately either pollutant concentrations in environmental media or radiological dose to human organs. The models are discussed in three sections: aquatic or surface water transport models, atmospheric transport models, and terrestrial and aquatic food chain models. Using data published primarily by model users, model predictions are compared to observations. This procedure is infeasible for food chain models and, therefore, the uncertainty embodied in the models input parameters, rather than the model output, is estimated. Aquatic transport models are divided into one-dimensional, longitudinal-vertical, and longitudinal-horizontal models. Several conclusions were made about the ability of the Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model to predict accurately downwind air concentrations from releases under several sets of conditions. It is concluded that no validation study has been conducted to test the predictions of either aquatic or terrestrial food chain models. Using the aquatic pathway from water to fish to an adult for 137 Cs as an example, a 95% one-tailed confidence limit interval for the predicted exposure is calculated by examining the distributions of the input parameters. Such an interval is found to be 16 times the value of the median exposure. A similar one-tailed limit for the air-grass-cow-milk-thyroid for 131 I and infants was 5.6 times the median dose. Of the three model types discussed in this report,the aquatic transport models appear to do the best job of predicting observed concentrations. However, this conclusion is based on many fewer aquatic validation data than were availaable for atmospheric model validation

  14. Real time model for public transportation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Celiński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The article outlines managing a public transportation fleet in the dynamic aspect. There are currently many technical possibilities of identifying demand in the transportation network. It is also possible to indicate legitimate basis of estimating and steering demand. The article describes a general public transportation fleet management concept based on balancing demand and supply. Material and methods: The presented method utilizes a matrix description of demand for transportation based on telemetric and telecommunication data. Emphasis was placed mainly on a general concept and not the manner in which data was collected by other researchers.  Results: The above model gave results in the form of a system for managing a fleet in real-time. The objective of the system is also to optimally utilize means of transportation at the disposal of service providers. Conclusions: The presented concept enables a new perspective on managing public transportation fleets. In case of implementation, the project would facilitate, among others, designing dynamic timetables, updated based on observed demand, and even designing dynamic points of access to public transportation lines. Further research should encompass so-called rerouting based on dynamic measurements of the characteristics of the transportation system.

  15. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  16. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  17. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  18. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  19. Regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Thomson, I.; Egan, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) Design Project, a regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates has been developed. This quasi-Lagrangian three-dimensional grid numerical model uses a detailed SO 2 emission inventory of major anthropogenic sources in the Eastern U.S. region, and observed meteorological data during an episode as inputs. The model accounts for advective transport and turbulent diffusion of the pollutants. The chemical transformation of SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ and the deposition of the species at the earth's surface are assumed to be linear processes at specified constant rates. The numerical model can predict the daily average concentrations of SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ at all receptor locations in the grid region during the episode. Because of the spatial resolution of the grid, this model is particularly suited to investigate the effect of tall stacks in reducing the ambient concentration levels of sulfur pollutants. This paper presents the formulations and assumptions of the regional sulfate transport model. The model inputs and results are discussed. Isopleths of predicted SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ concentrations are compared with the observed ground level values. The bulk of the information in this paper is directed to air pollution meteorologists and environmental engineers interested in the atmospheric transport modeling studies of sulfur oxide pollutants

  20. Retention and Solute Transport Properties in Disturbed and Undisturbed Soil Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Previatello da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Solute transport parameters can be determined in miscible displacement experiments, usually performed in columns with disturbed (sieved soil samples. Experiments with undisturbed samples are uncommon, due to the difficulty of taking undisturbed samples at the size required for these experiments. Structural alteration of the disturbed material implies modifications in the pore geometry that determines hydraulic properties, including hydraulic conductivity and retention and properties related to miscible displacement. An existing model for prediction of breakthrough curves based on retention properties was tested using material from a medium-textured Ferralsol, and alterations caused by sample disturbance were investigated. Soil water retention curves and miscible displacement parameters were determined in breakthrough experiments with nitrate salts in columns filled with undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Data obtained from the undisturbed samples showed a higher dispersion, suggesting homogenization of pore geometry and a reduction in the representative elementary volume by the disaggregation and sieving of the soil material. The transport parameters for nitrate determined in disturbed and undisturbed samples were significantly different and the model was able to simulate the observed breakthrough curves after fitting the pore connectivity parameter.

  1. Simultaneous transport of synthetic colloids and a nonsorbing solute through single saturated natural fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R.

    1994-01-01

    Tracer transport experiments involving colloids that showed little tendency to attach to rock surfaces and a nonsorbing solute (iodide) -were conducted in three different well-characterized natural fractures in tuff. The colloids always arrived earlier in the effluent than the iodide, which we believe is evidence of (1) hydrodynamic chromatography and/or (2) the fact that the colloids experience a smaller effective volume in the fracture because they diffuse too slowly to enter low-velocity regions (dead zones) along the rough fracture walls. The iodide also approached the inlet concentration in the effluent more slowly than the colloids, with the concentration at a given elution volume being greater at higher flow rates. By contrast, the rate of approach of the colloid concentration to the inlet concentration did not vary with flow rate. We attribute this behavior to matrix diffusion of the iodide, with the colloids being too large/nondiffusive to experience this phenomenon. Dispersion of all tracers was greatest in the fracture of widest average aperture and least in the fracture of narrowest aperture, which is consistent with Taylor dispersion theory. The tracer experiments were modeled/interpreted using a three-step approach that involved (1) estimating the aperture distribution in each fracture using surface profiling techniques, (2) predicting the flow field in the fractures using a localized parallel-plate approximation, and (3) predicting tracer transport in the fractures using particle-tracking techniques. Although considered preliminary at this time, the model results were in qualitative agreement with the experiments

  2. Specific transport and storage solutions: Waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniau, Helene; Gagner, Laurent; Gendreau, Francoise; Presta, Anne

    2006-01-01

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge: protection of people and environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, COGEMA LOGISTICS has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the COGEMA LOGISTICS technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfill both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (COGEMA LOGISTICS, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LEMARECHAL CELESTIN) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. The paper has the following contents: About radioactive waste; - Radioactive waste classification; - High level activity waste and long-lived intermediate level waste; - Long-lived low level waste; - Short-lived low- and intermediate level waste; - Very low level waste; - The radioactive waste in nuclear fuel cycle; - Packaging design and

  3. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K d model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  4. Commercial Consolidation Model Applied to Transport Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilherme de Aragão, J.J.; Santos Fontes Pereira, L. dos; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Since the 1990s, transport concessions, including public-private partnerships (PPPs), have been increasingly adopted by governments as an alternative for financing and operations in public investments, especially in transport infrastructure. The advantage pointed out by proponents of these models lies in merging the expertise and capital of the private sector to the public interest. Several arrangements are possible and have been employed in different cases. After the duration of the first PPP contracts in transportation, many authors have analyzed the success and failure factors of partnerships. The occurrence of failures in some stages of the process can greatly encumber the public administration, incurring losses to the fiscal responsibility of the competent bodies. This article aims to propose a new commercial consolidation model applied to transport infrastructure to ensure fiscal sustainability and overcome the weaknesses of current models. Initially, a systematic review of the literature covering studies on transport concessions between 1990 and 2015 is offered, where the different approaches between various countries are compared and the critical success factors indicated in the studies are identified. In the subsequent part of the paper, an approach for the commercial consolidation of the infrastructure concessions is presented, where the concessionary is paid following a finalistic performance model, which includes the overall fiscal balance of regional growth. Finally, the papers analyses the usefulness of the model in coping with the critical success factors explained before. (Author)

  5. SOLUTIONS AND MEANS OF ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORT IN THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALIN POPESCU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to achieve an overview of innovative initiatives on alternative transport in recent years in the context of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. In this context are presented the main problems caused by motorized traffic in the urban agglomerations. Also, there are mentioned measures that could be implemented in busy urban areas. On this occasion are mentioned both new technical solutions and new means of alternative transport type. Additional, specific projects and programs are highlighted using bicycle transportation. There are mentioned initiatives regarding urban transportation completed in European projects such as: CIVITAS, EFFECTS etc. The examples and figures are mainly focused on Romania.

  6. ORGANIZATIONAL STRESS SOURCES AND SOLUTION PROPOSALS IN PUBLIC TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zennur GÜRBÜZ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizational stress is a concept which can have negative effects for both the workers and the organizations. The purpose of this study is to determine and classify the organizational stress sources that public transportation are exposed to, and to provide suggestions for managing these stress factors. A comprehensive literature survey is made in organizational stress factors and the following classes are identified: work structure, organizational structure, organizational policy, within-company relations and physical conditions. A questionnaire is developed forAnkara EGO General Directorate; applied to 2.137 drivers in Ankara in 2016 with a meaningful return of 1.554 data sets, representing 72% of the population and results are statistically analysed. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis and related validity and regional variance analyses are performed by SPSS (22.0 software. The study revealed that: drivers are exposed to mid-level stess; and most critical stress causes are “injustice and/or insufficiency of salaries”, “aggresive, violent behavior and verbal abuse of passengers towards drivers”, “fear of losing jobs or renewal of the contract”. A significant level of variation in stres levels are identified with respect to different regions of Ankara where drivers are assigned.  Suggestions are made in relation to different stres causes to lower the stress levels exposed.

  7. The problem of complex eigensystems in the semianalytical solution for advancement of time in solute transport simulations: a new method using real arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Amjad M.J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    In the numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport, explicit solutions may be obtained for the concentration field at any future time without computing concentrations at intermediate times. The spatial variables are discretized and time is left continuous in the governing differential equation. These semianalytical solutions have been presented in the literature and involve the eigensystem of a coefficient matrix. This eigensystem may be complex (i.e., have imaginary components) due to the asymmetry created by the advection term in the governing advection-dispersion equation. Previous investigators have either used complex arithmetic to represent a complex eigensystem or chosen large dispersivity values for which the imaginary components of the complex eigenvalues may be ignored without significant error. It is shown here that the error due to ignoring the imaginary components of complex eigenvalues is large for small dispersivity values. A new algorithm that represents the complex eigensystem by converting it to a real eigensystem is presented. The method requires only real arithmetic.

  8. Parallel computing solution of Boltzmann neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansah-Narh, T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of the research was on developing parallel computing algorithm for solving Eigen-values of the Boltzmam Neutron Transport Equation (BNTE) in a slab geometry using multi-grid approach. In response to the problem of slow execution of serial computing when solving large problems, such as BNTE, the study was focused on the design of parallel computing systems which was an evolution of serial computing that used multiple processing elements simultaneously to solve complex physical and mathematical problems. Finite element method (FEM) was used for the spatial discretization scheme, while angular discretization was accomplished by expanding the angular dependence in terms of Legendre polynomials. The eigenvalues representing the multiplication factors in the BNTE were determined by the power method. MATLAB Compiler Version 4.1 (R2009a) was used to compile the MATLAB codes of BNTE. The implemented parallel algorithms were enabled with matlabpool, a Parallel Computing Toolbox function. The option UseParallel was set to 'always' and the default value of the option was 'never'. When those conditions held, the solvers computed estimated gradients in parallel. The parallel computing system was used to handle all the bottlenecks in the matrix generated from the finite element scheme and each domain of the power method generated. The parallel algorithm was implemented on a Symmetric Multi Processor (SMP) cluster machine, which had Intel 32 bit quad-core x 86 processors. Convergence rates and timings for the algorithm on the SMP cluster machine were obtained. Numerical experiments indicated the designed parallel algorithm could reach perfect speedup and had good stability and scalability. (au)

  9. Hydrogen recycle modeling in transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrogen recycling models now used in Tokamak transport codes are reviewed and the method by which realistic recycling models are being added is discussed. Present models use arbitrary recycle coefficients and therefore do not model the actual recycling processes at the wall. A model for the hydrogen concentration in the wall serves two purposes: (1) it allows a better understanding of the density behavior in present gas puff, pellet, and neutral beam heating experiments; and (2) it allows one to extrapolate to long pulse devices such as EBT, ISX-C and reactors where the walls are observed or expected to saturate. Several wall models are presently being studied for inclusion in transport codes

  10. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  11. A simulation model for intermodal freight transportation in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    With increased emphasis on intermodal transportation development, the issue of how to evaluate an intermodal freight transportation system and provide intermodal solutions has been receiving intensive attention. In order to improve freight flow effic...

  12. Solute transport through fractured rock: Radial diffusion into the rock matrix with several geological layers for an arbitrary length decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a model development to derive a semi-analytical solution to describe reactive solute transport through a single channel in a fracture with cylindrical geometry. The model accounts for advection through the channel, radial diffusion into the adjacent heterogeneous rock matrix comprising different geological layers, adsorption on both the channel surface, and the geological layers of the rock matrix and radioactive decay chain. Not only an arbitrary-length decay chain, but also as many number of the rock matrix layers with different properties as observed in the field can be handled. The solution, which is analytical in the Laplace domain, is transformed back to the time domain numerically e.g. by use of de Hoog algorithm. The solution is verified against experimental data and analytical solutions of limiting cases of solute transport through porous media. More importantly, the relative importance and contribution of different processes on solute transport retardation in fractured rocks are investigated by simulating several cases of varying complexity. The simulation results are compared with those obtained from rectangular model with linear matrix diffusion. It is found that the impact of channel geometry on breakthrough curves increases markedly as the transport distance along the flow channel and away into the rock matrix increase. The effect of geometry is more pronounced for transport of a decay chain when the rock matrix consists of a porous altered layer.

  13. Discrete-Feature Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport for SR-Can Review. External review contribution in support of SKI's and SSI's review of SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Joel (Clearwater Hardrock Consulting, Corvallis, OR (US))

    2008-03-15

    . The variants completed thus far do not include alternative conceptual models for the DFN submodel, or variants with respect to its key properties, such as the assumed correlation of size to transmissivity. The flow distribution to deposition holes is not strongly sensitive to the hydrologic properties of the large-scale deformation zones or the time-dependent boundary conditions in a temperate setting. The main controls appear to be the DFN submodel, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around tunnels, and spalled zones in the deposition-hole walls (if present). Advective-dispersive particle-tracking results are presented for a suite of Forsmark model variants. A continuous EDZ intersecting all deposition holes and extending along all repository tunnels is included in all of these variants presented here. This is a significant feature for flow and transport, due to the apparent sparseness of the fracture population in the repository volume at Forsmark. For the Forsmark model variants considered here, the safety-critical lower portion of the distribution of transport resistance Fr is not strongly sensitive to most of the variants that have been modelled. Spalling around deposition holes produces a slight reduction in the lowest values of Fr below about 2x103 yr/m, but apparently yields an increase in Fr for the remainder of the distribution. This result is likely sensitive to the assumptions regarding hydraulic properties of the spalled zones, which have been arbitrarily specified for lack of relevant data. Further investigation of the sensitivity of the Fr distribution to assumptions regarding these parameters is warranted. The lower end of the Fr distribution also shows some sensitivity to stochastic realizations of the DFN submodel. This indicates that further exploration of uncertainties in the DFN submodel, including major conceptual uncertainties (clustering or hierarchical structure) is needed

  14. Colloid transport with wetting fronts: interactive effects of solution surface tension and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Goeppert, Nadine; Tu, Ching; McCarthy, John; Perfect, Edmund; McKay, Larry

    2010-02-01

    Transport of colloids with transient wetting fronts represents an important mechanism of contaminant migration in the vadose zone. The work presented here used steady-state saturated and transient unsaturated flow columns to evaluate the transport of a fluorescent latex microsphere (980 nm in diameter) with capillary wetting fronts of different solution surface tensions and ionic strengths. The saturated transport experiments demonstrated that decreasing solution surface tension and ionic strength decreased colloid deposition at the solid-liquid interface and increased colloid recovery in the column effluent. The effect of solution surface tension on colloid transport and deposition was greater at lower ionic strength, suggesting an interaction between these two factors. Under transient unsaturated flow conditions, the number of colloids retained in sand decreased exponentially with travel distance through the porous media. However, lowering the solution surface tension and ionic strength resulted in a more even distribution of colloids along the column. The measured zeta potentials of colloids in different solutions suggest that both lowering surface tension and ionic strength would enhance the electrostatic repulsion between colloid and sand. The experimental results revealed that the effects are nonlinear, implying the possible existence of critical threshold values, beyond which the effects were not significant. In addition, colloid migration slowed down as solution surface tension decreased due to reduction of capillary forces that drove liquid movement. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling Transition Towards Sustainable Transportation Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Bačeković, I.; Mýrdal, Jón Steinar Garðarsson

    2016-01-01

    two energy sectors. In order to deal with the raised issue, authors of this paper developed amethodology for calculation of the transition towards sustainable transport sector, focusing on thesolutions that are already available. Furthermore, as a part of the model, a detailed mapping ofresources......In a transition towards 100% renewable energy system, transportation sector is rarely dealt withusing the holistic approach and measuring its impact on the whole energy system. Furthermore, assolutions for power and heat sectors are clearer, it is a tendency of the researchers to focus on thelatter...... needed has been carried out for each of the alternatives. It was shown that theelectrification of the transportation sector is a crucial point in transition, while for the transportmodes that cannot be electrified, or shifted to different transportation modes, four alternatives weredefined: synthetic...

  16. Models in Planning Urban Public Passenger Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Štefančić

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The solving of complex problems in public transport requiresthe usage of models that are based on the estimate of demandin planning the transport routes. The intention is to predictwhat is going to happen in the future, if the proposed solutionsare implemented. In the majority of cases, the publictransport system is formed as a network and stored in the computermemory in order to start the evaluation process by specifYingthe number of trip origins and destinations in each zone.The trip distribution model which is used to calculate the numberof trips between each pair in the zone is based on the overalltravel frictions from zone to zone.

  17. Uncertainty calculation in transport models and forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    . Forthcoming: European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 15-3, 64-72. 4 The last paper4 examined uncertainty in the spatial composition of residence and workplace locations in the Danish National Transport Model. Despite the evidence that spatial structure influences travel behaviour...... to increase the quality of the decision process and to develop robust or adaptive plans. In fact, project evaluation processes that do not take into account model uncertainty produce not fully informative and potentially misleading results so increasing the risk inherent to the decision to be taken...

  18. Effects of Monovalent and Divalent Salt Solutions on the Transport of Toxoplasma gondii in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnault, C. J. G.; Pullano, C. P.; Mutty, T.; L'Ollivier, C.; Dubey, J. P.; Dumetre, A.

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenic microorganism Toxoplasma gondii is a current public health threat. Knowledge of the fate and transport of T. gondii in the environment, especially the subsurface, is critical to evaluate the risk of soil and groundwater contaminations. The physico-chemcial properties of groundwater systems, i.e. solution chemistry and aquifer materials, play a key role in the interaction of biocolloids with surfaces and therefore their mobility. This research examines how different salt solutions alter the mobility of T. gondii through saturated porous media. Salt solutions containing varying ionic strengths and concentrations of sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride were used to test the transport of the T. gondii oocysts. These tests were performed using quartz silica sand columns fed by a peristaltic pump in order to generate flow and transport of the biocolloids. The salt solution was pumped though the column followed by a pulse of the T. gondii oocysts, then a pulse of salt solution without oocysts, and then lastly a pulse of distilled water. Sampling of the solution exiting the columns was tested for T. gondii oocysts using qPCR in order to quantify the oocysts present. The breakthough curve results were then compared to a conservative bromide tracer test in order to determine the factors associated with the movement of these biocolloids through the sand columns. A model of the flow of the toxoplasma colloids through the sand matrix was made in order to characterize the parameters affecting the transport and retention of T. gondii occysts though saturated porous media.

  19. The transport phenomena during the growth of ZnTe crystal by the temperature gradient solution growth technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liying; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Boru; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate the temperature field, the thermosolutal convection, the solute segregation and the growth interface morphology during the growth of ZnTe crystal from Te rich solution by the temperature gradient solution growth (TGSG) technique. Effects of the temperature gradient on the transport phenomena, the growth interface morphology and the growth rate are examined. The influences of the latent heat and the thermal conductivity of ZnTe crystal on the transport phenomena and the growth interface are also discussed. We find that the mass transfer of ZnTe in the solution is very slow because of the low diffusion coefficient and the lack of mixing in the lower part of the solution. During the growth, dilute solution with high density and low growth temperature accumulates in the central region of the growth interface, making the growth interface change into two distinct parts. The inner part is very concave, while the outer part is relatively flat. Growth conditions in front of the two parts of the growth interface are different. The crystalline quality of the inner part of the ingot is predicted to be worse than that of the outer part. High temperature gradient can significantly increase the growth rate, and avoid the diffusion controlled growth to some extent.

  20. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  1. A simplified tether model for molecular motor transporting cargo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang-Zhen, Li; Li-Chun, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins or protein complexes which function as transporting engines in biological cells. This paper models the tether between motor and its cargo as a symmetric linear potential. Different from Elston and Peskin's work for which performance of the system was discussed only in some limiting cases, this study produces analytic solutions of the problem for general cases by simplifying the transport system into two physical states, which makes it possible to discuss the dynamics of the motor–cargo system in detail. It turns out that the tether strength between motor and cargo should be greater than a threshold or the motor will fail to transport the cargo, which was not discussed by former researchers yet. Value of the threshold depends on the diffusion coefficients of cargo and motor and also on the strength of the Brownian ratchets dragging the system. The threshold approaches a finite constant when the strength of the ratchet tends to infinity. (general)

  2. Coupling of Groundwater Transport and Plant Uptake Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Plants significantly influence contaminant transport and fate. Important processes are uptake of soil and groundwater contaminants, as well as biodegradation in plants and their root zones. Models for the prediction of chemical uptake into plants are required for the setup of mass balances...... in environmental systems at different scale. Feedback mechanisms between plants and hydrological systems can play an important role, however having received little attention to date. Here, a new model concept for dynamic plant uptake models applying analytical matrix solutions is presented, which can be coupled...... to groundwater transport simulation tools. Exemplary simulations of plant uptake were carried out, in order to estimate concentrations in the soilplant- air system and the influence of plants on contaminant mass fluxes from soil to groundwater....

  3. Simplified analytical model for radionuclide transport simulation in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromoto, G.

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from a low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, an integrated safety assessment methodology has being developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The source-term modelling approach adopted in this system is described and the results obtained in the IAEA NSARS 'The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities' programme for model intercomparison studies are presented. The radionuclides released from the waste are calculated using a simple first order kinetics model, and the transport, through porous media below the waste is determined by using an analytical solution of the mass transport equation. The methodology and the results obtained in this work are compared with those reported by others participants of the NSARS programme. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  4. Contaminant transport in fractured porous media: analytical solution for a two-member decay chain in a single fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudicky, E.A.; Frind, E.O.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the problem of radionuclide chain decay during transport through a discrete fracture situated in a porous rock matrix. The solution takes into account advection along the fracture, molecular diffusion from the fracture to the porous matrix, adsorption on the fracture face, adsorption in the rock matrix, and radioactive decay. The solution for the daughter product is in the form of a double integral which is evaluated by Gauss-Legendre quadrature. Results show that the daughter product tends to advance ahead of the parent nuclide even when the half-life of the parent is larger. This is attributed to the effect of chain decay in the matrix, which tends to reduce the diffusive loss of the daughter along the fracture. The examples also demonstrate that neglecting the parent nuclide and modeling its daughter as a single species can result in significant overestimation of arrival times at some point along the fracture. Although the analytical solution is restricted to a two-member chain for practical reasons, it represents a more realistic description of nuclide transport along a fracture than available single-species models. The solution may be of use for application to other contaminants undergoing different types of first-order transformation reactions

  5. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...... management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm...

  6. Anomalous reactive transport in porous media: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Yaniv; Dror, Ishai; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We analyze dynamic behavior of chemically reactive species in a porous medium, subject to anomalous transport. In this context, we present transport experiments in a refraction-index-matched, three-dimensional, water-saturated porous medium. A pH indicator (Congo red) was used as either a conservative or a reactive tracer, depending on the tracer solution pH relative to that of the background solution. The porous medium consisted of an acrylic polymer material formed as spherical beads that have pH-buffering capacity. The magnitude of reaction during transport through the porous medium was related to the color change of the Congo red, via image analysis. Here, we focused on point injection of the tracer into a macroscopically uniform flow field containing water at a pH different from that of the injected tracer. The setup yielded measurements of the temporally evolving spatial (local-in-space) concentration field. Parallel experiments with the same tracer, but without reactions (no changes in pH), enabled identification of the transport itself to be anomalous (non-Fickian); this was quantified by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulation. A CTRW particle tracking model was then used to quantify the spatial and temporal migration of both the conservative and reactive tracer plumes. Model parameters related to the anomalous transport were determined from the conservative tracer experiments. An additional term accounting for chemical reaction was established solely from analysis of the reactant concentrations, and significantly, no other fitting parameters were required. The measurements and analysis emphasized the localized nature of reaction, caused by small-scale concentration fluctuations and preferential pathways. In addition, a threshold radius for pH-controlled reactive transport processes was defined under buffering conditions, which delineated the region in which reactions occurred rapidly.

  7. Error estimation and adaptive chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Braack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical method to use several chemical transport models of increasing accuracy and complexity in an adaptive way. In largest parts of the domain, a simplified chemical model may be used, whereas in certain regions a more complex model is needed for accuracy reasons. A mathematically derived error estimator measures the modeling error and provides information where to use more accurate models. The error is measured in terms of output functionals. Therefore, one has to consider adjoint problems which carry sensitivity information. This concept is demonstrated by means of ozone formation and pollution emission.

  8. Identification of key target markets for intermodal freight transport solutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert van Eeden

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA identified South Africa's freight logistics challenges as among the key binding constraints on the country's growth aspirations. The research presented here points to the structural imbalance between road and rail freight transport as one of the key contributors to this state of affairs. Most long-distance corridor transport has been captured by road. However, long-distance transport is a market segment that is very suitable for intermodal transportation : rail is utilised for the high-density, long-distance component and road for the feeder and distribution services at the corridor end points. A market segmentation approach is developed to identify the corridors and industries that are natural candidates for such solutions, thereby paving the way for role-players and stakeholders to initiate a dialogue on the development of appropriate solutions.

  9. Convergent radial tracing of viral and solute transport in gneiss saprolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard; Tindimugaya, Callist; Barker, John; Macdonald, David; Kulabako, Robinah

    2010-01-01

    Deeply weathered crystalline rock aquifer systems comprising unconsolidated saprolite and underlying fractured bedrock (saprock) underlie 40% of sub-Saharan Africa. The vulnerability of this aquifer system to contamination, particularly in rapidly urbanizing areas, remains poorly understood. In order to assess solute and viral transport in saprolite derived from Precambrian gneiss, forced-gradient tracer experiments using chloride and Escherichia coli phage PhiX174 were conducted in southeastern Uganda. The bacteriophage tracer was largely unrecovered; adsorption to the weathered crystalline rock matrix is inferred and enabled by the low pH (5.7) of site ground water and the bacteriophage's relatively high isoelectric point (pI = 6.6). Detection of the applied PhiX174 phage in the pumping well discharge at early times during the experiment traces showed, however, that average ground water flow velocities exceed that of the inert solute tracer, chloride. This latter finding is consistent with observations in other hydrogeological environments where statistically extreme sets of microscopic flow velocities are considered to transport low numbers of fecal pathogens and their proxies along a selected range of linked ground water pathways. Application of a radial advection-dispersion model with an exponentially decaying source term to the recovered chloride tracer estimates a dispersivity (alpha) of 0.8 +/- 0.1 m over a distance of 4.15 m. Specific yield (S(y)) is estimated to be 0.02 from volume balance calculations based on tracer experiments. As single-site observations, our estimates of saprolite S(y) and alpha are tentative but provide a starting point for assessing the vulnerability of saprolite aquifers in sub-Saharan Africa to contamination and estimating quantitatively the impact of climate and abstraction on ground water storage.

  10. Traveling Wave Solutions in a Reaction-Diffusion Epidemic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Wenbin; Guo, Zhengguang; Wang, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the traveling wave solutions in a reaction-diffusion epidemic model. The existence of the wave solutions is derived through monotone iteration of a pair of classical upper and lower solutions. The traveling wave solutions are shown to be unique and strictly monotonic. Furthermore, we determine the critical minimal wave speed.

  11. ANALYZING NUMERICAL ERRORS IN DOMAIN HEAT TRANSPORT MODELS USING THE CVBEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1987-01-01

    Besides providing an exact solution for steady-state heat conduction processes (Laplace-Poisson equations), the CVBEM (complex variable boundary element method) can be used for the numerical error analysis of domain model solutions. For problems where soil-water phase change latent heat effects dominate the thermal regime, heat transport can be approximately modeled as a time-stepped steady-state condition in the thawed and frozen regions, respectively. The CVBEM provides an exact solution of the two-dimensional steady-state heat transport problem, and also provides the error in matching the prescribed boundary conditions by the development of a modeling error distribution or an approximate boundary generation.

  12. TRACKING AND TRACING SOLUTION FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY INTERMODAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of designing a complex tracking and tracing solution for dangerous goods transportation with the support of modern information technologies. This research activity presents a part of the “ChemLogTT” [2] project solved at the University of Žilina. The main goal of our contribution is to present basic conception of a complex developed software tool for monitoring and analyzing mentioned dangerous goods transportation.

  13. A study of solute transport of radiolysis products in crud and its effects on crud growth on PWR fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Justin H.; Kim, Seung Jun; Jones, Barclay G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We model a 3-D numerical solute transport within crud deposit on PWR fuel pin. • Source term effect from radiolysis yield and recombination is minimal. • Lower crud porosity leads substantially higher concentration of solutes. • Thicker crud deposit generates substantially higher concentration of solutes. • High concentration of radiolysis species (H 2 , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 ) can be directly related to corrosion issues on fuel cladding. - Abstract: This research examines the concentration of radiolysis species (H 2 , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 ) over the porous crud layer using a three dimensional time dependent solute transport model. A Monte Carlo random walk technique is adopted to simulate the transport behavior of the different species with various parametric studies of source term, crud thickness, and crud porosity. Particularly, this model employs a system of coupled mass transport and chemical interactions as the source term, which makes the problem non-linear. It is demonstrated that a negligible effect on radiolysis species concentrations change due to the consideration of source term. The crud thickness and porosity effect on the concentration distributions are notably observed. In general, higher concentration starts from the intersection of the heating surface with the chimney wall from the beginning and it reaches the equilibrium state within tens of seconds. The concentration profiles of the radiolysis species H 2 , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 can be directly related to corrosion issues. The direct application of this study to nuclear engineering research is to aid in the design of reactors with higher performance without experiencing an Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA), an unexpected measured shift in axial power distribution from predicted values.

  14. Kinetic theory the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, S G

    1972-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 3: The Chapman-Enskog Solution of the Transport Equation for Moderately Dense Gases describes the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases. Topics covered range from the propagation of sound in monatomic gases to the kinetic theory of simple and composite monatomic gases and generalizations of the theory to higher densities. The application of kinetic theory to the determination of intermolecular forces is also discussed. This volume is divided into two sections and begins with an introduction to the work of Hilbert, Chapman, and Ensko

  15. S4 solution of the transport equation for eigenvalues using Legendre polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öztürk Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical solution of the transport equation for monoenergetic neutrons scattered isotropically through the medium of a finite homogeneous slab is studied for the determination of the eigenvalues. After obtaining the discrete ordinates form of the transport equation, separated homogeneous and particular solutions are formed and then the eigenvalues are calculated using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature set. Then, the calculated eigenvalues for various values of the c0, the mean number of secondary neutrons per collision, are given in the tables.

  16. On equiconvergence of ultraspherical polynomials solution of one-speed neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmazer, Ayhan; Tombakoglu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Ultraspherical polynomial approximation is used in slab criticality calculations for strongly anisotropic scattering. A unique and general formulation is developed for slab criticality condition whose sub-cases are spherical harmonics approximation, Chebyshev polynomial approximation of first and second kind. Since Legendre polynomials, Chebyshev Polynomials of first and second kinds are special cases of ultraspherical polynomials; our formulation inherently covers all these approximations and lets one to employ any other ultraspherical polynomial approximation in the solution of one-speed neutron transport equation. Our calculations showed that solution of one-speed neutron transport equation for various degrees of anisotropy and cross-section parameters is almost insensitive to the choice of ultraspherical polynomial with the present days' computing capabilities. In other words, as much as high order ultraspherical polynomial approximation is used the solution converges to the same value for a specified problem regardless the type of the ultraspherical polynomial assigned in the solution as equiconvergence theorem of Jacobi polynomials states

  17. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  18. Modelling anisotropic water transport in polymer composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work reports anisotropic water transport in a polymer composite consisting of an epoxy matrix reinforced with aligned triangular bars made of vinyl ester. By gravimetric experiments, water diffusion in resin and polymer composites were characterized. Parameters for Fickian diffusion and polymer relaxation models were ...

  19. Climate impact of transportation A model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girod, B.; Vuuren, D.P. van; Grahn, M.; Kitous, A.; Kim, S.H.; Kyle, P.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global

  20. Logistics Chains in Freight Transport Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.Y.

    2015-01-01

    The flow of trade is not equal to transport flows, mainly due to the fact that warehouses and distribution facilities are used as intermediary stops on the way from production locations to the points of consumption or further rework of goods. This thesis proposes a logistics chain model, which

  1. Np(V) transport in clayey porous medium: study of solution chemistry, sorption and flow coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Christine

    1997-01-01

    To assess the safety of radioactive waste disposal, the behaviour of radionuclides in porous media has to be known. The solute transport is controlled by hydrodynamics, physicochemical interactions and aqueous chemistry. When each main term is known independently, their coupling can be predicted. The aim is to study the migration of Np(V). Experiments are carried out on chromatography columns packed with a mixture of sand and Fo-Ca-7 clay. Column hydrodynamics is characterised with RTD measurements and is modelled thanks to a cell network model. Sorption properties of the clay are determined thanks to sodium/calcium and sodium/caesium exchange experiments. The sorption is modelled with ion exchange on three sites. The Na + /H + , Na + /Ca 2+ and Na + /Cs + exchange constants have been determined. Transport experiments of Np(V) have been carried out in IM Na + bicarbonate/carbonate media and is interpreted with H + /NpO 2+ /Na + cationic exchanges on the third site of the clay, and NpO 2 CO 3- , NpO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 3- and NpO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- formation. This mechanism has been validated by varying pH and carbonate concentration. An anion exchange site of low exchange capacity has been found through 14 C experiments. A selective elimination of goethite contained in Fo-Ca-7 shows that this iron oxide is not responsible for the anions retention. As expected, temperature influence on calcium and neptunium migration is quite small. It is used to estimate entropy and enthalpy changes for the corresponding ionic exchange reactions. (author) [fr

  2. Modelling soil transport by wind in drylands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding the movement of windblown soil particles and the resulting formation of complex surface features are among the most intriguing problems in dryland research. This understanding can only be achieved trough physical and mathematical modelling and must also involve observational data and laboratory experiments. Some current mathematical models that have contributed to the basic understanding of the transportation and deposition of soil particles by wind are presented and solved in these notes. (author). 26 refs, 5 figs

  3. The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem: Applications and solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Simon; Klose, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem (SSFCTP) consists in finding a minimum cost flow from a number of supplier nodes to a single demand node. Shipping costs comprise costs proportional to the amount shipped as well as a fixed-charge. Although the SSFCTP is an important special case...... of the well-known fixed-charge transportation problem, just a few methods for solving this problem have been proposed in the literature. After summarising some applications of this problem arising in manufacturing and transportation, we give an overview on approximation algorithms and worst-case results....... Finally, we briefly compare some exact solution algorithms for this problem....

  4. Modeling of Species Transport and Macrosegregation in Heavy Steel Ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wensheng; Shen, Houfa; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-04-01

    In the current study, two significant phenomena involved in heavy steel ingot casting, i.e., species transport and macrosegregation, were numerically simulated. First, a ladle-tundish-mold species transport model describing the entire multiple pouring process of heavy steel ingots was proposed. Carbon distribution and variation in both the tundish and the mold of a 292-ton steel ingot were predicted. Results indicate high carbon concentration in the bottom of the mold while low concentration carbon at the top of mold after the pouring process. Such concentration distribution helps in reducing both negative segregation in the bottom of the solidified ingot and positive segregation at the top. Second, a two-phase multiscale macrosegregation model was used to simulate the solidification process of industrial steel ingots. This model takes into account heat transfer, fluid flow, solute transport, and equiaxed grain motion on a system scale, as well as grain nucleation and growth on a microscopic scale. The model was first used to analyze a three-dimensional industry-scale steel ingot as a benchmark. Then, it was applied to study macrosegregation formation in a 53-ton steel ingot. Macrosegregation predicted by the numerical model was presented and compared with experimental measurements. Typical macrosegregation patterns in heavy steel ingots are found to be well reproduced with the two-phase model.

  5. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  6. Elucidation of the transport pathway in hairless rat skin enhanced by low-frequency sonophoresis based on the solute-water transport relationship and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasunori; Mutoh, Mizue; Ueda, Hideo; Fang, Liang; Hirayama, Kotaro; Atobe, Mahito; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2005-04-18

    In this study, we examined a relationship between hydrophilic solute and water (vehicle) transports in the excised hairless rat skin in the presence of ultrasound (41 kHz, 60-300 mW/cm2) irradiation and also conducted skin surface observation using confocal microscopy. When the applied intensity was increased stepwise over the rage of 60-300 mW/cm2, the transport of tritiated water (3H2O) was increased 140-fold in an intensity-dependent manner and this returned to normal on stopping the ultrasound application. The skin permeation clearance (mul/h) of model hydrophilic solutes, calcein (MW 623) and FITC-labeled dextrans [MW 4400 (FD-4) and MW 38000 (FD-40)], across the skin under the influence of ultrasound was plotted against the corresponding 3H2O flux (microl/h) to estimate the potential contribution of convective solvent flow, induced by the ultrasound application, to the solute transport. Good correlations were observed between the 3H2O flux and solute clearances and, unexpectedly, the slope values obtained from linear regression of the plots were consistent for all solutes examined (1.04+/-0.29 for calcein, 1.07+/-0.17 for FD-4, and 1.08+/-0.23 for FD-40, respectively). Transport of intact FD-4 and FD-40 was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. When the skin surface and deeper regions of the skin after sonophoresis of FD-40 were observed using a confocal microscope, the fluorescence of FD-40 was uniformly distributed in the area under the ultrasound horn and also evident in crack-like structures in the boundary of the horn. On the other hand, a hexagonal structure of horny cells in the stratum corneum (SC) observed by post-staining with rhodamine B was fully conserved in the area under the horn. These findings suggest that 41 kHz ultrasound can increase the transdermal transport of hydrophilic solutes by inducing convective solvent flow probably via both corneocytes and SC lipids as well as newly developed routes. Our observation also suggests that 41 k

  7. Method of solution of the neutron transport equation in multidimensional cartesian geometries using spherical harmonics and spatially orthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenstermacher, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    The solution of the neutron transport equation has long been a subject of intense interest to nuclear engineers. Present computer codes for the solution of this equation, however, are expensive to run for large, multidimensional problems, and also suffer from computational problems such as the ray effect. A method has been developed which eliminates many of these problems. It consists of transforming the transport equation into a set of linear partial differential equations by the use of spherical harmonics. The problem volume is divided into mesh boxes, and the flux components are approximated within each mesh box by spatially orthogonal quadratic polynomials, which need not be continuous at mesh box interfaces. A variational principle is developed, and used to solve for the unknown coefficients of these polynomials. Both one dimensional and two dimensional computer codes using this method have been written. The codes have each been tested on several test cases, and the solutions checked against solutions obtained by other methods. While the codes have some difficulty in modeling sharp transients, they produce excellent results on problems where the characteristic lengths are many mean free paths. On one test case, the two dimensional code, SHOP/2D, required only one-fourth the computer time required by the finite difference, discrete ordinates code TWOTRAN to produce a solution. In addition, SHOP/2D converged much better than TWOTRAN and produced more physical-appearing results

  8. Solution of the neutron transport problem with anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry by the decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, G.A.; Bogado Leite, S.Q.; Vilhena, M.T. de

    2009-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the one-speed stationary neutron transport problem, in an infinitely long cylinder with anisotropic scattering by the decomposition method. Series expansions of the angular flux distribution are proposed in terms of suitably constructed functions, recursively obtainable from the isotropic solution, to take into account anisotropy. As for the isotropic problem, an accurate closed-form solution was chosen for the problem with internal source and constant incident radiation, obtained from an integral transformation technique and the F N method

  9. Numerical Solution of the Electron Transport Equation in the Upper Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Mark Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holmes, Mark [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Sailor, William C [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A new approach for solving the electron transport equation in the upper atmosphere is derived. The problem is a very stiff boundary value problem, and to obtain an accurate numerical solution, matrix factorizations are used to decouple the fast and slow modes. A stable finite difference method is applied to each mode. This solver is applied to a simplifieed problem for which an exact solution exists using various versions of the boundary conditions that might arise in a natural auroral display. The numerical and exact solutions are found to agree with each other to at least two significant digits.

  10. On the Boltzmann Equation with Stochastic Kinetic Transport: Global Existence of Renormalized Martingale Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punshon-Smith, Samuel; Smith, Scott

    2018-02-01

    This article studies the Cauchy problem for the Boltzmann equation with stochastic kinetic transport. Under a cut-off assumption on the collision kernel and a coloring hypothesis for the noise coefficients, we prove the global existence of renormalized (in the sense of DiPerna/Lions) martingale solutions to the Boltzmann equation for large initial data with finite mass, energy, and entropy. Our analysis includes a detailed study of weak martingale solutions to a class of linear stochastic kinetic equations. This study includes a criterion for renormalization, the weak closedness of the solution set, and tightness of velocity averages in {{L}1}.

  11. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for [ 3 H]NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections

  12. Model prodrugs for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Andersen, R; Brodin, Birger

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal di/tri-peptide carrier, hPepT1, has been suggested as a target for increasing intestinal transport of low permeability compounds by creating prodrugs designed for the transporter. Model ester prodrugs using the stabilized dipeptides D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala as pro...... with a pH of approximately 6.0, but still release the model drug at the intercellular and blood pH of approximately 7.4. Even though benzyl alcohol is not a low molecular weight drug molecule, these results indicate that the dipeptide prodrug principle is a promising drug delivery concept. However......, the physico-chemical properties such as electronegativity, solubility, and log P of the drug molecule may also have an influence on the potential of these kinds of prodrugs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether the model drug electronegativity, estimated as Taft substitution parameter...

  13. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal, we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection kinetics was formulated using partial and ordinary differential equations in one- and three-dimensional (semi-spherical coordinates. Several key parameters including an injection velocity, a diffusion coefficient, thickness of subcutaneous tissue, and a permeability factor at the tissue-blood boundary were estimated from experimental data in rats. With reference to analytical solutions in a simplified model without convection, numerical solutions revealed that the diffusion coefficient and thickness of subcutaneous tissue determined the timing of the peak concentration in the plasma, and its magnitude was dictated by the permeability factor. Furthermore, the initial velocity, induced by needle injection, elevated an immediate transport of salubrinal at t < 1h. The described analysis with a combination of partial and ordinary differential equations contributes to the prediction of local and systemic effects and the understanding of the transportation mechanism of salubrinal and other agents.

  14. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju Celestino Ladu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  15. Periodic Solutions for a Delayed Population Model on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kejun Zhuang; Zhaohui Wen

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a delayed single population model on time scales. With the assistance of coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions for existence of periodic solutions are obtained. Furthermore, the better estimations for bounds of periodic solutions are established.

  16. ELVIS: Multi-Electrolyte Aqueous Activity Model for Geothermal Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, F. F.; Wagner, T.; Driesner, T.; Kulik, D. A.; Kosakowski, G.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature, pressure, and fluid salinities render geochemical modeling of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems a demanding task. Accurate prediction of fluid-mineral equilibria strongly depends on the availability of thermodynamic data and activity models. Typically, the Pitzer activity model is applied for geothermal fluids. A drawback of this model is the large number of parameters required to account for temperature and pressure dependencies, which significantly reduces computational efficiency of reactive transport simulations. In addition, most available parameterizations are valid only at vapor-saturated conditions. As an alternative we implemented the EUNIQUAC local composition model [2] that needs substantially fewer fitting parameters. However, the current EUNIQUAC model design does not include provision for high temperature (>150°C) applications and lacks a formulation for pressure dependence. Therefore, its application to geothermal conditions requires a re-formulation and re-fitting of the model. We developed a new tool termed GEMSFIT that allows generic fitting of activity models (for aqueous electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions) and equations of state implemented in our geochemical equilibrium solver GEM-Selektor (http://gems.web.psi.ch). GEMSFIT combines a PostgreSQL database for storing and managing the datasets of experimental measurements and interaction parameters, the parallelized genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB° for the parameter fitting, and an interface to the numerical kernel of GEM-Selektor to access activity models and perform chemical equilibrium calculations. Benchmarking of the partly re-parameterized EUNIQUAC model against Pitzer revealed that the former is less accurate, which can result in incorrect predictions of mineral precipitation/dissolution. Consequently, we modified the EUNIQUAC model and concurrently introduced a pressure dependence to be able to fit experimental data over wide ranges of

  17. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  18. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Efflux of drugs and solutes from brain: the interactive roles of diffusional transcapillary transport, bulk flow and capillary transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis, Dennis R; Vavra, Michael W; Schlageter, Kurt E; Kang, Eric W-Y; Itskovich, Andrea C; Hertzler, Shannon; Allen, Cathleen V; Lipton, Howard L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the roles of diffusion, convection and capillary transporters in solute removal from extracellular space (ECS) of the brain. Radiolabeled solutes (eight with passive distribution and four with capillary or cell transporters) were injected into the brains of rats (n=497) and multiple-time point experiments measured the amount remaining in brain as a function of time. For passively distributed compounds, there was a relationship between lipid:water solubility and total brain efflux:diffusional efflux, which dominated when k(p), the transcapillary efflux rate constant, was >10(0) h(-1); when 10(-1)transporters. The total efflux rate constant, k(eff), was the sum of a passive component (k(p)=0.0018 h(-1)), a convective component (k(csf)=0.2 h(-1)), and a variable, concentration-dependent component (k(x)=0 to 0.45 h(-1)). Compounds with cell membrane transporters had longer clearance half times as did an oligonucleotide, which interacted with cell surface receptors. Manipulation of physiologic state (n=35) did not affect efflux, but sucrose efflux half time was longer with pentobarbital anesthesia (24 h) than with no anesthesia or ketamine-xylazine anesthesia (2 to 3 h). These results show that solute clearance from normal brain ECS may involve multiple physiologic pathways, may be affected by anesthesia, and suggests that convection-mediated efflux may be manipulated to increase or decrease drug clearance from brain.

  20. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.; Lint, J. van; Vries, J.; Kester, L.J.H.M.; Passchier, I.

    2013-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large, urbanized areas. Intelligent transport solutions aim to reduce this problem. In general, traffic is monitored with the use of sensors, the resulting data are processed, a traffic state is estimated, and a control measure is computed and implemented. The

  1. Positive solution of a time and energy dependent neutron transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    A constructive method is given for the determination of a solution and an existence--uniqueness theorem for some nonlinear time and energy dependent neutron transport problems, including the linear transport system. The geometry of the medium under consideration is allowed to be either bounded or unbounded which includes the geometry of a finite or infinite cylinder, a half-space and the whole space R/subm/ (m=1,2,center-dotcenter-dotcenter-dot). Our approach to the problem is by successive approximation which leads to various recursion formulas for the approximations in terms of explicit integrations. It is shown under some Lipschitz conditions on the nonlinear functions, which describe the process of neutrons absorption, fission, and scattering, that the sequence of approximations converges to a unique positive solution. Since these conditions are satisfied by the linear transport equation, all the results for the nonlinear system are valid for the linear transport problem. In the general nonlinear problem, the existence of both local and global solutions are discussed, and an iterative process for the construction of the solution is given

  2. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- or depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for...

  3. Determination of a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation using a fractional derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabadal, J. E-mail: jorge.zabadal@ufrgs.br; Vilhena, M.T. E-mail: vilhena@mat.ufrgs.br; Segatto, C.F. E-mail: cynthia@mat.ufrgs.br; Pazos, R.P.Ruben Panta. E-mail: rpp@mat.pucrgs.br

    2002-07-01

    In this work we construct a closed-form solution for the multidimensional transport equation rewritten in integral form which is expressed in terms of a fractional derivative of the angular flux. We determine the unknown order of the fractional derivative comparing the kernel of the integral equation with the one of the Riemann-Liouville definition of fractional derivative. We report numerical simulations.

  4. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  5. Modelling contaminant transport in saturated aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, V.; Nayak, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    With the increase in population and industrialization the problem of pollution of groundwater has become critical. The present study deals with modelling of pollutant transport through saturated aquifers. Using this model it is possible to predict the concentration distribution, spatial as well as temporal, in the aquifer. The paper also deals with one of the methods of controlling the pollutant movement, namely by pumping wells. A simulation model is developed to determine the number, location and rate of pumping of a number of wells near the source of pollution so that the concentration is within acceptable limits at the point of interest. (Author) (18 refs., 14 figs., tab.)

  6. Modeling Complex Chemical Systems: Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas in complex gas mixtures are at the heart of numerous contemporary technologies. They typically contain dozens to hundreds of species, involved in hundreds to thousands of reactions. Chemists and physicists have always been interested in what are now called chemical reduction techniques (CRT's). The idea of such CRT's is that they reduce the number of species that need to be considered explicitly without compromising the validity of the model. This is usually achieved on the basis of an analysis of the reaction time scales of the system under study, which identifies species that are in partial equilibrium after a given time span. The first such CRT that has been widely used in plasma physics was developed in the 1960's and resulted in the concept of effective ionization and recombination rates. It was later generalized to systems in which multiple levels are effected by transport. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in tools for chemical reduction and reaction pathway analysis. An example of the latter is the PumpKin tool. Another trend is that techniques that have previously been developed in other fields of science are adapted as to be able to handle the plasma state of matter. Examples are the Intrinsic Low Dimension Manifold (ILDM) method and its derivatives, which originate from combustion engineering, and the general-purpose Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique. In this contribution we will provide an overview of the most common reduction techniques, then critically assess the pros and cons of the methods that have gained most popularity in recent years. Examples will be provided for plasmas in argon and carbon dioxide.

  7. Theoretical development and analytical solutions for transport of volatile organic compounds in dual-porosity soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantush, Mohamed M.; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2003-08-01

    Predicting the behavior of volatile organic compounds in soils or sediments is necessary for managing their use and designing appropriate remedial systems to eliminate potential threats to the environment, particularly the air and groundwater resources. In this effort, based on continuity of mass flux, we derive a mass flux boundary condition of the third type in terms of physically based mass transfer rate coefficients, describing the resistance to mass inflow of the soil-air interface, and obtain one-dimensional analytical solutions for transport and degradation of volatile organic compounds in semi-infinite structured soils under steady, unsaturated flow conditions. The advective-dispersive mass balance formulation allows for mobile-immobile liquid phase and vapor diffusive mass transfer, with linear equilibrium adsorption and liquid-vapor phase partitioning in the dynamic and stagnant soil regions. The mass transfer rate coefficients of volatile organic chemicals across the soil-air interface are expressed in terms of solute properties and hydrodynamic characteristics of resistive soil and air-boundary layers. The solutions estimate solute vapor flux from soil surface and describe mobile-phase solute concentration as a function of depth in the soil and time. In particular, solutions were derived for: (1) zero-initial concentration in the soil profile subject to a continuous and pulsed source at the soil surface; and (2) depletion from the soil following an initially contaminated soil profile. Sensitivity analysis with respect to different dimensionless parameters is conducted and the effect on solute concentration and vapor flux of such parameters as volatilization mass transfer velocity relative to infiltration, soil Peclet number, biochemical decay, and diffusive mass transfer into the immobile phase, is plotted and the results are discussed. The mass transfer rate coefficients and the analytical solutions are applied to simulate transport of an example

  8. Optimisation-Based Solution Methods for Set Partitioning Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel

    The scheduling of crew, i.e. the construction of work schedules for crew members, is often not a trivial task, but a complex puzzle. The task is complicated by rules, restrictions, and preferences. Therefore, manual solutions as well as solutions from standard software packages are not always su......_cient with respect to solution quality and solution time. Enhancement of the overall solution quality as well as the solution time can be of vital importance to many organisations. The _elds of operations research and mathematical optimisation deal with mathematical modelling of di_cult scheduling problems (among...... other topics). The _elds also deal with the development of sophisticated solution methods for these mathematical models. This thesis describes the set partitioning model which has been widely used for modelling crew scheduling problems. Integer properties for the set partitioning model are shown...

  9. Modelling an Ammonium Transporter with SCLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Troina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Stochastic Calculus of Looping Sequences (SCLS is a recently proposed modelling language for the representation and simulation of biological systems behaviour. It has been designed with the aim of combining the simplicity of notation of rewrite systems with the advantage of compositionality. It also allows a rather simple and accurate description of biological membranes and their interactions with the environment.In this work we apply SCLS to model a newly discovered ammonium transporter. This transporter is believed to play a fundamental role for plant mineral acquisition, which takes place in the arbuscular mycorrhiza, the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Due to its potential application in agriculture this kind of symbiosis is one of the main focuses of the BioBITs project. In our experiments the passage of NH3 / NH4+ from the fungus to the plant has been dissected in known and hypothetical mechanisms; with the model so far we have been able to simulate the behaviour of the system under different conditions. Our simulations confirmed some of the latest experimental results about the LjAMT2;2 transporter. The initial simulation results of the modelling of the symbiosis process are promising and indicate new directions for biological investigations.

  10. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.; Blankleider, B.

    1993-10-01

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  11. Modeling tritium transport in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A model of tritium transport in the environment near an atmospheric source of tritium is presented in the general context of modeling material cycling in ecosystems. The model was developed to test hypotheses about the process involved in tritium cycling. The temporal and spatial scales of the model were picked to allow comparison to environmental monitoring data collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant. Initial simulations with the model showed good agreement with monitoring data, including atmospheric and vegetation tritium concentrations. The model can also simulate values of tritium in vegetation organic matter if the key parameter distributing the source of organic hydrogen is varied to fit the data. However, because of the lack of independent conformation of the distribution parameter, there is still uncertainty about the role of organic movement of tritium in the food chain, and its effect on the dose to man

  12. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  13. Theoretical modelling of actinide spectra in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilo, Cecile

    2009-01-01

    The framework of this PhD is the interpretation of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion experiments performed on solvated U 4+ , NpO 2 + and PuO 2 2+ , which all have a f 2 configuration. Unexpectedly the two actinyl ions have a much higher relaxivity than U 4+ ,. One possible explanation is that the electronic relaxation rate is faster for Uranium(IV) than for the actinyl ions. We address this problem by exploring the electronic spectrum of the three compounds in gas phase and in solution with a two-step SOCI (Spin-Orbit Configuration-Interaction) method. The influence of electron correlation (treated in the first step) and spin-orbit relaxation effects (considered in the second step) has been discussed thoroughly. Solvent effects have been investigated as well. Another issue that has been questioned is the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for the study of actinide species. This matter has been discussed by comparing its performance to wave-function based correlated methods. The chemical problem chosen was the water exchange in [UO 2 2+ (H 2 O) 5 ]. We looked at the associative and at the dissociative mechanisms using a model with one additional water in the second hydration sphere. The last part of the thesis dealt with the spectroscopy of coordinated Uranyl(V). Absorption spectrum of Uranyl(V) with various ligands has been recorded. The first sharp absorption bands in the Near-Infrared region were assigned to the Uranium centered 5f-5f transitions, but uncertainties remained for the assignment of transitions observed in the Visible region. We computed the spectra of naked UO 2 + and [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 5- to elucidate the spectral changes induced by the carbonate ligands. (author) [fr

  14. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Butler, Adrian P.; Wheater, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I - ) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO 3 - ) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment

  15. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Simon A; Butler, Adrian P; Wheater, Howard S

    2008-04-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I-) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO3-) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment.

  16. User's guide of SWAP Version 2.0; simulation of water flow, solute transport and plant growth in the soil-water-atmosphere-plant environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, J.G.; Dam, van J.C.; Huygen, J.; Vervoort, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This manual describes how the numerical model SWAP version 2.0.9d can be used to simulate vertical transport of water, solutes and heat in variably saturated, cultivated soils. A brief theoretical description is followed by a technical description of model structure and general data flow. An

  17. Modelling sediment clasts transport during landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretier, Sébastien; Martinod, Pierre; Reich, Martin; Godderis, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Over thousands to millions of years, the landscape evolution is predicted by models based on fluxes of eroded, transported and deposited material. The laws describing these fluxes, corresponding to averages over many years, are difficult to prove with the available data. On the other hand, sediment dynamics are often tackled by studying the distribution of certain grain properties in the field (e.g. heavy metals, detrital zircons, 10Be in gravel, magnetic tracers). There is a gap between landscape evolution models based on fluxes and these field data on individual clasts, which prevent the latter from being used to calibrate the former. Here we propose an algorithm coupling the landscape evolution with mobile clasts. Our landscape evolution model predicts local erosion, deposition and transfer fluxes resulting from hillslope and river processes. Clasts of any size are initially spread in the basement and are detached, moved and deposited according to probabilities using these fluxes. Several river and hillslope laws are studied. Although the resulting mean transport rate of the clasts does not depend on the time step or the model cell size, our approach is limited by the fact that their scattering rate is cell-size-dependent. Nevertheless, both their mean transport rate and the shape of the scattering-time curves fit the predictions. Different erosion-transport laws generate different clast movements. These differences show that studying the tracers in the field may provide a way to establish these laws on the hillslopes and in the rivers. Possible applications include the interpretation of cosmogenic nuclides in individual gravel deposits, provenance analyses, placers, sediment coarsening or fining, the relationship between magnetic tracers in rivers and the river planform, and the tracing of weathered sediment.

  18. Turbulence modification and multiphase turbulence transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, D.C.; Kataoka, I.; Serizawa, A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown here that in the derivation of turbulence transport models for multiphase flows, terms naturally appear that can be interpreted as related to turbulence modification of one field by the other. We obtain two such terms, one suggesting turbulence enhancement due to instabilities in two-phase flow, the second one showing turbulence damping due to the presence of the other field, both in gas-particle and gas-liquid cases

  19. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory's site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone 14 C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  20. Fluid transport and ion fluxes in mammalian kidney proximal tubule: a model analysis of isotonic transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E.H.; Møbjerg, N.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2006-01-01

    Aim: By mathematical modelling, we analyse conditions for near-isotonic and isotonic transport by mammalian kidney proximal tubule. Methods: The model comprises compliant lateral intercellular space (lis) and cells, and infinitely large luminal and peritubular compartments with diffusible species...... with luminal and peritubular baths of identical composition. Results: The model of the tubular epithelium with physiological water permeability and paracellular electrical resistance generates solute coupled water uptake with an approx. 3% hypertonic absorbate. This function remains unperturbed following...... simulates major physiological features of proximal tubule, including significantly lower water permeability of the AQP1-null preparation, and a ratio of net sodium uptake and oxygen consumption exceeding that predicted from stoichiometry of the Na+/K+-pump. Physical properties of interspace basement...

  1. Natural analogues and radionuclide transport model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, some possible roles for natural analogues are discussed from the point of view of those involved with the development of mathematical models for radionuclide transport and with the use of these models in repository safety assessments. The characteristic features of a safety assessment are outlined in order to address the questions of where natural analogues can be used to improve our understanding of the processes involved and where they can assist in validating the models that are used. Natural analogues have the potential to provide useful information about some critical processes, especially long-term chemical processes and migration rates. There is likely to be considerable uncertainty and ambiguity associated with the interpretation of natural analogues, and thus it is their general features which should be emphasized, and models with appropriate levels of sophistication should be used. Experience gained in modelling the Koongarra uranium deposit in northern Australia is drawn upon. (author)

  2. Periodic solutions of nonautonomous differential systems modeling obesity population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Abraham J.; Gonzalez-Parra, Gilberto; Jodar, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the periodic behaviour of the solutions of a nonautonomous model for obesity population. The mathematical model represented by a nonautonomous system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is used to model the dynamics of obese populations. Numerical simulations suggest periodic behaviour of subpopulations solutions. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a periodic positive solution are obtained using a continuation theorem based on coincidence degree theory.

  3. Periodic solutions of nonautonomous differential systems modeling obesity population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, Abraham J. [Departamento de Matematicas y Estadistica, Universidad de Cordoba Monteria (Colombia)], E-mail: aarenas@sinu.unicordoba.edu.co; Gonzalez-Parra, Gilberto [Departamento de Calculo, Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: gcarlos@ula.ve; Jodar, Lucas [Instituto de Matematica Multidisciplinar, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia Edificio 8G, 2o, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: ljodar@imm.upv.es

    2009-10-30

    In this paper we study the periodic behaviour of the solutions of a nonautonomous model for obesity population. The mathematical model represented by a nonautonomous system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is used to model the dynamics of obese populations. Numerical simulations suggest periodic behaviour of subpopulations solutions. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a periodic positive solution are obtained using a continuation theorem based on coincidence degree theory.

  4. Simulation of reactive geochemical transport in groundwater using a semi-analytical screening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Walt W.

    1997-10-01

    A reactive geochemical transport model, based on a semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersive transport equation in two dimensions, is developed as a screening tool for evaluating the impact of reactive contaminants on aquifer hydrogeochemistry. Because the model utilizes an analytical solution to the transport equation, it is less computationally intensive than models based on numerical transport schemes, is faster, and it is not subject to numerical dispersion effects. Although the assumptions used to construct the model preclude consideration of reactions between the aqueous and solid phases, thermodynamic mineral saturation indices are calculated to provide qualitative insight into such reactions. Test problems involving acid mine drainage and hydrocarbon biodegradation signatures illustrate the utility of the model in simulating essential hydrogeochemical phenomena.

  5. Land transportation model for supply chain manufacturing industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Fajar

    2017-12-01

    Supply chain is a system that integrates production, inventory, distribution and information processes for increasing productivity and minimize costs. Transportation is an important part of the supply chain system, especially for supporting the material distribution process, work in process products and final products. In fact, Jakarta as the distribution center of manufacturing industries for the industrial area. Transportation system has a large influences on the implementation of supply chain process efficiency. The main problem faced in Jakarta is traffic jam that will affect on the time of distribution. Based on the system dynamic model, there are several scenarios that can provide solutions to minimize timing of distribution that will effect on the cost such as the construction of ports approaching industrial areas other than Tanjung Priok, widening road facilities, development of railways system, and the development of distribution center.

  6. Modelling of Sediment Transport in Beris Fishery Port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Ardani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the large amount of sedimentation and the resultant shoreline advancements at the breakwaters of Beris Fishery Port are studied. A series of numerical modeling of waves, sediment transport, and shoreline changes were conducted to predict the complicated equilibrium shoreline. The outputs show that the nearshore directions of wave components are not perpendicular to the coast which reveals the existence of longshore currents and consequently sediment transport along the bay. Considering the dynamic equilibrium condition of the bay, the effect of the existing sediment resources in the studied area is also investigated. The study also shows that in spite of the change of the diffraction point of Beris Bay after the construction of the fishery port, the bay is approaching its dynamic equilibrium condition, and the shoreline advancement behind secondary breakwater will stop before blocking the entrance of the port. The probable solutions to overcome the sedimentation problem at the main breakwater are also discussed.

  7. Travelling wave solutions to nonlinear physical models by means of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, considerable attention has been given to problem of finding spe- cial types of analytic solutions to understand biological, physical and chemical phenomena modelled by NPDEs. Among the possible solutions, certain solutions may depend only on a single combination of variables such as travelling wave ...

  8. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CPN-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T.

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP N-1 model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied

  9. Numerical solution of the neutron transport equation using cellular neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroushaki, Mehrdad

    2009-01-01

    Various methods have been used for solving the neutron transport equation in the past, and a number of computer codes have been developed based on these solution methods. This paper describes a novel method for the solution of the steady-state and time-dependent neutron transport equation using the duality between neutronic parameters in the method of characteristic (MOC) and the electrical parameters in the cellular neural networks (CNN). The relevant electrical circuit can be simulated by professional electrical circuit simulator software, HSPICE. This software is used for numerical solution of the transport equation only by preparation of appropriate inputs. This method does not need inner and outer iterations, which is a necessary step in the other deterministic methods. One of the main applications of the proposed method may be the development of a new hardware by VLSI technology for online spatio-temporal calculations of the transport equation for nuclear reactor core. The accuracy and capability of this method are examined in a 2D steady-state problem for a BWR fuel assembly, and a 2D time-dependent TWIGL seed/blanket problem

  10. Analytical reconstruction schemes for coarse-mesh spectral nodal solution of slab-geometry SN transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, R. C.; Filho, H. A.; Platt, G. M.; Oliveira, F. B. S.; Militao, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-mesh numerical methods are very efficient in the sense that they generate accurate results in short computational time, as the number of floating point operations generally decrease, as a result of the reduced number of mesh points. On the other hand, they generate numerical solutions that do not give detailed information on the problem solution profile, as the grid points can be located considerably away from each other. In this paper we describe two analytical reconstruction schemes for the coarse-mesh solution generated by the spectral nodal method for neutral particle discrete ordinates (S N ) transport model in slab geometry. The first scheme we describe is based on the analytical reconstruction of the coarse-mesh solution within each discretization cell of the spatial grid set up on the slab. The second scheme is based on the angular reconstruction of the discrete ordinates solution between two contiguous ordinates of the angular quadrature set used in the S N model. Numerical results are given so we can illustrate the accuracy of the two reconstruction schemes, as described in this paper. (authors)

  11. Investigating conceptual models for physical property couplings in solid solution models of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benbow, Steven; Watson, Claire; Savage, David

    2005-11-01

    The long-term behaviour of cementitious engineered barriers is an important process to consider when modelling the migration of radionuclides from a geological repository for nuclear waste. The modelling of cement is complicated by the fact that the cement is dominated by the behaviour of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel which is a complex solid exhibiting incongruent dissolution behaviour. In this report, we have demonstrated the implementation of a solid-solution CSH gel model within a geochemical transport modelling framework using the Raiden computer code to investigate cement/concrete-groundwater interactions. The modelling conducted here shows that it is possible to couple various conceptual models for the evolution of physical properties of concrete with a solid solution model for cement degradation in a fully coupled geochemical transport model to describe the interaction of cement/concrete engineered barriers with groundwater. The results show that changes to the conceptual models and flow rates can give rise to very different evolutions. Most simulations were carried out at a reduced 'experimental' scale rather than full repository scale. The work has shown the possibility to investigate also the changing physical properties of degrading cement. To further develop the model more emphasis is needed on kinetics and the detailed development of a nearly clogged pore space. Modelling of the full repository scale could be another way forward to understand the behaviour of degrading concrete. A general conclusion is that the combined effects of chemical evolution and physical degradation should be analysed in performance assessments of cementitious repositories. Moreover, the project results will be used as one basis in coming reviews of SKB's safety assessments of repositories for spent fuel and low-and intermediate level waste

  12. Investigating conceptual models for physical property couplings in solid solution models of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benbow, Steven; Watson, Claire; Savage, David [Quintesssa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The long-term behaviour of cementitious engineered barriers is an important process to consider when modelling the migration of radionuclides from a geological repository for nuclear waste. The modelling of cement is complicated by the fact that the cement is dominated by the behaviour of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel which is a complex solid exhibiting incongruent dissolution behaviour. In this report, we have demonstrated the implementation of a solid-solution CSH gel model within a geochemical transport modelling framework using the Raiden computer code to investigate cement/concrete-groundwater interactions. The modelling conducted here shows that it is possible to couple various conceptual models for the evolution of physical properties of concrete with a solid solution model for cement degradation in a fully coupled geochemical transport model to describe the interaction of cement/concrete engineered barriers with groundwater. The results show that changes to the conceptual models and flow rates can give rise to very different evolutions. Most simulations were carried out at a reduced 'experimental' scale rather than full repository scale. The work has shown the possibility to investigate also the changing physical properties of degrading cement. To further develop the model more emphasis is needed on kinetics and the detailed development of a nearly clogged pore space. Modelling of the full repository scale could be another way forward to understand the behaviour of degrading concrete. A general conclusion is that the combined effects of chemical evolution and physical degradation should be analysed in performance assessments of cementitious repositories. Moreover, the project results will be used as one basis in coming reviews of SKB's safety assessments of repositories for spent fuel and low-and intermediate level waste.

  13. Modeling VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the VOC permeability had been measured. Permeabilities for five VOCs [methylene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethylene] were measured across a polyethylene bag. Comparison of model and experimental results of VOC concentration as a function of time indicate that model accurately accounts for significant VOC transport mechanisms in a lab-scale waste drum

  14. Water and Solute Transport in Arid Vadose Zones: Innovations in Measurement and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, S W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Gee, Glendon W.; Allison, G B.; Parlange, M. B.; Hopmans, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the physics of flow and transport through the vadose zone has advanced significantly in the last three decades. These advances have been made primarily in humid regions or in irrigated agricultural settings. While some of the techniques are useful, many are not suited to arid regions. The fluxes of water and solutes typically found in arid regions are often orders of magnitude smaller than those found in agricultural settings, while the time scales for transport can be orders of magnitude larger. The depth over which transport must be characterized is also often much greater than in humid regions. Rather than relying on advances in applied tracers, arid-zone researchers have developed natural tracer techniques that are capable of quantifying transport over tens to thousands of years. Techniques have been developed to measure the hydraulic properties of sediments at all water contents, including the very dry range and at far greater depths. As arid and semiarid regions come under increased development pressures for such activities as hazardous- and radioactive-waste disposal, the development of techniques and the understanding of water and solute transport have become crucial components in defining the environmental impacts of activities at the landsurface

  15. Modeling of radon transport in unsaturated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.; Green, R.

    1995-01-01

    This study applies a recently developed model, LEACHV, to simulate transport of radon through unsaturated soil and compares calculated soil radon activities against field-measured values. For volatile and gas phase transport, LEACHV is modified from LEACHP, a pesticide version of LEACHM, as well-documented one-dimensional model for water and chemical movement through unsaturated soil. LEACHV adds consideration of air temperature changes and air flow driven by barometric pressure change to the other soil variables currently used in LEACHP. It applies diurnal barometric pressure and air temperature changes to reflect more accurately the typical field conditions, Sensitivity analysis and simulated results have clearly demonstrated the relative importance of barometric pressure change, rainfall events, changes in water content, gas advection, and radon source term in radon transport process. Comparisons among simulated results illustrated that the importance of barometric pressure change and its pumping phenomenon produces both fluctuation in soil gas radon activities and an elevation of the long-term average radon activity in shallow soils of an equal magnitude to the disturbed source parameter. Comparisons between measured and simulated soil radon activities showed that LEACHV can provide realistic estimates of radon activity concentration in the soil profile. 41 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Modelling of transport processes in porous media for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, M.

    1996-12-31

    Flows in porous media are encountered in many branches of technology. In these phenomena, a fluid of some sort is flowing through porous matrix of a solid medium. Examples of the fluid are water, air, gas and oil. The solid matrix can be soil, fissured rock, ceramics, filter paper, etc. The flow is in many cases accompanied by transfer of heat or solute within the fluid or between the fluid and the surrounding solid matrix. Chemical reactions or microbiological processes may also be taking place in the system. In this thesis, a 3-dimensional computer simulation model THETA for the coupled transport of fluid, heat, and solute in porous media has been developed and applied to various problems in the field of energy research. Although also applicable to porous medium applications in general, the version of the model described and used in this work is intended for studying the transport processes in aquifers, which are geological formations containing groundwater. The model highlights include versatile input and output routines, as well as modularity which, for example, enables an easy adaptation of the model for use as a subroutine in large energy system simulations. Special attention in the model development has been attached to high flow conditions, which may be present in Nordic esker aquifers located close to the ground surface. The simulation model has been written with FORTRAN 77 programming language, enabling a seamless operation both in PC and main frame environments. For PC simulation, a special graphic user interface has been developed. The model has been used with success in a wide variety of applications, ranging from basic thermal analyses to thermal energy storage system evaluations and nuclear waste disposal simulations. The studies have shown that thermal energy storage is feasible also in Nordic high flow aquifers, although at the cost of lower recovery temperature level, usually necessitating the use of heat pumps. In the nuclear waste studies, it

  17. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Approximate solutions of the two-dimensional integral transport equation by collision probability methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    1977-01-01

    A set of approximate solutions for the isotropic two-dimensional neutron transport problem has been developed using the Interface Current formalism. The method has been applied to regular lattices of rectangular cells containing a fuel pin, cladding and water, or homogenized structural material. The cells are divided into zones which are homogeneous. A zone-wise flux expansion is used to formulate a direct collision probability problem within a cell. The coupling of the cells is made by making extra assumptions on the currents entering and leaving the interfaces. Two codes have been written: the first uses a cylindrical cell model and one or three terms for the flux expansion; the second uses a two-dimensional flux representation and does a truly two-dimensional calculation inside each cell. In both codes one or three terms can be used to make a space-independent expansion of the angular fluxes entering and leaving each side of the cell. The accuracies and computing times achieved with the different approximations are illustrated by numerical studies on two benchmark pr

  19. The air transportation hub-and-spoke design problem: comparison between a continuous and a discrete solution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guina Sotomayor Alzamora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hub-and-spoke network design problem, also known as the hub location problem, aims to find the concentration points in a given network flow so that the sum of the distances of the linkages is minimized. In this work, we compare discrete solutions of this problem, given by the branch-and-cut method applied to the p-hub median model, with continuous solutions, given by the hyperbolic smoothing technique applied to a min-sum-min model. Computational experiments for particular instances of the Brazilian air transportation system, with the number of hubs varying from 2 to 8, are conducted with the support of a discretization heuristic and the Voronoi diagram.

  20. A model problem concerning ionic transport in microstructured solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto Sillamoni, Ignacio J.; Idiart, Martín I.

    2015-11-01

    We consider ionic transport by diffusion and migration through microstructured solid electrolytes. The assumed constitutive relations for the constituent phases follow from convex energy and dissipation potentials which guarantee thermodynamic consistency. The effective response is determined by homogenizing the relevant field equations via the notion ofmulti-scale convergence. The resulting homogenized response involves several effective tensors, but they all require the solution of just one standard conductivity problem over the representative volume element. A multi-scale model for semicrystalline polymer electrolytes with spherulitic morphologies is derived by applying the theory to a specific class of two-dimensional microgeometries for which the effective response can be computed exactly. An enriched model accounting for a random dispersion of filler particles with interphases is also derived. In both cases, explicit expressions for the effective material parameters are provided. The models are used to explore the effect of crystallinity and filler content on the overall response. Predictions support recent experimental observations on doped poly-ethylene-oxide systems which suggest that the anisotropic crystalline phase can actually support faster ion transport than the amorphous phase along certain directions dictated by the morphology of the polymeric chains. Predictions also support the viewpoint that ceramic fillers improve ionic conductivity and cation transport number via interphasial effects.

  1. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghini, O., E-mail: meneghini@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 120 Badger Ave, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Luna, C. J. [Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85004 (United States); Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  2. Multi-cut solutions in Chern-Simons matrix models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Kento

    2018-04-01

    We elaborate the Chern-Simons (CS) matrix models at large N. The saddle point equations of these matrix models have a curious structure which cannot be seen in the ordinary one matrix models. Thanks to this structure, an infinite number of multi-cut solutions exist in the CS matrix models. Particularly we exactly derive the two-cut solutions at finite 't Hooft coupling in the pure CS matrix model. In the ABJM matrix model, we argue that some of multi-cut solutions might be interpreted as a condensation of the D2-brane instantons.

  3. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pietribiasi

    Full Text Available The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters.The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio.The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value.The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and fluid balance.

  4. Spatially distributed characterization of hyporheic solute transport during baseflow recession in a headwater mountain stream using electrical geophysical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam S. Ward; Michael N. Gooseff; Michael Fitzgerald; Thomas J. Voltz; Kamini Singha

    2014-01-01

    The transport of solutes along hyporheic flowpaths is recognized as central to numerous biogeochemical cycles, yet our understanding of how this transport changes with baseflow recession, particularly in a spatially distributed manner, is limited. We conducted four steady-state solute tracer injections and collected electrical resistivity data to characterize hyporheic...

  5. A multi scale approximation solution for the time dependent Boltzmann-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2004-03-01

    The basis of all transient simulations for nuclear reactor cores is the reliable calculation of the power production. The local power distribution is generally calculated by solving the space, time, energy and angle dependent neutron transport equation known as Boltzmann equation. The computation of exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation is very time consuming. For practical numerical simulations approximated solutions are usually unavoidable. The objective of this work is development of an effective multi scale approximation solution for the Boltzmann equation. Most of the existing methods are based on separation of space and time. The new suggested method is performed without space-time separation. This effective approximation solution is developed on the basis of an expansion for the time derivative of different approximations to the Boltzmann equation. The method of multiple scale expansion is used for the expansion of the time derivative, because the problem of the stiff time behaviour can't be expressed by standard expansion methods. This multiple scale expansion is used in this work to develop approximation solutions for different approximations of the Boltzmann equation, starting from the expansion of the point kinetics equations. The resulting analytic functions are used for testing the applicability and accuracy of the multiple scale expansion method for an approximation solution with 2 delayed neutron groups. The results are tested versus the exact analytical results for the point kinetics equations. Very good agreement between both solutions is obtained. The validity of the solution with 2 delayed neutron groups to approximate the behaviour of the system with 6 delayed neutron groups is demonstrated in an additional analysis. A strategy for a solution with 4 delayed neutron groups is described. A multiple scale expansion is performed for the space-time dependent diffusion equation for one homogenized cell with 2 delayed neutron groups. The result is

  6. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  7. Note on the Solution of Transport Equation by Tau Method and Walsh Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahab Kadem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the combined Walsh function for the three-dimensional case. A method for the solution of the neutron transport equation in three-dimensional case by using the Walsh function, Chebyshev polynomials, and the Legendre polynomials are considered. We also present Tau method, and it was proved that it is a good approximate to exact solutions. This method is based on expansion of the angular flux in a truncated series of Walsh function in the angular variable. The main characteristic of this technique is that it reduces the problems to those of solving a system of algebraic equations; thus, it is greatly simplifying the problem.

  8. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  9. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing, 100085 (China); Luo Wensui [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  10. Effect of pore water velocities and solute input methods on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns of Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, BeiBei; Wang, QuanJiu

    2017-09-01

    Studies on solute transport under different pore water velocity and solute input methods in undisturbed soil could play instructive roles for crop production. Based on the experiments in the laboratory, the effect of solute input methods with small pulse input and large pulse input, as well as four pore water velocities, on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns obtained from the Loess Plateau under controlled condition was studied. Chloride breakthrough curves (BTCs) were generated using the miscible displacement method under water-saturated, steady flow conditions. Using the 0.15 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution as a tracer, a small pulse (0.1 pore volumes) was first induced, and then, after all the solution was wash off, a large pulse (0.5 pore volumes) was conducted. The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R) were used to describe the BTCs, and their prediction accuracies and fitted parameters were compared as well. All the BTCs obtained for the different input methods and the four pore water velocities were all smooth. However, the shapes of the BTCs varied greatly; small pulse inputs resulted in more rapid attainment of peak values that appeared earlier with increases in pore water velocity, whereas large pulse inputs resulted in an opposite trend. Both models could fit the experimental data well, but the prediction accuracy of the T-R was better. The values of the dispersivity, λ, calculated from the dispersion coefficient obtained from the CDE were about one order of magnitude larger than those calculated from the dispersion coefficient given by the T-R, but the calculated Peclet number, Pe, was lower. The mobile-immobile partition coefficient, β, decreased, while the mass exchange coefficient increased with increases in pore water velocity.

  11. Modeling Phosphorus Transport and Cycling in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. I.; Grace, K. A.; Jawitz, J. W.; Muller, S.; Munoz-Carpena, R.; Flaig, E. G.

    2005-12-01

    A solute transport model was used to predict phosphorus mobility in the northern Everglades. Over the past several decades, agricultural drainage waters discharged into the northern Everglades, have been enriched in phosphorus (P) relative to the historic rainfall-driven inputs. While methods of reducing total P concentrations in the discharge water have been actively pursued through implementation of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs), a major parallel effort has focused on the construction of a network of constructed wetlands for P removal before these waters enter the Everglades. This study describes the development of a water quality model for P transport and cycling and its application to a large constructed wetland: Stormwater Treatment Area 1 West (STA 1W), located southeast of Lake Okeechobee on the eastern perimeter of the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). In STA 1W agricultural nutrients such as phosphorus (P) are removed from EAA runoff before entering the adjacent Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) and the Everglades. STA 1W is divided by levees into 4 cells, which are flooded for most of the year; thus the dominant mechanism for flow and transport is overland flow. P is removed either through deposition into sediments or is taken up by plants; in either case the soils end up being significantly enriched in P. The model has been applied and calibrated to several years of water quality data from Cell 4 within STA 1W. Most existing P models have been applied to agricultural/upland systems, with only a few relevant to treatment wetlands such as STA 1W. To ensure sufficient flexibility in selecting appropriate system components and reactions, the model has been designed to incorporate a wide range of user-selectable mechanisms for P uptake and release parameters between soils and inflowing water. The model can track a large number of mobile and nonmobile components and utilizes a Godunov-style operator-splitting technique for the transported

  12. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  13. A new Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element simulator for solute transport in discrete fracture-matrix systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Karasaki, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1996-07-01

    Fracture network simulators have extensively been used in the past for obtaining a better understanding of flow and transport processes in fractured rock. However, most of these models do not account for fluid or solute exchange between the fractures and the porous matrix, although diffusion into the matrix pores can have a major impact on the spreading of contaminants. In the present paper a new finite element code TRIPOLY is introduced which combines a powerful fracture network simulator with an efficient method to account for the diffusive interaction between the fractures and the adjacent matrix blocks. The fracture network simulator used in TRIPOLY features a mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian solution scheme for the transport in fractures, combined with an adaptive gridding technique to account for sharp concentration fronts. The fracture-matrix interaction is calculated with an efficient method which has been successfully used in the past for dual-porosity models. Discrete fractures and matrix blocks are treated as two different systems, and the interaction is modeled by introducing sink/source terms in both systems. It is assumed that diffusive transport in the matrix can be approximated as a one-dimensional process, perpendicular to the adjacent fracture surfaces. A direct solution scheme is employed to solve the coupled fracture and matrix equations. The newly developed combination of the fracture network simulator and the fracture-matrix interaction module allows for detailed studies of spreading processes in fractured porous rock. The authors present a sample application which demonstrate the codes ability of handling large-scale fracture-matrix systems comprising individual fractures and matrix blocks of arbitrary size and shape.

  14. Chain segmentation for the Monte Carlo solution of particle transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.

    1984-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is proposed where the random walk chains generated in particle transport simulations are segmented. Forward and adjoint-mode estimators are then used in conjunction with the firstevent source density on the segmented chains to obtain multiple estimates of the individual terms of the Neumann series solution at each collision point. The solution is then constructed by summation of the series. The approach is compared to the exact analytical and to the Monte Carlo nonabsorption weighting method results for two representative slowing down and deep penetration problems. Application of the proposed approach leads to unbiased estimates for limited numbers of particle simulations and is useful in suppressing an effective bias problem observed in some cases of deep penetration particle transport problems

  15. Three-dimensional transport theory: An analytical solution of an internal beam searchlight problem-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a number of methods for obtaining analytical solutions and numerical results for three-dimensional one-speed neutron transport problems in a half-space containing a variety of source shapes which emit neutrons mono-directionally. For example, we consider an off-centre point source, a ring source and a disk source, or any combination of these, and calculate the surface scalar flux as a function of the radial and angular co-ordinates. Fourier transforms in the transverse directions are used and a Laplace transform in the axial direction. This enables the Wiener-Hopf method to be employed, followed by an inverse Fourier-Hankel transform. Some additional transformations are introduced which enable the inverse Hankel transforms involving Bessel functions to be evaluated numerically more efficiently. A hybrid diffusion theory method is also described which is shown to be a useful guide to the general behaviour of the solutions of the transport equation.

  16. Solution of stochastic media transport problems using a numerical quadrature-based method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, S. D.; Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.; Olson, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new conceptual framework for analyzing transport problems in random media. We decompose such problems into stratified subproblems according to the number of material pseudo-interfaces within realizations. For a given subproblem we assign pseudo-interface locations in each realization according to product quadrature rules, which allows us to deterministically generate a fixed number of realizations. Quadrature integration of the solutions of these realizations thus approximately solves each subproblem; the weighted superposition of solutions of the subproblems approximately solves the general stochastic media transport problem. We revisit some benchmark problems to determine the accuracy and efficiency of this approach in comparison to randomly generated realizations. We find that this method is very accurate and fast when the number of pseudo-interfaces in a problem is generally low, but that these advantages quickly degrade as the number of pseudo-interfaces increases. (authors)

  17. Compilation of field-scale caisson data on solute transport in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Fuentes, H.R.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1986-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted technical support studies to assess siting requirements mandated by Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 10 CFR Part 61. Field-scale transport studies were conducted under unsaturated moisture conditions and under steady and unsteady flow conditions in large caissons located and operated in a natural (field) environment. Moisture content, temperature, flow rate, base-line chemical, tracer influent, and tracer breakthrough data collected during tracer migration studies in the caisson are compiled in tables and graphs. Data suggest that the imposition of a period of drainage (influent solution flow was stopped) may cause an increase in tracer concentration in the soil solution at various sampling points in the caisson. Evaporation during drainage and diffusion of the tracers from immobile to mobile water are two phenomena that could explain the increase. Data also suggest that heterogeneity of sorption sites may increase the variability in transport of sorbing tracers compared with nonsorbing tracers

  18. Presentation of some methods for the solution of the monoenergetic neutrons transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle G, E. del.

    1978-01-01

    The neutrons transport theory problems whose solution has been reached were collected in order to show that the transport equation is so complicated that different techniques were developed so as to give approximative numerical solutions to problems concerning the practical application. Such a technique, which had not been investigated in the literature dealing with these problems, is described here. The results which were obtained through this technique in undimensional problems of criticity are satisfactory and speaking in a conceptual way this method is extremely simple because it times. There is no limitation to deal with problems related neutrons sources with an arbitrary distribution and in principle the application of this technique can be extended to unhomogeneous environments. (author)

  19. A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass tra