WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling small movements

  1. Evaluation model of reinforcement structures of Small mass movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Antonio Piazza

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass movements can be the result of elevated precipitation events and inadequate policies of land use. This study aims at diagnosing the performance of a hillside stabilization structure that suffered a landslide in the meteorological event at the Itajaí Valley in 2008, and to propose a simple method for evaluating reinforcement structures of small mass movement. The study area is located at BR–470 – km 45, near to the city limit of Gaspar and Blumenau, in Santa Catarina, South Brazil. Tests were performed to determine the infiltration rate and soil moisture, as well as a survey of the floristic composition and slope. The mass movement still takes place and the stabilization structure is compromised. The use of gabion wall and other geotechnical techniques for environmental recovery were insufficient to provide the hillside stabilization. To a greater efficiency we suggest: slope reduction; soil compaction; suitable planting species (ecologic succession; and implementation of a comprehensive drainage system.

  2. Application of a multistate model to estimate culvert effects on movement of small fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, J.R.; Hagler, M.M.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely acknowledged that culverted road-stream crossings may impede fish passage, effects of culverts on movement of nongame and small-bodied fishes have not been extensively studied and studies generally have not accounted for spatial variation in capture probabilities. We estimated probabilities for upstream and downstream movement of small (30-120 mm standard length) benthic and water column fishes across stream reaches with and without culverts at four road-stream crossings over a 4-6-week period. Movement and reach-specific capture probabilities were estimated using multistate capture-recapture models. Although none of the culverts were complete barriers to passage, only a bottomless-box culvert appeared to permit unrestricted upstream and downstream movements by benthic fishes based on model estimates of movement probabilities. At two box culverts that were perched above the water surface at base flow, observed movements were limited to water column fishes and to intervals when runoff from storm events raised water levels above the perched level. Only a single fish was observed to move through a partially embedded pipe culvert. Estimates for probabilities of movement over distances equal to at least the length of one culvert were low (e.g., generally ???0.03, estimated for 1-2-week intervals) and had wide 95% confidence intervals as a consequence of few observed movements to nonadjacent reaches. Estimates of capture probabilities varied among reaches by a factor of 2 to over 10, illustrating the importance of accounting for spatially variable capture rates when estimating movement probabilities with capture-recapture data. Longer-term studies are needed to evaluate temporal variability in stream fish passage at culverts (e.g., in relation to streamflow variability) and to thereby better quantify the degree of population fragmentation caused by road-stream crossings with culverts. ?? American Fisheries Society 2009.

  3. Comparison of Uncalibrated Model-free Visual Servoing Methods for Small-amplitude Movements: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Musić

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares the performance of several methods used for the estimation of an image Jacobian matrix in uncalibrated model-free visual servoing. This was achieved for an eye-in-hand configuration with small-amplitude movements with several sets of system parameters. The tested methods included the Broyden algorithm, Kalman and particle filters as well as the recently proposed population-based algorithm. The algorithms were tested in a simulation environment (Peter Corke’s Robotic Toolbox for MATLAB on a PUMA 560 robot. Several application scenarios were considered, including static point and dynamic trajectory tracking, with several characteristic shapes and three different speeds. Based on the obtained results, conclusions were drawn about the strengths and weaknesses of each method both for a particular setup and in general. Algorithm-switching was introduced and explored, since it might be expected to improve overall robot tracking performance with respect to the desired trajectory. Finally, possible future research directions are suggested.

  4. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  5. Road crossings as barriers to small-stream fish movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin L. Warren; Mitzi G. Pardew

    1998-01-01

    The authors used mark-recapture techniques to examine the effects of four types of road crossings on fish movement during spring base flows and summer low flows in small streams of the Ouachita Mountains, west-central Arkansas. The authors assessed movement for 21 fish species in seven families through culvert, slab, open-box, and ford crossings and through natural...

  6. Analysis of Small Muscle Movement Effects on EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Lieutenant, TuAF AFIT- ENG -MS-16-D-051 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air...AFIT- ENG -MS-16-D-051 ANALYSIS OF SMALL MUSCLE MOVEMENT EFFECTS ON EEG SIGNALS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of...First Lieutenant, TuAF December 2016 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT- ENG -MS-16-D-051

  7. Rapid Detection of Small Movements with GNSS Doppler Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinn, Roland; Geiger, Alain

    2017-04-01

    High-alpine terrain reacts very sensitively to varying environmental conditions. As an example, increasing temperatures cause thawing of permafrost areas. This, in turn causes an increasing threat by natural hazards like debris flow (e.g. rock glaciers) or rockfalls. The Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry is contributing to alpine mass-movement monitoring systems in different project areas in the Swiss Alps. A main focus lies on providing geodetic mass-movement information derived from GNSS static solutions on a daily and a sub-daily basis, obtained with low-cost and autonomous GNSS stations. Another focus is set on rapidly providing reliable geodetic information in real-time i.e. for an integration in early warning systems. One way to achieve this is the estimation of accurate station velocities from observations of range rates, which can be obtained as Doppler observables from time derivatives of carrier phase measurements. The key for this method lies in a precise modeling of prominent effects contributing to the observed range rates, which are satellite velocity, atmospheric delay rates and relativistic effects. A suitable observation model is then devised, which accounts for these predictions. The observation model, combined with a simple kinematic movement model forms the basis for the parameter estimation. Based on the estimated station velocities, movements are then detected using a statistical test. To improve the reliablity of the estimated parameters, another spotlight is set on an on-line quality control procedure. We will present the basic algorithms as well as results from first tests which were carried out with a low-cost GPS L1 phase receiver. With a u-blox module and a sampling rate of 5 Hz, accuracies on the mm/s level can be obtained and velocities down to 1 cm/s can be detected. Reliable and accurate station velocities and movement information can be provided within seconds.

  8. SMALL SCALE MORPHODYNAMICAL MODELLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Ditschke; O. Gothel; H. Weilbeer

    2001-01-01

    Long term morphological simulations using complete coupled models lead to very time consuming computations. Latteux (1995) presented modelling techniques developed for tidal current situations in order to reduce the computational effort. In this paper the applicability of such methods to small scale problems is investigated. It is pointed out that these methods can be transferred to small scale problems using the periodicity of the vortex shedding process.

  9. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly.

  10. An empirical movement model for sixgill sharks in Puget Sound: Combining observed and unobserved behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Phillip S. LEVIN, Peter HORNE, Kelly S. ANDREWS, Greg WILLIAMS

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the movement of animals is fundamental to population and community ecology. Historically, it has been difficult to quantify movement patterns of most fishes, but technological advances in acoustic telemetry have increased our abilities to monitor their movement. In this study, we combined small-scale active acoustic tracking with large-scale passive acoustic monitoring to develop an empirical movement model for sixgill sharks in Puget Sound, WA, USA. We began by testing whether ...

  11. Model for bidirectional movement of cytoplasmic dynein

    CERN Document Server

    Sumathy, S

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein exhibits a directional processive movement on microtubule filaments and is known to move in steps of varying length based on the number of ATP molecules bound to it and the load that it carries. It is experimentally observed that dynein takes occasional backward steps and the frequency of such backward steps increases as the load approaches the stall force. Using a stochastic process model, we investigate the bidirectional movement of single head of a dynein motor. The probability for backward step is implemented based on Crook's fluctuation theorem of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We find that the movement of dynein motor is characterized with negative velocity implying backward motion beyond stall force. We observe that the motor moves backward for super stall forces by hydrolyzing the ATP exactly the same way as it does while moving forward for sub stall forces.

  12. Physics Models of Pronuclear Movements in Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on published experimental data, Newton's laws, and Coulomb's law, we investigate natural and normal pronuclear movements in wild types of eggs and develop physics models to fit the experimental data quantitatively. The difference between our modeling calculated results and the experimental data is less than 20%. Our models explain why and how pronuclei move in even or in variant velocities. We hypothesize: During the migration, positively charged asters (or self assembled microtubules drive two negatively charged sperm and egg pronuclei to move towards each other. The driving force comes from a spontaneous and strong Electromagnetic Field (EMF. Hamilton's principle determines the path of these movements. A natural and normal EMF inside or around the pronuclei can be alternated environmentally. An abnormal EMF could induce aberrant embryos that cause life disease. We believe our models are helpful to further understand the mechanism of fertilization and have potential clinical value to prevent aberrant embryos that induce human life disease.

  13. Agent Based Model of Livestock Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, D. J.; Emelyanova, I. V.; Donald, G. E.; Garner, G. M.

    The modelling of livestock movements within Australia is of national importance for the purposes of the management and control of exotic disease spread, infrastructure development and the economic forecasting of livestock markets. In this paper an agent based model for the forecasting of livestock movements is presented. This models livestock movements from farm to farm through a saleyard. The decision of farmers to sell or buy cattle is often complex and involves many factors such as climate forecast, commodity prices, the type of farm enterprise, the number of animals available and associated off-shore effects. In this model the farm agent's intelligence is implemented using a fuzzy decision tree that utilises two of these factors. These two factors are the livestock price fetched at the last sale and the number of stock on the farm. On each iteration of the model farms choose either to buy, sell or abstain from the market thus creating an artificial supply and demand. The buyers and sellers then congregate at the saleyard where livestock are auctioned using a second price sealed bid. The price time series output by the model exhibits properties similar to those found in real livestock markets.

  14. Peristaltic transport of a generalized Burgers’ fluid: Application to the movement of chyme in small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Pandey, S. K.; Das, S.

    2011-07-01

    The present investigation deals with the peristaltic transport of generalized Burgers' fluid with fractional element model in a channel. The analysis is carried out under long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. An efficient mathematical tool, namely, Adomian decomposition method, is used to obtain the analytical approximate solutions of the fractional differential equation. The channel is governed by the propagation of sinusoidal waves that help the walls contract and relax but not expand beyond the natural boundary. The expressions of axial velocity, volume flow rate and pressure gradient are obtained. The effects of the fractional parameters and the material constants are discussed on pressure difference and the friction force across one wavelength. The comparative studies for various models of viscoelastic fluids such as fractional generalized Burgers' model, generalized Burgers' model, fractional Burgers' model and Burgers' model are performed. It is inferred that the movement of viscoelastic chyme with generalized Burgers' model through the small intestine is favorable in comparison to the movement of viscoelastic chyme with fractional generalized Burgers' model.

  15. Ordinary and Extraordinary Movement Behaviour of Small Resident Fish within a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneko Aspillaga

    Full Text Available It is important to account for the movement behaviour of fishes when designing effective marine protected areas (MPAs. Fish movements occur across different spatial and temporal scales and understanding the variety of movements is essential to make correct management decisions. This study describes in detail the movement patterns of an economically and commercially important species, Diplodus sargus, within a well-enforced Mediterranean MPA. We monitored horizontal and vertical movements of 41 adult individuals using passive acoustic telemetry for up to one year. We applied novel analysis and visualization techniques to get a comprehensive view of a wide range of movements. D. sargus individuals were highly territorial, moving within small home ranges ( 50 m, where they aggregated to spawn. This study advances our understanding about the functioning of an established MPA and provides important insights into the biology and management of a small sedentary species, suggesting the relevance of rare but important fish behaviours.

  16. Forward models and state estimation in compensatory eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Frens (Maarten); O. Donchin (Opher)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe compensatory eye movement (CEM) system maintains a stable retinal image, integrating information from different sensory modalities to compensate for head movements. Inspired by recent models of the physiology of limb movements, we suggest that CEM can be modeled as a control system w

  17. Forward models and state estimation in compensatory eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Frens (Maarten); O. Donchin (Opher)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe compensatory eye movement (CEM) system maintains a stable retinal image, integrating information from different sensory modalities to compensate for head movements. Inspired by recent models of the physiology of limb movements, we suggest that CEM can be modeled as a control system

  18. An empirical movement model for sixgill sharks in Puget Sound: Combining observed and unobserved behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip S. LEVIN; Peter HORNE; Kelly S. ANDREWS; Greg WILLIAMS

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the movement of animals is fundamental to population and community ecology.Historically,it has been difficult to quantify movement patterns of most fishes,but technological advances in acoustic telemetry have increased our abilities to monitor their movement.In this study,we combined small-scale active acoustic tracking with large-scale passive acoustic monitoring to develop an empirical movement model for sixgill sharks in Puget Sound,WA,USA.We began by testing whether a correlated random walk model described the daily movement of sixgills; however,the model failed to capture home-ranging behavior.We added this behavior and used the resultant model (a biased random walk model) to determine whether daily movement patterns are able to explain large-scale seasonal movement.The daily model did not explain the larger-scale patterns of movement observed in the passive monitoring data.In order to create the large-scale patterns,sixgills must have performed behaviors (large,fast directed movements) that were unobserved during small-scale active tracking.In addition,seasonal shifts in location were not captured by the daily model.We added these ‘unobserved' behaviors to the model and were able to capture large-scale seasonal movement of sixgill sharks over 150 days.The development of empirical models of movement allows researchers to develop hypotheses and test mechanisms responsible for a species movement behavior and spatial distribution.This knowledge will increase our ability to successfully manage species of concern [Current Zoology 58 (1):103-115,2012].

  19. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  20. Hidden Markov models: the best models for forager movements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Joo

    Full Text Available One major challenge in the emerging field of movement ecology is the inference of behavioural modes from movement patterns. This has been mainly addressed through Hidden Markov models (HMMs. We propose here to evaluate two sets of alternative and state-of-the-art modelling approaches. First, we consider hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs. They may better represent the behavioural dynamics of foragers since they explicitly model the duration of the behavioural modes. Second, we consider discriminative models which state the inference of behavioural modes as a classification issue, and may take better advantage of multivariate and non linear combinations of movement pattern descriptors. For this work, we use a dataset of >200 trips from human foragers, Peruvian fishermen targeting anchovy. Their movements were recorded through a Vessel Monitoring System (∼1 record per hour, while their behavioural modes (fishing, searching and cruising were reported by on-board observers. We compare the efficiency of hidden Markov, hidden semi-Markov, and three discriminative models (random forests, artificial neural networks and support vector machines for inferring the fishermen behavioural modes, using a cross-validation procedure. HSMMs show the highest accuracy (80%, significantly outperforming HMMs and discriminative models. Simulations show that data with higher temporal resolution, HSMMs reach nearly 100% of accuracy. Our results demonstrate to what extent the sequential nature of movement is critical for accurately inferring behavioural modes from a trajectory and we strongly recommend the use of HSMMs for such purpose. In addition, this work opens perspectives on the use of hybrid HSMM-discriminative models, where a discriminative setting for the observation process of HSMMs could greatly improve inference performance.

  1. Footballers' movement behaviour during 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-a-side small-sided games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguiar, Marco; Goncalves, Bruno; Botelho, Goreti; Lemmink, Koen; Sampaio, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare footballers' movement behaviour during 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-a-side small-sided games. Ten young professional players (age=18.0 +/- 0.67years) participated in 3 bouts of each small-sided games for 6min with 1min of active rest between bouts. Positional data were colle

  2. A Brownian Bridge Movement Model to Track Mobile Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    BRIDGE MOVEMENT MODEL TO TRACK MOBILE TARGETS by Chun Chieh Cheng September 2016 Thesis Advisor: Dashi I. Singham Second Reader: Michael P...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A BROWNIAN BRIDGE MOVEMENT MODEL TO TRACK MOBILE TARGETS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. A BROWNIAN BRIDGE MOVEMENT MODEL TO TRACK MOBILE TARGETS Chun Chieh Cheng Major

  3. An Improved Walk Model for Train Movement on Railway Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; MAO Bo-Hua; GAO Zi-You

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved walk model for simulating the train movement on railway network. In the proposed method, walkers represent trains. The improved walk model is a kind of the network-based simulation analysis model. Using some management rules for walker movement, walker can dynamically determine its departure and arrival times at stations. In order to test the proposed method, we simulate the train movement on a part of railway network. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the improved model is an effective tool for simulating the train movement on railway network. Moreover, it can well capture the characteristic behaviors of train scheduling in railway traffic.

  4. Hierarchical animal movement models for population-level inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, Mevin B.; Buderman, Frances E.; Brost, Brian M.; Hanks, Ephraim M.; Ivans, Jacob S.

    2016-01-01

    New methods for modeling animal movement based on telemetry data are developed regularly. With advances in telemetry capabilities, animal movement models are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Despite a need for population-level inference, animal movement models are still predominantly developed for individual-level inference. Most efforts to upscale the inference to the population level are either post hoc or complicated enough that only the developer can implement the model. Hierarchical Bayesian models provide an ideal platform for the development of population-level animal movement models but can be challenging to fit due to computational limitations or extensive tuning required. We propose a two-stage procedure for fitting hierarchical animal movement models to telemetry data. The two-stage approach is statistically rigorous and allows one to fit individual-level movement models separately, then resample them using a secondary MCMC algorithm. The primary advantages of the two-stage approach are that the first stage is easily parallelizable and the second stage is completely unsupervised, allowing for an automated fitting procedure in many cases. We demonstrate the two-stage procedure with two applications of animal movement models. The first application involves a spatial point process approach to modeling telemetry data, and the second involves a more complicated continuous-time discrete-space animal movement model. We fit these models to simulated data and real telemetry data arising from a population of monitored Canada lynx in Colorado, USA.

  5. Modelling active antennal movements of the American cockroach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pequeno-Zurro, Alejandro; Nitschke, Jahn; Szyszka, Paul

    2017-01-01

    and the spatial properties of encountered odorant concentrations. Video recordings reveal that the animal’s antennae exhibit systematic movements in the presence of behaviourally relevant odorants. We hypothesise a dynamic coupling between the left and right antenna modulated by odour stimulation. To test this we......, coupled Hopf oscillator to model antennal movements in response to odorant concentration, using this map for sensory drive signals for the model. We present simulation results of antennal movements in response to odorant concentrations....

  6. CONTROLLING SMALL MOVEMENTS OF ULTRA PRECISE DC ELECTRIC DRIVE WITH ELASTIC SHAFTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrobaba Y. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Control of the movement and positioning are the most intensive tasks of automatic control and regulation. However, these problems must be solved in the automation objects such as assembly and production lines, manufacturing machines, conveyors, hoisting machines, packaging machines, filling lines for liquids, metal-working machines. One problem lies in the fact that all the real drives are connected to the actuators with not perfectly tough shafting, but has some elasticity. This leads to the difficulty of motion of the executive body of the drive automatic control systems which consists of signal source generating signal due optimum speed diagrams for small movements of electric drive’s actuating device and automatic regulation system, which allows to work out optimum speed diagrams for small movements of electric drive’s actuating device with ultra-precision. In this article were developed optimum speed diagram for small movements of ultra-precise electric drive with elastic shafting. Were have identified all parameters of diagrams and its range of existence and also developed a device for generating the optimum speed diagram for small movements of ultra-precise electric drive with elastic shafting. The implementation of the proposed hardware software complex will significantly improve the accuracy of motion actuators of various ultra- precise DC drives

  7. Coarse-scale movement patterns of a small-bodied fish inhabiting a desert stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzul, M.C.; Quist, M.C.; Dinsmore, S.J.; Gaines, D.B.; Bower, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Located on the floor of Death Valley (CA, USA), Salt Creek harbors a single fish species, the Salt Creek pupfish, Cyprinodon salinus salinus, which has adapted to this extremely harsh environment. Salt Creek is fed by an underground spring and is comprised of numerous pools, runs, and marshes that exhibit substantial variability in temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentrations. In addition, the wetted area of Salt Creek is reduced throughout the summer months due to high rates of evaporation, with some reaches drying completely. Therefore, it seems logical that short- and long-term movement patterns may play an important role in Salt Creek pupfish population dynamics. The objective of this study was to describe coarse-scale movements of Salt Creek pupfish in Salt Creek during their breeding season from March to May. Sex ratios and length–frequency distributions varied spatially within Salt Creek, suggesting population segregation during the breeding season. Long-distance movements were generally rare, although two fish moved more than 1.2 km. Movement in upstream reaches was rare or absent, in contrast to the greater movement observed in downstream reaches (29% of recaptures). Temporal trends and demographic patterns in movement were not observed. Because the two most downstream habitats dry up in the summer, our results indicate that coarse-scale movements that re-populate downstream reaches likely occur during other times of year. Consequently, the importance of small- and large-scale movements is influenced by season. Further assessment of Salt Creek movement patterns conducted during other times of year may better illuminate long-distance movement patterns and source-sink dynamics.

  8. Ordinary and Extraordinary Movement Behaviour of Small Resident Fish within a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspillaga, Eneko; Bartumeus, Frederic; Linares, Cristina; Starr, Richard M; López-Sanz, Àngel; Díaz, David; Zabala, Mikel; Hereu, Bernat

    2016-01-01

    It is important to account for the movement behaviour of fishes when designing effective marine protected areas (MPAs). Fish movements occur across different spatial and temporal scales and understanding the variety of movements is essential to make correct management decisions. This study describes in detail the movement patterns of an economically and commercially important species, Diplodus sargus, within a well-enforced Mediterranean MPA. We monitored horizontal and vertical movements of 41 adult individuals using passive acoustic telemetry for up to one year. We applied novel analysis and visualization techniques to get a comprehensive view of a wide range of movements. D. sargus individuals were highly territorial, moving within small home ranges (sargus presented a sheltering behaviour, moving to more protected places to avoid the disturbance. Second, during the spawning season they made excursions to deep areas (> 50 m), where they aggregated to spawn. This study advances our understanding about the functioning of an established MPA and provides important insights into the biology and management of a small sedentary species, suggesting the relevance of rare but important fish behaviours.

  9. Demand and routing models for urban goods movement simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Polimeni, Antonio; Russo, Francesco; Vitetta, Antonino

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a macro-architecture for simulating goods movements in an urban area. Urban goods supply is analysed when the retailer is the decision-maker and chooses to supply his/her shop. Two components are considered: demand in terms of goods supply and vehicle routing with constraints to simulate goods movements. To analyse demand we consider a multi-step model, while to analyse goods movements a Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW) is formalized. We exa...

  10. Chicago's Renaissance 2010: The Small Schools Movement Meets the Ownership Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, William; Klonsky, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Would-be reformers need to beware of those who would co-opt the language of reform to undermine its ideals. Mr. Ayers and Mr. Klonsky examine how Chicago's Renaissance 2010 initiative has used the terms of the small schools movement to promote privatization and the erosion of public space. (Contains 5 endnotes.)

  11. Energy-optimal control model for train movements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Gao Zi-You; Mao Bao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new cellular automaton (CA) model for train movement simulations under mixed traffic conditions. A kind of control strategy is employed for trains to reduce energy consumption. In the proposed CA model, the driver controls the train movements by using some updated rules. In order to obtain a good insight into the evolution behaviours of the rail traffic flow, we investigate the space-time diagram of the rail traffic flow and the trajectories of the train movements. The numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CA model can well describe the dynamic behaviours of the train movements. Some complex phenomena of train movements can be reproduced, such as the train delay propagations, etc.

  12. MODELLING SYNERGISTIC EYE MOVEMENTS IN THE VISUAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARITZ Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Some theoretical and practical considerations about eye movements in visual field are presented in the first part of this paper. These movements are developed into human body to be synergistic and are allowed to obtain the visual perception in 3D space. The theoretical background of the eye movements’ analysis is founded on the establishment of movement equations of the eyeball, as they consider it a solid body with a fixed point. The exterior actions, the order and execution of the movements are ensured by the neural and muscular external system and thus the position, stability and movements of the eye can be quantified through the method of reverse kinematic. The purpose of these researches is the development of a simulation model of human binocular visual system, an acquisition methodology and an experimental setup for data processing and recording regarding the eye movements, presented in the second part of the paper. The modeling system of ocular movements aims to establish the binocular synergy and limits of visual field changes in condition of ocular motor dysfunctions. By biomechanical movements of eyeball is established a modeling strategy for different sort of processes parameters like convergence, fixation and eye lens accommodation to obtain responses from binocular balance. The results of modelling processes and the positions of eye ball and axis in visual field are presented in the final part of the paper.

  13. Modeling Interactions in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, David R.

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of interaction within small groups posits that group members initiate actions when tension mounts between the affective meanings of their situational identities and impressions produced by recent events. Actors choose partners and behaviors so as to reduce the tensions. A computer model based on this theory, incorporating reciprocal…

  14. Ferns, mosses and liverworts as model systems for light-mediated chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-11-17

    Light-induced chloroplast movement is found in most plant species, including algae and land plants. In land plants with multiple small chloroplasts, under weak light conditions, the chloroplasts move towards the light and accumulate on the periclinal cell walls to efficiently perceive light for photosynthesis (the accumulation response). Under strong light conditions, chloroplasts escape from light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In most plant species, blue light induces chloroplast movement, and phototropin receptor kinases are the blue light receptors. Molecular mechanisms for photoreceptors, signal transduction and chloroplast motility systems are being studied using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, to further understand the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary history of chloroplast movement in green plants, analyses using other plant systems are required. Here, we review recent works on chloroplast movement in green algae, liverwort, mosses and ferns that provide new insights on chloroplast movement.

  15. Using sutures to attach miniature tracking tags to small bats for multimonth movement and behavioral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Kevin T.; Weller, Theodore J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Hein, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    1. Determining the detailed movements of individual animals often requires them to carry tracking devices, but tracking broad-scale movement of small bats (bat dispersal and migration, particularly in the context of emerging conservation issues like fatalities at wind turbines and diseases. 2. We tested a novel method of attaching lightweight global positioning system (GPS) tags and geolocating data loggers to small bats. We used monofilament, synthetic, absorbable sutures to secure GPS tags and data loggers to the skin of anesthetized big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in Colorado and hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) in California. 3. GPS tags and data loggers were sutured to 17 bats in this study. Three tagged bats were recaptured seven months after initial deployment, with tags still attached; none of these bats showed ill effects from the tag. No severe injuries were apparent upon recapture of 6 additional bats that carried tags up to 26 days after attachment, however one of the bats exhibited skin chafing. 4. Use of absorbable sutures to affix small tracking devices seems to be a safe, effective method for studying movements of bats over multiple months, although additional testing is warranted. This new attachment method has the potential to quickly advance our understanding of small bats, particularly as more-sophisticated miniature tracking devices (e.g., satellite tags) become available.

  16. Social network models predict movement and connectivity in ecological landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Robert J.; Acevedo, M.A.; Reichert, Brian E.; Pias, Kyle E.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis is on the rise across scientific disciplines because of its ability to reveal complex, and often emergent, patterns and dynamics. Nonetheless, a growing concern in network analysis is the use of limited data for constructing networks. This concern is strikingly relevant to ecology and conservation biology, where network analysis is used to infer connectivity across landscapes. In this context, movement among patches is the crucial parameter for interpreting connectivity but because of the difficulty of collecting reliable movement data, most network analysis proceeds with only indirect information on movement across landscapes rather than using observed movement to construct networks. Statistical models developed for social networks provide promising alternatives for landscape network construction because they can leverage limited movement information to predict linkages. Using two mark-recapture datasets on individual movement and connectivity across landscapes, we test whether commonly used network constructions for interpreting connectivity can predict actual linkages and network structure, and we contrast these approaches to social network models. We find that currently applied network constructions for assessing connectivity consistently, and substantially, overpredict actual connectivity, resulting in considerable overestimation of metapopulation lifetime. Furthermore, social network models provide accurate predictions of network structure, and can do so with remarkably limited data on movement. Social network models offer a flexible and powerful way for not only understanding the factors influencing connectivity but also for providing more reliable estimates of connectivity and metapopulation persistence in the face of limited data.

  17. Understanding eye movements in face recognition using hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2014-09-16

    We use a hidden Markov model (HMM) based approach to analyze eye movement data in face recognition. HMMs are statistical models that are specialized in handling time-series data. We conducted a face recognition task with Asian participants, and model each participant's eye movement pattern with an HMM, which summarized the participant's scan paths in face recognition with both regions of interest and the transition probabilities among them. By clustering these HMMs, we showed that participants' eye movements could be categorized into holistic or analytic patterns, demonstrating significant individual differences even within the same culture. Participants with the analytic pattern had longer response times, but did not differ significantly in recognition accuracy from those with the holistic pattern. We also found that correct and wrong recognitions were associated with distinctive eye movement patterns; the difference between the two patterns lies in the transitions rather than locations of the fixations alone.

  18. Evaluating population exposure to N, N-dimethylformamide in a small industrial area accounting for population movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-mei WEI; Wei-li TIAN; Qing-yu ZHANG; Ying-yue ZHENG; Yi-ke YANG; Zu-cheng WU; Qi ZHU; Lei ZHOU; Si-mai FANG

    2011-01-01

    Population exposure to pollutants is important for studies on the exposure-response relationship.However,it is difficult to evaluate population exposure to non-conventional pollutants due to limited data on concentration levels and the movement patterns of inhabitants.In this study,an air dispersion model was used to simulate N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) concentrations,as a proxy to monitoring concentrations.A total of 1289 randomly selected household representatives were surveyed to obtain information on movement characteristics.Subsequently,population movement patterns were combined with DMF concentration levels on maps of 100 m× 100 m resolution to calculate population exposure.During 2008,the estimated population exposure to DMF ranged from 0.002 to 0.64 mg/m3.The highest level of population exposure to DMF was found in the north and northwest sub-districts of the study area,ranging from 0.42 to 0.64 mg/m3.The population exposure to DMF for different occupational groups indicated that retired people and farmers were vulnerable subpopulations among people highly exposed to DMF.This was mainly because they spent most time at home where the DMF concentration was high.As pollutant concentrations were divided into small grids,we found that exposure levels were substantially impacted by population movement characteristics.

  19. Continuous-time discrete-space models for animal movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Ephraim M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    The processes influencing animal movement and resource selection are complex and varied. Past efforts to model behavioral changes over time used Bayesian statistical models with variable parameter space, such as reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo approaches, which are computationally demanding and inaccessible to many practitioners. We present a continuous-time discrete-space (CTDS) model of animal movement that can be fit using standard generalized linear modeling (GLM) methods. This CTDS approach allows for the joint modeling of location-based as well as directional drivers of movement. Changing behavior over time is modeled using a varying-coefficient framework which maintains the computational simplicity of a GLM approach, and variable selection is accomplished using a group lasso penalty. We apply our approach to a study of two mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Colorado, USA.

  20. Forward models and state estimation in compensatory eye movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten A Frens

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The compensatory eye movement system maintains a stable retinal image, integrating information from different sensory modalities to compensate for head movements. Inspired by recent models of physiology of limb movements, we suggest that compensatory eye movements (CEM can be modeled as a control system with three essential building blocks: a forward model that predicts the effects of motor commands; a state estimator that integrates sensory feedback into this prediction; and, a feedback controller that translates a state estimate into motor commands. We propose a specific mapping of nuclei within the CEM system onto these control functions. Specifically, we suggest that the Flocculus is responsible for generating the forward model prediction and that the Vestibular Nuclei integrate sensory feedback to generate an estimate of current state. Finally, the brainstem motor nuclei – in the case of horizontal compensation this means the Abducens Nucleus and the Nucleus Prepositus Hypoglossi – implement a feedback controller, translating state into motor commands. While these efforts to understand the physiological control system as a feedback control system are in their infancy, there is the intriguing possibility that compensatory eye movements and targeted voluntary movements use the same cerebellar circuitry in fundamentally different ways.

  1. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design.

  2. Digital Modeling Phenomenon Of Surface Ground Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Voina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the development of specialized software applications it was possible to approach and resolve complex problems concerning automating and process optimization for which are being used field data. Computerized representation of the shape and dimensions of the Earth requires a detailed mathematical modeling, known as "digital terrain model". The paper aims to present the digital terrain model of Vulcan mining, Hunedoara County, Romania. Modeling consists of a set of mathematical equations that define in detail the surface of Earth and has an approximate surface rigorously and mathematical, that calculated the land area. Therefore, the digital terrain model means a digital representation of the earth's surface through a mathematical model that approximates the land surface modeling, which can be used in various civil and industrial applications in. To achieve the digital terrain model of data recorded using linear and nonlinear interpolation method based on point survey which highlights the natural surface studied. Given the complexity of this work it is absolutely necessary to know in detail of all topographic elements of work area, without the actions to be undertaken to project and manipulate would not be possible. To achieve digital terrain model, within a specialized software were set appropriate parameters required to achieve this case study. After performing all steps we obtained digital terrain model of Vulcan Mine. Digital terrain model is the complex product, which has characteristics that are equivalent to the specialists that use satellite images and information stored in a digital model, this is easier to use.

  3. An Early Childhood Movement Laboratory Model: Kindergym

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Rip

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood motor activity programs at institutions of higher learning can operate within the tripartite mission of the university while serving a vital function in providing leadership and guidance to educators. This article describes the University of Northern Iowa's Kindergym model. Within this model, curricular areas of games/sports,…

  4. Modeling of movements in sports training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashuba V.A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate data are expounded about methodical approaches at the modeling of technique of motor actions in sport. Practical material is presented on questions of design and perfection of technique of motor actions on the example of different types of sport. The model of technique of running step is offered on a line in short-track. A cross-correlation analysis between resulting speed of general centre-of-mass body of sportsmen and biomechanics descriptions exposed six important indexes. These indexes are plugged in a statistical model at run on a line. It is set that on the initial stages of preparation of sportsmen it is necessary to take into account the biokinematics and biodynamic structure of technique of motive actions.

  5. Permeability of roads to movement of scrubland lizards and small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Cheryl S; Tracey, Jeff A; McClenaghan, Leroy R; Fisher, Robert N

    2013-08-01

    A primary objective of road ecology is to understand and predict how roads affect connectivity of wildlife populations. Road avoidance behavior can fragment populations, whereas lack of road avoidance can result in high mortality due to wildlife-vehicle collisions. Many small animal species focus their activities to particular microhabitats within their larger habitat. We sought to assess how different types of roads affect the movement of small vertebrates and to explore whether responses to roads may be predictable on the basis of animal life history or microhabitat preferences preferences. We tracked the movements of fluorescently marked animals at 24 sites distributed among 3 road types: low-use dirt, low-use secondary paved, and rural 2-lane highway. Most data we collected were on the San Diego pocket mouse (Chaetodipus fallax), cactus mouse (Peromyscus eremicus), western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis), orange-throated whiptail (Aspidoscelis hyperythra), Dulzura kangaroo rat (Dipodomys simulans) (dirt, secondary paved), and deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) (highway only). San Diego pocket mice and cactus mice moved onto dirt roads but not onto a low-use paved road of similar width or onto the highway, indicating they avoid paved road substrate. Both lizard species moved onto the dirt and secondary paved roads but avoided the rural 2-lane rural highway, indicating they may avoid noise, vibration, or visual disturbance from a steady flow of traffic. Kangaroo rats did not avoid the dirt or secondary paved roads. Overall, dirt and secondary roads were more permeable to species that prefer to forage or bask in open areas of their habitat, rather than under the cover of rocks or shrubs. However, all study species avoided the rural 2-lane highway. Our results suggest that microhabitat use preferences and road substrate help predict species responses to low-use roads, but roads with heavy traffic may deter movement of a much wider range of small animal

  6. Modeling of Water Movement Near Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippisch, O.; Graf, H.; Bastian, P.; Roth, K.

    Water transport in unsaturated porous media is often described using Richards' equa- tion. However Richards' equation is based on the assumption that the gas phase is mobile enough to be always (nearly) at atmospheric pressure. This assumption is not valid if the porous medium is nearly saturated with water. The difference between model calculations using Richards' equation and a multiphase formulation is analyzed and compared to results from multistep outflow experiments with columns of sintered glass. The chosen parameterization for the hydraulic param- eters (van Genuchten/Brooks-Corey) proves to expecially important.

  7. Modeling Uncertainty of Directed Movement via Markov Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Zhangcai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic time geography (PTG is suggested as an extension of (classical time geography, in order to present the uncertainty of an agent located at the accessible position by probability. This may provide a quantitative basis for most likely finding an agent at a location. In recent years, PTG based on normal distribution or Brown bridge has been proposed, its variance, however, is irrelevant with the agent's speed or divergent with the increase of the speed; so they are difficult to take into account application pertinence and stability. In this paper, a new method is proposed to model PTG based on Markov chain. Firstly, a bidirectional conditions Markov chain is modeled, the limit of which, when the moving speed is large enough, can be regarded as the Brown bridge, thus has the characteristics of digital stability. Then, the directed movement is mapped to Markov chains. The essential part is to build step length, the state space and transfer matrix of Markov chain according to the space and time position of directional movement, movement speed information, to make sure the Markov chain related to the movement speed. Finally, calculating continuously the probability distribution of the directed movement at any time by the Markov chains, it can be get the possibility of an agent located at the accessible position. Experimental results show that, the variance based on Markov chains not only is related to speed, but also is tending towards stability with increasing the agent's maximum speed.

  8. Modeling movement and fidelity of American black ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, N.L.; Conroy, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial relationships among stocks of breeding waterfowl can be an important component of harvest management. Prediction and optimal harvest management under adaptive harvest management (AHM) requires information on the spatial relationships among breeding populations (fidelity and inter-year exchange), as well as rates of movements from breeding to harvest regions. We used band-recovery data to develop a model to estimate probabilities of movement for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) among 3 Canadian breeding strata and 6 harvest regions (3 in Canada, and 3 in the United States) over the period 1965-1998. Model selection criteria suggested that models containing area-, year-, and age-specific recovery rates with area- and sex-specific movement rates were the best for modeling movement. Movement by males to southern harvest areas was variable depending on the originating area. Males from the western breeding area predominantly moved to the Mississippi Flyway or southern Atlantic Flyway (??ij = 0.353, SE = 0.0187 and ??ij = 0.473, SE = 0.037, respectively), whereas males that originated in the eastern and central breeding strata moved to the northern Atlantic flyway (??ij = 0.842, SE = 0.010 and ??ij = 0.578, SE = 0.0222, respectively). We used combined recoveries and recaptures in Program MARK to estimate fidelity to the 3 Canadian breeding strata. Information criteria identified a model containing sex- and age-specific fidelity for black ducks. Estimates of fidelity were 0.9695 (SE = 0.0249) and 0.9554 (SE = 0.0434) for adult males and females, respectively. Estimates of fidelity for juveniles were slightly lower at 0.9210 (SE = 0.0931) and 0.8870 (SE = 0.0475) for males and females, respectively. These models have application to the development of spatially stratified black duck harvest management models for use in AHM.

  9. Fish population size and movement patterns in a small intermittently open South African estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukey, J. R.; Booth, A. J.; Froneman, P. W.

    2006-03-01

    The population size and movement patterns of small fish (>50 mm SL) in a small intermittently open estuary (Grant's Valley estuary: 33°40'12.1″S, 26°42'12.6″E) situated on the south-east Cape coast of South Africa were examined during the closed phase over the period May and August 2004. The estuary was subdivided into four discrete areas and the fish within each area sampled using a 30 m seine net (15 mm mesh). Fish captured were marked by fin clipping according to the area of capture. Fish population size was estimated by using three methods: the Schnabel estimator, the Hilborn estimator, and a derived estimator. A total of 12 species was captured and marked during the study. The total number of fish in the estuary was estimated at ca. 12 000 individuals (11 219-13 311). Marine-breeding species ( Rhabdosargus holubi, Monodactylus falciformis, and two mullet species) numerically dominated the ichthyofauna, possibly as a result of their effective use of overtopping events, when seawater washes over the sandbar, to enter the estuary during the closed mouth phase. The two mullet species, Myxus capensis and Liza richardsonii, and the Cape stumpnose, R. holubi moved extensively throughout the estuary, while the remaining species exhibited restricted movement patterns possibly due to the preference for refuge and foraging areas associated with reed beds. The observed movement patterns of individual fish species appeared to be associated with both foraging behaviour and habitat selection.

  10. Combining Spatial and Telemetric Features for Learning Animal Movement Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kapicioglu, Berk; Wikelski, Martin; Broderick, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new graphical model for tracking radio-tagged animals and learning their movement patterns. The model provides a principled way to combine radio telemetry data with an arbitrary set of userdefined, spatial features. We describe an efficient stochastic gradient algorithm for fitting model parameters to data and demonstrate its effectiveness via asymptotic analysis and synthetic experiments. We also apply our model to real datasets, and show that it outperforms the most popular radio telemetry software package used in ecology. We conclude that integration of different data sources under a single statistical framework, coupled with appropriate parameter and state estimation procedures, produces both accurate location estimates and an interpretable statistical model of animal movement.

  11. Modelling of sediment movement in the surf and swash zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TOKPOHOZIN N B; KOUNOUHEWA B; AVOSSEVOU G Y H; HOUEKPOHEHAM A; AWANOU C N

    2015-01-01

    Under the action of marine currents, non-cohesive sediments evolve by bed-load, by saltation or suspension depending on their granulometry. Several authors have considered that the movement of sediment is bidimensional and modelized the effects of swell by a constant velocitynear the seabed. Here we have studied the velocity profile of fluctuating currents near the seabed and studied the movement of sediment in 3D. The results show that in the areas of study (surf and swash) the movement of sediment occurs in a volume, and the evolution of sediment varies from an areato another. The obtained theoretical profiles of the position and velocity vectors confirm the observations of several authors.

  12. Learning Predictive Movement Models From Fabric-Mounted Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Brendan; Howard, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The measurement and analysis of human movement for applications in clinical diagnostics or rehabilitation is often performed in a laboratory setting using static motion capture devices. A growing interest in analyzing movement in everyday environments (such as the home) has prompted the development of "wearable sensors", with the most current wearable sensors being those embedded into clothing. A major issue however with the use of these fabric-embedded sensors is the undesired effect of fabric motion artefacts corrupting movement signals. In this paper, a nonparametric method is presented for learning body movements, viewing the undesired motion as stochastic perturbations to the sensed motion, and using orthogonal regression techniques to form predictive models of the wearer's motion that eliminate these errors in the learning process. Experiments in this paper show that standard nonparametric learning techniques underperform in this fabric motion context and that improved prediction accuracy can be made by using orthogonal regression techniques. Modelling this motion artefact problem as a stochastic learning problem shows an average 77% decrease in prediction error in a body pose task using fabric-embedded sensors, compared to a kinematic model.

  13. Functional reentry and circus movement arrhythmias in the small intestine of normal and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, B; Karam, S M

    2012-04-01

    In a few recent studies, the presence of arrhythmias based on reentry and circus movement of the slow wave have been shown to occur in normal and diseased stomachs. To date, however, reentry has not been demonstrated before in any other part of the gastrointestinal system. No animals had to be killed for this study. Use was made of materials obtained during the course of another study in which 11 rats were treated with streptozotocin and housed with age-matched controls. After 3 and 7 mo, segments of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were isolated and positioned in a tissue bath. Slow wave propagation was recorded with 121 extracellular electrodes. After the experiment, the propagation of the slow waves was reconstructed. In 10 of a total of 66 intestinal segments (15%), a circus movement of the slow wave was detected. These reentries were seen in control (n = 2) as well as in 3-mo (n = 2) and 7-mo (n = 6) diabetic rats. Local conduction velocities and beat-to-beat intervals during the reentries were measured (0.42 ± 0.15 and 3.03 ± 0.67 cm/s, respectively) leading to a wavelength of 1.3 ± 0.5 cm and a circuit diameter of 4.1 ± 1.5 mm. This is the first demonstration of a reentrant arrhythmia in the small intestine of control and diabetic rats. Calculations of the size of the circuits indicate that they are small enough to fit inside the intestinal wall. Extrapolation based on measured velocities and rates indicate that reentrant arrhythmias are also possible in the distal small intestine of larger animals including humans.

  14. Mass movements in small canyons in the northeast of Baiyun deepwater area, north of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xishuang; LIU Lejun; LI Jiagang; GAO Shan; ZHOU Qingjie; SU Tianyun

    2015-01-01

    The process of mass movements and their consequent turbidity currents in large submarine canyons has been widely reported, however, little attention was paid to that in small canyons. In this paper, we document mass movements in small submarine canyons in the northeast of Baiyun deepwater area, north of the South China Sea (SCS), and their strong effects on the evolution of the canyons based on geophysical data. Submarine canyons in the study area arrange closely below the shelf break zone which was at the depth of –500 m. Within submarine canyons, seabed surface was covered with amounts of failure scars resulted from past small-sized landslides. A complex process of mass transportation in the canyons is indicated by three directions of mass movements. Recent mass movement deposits in the canyons exhibit translucent reflections or parallel reflections which represent the brittle deformation and the plastic deformation, respectively. The area of most landslides in the canyons is less than 3 km2. The trigger mechanisms for mass movements in the study area are gravitational overloading, slope angle and weak properties of soil. Geophysical data indicate that the genesis of submarine canyons is the erosion of mass movements and consequent turbidity currents. The significant effects of mass movements on canyon are incision and sediment transportation at the erosion phases and fillings supply at the fill phases. This research will be helpful for the geological risk assessments and understanding the sediment transportation in the northern margin of the SCS.

  15. Soil Hydrologic Response and Nutrient Movement in Three Small Tropical Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, N. H.; Hamann, H. B.; Stallard, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    The movement of water over and through soils by storm-generated flowpaths in tropical forests not only mediates nutrient movement and physical weathering, but also potentially influences vegetation growth and dynamics with seasonally dry or saturated soil conditions. However, few small-scale catchment studies (10-1000ha) have produced a comprehensive, standardized dataset on soil hydrologic properties among tropical forest catchments, due in part to complexities within tropical systems, and to inconsistencies in methods, data collection, and/or analyses. In response, this study has utilized the global, standardized network of forest dynamics plots of the Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) for the rapid assessment of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and the water chemistry from storm-generated flowpaths. Ks measurements at varying depths help in testing Elsenbeer's (2001) functional classification continuum of tropical forest soilscapes and resulting hydrologic flowpaths. In Barro Colorado Island, Panama, Ks decreased rapidly with soil depth where horizontal surface and near-surface flowpaths were most prevalent. Ks measurements in Yasuni National Park, Ecuador indicated limited vertical movement of water at depths >15cm due to an impermeable soil layer. Ks measurements from Lambir Hills National Park, Malaysia, represented both ends of the continuum due to variability in soil type and lithology. In relation to soil hydrology and hydrological flowpaths, runoff chemistry at Yasuni reveals a general pattern of increased nutrient export as water moves through the canopy and over the soil surface, with concentrations of K+ increasing significantly in throughfall, and concentrations of both K+, and NO3- remaining high in overland flow. The results from the composite overland flow samples may indicate a more open nutrient cycle in tropical forest environments than has been suggested from earlier studies using radioactively labeled isotopes.

  16. Movement and spawning migration patterns suggest small marine reserves can offer adequate protection for exploited emperorfishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, B. M.; Mills, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    A critical feature of effective marine reserves is to be large enough to encompass home ranges of target species, thereby allowing a significant portion of the population to persist without the threat of exploitation. In this study, patterns of movement and home range for Lethrinus harak and Lethrinus obsoletus were quantified using an array of 33 acoustic receivers that covered approximately three quarters of Piti Marine Reserve in the Pacific island of Guam. This array was designed to ensure extensive overlap of receiver ranges throughout the study area. Eighteen individuals (12 L. harak and 6 L. obsoletus) were surgically implanted with ultrasonic transmitters and passively tracked for 4 months. Both species displayed high site fidelity and had relatively small home ranges. The home ranges of L. harak expanded with increasing body size. Feeding of fish by humans, which was common but restricted to a small area within the study site, had little effect on the distribution of the resident populations. L. harak made nightly spawning migrations within the reserve between full moon and last quarter moon of each lunar cycle, coinciding with a strong ebbing tide. Results indicate that even small reserves can include many individual home ranges of these emperorfishes and can protect spawning sites for L. harak. These species are heavily targeted in Guam, and there are major demographic differences between fished and protected sites. This study shows the potential for protected areas to sustain reproductive viability in exploited populations.

  17. Small is beautiful: models of small neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Damon G; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2012-08-01

    Modeling has contributed a great deal to our understanding of how individual neurons and neuronal networks function. In this review, we focus on models of the small neuronal networks of invertebrates, especially rhythmically active CPG networks. Models have elucidated many aspects of these networks, from identifying key interacting membrane properties to pointing out gaps in our understanding, for example missing neurons. Even the complex CPGs of vertebrates, such as those that underlie respiration, have been reduced to small network models to great effect. Modeling of these networks spans from simplified models, which are amenable to mathematical analyses, to very complicated biophysical models. Some researchers have now adopted a population approach, where they generate and analyze many related models that differ in a few to several judiciously chosen free parameters; often these parameters show variability across animals and thus justify the approach. Models of small neuronal networks will continue to expand and refine our understanding of how neuronal networks in all animals program motor output, process sensory information and learn.

  18. Human Posture and Movement Prediction based on Musculoskeletal Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Saeed Davoudabadi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explores an optimization-based formulation, so-called inverse-inverse dynamics, for the prediction of human posture and motion dynamics performing various tasks. It is explained how this technique enables us to predict natural kinematic and kinetic patterns for human posture...... and motion using AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). AMS uses inverse dynamics to analyze musculoskeletal systems and is, therefore, limited by its dependency on input kinematics. We propose to alleviate this dependency by assuming that voluntary postures and movement strategies in humans are guided by a desire...... investigated, a scaling to the mean height and body mass may be sufficient, while other questions require subject-specific models. The movement is parameterized by means of time functions controlling selected degrees-of-freedom (DOF). Subsequently, the parameters of these functions, usually referred...

  19. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  20. Train Control System Formalization Modeling oriented Movement Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chinese Train Control System-3(CTCS-3 was integrated via various control system devices, assurance of CTCS-3 system transmission probability relied on empirical judgment, it is necessary to form its formalization to support integration for system stability of the whole CTCS-3. Movement Authority(MA acts on the whole information process of CTCS-3 to control train, its process properties can be as the reflection of CTCS probability. Aiming at that,  paper selected MA as the objective, proposed MA-oriented CTCS-3 formalization modeling. Paper designed generation and transmission algorithms of MA, formed MA computation models for application functions. Based on computation models, paper constructed MA hierarchical Colored Petri Nets(CPN models, and completed MA timed CPN model, the report and experimental result demonstrate that the model proposed is effective and can reflect CTCS-3 system properties accurately. 

  1. Hidden Markov modelling of movement data from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver

    Movement data from marine animals tagged with electronic tags are becoming increasingly diverse and plentiful. This trend entails a need for statistical methods that are able to filter the observations to extract the ecologically relevant content. This dissertation focuses on the development...... state HMM is employed to deal with this task. Specifically, the continuous horizontal plane is discretised into grid cells, which enables a state-space model for the geographical location to be estimated on this grid. The estimation model for location is extended with an additional state representing...

  2. Modeling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hergarten

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application – an almost horizontal fluid table – is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. The results are tested against analytical solutions and the commercial avalanche model RAMMS. The overall results are in excellent agreement with the reference system RAMMS, and the deviations between the different models are far below the uncertainties in the determination of the relevant fluid parameters and involved avalanche volumes in reality. As this code is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool assisting regional scale natural hazard studies.

  3. Seasonal cues of Arctic grayling movement in a small Arctic stream: the importance of surface water connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Kurt C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Arp, Christopher D.; Adams, Jeff; Falke, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In Arctic ecosystems, freshwater fish migrate seasonally between productive shallow water habitats that freeze in winter and deep overwinter refuge in rivers and lakes. How these movements relate to seasonal hydrology is not well understood. We used passive integrated transponder tags and stream wide antennae to track 1035 Arctic grayling in Crea Creek, a seasonally flowing beaded stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska. Migration of juvenile and adult fish into Crea Creek peaked in June immediately after ice break-up in the stream. Fish that entered the stream during periods of high flow and cold stream temperature traveled farther upstream than those entering during periods of lower flow and warmer temperature. We used generalized linear models to relate migration of adult and juvenile fish out of Crea Creek to hydrology. Most adults migrated in late June – early July, and there was best support (Akaike weight = 0.46; w i ) for a model indicating that the rate of migration increased with decreasing discharge. Juvenile migration occurred in two peaks; the early peak consisted of larger juveniles and coincided with adult migration, while the later peak occurred shortly before freeze-up in September and included smaller juveniles. A model that included discharge, minimum stream temperature, year, season, and mean size of potential migrants was most strongly supported (w i  = 0.86). Juvenile migration rate increased sharply as daily minimum stream temperature decreased, suggesting fish respond to impending freeze-up. We found fish movements to be intimately tied to the strong seasonality of discharge and temperature, and demonstrate the importance of small stream connectivity for migratory Arctic grayling during the entire open-water period. The ongoing and anticipated effects of climate change and petroleum development on Arctic hydrology (e.g. reduced stream connectivity, earlier peak flows, increased evapotranspiration) have important implications

  4. Movement patterns and the conservation of amphibians breeding in small, temporary wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C.K.; Cade, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Many amphibians breed in water but live most of their lives in terrestrial habitats. Little is known, however, about the spatial distribution of these habitats or of the distances and directions amphibians move to reach breeding sites. The amphibian community at a small, temporary pond in northcentral Florida was monitored for 5 years. Based on captures and recaptures of more than 2500 striped newts (Notophthalmus perstriatus) and 5700 eastern narrow-mouthed toads (Gastrophryne carolinensis), we tabulated the angles of orientation that these amphibians entered and exited the pond basin. Our results showed that movements of these species between the pond and terrestrial habitats were nonrandom in orientation, but that narrow corridors did not appear to be used. Differences between the species likely reflect differences in habitat preferences, whereas intraspecific differences among years and between the sexes likely reflect variation among individuals. For terrestrial buffer zones to be effective at conserving pond-breeding amphibian communities, they need both a distance and a directional component. The determination of a directional component may be obscured if studies are carried out over a short time span. Conservation efforts for wetland-breeding amphibians that concentrate solely on the wetland likely will fail without consideration of the adjacent terrestrial habitat.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulation of Kinesin Movement with a Lattice Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong; DOU Shuo-Xing; WANG Peng-Ye

    2005-01-01

    @@ Kinesin is a processive double-headed molecular motor that moves along a microtubule by taking about 8nm steps. It generally hydrolyzes one ATP molecule for taking each forward step. The processive movement of the kinesin molecular motors is numerically simulated with a lattice model. The motors are considered as Brownian particles and the ATPase processes of both heads are taken into account. The Monte Carlo simulation results agree well with recent experimental observations, especially on the relation of velocity versus ATP and ADP concentrations.

  6. Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J Lucas; Hackney, Madeleine E; Kemp, Charles C; Ting, Lena H

    2017-01-31

    Physical interactions between two people are ubiquitous in our daily lives, and an integral part of many forms of rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated forces arising from physical interactions between humans during a cooperative motor task, particularly during overground movements. As such, the direction and magnitude of interaction forces between two human partners, how those forces are used to communicate movement goals, and whether they change with motor experience remains unknown. A better understanding of how cooperative physical interactions are achieved in healthy individuals of different skill levels is a first step toward understanding principles of physical interactions that could be applied to robotic devices for motor assistance and rehabilitation. Interaction forces between expert and novice partner dancers were recorded while performing a forward-backward partnered stepping task with assigned "leader" and "follower" roles. Their position was recorded using motion capture. The magnitude and direction of the interaction forces were analyzed and compared across groups (i.e. expert-expert, expert-novice, and novice-novice) and across movement phases (i.e. forward, backward, change of direction). All dyads were able to perform the partnered stepping task with some level of proficiency. Relatively small interaction forces (10-30N) were observed across all dyads, but were significantly larger among expert-expert dyads. Interaction forces were also found to be significantly different across movement phases. However, interaction force magnitude did not change as whole-body synchronization between partners improved across trials. Relatively small interaction forces may communicate movement goals (i.e. "what to do and when to do it") between human partners during cooperative physical interactions. Moreover, these small interactions forces vary with prior motor experience, and may act primarily as guiding cues that convey information about

  7. Modeling of movement-related potentials using a fractal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uşakli, Ali Bülent

    2010-06-01

    In bio-signal applications, classification performance depends greatly on feature extraction, which is also the case for electroencephalogram (EEG) based applications. Feature extraction, and consequently classification of EEG signals is not an easy task due to their inherent low signal-to-noise ratios and artifacts. EEG signals can be treated as the output of a non-linear dynamical (chaotic) system in the human brain and therefore they can be modeled by their dimension values. In this study, the variance fractal dimension technique is suggested for the modeling of movement-related potentials (MRPs). Experimental data sets consist of EEG signals recorded during the movements of right foot up, lip pursing and a simultaneous execution of these two tasks. The experimental results and performance tests show that the proposed modeling method can efficiently be applied to MRPs especially in the binary approached brain computer interface applications aiming to assist severely disabled people such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in communication and/or controlling devices.

  8. A model of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) habitat and movement in the oceanic North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, Melanie; Senina, Inna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gaspar, Philippe; Parker, Denise; Balazs, George; Polovina, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s(-1)), smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s (-1) ) than bigger ones (0.5 bl s(-1)). Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies.

  9. A Model of Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) Habitat and Movement in the Oceanic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, Melanie; Senina, Inna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gaspar, Philippe; Parker, Denise; Balazs, George; Polovina, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s−1), smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s−1) than bigger ones (0.5 bl s−1). Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies. PMID:24039901

  10. A model of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta habitat and movement in the oceanic North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Abecassis

    Full Text Available Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s(-1, smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s (-1 than bigger ones (0.5 bl s(-1. Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies.

  11. Modelling and monitoring of passive control structures in human movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemami, Hooshang; Hemami, Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Passive tissues, ligaments and cartilage are vital to human movement. Their contribution to stability, joint function and joint integrity is essential. The articulation of their functions and quantitative assessment of what they do in a healthy or injured state are important in athletics, orthopaedics, medicine and health. In this paper, the role of cartilage and ligaments in stability of natural contacts, connections and joints is articulated by including them in two very simple skeletal systems: one- and three-link rigid body systems. Based on the Newton-Euler equations, a state space presentation of the dynamics is discussed that allows inclusion of ligament and cartilage structures in the model, and allows for Lyapunov stability studies for the original and reduced systems. The connection constraints may be holonomic and non-holonomic depending on the structure of the passive elements. The development is pertinent to the eventual design of a computational framework for the study of human movement that involves computer models of all the relevant skeletal, neural and physiological elements of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a structure also permits testing of different hypotheses about the functional neuroanatomy of the CNS, and the study of the effects and dynamics of disease, deterioration, aging and injuries. The formulation here is applied to one- and three-link systems. Digital computer simulations of a two rigid body system are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach and the methods.

  12. Model selection for the extraction of movement primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Dominik M; Chiovetto, Enrico; Giese, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of blind source separation methods have been used in motor control research for the extraction of movement primitives from EMG and kinematic data. Popular examples are principal component analysis (PCA), independent component analysis (ICA), anechoic demixing, and the time-varying synergy model (d'Avella and Tresch, 2002). However, choosing the parameters of these models, or indeed choosing the type of model, is often done in a heuristic fashion, driven by result expectations as much as by the data. We propose an objective criterion which allows to select the model type, number of primitives and the temporal smoothness prior. Our approach is based on a Laplace approximation to the posterior distribution of the parameters of a given blind source separation model, re-formulated as a Bayesian generative model. We first validate our criterion on ground truth data, showing that it performs at least as good as traditional model selection criteria [Bayesian information criterion, BIC (Schwarz, 1978) and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) (Akaike, 1974)]. Then, we analyze human gait data, finding that an anechoic mixture model with a temporal smoothness constraint on the sources can best account for the data.

  13. Model selection for the extraction of movement primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik M Endres

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of blind source separation methods have been used in motor control research for the extraction of movement primitives from EMG and kinematic data. Popular examples are principal component analysis (PCA,independent component analysis (ICA, anechoic demixing, and the time-varying synergy model. However, choosing the parameters of these models, or indeed choosing the type of model, is often done in a heuristic fashion, driven by result expectations as much as by the data. We propose an objective criterion which allows to select the model type, number of primitives and the temporal smoothness prior. Our approach is based on a Laplace approximation to the posterior distribution of the parameters of a given blind source separation model, re-formulated as a Bayesian generative model.We first validate our criterion on ground truth data, showing that it performs at least as good as traditional model selection criteria (Bayesian information criterion, BIC and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC. Then, we analyze human gait data, finding that an anechoic mixture model with a temporal smoothness constraint on the sources can best account for the data.

  14. Is that really my movement? - Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backåberg, Sofia; Gummesson, Christina; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students' experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12-18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; "Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness," "Experiencing changes in one's own movement," and "Experiencing challenges in the learning process." The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required.

  15. Is that really my movement?—Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Backåberg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12–18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; “Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness,” “Experiencing changes in one's own movement,” and “Experiencing challenges in the learning process.” The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required.

  16. Is that really my movement?—Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backåberg, Sofia; Gummesson, Christina; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12–18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; “Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness,” “Experiencing changes in one's own movement,” and “Experiencing challenges in the learning process.” The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required. PMID:26274385

  17. Modeling pedestrian evacuation movement in a swaying ship

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Juan; Lo, SM

    2015-01-01

    With the advance in living standard, cruise travel has been rapidly expanding around the world in recent years. The transportation of passengers in water has also made a rapid development. It is expected that ships will be more and more widely used. Unfortunately, ship disasters occurred in these years caused serious losses. It raised the concern on effectiveness of passenger evacuation on ships. The present study thus focuses on pedestrian evacuation features on ships. On ships, passenger movements are affected by the periodical water motion and thus are quite different from the characteristic when walking on static horizontal floor. Taking into consideration of this special feature, an agent-based pedestrian model is formulized and the effect of ship swaying on pedestrian evacuation efficiency is investigated. Results indicated that the proposed model can be used to quantify the special evacuation process on ships.

  18. Cytokines and VEGF Induction in Orthodontic Movement in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontics is a branch of dentistry that aims at the resolution of dental malocclusions. The specialist carries out the treatment using intraoral or extraoral orthodontic appliances that require forces of a given load level to obtain a tooth movement in a certain direction in dental arches. Orthodontic tooth movement is dependent on efficient remodeling of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, correlated with several biological and mechanical responses of the tissues surrounding the teeth. A periodontal ligament placed under pressure will result in bone resorption whereas a periodontal ligament under tension results in bone formation. In the primary stage of the application of orthodontic forces, an acute inflammation occurs in periodontium. Several proinflammatory cytokines are produced by immune-competent cells migrating by means of dilated capillaries. In this paper we summarize, also through the utilization of animal models, the role of some of these molecules, namely, interleukin-1β and vascular endothelial growth factor, that are some proliferation markers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and the macrophage colony stimulating factor.

  19. Parametric Hidden Markov Models for Recognition and Synthesis of Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker; Grest, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    the applicability for online recognition based on very noisy 3D tracking data. The use of a parametric representation of movements is shown in a robot demo, where a robot removes objects from a table as demonstrated by an advisor. The synthesis for motor control is performed for arbitrary table-top positions.......In humanoid robotics, the recognition and synthesis of parametric movements plays an extraordinary role for robot human interaction. Such a parametric movement is a movement of a particular type (semantic), for example, similar pointing movements performed at different table-top positions....... For understanding the whole meaning of a movement of a human, the recognition of its type, likewise its parameterization are important. Only both together convey the whole meaning. Vice versa, for mimicry, the synthesis of movements for the motor control of a robot needs to be parameterized, e.g., by the relative...

  20. Tidal Movement of Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier, Northeast Greenland: Observations and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mayer, C.; Olesen, O. B.

    2000-01-01

    , 1997 and 1998. As part of this work, tidal-movement observations were carried out by simultaneous differential global positioning system (GPS) measurements at several locations distributed on the glacier surface. The GPS observations were performed continuously over several tidal cycles. At the same....... The observations show that the main part of the glacier tongue responds as a freely floating plate to the phase and amplitude of the local tide in the sea. However, kilometre-wide flexure zones exist along the marginal and upstream grounding lines. Attempts to model the observed tidal deflection and tilt patterns...... in the flexure zone by elastic-beam theory are unsuccessful, in contrast to previous findings by other investigators. The strongest disagreement between our measurements and results derived from elastic-beam theory is a significant variation of the phase of the tidal records with distance from the grounding line...

  1. Modeling movements of a long hand-held tool with effects of moments of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Chen, Hung-Jen

    2014-04-01

    The current experiment aimed to investigate the effects of weight position on movement time in target acquisition tasks. Subsequently, a simple mathematical model was developed to describe the movement time with the moments of inertia. Ten right-handed participants conducted continuous Fitts pointing tasks using a laparoscopic instrument as a long hand-held tool. The results showed significant effects of weight position on movement time. Furthermore, an extended Fitts' law model is proposed for the moments of inertia produced by the hand, instrument, and a constant mass in different positions. This predictive model accounted for 63% of the variance in movement time. The predictive model proposed in the present study can be applied not only to estimate movement time given a particular target width, instrument movement amplitude, and weight position of a long hand-held tool but also to standardize movement time and establish training standards.

  2. Influences of tongue biomechanics on speech movements during the production of velar stop consonants: a modeling study

    CERN Document Server

    Perrier, P; Zandipour, M; Perkell, J; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan; Zandipour, Majid; Perkell, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the following hypothesis: forward looping movements of the tongue that are observed in VCV sequences are due partly to the anatomical arrangement of the tongue muscles and how they are used to produce a velar closure. The study uses an anatomically based 2D biomechanical tongue model. Tissue elastic properties are accounted for in finite-element modeling, and movement is controlled by constant-rate control parameter shifts. Tongue raising and lowering movements are produced by the model with the combined actions of the genioglossus, styloglossus and hyoglossus. Simulations of V1CV2 movements were made, where C is a velar consonant and V is [a], [i] or [u]. If V1 is one of the vowels [a] and [u], the resulting trajectories describe movements that begin to loop forward before consonant closure and continue to slide along the palate during the closure. This prediction is in agreement with classical data published in the literature. If V1 is vowel [i], we observe a small backward movement. Thi...

  3. Modeling Movement Primitives with Hidden Markov Models for Robotic and Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, Michelle; Kulić, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Movement primitives are elementary motion units and can be combined sequentially or simultaneously to compose more complex movement sequences. A movement primitive timeseries consist of a sequence of motion phases. This progression through a set of motion phases can be modeled by Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). HMMs are stochastic processes that model time series data as the evolution of a hidden state variable through a discrete set of possible values, where each state value is associated with an observation (emission) probability. Each motion phase is represented by one of the hidden states and the sequential order by their transition probabilities. The observations of the MP-HMM are the sensor measurements of the human movement, for example, motion capture or inertial measurements. The emission probabilities are modeled as Gaussians. In this chapter, the MP-HMM modeling framework is described and applications to motion recognition and motion performance assessment are discussed. The selected applications include parametric MP-HMMs for explicitly modeling variability in movement performance and the comparison of MP-HMMs based on the loglikelihood, the Kullback-Leibler divergence, the extended HMM-based F-statistic, and gait-specific reference-based measures.

  4. Simulating train movement in railway traffic using a car-following model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Guan Li-Jia

    2009-01-01

    Based on a car-following model, in this paper, we propose a new traffic model for simulating train movement in railway traffic. In the proposed model, some realistic characteristics of train movement are considered, such as the distance headway and the safety stopping distance. Using the proposed traffic model, we analyse the space-time diagram of traffic flow, the trajectory of train movement, etc. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed model can be successfully used for simulating the train movement. Some complex phenomena can be reproduced, such as the complex acceleration and deceleration of trains and the propagation of train delay.

  5. Dynamical movement primitives: learning attractor models for motor behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Nakanishi, Jun; Hoffmann, Heiko; Pastor, Peter; Schaal, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical systems have been used in many disciplines to model complex behaviors, including biological motor control, robotics, perception, economics, traffic prediction, and neuroscience. While often the unexpected emergent behavior of nonlinear systems is the focus of investigations, it is of equal importance to create goal-directed behavior (e.g., stable locomotion from a system of coupled oscillators under perceptual guidance). Modeling goal-directed behavior with nonlinear systems is, however, rather difficult due to the parameter sensitivity of these systems, their complex phase transitions in response to subtle parameter changes, and the difficulty of analyzing and predicting their long-term behavior; intuition and time-consuming parameter tuning play a major role. This letter presents and reviews dynamical movement primitives, a line of research for modeling attractor behaviors of autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems with the help of statistical learning techniques. The essence of our approach is to start with a simple dynamical system, such as a set of linear differential equations, and transform those into a weakly nonlinear system with prescribed attractor dynamics by means of a learnable autonomous forcing term. Both point attractors and limit cycle attractors of almost arbitrary complexity can be generated. We explain the design principle of our approach and evaluate its properties in several example applications in motor control and robotics.

  6. Recording Lifetime Behavior and Movement in an Invertebrate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Sige; Liedo, Pablo; Altamirano-Robles, Leopoldo; Cruz-Enriquez, Janeth; Morice, Amy; Ingram, Donald K.; Kaub, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Carey, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of lifetime behavioral changes is essential for understanding aging and aging-related diseases. However, such studies are scarce partly due to the lack of efficient tools. Here we describe and provide proof of concept for a stereo vision system that classifies and sequentially records at an extremely fine scale six different behaviors (resting, micro-movement, walking, flying, feeding and drinking) and the within-cage (3D) location of individual tephritid fruit flies by time-of-day throughout their lives. Using flies fed on two different diets, full sugar-yeast and sugar-only diets, we report for the first time their behavioral changes throughout their lives at a high resolution. We have found that the daily activity peaks at the age of 15–20 days and then gradually declines with age for flies on both diets. However, the overall daily activity is higher for flies on sugar-only diet than those on the full diet. Flies on sugar-only diet show a stronger diurnal localization pattern with higher preference to staying on the top of the cage during the period of light-off when compared to flies on the full diet. Clustering analyses of age-specific behavior patterns reveal three distinct young, middle-aged and old clusters for flies on each of the two diets. The middle-aged groups for flies on sugar-only diet consist of much younger age groups when compared to flies on full diet. This technology provides research opportunities for using a behavioral informatics approach for understanding different ways in which behavior, movement, and aging in model organisms are mutually affecting. PMID:21559058

  7. A general discrete-time modeling framework for animal movement using multistate random walks

    OpenAIRE

    McClintock, B.T.; King, R; Thomas, L.; Matthiopoulos, J.; McConnell, B.J.; Morales, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in animal tracking technology have permitted the collection of detailed data on the movement paths of individuals from many species. However, analysis methods for these data have not developed at a similar pace, largely due to a lack of suitable candidate models, coupled with the technical difficulties of fitting such models to data. To facilitate a general modeling framework, we propose that complex movement paths can be conceived as a series of movement strategies among ...

  8. Prediction of Pig Trade Movements in Different European Production Systems Using Exponential Random Graph Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relun, Anne; Grosbois, Vladimir; Alexandrov, Tsviatko; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Jose M; Waret-Szkuta, Agnes; Molia, Sophie; Etter, Eric Marcel Charles; Martínez-López, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In most European countries, data regarding movements of live animals are routinely collected and can greatly aid predictive epidemic modeling. However, the use of complete movements' dataset to conduct policy-relevant predictions has been so far limited by the massive amount of data that have to be processed (e.g., in intensive commercial systems) or the restricted availability of timely and updated records on animal movements (e.g., in areas where small-scale or extensive production is predominant). The aim of this study was to use exponential random graph models (ERGMs) to reproduce, understand, and predict pig trade networks in different European production systems. Three trade networks were built by aggregating movements of pig batches among premises (farms and trade operators) over 2011 in Bulgaria, Extremadura (Spain), and Côtes-d'Armor (France), where small-scale, extensive, and intensive pig production are predominant, respectively. Three ERGMs were fitted to each network with various demographic and geographic attributes of the nodes as well as six internal network configurations. Several statistical and graphical diagnostic methods were applied to assess the goodness of fit of the models. For all systems, both exogenous (attribute-based) and endogenous (network-based) processes appeared to govern the structure of pig trade network, and neither alone were capable of capturing all aspects of the network structure. Geographic mixing patterns strongly structured pig trade organization in the small-scale production system, whereas belonging to the same company or keeping pigs in the same housing system appeared to be key drivers of pig trade, in intensive and extensive production systems, respectively. Heterogeneous mixing between types of production also explained a part of network structure, whichever production system considered. Limited information is thus needed to capture most of the global structure of pig trade networks. Such findings will be useful

  9. Modeling Coral Reef Fish Home Range Movements in Dry Tortugas, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Farmer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underestimation of reef fish space use may result in marine reserves that are too small to effectively buffer a portion of the stock from fishing mortality. Commonly used statistical home range models, such as minimum convex polygon (MCP or 95% kernel density (95% KD methods, require the exclusion of individuals who move beyond the bounds of the tracking study. Spatially explicit individual-based models of fish home range movements parameterized from multiple years of acoustic tracking data were developed for three exploited coral reef fishes (red grouper Epinephelus morio, black grouper Mycteroperca bonaci, and mutton snapper Lutjanus analis in Dry Tortugas, Florida. Movements were characterized as a combination of probability of movement, distance moved, and turning angle. Simulations suggested that the limited temporal and geographic scope of most movement studies may underestimate home range size, especially for fish with home range centers near the edges of the array. Simulations provided useful upper bounds for home range size (red grouper: 2.28±0.81 km2 MCP, 3.60±0.89 km2 KD; black grouper: 2.06±0.84 km2 MCP, 3.93±1.22 km2 KD; mutton snapper: 7.72±2.23 km2 MCP, 6.16±1.11 km2 KD. Simulations also suggested that MCP home ranges are more robust to artifacts of passive array acoustic detection patterns than 95% KD methods.

  10. Modeling coral reef fish home range movements in Dry Tortugas, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Nicholas A; Ault, Jerald S

    2014-01-01

    Underestimation of reef fish space use may result in marine reserves that are too small to effectively buffer a portion of the stock from fishing mortality. Commonly used statistical home range models, such as minimum convex polygon (MCP) or 95% kernel density (95% KD) methods, require the exclusion of individuals who move beyond the bounds of the tracking study. Spatially explicit individual-based models of fish home range movements parameterized from multiple years of acoustic tracking data were developed for three exploited coral reef fishes (red grouper Epinephelus morio, black grouper Mycteroperca bonaci, and mutton snapper Lutjanus analis) in Dry Tortugas, Florida. Movements were characterized as a combination of probability of movement, distance moved, and turning angle. Simulations suggested that the limited temporal and geographic scope of most movement studies may underestimate home range size, especially for fish with home range centers near the edges of the array. Simulations provided useful upper bounds for home range size (red grouper: 2.28±0.81 km2 MCP, 3.60±0.89 km2 KD; black grouper: 2.06±0.84 km2 MCP, 3.93±1.22 km2 KD; mutton snapper: 7.72±2.23 km2 MCP, 6.16±1.11 km2 KD). Simulations also suggested that MCP home ranges are more robust to artifacts of passive array acoustic detection patterns than 95% KD methods.

  11. Model for processive movement of myosin Ⅴ and myosin Ⅵ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ping; Dou Shuo-Xing; Wang Peng-Ye

    2005-01-01

    Myosin Ⅴ and myosin Ⅵ are two classes of two-headed molecular motors of the myosin superfamily that move processively along helical actin filaments in opposite directions. Here we present a hand-over-hand model for their processive movements. In the model, the moving direction of a dimeric molecular motor is automatically determined by the relative orientation between its two heads at free state and its head's binding orientation on track filament.This determines that myosin Ⅴ moves toward the barbed end and myosin Ⅵ moves toward the pointed end of actin.During the moving period in one step, one head remains bound to actin for myosin Ⅴ whereas two heads are detached for myosin Ⅵ: the moving manner is determined by the length of neck domain. This naturally explains the similar dynamic behaviours but opposite moving directions of myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ (the neck of which is truncated to only one-sixth of the native length). Because of different moving manners, myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ exhibit significantly broader step-size distribution than native myosin Ⅴ. However, all the three motors give the same mean step size of ~36nm (the pseudo-repeat of actin helix). All these theoretical results are in agreement with previous experimental ones.

  12. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-03-07

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we generalize our recently developed model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as "bipedal" motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic "crawlers" and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials.

  13. Showing a model's eye movements in examples does not improve learning of problem-solving tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marlen, Tim; van Wermeskerken, Margot; Jarodzka, Halszka; van Gog, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement modeling examples (EMME) are demonstrations of a computer-based task by a human model (e.g., a teacher), with the model's eye movements superimposed on the task to guide learners' attention. EMME have been shown to enhance learning of perceptual classification tasks; however, it is an

  14. Showing a model's eye movements in examples does not improve learning of problem-solving tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marlen, Tim; van Wermeskerken, Margot; Jarodzka, Halszka; van Gog, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement modeling examples (EMME) are demonstrations of a computer-based task by a human model (e.g., a teacher), with the model's eye movements superimposed on the task to guide learners' attention. EMME have been shown to enhance learning of perceptual classification tasks; however, it is an o

  15. Geochemistry, water dynamics and metals: Major, trace elements, Pb and Sr isotope constraints on their origins and movements in a small anthropized catchment over a flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, J.M.; Othman, D.B. [University Montpellier II, Laboratoire Geofluides, Bassins, Eaux, Montpellier (France)

    1997-10-01

    Major, trace elements and Sr-Pb isotope data on the dissolved and particulate phases are reported for water samples taken regularly over the September flood of a Mediterranean river (S France). This river drains runoff from a small, carbonate, karstified watershed with Miocene and Jurassic lithologies, and characterized by agricultural, urban and road network activities. The objective is to combine all the data into a dynamic model for constraining the origin(s) and movements of waters and of their loads. Furthermore, for metals, it becomes then feasible to know their fate and bioavailability downstream 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Safe production model for small mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Calizaya F.; Suryanto S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented a "safe production model" that can be adopted by small mine opera-tors to achieve their production targets safely and efficiently. The model consists of eightelements ranging from management commitment and leadership to safety account-abilityand communication. The model is developed considering the mine operators' resourcelimitations and the workers' training needs. The study concludes with a summary of asample survey that is conducted to validate the model and estimate a parameter for eachmine and determine its position in the safe production scale.

  17. Mathematical Modelling of Translation and Rotation Movement in Quad Tiltrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Dharmawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quadrotor as one type of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle is an underactuated mechanical system. It means that the system has some control inputs is lower than its DOF (Degrees of Freedom. This condition causes quadrotor to have limited mobility because of its inherent under actuation, namely, the availability of four independent control signals (four-speed rotating propellers versus 6 degrees of freedom parameterizing quadrotor position or orientation in space. If a quadrotor is made to have 6 DOF, a full motion control system to optimize the flight will be different from before. So it becomes necessary to develop over actuated quad tiltrotor. Quad tiltrotor has control signals more than its DOF. Therefore, we can refer it to the overactuated system. We need a good control system to fly the quad tiltrotor. Good control systems can be designed using the model of the quad tiltrotor system. We can create quad tiltrotor model using its dynamics based on Newton-Euler approach. After we have a set of model, we can simulate the control system using some control method. There are several control methods that we can use in the quad tiltrotor flight system. However, we can improve the control by implementing a modern control system that uses the concept of state space. The simulations show that the quad tiltrotor has done successful translational motion without significant interference. Also, undesirable rotation movement in the quad tiltrotor flight when performing the translational motions resulting from the transition process associated with the tilt rotor change was successfully reduced below 1 degree.

  18. Body Movement Music Score – Introduction of a newly developed model for the analysis and description of body qualities, movement and music in music therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Agnieszka Skrzypek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In music therapy, there is a range of music therapy concepts that, in addition to music, describe and analyse the body and movement. A model that equally examines the body, movement and music has not been developed. The Body Movement Music Score (BMMS is a newly developed and evaluated music therapy model for analysing body qualities, movement, playing style of musical instruments and music and to describe body behaviour and body expression, movement behaviour and movement expression, playing behaviour and musical expression in music therapy treatment. The basis for the development of the Body Movement Music Score was the evaluation of the analytical movement model Emotorics-Emotive Body Movement Mind Paradigm (Emotorics-EBMMP by Yona Shahar Levy for the analysis and description of the emotive-motor behaviour and movement expression of schizophrenic patients in music therapy treatment. Participants and procedure The application of the Body Movement Music Score is presented in a videotaped example from the music therapy treatment of one schizophrenic patient. Results The results of applying the Body Movement Music Score are presented in the form of Body Qualities I Analysis, Body Qualities II Analysis, Movement Analysis, Playing Style Analysis and Music Analysis Profiles. Conclusions The Body Movement Music Score has been developed and evaluated for the music therapy treatment of schizophrenic patients. For the development of the model, a proof of reliability is necessary to verify the reliability and limitations of the model in practice and show that the Body Movement Music Score could be used for both practical and clinical work, for documentation purposes and to impact research in music therapy.

  19. The design and testing of a novel mechanomyogram-driven switch controlled by small eyebrow movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Natasha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with severe physical disabilities and minimal motor behaviour may be unable to use conventional mechanical switches for access. These persons may benefit from access technologies that harness the volitional activity of muscles. In this study, we describe the design and demonstrate the performance of a binary switch controlled by mechanomyogram (MMG signals recorded from the frontalis muscle during eyebrow movements. Methods Muscle contractions, detected in real-time with a continuous wavelet transform algorithm, were used to control a binary switch for computer access. The automatic selection of scale-specific thresholds reduced the effect of artefact, such as eye blinks and head movement, on the performance of the switch. Switch performance was estimated by cued response-tests performed by eleven participants (one with severe physical disabilities. Results The average sensitivity and specificity of the switch was 99.7 ± 0.4% and 99.9 ± 0.1%, respectively. The algorithm performance was robust against typical participant movement. Conclusions The results suggest that the frontalis muscle is a suitable site for controlling the MMG-driven switch. The high accuracies combined with the minimal requisite effort and training show that MMG is a promising binary control signal. Further investigation of the potential benefits of MMG-control for the target population is warranted.

  20. Microcosm Experiments and Modeling of Microbial Movement Under Unsaturated Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockman, F.J.; Kapadia, N.; Williams, G.; Rockhold, M.

    2006-04-05

    Colonization of bacteria in porous media has been studied primarily in saturated systems. In this study we examine how microbial colonization in unsaturated porous media is controlled by water content and particle size. This is important for understanding the feasibility and success of bioremediation via nutrient delivery when contaminant degraders are at low densities and when total microbial populations are sparse and spatially discontinuous. The study design used 4 different sand sizes, each at 4 different water contents; experiments were run with and without acetate as the sole carbon source. All experiments were run in duplicate columns and used the motile organism Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC, a carbon tetrachloride degrader. At a given sand size, bacteria traveled further with increasing volumetric water content. At a given volumetric water content, bacteria generally traveled further with increasing sand size. Water redistribution, solute transport, gas diffusion, and bacterial colonization dynamics were simulated using a numerical finite-difference model. Solute and bacterial transport were modeled using advection-dispersion equations, with reaction rate source/sink terms to account for bacterial growth and substrate utilization, represented using dual Monod-type kinetics. Oxygen transport and diffusion was modeled accounting for equilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and gas phases. The movement of bacteria in the aqueous phase was modeled using a linear impedance model in which the term D{sub m} is a coefficient, as used by Barton and Ford (1995), representing random motility. The unsaturated random motility coefficients we obtained (1.4 x 10{sup -6} to 2.8 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec) are in the same range as those found by others for saturated systems (3.5 x 10{sup -6} to 3.5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec). The results show that some bacteria can rapidly migrate in well sorted unsaturated sands (and perhaps in relatively high porosity, poorly

  1. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we present a phase-field model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as ``bipedal'' motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic ``crawlers'' and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  3. A state-space model for estimating detailed movements and home range from acoustic receiver data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Weng, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    We present a state-space model for acoustic receiver data to estimate detailed movement and home range of individual fish while accounting for spatial bias. An integral part of the approach is the detection function, which models the probability of logging tag transmissions as a function...... is used to estimate home range and movement of a reef fish in the Pacific Ocean....

  4. Small World Model-Based Polylogarithmic Routing Using Mobile Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Wu; Shu-Hui Yang

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile nodes to improve network system performance has drawn considerable attention recently.The movement-assisted model considers mobility as a desirable feature, where routing is based on the store-carry-forward paradigm with random or controlled movement of resource rich mobile nodes. The application of such a model has been used in several emerging networks, including mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), wireless sensor networks (WSNs), and delay tolerant networks (DTNs). It is well known that mobility increases the capacity of MANETs by reducing the number of relays for routing, prolonging the lifespan of WSNs by using mobile nodes in place of bottleneck static sensors, and ensuring network connectivity in DTNs using mobile nodes to connect different parts of a disconnected network. Trajectory planning and the coordination of mobile nodes are two important design issues aiming to optimize or balance several measures,including delay, average number of relays, and moving distance. In this paper, we propose a new controlled mobility model with an expected polylogarithmic number of relays to achieve a good balance among several contradictory goals, including delay, the number of relays, and moving distance. The model is based on the small-world model where each static node has "short" link connections to its nearest neighbors and "long" link connections to other nodes following a certain probability distribution. Short links are regular wireless connections whereas long links are implemented using mobile nodes. Various issues are considered, including trade-offs between delay and average number of relays, selection of the number of mobilenodes, and selection of the number of long links. The effectiveness of the proposed model is evaluated analytically as well as through simulation.

  5. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile damage modeling within the Small Punch Test (SPT) is extensively investigated. The capabilities ofthe SPT to reliably estimate fracture and damage properties are thoroughly discussed and emphasis isplaced on the use of notched specimens. First, different notch profiles are analyzed...... and constraint conditionsquantified. The role of the notch shape is comprehensively examined from both triaxiality and notchfabrication perspectives. Afterwards, a methodology is presented to extract the micromechanical-basedductile damage parameters from the load-displacement curve of notched SPT samples...

  6. Small Signal Circuit Model of Double Photodiodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jian-zhong; Ni Guo-qiang; MAO Lu-hong

    2004-01-01

    The transmission delay of photogenerated carriers in a CMOS-process-compatible double photodiode (DPD) is analyzed by using device simulation. The DPD small signal equivalent circuit model which includes transmission delay of photogenerated carriers is given. From analysis on the frequency domain of the circuit model the device has two poles. One has the relationship with junction capacitance and the DPD's load,the other with the depth and the doping concentration of the N-well in the DPD. Different depth of the Nwell and different area of the DPDs with bandwidth were compared. The analysis results are important to design the high speed DPDs.

  7. How-to-Do-It: Tracing Small Mammal Movements with Fluorescent Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullican, Tim R.; Streubel, Donald P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an activity designed to teach small mammal ecology and the scientific method using fluorescent dyes and pigments. Procedures for analyzing home ranges and social organizations are described. A list of 16 references is included. (CW)

  8. Modeling of Batter Pile Behavior under Lateral Soil Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; Hsu, H. Q.

    2017-06-01

    Pile foundation is frequently used when structures are located on weak sublayers or are at risk from lateral loadings such as earthquakes. The design of pile foundations has recently become crucial to stop slope movement. To understand the behavior of pile foundations subjected to lateral soil movement, the three-dimensional Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC3D) program was used to perform numerical simulations, which can reduce the cost of field testing. Vertical piles and batter piles were combined into 3 × 3 pile groups, and the response of batter piles to soil movement was analyzed. The outer batter piles led to an increased bending moment in the middle, vertical pile row. Increasing the pile spacing and the presence of battered piles reduced the pile group’s displacement. The batter pile group’s maximum bending moment was smaller than the vertical pile group’s in sand soil, but 5-8 times higher in clay soil.

  9. Fall and winter habitat use and movement by Columbia River redband trout in a small stream in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Bennett, David H.; Marotz, B.

    2001-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to quantify the movements and habitat use of resident adult Columbia River redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri (hereafter, redband trout) from October to December 1997 in South Fork Callahan Creek, a third-order tributary to Callahan Creek in the Kootenai River drainage in northwestern Montana. All redband trout (N = 23) were consistently relocated in a stream reach with moderate gradient (2.3%) near the site of original capture. Some fish (N = 13) displayed sedentary behavior, whereas others were mobile (N = 10). The mean total distance moved during the study for all fish combined was 64 m (SD = 105 m; range, 0–362 m), and the mean home range from October through December was 67 m (SD = 99 m; range, 5–377 m). Thirteen redband trout made short upstream and downstream movements (mean total movement = 134 m; range, 8–362 m) that were related to habitat use. Mobile fish commonly migrated to complex pools that spanned the entire channel width (primary pools). Eight of 10 fish that did not change habitat location occupied primary pools, whereas the remaining 2 fish occupied lateral pools. Fish commonly overwintered in primary pools dominated by cobble and boulder substrates that contained large woody debris. As water temperatures decreased from 3.2–6.3°C in October to 0–3.8°C in November and December, we found a 29% average increase (46–75%) in the proportional use of primary pool habitats. The lack of extensive movement and small home ranges indicate that adult redband trout found suitable overwintering habitat in deep pools with extensive amounts of cover within a third-order mountain stream. Resource managers who wish to protect overwintering habitat features preferred by redband trout throughout their limited range in streams affected by land management practices could apply strategies that protect and enhance pool habitat and stream complexity.

  10. Toward the quantification of a conceptual framework for movement ecology using circular statistical modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Ken Shimatani

    Full Text Available To analyze an animal's movement trajectory, a basic model is required that satisfies the following conditions: the model must have an ecological basis and the parameters used in the model must have ecological interpretations, a broad range of movement patterns can be explained by that model, and equations and probability distributions in the model should be mathematically tractable. Random walk models used in previous studies do not necessarily satisfy these requirements, partly because movement trajectories are often more oriented or tortuous than expected from the models. By improving the modeling for turning angles, this study aims to propose a basic movement model. On the basis of the recently developed circular auto-regressive model, we introduced a new movement model and extended its applicability to capture the asymmetric effects of external factors such as wind. The model was applied to GPS trajectories of a seabird (Calonectris leucomelas to demonstrate its applicability to various movement patterns and to explain how the model parameters are ecologically interpreted under a general conceptual framework for movement ecology. Although it is based on a simple extension of a generalized linear model to circular variables, the proposed model enables us to evaluate the effects of external factors on movement separately from the animal's internal state. For example, maximum likelihood estimates and model selection suggested that in one homing flight section, the seabird intended to fly toward the island, but misjudged its navigation and was driven off-course by strong winds, while in the subsequent flight section, the seabird reset the focal direction, navigated the flight under strong wind conditions, and succeeded in approaching the island.

  11. Velocity-based movement modeling for individual and population level inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim M Hanks

    Full Text Available Understanding animal movement and resource selection provides important information about the ecology of the animal, but an animal's movement and behavior are not typically constant in time. We present a velocity-based approach for modeling animal movement in space and time that allows for temporal heterogeneity in an animal's response to the environment, allows for temporal irregularity in telemetry data, and accounts for the uncertainty in the location information. Population-level inference on movement patterns and resource selection can then be made through cluster analysis of the parameters related to movement and behavior. We illustrate this approach through a study of northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus movement in the Bering Sea, Alaska, USA. Results show sex differentiation, with female northern fur seals exhibiting stronger response to environmental variables.

  12. Velocity-based movement modeling for individual and population level inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Ephraim M; Hooten, Mevin B; Johnson, Devin S; Sterling, Jeremy T

    2011-01-01

    Understanding animal movement and resource selection provides important information about the ecology of the animal, but an animal's movement and behavior are not typically constant in time. We present a velocity-based approach for modeling animal movement in space and time that allows for temporal heterogeneity in an animal's response to the environment, allows for temporal irregularity in telemetry data, and accounts for the uncertainty in the location information. Population-level inference on movement patterns and resource selection can then be made through cluster analysis of the parameters related to movement and behavior. We illustrate this approach through a study of northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) movement in the Bering Sea, Alaska, USA. Results show sex differentiation, with female northern fur seals exhibiting stronger response to environmental variables.

  13. Modeling movement disorders¿CRPS-related dystonia explained by abnormal proprioceptive reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Munts, A.G.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Humans control their movements using adaptive proprioceptive feedback from muscle afferents. The interaction between proprioceptive reflexes and biomechanical properties of the limb is essential in understanding the etiology of movement disorders. A non-linear neuromuscular model of the wrist incorp

  14. Salt movements and faulting of the overburden - can numerical modeling predict the fault patterns above salt structures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Wesenberg, Rasmus

    among other things the productivity due to the segmentation of the reservoir (Stewart 2006). 3D seismic data above salt structures can map such fault patterns in great detail and studies have shown that a variety of fault patterns exists. Yet, most patterns fall between two end members: concentric...... and radiating fault patterns. Here we use a modified version of the numerical spring-slider model introduced by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.(1998a) for simulating the emergence of small scale faults and fractures above a rising salt structure. The three-dimensional spring-slider model enables us to control....... The modeling shows that purely vertical movement of the salt introduces a mesh of concentric normal faults in the overburden, and that the frequency of radiating faults increases with the amount of lateral movements across the salt-overburden interface. The two end-member fault patterns (concentric vs...

  15. Modeling Unidirectional Pedestrian Movement: An Investigation of Diffusion Behavior in the Built Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unidirectional pedestrian movement is a special phenomenon in the evacuation process of large public buildings and urban environments at pedestrian scale. Several macroscopic models for collective behaviors have been built to predict pedestrian flow. However, current models do not explain the diffusion behavior in pedestrian crowd movement, which can be important in representing spatial-temporal crowd density differentiation in the movement process. This study builds a macroscopic model for describing crowd diffusion behavior and evaluating unidirectional pedestrian flow. The proposed model employs discretization of time and walking speed in geometric distribution to calculate downstream pedestrian crowd flow and analyze movement process based on upstream number of pedestrians and average walking speed. The simulated results are calibrated with video observation data in a baseball stadium to verify the model precision. Statistical results have verified that the proposed pedestrian diffusion model could accurately describe pedestrian macromovement behavior within the margin of error.

  16. Small platform sleep deprivation selectively increases the average duration of rapid eye movement sleep episodes during sleep rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitka, Tamas; Katai, Zita; Pap, Dorottya; Molnar, Eszter; Adori, Csaba; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2009-12-28

    The single platform-on-water (flower pot) method is extensively used for depriving rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Detailed comparison of sleep-wake architecture, recorded during the rebound period after spending three days on either a small or large platform, could separate the effects of REMS deficit from other stress factors caused by the procedure. A further aim of the study was to find the most characteristic REMS parameter of the rebound originating from REMS deficit. Rats were kept on a small or large platform for 72 h. Their fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the 24 h rebound at the beginning of the passive phase. A similar period of a home cage group was also recorded. The most typical differences between the two rebound groups were the increased cumulative time and longer average duration of REMS episodes without significant change in the number of these episodes of the small platform animals during the passive phase. Results obtained by cosinor analysis were in accordance with the findings above. Since we did not find any difference in the average duration of REMS episodes comparing the large platform rebound group and the home cage group, we concluded that the increased mean duration of REMS episodes is a selective marker for the rebound caused by small platform sleep deprivation, while other changes in sleep architecture may be the consequence of stress and also some sleep deficit.

  17. Business Model Innovation for Small Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirania Swasty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian economy through Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs is expected to absorb labor and contribute to the growth of Gross Domestic Product. However, SMEs lack both managerial and technical skills. This research is about business model innovation for SMEs especially in fashion and garment industry. Study used qualitative approach by mentoring four selected SMEs in Babakan Penghulu Village– Cinambo Sub-District, Eastern Bandung. The tools used to analyze them including PEST analysis, Porter’s Five Forces,Resource Based View, Value Chain Analysis and Business Model Canvas. Finding suggests SMEs to have business model innovation derived from value proposition. SMEs should build their own brand awareness. Moreover, as garment and fashion industry, design can be a particularly important part of the Value Proposition. SMEs could communicate its value propositions and inform their service through its official websites and other social media. Since the intangible resources include brand and design, thus SMEs should build brand image and innovate year by year. SMEs must hire designers and launch a series of new products offers under the signature of their own brands. Ideation to strengthen strategies derives from value proposition building block as a starting point. Moreover, Business Model Canvas makes strategy more focused and measurable. Business model innovation is expected to increase overall performance of SMEs.

  18. Hydrological Modelling of Small Catchments Using Swat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, N.; White, S. M.; Worrall, F.; Groves, S.

    The data from a 142ha catchment in Eastern England(Colworth, Bedfordshire)are be- ing used to investigate the performance of the USDA SWAT software for modelling hydrology of small catchments. Stream flow at the catchment outlet has been mon- itored since October 1999. About 50% of the total catchment is directly controlled within one farm and a rotation of wheat, oil seed rape, grass, linseed, beans and peas is grown. Three years of stream flow and climate data are available. Calibration and validation of stream flow was carried out with both runoff modelling options in the SWAT model (USDA curve number method and the Green and Ampt method). The Nash and Sutcliffe efficiencies for the calibration period were 66% and 63% respec- tively. The performance of SWAT was better in the validation period as a whole, with regard to timing of peaks, baseflow values and Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency. An ef- ficiency of 70% was obtained using the curve number method, which is comparable with the efficiencies obtainable with more complex models. Despite this performance, SWAT is under predicting stream flow peaks. A detailed investigation of important model components, has allowed us to identify some of the reasons for under predic- tion of stream flow peaks.

  19. Modelling and Simulation for Train Movement Control Using Car-Following Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; GAO Zi-You; TANG Tao

    2011-01-01

    Based on optimal velocity car-following model, in this paper, we propose a new railway traffc model for describing the process of train movement control.In the proposed model, we give an improved form of the optimal velocity function Vopt, which is considered as the desired velocity function for train movement control under different control conditions.In order to test the proposed model, we simulate and anaiyze the trajectories of train movements,moreover, discuss the relationship curves between the train allowable velocity and the site of objective point in detail Analysis results indicate that the proposed model can well capture some realistic futures of train movement control.PACS numbers: 02.70.-c, 89.40.-a

  20. Human balancing of an inverted pendulum: position control by small, ballistic-like, throw and catch movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin

    2002-05-01

    In standing, there are small sways of the body. Our interest is to use an artificial task to illuminate the mechanisms underlying the sways and to account for changes in their size. Using the ankle musculature, subjects balanced a large inverted pendulum. The equilibrium of the pendulum is unstable and quasi-regular sway was observed like that in quiet standing. By giving full attention to minimising sway subjects could systematically reduce pendulum movement. The pendulum position, the torque generated at each ankle and the soleus and tibialis anterior EMGs were recorded. Explanations about how the human inverted pendulum is balanced usually ignore the fact that balance is maintained over a range of angles and not just at one angle. Any resting equilibrium position of the pendulum is unstable and in practice temporary; movement to a different resting equilibrium position can only be accomplished by a biphasic 'throw and catch' pattern of torque and not by an elastic mechanism. Results showed that balance was achieved by the constant repetition of a neurally generated ballistic-like biphasic pattern of torque which can control both position and sway size. A decomposition technique revealed that there was a substantial contribution to changes in torque from intrinsic mechanical ankle stiffness; however, by itself this was insufficient to maintain balance or to control position. Minimisation of sway size was caused by improvement in the accuracy of the anticipatory torque impulses. We hypothesise that examination of centre of mass and centre of pressure data for quiet standing will duplicate these results.

  1. A generalized mathematical model to determine the turning movement counts at

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sayed Ahmed Al-Sobky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traffic turning movement counts at roundabouts is one of the key inputs required for roundabout assessment, control and management. Traditionally, a direct counting is conducted to track a vehicle from entering through circulation until exiting. This counting may be difficult and costly due to the size of roundabout, the vision obstacles, and the continuous traffic flow. Many researchers tried to avoid the tracking problem by counting only at entries and exits, then estimating the movements based on historical data which unfortunately affect the results. Other researchers reduced the tracking problem by counting some turning movements in addition to at entries and exits, then calculating mathematically the remaining movements. This approach is practical and accurate; however, it was applied on limited cases. In this paper, a generalized mathematical model was developed to calculate the most difficult movements based on the easiest movements determined based on the size of monitoring area. The developed model can be used to calculate the turning movements, including the u-turns, for roundabouts with any number of legs. The developed model was presented in O–D matrix forms to be practical and user-friendly. The model was validated against reference count data and the results were found to be satisfactory.

  2. Automatic removal of eye movement artifacts from the EEG using ICA and the dipole model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Zhou; Jean Gotman

    2009-01-01

    12 patients were analyzed.The experimental results indicate that ICA with the dipole model is very efficient at automatically subtracting the eye movement artifacts,while retaining the EEG slow waves and making their interpretation easier.

  3. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  4. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS

    2010-01-01

    Context: The forward lunge is widely used among athletes for training and rehabilitation purposes. The forward lunge movement has also been suggested as a model to study functional adaptation to ACL rupture. Previous investigations indicate that the absence of the ACL influences the movement patt...... by the ACL. The forward lunge explored the muscle and reaction forces, which can be used for further examination of ACL injury mechanisms and prevention strategies by applying parameter and optimization studies to the model....

  5. Modelling of railway vehicle movement considering non-ideal geometry of wheels and rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandora R.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A model of railway vehicle movement is presented. This model takes into account arbitrary shape of wheel and rails. Therefore models of contact of surfaces of arbitrary geometry are built in. The contact forces are found with possibility of choice from methods of rolling contact mechanics. The shape irregularities cause vibrations, therefore a model of track and its rails, sleepers and ballast is incorporated and also the vehicle model includes vibration-damping elements. Overall it makes a complete model of the vehicle movement with focus on the wear prediction and vibrations due to the corrugation.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Ayakawa Shiho; Oda Kyota; Ikeya-Hashizume Chisa; Tomita Natsuo; Shibamoto Yuta; Baba Fumiya; Ogino Hiroyuki; Sugie Chikao

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrenc...

  7. Effects of Pronunciation Practice System Based on Personalized CG Animations of Mouth Movement Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pronunciation practice system based on personalized Computer Graphics: CG animation of mouth movement model is proposed. The system enables a learner to practice pronunciation by looking at personalized CG animations of mouth movement model , and allows him/her to compare them with his/her own mouth movements. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the system by using personalized CG animation of mouth movement model, Japanese vowel and consonant sounds were read by 8 infants before and after practicing with the proposed system, and their pronunciations were examined. Remarkable improvement on their pronunciations is confirmed through a comparison to their pronunciation without the proposed system based on identification test by subjective basis.

  8. A Hidden Markov Movement Model for rapidly identifying behavioral states from animal tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whoriskey, Kim; Auger-Méthé, Marie; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard

    2017-01-01

    1. Electronic telemetry is frequently used to document animal movement through time. Methods that can identify underlying behaviors driving specific movement patterns can help us understand how and why animals use available space, thereby aiding conservation and management efforts. For aquatic....... 2. We developed a new Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for identifying behavioral states from animal tracks with negligible error, which we called the Hidden Markov Movement Model (HMMM). We implemented as the basis for the HMMM the process equation of the DCRWS, but we used the method of maximum...... animal tracking data with significant measurement error, a Bayesian state-space model called the first-Difference Correlated Random Walk with Switching (DCRWS) has often been used for this purpose. However, for aquatic animals, highly accurate tracking data of animal movement are now becoming more common...

  9. Model-Based Synthesis of Visual Speech Movements from 3D Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Edge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method for the synthesis of visual speech movements using a hybrid unit selection/model-based approach. Speech lip movements are captured using a 3D stereo face capture system and split up into phonetic units. A dynamic parameterisation of this data is constructed which maintains the relationship between lip shapes and velocities; within this parameterisation a model of how lips move is built and is used in the animation of visual speech movements from speech audio input. The mapping from audio parameters to lip movements is disambiguated by selecting only the most similar stored phonetic units to the target utterance during synthesis. By combining properties of model-based synthesis (e.g., HMMs, neural nets with unit selection we improve the quality of our speech synthesis.

  10. An action potential-driven model of soleus muscle activation dynamics for locomotor-like movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Sandercock, Thomas G.; Heckman, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically plausible, computationally robust model for muscle activation dynamics (A(t)) under physiologically relevant excitation and movement. Approach. The interaction of excitation and movement on A(t) was investigated comparing the force production between a cat soleus muscle and its Hill-type model. For capturing A(t) under excitation and movement variation, a modular modeling framework was proposed comprising of three compartments: (1) spikes-to-[Ca2+]; (2) [Ca2+]-to-A; and (3) A-to-force transformation. The individual signal transformations were modeled based on physiological factors so that the parameter values could be separately determined for individual modules directly based on experimental data. Main results. The strong dependency of A(t) on excitation frequency and muscle length was found during both isometric and dynamically-moving contractions. The identified dependencies of A(t) under the static and dynamic conditions could be incorporated in the modular modeling framework by modulating the model parameters as a function of movement input. The new modeling approach was also applicable to cat soleus muscles producing waveforms independent of those used to set the model parameters. Significance. This study provides a modeling framework for spike-driven muscle responses during movement, that is suitable not only for insights into molecular mechanisms underlying muscle behaviors but also for large scale simulations.

  11. Hillslope sediment and soil carbon transport: can we model their movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Greg; Kunkel, Veikko; Dever, Chris; Braggins, Matthew; Willgoose, Garry

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying and predicting the movement of hillslope sediment and soil organic carbon (SOC) is of huge scientific, agronomic and economic benefit. In particular, the movement and fate of SOC has attracted considerable recent attention. However, the reliable modelling and prediction of sediment and SOC movement has proved elusive. Here we examine the movement of sediment and SOC along a grazing hillslope in south-eastern Australia. The slope is linear, uniformly managed and has consistent vegetation (grassland). We quantify sediment and SOC transport using the environmental tracer 137-Ceasium. However, here we collect field samples using the conventional soil cores but also shallow samples to quantify the dynamics of the near surface. We also model the movement of sediment and SOC using a numerically based soil erosion and landscape evolution model. Our results show that the hillslope is erosional which is supported by field observation. However, there was no relationship between SOC and 137-Caesium suggesting that SOC and their movement and fate are not related. Significant relationships were observed between soil texture and SOC for the near surface but not for the deeper cores suggesting any movement and fate of SOC is more controlled by soil particle size at the near surface. The SIBERIA sediment transport model was calibrated and run for the site. Comparing the field derived erosion and SOC data with model prediction found no significant relationship. However, the numerical model was able to predict the cyclic pattern of 137-Ceasium and SOC as well as overall trends. Our findings demonstrate that the movement and fate of sediment and SOC is complex.

  12. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  13. Longitudinal dispersion modeling in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarova, Pavla; Pekar, Jan; Miklanek, Pavol

    2014-05-01

    The environmental problems caused by the increasing of pollutant loads discharged into natural water bodies are very complex. For that reason the cognition of transport mechanism and mixing characteristics in natural streams is very important. The mathematical and numerical models have become very useful tools for solving the water management problems. The mathematical simulations based on numerical models of pollution mixing in streams can be used (for example) for prediction of spreading of accidental contaminant waves in rivers. The paper deals with the estimation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficients and with the numerical simulation of transport and transformation of accidental pollution in the small natural streams. There are different ways of solving problems of pollution spreading in open channels, in natural rivers. One of them is the hydrodynamic approach, which endeavours to understand and quantify the spreading phenomenon in a stream. The hydrodynamic models are based on advection-diffusion equation and the majority of them are one-dimensional models. Their disadvantage is inability to simulate the spread of pollution until complete dispersion of pollutant across the stream section is finished. Two-dimensional mixing models do not suffer from these limitations. On the other hand, the one-dimensional models are simpler than two-dimensional ones, they need not so much input data and they are often swifter. Three-dimensional models under conditions of natural streams are applicable with difficulties (or inapplicable) for their complexity and demands on accuracy and amount of input data. As there was mentioned above the two-dimensional models can be used also until complete dispersion of pollutant across the stream section is not finished, so we decided to apply the two-dimensional model SIRENIE. Experimental microbasin Rybarik is the part of the experimental Mostenik brook basin of IH SAS Bratislava. It was established as a Field Hydrological

  14. Modeling white sturgeon movement in a reservoir: The effect of water quality and sturgeon density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, A.B.; Jager, H.I.; Myers, R.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a movement model to examine the distribution and survival of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) in a reservoir subject to large spatial and temporal variation in dissolved oxygen and temperature. Temperature and dissolved oxygen were simulated by a CE-QUAL-W2 model of Brownlee Reservoir, Idaho for a typical wet, normal, and dry hydrologic year. We compared current water quality conditions to scenarios with reduced nutrient inputs to the reservoir. White sturgeon habitat quality was modeled as a function of temperature, dissolved oxygen and, in some cases, suitability for foraging and depth. We assigned a quality index to each cell along the bottom of the reservoir. The model simulated two aspects of daily movement. Advective movement simulated the tendency for animals to move toward areas with high habitat quality, and diffusion simulated density dependent movement away from areas with high sturgeon density in areas with non-lethal habitat conditions. Mortality resulted when sturgeon were unable to leave areas with lethal temperature or dissolved oxygen conditions. Water quality was highest in winter and early spring and lowest in mid to late summer. Limiting nutrient inputs reduced the area of Brownlee Reservoir with lethal conditions for sturgeon and raised the average habitat suitability throughout the reservoir. Without movement, simulated white sturgeon survival ranged between 45 and 89%. Allowing movement raised the predicted survival of sturgeon under all conditions to above 90% as sturgeon avoided areas with low habitat quality. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Video-based feedback combined with reflective enquiry – An interactive model for movement awareness among nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Backåberg; Mikael Rask; Christina Gummesson; David Brunt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe an interactive model developed for movement awareness in a practical learning situation and to explore the use of video-based digital feedback and reflective enquiry in this model among nursing students. Sixteen students participated in individual interactive video sessions with a facilitator, who encouraged the students to reflect upon their own movements. Qualitative analysis showed that movement patterns were visualized, and that movement awareness and ...

  16. Allosteric communication in myosin V: from small conformational changes to large directed movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cecchini

    Full Text Available The rigor to post-rigor transition in myosin, a consequence of ATP binding, plays an essential role in the Lymn-Taylor functional cycle because it results in the dissociation of the actomyosin complex after the powerstroke. On the basis of the X-ray structures of myosin V, we have developed a new normal mode superposition model for the transition path between the two states. Rigid-body motions of the various subdomains and specific residues at the subdomain interfaces are key elements in the transition. The allosteric communication between the nucleotide binding site and the U50/L50 cleft is shown to result from local changes due to ATP binding, which induce large amplitude motions that are encoded in the structure of the protein. The triggering event is the change in the interaction of switch I and the P-loop, which is stabilized by ATP binding. The motion of switch I, which is a relatively rigid element of the U50 subdomain, leads directly to a partial opening of the U50/L50 cleft; the latter is expected to weaken the binding of myosin to actin. The calculated transition path demonstrates the nature of the subdomain coupling and offers an explanation for the mutual exclusion of ATP and actin binding. The mechanism of the uncoupling of the converter from the motor head, an essential part of the transition, is elucidated. The origin of the partial untwisting of the central beta-sheet in the rigor to post-rigor transition is described.

  17. A NEW CONCEPT OF MODELING NEEDS OF THE POPULATION IN THE LABOR MOVEMENT BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Ghorbachov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, with the purpose of accounting a casual character of distribution of capacities of transport areas on labor movements in a matrix of correspondences, the interval concept of modeling the population needs in movements has been suggested when for transport calculations one uses not one variant of a matrix but borders of an interval of its possible values at the set area capacities.

  18. Self-Propelled Pedestrian Dynamics Model: Application to Passenger Movement and Infection Propagation in Airplanes

    CERN Document Server

    Namilae, S; Mubayi, A; Scotch, M; Pahle, R

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the number of contacts between passengers on an airplane can potentially curb the spread of infectious diseases. In this paper, a social force based pedestrian movement model is formulated and applied to evaluate the movement and contacts among passengers during boarding and deplaning of an airplane. Within the social force modeling framework, we introduce location dependence on the self-propelling momentum of pedestrian particles. The model parameters are varied over a large design space and the results are compared with experimental observations to validate the model. This model is then used to assess the different approaches to minimize passenger contacts during boarding and deplaning of airplanes. We find that smaller aircrafts are effective in reducing the contacts between passengers. Column wise deplaning and random boarding are found to be two strategies that reduced the number of contacts during passenger movement, and can potentially lower the likelihood of infection spread.

  19. Self-propelled pedestrian dynamics model: Application to passenger movement and infection propagation in airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namilae, S.; Srinivasan, A.; Mubayi, A.; Scotch, M.; Pahle, R.

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the number of contacts between passengers on an airplane can potentially curb the spread of infectious diseases. In this paper, a social force based pedestrian movement model is formulated and applied to evaluate the movement and contacts among passengers during boarding and deplaning of an airplane. Within the social force modeling framework, we introduce location dependence on the self-propelling momentum of pedestrian particles. The model parameters are varied over a large design space and the results are compared with experimental observations to validate the model. This model is then used to assess the different approaches to minimize passenger contacts during boarding and deplaning of airplanes. We find that smaller aircrafts are effective in reducing the contacts between passengers. Column wise deplaning and random boarding are found to be two strategies that reduced the number of contacts during passenger movement, and can potentially lower the likelihood of infection spread.

  20. Hybrid Modelling of Individual Movement and Collective Behaviour

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of dispersal in biological systems are often written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) which describe the time evolution of population-level variables (concentrations, densities). A more detailed modelling approach is given by individual-based (agent-based) models which describe the behaviour of each organism. In recent years, an intermediate modelling methodology - hybrid modelling - has been applied to a number of biological systems. These hybrid models couple an individual-based description of cells/animals with a PDE-model of their environment. In this chapter, we overview hybrid models in the literature with the focus on the mathematical challenges of this modelling approach. The detailed analysis is presented using the example of chemotaxis, where cells move according to extracellular chemicals that can be altered by the cells themselves. In this case, individual-based models of cells are coupled with PDEs for extracellular chemical signals. Travelling waves in these hybrid models are investigated. In particular, we show that in contrary to the PDEs, hybrid chemotaxis models only develop a transient travelling wave. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Generalized Pareto for Pattern-Oriented Random Walk Modelling of Organisms' Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bertrand

    Full Text Available How organisms move and disperse is crucial to understand how population dynamics relates to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment. Random walk (RW models are typical tools to describe movement patterns. Whether Lévy or alternative RW better describes forager movements is keenly debated. We get around this issue using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD. GPD includes as specific cases Normal, exponential and power law distributions, which underlie Brownian, Poisson-like and Lévy walks respectively. Whereas previous studies typically confronted a limited set of candidate models, GPD lets the most likely RW model emerge from the data. We illustrate the wide applicability of the method using GPS-tracked seabird foraging movements and fishing vessel movements tracked by Vessel Monitoring System (VMS, both collected in the Peruvian pelagic ecosystem. The two parameters from the fitted GPD, a scale and a shape parameter, provide a synoptic characterization of the observed movement in terms of characteristic scale and diffusive property. They reveal and quantify the variability, among species and individuals, of the spatial strategies selected by predators foraging on a common prey field. The GPD parameters constitute relevant metrics for (1 providing a synthetic and pattern-oriented description of movement, (2 using top predators as ecosystem indicators and (3 studying the variability of spatial behaviour among species or among individuals with different personalities.

  2. Generalized Pareto for Pattern-Oriented Random Walk Modelling of Organisms' Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sophie; Joo, Rocío; Fablet, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    How organisms move and disperse is crucial to understand how population dynamics relates to the spatial heterogeneity of the environment. Random walk (RW) models are typical tools to describe movement patterns. Whether Lévy or alternative RW better describes forager movements is keenly debated. We get around this issue using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). GPD includes as specific cases Normal, exponential and power law distributions, which underlie Brownian, Poisson-like and Lévy walks respectively. Whereas previous studies typically confronted a limited set of candidate models, GPD lets the most likely RW model emerge from the data. We illustrate the wide applicability of the method using GPS-tracked seabird foraging movements and fishing vessel movements tracked by Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), both collected in the Peruvian pelagic ecosystem. The two parameters from the fitted GPD, a scale and a shape parameter, provide a synoptic characterization of the observed movement in terms of characteristic scale and diffusive property. They reveal and quantify the variability, among species and individuals, of the spatial strategies selected by predators foraging on a common prey field. The GPD parameters constitute relevant metrics for (1) providing a synthetic and pattern-oriented description of movement, (2) using top predators as ecosystem indicators and (3) studying the variability of spatial behaviour among species or among individuals with different personalities.

  3. Peristaltic Transport of a Rheological Fluid: Model for Movement of Food Bolus Through Esophagus

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, J C

    2011-01-01

    Fluid mechanical peristaltic transport through esophagus has been of concern in the paper. A mathematical model has been developed with an aim to study the peristaltic transport of a rheological fluid for arbitrary wave shapes and tube lengths. The Ostwald-de Waele power law of viscous fluid is considered here to depict the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid. The model is formulated and analyzed with the specific aim of exploring some important information concerning the movement of food bolus through the esophagus. The analysis has been carried out by using lubrication theory. The study is particularly suitable for cases where the Reynolds number is small. The esophagus is treated as a circular tube through which the transport of food bolus takes places by periodic contraction of the esophageal wall. Variation of different variables concerned with the transport phenomena such as pressure, flow velocity, particle trajectory and reflux are investigated for a single wave as well as for a train of periodic per...

  4. A large 3D physical model: a tool to investigate the consequences of ground movements on the surface structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil subsidence of various extend and amplitude can result from the failure of underground cavities, whether natural (for example caused by the dissolution of rocks by underground water flow or man-made (such as mines. The impact of the ground movements on existing structures (houses, buildings, bridges, etc… is generally dramatic. A large small-scale physical model is developed in order to improve our understanding of the behaviour of the building subjected to ground subsidence or the collapse of cavities. We focus on the soil-structure interaction and on the mitigation techniques allowing reducing the vulnerability of the buildings (structures.

  5. Electrical models of excitation-contraction coupling and charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, R T; Levis, R A; Eisenberg, R S

    1980-07-01

    The consequences of ionic current flow from the T system to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle are examined. The Appendix analyzes a simple model in which the conductance gx, linking T system and SR, is in series with a parallel resistor and capacitor having fixed values. The conductance gx is supposed to increase rapidly with depolarization and to decrease slowly with repolarization. Nonlinear transient currents computed from this model have some of the properties of gating currents produced by intramembrane charge movement. In particular, the integral of the transient current upon depolarization approximates that upon repolarization. Thus, equality of nonlinear charge movement can occur without intramembrane charge movement. A more complicated model is used in the text to fit the structure of skeletal muscle and other properties of its charge movement. Rectification is introduced into gx and the membrane conductance of the terminal cisternae to give asymmetry in the time-course of the transient currents and saturation in the curve relating charge movement to depolarization, respectively. The more complex model fits experimental data quite well if the longitudinal tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum are isolated from the terminal cisternae by a substantial resistance and if calcium release from the terminal cisternae is, for the most part, electrically silent. Specific experimental tests of the model are proposed, and the implications for excitation-contraction coupling are discussed.

  6. The punctum fixum-punctum mobile model: a neuromuscular principle for efficient movement generation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Laßberg

    Full Text Available According to the "punctum fixum-punctum mobile model" that was introduced in prior studies, for generation of the most effective intentional acceleration of a body part the intersegmental neuromuscular onset succession has to spread successively from the rotation axis (punctum fixum toward the body part that shall be accelerated (punctum mobile. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this principle is, indeed, fundamental for any kind of efficient rotational accelerations in general, independent of the kind of movements, type of rotational axis, the current body position, or movement direction. Neuromuscular onset succession was captured by surface electromyography of relevant muscles of the anterior and posterior muscle chain in 16 high-level gymnasts during intentional accelerating movement phases while performing 18 different gymnastics elements (in various body positions to forward and backward, performed on high bar, parallel bars, rings and trampoline, as well as during non-sport specific pivot movements around the longitudinal axis. The succession patterns to generate the acceleration phases during these movements were described and statistically evaluated based on the onset time difference between the muscles of the corresponding muscle chain. In all the analyzed movement phases, the results clearly support the hypothesized succession pattern from punctum fixum to punctum mobile. This principle was further underlined by the finding that the succession patterns do change their direction running through the body when the rotational axis (punctum fixum has been changed (e.g., high bar or rings [hands] vs. floor or trampoline [feet]. The findings improve our understanding of intersegmental neuromuscular coordination patterns to generate intentional movements most efficiently. This could help to develop more specific methods to facilitate such patterns in particular contexts, thus allowing for shorter motor learning

  7. Fuzzy Deductive Inference Scheme Application in Solving the Problem of Modelling Movements of the Hand Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhenyuk Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision-making model with basic fuzzy rule modus ponens is suggested in this paper to control the hand prosthesis. The hand movements are described by angles of finger and wrist flexion. Electromyogram (EMG of hand muscles was used as a source of the input data. Software was developed to implement the decision-making model with fuzzy rule modus ponens. In particular, the software receives EMG data, executes calculations and visualises the output data. The key advantage of the model is smoothness of output data changes; this way a maximum approach to natural hand movements is reached.

  8. Modeling the Movement of Beach Alluvia in the Alongshore Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Bondareva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors have worked out a design model for the dynamics of a mixed-composition beach in the vicinity of transverse structures. The model uses a modified formula for calculating alluvia, which is based on modified energy dependencies. The authors provide an algorithm for performing these calculations.

  9. An assessment of six muscle spindle models for predicting sensory information during human wrist movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja eMalik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The muscle spindle is an important sensory organ for proprioceptive information, yet there have been few attempts to use Shannon information theory to quantify the capacity of human muscle spindles to encode sensory input.Methods: Computer simulations linked kinematics, to biomechanics, to six muscle spindle models that generated predictions of firing rate. The predicted firing rates were compared to firing rates of human muscle spindles recorded during a step-tracking (center-out task to validate their use. The models were then used to predict firing rates during random movements with statistical properties matched to the ergonomics of human wrist movements. The data were analyzed for entropy and mutual information.Results: Three of the six models produced predictions that approximated the firing rate of human spindles during the step-tracking task. For simulated random movements these models predicted mean rates of 16.0±4.1 imp/s (mean±sd, peak firing rates <50 imp/s and zero firing rate during an average of 25% of the movement. The average entropy of the neural response was 4.1±0.3 bits and is an estimate of the maximum information that could be carried by muscles spindles during ecologically valid movements. The information about tendon displacement preserved in the neural response was 0.10±0.05 bits per symbol; whereas 1.25±0.30 bits per symbol of velocity input were preserved in the neural response of the spindle models.Conclusions: Muscle spindle models, originally based on cat experiments, have predictive value for modeling responses of human muscle spindles with minimal parameter optimization. These models predict more than 10-fold more velocity over length information encoding during ecologically valid movements. These results establish theoretical parameters for developing neuroprostheses for proprioceptive function.

  10. Automated quantitative gait analysis in animal models of movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandeputte Caroline

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate and reproducible behavioral tests in animal models are of major importance in the development and evaluation of new therapies for central nervous system disease. In this study we investigated for the first time gait parameters of rat models for Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD and stroke using the Catwalk method, a novel automated gait analysis test. Static and dynamic gait parameters were measured in all animal models, and these data were compared to readouts of established behavioral tests, such as the cylinder test in the PD and stroke rats and the rotarod tests for the HD group. Results Hemiparkinsonian rats were generated by unilateral injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine in the striatum or in the medial forebrain bundle. For Huntington's disease, a transgenic rat model expressing a truncated huntingtin fragment with multiple CAG repeats was used. Thirdly, a stroke model was generated by a photothrombotic induced infarct in the right sensorimotor cortex. We found that multiple gait parameters were significantly altered in all three disease models compared to their respective controls. Behavioural deficits could be efficiently measured using the cylinder test in the PD and stroke animals, and in the case of the PD model, the deficits in gait essentially confirmed results obtained by the cylinder test. However, in the HD model and the stroke model the Catwalk analysis proved more sensitive than the rotarod test and also added new and more detailed information on specific gait parameters. Conclusion The automated quantitative gait analysis test may be a useful tool to study both motor impairment and recovery associated with various neurological motor disorders.

  11. Molecular characterization of peste des petits ruminants viruses from outbreaks caused by unrestricted movements of small ruminants in pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, M; Saeed, A; Abubakar, M; Kanwal, S; Berg, M

    2015-02-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an endemic disease of small ruminants, and vaccination has been the method of control but outbreaks are continuously occurring in Pakistan. The following study presents a detailed investigation of an outbreak, suspected to be PPR, probably introduced by PPRV-infected sheep and goats from Sindh Province (north-west) to Punjab Province (central) of Pakistan during the flood relief campaign in 2011. A total of 70 serum samples from 28 different flocks were tested with competitive ELISA (H antibodies), which detected 24 (34.2%) samples positive for PPRV antibodies. Nasal swabs and faeces were tested with immunocapture ELISA (N antigen), which detected 18 (25.7%) samples positive for PPRV antigen. The RNA detected positive (n = 28, 40%) using real-time PCR was subjected to conventional PCR for the amplification of the fusion and nucleoprotein genes. Sequencing of both genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated the grouping of all the sequences to be in lineage IV along with other Asian isolates of PPRV. However, sequences of both genes were divided into two groups within lineage IV. One group of viruses clustered with previously characterized Pakistani isolates, whereas the other group was distinctly clustered with isolates from the Middle East or India. The sequence identity indicated the introduction of at least one population of PPRV from a different source and circulation in the local flocks of small ruminants, which emphasized the need to obtain health clearance certificate before movement of animals. The results of this study provide baseline data for the genetic characterization of different PPRV populations in Pakistan. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities associated with orthodontic tooth movement: a behavioral rat model for orthodontic tooth movement-induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Mandeep; Bhatt, Poolak; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    To test whether orofacial mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities occur in rats during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Sprague-Dawley rats (140 to 160 g) were divided into an experimental (E) group (n =7), with an active orthodontic spring placed in the right side of their mouth, and a sham (S) group (n = 7), with an inactive orthodontic spring. Mechanical sensitivity was tested preoperatively (1 day before attaching the orthodontic spring) and postoperatively (1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours, days 1 to 7, day 14, day 21, and day 28 after orthodontic spring attachment) on the cheek, upper lip, and maxillary incisor labial gingiva bilaterally by recording the threshold for a head withdrawal response evoked by von Frey filaments. Thermal sensitivity was also tested preoperatively and postoperatively on the cheek bilaterally by applying a noxious thermal stimulus and measuring head withdrawal response duration, response score, and response percentile rate. Statistical analyses involved a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance (MMRM ANOVA). The mechanical and thermal sensitivities at all bilateral sites were significantly increased (P pain model correlates with the time course of OTM-induced pain in humans and suggests that OTM-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities may be useful measures of OTM-induced pain.

  13. The Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) Teaching Model for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Meirav; Walter, Ofra

    2012-01-01

    Previously, the Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) has been found to contribute to the development of emotional competencies in higher education. This study presents and evaluates a teaching model based on SDM for the development of emotional competencies in teacher education. The study examined the contributions of this model to the increase…

  14. The Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) Teaching Model for Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Meirav; Walter, Ofra

    2012-01-01

    Previously, the Sherborne Developmental Movement (SDM) has been found to contribute to the development of emotional competencies in higher education. This study presents and evaluates a teaching model based on SDM for the development of emotional competencies in teacher education. The study examined the contributions of this model to the increase…

  15. A spatially distributed model of pesticide movement in Dutch macroporous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiktak, A.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a spatially distributed version of the pesticide fate model PEARL is routinely used to assess the leaching potential of pesticides to groundwater. Recently, the model was modified to simulate the movement of pesticides to surface water. The peak concentration is considered to be

  16. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS

    2010-01-01

    5 20 years). Interventions: Three-dimensional coordinates of skin-mounted markers were obtained via five video cameras. The subject performed a forward lunge on a force plate, targeting a knee flexion angle of 906. A model of the lunge movement was developed using the AnyBody Modeling System...

  17. Decoding finger movements from ECoG signals using switching linear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi eFlamary

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting challenges in ECoG-based Brain-Machine Interface is movement prediction. Being able to perform such a prediction paves the way to high-degree precision command for a machine such as a robotic arm or robotic hands. As a witness of the BCI community increasing interest towards such a problem, the fourth BCI Competition provides a dataset which aim is to predict individual finger movements from ECog signals. The difficulty of the problem relies on the fact that there is no simple relation between ECoG signals and finger movements. We propose in this paper, to estimate and decode these finger flexions using switching models controlled by an hidden state. Switching models can integrate prior knowledge about the decoding problem and helps in predicting fine and precise movements. Our model is thus based on a first block which estimates which finger is moving and anotherblock which, knowing which finger is moving, predicts the movements of allother fingers. Numerical results that have been submitted to the Competition show that the model yields high decoding performances when the hidden state is well estimated. This approach achieved the second place in the BCI competition with a correlation measure between real and predictedmovements of 0.42.

  18. Fuzzy Computing Model of Activity Recognition on WSN Movement Data for Ubiquitous Healthcare Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shu-Yin; Kan, Yao-Chiang; Chen, Yun-Shan; Tu, Ying-Ching; Lin, Hsueh-Chun

    2016-12-03

    Ubiquitous health care (UHC) is beneficial for patients to ensure they complete therapeutic exercises by self-management at home. We designed a fuzzy computing model that enables recognizing assigned movements in UHC with privacy. The movements are measured by the self-developed body motion sensor, which combines both accelerometer and gyroscope chips to make an inertial sensing node compliant with a wireless sensor network (WSN). The fuzzy logic process was studied to calculate the sensor signals that would entail necessary features of static postures and dynamic motions. Combinations of the features were studied and the proper feature sets were chosen with compatible fuzzy rules. Then, a fuzzy inference system (FIS) can be generated to recognize the assigned movements based on the rules. We thus implemented both fuzzy and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems in the model to distinguish static and dynamic movements. The proposed model can effectively reach the recognition scope of the assigned activity. Furthermore, two exercises of upper-limb flexion in physical therapy were applied for the model in which the recognition rate can stand for the passing rate of the assigned motions. Finally, a web-based interface was developed to help remotely measure movement in physical therapy for UHC.

  19. Fuzzy Computing Model of Activity Recognition on WSN Movement Data for Ubiquitous Healthcare Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shu-Yin; Kan, Yao-Chiang; Chen, Yun-Shan; Tu, Ying-Ching; Lin, Hsueh-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous health care (UHC) is beneficial for patients to ensure they complete therapeutic exercises by self-management at home. We designed a fuzzy computing model that enables recognizing assigned movements in UHC with privacy. The movements are measured by the self-developed body motion sensor, which combines both accelerometer and gyroscope chips to make an inertial sensing node compliant with a wireless sensor network (WSN). The fuzzy logic process was studied to calculate the sensor signals that would entail necessary features of static postures and dynamic motions. Combinations of the features were studied and the proper feature sets were chosen with compatible fuzzy rules. Then, a fuzzy inference system (FIS) can be generated to recognize the assigned movements based on the rules. We thus implemented both fuzzy and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems in the model to distinguish static and dynamic movements. The proposed model can effectively reach the recognition scope of the assigned activity. Furthermore, two exercises of upper-limb flexion in physical therapy were applied for the model in which the recognition rate can stand for the passing rate of the assigned motions. Finally, a web-based interface was developed to help remotely measure movement in physical therapy for UHC. PMID:27918482

  20. Fuzzy Computing Model of Activity Recognition on WSN Movement Data for Ubiquitous Healthcare Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous health care (UHC is beneficial for patients to ensure they complete therapeutic exercises by self-management at home. We designed a fuzzy computing model that enables recognizing assigned movements in UHC with privacy. The movements are measured by the self-developed body motion sensor, which combines both accelerometer and gyroscope chips to make an inertial sensing node compliant with a wireless sensor network (WSN. The fuzzy logic process was studied to calculate the sensor signals that would entail necessary features of static postures and dynamic motions. Combinations of the features were studied and the proper feature sets were chosen with compatible fuzzy rules. Then, a fuzzy inference system (FIS can be generated to recognize the assigned movements based on the rules. We thus implemented both fuzzy and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems in the model to distinguish static and dynamic movements. The proposed model can effectively reach the recognition scope of the assigned activity. Furthermore, two exercises of upper-limb flexion in physical therapy were applied for the model in which the recognition rate can stand for the passing rate of the assigned motions. Finally, a web-based interface was developed to help remotely measure movement in physical therapy for UHC.

  1. Advanced statistical methods for eye movement analysis and modeling: a gentle introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Boccignone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In this Chapter we show that by considering eye movements, and in particular, the resulting sequence of gaze shifts, a stochastic process, a wide variety of tools become available for analyses and modelling beyond conventional statistical methods. Such tools encompass random walk analyses and more complex techniques borrowed from the pattern recognition and machine learning fields. After a brief, though critical, probabilistic tour of current computational models of eye movements and visual attention, we lay down the basis for gaze shift pattern analysis. To this end, the concepts of Markov Processes, the Wiener process and related random walks within the Gaussian framework of the Central Limit Theorem will be introduced. Then, we will deliberately violate fundamental assumptions of the Central Limit Theorem to elicit a larger perspective, rooted in statistical physics, for analysing and modelling eye movements in terms of anomalous, non-Gaussian, random walks and modern foraging theory. Eventually, by resort...

  2. MODELLING THE CONSTRAINTS OF SPATIAL ENVIRONMENT IN FAUNA MOVEMENT SIMULATIONS: COMPARISON OF A BOUNDARIES ACCURATE FUNCTION AND A COST FUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Jolivet, L.; Cohen, M.; Ruas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape influences fauna movement at different levels, from habitat selection to choices of movements' direction. Our goal is to provide a development frame in order to test simulation functions for animal's movement. We describe our approach for such simulations and we compare two types of functions to calculate trajectories. To do so, we first modelled the role of landscape elements to differentiate between elements that facilitate movements and the ones being hindrances. Different influe...

  3. Stochastic particle based models for suspended particle movement in surface flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina W.TSAI; Chuanjian MAN; Jungsun OH

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of suspended sediment particle movement in surface water can be achieved by stochastic particle tracking model approaches. In this paper, different mathematical forms of particle tracking models are introduced to describe particle movement under various flow conditions, i.e., the stochastic diffusion process, stochastic jump process, and stochastic jump diffusion process. While the stochastic diffusion process can be used to represent the stochastic movement of suspended particles in turbulent flows, the stochastic jump and the stochastic jump diffusion processes can be used to describe suspended particle movement in the occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows. An extreme flow herein is defined as a hydrologic flow event or a hydrodynamic flow phenomenon with a low probability of occurrence and a high impact on its ambient flow environment. In this paper, the suspended sediment particle is assumed to immediately follow the extreme flows in the jump process (i.e. the time lag between the flow particle and the sediment particle in extreme flows is considered negligible). In the proposed particle tracking models, a random term mainly caused by fluid eddy motions is modeled as a Wiener process, while the random occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows can be modeled as a Poisson process. The frequency of occurrence of the extreme flows in the proposed particle tracking model can be explicitly accounted for by the Poisson process when evaluating particle movement. The ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be obtained from the proposed stochastic models via simulations. The ensemble mean and variance of particle velocity are verified with available data. Applicability of the proposed stochastic particle tracking models for sediment transport modeling is also discussed.

  4. Consistently modeling the same movement strategy is more important than model skill level in observational learning contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John J; Dean, Noah

    2014-02-01

    The experiment undertaken was designed to elucidate the impact of model skill level on observational learning processes. The task was bimanual circle tracing with a 90° relative phase lead of one hand over the other hand. Observer groups watched videos of either an instruction model, a discovery model, or a skilled model. The instruction and skilled model always performed the task with the same movement strategy, the right-arm traced clockwise and the left-arm counterclockwise around circle templates with the right-arm leading. The discovery model used several movement strategies (tracing-direction/hand-lead) during practice. Observation of the instruction and skilled model provided a significant benefit compared to the discovery model when performing the 90° relative phase pattern in a post-observation test. The observers of the discovery model had significant room for improvement and benefited from post-observation practice of the 90° pattern. The benefit of a model is found in the consistency with which that model uses the same movement strategy, and not within the skill level of the model. It is the consistency in strategy modeled that allows observers to develop an abstract perceptual representation of the task that can be implemented into a coordinated action. Theoretically, the results show that movement strategy information (relative motion direction, hand lead) and relative phase information can be detected through visual perception processes and be successfully mapped to outgoing motor commands within an observational learning context.

  5. A biobehavioral model of weight loss associated with meditative movement practice among breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K Larkey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

  6. Referee comment on Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmela Herzog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many archaeological studies assessing the impact of topography on past human movement, only weak arguments without validation for the weights assigned to different terrain features are given. Therefore a study presenting terrain coefficients relying on sound tests is most welcome though the range of applications in archaeological modelling is limited. This article is a referee comment for de Gruchy, M., Caswell, E and Edwards, J. 2017 Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement, Internet Archaeology.

  7. Whisker movements reveal spatial attention: a unified computational model of active sensing control in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchinson, Ben; Prescott, Tony J

    2013-01-01

    Spatial attention is most often investigated in the visual modality through measurement of eye movements, with primates, including humans, a widely-studied model. Its study in laboratory rodents, such as mice and rats, requires different techniques, owing to the lack of a visual fovea and the particular ethological relevance of orienting movements of the snout and the whiskers in these animals. In recent years, several reliable relationships have been observed between environmental and behavioural variables and movements of the whiskers, but the function of these responses, as well as how they integrate, remains unclear. Here, we propose a unifying abstract model of whisker movement control that has as its key variable the region of space that is the animal's current focus of attention, and demonstrate, using computer-simulated behavioral experiments, that the model is consistent with a broad range of experimental observations. A core hypothesis is that the rat explicitly decodes the location in space of whisker contacts and that this representation is used to regulate whisker drive signals. This proposition stands in contrast to earlier proposals that the modulation of whisker movement during exploration is mediated primarily by reflex loops. We go on to argue that the superior colliculus is a candidate neural substrate for the siting of a head-centred map guiding whisker movement, in analogy to current models of visual attention. The proposed model has the potential to offer a more complete understanding of whisker control as well as to highlight the potential of the rodent and its whiskers as a tool for the study of mammalian attention.

  8. A new teaching model for demonstrating the movement of the extraocular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Joe; Refsland, Jason; Iovino, Lee; Holley, Gary; Laws, Tyler; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    The extraocular muscles consist of the superior, inferior, lateral, and medial rectus muscles and the superior and inferior oblique muscles. This study aimed to create a new teaching model for demonstrating the function of the extraocular muscles. A coronal section of the head was prepared and sutures attached to the levator palpebral superioris muscle and six extraocular muscles. Tension was placed on each muscle from a posterior approach and movement of the eye documented from an anterior view. All movements were clearly seen less than that of the inferior rectus muscle. To our knowledge, this is the first cadaveric teaching model for demonstrating the movements of the extraocular muscles. Clin. Anat. 30:733-735, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Model for the movement and distribution of fish in a body of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, D.L.

    1978-06-01

    A Monte Carlo mathematical model tracks the movement of fish in a body of water (e.g., a pond or reservoir) which is represented by a two-dimensional grid. For the case of a long, narrow reservoir, depth and length along the reservoir are the logical choices for coordinate axes. In the model, it is assumed that the movement of fish is influenced by gradients of temperature and dissolved oxygen, as well as food availability and habitat preference. The fish takes one spatial ''step'' at a time, the direction being randomly selected, but also biased by the above factors. In trial simulations, a large number of simulated fish were allowed to distribute themselves in a hypothetical body of water. Assuming only temperature was influencing the movements of the fish, the resultant distributions are compared with experimental data on temperature preferences.

  10. Development and validation of a 3-D model to predict knee joint loading during dynamic movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, S G; Su, A; van den Bogert, A J

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a subject-specific 3-D model of the lower extremity to predict neuromuscular control effects on 3-D knee joint loading during movements that can potentially cause injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. The simulation consisted of a forward dynamic 3-D musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity, scaled to represent a specific subject. Inputs of the model were the initial position and velocity of the skeletal elements, and the muscle stimulation patterns. Outputs of the model were movement and ground reaction forces, as well as resultant 3-D forces and moments acting across the knee joint. An optimization method was established to find muscle stimulation patterns that best reproduced the subject's movement and ground reaction forces during a sidestepping task. The optimized model produced movements and forces that were generally within one standard deviation of the measured subject data. Resultant knee joint loading variables extracted from the optimized model were comparable to those reported in the literature. The ability of the model to successfully predict the subject's response to altered initial conditions was quantified and found acceptable for use of the model to investigate the effect of altered neuromuscular control on knee joint loading during sidestepping. Monte Carlo simulations (N = 100,000) using randomly perturbed initial kinematic conditions, based on the subject's variability, resulted in peak anterior force, valgus torque and internal torque values of 378 N, 94 Nm and 71 Nm, respectively, large enough to cause ACL rupture. We conclude that the procedures described in this paper were successful in creating valid simulations of normal movement, and in simulating injuries that are caused by perturbed neuromuscular control.

  11. A computational model for aperture control in reach-to-grasp movement based on predictive variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro eTakemura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In human reach-to-grasp movement, visual occlusion of a target object leads to a larger peak grip aperture compared to conditions where online vision is available. However, no previous computational and neural network models for reach-to-grasp movement explain the mechanism of this effect. We simulated the effect of online vision on the reach-to-grasp movement by proposing a computational control model based on the hypothesis that the grip aperture is controlled to compensate for both motor variability and sensory uncertainty. In this model, the aperture is formed to achieve a target aperture size that is sufficiently large to accommodate the actual target; it also includes a margin to ensure proper grasping despite sensory and motor variability. To this end, the model considers: i the variability of the grip aperture, which is predicted by the Kalman filter, and ii the uncertainty of the object size, which is affected by visual noise. Using this model, we simulated experiments in which the effect of the duration of visual occlusion was investigated. The simulation replicated the experimental result wherein the peak grip aperture increased when the target object was occluded, especially in the early phase of the movement. Both predicted motor variability and sensory uncertainty play important roles in the online visuomotor process responsible for grip aperture control.

  12. Continuum modelling of pedestrian flows - Part 2: Sensitivity analysis featuring crowd movement phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duives, Dorine C.; Daamen, Winnie; Hoogendoorn, Serge P.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years numerous pedestrian simulation tools have been developed that can support crowd managers and government officials in their tasks. New technologies to monitor pedestrian flows are in dire need of models that allow for rapid state-estimation. Many contemporary pedestrian simulation tools model the movements of pedestrians at a microscopic level, which does not provide an exact solution. Macroscopic models capture the fundamental characteristics of the traffic state at a more aggregate level, and generally have a closed form solution which is necessary for rapid state estimation for traffic management purposes. This contribution presents a next step in the calibration and validation of the macroscopic continuum model detailed in Hoogendoorn et al. (2014). The influence of global and local route choice on the development of crowd movement phenomena, such as dissipation, lane-formation and stripe-formation, is studied. This study shows that most self-organization phenomena and behavioural trends only develop under very specific conditions, and as such can only be simulated using specific parameter sets. Moreover, all crowd movement phenomena can be reproduced by means of the continuum model using one parameter set. This study concludes that the incorporation of local route choice behaviour and the balancing of the aptitude of pedestrians with respect to their own class and other classes are both essential in the correct prediction of crowd movement dynamics.

  13. Finite-elements numerical model of the current-sheet movement and shaping in coaxial discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanova, Federico [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Moreno, Cesar [INFIP-PLADEMA, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2005-08-01

    The movement and shaping of the current sheath in coaxial plasma guns is numerically modelled by means of a dynamic finite-elements representation. Numerical instabilities are avoided by a reshaping algorithm applied during the tracking of the current sheath acceleration. Improving upon older versions of the algorithm, the present model includes a delay model to treat the dielectric breakdown. Comparison against experimental measurements showed very good performances in representing the arrival times of the shock front at different filling pressures.

  14. DETERMINED MODEL FOR COORDINATED REGULATION OF MOTOR TRANSPORT MOVEMENT ON HIGHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ivanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines certain parameters of a determined model and its response to changes in these parameters. The determined model for bidirectional movement has been developed in the paper. The paper contains proposals for an optimization of the developed model which are intended for reduction of motor vehicle delays in front of an in-traffic light stop line along the main highway direction.

  15. Integrating batch marks and radio tags to estimate the size of a closed population with a movement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Carl James; Cope, Scott; Fratton, Glenda

    2013-12-01

    Movement models require individually identifiable marks to estimate the movement rates among strata. But they are relatively expensive to apply and monitor. Batch marks can be readily applied, but individual animal movements cannot be identified. We describe a method to estimate population size in a stratified population when movement takes place among strata and animals are marked with a combination of batch and individually identifiable tags. A hierarchical model with Bayesian inference is developed that pools information across segments on the detection efficiency based on radio-tagged fish and also uses the movement of the radio-tagged fish to impute the movement of the batch-marked fish to provide estimates of the population size on a segment and river level. The batch marks provide important information to help estimate the movement rates, but contribute little to the overall estimate of the population size. In this case, the approximate equal catchability among strata in either sample obviates the need for stratification.

  16. Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2012). Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples. Instructional Science, 40(5), 813-827. doi:10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

  17. Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2012). Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples. Instructional Science, 40(5), 813-827. doi:10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

  18. Muscle, the motor of movement: properties in function, experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review exemplary aspects of different views of skeletal muscle characteristics. A classical view of muscle characteristics plays a very important role in modelling of muscles and movement. However, it often also pervades concepts on which our understanding of muscle f

  19. Active controlled muscles in numerical model of human arm for movement in two degrees of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budziszewski, P.; Nunen, E. van; Mordaka, J.K.; Kȩdzior, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of numerical model of human upper extremity able to perform movements and stabilization tasks in two degrees of freedom as a result of muscle activation controlled by a PID-based controller. These tasks are defined by functions of specified angle for every degree

  20. Creating a Double-Spring Model to Teach Chromosome Movement during Mitosis & Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peigao

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis is essential for understanding genetic transmission, but students often find this process difficult to grasp in a classroom setting. I propose a "double-spring model" that incorporates a physical demonstration and can be used as a teaching tool to help students understand this…

  1. Creating a Double-Spring Model to Teach Chromosome Movement during Mitosis & Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peigao

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis is essential for understanding genetic transmission, but students often find this process difficult to grasp in a classroom setting. I propose a "double-spring model" that incorporates a physical demonstration and can be used as a teaching tool to help students understand this…

  2. Modelling non-Euclidean movement and landscape connectivity in highly structured ecological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Christopher; Fuller, Angela K.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Movement is influenced by landscape structure, configuration and geometry, but measuring distance as perceived by animals poses technical and logistical challenges. Instead, movement is typically measured using Euclidean distance, irrespective of location or landscape structure, or is based on arbitrary cost surfaces. A recently proposed extension of spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models resolves this issue using spatial encounter histories of individuals to calculate least-cost paths (ecological distance: Ecology, 94, 2013, 287) thereby relaxing the Euclidean assumption. We evaluate the consequences of not accounting for movement heterogeneity when estimating abundance in highly structured landscapes, and demonstrate the value of this approach for estimating biologically realistic space-use patterns and landscape connectivity.

  3. Impulse processing: a dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-08-01

    The Visual World Paradigm (VWP) presents listeners with a challenging problem: They must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the VWP, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the VWP.

  4. Impulse processing: A dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    The visual world paradigm presents listeners with a challenging problem: they must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the visual world paradigm, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the visual world paradigm. PMID:21609355

  5. Development of a behavior model of pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Hou, Jingqiu; Zhao, Zhihe; Jian, Fan; Wamalwa, Peter; Lai, Wenli; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Liao, Zhenyu

    2009-08-01

    The mechanism of orthodontic pain and discomfort is poorly understood partly because of the limited number of animal behavioral models for pain assessment. This study aimed to develop a behavioral model for assessment of tooth-movement pain in rats using directed face-grooming activity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-300 g were used. They were videotaped on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 after experimental tooth movement and their directed face-grooming behavior was evaluated. In addition, we also evaluated behavioral responses to the application of a progressively higher magnitude force and to multiple applications of an equal magnitude force. Finally, the effects of peripherally and systemically administered morphine and of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, on the behavioral responses were evaluated. The results indicated that time spent on directed face-grooming activity increased dramatically after initiating experimental tooth movement. The change concurred with the initial orthodontic pain response. This behavioral change was reproducible and was related to force magnitude. Application of both systemic and peripheral morphine and MK-801 could exert an analgesic effect on this pain model. These results suggest that directed face-grooming behavior can be a reliable measure for tooth-movement pain in rats, which could be widely used in investigating the orthodontic pain mechanism.

  6. Learned graphical models for probabilistic planning provide a new class of movement primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, Elmar A; Neumann, Gerhard; Toussaint, Marc; Maass, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    BIOLOGICAL MOVEMENT GENERATION COMBINES THREE INTERESTING ASPECTS: its modular organization in movement primitives (MPs), its characteristics of stochastic optimality under perturbations, and its efficiency in terms of learning. A common approach to motor skill learning is to endow the primitives with dynamical systems. Here, the parameters of the primitive indirectly define the shape of a reference trajectory. We propose an alternative MP representation based on probabilistic inference in learned graphical models with new and interesting properties that complies with salient features of biological movement control. Instead of endowing the primitives with dynamical systems, we propose to endow MPs with an intrinsic probabilistic planning system, integrating the power of stochastic optimal control (SOC) methods within a MP. The parameterization of the primitive is a graphical model that represents the dynamics and intrinsic cost function such that inference in this graphical model yields the control policy. We parameterize the intrinsic cost function using task-relevant features, such as the importance of passing through certain via-points. The system dynamics as well as intrinsic cost function parameters are learned in a reinforcement learning (RL) setting. We evaluate our approach on a complex 4-link balancing task. Our experiments show that our movement representation facilitates learning significantly and leads to better generalization to new task settings without re-learning.

  7. A Bayesian Combined Model for Time-Dependent Turning Movement Proportions Estimation at Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent turning movement flows are very important input data for intelligent transportation systems but are impossible to be detected directly through current traffic surveillance systems. Existing estimation models have proved to be not accurate and reliable enough during all intervals. An improved way to address this problem is to develop a combined model framework that can integrate multiple submodels running simultaneously. This paper first presents a back propagation neural network model to estimate dynamic turning movements, as well as the self-adaptive learning rate approach and the gradient descent with momentum method for solving. Second, this paper develops an efficient Kalman filtering model and designs a revised sequential Kalman filtering algorithm. Based on the Bayesian method using both historical data and currently estimated results for error calibration, this paper further integrates above two submodels into a Bayesian combined model framework and proposes a corresponding algorithm. A field survey is implemented at an intersection in Beijing city to collect both time series of link counts and actual time-dependent turning movement flows, including historical and present data. The reported estimation results show that the Bayesian combined model is much more accurate and stable than other models.

  8. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve...... valve design. Simulated results of the total fluid force are presented showing the movement-induced fluid force to be significant for a reference application. The model form established is useful for valve designers during development and for accurate operation simulation....... member itself. These fluid forces may be accurately simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, but such models suffer from being computationally expensive and is not suited for optimization routines. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive method for modeling the fluid forces...

  9. Oscillator-based assistance of cyclical movements: model-based and model-free approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronsse, Renaud; Lenzi, Tommaso; Vitiello, Nicola; Koopman, Bram; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; de Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; van den Kieboom, Jesse; van der Kooij, Herman; Carozza, Maria Chiara; IJspeert, Auke Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we propose a new method for providing assistance during cyclical movements. This method is trajectory-free, in the sense that it provides user assistance irrespective of the performed movement, and requires no other sensing than the assisting robot’s own encoders. The approach is

  10. Unloading arm movement modeling using neural networks for a rotary hearth furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Inoan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks are being applied in many fields of engineering having nowadays a wide range of application. Neural networks are very useful for modeling dynamic processes for which the mathematical modeling is hard to obtain, or for processes that can’t be modeled using mathematical equations. This paper describes the modeling process for the unloading arm movement from a rotary hearth furnace using neural networks with back propagation algorithm. In this case the designed network was trained using the simulation results from a previous calculated mathematical model.

  11. A refined cellular automaton model to rectify impractical vehicular movement behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lawrence W.; Chiou, Yu-Chiun; Lin, Zih-Shin; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2009-09-01

    When implementing cellular automata (CA) into a traffic simulation, one common defect yet to be rectified is the abrupt deceleration when vehicles encounter stationary obstacles or traffic jams. To be more in line with real world vehicular movement, this paper proposes a piecewise-linear movement to replace the conventional particle-hopping movement adopted in most previous CA models. Upon this adjustment and coupled with refined cell system, a new CA model is developed using the rationale of Forbes’ et al. car-following concept. The proposed CA model is validated on a two-lane freeway mainline context. It shows that this model can fix the unrealistic deceleration behaviors, and thus can reflect genuine driver behavior in the real world. The model is also capable of revealing Kerner’s three-phase traffic patterns and phase transitions among them. Furthermore, the proposed CA model is applied to simulate a highway work zone wherein traffic efficiency (maximum flow rates) and safety (speed deviations) impacted by various control schemes are tested.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Balance Prediction Models for Sit-to-Stand Movement in the Sagittal Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar David Pena Cabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of balance control ability would become important in the rehabilitation training. In this paper, in order to make clear usefulness and limitation of a traditional simple inverted pendulum model in balance prediction in sit-to-stand movements, the traditional simple model was compared to an inertia (rotational radius variable inverted pendulum model including multiple-joint influence in the balance predictions. The predictions were tested upon experimentation with six healthy subjects. The evaluation showed that the multiple-joint influence model is more accurate in predicting balance under demanding sit-to-stand conditions. On the other hand, the evaluation also showed that the traditionally used simple inverted pendulum model is still reliable in predicting balance during sit-to-stand movement under non-demanding (normal condition. Especially, the simple model was shown to be effective for sit-to-stand movements with low center of mass velocity at the seat-off. Moreover, almost all trajectories under the normal condition seemed to follow the same control strategy, in which the subjects used extra energy than the minimum one necessary for standing up. This suggests that the safety considerations come first than the energy efficiency considerations during a sit to stand, since the most energy efficient trajectory is close to the backward fall boundary.

  13. Attractor and Lyapunov models for reach and grasp movements with application to robot-assisted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Nathan, Dominic E; Johnson, Michelle J

    2009-01-01

    The principles of attractors and Lyapunov exponents were used to develop a reaching-to-grasp model for use in a robotic therapy system for stroke patients. Previously known models for these movements, the fifth order minimum jerk and the seventh order polynomial, do not account for the change in grasp aperture of the hand. The Lyapunov model was tested with reaching-to-grasp movements performed by five neurologically intact subjects and produced an average R-square = .97 over 15 replications for 41 different task events, reflecting a notable advantage over the fifth order (average R-square = .58) and seventh order (average R-square = .67) models. A similar level of success was obtained for the Lyapunov model that was specific to grasp aperture. The results indicated that intentional movements can be accurately characterized as attractor trajectories, and as functions of position along two Cartesian coordinates rather than as functions of time. The Lyapunov exponent model requires fewer parameters and provides an efficient platform for real-time implementation.

  14. Analysis of crowd movement simulation model%人群运动仿真模型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀国

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of pedestrian movement behavior has a wide range of applications in the crowd simulation, digital entertainment and security planning. The commonly used crowd motion simulation models include the rule-based model, the social force based model, the cellular automata model and Agent based model, etc. This paper introduces the advantages and disadvantages of various models in detail, and the crowd movement planning, including the global path planning, the local path navigation and interaction effect between individuals and so on. In order to realize the real crowd movement simulation effect, a suitable model needs to be adopted according to various environmental factors to improve the simulation fidelity of the crowd movement.%计算机模拟行人的运动行为在人群模拟、数字娱乐及安全规划等都有着广泛的应用。人群运动仿真的常用模型包括基于规则模型、基于社会力模型、元胞自动机模型和基于Agent模型等。详细介绍了各种模型的优缺点,以及人群运动规划,包括全局路径规划、局部路径导航和个体之间的交互作用。现阶段要想实现真实的人群运动模拟效果,需要根据各种环境因素选用合适的模型来提高人群运动的仿真度。

  15. ON SOME APPROACHES TO ECONOMICMATHEMATICAL MODELING OF SMALL BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Small business is an important part of modern Russian economy. We give a wide panorama developed by us of possible approaches to the construction of economic-mathematical models that may be useful to describe the dynamics of small businesses, as well as management. As for the description of certain problems of small business can use a variety of types of economic-mathematical and econometric models, we found it useful to consider a fairly wide range of such models, which resulted in quite a short description of the specific models. In this description of the models brought to such a level that an experienced professional in the field of economic-mathematical modeling could, if necessary, to develop their own specific model to the stage of design formulas and numerical results. Particular attention is paid to the use of statistical methods of non-numeric data, the most pressing at the moment. Are considered the problems of economic-mathematical modeling in solving problems of small business marketing. We have accumulated some experience in application of the methodology of economic-mathematical modeling in solving practical problems in small business marketing, in particular in the field of consumer goods and industrial purposes, educational services, as well as in the analysis and modeling of inflation, taxation and others. In marketing models of decision making theory we apply rankings and ratings. Is considered the problem of comparing averages. We present some models of the life cycle of small businesses - flow model projects, model of capture niches, and model of niche selection. We discuss the development of research on economic-mathematical modeling of small businesses

  16. High resolution measurements of dune movement in a scale model of the River Oder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsener, Thorsten; Henning, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of three dimensional river bed topographies of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained from scale model experiments with movable bed. The use of a stereo photogrammetric system allowed for measuring the submerged river bed during the laboratory experiments. The system is based on three synchronized cameras and a bar code system for orientation and can be used in both dry and wet conditions. For bed surface elevation measurements, a grid is projected onto the channel bed, defining the bed surface via slide projection. When applied to subaqueous problems, the system provides reliable data and insight in the distribution and migration of bed forms and the impact of steady and unsteady discharges on bed topography. The presented data has been obtained from a hydraulic scale model with moveable bed, concerning an 8km long reach of the River Oder at the German-Polish border. The model has been set up in order to investigate the influence of river training measures on accessible water depths and on the development of river bed forms. To determine the movement of the dunes, a 3 x 3 m² area of the model, representing 90,000 m² in field scale, has been recorded over a time of 11 h, providing 4000 topographic data sets of about 10,000 data points each. To simulate nature like transport conditions, the natural bedload material was substituted by synthetic granules (polystyrene) with lesser density and coarser diameter. Due to the small density of polystyrene the dune migration was considerably faster than it would have been for the use of sand as bed load material. In theory, flow is often assumed to be steady and uniform. However, during sediment transport, bed topography changes continuously. The presented analysis of the data shows the wide spatial and temporal variety of occurring dunes and the correlation between dune dimen-sions and dune migration speed. Possible future analysis of the three-dimensional data will be discussed and

  17. Integrating population- and individual-level information in a movement model of Yellowstone bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, C; White, P J; Hoeting, J A; Wallen, R L; Watson, F G R; Blanton, D; Hobbs, N T

    2014-03-01

    Throughout the world, fragmentation of landscapes by human activities has constrained the opportunity for large herbivores to migrate. Conflict between people and wildlife results when migrating animals transmit disease to livestock, damage property, and threaten human safety. Mitigating this conflict requires understanding the forces that shape migration patterns. Bison Bos bison migrating from Yellowstone National Park into the state of Montana during winter and spring concern ranchers on lands surrounding the park because bison can transmit brucellosis (Brucella abortus) to cattle. Migrations have been constrained, with bison being lethally removed or moved back into the park. We developed a state-space model to support decisions on bison management aimed at mitigating conflict with landowners outside the park. The model integrated recent GPS observations with 22 years (1990-2012) of aerial counts to forecast monthly distributions and identify factors driving migration. Wintering areas were located along decreasing elevation gradients, and bison accumulated in wintering areas prior to moving to areas progressively lower in elevation. Bison movements were affected by time since the onset of snowpack, snowpack magnitude, standing crop, and herd size. Migration pathways were increasingly used over time, suggesting that experience or learning influenced movements. To support adaptive management of Yellowstone bison, we forecast future movements to evaluate alternatives. Our approach of developing models capable of making explicit probabilistic forecasts of large herbivore movements and seasonal distributions is applicable to managing the migratory movements of large herbivores worldwide. These forecasts allow managers to develop and refine strategies in advance, and promote sound decision-making that reduces conflict as migratory animals come into contact with people.

  18. Integrated Bayesian models of learning and decision making for saccadic eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Kay H; Penny, Will D; Harrison, Lee M; Daunizeau, Jean; Ruff, Christian C; Duzel, Emrah; Friston, Karl J; Stephan, Klaas E

    2008-11-01

    The neurophysiology of eye movements has been studied extensively, and several computational models have been proposed for decision-making processes that underlie the generation of eye movements towards a visual stimulus in a situation of uncertainty. One class of models, known as linear rise-to-threshold models, provides an economical, yet broadly applicable, explanation for the observed variability in the latency between the onset of a peripheral visual target and the saccade towards it. So far, however, these models do not account for the dynamics of learning across a sequence of stimuli, and they do not apply to situations in which subjects are exposed to events with conditional probabilities. In this methodological paper, we extend the class of linear rise-to-threshold models to address these limitations. Specifically, we reformulate previous models in terms of a generative, hierarchical model, by combining two separate sub-models that account for the interplay between learning of target locations across trials and the decision-making process within trials. We derive a maximum-likelihood scheme for parameter estimation as well as model comparison on the basis of log likelihood ratios. The utility of the integrated model is demonstrated by applying it to empirical saccade data acquired from three healthy subjects. Model comparison is used (i) to show that eye movements do not only reflect marginal but also conditional probabilities of target locations, and (ii) to reveal subject-specific learning profiles over trials. These individual learning profiles are sufficiently distinct that test samples can be successfully mapped onto the correct subject by a naïve Bayes classifier. Altogether, our approach extends the class of linear rise-to-threshold models of saccadic decision making, overcomes some of their previous limitations, and enables statistical inference both about learning of target locations across trials and the decision-making process within trials.

  19. Motor commands for fast point-to-point arm movements are customized for small changes in inertial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Ilona J; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, A J Knoek; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2011-12-01

    For repeated point-to-point arm movements it is often assumed that motor commands are customized in a trial-to-trial manner, based on previous endpoint error. To test this assumption, we perturbed movement execution without affecting the endpoint error by using a modest manipulation of inertia. Participants made point-to-point elbow flexion and extension movements in the horizontal plane, under the instruction to move as fast as possible from one target area to another. In selected trials the moment of inertia of the lower arm was increased or decreased by 25%. First, we found that an unexpected increase or decrease of inertia did not affect the open loop controlled part of the movement path (and thus endpoint error was not affected). Second, we found that when the increased or decreased inertia was presented repeatedly, after 5-11 trials motor commands were customized: the first 100ms of agonistic muscle activity in the smoothed and rectified electromyographic signal of agonistic muscles was higher for the high inertia compared to the low inertia. We conclude that endpoint error is not the only parameter that is used to evaluate if motor commands lead to movements as planned. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Mathematical Model on Water Redistribution Mechanism of the Seismonastic Movement of Mimosa Pudica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, K.W.; Ye, Z.W.; Chye, M.L.; Ngan, A.H.W.

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical model based on the water redistribution mechanism is proposed to predict the volumetric strain of motor cells in Mimosa pudica during the seismonastic movement. The model describes the water and ion movements following the opening of ion channels triggered by stimulation. The cellular strain is related to the angular velocity of the plant movement, and both their predictions are in good agreement with experimental data, thus validating the water redistribution mechanism. The results reveal that an increase in ion diffusivity across the cell membrane of <15-fold is sufficient to produce the observed seismonastic movement. PMID:23823246

  1. Comparison Between Overtopping Discharge in Small and Large Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

    small and large scale model tests show no clear evidence of scale effects for overtopping above a threshold value. In the large scale model no overtopping was measured for waveheights below Hs = 0.5m as the water sunk into the voids between the stones on the crest. For low overtopping scale effects...... are presented as the small-scale model underpredicts the overtopping discharge....

  2. EXAMINING THE MOVEMENTS OF MOBILE NODES IN THE REAL WORLD TO PRODUCE ACCURATE MOBILITY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANWEER ALAM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available All communication occurs through a wireless median in an ad hoc network. Ad hoc networks are dynamically created and maintained by the individual nodes comprising the network. Random Waypoint Mobility Model is a model that includes pause times between changes in destination and speed. To produce a real-world environment within which an ad hoc network can be formed among a set of nodes, there is a need for the development of realistic, generic and comprehensive mobility models. In this paper, we examine the movements of entities in the real world and present the production of mobility model in an ad hoc network.

  3. Small-scale models of multiring basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Pascal; Thomas, Pierre

    1999-07-01

    Small-scale sand-silicone simulations of multiring impact structures have been undertaken in order to understand the effects of the rheology of the lithosphere on the variability of natural multiring structures. For low sand-silicone thickness ratio (1:3), brittle strain is accommodated by spiral strike-slip faults. For higher sand-silicone ratios (1:1 or 2:1), an inner concentric ring affected by strike-slip faults is relayed by an external ring affected by concentric normal faults. The diameter of the inner ring decreases with the increase of the sand-silicone thickness ratio. It is suggested that the flexure of the brittle layer due to the silicone flow is responsible for the brittle strain field which is enhanced by the channel flow of the lower crust. The characteristic geometry of the intersection of conjugated strike-slip faults can be observed around large multiring basins on silicate crust such as Orientale on the Moon and on icy crust, such as Valhalla on Callisto and Gilgamesh on Ganymede. The strain field around these large craters is discussed in terms of mechanical properties of the lithospheres. On the Moon, large craters without relaxation faults, such as Imbrium are located on thin crust regions. The crust was too thin to have a ductile lower layer at the time of impact. Gilgamesh on Ganymede is surrounded mainly by strike-slip faults. Asgard on Callisto has the same diameter as Gilgamesh but is surrounded by concentric normal faults. The brittle-ductile thickness ratio is thus higher on Callisto than on Ganymede.

  4. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Ajay; Matias, Ricardo; Veloso, António P.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1) elevation and 2) abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3) upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4) internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual’s anthropometry. We compared the model to “gold standard” bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models. PMID:26734761

  5. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Ajay; Matias, Ricardo; Veloso, António P; Delp, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1) elevation and 2) abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3) upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4) internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual's anthropometry. We compared the model to "gold standard" bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2 mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models.

  6. A Biomechanical Model of the Scapulothoracic Joint to Accurately Capture Scapular Kinematics during Shoulder Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Seth

    Full Text Available The complexity of shoulder mechanics combined with the movement of skin relative to the scapula makes it difficult to measure shoulder kinematics with sufficient accuracy to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Multibody skeletal models can improve motion capture accuracy by reducing the space of possible joint movements, and models are used widely to improve measurement of lower limb kinematics. In this study, we developed a rigid-body model of a scapulothoracic joint to describe the kinematics of the scapula relative to the thorax. This model describes scapular kinematics with four degrees of freedom: 1 elevation and 2 abduction of the scapula on an ellipsoidal thoracic surface, 3 upward rotation of the scapula normal to the thoracic surface, and 4 internal rotation of the scapula to lift the medial border of the scapula off the surface of the thorax. The surface dimensions and joint axes can be customized to match an individual's anthropometry. We compared the model to "gold standard" bone-pin kinematics collected during three shoulder tasks and found modeled scapular kinematics to be accurate to within 2 mm root-mean-squared error for individual bone-pin markers across all markers and movement tasks. As an additional test, we added random and systematic noise to the bone-pin marker data and found that the model reduced kinematic variability due to noise by 65% compared to Euler angles computed without the model. Our scapulothoracic joint model can be used for inverse and forward dynamics analyses and to compute joint reaction loads. The computational performance of the scapulothoracic joint model is well suited for real-time applications; it is freely available for use with OpenSim 3.2, and is customizable and usable with other OpenSim models.

  7. State-Space Modelling of the Drivers of Movement Behaviour in Sympatric Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F J Pérez-Barbería

    Full Text Available Understanding animal movement behaviour is key to furthering our knowledge on intra- and inter-specific competition, group cohesion, energy expenditure, habitat use, the spread of zoonotic diseases or species management. We used a radial basis function surface approximation subject to minimum description length constraint to uncover the state-space dynamical systems from time series data. This approximation allowed us to infer structure from a mathematical model of the movement behaviour of sheep and red deer, and the effect of density, thermal stress and vegetation type. Animal movement was recorded using GPS collars deployed in sheep and deer grazing a large experimental plot in winter and summer. Information on the thermal stress to which animals were exposed was estimated using the power consumption of mechanical heated models and meteorological records of a network of stations in the plot. Thermal stress was higher in deer than in sheep, with less differences between species in summer. Deer travelled more distance than sheep, and both species travelled more in summer than in winter; deer travel distance showed less seasonal differences than sheep. Animal movement was better predicted in deer than in sheep and in winter than in summer; both species showed a swarming behaviour in group cohesion, stronger in deer. At shorter separation distances swarming repulsion was stronger between species than within species. At longer separation distances inter-specific attraction was weaker than intra-specific; there was a positive density-dependent effect on swarming, and stronger in deer than in sheep. There was not clear evidence which species attracted or repelled the other; attraction between deer at long separation distances was stronger when the model accounted for thermal stress, but in general the dynamic movement behaviour was hardly affected by the thermal stress. Vegetation type affected intra-species interactions but had little effect on

  8. State-Space Modelling of the Drivers of Movement Behaviour in Sympatric Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Barbería, F J; Small, M; Hooper, R J; Aldezabal, A; Soriguer-Escofet, R; Bakken, G S; Gordon, I J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding animal movement behaviour is key to furthering our knowledge on intra- and inter-specific competition, group cohesion, energy expenditure, habitat use, the spread of zoonotic diseases or species management. We used a radial basis function surface approximation subject to minimum description length constraint to uncover the state-space dynamical systems from time series data. This approximation allowed us to infer structure from a mathematical model of the movement behaviour of sheep and red deer, and the effect of density, thermal stress and vegetation type. Animal movement was recorded using GPS collars deployed in sheep and deer grazing a large experimental plot in winter and summer. Information on the thermal stress to which animals were exposed was estimated using the power consumption of mechanical heated models and meteorological records of a network of stations in the plot. Thermal stress was higher in deer than in sheep, with less differences between species in summer. Deer travelled more distance than sheep, and both species travelled more in summer than in winter; deer travel distance showed less seasonal differences than sheep. Animal movement was better predicted in deer than in sheep and in winter than in summer; both species showed a swarming behaviour in group cohesion, stronger in deer. At shorter separation distances swarming repulsion was stronger between species than within species. At longer separation distances inter-specific attraction was weaker than intra-specific; there was a positive density-dependent effect on swarming, and stronger in deer than in sheep. There was not clear evidence which species attracted or repelled the other; attraction between deer at long separation distances was stronger when the model accounted for thermal stress, but in general the dynamic movement behaviour was hardly affected by the thermal stress. Vegetation type affected intra-species interactions but had little effect on inter

  9. Modeling loggerhead turtle movement in the Mediterranean: importance of body size and oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Scott A; Moore, Jeffrey E; Dunn, Daniel C; van Buiten, Ricardo Sagarminaga; Eckert, Karen L; Halpin, Patrick N

    2008-03-01

    Adapting state-space models (SSMs) to telemetry data has been helpful for dealing with location error and for modeling animal movements. We used a combination of two hierarchical Bayesian SSMs to estimate movement pathways from Argos satellite-tag data for 15 juvenile loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the western Mediterranean Sea, and to probabilistically assign locations to one of two behavioral movement types and relate those behaviors to environmental features. A Monte Carlo procedure helped propagate location uncertainty from the first SSM into the estimation of behavioral states and environment--behavior relationships in the second SSM. Turtles using oceanic habitats of the Balearic Sea (n = 9 turtles) within the western Mediterranean were more likely to exhibit "intensive search" behavior as might occur during foraging, but only larger turtles responded to variations in sea-surface height. This suggests that they were better able than smaller turtles to cue on environmental features that concentrate prey resources or were more dependent on high-quality feeding areas. These findings stress the importance of individual heterogeneity in the analysis of movement behavior and, taken in concert with descriptive studies of Pacific loggerheads, suggest that directed movements toward patchy ephemeral resources may be a general property of larger juvenile loggerheads in different populations. We discovered size-based variation in loggerhead distribution and documented use of the western Mediterranean Sea by turtles larger than previously thought to occur there. With one exception, only individuals > 57 cm curved carapace length used the most westerly basin in the Mediterranean (western Alborán Sea). These observations shed new light on loggerhead migration phenology.

  10. Geometric Assortative Growth Model for Small-World Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that both humanly constructed and natural networks are often characterized by small-world phenomenon and assortative mixing. In this paper, we propose a geometrically growing model for small-world networks. The model displays both tunable small-world phenomenon and tunable assortativity. We obtain analytical solutions of relevant topological properties such as order, size, degree distribution, degree correlation, clustering, transitivity, and diameter. It is also worth noting that the model can be viewed as a generalization for an iterative construction of Farey graphs.

  11. Geometric assortative growth model for small-world networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yilun

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that both humanly constructed and natural networks are often characterized by small-world phenomenon and assortative mixing. In this paper, we propose a geometrically growing model for small-world networks. The model displays both tunable small-world phenomenon and tunable assortativity. We obtain analytical solutions of relevant topological properties such as order, size, degree distribution, degree correlation, clustering, transitivity, and diameter. It is also worth noting that the model can be viewed as a generalization for an iterative construction of Farey graphs.

  12. Mathematical model of small water-plane area twin-hull and application in marine simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Lyu, Zhenwang; Yin, Yong; Jin, Yicheng

    2013-09-01

    Small water-plane area twin-hull (SWATH) has drawn the attention of many researchers due to its good sea-keeping ability. In this paper, MMG's idea of separation was used to perform SWATH movement modeling and simulation; respectively the forces and moment of SWATH were divided into bare hull, propeller, rudder at the fluid hydrodynamics, etc. Wake coefficient at the propellers which reduces thrust coefficient, and rudder mutual interference forces among the hull and propeller, for the calculation of SWATH, were all considered. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method of integration was used by solving differential equations, in order to get SWATH's movement states. As an example, a turning test at full speed and full starboard rudder of `Seagull' craft is shown. The simulation results show the SWATH's regular pattern and trend of motion. It verifies the correctness of the mathematical model of the turning movement. The SWATH's mathematical model is applied to marine simulator in order to train the pilots or seamen, or safety assessment for ocean engineering project. Lastly, the full mission navigation simulating system (FMNSS) was determined to be a successful virtual reality technology application sample in the field of navigation simulation.

  13. Pursuit eye-movements in curve driving differentiate between future path and tangent point models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Lappi

    Full Text Available For nearly 20 years, looking at the tangent point on the road edge has been prominent in models of visual orientation in curve driving. It is the most common interpretation of the commonly observed pattern of car drivers looking through a bend, or at the apex of the curve. Indeed, in the visual science literature, visual orientation towards the inside of a bend has become known as "tangent point orientation". Yet, it remains to be empirically established whether it is the tangent point the drivers are looking at, or whether some other reference point on the road surface, or several reference points, are being targeted in addition to, or instead of, the tangent point. Recently discovered optokinetic pursuit eye-movements during curve driving can provide complementary evidence over and above traditional gaze-position measures. This paper presents the first detailed quantitative analysis of pursuit eye movements elicited by curvilinear optic flow in real driving. The data implicates the far zone beyond the tangent point as an important gaze target area during steady-state cornering. This is in line with the future path steering models, but difficult to reconcile with any pure tangent point steering model. We conclude that the tangent point steering models do not provide a general explanation of eye movement and steering during a curve driving sequence and cannot be considered uncritically as the default interpretation when the gaze position distribution is observed to be situated in the region of the curve apex.

  14. Validation of a spatial–temporal soil water movement and plant water uptake model

    KAUST Repository

    HEPPELL, J.

    2014-06-01

    © 2014, (publisher). All rights reserved. Management and irrigation of plants increasingly relies on accurate mathematical models for the movement of water within unsaturated soils. Current models often use values for water content and soil parameters that are averaged over the soil profile. However, many applications require models to more accurately represent the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum, in particular, water movement and saturation within specific parts of the soil profile. In this paper a mathematical model for water uptake by a plant root system from unsaturated soil is presented. The model provides an estimate of the water content level within the soil at different depths, and the uptake of water by the root system. The model was validated using field data, which include hourly water content values at five different soil depths under a grass/herb cover over 1 year, to obtain a fully calibrated system for plant water uptake with respect to climate conditions. When compared quantitatively to a simple water balance model, the proposed model achieves a better fit to the experimental data due to its ability to vary water content with depth. To accurately model the water content in the soil profile, the soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity needed to vary with depth.

  15. Modeling and simulation of high-speed passenger train movements in the rail line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Cheng-Xuan; Xu Yan; Li Ke-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a new formula of the real-time minimum safety headway based on the relative velocity of consecutive trains and present a dynamic model of high-speed passenger train movements in the rail line based on the proposed formula of the minimum safety headway.Moreover,we provide the control strategies of the high-speed passenger train operations based on the proposed formula of the real-time minimum safety headway and the dynamic model of highspeed passenger train movements.The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategies of the passenger train operations can greatly reduce the delay propagation in the high-speed rail line when a random delay occurs.

  16. Autonomy and Non-autonomy of Angiogenic Cell Movements Revealed by Experiment-Driven Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Sugihara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a multicellular phenomenon driven by morphogenetic cell movements. We recently reported morphogenetic vascular endothelial cell (EC behaviors to be dynamic and complex. However, the principal mechanisms orchestrating individual EC movements in angiogenic morphogenesis remain largely unknown. Here we present an experiment-driven mathematical model that enables us to systematically dissect cellular mechanisms in branch elongation. We found that cell-autonomous and coordinated actions governed these multicellular behaviors, and a cell-autonomous process sufficiently illustrated essential features of the morphogenetic EC dynamics at both the single-cell and cell-population levels. Through refining our model and experimental verification, we further identified a coordinated mode of tip EC behaviors regulated via a spatial relationship between tip and follower ECs, which facilitates the forward motility of tip ECs. These findings provide insights that enhance our mechanistic understanding of not only angiogenic morphogenesis, but also other types of multicellular phenomenon.

  17. Fast fitting of non-Gaussian state-space models to animal movement data via Template Model Builder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Whoriskey, Kim; Yurkowski, David

    2015-01-01

    State-space models (SSM) are often used for analyzing complex ecological processes that are not observed directly, such as marine animal movement. When outliers are present in the measurements, special care is needed in the analysis to obtain reliable location and process estimates. Here we...

  18. Simulating the activation, contraction and movement of skeletal muscles using the bidomain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Rincon, A; Cantu, C; Soto, R; Shimoda, S

    2016-08-01

    A simulation of the muscle activation, contraction and movement is here presented. This system was developed based on the Bidomain mathematical model of the electrical propagation in muscles. This study shows an electrical stimuli input to a muscle and how this behave. The comparison between healthy subject and patient with muscle activation impairment is depicted, depending on whether the signal reaches a threshold. A 3D model of a bicep muscle and a forearm bone connected was constructed using OpenGL. This platform could be used for development of controllers for biomechatronic systems in future works. This kind of bioinspired model could be used for a better understanding of the neuromotor system.

  19. A Novel Rat Model of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Using Temporary Skeletal Anchorage Devices: 3D Finite Element Analysis and In Vivo Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Doschak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to develop a model of orthodontic tooth movement using a microimplant as a TSAD in rodents. A finite element model of the TSAD in alveolar bone was built using μCT images of rat maxilla to determine the von Mises stresses and displacement in the alveolar bone surrounding the TSAD. For in vivo validation of the FE model, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 25) were used and a Stryker 1.2 × 3 mm microimplant was inserted in the right maxilla and used to protract the right first permanent molar using a NiTi closed coil spring. Tooth movement measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, animals were euthanized and tissues were analyzed by histology and EPMA. FE modeling showed maximum von Mises stress of 45 Mpa near the apex of TSAD but the average von Mises stress was under 25 Mpa. Appreciable tooth movement of 0.62 ± 0.04 mm at 4 weeks and 1.99 ± 0.14 mm at 8 weeks was obtained. Histological and EPMA results demonstrated no active bone remodeling around the TSAD at 8 weeks depicting good secondary stability. This study provided evidence that protracted tooth movement is achieved in small animals using TSADs. PMID:25295060

  20. An integrative model for the neural mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier A. Coubard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, twenty-six years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR in anxiety disorders, particularly in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons why the scientific community is still divided about EMDR. I then slide from psychology to physiology describing eye movements/emotion interaction from the physiological viewpoint, and introduce theoretical and technical tools used in movement research to re-examine EMDR neural mechanism. Using a recent physiological model for the neuropsychological architecture of motor and cognitive control, the Threshold Interval Modulation with Early Release-Rate of rIse Deviation with Early Release – TIMER-RIDER – model, I explore how attentional control and bilateral stimulation may participate to EMDR effects. These effects may be obtained by two processes acting in parallel: (i activity level enhancement of attentional control component; and (ii bilateral stimulation in any sensorimotor modality, both resulting in lower inhibition enabling dysfunctional information to be processed and anxiety to be reduced. The TIMER-RIDER model offers quantitative predictions about EMDR effects for future research about its underlying physiological mechanisms.

  1. An Integrative Model for the Neural Mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubard, Olivier A

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, 26 years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons why the scientific community is still divided about EMDR. I then slide from psychology to physiology describing eye movements/emotion interaction from the physiological viewpoint, and introduce theoretical and technical tools used in movement research to re-examine EMDR neural mechanism. Using a recent physiological model for the neuropsychological architecture of motor and cognitive control, the Threshold Interval Modulation with Early Release-Rate of rIse Deviation with Early Release (TIMER-RIDER)-model, I explore how attentional control and bilateral stimulation may participate to EMDR effects. These effects may be obtained by two processes acting in parallel: (i) activity level enhancement of attentional control component; and (ii) bilateral stimulation in any sensorimotor modality, both resulting in lower inhibition enabling dysfunctional information to be processed and anxiety to be reduced. The TIMER-RIDER model offers quantitative predictions about EMDR effects for future research about its underlying physiological mechanisms.

  2. Simulating large-scale pedestrian movement using CA and event driven model: Methodology and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Fu, Siyao; He, Haibo; Jia, Hongfei; Li, Yanzhong; Guo, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale regional evacuation is an important part of national security emergency response plan. Large commercial shopping area, as the typical service system, its emergency evacuation is one of the hot research topics. A systematic methodology based on Cellular Automata with the Dynamic Floor Field and event driven model has been proposed, and the methodology has been examined within context of a case study involving the evacuation within a commercial shopping mall. Pedestrians walking is based on Cellular Automata and event driven model. In this paper, the event driven model is adopted to simulate the pedestrian movement patterns, the simulation process is divided into normal situation and emergency evacuation. The model is composed of four layers: environment layer, customer layer, clerk layer and trajectory layer. For the simulation of movement route of pedestrians, the model takes into account purchase intention of customers and density of pedestrians. Based on evacuation model of Cellular Automata with Dynamic Floor Field and event driven model, we can reflect behavior characteristics of customers and clerks at the situations of normal and emergency evacuation. The distribution of individual evacuation time as a function of initial positions and the dynamics of the evacuation process is studied. Our results indicate that the evacuation model using the combination of Cellular Automata with Dynamic Floor Field and event driven scheduling can be used to simulate the evacuation of pedestrian flows in indoor areas with complicated surroundings and to investigate the layout of shopping mall.

  3. A modeling investigation of vowel-to-vowel movement planning in acoustic and muscle spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandipour, Majid

    The primary objective of this research was to explore the coordinate space in which speech movements are planned. A two dimensional biomechanical model of the vocal tract (tongue, lips, jaw, and pharynx) was constructed based on anatomical and physiological data from a subject. The model transforms neural command signals into the actions of muscles. The tongue was modeled by a 221-node finite element mesh. Each of the eight tongue muscles defined within the mesh was controlled by a virtual muscle model. The other vocal-tract components were modeled as simple 2nd-order systems. The model's geometry was adapted to a speaker, using MRI scans of the speaker's vocal tract. The vocal tract model, combined with an adaptive controller that consisted of a forward model (mapping 12-dimensional motor commands to a 64-dimensional acoustic spectrum) and an inverse model (mapping acoustic trajectories to motor command trajectories), was used to simulate and explore the implications of two planning hypotheses: planning in motor space vs. acoustic space. The acoustic, kinematic, and muscle activation (EMG) patterns of vowel-to-vowel sequences generated by the model were compared to data from the speaker whose acoustic, kinematic and EMG were also recorded. The simulation results showed that: (a) modulations of the motor commands effectively accounted for the effects of speaking rate on EMG, kinematic, and acoustic outputs; (b) the movement and acoustic trajectories were influenced by vocal tract biomechanics; and (c) both planning schemes produced similar articulatory movement, EMG, muscle length, force, and acoustic trajectories, which were also comparable to the subject's data under normal speaking conditions. In addition, the effects of a bite-block on measured EMG, kinematics and formants were simulated by the model. Acoustic planning produced successful simulations but motor planning did not. The simulation results suggest that with somatosensory feedback but no auditory

  4. Seasonal Climate Variation and Caribou Availability: Modeling Sequential Movement Using Satellite-Relocation Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Nicolson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Livelihood systems that depend on mobile resources must constantly adapt to change. For people living in permanent settlements, environmental changes that affect the distribution of a migratory species may reduce the availability of a primary food source, with the potential to destabilize the regional social-ecological system. Food security for Arctic indigenous peoples harvesting barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti depends on movement patterns of migratory herds. Quantitative assessments of physical, ecological, and social effects on caribou distribution have proven difficult because of the significant interannual variability in seasonal caribou movement patterns. We developed and evaluated a modeling approach for simulating the distribution of a migratory herd throughout its annual cycle over a multiyear period. Beginning with spatial and temporal scales developed in previous studies of the Porcupine Caribou Herd of Canada and Alaska, we used satellite collar locations to compute and analyze season-by-season probabilities of movement of animals between habitat zones under two alternative weather conditions for each season. We then built a set of transition matrices from these movement probabilities, and simulated the sequence of movements across the landscape as a Markov process driven by externally imposed seasonal weather states. Statistical tests showed that the predicted distributions of caribou were consistent with observed distributions, and significantly correlated with subsistence harvest levels for three user communities. Our approach could be applied to other caribou herds and could be adapted for simulating the distribution of other ungulates and species with similarly large interannual variability in the use of their range.

  5. Development of Four Dimensional Human Model that Enables Deformation of Skin, Organs and Blood Vessel System During Body Movement - Visualizing Movements of the Musculoskeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a four dimensional human model that is able to visualize the structure of a whole human body, including the inner structures, in real-time to allow us to analyze human dynamic changes in the temporal, spatial and quantitative domains. To verify whether our model was generating changes according to real human body dynamics, we measured a participant's skin expansion and compared it to that of the model conducted under the same body movement. We also made a contribution to the field of orthopedics, as we were able to devise a display method that enables the observer to more easily observe the changes made in the complex skeletal muscle system during body movements, which in the past were difficult to visualize.

  6. An Institutionalist Explanation of the Evolution of Taiwan’s Disability Movement: From the Charity Model to the Social Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-lun Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we analyze the process of institutional change in Taiwan’s disability field by focusing on the role of social movements. An institutional perspective emphasizes how a particular logic in an organizational field generates formal and informal institutions that define how persons with disabilities are treated in a society. Before the 1990s, the charity model was dominant, and later it came to be challenged by the disability movement, which advocated for the social model. We argue that the transition to a social model was a major achievement by disability organizations, which successfully combined the dual roles of advocate and service provider. By making strategic use of welfare privatization in the 1990s, they were able to mobilize a series of lobbying campaigns. Their efforts culminated in the passing of the Physically and Mentally Disabled Citizens Protection Act in 1997, which marked the beginning of the social model in Taiwan.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Speed Profile Models for Ankle Pointing Movements: Evidence that Lower and Upper Extremity Discrete Movements are controlled by a Single Invariant Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eMichmizos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether our knowledge of how the central nervous system controls the upper extremities, can generalize, and to what extent to the lower limbs. Our continuous efforts to design the ideal adaptive robotic therapy for the lower limbs of stroke patients and children with cerebral palsy highlighted the importance of analyzing and modeling the kinematics of the lower limbs, in general, and those of the ankle joints, in particular. We recruited 15 young healthy adults that performed in total 1,386 visually-evoked, visually-guided and target-directed discrete pointing movements with their ankle in dorsal–plantar and inversion–eversion directions. Using a nonlinear, least-squares error-minimization procedure, we estimated the parameters for 19 models which were initially designed to capture the dynamics of upper limb movements of various complexity. We validated our models based on their ability to reconstruct the experimental data. Our results suggest a remarkable similarity between the top performing models that described the speed profiles of ankle pointing movements and the ones previously found for the upper extremities both during arm reaching and wrist pointing movements. Among the top performers were the support-bounded lognormal and the beta models that have a neurophysiological basis and have been successfully used in upper extremity studies with normal subjects and patients. Our findings suggest that the same model can be applied to different human hardware, perhaps revealing a key invariant in human motor control. These findings have a great potential to enhance our rehabilitation efforts in any population with lower extremity deficits by, for example, assessing the level of motor impairment and improvement as well as informing the design of control algorithms for therapeutic ankle robots.

  8. Holonic Business Process Modeling in Small to Medium Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Budi Mulyono

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Holonic modeling analysis which is the application of system thinking in design, manage, and improvement, is used in a novel context for business process modeling. An approach and techniques of holon and holarchies is presented specifically for small and medium sized enterprise process modeling development. The fitness of the approach is compared with well known reductionist or task breakdown approach. The strength and weaknesses of the holonic modeling is discussed with illustrating case example in term of its suitability for an Indonesia’s small and medium sized industry. The novel ideas in this paper have great impact on the way analyst should perceive business process. Future research is applying the approach in supply chain context.Key words: Business process, holonic modeling, operations management, small to medium sized enterprise

  9. [Strive for excellence and addiction to body movement: a risk model in high-level athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, C

    2000-04-01

    Champion athletes strive to attain a personal goal defined by a socially constructed image of psychomotor performance to be accomplished at the moment of the championship celebration. This intrapsychic process is initiated by a transformation of the body, programmed and controlled by repeated training. The athlete's body becomes accustomed to ritualized obsessive movements, favoring the feeling of self-fulfillment solely during muscular effort (contraction/relaxation, displacement). This social goal of excellence implies personal adaptation involving an addictive link to movement: a mechanism uniquely valid in high level sports. Twelve years experience in psychological support of high-level athletes participating in Olympic sports has led to an analysis of this adaptive mechanism and a proposed psychopathological model of its invasion of the athlete's psychic economy.

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  11. Holonic Business Process Modeling in Small to Medium Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Budi Mulyono; Tezar Yuliansyah Saputra; Nur Arief Rahmatsyah

    2012-01-01

    Holonic modeling analysis which is the application of system thinking in design, manage, and improvement, is used in a novel context for business process modeling. An approach and techniques of holon and holarchies is presented specifically for small and medium sized enterprise process modeling development. The fitness of the approach is compared with well known reductionist or task breakdown approach. The strength and weaknesses of the holonic modeling is discussed with illustrating case exa...

  12. Pharmacological modulation of movement-evoked pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Prasant; Pai, Madhavi; Blomme, Eric A; Hsieh, Gin C; Decker, Michael W; Honore, Prisca

    2009-06-24

    This study was conducted to characterize movement-induced pain in a rat model of knee joint osteoarthritis and validate this behavioral assessment by evaluating the effects of clinically used analgesic compounds. Unilateral intra-articular administration of a chondrocyte glycolytic inhibitor monoiodoacetate, was used to induce knee joint osteoarthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats. In this osteoarthritis model, histologically erosive disintegration of the articular surfaces of the ipsilateral joint are observed which closely mimic the clinical picture of osteoarthritis. Movement-induced pain behavior was measured using hind limb compressive grip force evaluation. The animals exhibited pain behaviors epitomized by a long-lasting decrement in bilateral compressive hind limb grip force following unilateral knee injury. The effects of clinically used reference analgesics were evaluated 20 days following i.a. injection of monoiodoacetate. Full analgesic activity was observed for tramadol, celecoxib and diclofenac; moderate effects for indomethacin, duloxetine and gabapentin but weak or no effects for acetaminophen, ibuprofen and lamotrigine. As morphine reduced grip force in naïve rats, its analgesic effects could not be accurately evaluated in this model. Finally, the effects of celecoxib were maintained following chronic dosing. The results indicate that this in vivo model utilizing a movement-induced pain behavior spawned by knee joint osteoarthritis may provide a valuable tool in examining the role of potential analgesic targets in osteoarthritic pain. As the model is clinically relevant, it will further enhance the mechanistic understanding of chronic arthritic joint pain and help in developing newer and better therapeutic strategies to manage osteoarthritis pain.

  13. Models for solid-state transport: messenger RNA movement from nucleus to cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S

    1994-09-01

    This paper explores the idea that mRNAs are transported between their transcription and processing sites in the nucleus, and their translation and degradation sites in the cytoplasm, by a 'solid-state' process. The underlying assumption is that negligible quantities of mRNA and of mRNA precursors are in solution in vivo. Therefore, mRNA transport cannot be considered as movement in the aqueous phase of the cell. The main lines of experimental evidence supporting this 'solid-state' concept are summarized and related controversies are outlined. Three possible models for a solid-state transport mechanism are discussed: a direct transfer model, with receptors organized analogously to the components of a multienzyme complex; a motor-driven model, analogous to synaptic vesicle transport in axons; and an assembly-driven model which assumes net movement along a fibril resulting from differential activities at the poles. Qualitative evaluation indicates that each of these models has characteristic advantages and disadvantages. The possibility that other nucleocytoplasmic transport processes might operate by solid-state mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  14. Spatiotemporal modelling of marine movement data using Template Model Builder (TMB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Jonsen, Ian D.

    2017-01-01

    Tracking of marine animals has increased exponentially in the past decade, and the resulting data could lead to an in-depth understanding of the causes and consequences of movement in the ocean. However, most common marine tracking systems are associated with large measurement errors. Accounting...

  15. Elucidating the significance of spatial memory on movement decisions by African savannah elephants using state-space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Leo; Kilian, Werner; Wittemyer, George

    2015-04-22

    Spatial memory facilitates resource acquisition where resources are patchy, but how it influences movement behaviour of wide-ranging species remains to be resolved. We examined African elephant spatial memory reflected in movement decisions regarding access to perennial waterholes. State-space models of movement data revealed a rapid, highly directional movement behaviour almost exclusively associated with visiting perennial water. Behavioural change point (BCP) analyses demonstrated that these goal-oriented movements were initiated on average 4.59 km, and up to 49.97 km, from the visited waterhole, with the closest waterhole accessed 90% of the time. Distances of decision points increased when switching to different waterholes, during the dry season, or for female groups relative to males, while selection of the closest waterhole decreased when switching. Overall, our analyses indicated detailed spatial knowledge over large scales, enabling elephants to minimize travel distance through highly directional movement when accessing water. We discuss the likely cognitive and socioecological mechanisms driving these spatially precise movements that are most consistent with our findings. By applying modern analytic techniques to high-resolution movement data, this study illustrates emerging approaches for studying how cognition structures animal movement behaviour in different ecological and social contexts. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Vibrations of a Simply Supported Beam with a Fractional Viscoelastic Material Model – Supports Movement Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Freundlich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents vibration analysis of a simply supported beam with a fractional order viscoelastic material model. The Bernoulli-Euler beam model is considered. The beam is excited by the supports movement. The Riemann – Liouville fractional derivative of order 0 α ⩽ 1 is applied. In the first stage, the steady-state vibrations of the beam are analyzed and therefore the Riemann – Liouville fractional derivative with lower terminal at −∞ is assumed. This assumption simplifies solution of the fractional differential equations and enables us to directly obtain amplitude-frequency characteristics of the examined system. The characteristics are obtained for various values of fractional derivative of order α and values of the Voigt material model parameters. The studies show that the selection of appropriate damping coefficients and fractional derivative order of damping model enables us to fit more accurately dynamic characteristic of the beam in comparison with using integer order derivative damping model.

  17. Deterministic multidimensional growth model for small-world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Aoyuan

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a deterministic multidimensional growth model for small-world networks. The model can characterize the distinguishing properties of many real-life networks with geometric space structure. Our results show the model possesses small-world effect: larger clustering coefficient and smaller characteristic path length. We also obtain some accurate results for its properties including degree distribution, clustering coefficient and network diameter and discuss them. It is also worth noting that we get an accurate analytical expression for calculating the characteristic path length. We verify numerically and experimentally these main features.

  18. Small Sample Properties of Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Time Series Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the small sample (N = 1, 3, 5, 10, 15) performance of a Bayesian multivariate vector autoregressive (BVAR-SEM) time series model relative to frequentist power and parameter estimation bias. A multivariate autoregressive model was developed based on correlated autoregressive time series vectors of varying…

  19. On Control of Reaching Movements for Musculo-Skeletal Redundant Arm Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Tahara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a dynamic sensory-motor control mechanism of reaching movements for a musculo-skeletal redundant arm model. The formulation of a musculo-skeletal redundant arm system, which takes into account non-linear muscle properties obtained by some physiological understandings, is introduced and numerical simulations are perfomed. The non-linear properties of muscle dynamics make it possible to modulate the viscosity of the joints, and the end point of the arm converges to the desired point with a simple task-space feedback when adequate internal forces are chosen, regardless of the redundancy of the joint. Numerical simulations were performed and the effectiveness of our control scheme is discussed through these results. The results suggest that the reaching movements can be achieved using only a simple task-space feedback scheme together with the internal force effect that comes from non-linear properties of skeletal muscles without any complex mathematical computation such as an inverse dynamics or optimal trajectory derivation. In addition, the dynamic damping ellipsoid for evaluating how the internal forces can be determined is introduced. The task-space feedback is extended to the ‘virtual spring-damper hypothesis’ based on the research by Arimoto et al. (2006 to reduce the muscle output forces and heterogeneity of convergence depending on the initial state and desired position. The research suggests a new direction for studies of brain-motor control mechanism of human movements.

  20. Modeling and Predicting Tissue Movement and Deformation for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiangyun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Lai, Qianfeng; Guo, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Qi; Yu, Sijiao; Tong, Qianqian; Si, Weixin; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the target tissue (such as a tumor) often moves and/or deforms in response to an external force. This problem creates difficulties in treating patients and can lead to the destruction of normal tissue. In order to solve this problem, we present a novel method to model and predict the movement and deformation of the target tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. Methods Our method computationally predicts the position of the target tissue under external force. This prediction allows appropriate adjustments in the focal region during the application of HIFU so that the treatment head is kept aligned with the diseased tissue through the course of therapy. To accomplish this goal, we utilize the cow tissue as the experimental target tissue to collect spatial sequences of ultrasound images using the HIFU equipment. A Geodesic Localized Chan-Vese (GLCV) model is developed to segment the target tissue images. A 3D target tissue model is built based on the segmented results. A versatile particle framework is constructed based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Further, an iterative parameter estimation algorithm is utilized to determine the essential parameters of the versatile particle framework. Finally, the versatile particle framework with the determined parameters is used to estimate the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Results To validate our method, we compare the predicted contours with the ground truth contours. We found that the lowest, highest and average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values between predicted and ground truth contours were, respectively, 0.9615, 0.9770 and 0.9697. Conclusion Our experimental result indicates that the proposed method can effectively predict the dynamic contours of the moving and deforming tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. PMID:25993644

  1. Modeling of movement of liquid metal droplets driven by an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M F; Jin, M J; Jin, X J; Zuo, S G

    2017-07-19

    The motion of liquid metal has potential applications ranging from micro-pumps and self-fueled motors to rapid cooling and drug delivery. In this study, we systematically investigate the effects of the radius of LMDs (liquid metal droplets), the concentration of electrolyte solution and the applied electric field on the movement behavior of LMDs experimentally. The research also explains the experimental phenomenon with an innovative modeling analysis, which combines pertinent forces (i.e., the driving force induced by the gradient of surface tension, the viscous friction between the droplet and its surrounding electrolyte, and the friction between the droplet and the substrate). The model is highly consistent with the rule that LMDs with a larger radius need smaller actuation voltage, and we can predict the critical voltages of LMDs with r = 2-4 mm through Velectrode = 30.62/r(2) - 0.998, which is obtained by fitting the parameters. We also obtain the model V = [-66.2Vr(2)/(259.7-17.7) + 1.253]r(2), which can predict the average velocity-voltage lines of LMDs with r = 3, 3.5 mm and V = 1-13 V. In addition, the velocity increases upon increasing the concentration of the electrolyte solution from 0.1 mol L(-1) to 0.3 mol L(-1), and tends to be stable at more than 0.3 mol L(-1) owing to the saturation of the EDL (electrical double layer) charge density. Additionally, we discuss the phenomenon of elongation during movement that occurs upon increasing the size of the LMDs. If the size of the LMDs continues to increase, the reverse movement from the anode to the cathode can occur, and the phenomenon can also be explained by the model.

  2. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured.

  3. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Postlethwaite

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured.

  4. 眼睛运动模型的设计%Design of eye movement model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑞森

    2012-01-01

    At present, the implementation scheme of biological pattern recognition system can be classified into two categories which are related to eye movements. In this paper, based on the cellular neural networks (CNN). the center of gravity (COG) search algorithm based on Euclidean distance as well as the random selection with distance weighting (RSDW) model, a model of eye movements is proposed. The feature of the eye movement trajectory map of this model has a good consistency with the feature obtained from eye tracking experiment. Also this model can be used as an important part of the information acquisition module of biological pattern recognition system.%现阶段,生物模式识别系统主要有两种实现方案,且这些方案的实现都与眼睛的运动有关,因此这里利用细胞神经网络(CNN),基于欧氏距离的质心(COG)搜索算法以及距离权重选择模型(RSDW)的思想建立了一个眼睛运动模型.该模型输出的眼睛运动轨迹图特性与实际仪器测试的眼睛运动轨迹图特性具有较好的一致性,同时该模型能直接作为生物模式识别系统中信息获取模块的重要组成部分.

  5. Modeling of CBM production, CO2 injection, and tracer movement at a field CO2 sequestration site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, Hema J.; Bowes, Benjamin D.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Gondle, Raj K.; Wells, Arthur W.; Strazisar, Brian R.

    2012-07-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is a potential technology mainly because of the potential for simultaneous enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM). Several pilot tests have been performed around the globe leading to mixed results. Numerous modeling efforts have been carried out successfully to model methane production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Sensitivity analyses and history matching along with several optimization tools were used to estimate reservoir properties and to investigate reservoir performance. Geological and geophysical techniques have also been used to characterize field sequestration sites and to inspect reservoir heterogeneity. The fate and movement of injected CO{sub 2} can be determined by using several monitoring techniques. Monitoring of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers is one of these monitoring technologies. As a part of this monitoring technique, a small fraction of a traceable fluid is added to the injection wellhead along with the CO{sub 2} stream at different times to monitor the timing and location of the breakthrough in nearby monitoring wells or offset production wells. A reservoir modeling study was performed to simulate a pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan coal basin of northern New Mexico. Several unknown reservoir properties at the field site were estimated by modeling the coal seam as a dual porosity formation and by history matching the methane production and CO{sub 2} injection. In addition to reservoir modeling of methane production and CO{sub 2} injection, tracer injection was modeled. Tracers serve as a surrogate for determining potential leakage of CO{sub 2}. The tracer was modeled as a non-reactive gas and was injected into the reservoir as a mixture along with CO{sub 2}. Geologic and geometric details of the field site, numerical modeling details of methane production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer injection are presented in this paper. Moreover, the numerical

  6. Collisions of Small Nuclei in the Thermal Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, J; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Sharma, N.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the expectations of the thermal model for particle production in collisions of small nuclei. The maxima observed in particle ratios of strange particles to pions as a function of beam energy in heavy ion collisions, are reduced when considering smaller nuclei. Of particular interest is the $\\Lambda/\\pi^+$ ratio shows the strongest maximum which survives even in collisions of small nuclei.

  7. Exemplar-based Parametric Hidden Markov Models for Recognition and Synthesis of Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker; Grest, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in movement recognition is the recognition of movements of a particular type. E.g. pointing movements are of a particular type but differ in terms of the pointing direction. Arm movements with the goal of reaching out and grasping an object are of a particular type but differ...

  8. Empirical spatial econometric modelling of small scale neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkman, Linda

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to model small scale neighbourhood in a house price model by implementing the newest methodology in spatial econometrics. A common problem when modelling house prices is that in practice it is seldom possible to obtain all the desired variables. Especially variables capturing the small scale neighbourhood conditions are hard to find. If there are important explanatory variables missing from the model, the omitted variables are spatially autocorrelated and they are correlated with the explanatory variables included in the model, it can be shown that a spatial Durbin model is motivated. In the empirical application on new house price data from Helsinki in Finland, we find the motivation for a spatial Durbin model, we estimate the model and interpret the estimates for the summary measures of impacts. By the analysis we show that the model structure makes it possible to model and find small scale neighbourhood effects, when we know that they exist, but we are lacking proper variables to measure them.

  9. Algebraic approach to small-world network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle; Muller, Lyle E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an analytic model for directed Watts-Strogatz small-world graphs and deduce an algebraic expression of its defining adjacency matrix. The latter is then used to calculate the small-world digraph's asymmetry index and clustering coefficient in an analytically exact fashion, valid nonasymptotically for all graph sizes. The proposed approach is general and can be applied to all algebraically well-defined graph-theoretical measures, thus allowing for an analytical investigation of finite-size small-world graphs.

  10. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  11. Development of Biological Movement Recognition by Interaction between Active Basis Model and Fuzzy Optical Flow Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia Yousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003. Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human. Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach.

  12. Modeling neck linker of kinesin motor movement with MRSR stochastic differential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Wan Qashishah Akmal Wan; Ramli, Siti Norafidah Mohd; Radiman, Shahidan

    2016-11-01

    Stochastic differential equation has a significant role in a range of biological areas including molecular motor like kinesin motor. Mean-reverting square root (MRSR) stochastic differential equation is commonly used in economics and finance areas. In this study, we use the MRSR stochastic differential equation to model neck linker motion of kinesin motor by considering the possibilities of rightward direction and occasionally in the leftward direction of kinesin movements. This neck linker docking model of kinesin motor incorporates the conformational change in the chemical kinetics and the tethered diffusion of the free head of kinesin motor. Here, we demonstrate this model by using Hookean spring method which referred to the stiffness model of neck linker. The motion of kinesin motor seems to be well described to move in unidirectional way with volatile behavior based on MRSR rather than common stochastic differential equation [DOI 10.1007/s11538-011-9697-6].

  13. Modeling collective human mobility: Understanding exponential law of intra-urban movement

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Xiao; Dong, Li; Xu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    It is very important to understand urban mobility patterns because most trips are concentrated in urban areas. In the paper, a new model is proposed to model collective human mobility in urban areas. The model can be applied to predict individual flows not only in intra-city but also in countries or a larger range. Based on the model, it can be concluded that the exponential law of distance distribution is attributed to decreasing exponentially of average density of human travel demands. Since the distribution of human travel demands only depends on urban planning, population distribution, regional functions and so on, it illustrates that these inherent properties of cities are impetus to drive collective human movements.

  14. Organisational models in agriculture with special reference to small farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakić Nebojša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural value chains can be understood as the systems of people, organizations and activities needed to create process and deliver agricultural products from producers to consumers. Over time and due to huge changes that have happened in the surroundings, agricultural value chains have become very integrated and complex. Small farmers can prosper by joining in modern higher-level agricultural value chains, but there are numerous obstacles, as well. The work presents the typology of organizational models for agricultural production that consists of the models organised by producers, agribusiness companies (processors, retail chains, and intermediaries, facilitators (governments, non-governmental organisations and completely integrated models, established by some big companies. None of these models provides ideal solutions from the perspective of small producers. However, they say that the institutions, such as cooperatives and small farmers' organisations, present important mechanisms for including small producers in modern value chains and realizing the cooperation with agribusiness companies and other important players. This is also important for decision-makers and governmental bodies that should create a suitable environment and provide support so that small farmers and their organisations can integrate in modern value chains in a successful way.

  15. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Sang Hyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule.

  16. Jaguars on the move: modeling movement to mitigate fragmentation from road expansion in the Mayan Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Conde, Dalia Amor; Manterola, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    -telemetry and GPS data to infer the movement behavior of jaguars Panthera onca as a response to vegetation, roads and human population density in the Mayan Forests of Mexico and Guatemala. We used the results of the model to simulate jaguars moving along a road that bisects the major reserve system in the area....... The aim of the simulations was to identify suitable locations for wildlife passes. We found that jaguars move preferentially to undisturbed forests and that females avoid moving close to roads and to areas with even low levels of human occupation. Males also avoid roads, but to a lesser degree, and appear...

  17. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  18. A passive movement method for parameter estimation of a musculo-skeletal arm model incorporating a modified hill muscle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tung Fai; Wilson, Adrian J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present an experimental method of parameterising the passive mechanical characteristics of the bicep and tricep muscles in vivo, by fitting the dynamics of a two muscle arm model incorporating anatomically meaningful and structurally identifiable modified Hill muscle models to measured elbow movements. Measurements of the passive flexion and extension of the elbow joint were obtained using 3D motion capture, from which the elbow angle trajectories were determined and used to obtain the spring constants and damping coefficients in the model through parameter estimation. Four healthy subjects were used in the experiments. Anatomical lengths and moment of inertia values of the subjects were determined by direct measurement and calculation. There was good reproducibility in the measured arm movement between trials, and similar joint angle trajectory characteristics were seen between subjects. Each subject had their own set of fitted parameter values determined and the results showed good agreement between measured and simulated data. The average fitted muscle parallel spring constant across all subjects was 143 N/m and the average fitted muscle parallel damping constant was 1.73 Ns/m. The passive movement method was proven to be successful, and can be applied to other joints in the human body, where muscles with similar actions are grouped together. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling Marten (Martes americana Movement Costs in a Boreal Forest: Effects of Grain Size and Thematic Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophélie Planckaert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated landscape resistance to movements of American marten (Martes americana based on snow-tracking data. We generated movement cost maps of the study area with different grain size, thematic resolution, and habitat-specific resistance to movements. We compared simulated tracks obtained from resistance maps to real tracks plotted along transects that we surveyed in winters 2004 to 2008 at the Montmorency Forest, Quebec, Canada. Simulated tracks were located at the intersection between least-cost paths simulated across the study area and transects. We used nearest-neighbour distances between simulated and real tracks to assess the performance of resistance maps and estimate landscape resistance parameters. Simulations with specified costs to movement for open areas, young forest, and mature forest performed better than simpler resistance scenarios, suggesting that resistance to marten movements differed among those landscape attributes that were considered. Simulations with a map grain size of 100 m performed significantly better than 5, 25, and 300 m, possibly because of gap crossing avoidance. Model performance (compared to null model was maximal when resistance to movement in open habitat was set to 20 times higher than in mature forest, but uncertainty around this estimate was large. This research demonstrates that presence-only (point data can be used to parameterize movements using spatially explicit modelling.

  20. Effects of belief and logic on syllogistic reasoning: Eye-movement evidence for selective processing models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Linden J; Phillips, Peter; Wade, Caroline N; Quayle, Jeremy D

    2006-01-01

    Studies of syllogistic reasoning have demonstrated a nonlogical tendency for people to endorse more believable conclusions than unbelievable ones. This belief bias effect is more dominant on invalid syllogisms than valid ones, giving rise to a logic by belief interaction. We report an experiment in which participants' eye movements were recorded in order to provide insights into the nature and time course of the reasoning processes associated with manipulations of conclusion validity and believability. Our main dependent measure was people's inspection times for syllogistic premises, and we tested predictions deriving from three contemporary mental-models accounts of the logic by belief interaction. Results supported recent "selective processing" theories of belief bias (e.g., Evans, 2000; Klauer, Musch, & Naumer, 2000), which assume that the believability of a conclusion biases model construction processes, rather than biasing the search for falsifying models (e.g., Oakhill & Johnson-Laird, 1985) or a response stage of reasoning arising from subjective uncertainty (e.g., Quayle & Ball, 2000). We conclude by suggesting that the eye-movement analyses in reasoning research may provide a useful adjunct to other process-tracing techniques such as verbal protocol analysis.

  1. Small populations corrections for selection-mutation models

    CERN Document Server

    Jabin, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We consider integro-differential models describing the evolution of a population structured by a quantitative trait. Individuals interact competitively, creating a strong selection pressure on the population. On the other hand, mutations are assumed to be small. Following the formalism of Diekmann, Jabin, Mischler, and Perthame, this creates concentration phenomena, typically consisting in a sum of Dirac masses slowly evolving in time. We propose a modification to those classical models that takes the effect of small populations into accounts and corrects some abnormal behaviours.

  2. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  3. PROPOSAL OF A MODEL MANAGEMENT TO SMALL DESIGN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio José de OLIVEIRA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is the proposition of a management model specifically developed for small building design firms, aligned with their needs and particularities. The field research was conducted with a qualitative approach through the analysis of four case studies in small building design firms acting mainly in São Paulo City. The data collection was accomplished through semi-structured interviews, direct observation and analysis of documents. The proposed model includes guidance to the management of the core processes and activities of small building design firms, such as: organizational structure; strategic planning; planning and control of design process; costs management; sales management; information systems; human resources management; services added to the design; and performance evaluation. Key-words: design firms; design process; building construction.

  4. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-01-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of th...

  5. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    impact on the work output of the expander.The final part of this report deals with the performance of plate heat exchangers. Several plate heat exchanger correlations were reviewed focussing on their applicability to ORC systems. A framework for dynamic heat exchanger modelling was developed......he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance...... times and below 10−7 away from the phase boundaries.Regarding expansion devices for small scale organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems,this work focussed on reciprocating machines. A prototype of a reciprocating expander with a swept volume of 736 cm3 was tested and modelled. he model was written in object...

  6. Waste Reduction Model (WARM) Resources for Small Businesses and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief overview of how EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) can be used by small businesses and organizations. The page includes a brief summary of uses of WARM for the audience and links to other resources.

  7. On the small-time behavior of stochastic logistic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung Tien Nguyen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the small-time behaviors of the solution to  a stochastic logistic model. The obtained results allow us to estimate the number of individuals in the population and can be used to study stochastic prey-predator systems.

  8. Small-Scale Helicopter Automatic Autorotation: Modeling, Guidance, and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taamallah, S.

    2015-01-01

    Our research objective consists in developing a, model-based, automatic safety recovery system, for a small-scale helicopter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in autorotation, i.e. an engine OFF flight condition, that safely flies and lands the helicopter to a pre-specified ground location. In pursuit o

  9. The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumtuma, Chamnan; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Yeamsang, Theerawat

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand was created by research and development. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected via the following steps: a participatory workshop meeting, the formation of a team according to knowledge base, field study, brainstorming, group discussion, activities carried out…

  10. Small data global existence for a fluid-structure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Mihaela; Kukavica, Igor; Lasiecka, Irena; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2017-02-01

    We address the system of partial differential equations modeling motion of an elastic body inside an incompressible fluid. The fluid is modeled by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations while the structure is represented by the damped wave equation with interior damping. The additional boundary stabilization γ, considered in our previous paper, is no longer necessary. We prove the global existence and exponential decay of solutions for small initial data in a suitable Sobolev space.

  11. A computational model of the hippocampus that represents environmental structure and goal location, and guides movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Makino, Yoshinari; Miura, Haruki; Yano, Masafumi

    2011-08-01

    Hippocampal place cells (PCs) are believed to represent environmental structure. However, it is unclear how and which brain regions represent goals and guide movements. Recently, another type of cells that fire around a goal was found in rat hippocampus (we designate these cells as goal place cells, GPCs). This suggests that the hippocampus is also involved in goal representation. Assuming that the activities of GPCs depend on the distance to a goal, we propose an adaptive navigation model. By monitoring the population activity of GPCs, the model navigates to shorten the distance to the goal. To achieve the distance-dependent activities of GPCs, plastic connections are assumed between PCs and GPCs, which are modified depending on two reward-triggered activities: activity propagation through PC-PC network representing the topological environmental structure, and the activity of GPCs with different durations. The former activity propagation is regarded as a computational interpretation of "reverse replay" phenomenon found in rat hippocampus. Simulation results confirm that after reaching a goal only once, the model can navigate to the goal along almost the shortest path from arbitrary places in the environment. This indicates that the hippocampus might play a primary role in the representation of not only the environmental structure but also the goal, in addition to guiding the movement. This navigation strategy using the population activity of GPCs is equivalent to the taxis strategy, the simplest and most basic for biological systems. Our model is unique because this simple strategy allows the model to follow the shortest path in the topological map of the environment.

  12. Models of nanoparticles movement, collision, and friction in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Filip, E-mail: filip@meca.omtr.pub.ro [Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Department of Machine Elements and Tribology (Romania)

    2012-03-15

    Nanoparticles have been widely used in polishing slurry such as chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. The movement of nanoparticles in polishing slurry and the interaction between nanoparticles and solid surface are very important to obtain an atomic smooth surface in CMP process. Polishing slurry contains abrasive nanoparticles (with the size range of about 10-100 nm) and chemical reagents. Abrasive nanoparticles and hydrodynamic pressure are considered to cause the polishing effect. Nanoparticles behavior in the slurry with power-law viscosity shows great effect on the wafer surface in polishing process. CMP is now a standard process of integrated circuit manufacturing at nanoscale. Various models can dynamically predict the evolution of surface topography for any time point during CMP. To research, using a combination of individual nanoscale friction measurements for CMP of SiO{sub 2}, in an analytical model, to sum these effects, and the results scale CMP experiments, can guide the research and validate the model. CMP endpoint measurements, such as those from motor current traces, enable verification of model predictions, relating to friction and wear in CMP and surface topography evolution for different types of CMP processes and patterned chips. In this article, we explore models of the microscopic frictional force based on the surface topography and present both experimental and theoretical studies on the movement of nanoparticles in polishing slurry and collision between nanoparticles, as well as between the particles and solid surfaces in time of process CMP. Experimental results have proved that the nanoparticle size and slurry properties have great effects on the polishing results. The effects of the nanoparticle size and the slurry film thickness are also discussed.

  13. Models for blisks with large blends and small mistuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihan; Epureanu, Bogdan I.; Filippi, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Small deviations of the structural properties of individual sectors of blisks, referred to as mistuning, can lead to localization of vibration energy and drastically increased forced responses. Similar phenomena are observed in blisks with large damages or repair blends. Such deviations are best studied statistically because they are random. In the absence of cyclic symmetry, the computational cost to predict the vibration behavior of blisks becomes prohibitively high. That has lead to the development of various reduced-order models (ROMs). Existing approaches are either for small mistuning, or are computationally expensive and thus not effective for statistical analysis. This paper discusses a reduced-order modeling method for blisks with both large and small mistuning, which requires low computational effort. This method utilizes the pristine, rogue and interface modal expansion (PRIME) method to model large blends. PRIME uses only sector-level cyclic modes strategically combined together to create a reduction basis which yields ROMs that efficiently and accurately model large mistuning. To model small mistuning, nodal energy weighted transformation (NEWT) is integrated with PRIME, resulting in N-PRIME, which requires only sector-level calculations to create a ROM which captures both small and large mistuning with minimized computational effort. The combined effects of large blends and small mistuning are studied using N-PRIME for a dual flow path system and for a conventional blisk. The accuracy of the N-PRIME method is validated against full-order finite element analyses for both natural and forced response computations, including displacement amplitudes and surface stresses. Results reveal that N-PRIME is capable of accurately predicting the dynamics of a blisk with severely large mistuning, along with small random mistuning throughout each sector. Also, N-PRIME can accurately capture modes with highly localized motions. A statistical analysis is performed to

  14. Robust adaptive control modeling of human arm movements subject to altered gravity and mechanical loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryfonidis, Michail

    It has been observed that during orbital spaceflight the absence of gravitation related sensory inputs causes incongruence between the expected and the actual sensory feedback resulting from voluntary movements. This incongruence results in a reinterpretation or neglect of gravity-induced sensory input signals. Over time, new internal models develop, gradually compensating for the loss of spatial reference. The study of adaptation of goal-directed movements is the main focus of this thesis. The hypothesis is that during the adaptive learning process the neural connections behave in ways that can be described by an adaptive control method. The investigation presented in this thesis includes two different sets of experiments. A series of dart throwing experiments took place onboard the space station Mir. Experiments also took place at the Biomechanics lab at MIT, where the subjects performed a series of continuous trajectory tracking movements while a planar robotic manipulandum exerted external torques on the subjects' moving arms. The experimental hypothesis for both experiments is that during the first few trials the subjects will perform poorly trying to follow a prescribed trajectory, or trying to hit a target. A theoretical framework is developed that is a modification of the sliding control method used in robotics. The new control framework is an attempt to explain the adaptive behavior of the subjects. Numerical simulations of the proposed framework are compared with experimental results and predictions from competitive models. The proposed control methodology extends the results of the sliding mode theory to human motor control. The resulting adaptive control model of the motor system is robust to external dynamics, even those of negative gain, uses only position and velocity feedback, and achieves bounded steady-state error without explicit knowledge of the system's nonlinearities. In addition, the experimental and modeling results demonstrate that

  15. Cortical sources of ERP in prosaccade and antisaccade eye movements using realistic source models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The cortical sources of event-related-potentials (ERP) using realistic source models were examined in a prosaccade and antisaccade procedure. College-age participants were presented with a preparatory interval and a target that indicated the direction of the eye movement that was to be made. In some blocks a cue was given in the peripheral location where the target was to be presented and in other blocks no cue was given. In Experiment 1 the prosaccade and antisaccade trials were presented randomly within a block; in Experiment 2 procedures were compared in which either prosaccade and antisaccade trials were mixed in the same block, or trials were presented in separate blocks with only one type of eye movement. There was a central negative slow wave occurring prior to the target, a slow positive wave over the parietal scalp prior to the saccade, and a parietal spike potential immediately prior to saccade onset. Cortical source analysis of these ERP components showed a common set of sources in the ventral anterior cingulate and orbital frontal gyrus for the presaccadic positive slow wave and the spike potential. In Experiment 2 the same cued- and non-cued blocks were used, but prosaccade and antisaccade trials were presented in separate blocks. This resulted in a smaller difference in reaction time between prosaccade and antisaccade trials. Unlike the first experiment, the central negative slow wave was larger on antisaccade than on prosaccade trials, and this effect on the ERP component had its cortical source primarily in the parietal and mid-central cortical areas contralateral to the direction of the eye movement. These results suggest that blocked prosaccade and antisaccade trials results in preparatory or set effects that decreases reaction time, eliminates some cueing effects, and is based on contralateral parietal-central brain areas. PMID:23847476

  16. Cortical Sources of ERP in Prosaccade and Antisaccade Eye Movements using Realistic Source Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Richards

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The cortical sources of event-related-potentials (ERP using realistic source models were examined in a prosaccade and antisaccade task. College-age participants were presented with a preparatory interval and a target that indicated the direction of the eye movement that was to be made. In some blocks a cue was given in the peripheral location where the target was to be presented and in other blocks no cue was given. In Experiment 1 the prosaccade and antisaccade trials were presented randomly within a block; in Experiment 2 procedures were compared in which either prosaccade and antisaccade trials were mixed in the same block, or trials were presented in separate blocks with only one type of eye movement. There was a central negative slow wave occurring prior to the target, a slow positive wave over the parietal scalp prior to the saccade, and a parietal spike potential immediately prior to saccade onset. Cortical source analysis of these ERP components showed a common set of sources in the ventral anterior cingulate and orbital frontal gyrus for the presaccadic positive slow wave and the spike potential. In Experiment 2 the same cued- and non-cued blocks were used, but prosaccade and antisaccade trials were presented in separate blocks. This resulted in a smaller difference in reaction time between prosaccade and antisaccade trials. Unlike the first experiment, the central negative slow wave was larger on antisaccade than on prosaccade trials, and this effect on the ERP component had its cortical source primarily in the parietal and mid-central cortical areas contralateral to the direction of the eye movement. These results suggest that blocked prosaccade and antisaccade trials results in preparatory or set effects that decreases reaction time, eliminates some cueing effects, and is based on contralateral parietal-central brain areas.

  17. Modelling of agricultural combination driver behaviour from the aspect of safety of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, Jan; Tanaś, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Tadeusz; Kromulski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Statistics show that the travel of agricultural machinery to a work area and their movement during labour is the source of many serious accidents. The most dangerous in consequences prove to be those that occur during transport and associated with maneuvering tractors and machinery (about 30% of all fatal accidents). It can be assumed that at least some of these accidents were caused indirectly by the specific design features of agricultural machines which adversely affect the driveability. The single- and multi-loop structures of the driver-vehicle system models are formulated to study the contributions of various preview and prediction strategies to the path tracking and dynamic performance of the articulated vehicle. In the presented study the compensatory model of driver utilizes the lateral acceleration of the tractor, roll angle of trailer sprung mass and the articulation rate as the internal motion feedback variables. The control model of steering of an agricultural set has been implemented in the Matlab/Simulink environment. The model has been constructed with the use of stochastic methods and operational transmittances describing the various components of the system. The model operational transmittances has been estimated using Box-Jenkins and continuous-time process models from input-output data. The model has been tested using experimental data from road investigation of the agricultural set.

  18. Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  19. A Model-Based Approach for the Measurement of Eye Movements Using Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kwangjae; Reschke, Millard F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a video eye-tracking algorithm which searches for the best fit of the pupil modeled as a circular disk. The algorithm is robust to common image artifacts such as the droopy eyelids and light reflections while maintaining the measurement resolution available by the centroid algorithm. The presented algorithm is used to derive the pupil size and center coordinates, and can be combined with iris-tracking techniques to measure ocular torsion. A comparison search method of pupil candidates using pixel coordinate reference lookup tables optimizes the processing requirements for a least square fit of the circular disk model. This paper includes quantitative analyses and simulation results for the resolution and the robustness of the algorithm. The algorithm presented in this paper provides a platform for a noninvasive, multidimensional eye measurement system which can be used for clinical and research applications requiring the precise recording of eye movements in three-dimensional space.

  20. A model for the facilitation of mental health through belly dancing as movement

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Cur. Movement is an integral aspect of daily living. Movement allows the human being to express, find meaning and reflect a part or the whole of the unfolding of the stories of their lives. In nursing movement is the dialogue and interaction between professional nurse and patient. The essence of the dialogue is the movement towards caring and healing between the professional nurse and the individual. The purpose of this research is to develop, describe, evaluate and provide guidelines fo...

  1. Reinforcement learning of targeted movement in a spiking neuronal model of motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Chadderdon

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor control has traditionally been considered from a control theory perspective, without relation to neurobiology. In contrast, here we utilized a spiking-neuron model of motor cortex and trained it to perform a simple movement task, which consisted of rotating a single-joint "forearm" to a target. Learning was based on a reinforcement mechanism analogous to that of the dopamine system. This provided a global reward or punishment signal in response to decreasing or increasing distance from hand to target, respectively. Output was partially driven by Poisson motor babbling, creating stochastic movements that could then be shaped by learning. The virtual forearm consisted of a single segment rotated around an elbow joint, controlled by flexor and extensor muscles. The model consisted of 144 excitatory and 64 inhibitory event-based neurons, each with AMPA, NMDA, and GABA synapses. Proprioceptive cell input to this model encoded the 2 muscle lengths. Plasticity was only enabled in feedforward connections between input and output excitatory units, using spike-timing-dependent eligibility traces for synaptic credit or blame assignment. Learning resulted from a global 3-valued signal: reward (+1, no learning (0, or punishment (-1, corresponding to phasic increases, lack of change, or phasic decreases of dopaminergic cell firing, respectively. Successful learning only occurred when both reward and punishment were enabled. In this case, 5 target angles were learned successfully within 180 s of simulation time, with a median error of 8 degrees. Motor babbling allowed exploratory learning, but decreased the stability of the learned behavior, since the hand continued moving after reaching the target. Our model demonstrated that a global reinforcement signal, coupled with eligibility traces for synaptic plasticity, can train a spiking sensorimotor network to perform goal-directed motor behavior.

  2. A coupled model of soil water-heat-solute movement under the mulched drip irrigation condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Tian, F.; Gao, L.; Hu, H.

    2010-12-01

    : The mulched drip irrigation (MDI), first developed in northwestern part of China (Xinjiang Province) in the cotton field in 1996, can obtain higher yield while at the lower cost of water consumption and thus becomes popular rapidly. However, it has the potential risk of salinizing the arable soil. Also, plastic film can alter the energy balance at the ground surface and invoke the regime shifting of soil heat transfer. It is, therefore, necessary to simulate the inter-related movement of water, heat, and dissolvable solute in the soil under the MDI condition for the purpose of sustainable agricultural production as well as of climate change issue. With the different boundary condition and irrigation rate, the transportation and distribution features of water-heat-salt under the MDI condition are significantly different from those under the other irrigation methods. The existing tools such as HYDRUS and VS2DH(T) could not set up the special boundary condition relevant to MDI, e.g., the moving ponded area. A new two-dimensional numerical model of Richard’s equation and Convection-Dispersion equations was developed which coupled soil water, solute, and heat together. For the homogenous and isotropic porous media, the soil water-heat-solute movement under the MDI condition is considered as 2D problem. The Richards and solute convection-diffusive equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations (ODEs) through spatial semi-discretization, and so do the corresponding boundary conditions. The resultant ODEs are solved using a state-of-the-art solver, CVODE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The model is validated against the numerical examples as well as the field data. The results show the high numerical efficiency, the high simulation accuracy, and the flexibility of the model to mimic changing boundary conditions. Key words: numerical model, Richard’s equation, Convection-Diffusive equation, CVODE

  3. Edge Detection Model Based on Involuntary Eye Movements of the Eye-Retina System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Róka

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional edge-detection algorithms in image processing typically convolute afilter operator and the input image, and then map overlapping input image regions tooutput signals. Convolution also serves as a basis in biologically inspired (Sobel, Laplace,Canny algorithms. Recent results in cognitive retinal research have shown that ganglioncell receptive fields cover the mammalian retina in a mosaic arrangement, withinsignificant amounts of overlap in the central fovea. This means that the biologicalrelevance of traditional and widely adapted edge-detection algorithms with convolutionbasedoverlapping operator architectures has been disproved. However, using traditionalfilters with non-overlapping operator architectures leads to considerable losses in contourinformation. This paper introduces a novel, tremor-based retina model and edge-detectionalgorithm that reconciles these differences between the physiology of the retina and theoverlapping architectures used by today's widely adapted algorithms. The algorithm takesinto consideration data convergence, as well as the dynamic properties of the retina, byincorporating a model of involuntary eye tremors and the impulse responses of ganglioncells. Based on the evaluation of the model, two hypotheses are formulated on the highlydebated role of involuntary eye tremors: 1 The role of involuntary eye tremors hasinformation theoretical implications 2 From an information processing point of view, thefunctional role of involuntary eye-movements extends to more than just the maintenance ofaction potentials. Involuntary eye-movements may be responsible for the compensation ofinformation losses caused by a non-overlapping receptive field architecture. In support ofthese hypotheses, the article provides a detailed analysis of the model's biologicalrelevance, along with numerical simulations and a hardware implementation.

  4. Reinforcement learning of targeted movement in a spiking neuronal model of motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, George L; Neymotin, Samuel A; Kerr, Cliff C; Lytton, William W

    2012-01-01

    Sensorimotor control has traditionally been considered from a control theory perspective, without relation to neurobiology. In contrast, here we utilized a spiking-neuron model of motor cortex and trained it to perform a simple movement task, which consisted of rotating a single-joint "forearm" to a target. Learning was based on a reinforcement mechanism analogous to that of the dopamine system. This provided a global reward or punishment signal in response to decreasing or increasing distance from hand to target, respectively. Output was partially driven by Poisson motor babbling, creating stochastic movements that could then be shaped by learning. The virtual forearm consisted of a single segment rotated around an elbow joint, controlled by flexor and extensor muscles. The model consisted of 144 excitatory and 64 inhibitory event-based neurons, each with AMPA, NMDA, and GABA synapses. Proprioceptive cell input to this model encoded the 2 muscle lengths. Plasticity was only enabled in feedforward connections between input and output excitatory units, using spike-timing-dependent eligibility traces for synaptic credit or blame assignment. Learning resulted from a global 3-valued signal: reward (+1), no learning (0), or punishment (-1), corresponding to phasic increases, lack of change, or phasic decreases of dopaminergic cell firing, respectively. Successful learning only occurred when both reward and punishment were enabled. In this case, 5 target angles were learned successfully within 180 s of simulation time, with a median error of 8 degrees. Motor babbling allowed exploratory learning, but decreased the stability of the learned behavior, since the hand continued moving after reaching the target. Our model demonstrated that a global reinforcement signal, coupled with eligibility traces for synaptic plasticity, can train a spiking sensorimotor network to perform goal-directed motor behavior.

  5. A small world model for the spread of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel T. Vieira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognised that the structure of social networks plays an important role in the dynamics of disease propagation. The spread of HIV usually results from a complex network of social interactions and other factors related to culture, sexual behaviour, demography, geography and disease characteristics, as well as the availability, accessibility and delivery of healthcare. The small world phenomenon has been used for representing social network interactions. It states that, given some random connections, the degrees of separation between any two individuals within a population can be very small. In this paper we present a discrete event simulation model which uses a variant of the small world network model to represent social interactions and the sexual transmission of HIV within a population. We use the model to demonstrate the importance of the choice of topology and initial distribution of infection, and capture the direct and non-linear relationship between the probability of a casual partnership (small world randomness parameter and the spread of HIV.

  6. On the origin of crossover interference: A chromosome oscillatory movement (COM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hultén Maj A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now nearly a century since it was first discovered that crossovers between homologous parental chromosomes, originating at the Prophase stage of Meiosis I, are not randomly placed. In fact, the number and distribution of crossovers are strictly regulated with crossovers/chiasmata formed in optimal positions along the length of individual chromosomes, facilitating regular chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. In spite of much research addressing this question, the underlying mechanism(s for the phenomenon called crossover/chiasma interference is/are still unknown; and this constitutes an outstanding biological enigma. Results The Chromosome Oscillatory Movement (COM model for crossover/chiasma interference implies that, during Prophase of Meiosis I, oscillatory movements of the telomeres (attached to the nuclear membrane and the kinetochores (within the centromeres create waves along the length of chromosome pairs (bivalents so that crossing-over and chiasma formation is facilitated by the proximity of parental homologs induced at the nodal regions of the waves thus created. This model adequately explains the salient features of crossover/chiasma interference, where (1 there is normally at least one crossover/chiasma per bivalent, (2 the number is correlated to bivalent length, (3 the positions are dependent on the number per bivalent, (4 interference distances are on average longer over the centromere than along chromosome arms, and (5 there are significant changes in carriers of structural chromosome rearrangements. Conclusions The crossover/chiasma frequency distribution in humans and mice with normal karyotypes as well as in carriers of structural chromosome rearrangements are those expected on the COM model. Further studies are underway to analyze mechanical/mathematical aspects of this model for the origin of crossover/chiasma interference, using string replicas of the homologous chromosomes at the

  7. Landscape fragmentation and pollinator movement within agricultural environments: a modelling framework for exploring foraging and movement ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A. Rands

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pollinator decline has been linked to landscape change, through both habitat fragmentation and the loss of habitat suitable for the pollinators to live within. One method for exploring why landscape change should affect pollinator populations is to combine individual-level behavioural ecological techniques with larger-scale landscape ecology. A modelling framework is described that uses spatially-explicit individual-based models to explore the effects of individual behavioural rules within a landscape. The technique described gives a simple method for exploring the effects of the removal of wild corridors, and the creation of wild set-aside fields: interventions that are common to many national agricultural policies. The effects of these manipulations on central-place nesting pollinators are varied, and depend upon the behavioural rules that the pollinators are using to move through the environment. The value of this modelling framework is discussed, and future directions for exploration are identified.

  8. A 3-D biomechanical skeleton model for posture and movement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Moreno; D'Amico, Gabriele; Roncoletta, Piero

    2006-01-01

    A project to merge into a full 3D reliable and detailed human skeleton representation various segmental biomechanical models presented in literature has been undertaken by our group. The obtained 3D skeleton model is fully parametric and can so be fitted to each subject anthropometric characteristics. A non-ionizing approach based on 3D opto-electronic measurements of body landmarks labelled by passive markers has been chosen to build the 3D parametric biomechanical skeleton model. To this aim various protocols involving different body labelling (and so different related anthropometric data) have been established for different analyses. To analyse human posture and spinal related pathologies, a 27 markers protocol has been set for static analysis, while 49 markers protocol has been set for gait and movement analysis. A special focus has been devoted to identify and model the spine with a correct degree of accuracy and reliability. To this aim complex signal processing and optimisation procedures have been tested. The model is able to fully integrate information deriving from other measurements devices as force platform data, surface EMG, foot pressure maps. The presented model is the first proposed in literature, to authors knowledge, able to process such multifactorial information to perform a full kinematic and kinetic analysis with particular focus on the spine. Several hundreds of patients have been already analysed and followed up with this methodology that proved to be useful for various posture and spine related pathologies (in particular spine deformities, low-back pain etc.).

  9. Small signal frequency domain model of an HVDC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osauskas, C.M.; Hume, D.J.; Wood, A.R. [UnIversity of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2001-11-01

    A small-signal analytic frequency domain model of a 6-pulse HVDC converter is presented. The model consists of a set of explicit algebraic equations which relate the transfer of distortion from AC voltage, DC current and firing angle modulation, to AC current and DC voltage. The equations represent the linearisation of the transfers around a base operating point, and are derived from a piecewise linear description of the AC current and DC voltage waveforms. The model provides an understanding of the transfer of distortion by the converter and is in excellent agreement with time domain simulations. (author)

  10. Prediction Model for Bankruptcy in Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Gabriela Sánchez Trujillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to validate and improve the Weighted Ratio Valuation Model (RPV model in micro and small enterprises in Central Mexico, in order to propose an alternative to financial valuation methods to anticipate bankruptcy in this sector of the economy. To achieve this objective, the study proposes the empirical application of Mosqueda 2010. The results shed important information that allowed the identification of variables that lead to bankruptcy, making risk detection more accurate, which, in turn, made it possible to validate and consolidate the model. 1024x768 Normal 0 21 false false false

  11. Corona graphs as a model of small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qian; Yi, Yuhao; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2015-11-01

    We introduce recursive corona graphs as a model of small-world networks. We investigate analytically the critical characteristics of the model, including order and size, degree distribution, average path length, clustering coefficient, and the number of spanning trees, as well as Kirchhoff index. Furthermore, we study the spectra for the adjacency matrix and the Laplacian matrix for the model. We obtain explicit results for all the quantities of the recursive corona graphs, which are similar to those observed in real-life networks.

  12. MODELLING THE CONSTRAINTS OF SPATIAL ENVIRONMENT IN FAUNA MOVEMENT SIMULATIONS: COMPARISON OF A BOUNDARIES ACCURATE FUNCTION AND A COST FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jolivet

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Landscape influences fauna movement at different levels, from habitat selection to choices of movements’ direction. Our goal is to provide a development frame in order to test simulation functions for animal’s movement. We describe our approach for such simulations and we compare two types of functions to calculate trajectories. To do so, we first modelled the role of landscape elements to differentiate between elements that facilitate movements and the ones being hindrances. Different influences are identified depending on landscape elements and on animal species. Knowledge were gathered from ecologists, literature and observation datasets. Second, we analysed the description of animal movement recorded with GPS at fine scale, corresponding to high temporal frequency and good location accuracy. Analysing this type of data provides information on the relation between landscape features and movements. We implemented an agent-based simulation approach to calculate potential trajectories constrained by the spatial environment and individual’s behaviour. We tested two functions that consider space differently: one function takes into account the geometry and the types of landscape elements and one cost function sums up the spatial surroundings of an individual. Results highlight the fact that the cost function exaggerates the distances travelled by an individual and simplifies movement patterns. The geometry accurate function represents a good bottom-up approach for discovering interesting areas or obstacles for movements.

  13. Ab initio modeling of small proteins by iterative TASSER simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting 3-dimensional protein structures from amino-acid sequences is an important unsolved problem in computational structural biology. The problem becomes relatively easier if close homologous proteins have been solved, as high-resolution models can be built by aligning target sequences to the solved homologous structures. However, for sequences without similar folds in the Protein Data Bank (PDB library, the models have to be predicted from scratch. Progress in the ab initio structure modeling is slow. The aim of this study was to extend the TASSER (threading/assembly/refinement method for the ab initio modeling and examine systemically its ability to fold small single-domain proteins. Results We developed I-TASSER by iteratively implementing the TASSER method, which is used in the folding test of three benchmarks of small proteins. First, data on 16 small proteins (α-root mean square deviation (RMSD of 3.8Å, with 6 of them having a Cα-RMSD α-RMSD α-RMSD of the I-TASSER models was 3.9Å, whereas it was 5.9Å using TOUCHSTONE-II software. Finally, 20 non-homologous small proteins (α-RMSD of 3.9Å was obtained for the third benchmark, with seven cases having a Cα-RMSD Conclusion Our simulation results show that I-TASSER can consistently predict the correct folds and sometimes high-resolution models for small single-domain proteins. Compared with other ab initio modeling methods such as ROSETTA and TOUCHSTONE II, the average performance of I-TASSER is either much better or is similar within a lower computational time. These data, together with the significant performance of automated I-TASSER server (the Zhang-Server in the 'free modeling' section of the recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP7 experiment, demonstrate new progresses in automated ab initio model generation. The I-TASSER server is freely available for academic users http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/I-TASSER.

  14. Modeling and Parameter Estimation of a Small Wind Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Ramírez Gómez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and parameter estimation of a small wind generation system is presented in this paper. The system consists of a wind turbine, a permanent magnet synchronous generator, a three phase rectifier, and a direct current load. In order to estimate the parameters wind speed data are registered in a weather station located in the Fraternidad Campus at ITM. Wind speed data were applied to a reference model programed with PSIM software. From that simulation, variables were registered to estimate the parameters. The wind generation system model together with the estimated parameters is an excellent representation of the detailed model, but the estimated model offers a higher flexibility than the programed model in PSIM software.

  15. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  17. A small-world network model of facial emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Takuma; Ochiai, Fumio; Suzuki, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Various models have been proposed to increase understanding of the cognitive basis of facial emotions. Despite those efforts, interactions between facial emotions have received minimal attention. If collective behaviours relating to each facial emotion in the comprehensive cognitive system could be assumed, specific facial emotion relationship patterns might emerge. In this study, we demonstrate that the frameworks of complex networks can effectively capture those patterns. We generate 81 facial emotion images (6 prototypes and 75 morphs) and then ask participants to rate degrees of similarity in 3240 facial emotion pairs in a paired comparison task. A facial emotion network constructed on the basis of similarity clearly forms a small-world network, which features an extremely short average network distance and close connectivity. Further, even if two facial emotions have opposing valences, they are connected within only two steps. In addition, we show that intermediary morphs are crucial for maintaining full network integration, whereas prototypes are not at all important. These results suggest the existence of collective behaviours in the cognitive systems of facial emotions and also describe why people can efficiently recognize facial emotions in terms of information transmission and propagation. For comparison, we construct three simulated networks--one based on the categorical model, one based on the dimensional model, and one random network. The results reveal that small-world connectivity in facial emotion networks is apparently different from those networks, suggesting that a small-world network is the most suitable model for capturing the cognitive basis of facial emotions.

  18. Scaling and percolation in the small-world network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M. E. J. [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States); Watts, D. J. [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we study the small-world network model of Watts and Strogatz, which mimics some aspects of the structure of networks of social interactions. We argue that there is one nontrivial length-scale in the model, analogous to the correlation length in other systems, which is well-defined in the limit of infinite system size and which diverges continuously as the randomness in the network tends to zero, giving a normal critical point in this limit. This length-scale governs the crossover from large- to small-world behavior in the model, as well as the number of vertices in a neighborhood of given radius on the network. We derive the value of the single critical exponent controlling behavior in the critical region and the finite size scaling form for the average vertex-vertex distance on the network, and, using series expansion and Pade approximants, find an approximate analytic form for the scaling function. We calculate the effective dimension of small-world graphs and show that this dimension varies as a function of the length-scale on which it is measured, in a manner reminiscent of multifractals. We also study the problem of site percolation on small-world networks as a simple model of disease propagation, and derive an approximate expression for the percolation probability at which a giant component of connected vertices first forms (in epidemiological terms, the point at which an epidemic occurs). The typical cluster radius satisfies the expected finite size scaling form with a cluster size exponent close to that for a random graph. All our analytic results are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of the model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  19. Decoding dexterous finger movements in a neural prosthesis model approaching real-world conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Joshua; Baker, Justin; House, Paul A; Greger, Bradley

    2012-11-01

    Dexterous finger movements can be decoded from neuronal action potentials acquired from a nonhuman primate using a chronically implanted Utah Electrode Array. We have developed an algorithm that can, after training, detect and classify individual and combined finger movements without any a priori knowledge of the data, task, or behavior. The algorithm is based on changes in the firing rates of individual neurons that are tuned for one or more finger movement types. Nine different movement types, which consisted of individual flexions, individual extensions, and combined flexions of the thumb, index finger, and middle finger, were decoded. The algorithm performed reliably on data recorded continuously during movement tasks, including a no-movement state, with an overall average sensitivity and specificity that were both > 92%. These results demonstrate a viable algorithm for decoding dexterous finger movements under conditions similar to those required for a real-world neural prosthetic application.

  20. Modelling foraging movements of diving predators: a theoretical study exploring the effect of heterogeneous landscapes on foraging efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimienti, Marianna; Bartoń, Kamil A; Scott, Beth E; Travis, Justin M J

    2014-01-01

    Foraging in the marine environment presents particular challenges for air-breathing predators. Information about prey capture rates, the strategies that diving predators use to maximise prey encounter rates and foraging success are still largely unknown and difficult to observe. As well, with the growing awareness of potential climate change impacts and the increasing interest in the development of renewable sources it is unknown how the foraging activity of diving predators such as seabirds will respond to both the presence of underwater structures and the potential corresponding changes in prey distributions. Motivated by this issue we developed a theoretical model to gain general understanding of how the foraging efficiency of diving predators may vary according to landscape structure and foraging strategy. Our theoretical model highlights that animal movements, intervals between prey capture and foraging efficiency are likely to critically depend on the distribution of the prey resource and the size and distribution of introduced underwater structures. For multiple prey loaders, changes in prey distribution affected the searching time necessary to catch a set amount of prey which in turn affected the foraging efficiency. The spatial aggregation of prey around small devices (∼ 9 × 9 m) created a valuable habitat for a successful foraging activity resulting in shorter intervals between prey captures and higher foraging efficiency. The presence of large devices (∼ 24 × 24 m) however represented an obstacle for predator movement, thus increasing the intervals between prey captures. In contrast, for single prey loaders the introduction of spatial aggregation of the resources did not represent an advantage suggesting that their foraging efficiency is more strongly affected by other factors such as the timing to find the first prey item which was found to occur faster in the presence of large devices. The development of this theoretical model represents a useful

  1. Quasi-Bayesian software reliability model with small samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin; TU Jun-xiang; CHEN Zhuo-ning; YAN Xiao-guang

    2009-01-01

    In traditional Bayesian software reliability models,it was assume that all probabilities are precise.In practical applications the parameters of the probability distributions are often under uncertainty due to strong dependence on subjective information of experts' judgments on sparse statistical data.In this paper,a quasi-Bayesian software reliability model using interval-valued probabilities to clearly quantify experts' prior beliefs on possible intervals of the parameters of the probability distributions is presented.The model integrates experts' judgments with statistical data to obtain more convincible assessments of software reliability with small samples.For some actual data sets,the presented model yields better predictions than the Jelinski-Moranda (JM) model using maximum likelihood (ML).

  2. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  3. Thermal Model Description of Collisions of Small Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, J.; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Sharma, N.

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of particle production on the size of the colliding nuclei is analyzed in terms of the thermal model using the canonical ensemble. The concept of strangeness correlation in clusters of sub-volume $V_c$ is used to account for the suppression of strangeness. A systematic analysis is presented of the predictions of the thermal model for particle production in collisions of small nuclei. The pattern of the maxima in particle ratios of strange particles to pions as a function of beam energy is quite special, as they do not occur at the same beam energy and are sensitive to system size. In particular, the $\\Lambda/\\pi^+$ ratio shows a clear maximum even for the smallest systems while the maximum in the K$^+/\\pi^+$ ratio disappears in small systems.

  4. DEVELOPMENT MODEL OF UNDER DEVELOPED SMALL ISLAND IN SUMENEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarti Sudarti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to build a Geographic Information System and Management Information System models of development of small islands in Sumenep. Based on the identification of economic potential there are few regions such as Nonggunong, Gayam, Ra'as, and Sapeken which have large contribution toward the rice plant production. The whole districts of the islands in Sumenep are the base of cow, horse, chicken and livestock commodities. Sapeken have significant contribution for marine fish. Giligenting, Nonggunong, Gayam, and Arjasa have large potential for brackish fish. Moreover, Gili-genting also has a great contribution for fresh fish.Keywords: Development model, under-developed area, small islandsJEL classification numbers: O13, O14

  5. A large population of small chloroplasts in tobacco leaf cells allows more effective chloroplast movement than a few enlarged chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-05-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities.

  6. A model for visual image-background discrimination by relative movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆惠民; 王秀春; 刘守忠; 史美德; 刘芳; 郭爱克

    1997-01-01

    Biologically plausible electronic neural network setup for real time processing motion image informa-tion was built. Using this setup the first part of the model was examined and real time discrimination of moving object image was realized from complex background in high resolution. Afterimages may play an important role in filtering moving object image and the aperture problem should be separated into two parts: the first part, i.e. the incomplete filtered moving object image, can be better resolved by parallel integration of multi-channel visual information, howev-er, the second part, i.e. the inaccurate measurement results for movement direction, may only get certain compensa-tion by visual integration.

  7. A Model of the Smooth Pursuit Eye Movement with Prediction and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Zambrano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth pursuit is one of the five main eye movements in humans, consisting of tracking a steadily moving visual target. Smooth pursuit is a good example of a sensory-motor task that is deeply based on prediction: tracking a visual target is not possible by correcting the error between the eye and the target position or velocity with a feedback loop, but it is only possible by predicting the trajectory of the target. This paper presents a model of smooth pursuit based on prediction and learning. It starts from amodel of the neuro-physiological system proposed by Shibata and Schaal (Shibata et al., Neural Networks, vol. 18, pp. 213-224, 2005. The learning component added here decreases the prediction time in the case of target dynamics already experienced by the system. In the implementation described here, the convergence time is, after the learning phase, 0.8 s.

  8. Modeling and simulation of strata movement for protective seam mining with large interburden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Chang-sheng; LI De-hai; LI Hua-min

    2009-01-01

    Based on simulated material scale modeling and numerical simulation,the pro-tective seam mining method was conducted at one coal mine.After extracting the No.15 seam,the overlying strata movement and the deformation of the No.9-10 protected seam were studied.The experiment results show that it is feasible to destress the protected seams with large interburden thickness.When the face had advanced 200 m from the setup room,the No.9-10 seam was fully destressed,resulting in easy gas drainage in the destressed zone.Recommendations on mining sequence of multiple seams mining in the same coal areas were made.

  9. A dynamic model of a passively cooled small modular reactor for controller design purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arda, Samet E., E-mail: s.e.arda@asu.edu; Holbert, Keith E., E-mail: holbert@asu.edu

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A mathematical dynamic model is developed for a passively cooled small modular reactor. • Reactor response associated single-phase natural circulation is analyzed. • A moving boundary model for a helical-coil steam generator is analyzed. • Dynamic responses of the overall model to representative perturbations are evaluated. • This compact model can be utilized for control system design. - Abstract: An analytical dynamic model for a passively cooled small modular reactor (SMR) is developed using a state-variable lumped parameter approach. Reactor power is represented by the generation time formulation of the point kinetics equations with a single combined neutron precursor group. The heat transfer process in the core is described via an overall heat transfer coefficient by defining two coolant lumps paired to a single fuel lump. In addition, a thermal–hydraulics model for single-phase natural circulation is incorporated. For the helical-coil steam generator, a moving-boundary model including subcooled, two-phase, and superheated regions is utilized. Finally, the hot leg riser and downcomer regions are expressed by first-order lags. The performance of the overall system described by ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is evaluated by the Simulink dynamic environment and directly using a MATLAB ODE solver recommended for stiff systems. Simulation results based on NuScale SMR design data show that the initial steady-state values for 100% power are within range of the design data and the model can predict the system dynamics due to typical perturbations, e.g., control rod movement and change in feedwater mass flow rate and temperature. The model developed in this work can be utilized as a foundation for designing and testing a suitable control algorithm for reactor thermal power.

  10. New model for Jurassic microcontinent movement and Gondwana breakup in the Weddell Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Tom; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Leat, Philip

    2017-04-01

    The breakup of the Gondwana supercontinent changed the face of our planet. Precursors of supercontinental breakup are widely recognised in the Weddell Sea region in the Jurassic. These include the Karoo/Ferrar Large Igneous Province that extends from South Africa to East Antarctica and significant continental rifting and associated translation of microcontinental blocks in the Weddell Sea Embayment region. However, significant controversy surrounds the pre-breakup position, extent, timing and driving mechanism of inferred microcontinental movement. In particular geological and paleomagnetic data suggest >1000 km of translation and 90 degree rotation of the Haag-Ellsworth Whitmore block (HEW) away from East Antarctica. In contrast, some geophysical interpretations suggest little or no Jurassic or subsequent HEW block movement. Here we present a simpler tectonic model for the Weddell Sea Rift System and HEW movement, derived from our new compilation of airborne geophysical data, satellite magnetic data and potential field modelling (Jordan et al., 2016- Gondwana Res.). Based on the amount of inferred Jurassic crustal extension and pattern of magnetic anomalies we propose that the HEW was translated 500 km towards the Paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana, possibly in response to a process of slab roll-back that led to distributed back-arc extension in the Weddell Sea Rift System. Widespread magmatism in the region was likely influenced by the presence of one or more mantle plumes impinging beneath the stretching lithosphere. A second phase of continental extension is inferred to have occurred between 180 and 165 Ma (prior to seafloor spreading) and is more closely associated with Gondwana breakup. This second phase over-printed the northern part of the older back arc system. We find no geophysical evidence indicating more than 30 degrees of syn-extensional HEW rotation during Jurassic rifting in the southern Weddell Sea Rift System. Instead, we propose the majority ( 60

  11. Hidden Markov model analysis reveals the advantage of analytic eye movement patterns in face recognition across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Crookes, Kate; Hayward, William G; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2017-12-01

    It remains controversial whether culture modulates eye movement behavior in face recognition. Inconsistent results have been reported regarding whether cultural differences in eye movement patterns exist, whether these differences affect recognition performance, and whether participants use similar eye movement patterns when viewing faces from different ethnicities. These inconsistencies may be due to substantial individual differences in eye movement patterns within a cultural group. Here we addressed this issue by conducting individual-level eye movement data analysis using hidden Markov models (HMMs). Each individual's eye movements were modeled with an HMM. We clustered the individual HMMs according to their similarities and discovered three common patterns in both Asian and Caucasian participants: holistic (looking mostly at the face center), left-eye-biased analytic (looking mostly at the two individual eyes in addition to the face center with a slight bias to the left eye), and right-eye-based analytic (looking mostly at the right eye in addition to the face center). The frequency of participants adopting the three patterns did not differ significantly between Asians and Caucasians, suggesting little modulation from culture. Significantly more participants (75%) showed similar eye movement patterns when viewing own- and other-race faces than different patterns. Most importantly, participants with left-eye-biased analytic patterns performed significantly better than those using either holistic or right-eye-biased analytic patterns. These results suggest that active retrieval of facial feature information through an analytic eye movement pattern may be optimal for face recognition regardless of culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  13. From Genes to Morphogenetic Movements: How Cell-level Modeling Makes such Connections Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodland, G. Wayne

    2006-03-01

    New understanding provided by computational modeling makes it possible to identify, in detail, the sequence of events by which gene expression gives rise to specific morphogenetic movements. Convergent extension (CE), an important developmental process in which embryonic tissues undergo self-driven narrowing in one in-plane direction and expansion in the other, is one such example. CE is triggered by gene expression and, in amphibian gastrulae, involves cephalocaudal (CC) gradients of the morphogens Xbra and Chordin and signalling molecules that include planar cell polarity (PCP) and Wnt/Ca2+ (Nature 2004, 430: 305-306). When these pathways have established suitable biochemical conditions, cellular protrusions called lamellipodia, which previously arose with random orientations, form preferentially in the mediolateral (ML) direction. To investigate whether lamellipodium action has the mechanical capacity to drive cell intercalation and its attendant cell reshaping, the cell-level finite element model of Chen and Brodland (ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 2000, 122: 394-401) was modified so that lamellipodia could originate from randomly selected cells, connect to next-neighboring cells in the ML direction and then contract. The simulations show that lamellipodia with these characteristics can, indeed, drive CE and that adjacent tissue must resist ML narrowing in order for characteristically elongated cells to result, predictions that have been confirmed experimentally. When these meso-scale findings are integrated with tissue- and whole-embryo mechanics, multi-scale ``mechanical pathways'' become evident. These pathways, in turn, interface directly with known biochemical pathways to produce an unbroken causal sequence from gene expression to specific morphogentic movements.

  14. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily L; DuBoff, Brian; Feany, Mel B; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  15. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Ryan

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  16. Osteogenic Activity of Locally Applied Small Molecule Drugs in a Rat Femur Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Cottrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term success of arthroplastic joints is dependent on the stabilization of the implant within the skeletal site. Movement of the arthroplastic implant within the bone can stimulate osteolysis, and therefore methods which promote rigid fixation or bone growth are expected to enhance implant stability and the long-term success of joint arthroplasty. In the present study, we used a simple bilateral bone defect model to analyze the osteogenic activity of three small-molecule drug implants via microcomputerized tomography (micro-CT and histomorphometry. In this study, we show that local delivery of alendronate, but not lovastatin or omeprazole, led to significant new bone formation at the defect site. Since alendronate impedes osteoclast-development, it is theorized that alendronate treatment results in a net increase in bone formation by preventing osteoclast mediated remodeling of the newly formed bone and upregulating osteoblasts.

  17. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which interact with the function of the small intestine, i.e. viscosity and water holding capacity. This leads us to consider some features of digestion which have not been taken into account previously, in particular the interrelationship between the evolution of dry matter and water in the bolus. The numerical results are in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fibre on the velocity of bolus along the small intestine and on its degradation. These results highlight the negative effect of soluble dietary fibre on d...

  18. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  19. Predicting the Direction of Stock Market Index Movement Using an Optimized Artificial Neural Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingyue; Song, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In the business sector, it has always been a difficult task to predict the exact daily price of the stock market index; hence, there is a great deal of research being conducted regarding the prediction of the direction of stock price index movement. Many factors such as political events, general economic conditions, and traders' expectations may have an influence on the stock market index. There are numerous research studies that use similar indicators to forecast the direction of the stock market index. In this study, we compare two basic types of input variables to predict the direction of the daily stock market index. The main contribution of this study is the ability to predict the direction of the next day's price of the Japanese stock market index by using an optimized artificial neural network (ANN) model. To improve the prediction accuracy of the trend of the stock market index in the future, we optimize the ANN model using genetic algorithms (GA). We demonstrate and verify the predictability of stock price direction by using the hybrid GA-ANN model and then compare the performance with prior studies. Empirical results show that the Type 2 input variables can generate a higher forecast accuracy and that it is possible to enhance the performance of the optimized ANN model by selecting input variables appropriately.

  20. 3D Modeling of sediment movement by ships-generated wakes in confined shipping channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengcheng JI; Abdellatif OUAHSINE; Hassan SMAOUI; Philippe SERGENT

    2014-01-01

    Ship-generated waves and return currents are capable of re-suspending significant quantities of bottom and bank sediments. However, most of the previous studies done on the subject do not show how and where sediment is re-suspended by the wakes and the directions of net transport. In this paper, a 3D numerical model based on hydro-sedimentary coupling is presented to search the relationship between the sediment movement, and the pattern of ship-generated waves around and far away from the vessel and the return currents around the ships. The hydrodynamic model is based on 3D Navier-Stokes equations including the standard k-ε model for turbulence processes, and the sediment transport model is based on a 3D equation for the re-suspended sediment transport. The computation results show that the areas of sediment concentration and transport (whether by resuspension or by the bedload) depend mainly on the position, the speed of the ship in the waterways, the kinematics of ship-generated waves and on the return flows. Thus, a map of sediment distribution and the modes of sediment transport generated by the passage of the ship are presented.

  1. Model Predictive Control for a Small Scale Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfu Du

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinematical and dynamical equations of a small scale unmanned helicoper are presented in the paper. Based on these equations a model predictive control (MPC method is proposed for controlling the helicopter. This novel method allows the direct accounting for the existing time delays which are used to model the dynamics of actuators and aerodynamics of the main rotor. Also the limits of the actuators are taken into the considerations during the controller design. The proposed control algorithm was verified in real flight experiments where good perfomance was shown in postion control mode.

  2. Point process models for household distributions within small areal units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zack W. Almquist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-demographic data sets are increasingly available worldwide, permitting ever more realistic modeling and analysis of social processes ranging from mobility to disease trans- mission. The information provided by these data sets is typically aggregated by areal unit, for reasons of both privacy and administrative cost. Unfortunately, such aggregation does not permit fine-grained assessment of geography at the level of individual households. In this paper, we propose to partially address this problem via the development of point pro- cess models that can be used to effectively simulate the location of individual households within small areal units.

  3. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  4. ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Flegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA s ORDEM2010 and ESA s MASTER-2009, have been publicly released. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in near-Earth orbit. The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris but are still large enough to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. This paper details the 1 mm to 1 cm orbital debris populations of both ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009; their sources (both known and presumed), current supporting data and theory, and methods of population analysis. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are also presented and discussed within the context of each model.

  5. Dynamic model of the vergence eye movement system: simulations using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, G K

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic model of the vergence eye movement system was developed and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The model was based on a dual-mode dynamic model previously written in FORTRAN. It consisted of a fast open-loop component and a slow closed-loop component. The new model contained several important modifications. For example, in the fast component, a zero-order hold element replaced the sampler and the target trajectory estimator in the earlier model to provide more stable and accurate responses. Also, a periodicity detector was added to automatically detect periodicity in the stimulus waveform. The stored periodic stimulus, with a reduction in latency, was used to drive the fast component output. Moreover, a connection representing the efference copy signal was added from the fast component output to the disparity input to provide an accurate estimate of the stimulus waveform. Further, Robinson's model of the extraocular muscles replaced the earlier 2nd-order plant to provide more realistic muscle dynamics. The entire model, containing the fast and slow components, was simulated using a variety of stimuli such as pulses, positive and negative ramps, square-wave, and sine-wave. The responses showed dynamic characteristics similar to experimental results. Thus, this new MATLAB/SIMULINK program provides a relatively easy-to-use, versatile, and powerful simulation environment for investigating the basic as well as clinical aspects of vergence dynamics. Moreover, the simulation program has general characteristics that can be modified to represent other oculomotor systems such as the versional and accommodation systems. This provides a framework for future investigation of dynamic interactions between oculomotor systems.

  6. Loss-improved electroacoustical modeling of small Helmholtz resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starecki, Tomasz

    2007-10-01

    Modeling of small Helmholtz resonators based on electroacoustical analogies often results in significant disagreement with measurements, as existing models do not take into account some losses that are observed in practical implementations of such acoustical circuits, e.g., in photoacoustic Helmholtz cells. The paper presents a method which introduces loss corrections to the transmission line model, resulting in substantial improvement of simulations. Values of the loss corrections obtained from comparison of frequency responses of practically implemented resonators with computer simulations are presented in tabular and graphical form. A simple analytical function that can be used for interpolation or extrapolation of the loss corrections for other dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators is also given. Verification of such a modeling method against an open two-cavity Helmholtz structure shows very good agreement between measurements and simulations.

  7. SMALL-SCALE MODELING OF DYNAMIC FACILITIES FOR PROTECTION OF HYDROSYSTEM TAILRACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova Y. A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the formation of plunge basin in the Cheboksary hydroplant, we used a scale model of the spillway dam and all structures in the tailrace, installed in the slot flume. When we passed the flow corresponding to the diversion flow of the hydroplant with a glance to the modeling scale, it was found that the plunge basin was formed behind the end fixing of the spillway apron. To research the dynamic facilities of hydrosystem tailrace protection against erosion, we used a small glass flume with a model of the roundcrested weir. For the experiment, the water-surface elevations were built in the flume without the weir, and the uniform motion area was established. In MathCAD software environment, the curve of the flow of measuring rectangular weir of the flume was created. Because of measurements, the curve of water surface by the flow motion through the round-crested weir was made. As the main criterion for modeling, the criterion of Froude was selected. Scale of modeling of flow parameters was determined. For testing, models of hydrodynamic profile and sail structure with streamforming sluice valves were built. The process of sand washout from the flume bottom and formation of the bottom ridges when installing the profile was photographed. Impact of the profile on the flow and its relation with the formation of the bottom topography were studied. Full-scale values of geometric parameters of the bottom ridges and their movement velocity were established as well

  8. Quantification of physiological, movement, and technical outputs during a novel small-sided game in young team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Craig B; Gill, Nicholas D; Kinugasa, Taisuke; Kilding, Andrew E

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the physiological responses, time-motion characteristics, and technical executions associated with a novel non-sport-specific small-sided game (SSG) in young team sport players. On 6 separate occasions, 12 young male team sport athletes (mean ± SD: age, 13.0 ± 0.3 years; height, 157.4 ± 4.9 cm; body mass, 47.0 ± 5.0 kg; and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, 55.1 ± 4.6 ml·kg·min) completed various "bucketball" SSG formats (i.e., 3 vs. 3, 4 vs. 4, and 6 vs. 6) twice each. Heart rate (HR) was measured during each SSG at 5-second intervals. Time-motion characteristics were measured using global positioning systems. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were recorded immediately after the SSGs using the Borg scale (RPEs, 6-20). Technical skill executions were measured using a high-speed digital video camera. Analysis revealed a tendency for the 3 vs. 3 games to elicit higher HRs (88.3 ± 4.3) than either 4 vs. 4 (85.9 ± 4.9) or 6 vs. 6 formats (85.9 ± 3.2). Total distance traveled at 13-17.9 km·h was more during 6 vs. 6 than 3 vs. 3 games (very likely substantial true difference, 97%), and total possessions and number of catches, passes, and shots were all higher in 3 vs. 3 compared with 4 vs. 4 and 6 vs. 6 games. There was no difference in RPE between the game formats. The results of this study indicate that 3 vs. 3 non-sport-specific SSGs provide higher stimulus for aerobic fitness adaptation and technical improvement than 4 vs. 4 and 6 vs. 6 formats, and their use for training young team sport athletes is recommended.

  9. Cognitive mechanisms of visuomotor transformation in movement imitation: examining predictions based on models of apraxia and motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenhorst, Robynne M; Walter, Charles B

    2009-11-01

    When we observe a movement and then reproduce it, how is this visual input transformed into motor output? Studies on stroke patients with apraxia suggest that there may be two distinct routes used for gesture imitation; an indirect route that recruits stored movement memories (motor programs) and a direct route that bypasses them. The present study examined 30 healthy adults ages 18-80 (mean age=44.0 years, SD=19.5) to learn how motor programs are recruited or bypassed in movement imitation depending upon task conditions (whether familiar letters or novel shapes are imitated) and perceptual factors (whether shapes or letters are perceived). Subjects were asked to imitate the movements of a model who formed shapes and letters on a sheer mesh screen, and to report whether they perceived the task as a shape or a letter. Movements were recorded using a Vicon motion analysis system, and subsequently analyzed to determine the degree of difference between the demonstrated and produced movements. As predicted, letter perception on the letter tasks resulted in increased temporal error when the demonstrated stroke order conflicted with subjects' habitual pattern of letter formation. No such interference effects were observed when the letter tasks were perceived as shapes. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories on imitation, and implications for rehabilitation and motor re-learning are presented.

  10. Modeling studies of gas movement and moisture migration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Modeling studies on moisture redistribution processes that are mediated by gas phase flow and diffusion have been carried out. The problem addressed is the effect of a lowered humidity of the soil gas at the land surface on moisture removal from Yucca Mountain, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. At the land surface, humid formation gas contacts much drier atmospheric air. Near this contact, the humidity of the soil gas may be considerably lower than at greater depth, where the authors expect equilibrium with the liquid phase and close to 100% humidity. The lower relative humidity of the soil gas may be modeled by imposing, at the land surface, an additional negative capillary suction corresponding to vapor pressure lowering according to Kelvin`s Equation, thus providing a driving force for the upward movement of moisture in both the vapor and liquid phases. Sensitivity studies show that moisture removal from Yucca Mountain arising from the lowered-relative-humidity boundary condition is controlled by vapor diffusion. There is much experimental evidence in the soil literature that diffusion of vapor is enhanced due to pore-level phase change effects by a few orders of magnitude. Modeling results presented here will account for this enhancement in vapor diffusion.

  11. Modeling chloride movement in the alluvial aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    1977-01-01

    A solute-transport model that can be used to predict the movement of dissolved chemicals in flowing ground water was applied to a problem of ground-water contamination at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, near Denver, Colo. The model couples a finite-difference solution to the ground-water flow equation with the method-of-characteristics solution to the solute-transport equation. From 1943 to 1956 liquid industrial wastes containing high chloride concentrations were disposed into unlined ponds at the Arsenal. Wastes seeped out of the unlined disposal ponds and spread for many square miles in the underlying shallow alluvial aquifer. Since 1956 disposal has been into an asphalt-lined reservoir, which contributed to a decline in ground-water contamination by 1972. The simulation model quantitatively integrated the effects of the major factors that controlled changes in chloride concentrations and accurately reproduced the 30-year history of chloride ground-water contamination. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that the geologic framework of the area markedly restricted the transport and dispersion of dissolved chemicals in the alluvium. Dilution, from irrigation recharge and seepage from unlined canals, was an important factor in reducing the level of chloride concentrations downgradient from the Arsenal. Similarly, recharge of uncontaminated water from the unlined ponds since 1956 has helped to dilute and flush the contaminated ground water.

  12. Modelling the time dependent movements of the La Saxe Rockslide by a dynamic visco-plastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista Crosta, Giovanni; di Prisco, Claudio; Castellanza, Riccardo; Frattini, Paolo; Agliardi, Federico; Frigerio, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    A challenging issue in geological and geotechnical problems associated with slope stability concerns the analysis of sliding masses subject to continuous slow movements and intermittent stages of slowing and accelerating motion. In this work an attempt for simulating and forecasting the movement of the La Saxe rockslide (Aosta valley; Italian Western Alps; volume: about 8*10e6 m3) will be shown. The La Saxe rockslide movement could be interpreted as the result of two specific behaviours: i) a continuous creep-like movement occurring independently on groundwater conditions, even under dry-winter conditions, when the water table is mainly below or close to the failure surface; ii) a superimposed acceleration-exhaustion trend, occurring during the snow melting period (late spring-early summer) and directly related to the associated water table fluctuations, which disappears when the water inputs are reduced (late summer and winter conditions). A reliable, monitoring-driven approach to model such rockslide behaviour should account for: a) the time-dependent behaviour by means of a viscous-plastic constitutive law reproducing the creep behaviour; b) the water table fluctuation as main input to reproduce the late spring - early summer acceleration; c) 3D rockslide behaviour maintaining at the same time an high level of simplicity so to allow implementation within EWS (Early Warning System) for risk management. To this purpose a 1D pseudo-dynamic visco-plastic Newmark approach, based on Perzyna's theory (Secondi et. al 2011) has been applied. Newmark's approach considers the slope as a rigid block placed in the centre of mass of the rock slide, where the active forces are: the landslide weight, the inertial forces and the seepage force deriving from the water table level which is a function of time. All the non-linearities are condensed in an interface thin layer between the rigid block and the bedrock, whose mechanical response is assumed to be visco-plastic. In order to

  13. Modelling and Simulation of the Knee Joint with a Depth Sensor Camera for Prosthetics and Movement Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risto, S.; Kallergi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to model and simulate the knee joint. A computer model of the knee joint was first created, which was controlled by Microsoft's Kinect for Windows. Kinect created a depth map of the knee and lower leg motion independent of lighting conditions through an infrared sensor. A combination of open source software such as Blender, Python, Kinect SDK and NI_Mate were implemented for the creation and control of the simulated knee based on movements of a live physical model. A physical size model of the knee and lower leg was also created, the movement of which was controlled remotely by the computer model and Kinect. The real time communication of the model and the robotic knee was achieved through programming in Python and Arduino language. The result of this study showed that Kinect in the modelling of human kinematics and can play a significant role in the development of prosthetics and other assistive technologies.

  14. Modeling impact of small Kansas landfills on underlying aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M.; Stadnyk, N.G.; Stotts, M.

    1996-01-01

    Small landfills are exempt from compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D standards for liner and leachate collection. We investigate the ramifications of this exemption under western Kansas semiarid environments and explore the conditions under which naturally occurring geologic settings provide sufficient protection against ground-water contamination. The methodology we employed was to run water budget simulations using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, and fate and transport simulations using the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model (MULTIMED) for several western Kansas small landfill scenarios in combination with extensive sensitivity analyses. We demonstrate that requiring landfill cover, leachate collection system (LCS), and compacted soil liner will reduce leachate production by 56%, whereas requiring only a cover without LCS and liner will reduce leachate by half as much. The most vulnerable small landfills are shown to be the ones with no vegetative cover underlain by both a relatively thin vadose zone and aquifer and which overlie an aquifer characterized by cool temperatures and low hydraulic gradients. The aquifer-related physical and chemical parameters proved to be more important than vadose zone and biodegradation parameters in controlling leachate concentrations at the point of compliance. ??ASCE.

  15. Plasma iron levels appraised 15 days after spinal cord injury in a limb movement animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, F M; Esteves, A M; Tufik, S; de Mello, M T

    2011-03-01

    Experimental, controlled trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate plasma iron and transferrin levels in a limb movement animal model with spinal cord injury (SCI). Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Psicobiologia. In all, 72 male Wistar rats aged 90 days were divided into four groups: (1) acute SCI (1 day, SCI1), (2) 3 days post-SCI (SCI3), (3) 7 days post-SCI (SCI7) and (4) 15 days post-SCI (SCI15). Each of these groups had corresponding control (CTRL) and SHAM groups. Plasma iron and transferrin levels of the different groups were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's test. We found a significant reduction in iron plasma levels after SCI compared with the CTRL group: SCI1 (CTRL: 175±10.58 μg dl(-1); SCI: 108.28±11.7 μg dl(-1)), SCI3 (CTRL: 195.5±11.00 μg dl(-1); SCI: 127.88±12.63 μg dl(-1)), SCI7 (CTRL: 186±2.97 μg dl(-1); SCI: 89.2±15.39 μg dl(-1)) and SCI15 (CTRL: 163±5.48 μg dl(-1); SCI: 124.44±10.30 μg dl(-1)) (P<0.05; ANOVA). The SHAM1 group demonstrated a reduction in iron plasma after acute SCI (CTRL: 175±10.58 μg dl(-1); SHAM: 114.60±7.81 μg dl(-1)) (P<0.05; ANOVA). Reduced iron metabolism after SCI may be one of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of sleep-related movement disorders.

  16. Analysing movements in investor’s risk aversion using the Heston volatility model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexie ALUPOAIEI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we intend to identify and analyze, if it is the case, an “epidemiological” relationship between forecasts of professional investors and short-term developments in the EUR/RON exchange rate. Even that we don’t call a typical epidemiological model as those ones used in biology fields of research, we investigated the hypothesis according to which after the Lehman Brothers crash and implicit the generation of the current financial crisis, the forecasts of professional investors pose a significant explanatory power on the futures short-run movements of EUR/RON. How does it work this mechanism? Firstly, the professional forecasters account for the current macro, financial and political states, then they elaborate forecasts. Secondly, based on that forecasts they get positions in the Romanian exchange market for hedging and/or speculation purposes. But their positions incorporate in addition different degrees of uncertainty. In parallel, a part of their anticipations are disseminated to the public via media channels. Since some important movements are viewed within macro, financial or political fields, the positions of professsional investors from FX derivative market are activated. The current study represents a first step in that direction of analysis for Romanian case. For the above formulated objectives, in this paper different measures of EUR/RON rate volatility have been estimated and compared with implied volatilities. In a second timeframe we called the co-integration and dynamic correlation based tools in order to investigate the relationship between implied volatility and daily returns of EUR/RON exchange rate.

  17. A minimal limit-cycle model to profile movement patterns of individuals during agility drill performance: Effects of skill level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Identification of control strategies during agility performance is significant in understanding movement behavior. This study aimed at providing a fundamental mathematical model for describing the motion of participants during an agility drill and to determine whether skill level constrained model components. Motion patterns of two groups of skilled and unskilled participants (n=8 in each) during performance of a forward/backward agility drill modeled as limit-cycles. Participant movements were recorded by motion capture of a reflective marker attached to the sacrum of each individual. Graphical and regression analyses of movement kinematics in Hooke's plane, phase plane and velocity profile were performed to determine components of the models. Results showed that the models of both skilled and unskilled groups had terms from Duffing stiffness as well as Van der Pol damping oscillators. Data also indicated that the proposed models captured on average 97% of the variance for both skilled and unskilled groups. Findings from this study revealed the movement patterning associated with skilled and unskilled performance in a typical forward/backward agility drill which might be helpful for trainers and physiotherapists in enhancing agility.

  18. A simple physical model predicts small exon length variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common splice variations are small exon length variations caused by the use of alternative donor or acceptor splice sites that are in very close proximity on the pre-mRNA. Among these, three-nucleotide variations at so-called NAGNAG tandem acceptor sites have recently attracted considerable attention, and it has been suggested that these variations are regulated and serve to fine-tune protein forms by the addition or removal of a single amino acid. In this paper we first show that in-frame exon length variations are generally overrepresented and that this overrepresentation can be quantitatively explained by the effect of nonsense-mediated decay. Our analysis allows us to estimate that about 50% of frame-shifted coding transcripts are targeted by nonsense-mediated decay. Second, we show that a simple physical model that assumes that the splicing machinery stochastically binds to nearby splice sites in proportion to the affinities of the sites correctly predicts the relative abundances of different small length variations at both boundaries. Finally, using the same simple physical model, we show that for NAGNAG sites, the difference in affinities of the neighboring sites for the splicing machinery accurately predicts whether splicing will occur only at the first site, splicing will occur only at the second site, or three-nucleotide splice variants are likely to occur. Our analysis thus suggests that small exon length variations are the result of stochastic binding of the spliceosome at neighboring splice sites. Small exon length variations occur when there are nearby alternative splice sites that have similar affinity for the splicing machinery.

  19. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  20. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  1. Forecasting Stock Exchange Movements Using Artificial Neural Network Models and Hybrid Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güreşen, Erkam; Kayakutlu, Gülgün

    Forecasting stock exchange rates is an important financial problem that is receiving increasing attention. During the last few years, a number of neural network models and hybrid models have been proposed for obtaining accurate prediction results, in an attempt to outperform the traditional linear and nonlinear approaches. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of neural network models; recurrent neural network (RNN), dynamic artificial neural network (DAN2) and the hybrid neural networks which use generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH) and exponential generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (EGARCH) to extract new input variables. The comparison for each model is done in two view points: MSE and MAD using real exchange daily rate values of Istanbul Stock Exchange (ISE) index XU10).

  2. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  3. Modeling Checkpoint-Based Movement with the Earth Mover’s Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duckham, Matt; van Kreveld, Marc; Purves, Ross; Speckmann, Bettina; Tao, Yaguang; Verbeek, Kevin; Wood, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Movement data comes in various forms, including trajectory data and checkpoint data. While trajectories give detailed information about the movement of individual entities, checkpoint data in its simplest form does not give identities, just counts at checkpoints. However, checkpoint data is of incre

  4. Mathematical Modelling of Particle Movement Ahead of the Solid-liquid Interface in Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Whether the particle will be trapped by the solid-liquid interface or not is dependent on its moving behavior ahead of theinterface, so a mathematical model has been developed to investigate the movement of the particle ahead of the solid-liquidinterface. Based on the theory for the boundary layer, the fluid velocity field near the solid-liquid interface was obtained, andthe trajectories of particles were calculated by the equations of motion for particles. In this model, the drag force, the addedmass force, the buoyance force, the gravitational force, the Saffman force and the Basset history force are considered. Theresults show that the behavior of the particle ahead of the solid-liquid interface is affected by the physical property of theparticle and fluid flow. And in the continuous casting process, if it moves in the stream directed upward or downward nearvertical solid-liquid interface or in the horizontal flow under the solid-liquid interface, the particle with the diameter from 5μmto 60 μm can reach the solid-liquid interface. But if it moves in horizontal flow above the solid-liquid interface, only theparticle with the diameter from 5μm to 10μm can reach the solid-liquid interface.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Oil Spill Movement along North-West Coast of India Using GNOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Remyalekshmi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available India is located at a very strategic point with respect to the international commercial sea routes with a large amount of crude oil traffic. Hence, the risk of oil spill occurring in the Indian waters is considerably high. In the present paper, forecasting the movement of a possible crude oil spill of 10,000 barrels at a location of latitude 21° 41′ 48.53′ N and longitude 66° 46′ 41.45″ E, intersection point of two ship routes from Kandla port and Bombay port (Kandla port of India to Yanbu port of Saudi Arabia and Bombay port of India to Ras Tanura port of Saudi Arabia has been carried out using GNOME (General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment model developed by Hazardous Materials Response Division (HAZMAT of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Response and Restoration (NOAA OR&R of United States government. The governing equations for horizontal diffusion, evaporation, dissolution, dispersion etc, adopted by GNOME have been presented in the paper. The simulation is carried out for month of September 2011. It is found that the spill possibly takes 10 hours to reach Gujarat coast and 15 hours to reach Maharashtra coast. With this available knowledge, appropriate mitigation measures may be adopted before spill reaches the shores.

  6. Nonhuman primates: translational models for predicting antipsychotic-induced movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsolt, Roger D; Castagné, Vincent; Hayes, Eric; Virley, David

    2013-12-01

    Repeated haloperidol treatment administered to nonhuman primates (NHPs) over several months or even years leads to the gradual appearance of drug-induced dystonic reactions in the orofacial region (mouth opening, tongue protrusion or retraction, bar biting) and in the whole body (writhing of the limbs and trunk, bar grasping). The propensity of antipsychotics to induce dystonia in NHPs is not correlated with their propensity to induce catalepsy in rodents, suggesting that the two types of effects are dissociated and may represent distinct aspects of the extrapyramidal symptoms induced by antipsychotics. In view of the clear homology to clinically observed phenomena, antipsychotic-induced dystonias in antipsychotic-primed NHPs would appear to possess a high degree of translational validity. These NHP phenomena could therefore serve as a useful model for predicting the occurrence of similar abnormal movements with novel substances developed for the treatment of schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders. Moreover, the NHP dystonia model could possibly serve as a biomarker for substances that will eventually cause tardive dyskinesia in patients.

  7. Autonomous Navigation of Small Uavs Based on Vehicle Dynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaghani, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to autonomous navigation for small UAVs, in which the vehicle dynamic model (VDM) serves as the main process model within the navigation filter. The proposed method significantly increases the accuracy and reliability of autonomous navigation, especially for small UAVs with low-cost IMUs on-board. This is achieved with no extra sensor added to the conventional INS/GNSS setup. This improvement is of special interest in case of GNSS outages, where inertial coasting drifts very quickly. In the proposed architecture, the solution to VDM equations provides the estimate of position, velocity, and attitude, which is updated within the navigation filter based on available observations, such as IMU data or GNSS measurements. The VDM is also fed with the control input to the UAV, which is available within the control/autopilot system. The filter is capable of estimating wind velocity and dynamic model parameters, in addition to navigation states and IMU sensor errors. Monte Carlo simulations reveal major improvements in navigation accuracy compared to conventional INS/GNSS navigation system during the autonomous phase, when satellite signals are not available due to physical obstruction or electromagnetic interference for example. In case of GNSS outages of a few minutes, position and attitude accuracy experiences improvements of orders of magnitude compared to inertial coasting. It means that during such scenario, the position-velocity-attitude (PVA) determination is sufficiently accurate to navigate the UAV to a home position without any signal that depends on vehicle environment.

  8. Atmospheric dispersion modelling over complex terrain at small scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, S.; Janour, Z.; Kukacka, L.; Jurcakova, K.; Kellnerova, R.; Gulikova, E.

    2014-03-01

    Previous study concerned of qualitative modelling neutrally stratified flow over open-cut coal mine and important surrounding topography at meso-scale (1:9000) revealed an important area for quantitative modelling of atmospheric dispersion at small-scale (1:3300). The selected area includes a necessary part of the coal mine topography with respect to its future expansion and surrounding populated areas. At this small-scale simultaneous measurement of velocity components and concentrations in specified points of vertical and horizontal planes were performed by two-dimensional Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Fast-Response Flame Ionization Detector (FFID), respectively. The impact of the complex terrain on passive pollutant dispersion with respect to the prevailing wind direction was observed and the prediction of the air quality at populated areas is discussed. The measured data will be used for comparison with another model taking into account the future coal mine transformation. Thus, the impact of coal mine transformation on pollutant dispersion can be observed.

  9. Tracking Movement of Plant Carbon Through Soil to Water by Lignin Phenol Stable Carbon Isotope Composition in a Small Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, K.; Filley, T.; Six, J.; Frey, J.

    2005-12-01

    Few studies integrate land cover, soil physical structure, and aquatic physical fractions when investigating the fate of agricultural carbon in watersheds. In crop systems that involve rotations of soy (a C3 plant) and corn (a C4 plant) the large intrinsic differences in stable carbon isotope values and lignin plus cutin chemistry enable tracking of plant carbon movement from soil fractions to DOM and overland flow during precipitation events. In a small (~3Km2) agricultural basin in central Indiana, we studied plant carbon dynamics in a soy/corn agricultural rotation (2004-2005) to determine the relative inputs of these two plants to soil fractions and the resultant contributions to dissolved, colloidal, and particulate organic matter when mobilized. Using bulk isotope values the fraction of carbon derived from corn in macroaggregates (>250 micron), microaggregates (53-250 mm), and silts plus clays (lignin in the soil fractions revealed a wide range of relative inputs among the monomers with cinnamyl phenols being almost exclusively (~ 93%) derived from corn. Syringyl phenols ranged from 75-56% corn and vanillyl phenols ranged from 37-40% corn carbon. The relative input among the fractions mirrors closely the comparative plant chemistry abundances between soy and corn. During export of DOM from the land to the stream the relative abundance of plant source varied with discharge (0.05-1.8 m3/sec) as increases in flow increased the relative export of corn-derived C from the fields. Over the full range of flows lignin phenols varied from 0.05 to 82% corn-derived with the greatest relative corn input for cinnamyl and syringyl carbon. The trend with stream discharge indicates a progressive movement of particulate corn residues with overland flow. Ongoing studies look to resolve contributions of algae, bacteria and terrestrial plants to soil fractions and their mobilized components.

  10. Building a Scoring Model for Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Constantin CARACOTA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to produce a scoring model for small and medium enterprises seeking financing through a bank loan. To analyze the loan application, scoring system developed for companies is as follows: scoring quantitative factors and scoring qualitative factors. We have estimated the probability of default using logistic regression. Regression coefficients determination was made with a solver in Excel using five ratios as input data. Analyses and simulations were conducted on a sample of 113 companies, all accepted for funding. Based on financial information obtained over two years, 2007 and 2008, we could establishe and appreciate the default value.

  11. Small-signal, continuous, exact model of PWM voltage regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, W.; Maranesi, P.; Varoli, V.

    1985-02-01

    The small-signal time-continuous open-loop response of buck, boost, and buck-boost pulse-width-modulation (PWM) voltage regulators using MOSFET switches in their power stages is modeled, applying a time-domain sampling theorem (Woodward, 1953) to obtain the Fourier open-loop transfer function corresponding to the comb function describing the response at the chopping instants only. The results are presented graphically along with simplified circuit diagrams of the PWM devices, and the accuracy and computational efficiency of the analytical approach are indicated.

  12. SWIM: A Simple Model to Generate Small Mobile Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents small world in motion (SWIM), a new mobility model for ad-hoc networking. SWIM is relatively simple, is easily tuned by setting just a few parameters, and generates traces that look real--synthetic traces have the same statistical properties of real traces. SWIM shows both experimentally and theoretically the presence of the power law and exponential decay dichotomy of inter-contact times, and, most importantly, our experiments show that it can predict very accurately the performance of forwarding protocols.

  13. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates.

  14. Modeling vertical movement of organic matter in a soil incubated for 41 years with "1"4C labeled straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, S.; Christensen, B.T.; Thomsen, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of organic matter (OM) in the soil profile reflects the balance between inputs and decomposition at different depths as well as transport of OM within the profile. In this study we modeled movement of OM in the soil profile as a result of mechanisms resulting in dispersive...

  15. A non-Markov ratchet model of molecular motors: processive movement of single-headed kinesin KIF1A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ping; Dou Shuo-Xing; Wang Peng-Ye

    2006-01-01

    A fluctuating ratchet model of non-Markov process is presented to describe the processive movement of molecular motors of single-headed kinesin KIF1A, where the fluctuation perturbation to the local potential is introduced and the detailed ATPase pathway of the motor is included. The theoretical results show good quantitative agreement with the previous experimental ones.

  16. A small group learning model for evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Achkar M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Morhaf Al Achkar, M Kelly Davies Department of Family Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: Evidence-based medicine (EBM skills are invaluable tools for residents and practicing physicians. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of small-group learning models in teaching fundamental EBM skills. Methods: The intervention consisted of an EBM bootcamp divided into four 2-hour sessions across 4-week rotations. Residents worked in small groups of three to four to explore fundamentals of EBM through interactive dialogue and mock clinical scenario practice. The intervention’s effectiveness was evaluated using pre- and post-assessments. Results: A total of 40 (93.0% residents out of a potential 43 participated in the EBM bootcamps across the 3 years. There was significant improvement of 3.28 points on self-assessed EBM skills from an average of 9.66–12.945 out of a maximum score of 15 (P=0.000. There was significant improvement of 1.68 points on the EBM skills test from an average of 6.02–7.71 out of a maximum score of 9 (P=0.00. All residents (100% agreed or strongly agreed that EBM is important for a physician’s clinical practice. This view did not change after the training. Conclusion: A brief small-group interactive workshop in EBM basic skills at the start of residency was effective in developing fundamental EBM skills. Keywords: evidence-based medicine, resident training, small group

  17. Is my model good enough? Best practices for verification and validation of musculoskeletal models and simulations of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jennifer L; Uchida, Thomas K; Seth, Ajay; Rajagopal, Apoorva; Delp, Scott L

    2015-02-01

    Computational modeling and simulation of neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) systems enables researchers and clinicians to study the complex dynamics underlying human and animal movement. NMS models use equations derived from physical laws and biology to help solve challenging real-world problems, from designing prosthetics that maximize running speed to developing exoskeletal devices that enable walking after a stroke. NMS modeling and simulation has proliferated in the biomechanics research community over the past 25 years, but the lack of verification and validation standards remains a major barrier to wider adoption and impact. The goal of this paper is to establish practical guidelines for verification and validation of NMS models and simulations that researchers, clinicians, reviewers, and others can adopt to evaluate the accuracy and credibility of modeling studies. In particular, we review a general process for verification and validation applied to NMS models and simulations, including careful formulation of a research question and methods, traditional verification and validation steps, and documentation and sharing of results for use and testing by other researchers. Modeling the NMS system and simulating its motion involves methods to represent neural control, musculoskeletal geometry, muscle-tendon dynamics, contact forces, and multibody dynamics. For each of these components, we review modeling choices and software verification guidelines; discuss variability, errors, uncertainty, and sensitivity relationships; and provide recommendations for verification and validation by comparing experimental data and testing robustness. We present a series of case studies to illustrate key principles. In closing, we discuss challenges the community must overcome to ensure that modeling and simulation are successfully used to solve the broad spectrum of problems that limit human mobility.

  18. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ziyue; Mansoor, Awais; Mollura, Daniel J. [Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI), Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Bagci, Ulas, E-mail: ulasbagci@gmail.com [Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV), University of Central Florida (UCF), Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Kramer-Marek, Gabriela [The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom); Luna, Brian [Microfluidic Laboratory Automation, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2715 (United States); Kubler, Andre [Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Sanjay [Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Foster, Brent [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95817 (United States); Papadakis, Georgios Z. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Camp, Jeremy V. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States); Jonsson, Colleen B. [National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Bishai, William R. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 and Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K. [Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases.

  19. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  20. Comparing interval estimates for small sample ordinal CFA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2015-01-01

    Robust maximum likelihood (RML) and asymptotically generalized least squares (AGLS) methods have been recommended for fitting ordinal structural equation models. Studies show that some of these methods underestimate standard errors. However, these studies have not investigated the coverage and bias of interval estimates. An estimate with a reasonable standard error could still be severely biased. This can only be known by systematically investigating the interval estimates. The present study compares Bayesian, RML, and AGLS interval estimates of factor correlations in ordinal confirmatory factor analysis models (CFA) for small sample data. Six sample sizes, 3 factor correlations, and 2 factor score distributions (multivariate normal and multivariate mildly skewed) were studied. Two Bayesian prior specifications, informative and relatively less informative were studied. Undercoverage of confidence intervals and underestimation of standard errors was common in non-Bayesian methods. Underestimated standard errors may lead to inflated Type-I error rates. Non-Bayesian intervals were more positive biased than negatively biased, that is, most intervals that did not contain the true value were greater than the true value. Some non-Bayesian methods had non-converging and inadmissible solutions for small samples and non-normal data. Bayesian empirical standard error estimates for informative and relatively less informative priors were closer to the average standard errors of the estimates. The coverage of Bayesian credibility intervals was closer to what was expected with overcoverage in a few cases. Although some Bayesian credibility intervals were wider, they reflected the nature of statistical uncertainty that comes with the data (e.g., small sample). Bayesian point estimates were also more accurate than non-Bayesian estimates. The results illustrate the importance of analyzing coverage and bias of interval estimates, and how ignoring interval estimates can be misleading

  1. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  2. Validity of a small low-cost triaxial accelerometer with integrated logger for uncomplicated measurements of postures and movements of head, upper back and upper arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Camilla; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Forsman, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    Repetitive work and work in constrained postures are risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders. Low-cost, user-friendly technical methods to quantify these risks are needed. The aims were to validate inclination angles and velocities of one model of the new generation of accelerometers with integrated data loggers against a previously validated one, and to compare meaurements when using a plain reference posture with that of a standardized one. All mean (n = 12 subjects) angular RMS-differences in 4 work tasks and 4 body parts were postures and movements during work. Further work is needed for validation of the plain reference posture for upper arms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Roof strata horizontal movement assessed by instrumented bolts monitoring and FEM modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, W. [CBPM ' ' Cuprum' ' OBR (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Results of investigation concerning in-situ assessment of roof strata 3-d movement in the vicinity of a selected hard rock yielding pillar are presented in the paper. Based on laboratory calibration tests it was possible to establish the analytical relationships between the load (or stress) increment within the bolt rod, and the extensometer read-out box increment for all pairs of extensometers, glued-in at five measurement horizons. These relationships were a base for the assessment of rod axial forces and bending moments in time domain. The finite difference method technique was used for bolt rod deflection (lateral) assessment based on the elastic beam (rod) deflection differential equation solution involving the values of in-situ measurement based bending moments. In-situ obtained measurement data were supplemented with numerical experiments performed in a large geometric scale. The numerical models based on the 3-d finite element method, represented the roof bolting-pillar-floor systems in the in-situ measurement sites conditions.

  4. High resolution modeling of a small urban catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most complex issues that urban environments have to deal with. In France, flooding remains the first natural risk with 72% of decrees state of natural disaster issued between October 1982 and mid-November 2014. Flooding is a result of meteorological extremes that are usually aggravated by the hydrological behavior of urban catchments and human factors. The continuing urbanization process is indeed changing the whole urban water cycle by limiting the infiltration and promoting runoff. Urban environments are very complex systems due to their extreme variability, the interference between human activities and natural processes but also the effect of the ongoing urbanization process that changes the landscape and hardly influences their hydrologic behavior. Moreover, many recent works highlight the need to simulate all urban water processes at their specific temporal and spatial scales. However, considering urban catchments heterogeneity still challenging for urban hydrology, even after advances noticed in term of high-resolution data collection and computational resources. This issue is more to be related to the architecture of urban models being used and how far these models are ready to take into account the extreme variability of urban catchments. In this work, high spatio-temporal resolution modeling is performed for a small and well-equipped urban catchment. The aim of this work is to identify urban modeling needs in terms of spatial and temporal resolution especially for a very small urban area (3.7 ha urban catchment located in the Perreux-sur-Marne city at the southeast of Paris) MultiHydro model was selected to carry out this work, it is a physical based and fully distributed model that interacts four existing modules each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environments. MultiHydro was implemented at 10m, 5m and 2m resolution. Simulations were performed at different spatio-temporal resolutions and analyzed with

  5. Evaluation of ground movement and damage to structures from Chinese coal mining using a new GIS coupling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djamaluddin, I.; Mitani, Y.; Esaki, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, combining a theoretical method of predicting subsidence over time and using a geographical information system (GIS), a GIS-based dynamic model is proposed to rapid simulate the phenomenon of progressive movement distribution from large sequential mining. The theoretical method uses stochastic medium concept involving Knothe time function for basic governing equations to calculate progressive movement because this solutions have been widely developed and used in Chinese mining practice to solve the coal extraction problem under building, railways, and rivers. In order to assess the impact of progressive movement to the surface structures, a fuzzy model is suggested to identify damage classifications with contributions of subsidence calculations and building mesh data. For implementation of the GIS-based prediction and assessment model, a new GIS coupling model is established by implementing tight coupling strategy using the component object model (COM) program to overcome the problems of complex model integration for dynamic prediction and assessment. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the effectiveness of this GIS-based model for prediction and evaluation of subsidence-induced damage from coal mining beneath surface structures in China.

  6. Soybean yield modeling using bootstrap methods for small samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalposso, G.A.; Uribe-Opazo, M.A.; Johann, J.A.

    2016-11-01

    One of the problems that occur when working with regression models is regarding the sample size; once the statistical methods used in inferential analyzes are asymptotic if the sample is small the analysis may be compromised because the estimates will be biased. An alternative is to use the bootstrap methodology, which in its non-parametric version does not need to guess or know the probability distribution that generated the original sample. In this work we used a set of soybean yield data and physical and chemical soil properties formed with fewer samples to determine a multiple linear regression model. Bootstrap methods were used for variable selection, identification of influential points and for determination of confidence intervals of the model parameters. The results showed that the bootstrap methods enabled us to select the physical and chemical soil properties, which were significant in the construction of the soybean yield regression model, construct the confidence intervals of the parameters and identify the points that had great influence on the estimated parameters. (Author)

  7. Digestion of starch in a dynamic small intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime-Fonseca, M R; Gouseti, O; Fryer, P J; Wickham, M S J; Bakalis, S

    2016-12-01

    The rate and extent of starch digestion have been linked with important health aspects, such as control of obesity and type-2 diabetes. In vitro techniques are often used to study digestion and simulated nutrient absorption; however, the effect of gut motility is often disregarded. The present work aims at studying fundamentals of starch digestion, e.g. the effect of viscosity on digestibility, taking into account both biochemical and engineering (gut motility) parameters. New small intestinal model (SIM) that realistically mimics gut motility (segmentation) was used to study digestibility and simulated oligosaccharide bio accessibility of (a) model starch solutions; (b) bread formulations. First, the model was compared with the rigorously mixed stirred tank reactor (STR). Then the effects of enzyme concentration/flow rate, starch concentration, and digesta viscosity (addition of guar gum) were evaluated. Compared to the STR, the SIM showed presence of lag phase when no digestive processes could be detected. The effects of enzyme concentration and flow rate appeared to be marginal in the region of mass transfer limited reactions. Addition of guar gum reduced simulated glucose absorption by up to 45 % in model starch solutions and by 35 % in bread formulations, indicating the importance of chyme rheology on nutrient bioaccessibility. Overall, the work highlights the significance of gut motility in digestive processes and offers a powerful tool in nutritional studies that, additionally to biochemical, considers engineering aspects of digestion. The potential to modulate food digestibility and nutrient bioaccessibility by altering food formulation is indicated.

  8. Spatial variation in population structure and its relation to movement and the potential for dispersal in a model intertidal invertebrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor T Bringloe

    Full Text Available Dispersal, the movement of an individual away from its natal or breeding ground, has been studied extensively in birds and mammals to understand the costs and benefits of movement behavior. Whether or not invertebrates disperse in response to such attributes as habitat quality or density of conspecifics remains uncertain, due in part to the difficulties in marking and recapturing invertebrates. In the upper Bay of Fundy, Canada, the intertidal amphipod Corophium volutator swims at night around the new or full moon. Furthermore, this species is regionally widespread across a large spatial scale with site-to-site variation in population structure. Such variation provides a backdrop against which biological determinants of dispersal can be investigated. We conducted a large-scale study at nine mudflats, and used swimmer density, sampled using stationary plankton nets, as a proxy for dispersing individuals. We also sampled mud residents using sediment cores over 3 sampling rounds (20-28 June, 10-17 July, 2-11 August 2010. Density of swimmers was most variable at the largest spatial scales, indicating important population-level variation. The smallest juveniles and large juveniles or small adults (particularly females were consistently overrepresented as swimmers. Small juveniles swam at most times and locations, whereas swimming of young females decreased with increasing mud presence of young males, and swimming of large juveniles decreased with increasing mud presence of adults. Swimming in most stages increased with density of mud residents; however, proportionally less swimming occurred as total mud resident density increased. We suggest small juveniles move in search of C. volutator aggregations which possibly act as a proxy for better habitat. We also suggest large juveniles and small adults move if potential mates are limiting. Future studies can use sampling designs over large spatial scales with varying population structure to help

  9. Modelling of the small pixel effect in gallium arsenide X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out to investigate the small pixel effect in highly pixellated X-ray imaging detectors fabricated from semi-insulating gallium arsenide. The presence of highly non-uniform weighting fields in detectors with a small pixel geometry causes the majority of the induced signal to be generated when the moving charges are close to the pixellated contacts. The response of GaAs X-ray imaging detectors is further complicated by the presence of charge trapping, particularly of electrons. In this work detectors are modelled with a pixel pitch of 40 and 150 mu m, and with thicknesses of 300 and 500 mu m. Pulses induced in devices with 40 mu m pixels are due almost totally to the movement of the lightly-trapped holes and can exhibit significantly higher charge collection efficiencies than detectors with large electrodes, in which electron trapping is significant. Details of the charge collection efficiencies as a function of interaction depth in the detector and of the incident phot...

  10. Coordination Mechanism in Fast Human Movements - Experimental and Modelling Studies. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    produced a delayed second burst from the triceps brachii which translated into increased movement times. Antagonist fatigue regimens, 5:5 and 5:10... translation and commentary by T.S. Hall, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1972, pp. 24-30. 15. Dindar, F. and M. Verrier. "Studies of the...Sisson. "The Time Relations of the Events in Quick Voluntary Movements." Journal of Experimental Psychology. 19: 519-523, 1936. 28. Henneman , E., and C. B

  11. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Parkinson, William M; Kopke, Danielle L; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-09-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology.

  12. Palmitoyl Serotonin Inhibits L-dopa-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements in the Mouse Parkinson Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Go, Jun; Son, Eunjung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kim, Mee Ree

    2016-08-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most common treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long term use of L-DOPA for PD therapy lead to abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) known as dyskinesia. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is enriched protein in basal ganglia, and inhibition of the protein reduces dyskinetic behavior of mice. Palmitoyl serotonin (PA-5HT) is a hybrid molecule patterned after arachidonoyl serotonin, antagonist of FAAH. However, the effect of PA-5HT on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in PD have not yet been elucidated. To investigate whether PA-5HT relieve LID in PD and decrease hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors, we used the 6-hydroxydopomine (6-OHDA)-lesioned mouse model of PD and treated the L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) for 10 days with PA-5HT (0.3 mg/kg/day). The number of wall contacts with the forelimb in the cylinder test was significantly decreased by 6-OHDA lesion in mice and the pharmacotherapeutic effect of L-DOPA was also revealed in PA-5HT-treated mice. Moreover, in AIMs test, PA-5HT-treated mice showed significant reduction of locomotive, axial, limb, and orofacial AIMs score compared to the vehicle-treated mice. LID-induced hyper-phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and overexpression of FosB/ΔFosB was markedly decreased in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum of PA-5HT-treated mice, indicating that PA-5HT decreased the dopamine D1 receptor-hyperactivation induced by chronic treatment of L-DOPA in dopamine-denervated striatum. These results suggest that PA-5HT effectively attenuates the development of LID and enhance of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and FosB/ΔFosB expression in the hemi-parkinsonian mouse model. PA-5HT may have beneficial effect on the LID in PD.

  13. Flexible modeling frameworks to replace small ensembles of hydrological models and move toward large ensembles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Nans; Clark, Martyn P.; Mizukami, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Climate change impacts on hydrological processes are typically assessed using small ensembles of hydrological models. That is, a handful of hydrological models are typically driven by a larger number of climate models. Such a setup has several limitations. Because the number of hydrological models is small, only a small proportion of the model space is sampled, likely leading to an underestimation of the uncertainties in the projections. Further, sampling is arbitrary: although hydrological models should be selected to provide a representative sample of existing models (in terms of complexity and governing hypotheses), they are instead usually selected based on legacy reasons. Furthermore, running several hydrological models currently constitutes a practical challenge because each model must be setup and calibrated individually. Finally, and probably most importantly, the differences between the projected impacts cannot be directly related to differences between hydrological models, because the models are different in almost every possible aspect. We are hence in a situation in which different hydrological models deliver different projections, but for reasons that are mostly unclear, and in which the uncertainty in the projections is probably underestimated. To overcome these limitations, we are experimenting with the flexible modeling framework FUSE (Framework for Understanding Model Errors). FUSE enables to construct conceptual models piece by piece (in a "pick and mix" approach), so it can be used to generate a large number of models that mimic existing models and/or models that differ from other models in single targeted respect (e.g. how baseflow is generated). FUSE hence allows for controlled modeling experiments, and for a more systematic and exhaustive sampling of the model space. Here we explore climate change impacts over the contiguous USA on a 12km grid using two groups of three models: the first group involves the commonly used models VIC, PRMS and HEC

  14. How Relevant Are Imaging Findings in Animal Models of Movement Disorders to Human Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Darryl; Landau, Anne M; Doudet, Doris J

    2015-08-01

    The combination of novel imaging techniques with the use of small animal models of disease is often used in attempt to understand disease mechanisms, design potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, and develop novel methods with translatability to human clinical conditions. However, it is clear that most animal models are deficient when compared to the complexity of human diseases: they cannot sufficiently replicate all the features of multisystem disorders. Furthermore, some practical differences may affect the use or interpretation of animal imaging to model human conditions such as the use of anesthesia, various species differences, and limitations of methodological tools. Nevertheless, imaging animal models allows us to dissect, in interpretable bits, the effects of one system upon another, the consequences of variable neuronal losses or overactive systems, the results of experimental treatments, and we can develop and validate new methods. In this review, we focus on imaging modalities that are easily used in both human subjects and animal models such as positron emission and magnetic resonance imaging and discuss aging and Parkinson's disease as prototypical examples of preclinical imaging studies.

  15. Fast fitting of non-Gaussian state-space models to animal movement data via Template Model Builder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Whoriskey, Kim; Yurkowski, David; Nielsen, Anders; Mills, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    State-space models (SSM) are often used for analyzing complex ecological processes that are not observed directly, such as marine animal movement. When outliers are present in the measurements, special care is needed in the analysis to obtain reliable location and process estimates. Here we recommend using the Laplace approximation combined with automatic differentiation (as implemented in the novel R package Template Model Builder; TMB) for the fast fitting of continuous-time multivariate non-Gaussian SSMs. Through Argos satellite tracking data, we demonstrate that the use of continuous-time t-distributed measurement errors for error-prone data is more robust to outliers and improves the location estimation compared to using discretized-time t-distributed errors (implemented with a Gibbs sampler) or using continuous-time Gaussian errors (as with the Kalman filter). Using TMB, we are able to estimate additional parameters compared to previous methods, all without requiring a substantial increase in computational time. The model implementation is made available through the R package argosTrack.

  16. Small Area Model-Based Estimators Using Big Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The timely, accurate monitoring of social indicators, such as poverty or inequality, on a finegrained spatial and temporal scale is a crucial tool for understanding social phenomena and policymaking, but poses a great challenge to official statistics. This article argues that an interdisciplinary approach, combining the body of statistical research in small area estimation with the body of research in social data mining based on Big Data, can provide novel means to tackle this problem successfully. Big Data derived from the digital crumbs that humans leave behind in their daily activities are in fact providing ever more accurate proxies of social life. Social data mining from these data, coupled with advanced model-based techniques for fine-grained estimates, have the potential to provide a novel microscope through which to view and understand social complexity. This article suggests three ways to use Big Data together with small area estimation techniques, and shows how Big Data has the potential to mirror aspects of well-being and other socioeconomic phenomena.

  17. Electron Transport through Models for Small-World Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Lazarus; Novotny, Mark

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the quantum transport of (spinless) electrons through simplified models related to small-world nanomaterials. We employ a tight-binding Hamiltonian, and obtain the transmission coefficient from a matrix solution of the associated time-independent Schrödinger Equation. The system studied corresponds to d=1 semi-infinite input and output leads, connected to a `blob' of N atoms. We first present exact results for N inter-connected atoms, a fully-connected graph. The exact solution, for any N, is given both for symmetric and non-symmetric connections between the `blob' and the input/output. We then present numerical results obtained by removing some of the connections within the N-site `blob', thereby approaching transport through a small-world nanomaterial [1-4]. [1] S. Caliskan, M.A. Novotny, and J.I. Cerd'a, J. Appl. Phys., 102, 013707 (2007). [2] M.A. Novotny et al., J. Appl. Phys., 97, 10B309 (2005). [3] M.A. Novotny and S.M. Wheeler, Braz. J. Physics 34, 395 (2004). [4] J. Yancey, M.A. Novotny, and S.R. Gwaltney, 2008 March Meeting presentation.

  18. Simple Electromagnetic Modeling of Small Airplanes: Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of simple electromagnetic models of small airplanes, which can contain composite materials in their construction. Electromagnetic waves can penetrate through the surface of the aircraft due to the specific electromagnetic properties of the composite materials, which can increase the intensity of fields inside the airplane and can negatively influence the functionality of the sensitive avionics. The airplane is simulated by two parallel dielectric layers (the left-hand side wall and the right-hand side wall of the airplane. The layers are put into a rectangular metallic waveguide terminated by the absorber in order to simulate the illumination of the airplane by the external wave (both of the harmonic nature and pulse one. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, the parametric analysis can be performed, and the results can be used in order to train an artificial neural network. The trained networks excel in further reduction of CPU-time demands of an airplane modeling.

  19. ICT evaluation models and performance of medium and small enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayaga Anass

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on prior research related to (1 impact of information communication technology (ICT and (2 operational risk management (ORM in the context of medium and small enterprises (MSEs, the focus of this study was to investigate the relationship between (1 ICT operational risk management (ORM and (2 performances of MSEs. To achieve the focus, the research investigated evaluating models for understanding the value of ICT ORM in MSEs. Multiple regression, Repeated-Measures Analysis of Variance (RM-ANOVA and Repeated-Measures Multivariate Analysis of Variance (RM-MANOVA were performed. The findings of the distribution revealed that only one variable made a significant percentage contribution to the level of ICT operation in MSEs, the Payback method (β = 0.410, p < .000. It may thus be inferred that the Payback method is the prominent variable, explaining the variation in level of evaluation models affecting ICT adoption within MSEs. Conclusively, in answering the two questions (1 degree of variability explained and (2 predictors, the results revealed that the variable contributed approximately 88.4% of the variations in evaluation models affecting ICT adoption within MSEs. The analysis of variance also revealed that the regression coefficients were real and did not occur by chance

  20. Small-scale behaviour in deterministic reaction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ben-Avraham, Daniel, E-mail: paolo.politi@isc.cnr.i, E-mail: benavraham@clarkson.ed [Physics Department, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    In a recent paper published in this journal (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 495004) we studied a one-dimensional particles system where nearest particles attract with a force inversely proportional to a power {alpha} of their distance and coalesce upon encounter. Numerics yielded a distribution function h(z) for the gap between neighbouring particles, with h(z) {approx} z{sup {beta}({alpha})} for small z and {beta}({alpha}) > {alpha}. We can now prove analytically that in the strict limit of z {yields} 0, {beta} = {alpha} for {alpha} > 0, corresponding to the mean-field result, and we compute the length scale where the mean field breaks down. More generally, in that same limit correlations are negligible for any similar reaction model where attractive forces diverge with vanishing distance. The actual meaning of the measured exponent {beta}({alpha}) remains an open question.

  1. Bayesian model comparison and model averaging for small-area estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Aitkin, Murray; Liu, Charles C.; Chadwick, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers small-area estimation with lung cancer mortality data, and discusses the choice of upper-level model for the variation over areas. Inference about the random effects for the areas may depend strongly on the choice of this model, but this choice is not a straightforward matter. We give a general methodology for both evaluating the data evidence for different models and averaging over plausible models to give robust area effect distributions. We reanalyze the data of Tsutak...

  2. SIMPLIFIED MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF SMALL SIZED UNMANNED AIRCRAFT VEHICLE LAYOUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong reduction of new aircraft design period using new technology based on artificial intelligence is the key problem mentioned in forecasts of leading aerospace industry research centers. This article covers the approach to devel- opment of quick aerodynamic design methods based on artificial intelligence neural system. The problem is being solved for the classical scheme of small sized unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV. The principal parts of the method are the mathe- matical model of layout, layout generator of this type of aircraft is built on aircraft neural networks, automatic selection module for cleaning variety of layouts generated in automatic mode, robust direct computational fluid dynamics method, aerodynamic characteristics approximators on artificial neural networks.Methods based on artificial neural networks have intermediate position between computational fluid dynamics methods or experiments and simplified engineering approaches. The use of ANN for estimating aerodynamic characteris-tics put limitations on input data. For this task the layout must be presented as a vector with dimension not exceeding sev-eral hundred. Vector components must include all main parameters conventionally used for layouts description and com- pletely replicate the most important aerodynamics and structural properties.The first stage of the work is presented in the paper. Simplified mathematical model of small sized UAV was developed. To estimate the range of geometrical parameters of layouts the review of existing vehicle was done. The result of the work is the algorithm and computer software for generating the layouts based on ANN technolo-gy. 10000 samples were generated and the dataset containig geometrical and aerodynamic characteristics of layoutwas created.

  3. Is having similar eye movement patterns during face learning and recognition beneficial for recognition performance? Evidence from hidden Markov modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Tim; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2017-05-04

    The hidden Markov model (HMM)-based approach for eye movement analysis is able to reflect individual differences in both spatial and temporal aspects of eye movements. Here we used this approach to understand the relationship between eye movements during face learning and recognition, and its association with recognition performance. We discovered holistic (i.e., mainly looking at the face center) and analytic (i.e., specifically looking at the two eyes in addition to the face center) patterns during both learning and recognition. Although for both learning and recognition, participants who adopted analytic patterns had better recognition performance than those with holistic patterns, a significant positive correlation between the likelihood of participants' patterns being classified as analytic and their recognition performance was only observed during recognition. Significantly more participants adopted holistic patterns during learning than recognition. Interestingly, about 40% of the participants used different patterns between learning and recognition, and among them 90% switched their patterns from holistic at learning to analytic at recognition. In contrast to the scan path theory, which posits that eye movements during learning have to be recapitulated during recognition for the recognition to be successful, participants who used the same or different patterns during learning and recognition did not differ in recognition performance. The similarity between their learning and recognition eye movement patterns also did not correlate with their recognition performance. These findings suggested that perceptuomotor memory elicited by eye movement patterns during learning does not play an important role in recognition. In contrast, the retrieval of diagnostic information for recognition, such as the eyes for face recognition, is a better predictor for recognition performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decoding of individual finger movements from surface EMG signals using vector autoregressive hierarchical hidden Markov models (VARHHMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dimitrije; Kanitz, Gunter; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian; Antfolk, Christian

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for predicting individual fingers movements from surface electromyography (EMG). The method is intended for real-time dexterous control of a multifunctional prosthetic hand device. The EMG data was recorded using 16 single-ended channels positioned on the forearm of healthy participants. Synchronously with the EMG recording, the subjects performed consecutive finger movements based on the visual cues. Our algorithm could be described in following steps: extracting mean average value (MAV) of the EMG to be used as the feature for classification, piece-wise linear modeling of EMG feature dynamics, implementation of hierarchical hidden Markov models (HHMM) to capture transitions between linear models, and implementation of Bayesian inference as the classifier. The performance of our classifier was evaluated against commonly used real-time classifiers. The results show that the current algorithm setup classifies EMG data similarly to the best among tested classifiers but with equal or less computational complexity.

  5. Modelling transition states of a small once-through boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talonpoika, T. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Energy Technology

    1997-12-31

    the model gives results that are logical in the directions of the charges, and the order of magnitude of the time scale of charges is also as expected. The results of the tests on the process fluid side show that the model gives reasonable results both on temperature charges that cause small alterations in the process state and on mass flow rate charges causing very great alterations. The test runs show that the dynamic model has no problems in calculating cases in which the temperature of the entering heat source suddenly goes below that of the tube wall or the process fluid. (author) 7 refs.

  6. Modelling hourly rates of evaporation from small lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Granger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a field study of open water evaporation carried out on three small lakes in Western and Northern Canada. In this case small lakes are defined as those for which the temperature above the water surface is governed by the upwind land surface conditions; that is, a continuous boundary layer exists over the lake, and large-scale atmospheric effects such as entrainment do not come into play. Lake evaporation was measured directly using eddy covariance equipment; profiles of wind speed, air temperature and humidity were also obtained over the water surfaces. Observations were made as well over the upwind land surface.

    The major factors controlling open water evaporation were examined. The study showed that for time periods shorter than daily, the open water evaporation bears no relationship to the net radiation; the wind speed is the most significant factor governing the evaporation rates, followed by the land-water temperature contrast and the land-water vapour pressure contrast. The effect of the stability on the wind field was demonstrated; relationships were developed relating the land-water wind speed contrast to the land-water temperature contrast. The open water period can be separated into two distinct evaporative regimes: the warming period in the Spring, when the land is warmer than the water, the turbulent fluxes over water are suppressed; and the cooling period, when the water is warmer than the land, the turbulent fluxes over water are enhanced.

    Relationships were developed between the hourly rates of lake evaporation and the following significant variables and parameters (wind speed, land-lake temperature and humidity contrasts, and the downwind distance from shore. The result is a relatively simple versatile model for estimating the hourly lake evaporation rates. The model was tested using two independent data sets. Results show that the modelled evaporation follows the observed values

  7. Using hypnotic suggestion to model loss of control and awareness of movements: an exploratory FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinton Deeley

    Full Text Available The feeling of voluntary control and awareness of movement is fundamental to our notions of selfhood and responsibility for actions, yet can be lost in neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. delusions of control, non-epileptic seizures and culturally influenced dissociative states (e.g. attributions of spirit possession. The brain processes involved remain poorly understood. We used suggestion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate loss of control and awareness of right hand movements in 15 highly hypnotically suggestible subjects. Loss of perceived control of movements was associated with reduced connectivity between supplementary motor area (SMA and motor regions. Reduced awareness of involuntary movements was associated with less activation in parietal cortices (BA 7, BA 40 and insula. Collectively these results suggest that the sense of voluntary control of movement may critically depend on the functional coupling of SMA with motor systems, and provide a potential neural basis for the narrowing of awareness reported in pathological and culturally influenced dissociative phenomena.

  8. Eye movements and information geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database.

  9. Cell and small animal models for phenotypic drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mihaly Szabo,1 Sara Svensson Akusjärvi,1 Ankur Saxena,1 Jianping Liu,2 Gayathri Chandrasekar,1 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor, and Cell Biology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden Abstract: The phenotype-based drug discovery (PDD approach is re-emerging as an alternative platform for drug discovery. This review provides an overview of the various model systems and technical advances in imaging and image analyses that strengthen the PDD platform. In PDD screens, compounds of therapeutic value are identified based on the phenotypic perturbations produced irrespective of target(s or mechanism of action. In this article, examples of phenotypic changes that can be detected and quantified with relative ease in a cell-based setup are discussed. In addition, a higher order of PDD screening setup using small animal models is also explored. As PDD screens integrate physiology and multiple signaling mechanisms during the screening process, the identified hits have higher biomedical applicability. Taken together, this review highlights the advantages gained by adopting a PDD approach in drug discovery. Such a PDD platform can complement target-based systems that are currently in practice to accelerate drug discovery. Keywords: phenotype, screening, PDD, discovery, zebrafish, drug

  10. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel, E-mail: teodor.chelaru@upb.ro [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest - Research Center for Aeronautics and Space, Str. Ghe Polizu, nr. 1, Bucharest, Sector 1 (Romania); Cristian, Barbu, E-mail: barbucr@mta.ro [Military Technical Academy, Romania, B-dul. George Coşbuc, nr. 81-83, Bucharest, Sector 5 (Romania); Chelaru, Adrian, E-mail: achelaru@incas.ro [INCAS -National Institute for Aerospace Research Elie Carafoli, B-dul Iuliu Maniu 220, 061126, Bucharest, Sector 6 (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital

  11. A modeling approach to compute modification of net joint forces caused by coping movements in obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Many disorders of the musculoskeletal system are caused by modified net joint forces resulting from individual coping movement strategies of patients suffering from neuromuscular diseases. Purpose of this work is to introduce a personalized biomechanical model which allows the calculation of individual net joint forces via inverse dynamics based on anthropometry and kinematics of the upper extremity measured by 3D optoelectronical motion analysis. Methods The determined resulting n...

  12. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  13. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  14. Modeling eye movements in visual agnosia with a saliency map approach: bottom-up guidance or top-down strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulsham, Tom; Barton, Jason J S; Kingstone, Alan; Dewhurst, Richard; Underwood, Geoffrey

    2011-08-01

    Two recent papers (Foulsham, Barton, Kingstone, Dewhurst, & Underwood, 2009; Mannan, Kennard, & Husain, 2009) report that neuropsychological patients with a profound object recognition problem (visual agnosic subjects) show differences from healthy observers in the way their eye movements are controlled when looking at images. The interpretation of these papers is that eye movements can be modeled as the selection of points on a saliency map, and that agnosic subjects show an increased reliance on visual saliency, i.e., brightness and contrast in low-level stimulus features. Here we review this approach and present new data from our own experiments with an agnosic patient that quantifies the relationship between saliency and fixation location. In addition, we consider whether the perceptual difficulties of individual patients might be modeled by selectively weighting the different features involved in a saliency map. Our data indicate that saliency is not always a good predictor of fixation in agnosia: even for our agnosic subject, as for normal observers, the saliency-fixation relationship varied as a function of the task. This means that top-down processes still have a significant effect on the earliest stages of scanning in the setting of visual agnosia, indicating severe limitations for the saliency map model. Top-down, active strategies-which are the hallmark of our human visual system-play a vital role in eye movement control, whether we know what we are looking at or not. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards efficient and robust control of bipedal walking : basic models of posture and rhythmic movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Walking is a very important function of the human movement apparatus. The question how walking is controlled by the central nervous system is yet to be answered. A number of reasons lead us to believe that neural oscillators in the spinal cord, termed Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), have a major

  16. Towards efficient and robust control of bipedal walking : basic models of posture and rhythmic movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, Bart Willem

    2008-01-01

    Walking is a very important function of the human movement apparatus. The question how walking is controlled by the central nervous system is yet to be answered. A number of reasons lead us to believe that neural oscillators in the spinal cord, termed Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), have a major

  17. Piperidine, pyridine alkaloid inhibition of fetal movement in a day 40 pregnant goat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The inhibition of fetal movement is one mechanism behind the development of multiple congenital contracture-type defects and cleft palate in developing fetuses of humans and animals. In this study, we tested the alkaloids anabasine, lobeline, and myosmine for agonist actions, and sensitivity to alp...

  18. Jaguars on the move: modeling movement to mitigate fragmentation from road expansion in the Mayan Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Conde, Dalia Amor; Manterola, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Road-induced habitat fragmentation is one of the greatest threats to large carnivores. Wildlife passes have been used to reduce fragmentation by mitigating the effects of roads as barriers to animal movement. However, direct observations of animals crossing roads are extremely rare and thus...

  19. Modeling Small Scale Solar Powered ORC Unit for Standalone Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bocci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When the electricity from the grid is not available, the generation of electricity in remote areas is an essential challenge to satisfy important needs. In many developing countries the power generation from Diesel engines is the applied technical solution. However the cost and supply of fuel make a strong dependency of the communities on the external support. Alternatives to fuel combustion can be found in photovoltaic generators, and, with suitable conditions, small wind turbines or microhydroplants. The aim of the paper is to simulate the power generation of a generating unit using the Rankine Cycle and using refrigerant R245fa as a working fluid. The generation unit has thermal solar panels as heat source and photovoltaic modules for the needs of the auxiliary items (pumps, electronics, etc.. The paper illustrates the modeling of the system using TRNSYS platform, highlighting standard and “ad hoc” developed components as well as the global system efficiency. In the future the results of the simulation will be compared with the data collected from the 3 kW prototype under construction in the Tuscia University in Italy.

  20. Bi-Bayesian Combined Model for Two-Step Prediction of Dynamic Turning Movement Proportions at Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Short-term prediction of dynamic turning movement proportions at intersections is very important for intelligent transportation systems, but it is impossible to detect turning flows directly through current traffic surveillance devices. Existing prediction models have proved to be rather accurate in general, but not precise enough during every time interval, and can only obtain the one-step prediction. This paper first presents a Bayesian combined model to forecast the entering and exiting flows at intersections, by integrating a nonlinear regression, a moving average, and an autoregressive model. Based on the forecasted traffic flows, this paper further develops an accurate backpropagation neural network model and an efficient Kalman filtering model to predict the dynamic turning movement proportions. Using Bayesian method with both historical information and currently prediction results for error adjustment, this paper finally integrates both the above two prediction models and proposes a Bi-Bayesian combined framework to achieve both one-step and two-step predictions. A case study is implemented based on practical survey data, which are collected at an intersection in Beijing city, including both historical and current data. The reported prediction results indicate that the Bi-Bayesian combined model is rather accurate and stable for on-line applications.

  1. Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O.

    2015-01-01

    1.Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates.2.U

  2. Moving on with foraging theory : Incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Jan A; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O

    2015-01-01

    Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Usin

  3. Modeling of fire smoke movement in multizone garments building using two open source platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Md. Arifur Rahman; Galib, Musanna; Islam, Adnan; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2017-06-01

    Casualty of garment factory workers from factory fire in Bangladesh is a recurring tragedy. Smoke, which is more fatal than fire itself, often propagates through different pathways from lower to upper floors during building fire. Among the toxic gases produced from a building fire, carbon monoxide (CO) can be deadly, even in small amounts. This paper models the propagation and transportation of fire induced smoke (CO) that resulted from the burning of synthetic polyester fibers using two open source platforms, CONTAM and Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS). Smoke migration in a generic multistoried garment factory building in Bangladesh is modeled using CONTAM where each floor is compartmentalized by different zones. The elevator and stairway shafts are modeled by phantom zones to simulate contaminant (CO) transport from one floor to upper floors. FDS analysis involves burning of two different stacks of polyester jacket of six feet height and with a maximum heat release rate per unit area of 1500kw/m2 over a storage area 50m2 and 150m2, respectively. The resulting CO generation and removal rates from FDS are used in CONTAM to predict fire-borne CO propagation in different zones of the garment building. Findings of the study exhibit that the contaminant flow rate is a strong function of the position of building geometry, location of initiation of fire, amount of burnt material, presence of AHU and contaminant generation and removal rate of CO from the source location etc. The transport of fire-smoke in the building Hallways, stairways and lifts are also investigated in detail to examine the safe egress of the occupants in case of fire.

  4. A novel model of motor learning capable of developing an optimal movement control law online from scratch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimansky, Yury P; Kang, Tao; He, Jiping

    2004-02-01

    A computational model of a learning system (LS) is described that acquires knowledge and skill necessary for optimal control of a multisegmental limb dynamics (controlled object or CO), starting from "knowing" only the dimensionality of the object's state space. It is based on an optimal control problem setup different from that of reinforcement learning. The LS solves the optimal control problem online while practicing the manipulation of CO. The system's functional architecture comprises several adaptive components, each of which incorporates a number of mapping functions approximated based on artificial neural nets. Besides the internal model of the CO's dynamics and adaptive controller that computes the control law, the LS includes a new type of internal model, the minimal cost (IM(mc)) of moving the controlled object between a pair of states. That internal model appears critical for the LS's capacity to develop an optimal movement trajectory. The IM(mc) interacts with the adaptive controller in a cooperative manner. The controller provides an initial approximation of an optimal control action, which is further optimized in real time based on the IM(mc). The IM(mc) in turn provides information for updating the controller. The LS's performance was tested on the task of center-out reaching to eight randomly selected targets with a 2DOF limb model. The LS reached an optimal level of performance in a few tens of trials. It also quickly adapted to movement perturbations produced by two different types of external force field. The results suggest that the proposed design of a self-optimized control system can serve as a basis for the modeling of motor learning that includes the formation and adaptive modification of the plan of a goal-directed movement.

  5. Stochastic modelling and diffusion modes for POD models and small-scale flow analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Resseguier, Valentin; Heitz, Dominique; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic modelling in the constitution of fluid flow reduced-order models. This framework introduces a spatially inhomogeneous random field to represent the unresolved small-scale velocity component. Such a decomposition of the velocity in terms of a smooth large-scale velocity component and a rough, highly oscillating, component gives rise, without any supplementary assumption, to a large-scale flow dynamics that includes a modified advection term together with an inhomogeneous diffusion term. Both of those terms, related respectively to turbophoresis and mixing effects, depend on the variance of the unre-solved small-scale velocity component. They bring to the reduced system an explicit subgrid term enabling to take into account the action of the truncated modes. Besides, a decomposition of the variance tensor in terms of diffusion modes provides a meaningful statistical representation of the stationary or nonstationary structuration of the small-scale velocity and of its action on the reso...

  6. A three-dimensional k-ε-k_p model in curvilinear coordinates for sediment movement and bed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To aim at the substitution of the magnitude and direction of water flow movement near bed for those of bed load transport in solid-liquid two-phase one-fluid model, and to simulate the effect of secondary flow on transverse bed load transport in channel bends and the effect of bed slope on bed load trans- port in a better way, a three-dimensional k-ε-kp solid-liquid two-phase two-fluid model in curvilinear coordinates is solved numerically with a finite-volume method on an adaptive grid for studying wa- ter-sediment movements and bed evolution in a 120° channel bend. Numerical results show that the trajectories of solid-phase deviate from those of liquid-phase in the channel bend, and the deviation increases with the increase of the particle diameters. The calculated bed deformation by the k-ε-kp model is in better agreement with measured bed deformation than those by one-fluid model. It is proved that the k-ε-kp model can simulate the effect of secondary flow on lateral bed load transport with the higher accuracy than the one-fluid model.

  7. LEVY WALK MODELS OF SURVIVOR MOVEMENT IN DISASTER AREAS WITH BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socrates E. Akpoyibo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disasters are catastrophic events that occur unexpectedly in a random manner. It is important that when a disaster occurs, the victims in the disaster area are rescued quickly to avoid massive casualties. Disaster areas may leave victims bereft of food, water, shelter and medical help. The goal of the work outlined in this paper is to study the movement of survivors towards rescue devices when barriers are involved. Barriers are obstacles that prevent both survivors and crewmembers from moving freely in a disaster area thereby slowing down rescue operations. It would therefore be necessary to study movements of survivors with barriers included in the simulations so as to produce more realistic results to be used when rescuing survivors in disaster areas.

  8. Balancing direct and indirect sources of navigational information in a leaderless model of collective animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codling, Edward A; Bode, Nikolai W F

    2016-04-07

    Navigation is an important movement process that enables individuals and groups of animals to find targets in space at different spatio-temporal scales. Earlier studies have shown how being in a group can confer navigational advantages to individuals, either through following more experienced leaders or through the pooling of many inaccurate compasses, a process known as the 'many wrongs principle'. However, the exact mechanisms for how information is transferred and used within the group in order to improve both individual- and group-level navigational performance are not fully understood. Here we explore the relative weighting that should be given to different sources of navigational information by an individual within a navigating group at each step of the movement process. Specifically, we consider a direct goal-oriented source of navigational information such as the individual׳s own imperfect knowledge of the target (a 'noisy compass') alongside two indirect sources of navigational information: the previous movement directions of neighbours in the group (social information) and, for the first time in this context, the previous movement direction of the individual (persistence). We assume that all individuals are equal in their abilities and that direct navigational information is prone to higher errors than indirect information. Using computer simulations, we show that in such situations giving a high weighting to either type of indirect navigational information can serve to significantly improve the navigation success of groups. Crucially, we also show that if the quality of social information is reduced, e.g. by an individual׳s limited cognitive abilities, the best navigational strategy for groups assigns a considerable weighting to persistence, a behaviour that is neither social, nor directly aimed at navigating.

  9. Coordination Mechanism in Fast Human Movements. Experimental and Modelling Studies. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    spinal cord injury, and p stroke . It had been accepted that functional electrical - stimulation can be responsible for muscle rehabilitation and... Physiotherapy Canada, 1979, 31(5), 265-267. 59. Golla, F., and Hettwer, J. A study of the electromyograms of voluntary movement. Brain, 1924, 47, 57-69. ’ao 60...Kinetics Pub., 1982. 134. Schuck, E., Friedman, H., Wileman., W. and McNeal, D. Developing clinical devices for hemiplegic stroke patients. In M.M

  10. An Integrative Model for the Neural Mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

    OpenAIRE

    Coubard, Olivier A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, 26 years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons ...

  11. An integrative model for the neural mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

    OpenAIRE

    Coubard, Olivier A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, twenty-six years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the ...

  12. Multiobjective Bak-Sneppen model on a small-world network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elettreby, M.F. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)] e-mail: mohfathy@mans.edu.eg

    2005-11-01

    Small-world networks (SWN) are relevant to biological systems. We study the dynamics of the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model on small-world network, including the concepts of extremal dynamics, multiobjective optimization and coherent noise. We find that the small-world structure stabilizes the system. Also, it is more realistic to augment the Bak-Sneppen model by these concepts.

  13. A geometric growth model interpolating between regular and small-world networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhou, Shuigeng [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Zhiyong [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, Zhen [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2007-09-28

    We propose a geometric growth model which interpolates between one-dimensional linear graphs and small-world networks. The model undergoes a transition from large to small worlds. We study the topological characteristics by both theoretical predictions and numerical simulations, which are in good accordance with each other. Our geometrically growing model is a complementarity for the static WS model.

  14. To Pass or Not to Pass: Modeling the Movement and Affordance Dynamics of a Pick and Place Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Lamb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans commonly engage in tasks that require or are made more efficient by coordinating with other humans. In this paper we introduce a task dynamics approach for modeling multi-agent interaction and decision making in a pick and place task where an agent must move an object from one location to another and decide whether to act alone or with a partner. Our aims were to identify and model (1 the affordance related dynamics that define an actor's choice to move an object alone or to pass it to their co-actor and (2 the trajectory dynamics of an actor's hand movements when moving to grasp, relocate, or pass the object. Using a virtual reality pick and place task, we demonstrate that both the decision to pass or not pass an object and the movement trajectories of the participants can be characterized in terms of a behavioral dynamics model. Simulations suggest that the proposed behavioral dynamics model exhibits features observed in human participants including hysteresis in decision making, non-straight line trajectories, and non-constant velocity profiles. The proposed model highlights how the same low-dimensional behavioral dynamics can operate to constrain multiple (and often nested levels of human activity and suggests that knowledge of what, when, where and how to move or act during pick and place behavior may be defined by these low dimensional task dynamics and, thus, can emerge spontaneously and in real-time with little a priori planning.

  15. A three-dimensional k-ε-kp model in curvilinear coordinates for sediment movement and bed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN YongMing; LIU Cheng

    2009-01-01

    To aim at the substitution of the magnitude and direction of water flow movement near bed for those of bed load transport in solid-liquid two-phase one-fluid model, and to simulate the effect of secondary flow on transverse bed load transport in channel bends and the effect of bed slope on bed load transport in a better way, a three-dimensional k-ε-kp solid-liquid two-phase two-fluid model in curvilinear coordinates is solved numerically with a finite-volume method on an adaptive grid for studying water-sediment movements and bed evolution in a 120° channel bend. Numerical results show that the trajectories of solid-phase deviate from those of liquid-phase in the channel bend, and the deviation increases with the increase of the particle diameters. The calculated bed deformation by the k-ε-kpmodel is in better agreement with measured bed deformation than those by one-fluid model. It is proved that the k-ε-kp model can simulate the effect of secondary flow on lateral bed load transport with the higher accuracy than the one-fluid model.

  16. A limit-cycle model of leg movements in cross-country skiing and its adjustments with fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignetti, F; Schena, F; Mottet, D; Rouard, A

    2010-08-01

    Using dynamical modeling tools, the aim of the study was to establish a minimal model reproducing leg movements in cross-country skiing, and to evaluate the eventual adjustments of this model with fatigue. The participants (N=8) skied on a treadmill at 90% of their maximal oxygen consumption, up to exhaustion, using the diagonal stride technique. Qualitative analysis of leg kinematics portrayed in phase planes, Hooke planes, and velocity profiles suggested the inclusion in the model of a linear stiffness and an asymmetric van der Pol-type nonlinear damping. Quantitative analysis revealed that this model reproduced the observed kinematics patterns of the leg with adequacy, accounting for 87% of the variance. A rising influence of the stiffness term and a dropping influence of the damping terms were also evidenced with fatigue. The meaning of these changes was discussed in the framework of motor control.

  17. A modeling approach to compute modification of net joint forces caused by coping movements in obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Many disorders of the musculoskeletal system are caused by modified net joint forces resulting from individual coping movement strategies of patients suffering from neuromuscular diseases. Purpose of this work is to introduce a personalized biomechanical model which allows the calculation of individual net joint forces via inverse dynamics based on anthropometry and kinematics of the upper extremity measured by 3D optoelectronical motion analysis. Methods The determined resulting net joint forces in the anatomical axis of movement may be used to explain the reason for possible malfunction of the musculoskeletal system, especially joint malformation. For example the resulting net joint forces in the humerothoracic joint from simulations are compared to a sample of children presenting obstetric brachial plexus palsy showing an internal shoulder rotation position and a sample of healthy children. Results The results presented from the simulation show that an increased internal shoulder rotation position leads to increased net joint forces in the humerothoracic joint. A similar behavior is presented for the subjects suffering from brachial plexus palsy with an internal shoulder rotation position. Conclusions The increased net joint forces are a possible reason for joint malformation in the humerothoracic joint caused by coping movements resulting from neuromuscular dysfunction as stated in literature. PMID:24139445

  18. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  19. Eye Movement Deficits Are Consistent with a Staging Model of pTDP-43 Pathology in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gorges

    Full Text Available The neuropathological process underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS can be traced as a four-stage progression scheme of sequential corticofugal axonal spread. The examination of eye movement control gains deep insights into brain network pathology and provides the opportunity to detect both disturbance of the brainstem oculomotor circuitry as well as executive deficits of oculomotor function associated with higher brain networks.To study systematically oculomotor characteristics in ALS and its underlying network pathology in order to determine whether eye movement deterioration can be categorized within a staging system of oculomotor decline that corresponds to the neuropathological model.Sixty-eight ALS patients and 31 controls underwent video-oculographic, clinical and neuropsychological assessments.Oculomotor examinations revealed increased anti- and delayed saccades' errors, gaze-palsy and a cerebellary type of smooth pursuit disturbance. The oculomotor disturbances occurred in a sequential manner: Stage 1, only executive control of eye movements was affected. Stage 2 indicates disturbed executive control plus 'genuine' oculomotor dysfunctions such as gaze-paly. We found high correlations (p<0.001 between the oculomotor stages and both, the clinical presentation as assessed by the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS score, and cognitive scores from the Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioral ALS Screen (ECAS.Dysfunction of eye movement control in ALS can be characterized by a two-staged sequential pattern comprising executive deficits in Stage 1 and additional impaired infratentorial oculomotor control pathways in Stage 2. This pattern parallels the neuropathological staging of ALS and may serve as a technical marker of the neuropathological spreading.

  20. A model for intracellular movement of Cauliflower mosaic virus: the concept of the mobile virion factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoelz, James E; Angel, Carlos A; Nelson, Richard S; Leisner, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The genomes of many plant viruses have a coding capacity limited to inclusion body protein' (IB) present in infected plants. P6 is now referred to in most articles as the transactivator (TAV)/viroplasmin protein, because the first viral function to be characterized for the Caulimovirus P6 protein beyond its role as an inclusion body protein (the viroplasmin) was its role in translational transactivation (the TAV function). This review will discuss the currently accepted functions for P6 and then present the evidence for an entirely new function for P6 in intracellular movement.

  1. Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer Risk Factors and Screening Behaviors - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    These model-based estimates use two surveys, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The two surveys are combined using novel statistical methodology.

  2. Experimental models of small intestinal transplantation in rats: orthotopic versus heterotopic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao A

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of surgical models of small intestinal transplantation (SITx in rats, namely heterotopic (HIT and orthotopic transplantion (OIT, have been reviewed. In OIT, the small intestine of the recipient is removed and the transplanted intestine replaces it in continuity. On the other hand, in the HIT model, the small intestinal grafts are rendered dysfunctional without alimentary tract continuity. Histological evidence showed that acute rejection appeared earlier in HIT as compared to OIT. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the muscularis externa produced in the chronic rejection process were more pronounced in HIT allografts. The HIT grafts showed severe mucosal atrophy due to the lack of intraluminal trophic factors, because oral feedings can stimulate tropic hormones for mucosal growth, and provide nutrients for enterocytes. Intestinal permeability was consistently higher after HIT than after OIT. The HIT grafts demonstrated less contractility and less response to chemical stimulation than did OIT grafts. The OIT models are advantageous in studies of intraluminal nutrients, and intestinal secretions in these models might modulate the intestinal immune status and possibly delay rejection. The superior intestinal barrier function and the delayed onset of rejection in OIT rats suggest that nutrients and other factors in the succus entericus are important for the maintenance of intestinal graft function.

  3. Interior Ballistics Modeling Applied to Small Arms Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    ball cartridge M2, Projectile weight 150 grains (9.72 x I0-3 kg) Propellant weight 49.9 grains (3.23 x l0" kg) Bore area 0.0732 in.’ (4.72 x 10" mi...recoil (ref. Si). The small bore area of small arms also creates greater problems with heat transfer and erosion (ref. 52). Gas Transmission Systems...34 Olin Corporation, Winchester Western Division Technical Report WWR-68-2, 15 January 1968 I 11. B.W. Brodman , M.P. Devine, and M.T. Gurbarg

  4. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clevin, L.; Grantcharov, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    . Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared...... with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using...

  5. The predator-prey models for the mechanism of autocatalysis, pair wise interactions and movements to free places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shakil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to develop the modeled equations for different types of mechanism of the predator-prey interactions with the help of a quasi chemical approach while taking a special study case of foxes and rabbits, these mechanisms include autocatalysis mechanism, pair wise interactions and the mechanism of their movements to some free places. The chemical reactions representing the interactions obey the mass action law. The territorial animal like fox is assigned a simple cell as its territory. Under the proper relations between coefficients, this system may demonstrate globally stable dynamics.

  6. The virtual promenade, didactic experiments on the potentials of combining conventional and digital modelling of the city experienced in movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette; Bohn, Claus

    2014-01-01

    in the education of future architects? This paper is therefore likewise divided. The first part is about the city and the architectural tools involved in the workshop. This section is titled Representing the City. The second part is elaborating on the technical aspects of the Virtual Reality technology used...... modelling seen through latest Virtual Reality technologies. Thus the research question is two-folded: What kind of architecture can we imagine and conjure through movement combining classical tools and methods with newest technology and how do we respond to these new tools and integrate them....... This part is titled Applied Desktop Virtual Reality....

  7. Modeling and hazard mapping of complex cascading mass movement processes: the case of glacier lake 513, Carhuaz, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Demian; Huggel, Christian; García, Javier; Ludeña, Sebastian; Cochachin, Alejo

    2013-04-01

    The Cordilleras in Peru are especially vulnerable to, and affected by impacts from climate change. Local communities and cities often exist directly within the reach of major hazard potentials such as lake outburst floods (aluviones), mud-/debris flows (huaycos) or large rock-/ice avalanches. They have been repeatedly and strongly affected these regions over the last decades and since the last century, and thousands of people have been killed. One of the most recent events in the Cordillera Blanca occurred on 11 April 2010, when a rock/ice avalanche from the top of Hualcán mountain, NE of the town of Carhuaz impacted the glacier lake 513 (Laguna 513), caused displacement waves and triggered an outburst flood wave. The flow repeatedly transformed from debris flow to hyperconcentrated flow and eventually caused significant damage in Carhuaz. This event was motivation to start early warning and prevention efforts to reduce risks related to ice/rock avalanches and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOF). One of the basic components of an early warning system is the assessment, understanding and communication of relevant hazards and risks. Here we report on the methodology and results of generating GLOF related hazard maps for Carhuaz based on numerical modeling and field work. This exercise required an advanced concept and implementation of different mass movement models. Specifically, numerical models were applied for simulating avalanche flow, avalanche lake impact, displacement wave generation and lake overtopping, and eventually flow propagation of the outburst flood with changing rheology between debris flow and hyperconcentrated flows. We adopted a hazard mapping procedure slightly adjusted adjusted from guidelines developed in Switzerland and in the Andes region. A methodology has thereby been developed to translate results from numerical mass movement modeling into hazard maps. The resulting hazard map was verified and adjusted during field work. This study shows

  8. inverse gaussian model for small area estimation via gibbs sampling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ... for the factor effects is motivated from the context of the ... extremely useful in small area estimation theory, where one can ... study as the ten regions stratified by six education classes. .... The expectation of a function g(θ) of the parameters is ...... money income. .... included in the paper in the interest of saving space.

  9. Testing predictions of small brood models using parasitoid wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guinnee, M.A.; Bernal, J.S.; Bezemer, T.M.; Fidgen, J.G.; Hardy, I.C.W.; Mayhew, P.J.; Mills, N.J.; West, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Question: How is variation in offspring size (between broods) related to brood size? Hypotheses: Variance in offspring size (between broods) should decrease with increasing brood size as predicted by Charnov and colleagues' (Charnov and Downhower, 1995; Charnov et al., 1995) small brood invariant.

  10. Bayesian State-Space Modelling of Conventional Acoustic Tracking Provides Accurate Descriptors of Home Range Behavior in a Small-Bodied Coastal Fish Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Balle, Salvador; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSM) are increasingly applied in studies involving biotelemetry-generated positional data because they are able to estimate movement parameters from positions that are unobserved or have been observed with non-negligible observational error. Popular telemetry systems in marine coastal fish consist of arrays of omnidirectional acoustic receivers, which generate a multivariate time-series of detection events across the tracking period. Here we report a novel Bayesian fitting of a SSM application that couples mechanistic movement properties within a home range (a specific case of random walk weighted by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) with a model of observational error typical for data obtained from acoustic receiver arrays. We explored the performance and accuracy of the approach through simulation modelling and extensive sensitivity analyses of the effects of various configurations of movement properties and time-steps among positions. Model results show an accurate and unbiased estimation of the movement parameters, and in most cases the simulated movement parameters were properly retrieved. Only in extreme situations (when fast swimming speeds are combined with pooling the number of detections over long time-steps) the model produced some bias that needs to be accounted for in field applications. Our method was subsequently applied to real acoustic tracking data collected from a small marine coastal fish species, the pearly razorfish, Xyrichtys novacula. The Bayesian SSM we present here constitutes an alternative for those used to the Bayesian way of reasoning. Our Bayesian SSM can be easily adapted and generalized to any species, thereby allowing studies in freely roaming animals on the ecological and evolutionary consequences of home ranges and territory establishment, both in fishes and in other taxa. PMID:27119718

  11. Growing small-world networks based on a modified BA model

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xinping; Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    We propose a simple growing model for the evolution of small-world networks. It is introduced as a modified BA model in which all the edges connected to the new nodes are made locally to the creator and its nearest neighbors. It is found that this model can produce small-world networks with power-law degree distributions. Properties of our model, including the degree distribution, clustering, and the average path length are compared with that of the BA model. Since most real networks are both scale-free and small-world networks, our model may provide a satisfactory description for empirical characteristics of real networks.

  12. Spatial modeling of personalized exposure dynamics: the case of pesticide use in small-scale agricultural production landscapes of the developing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binder Claudia R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticide poisoning is a global health issue with the largest impacts in the developing countries where residential and small-scale agricultural areas are often integrated and pesticides sprayed manually. To reduce health risks from pesticide exposure approaches for personalized exposure assessment (PEA are needed. We present a conceptual framework to develop a spatial individual-based model (IBM prototype for assessing potential exposure of farm-workers conducting small-scale agricultural production, which accounts for a considerable portion of global food crop production. Our approach accounts for dynamics in the contaminant distributions in the environment, as well as patterns of movement and activities performed on an individual level under different safety scenarios. We demonstrate a first prototype using data from a study area in a rural part of Colombia, South America. Results Different safety scenarios of PEA were run by including weighting schemes for activities performed under different safety conditions. We examined the sensitivity of individual exposure estimates to varying patterns of pesticide application and varying individual patterns of movement. This resulted in a considerable variation in estimates of magnitude, frequency and duration of exposure over the model runs for each individual as well as between individuals. These findings indicate the influence of patterns of pesticide application, individual spatial patterns of movement as well as safety conditions on personalized exposure in the agricultural production landscape that is the focus of our research. Conclusion This approach represents a conceptual framework for developing individual based models to carry out PEA in small-scale agricultural settings in the developing world based on individual patterns of movement, safety conditions, and dynamic contaminant distributions. The results of our analysis indicate our prototype model is sufficiently

  13. Small-world phenomena in physics: the Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitterman, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan (Israel)

    2000-12-01

    The Ising system with a small fraction of random long-range interactions is the simplest example of small-world phenomena in physics. Considering the latter both in an annealed and in a quenched state we conclude that: (a) the existence of random long-range interactions leads to a phase transition in the one-dimensional case and (b) there is a minimal average number p of these interactions per site (p<1 in the annealed state, and p{approx_equal}1 in the quenched state) needed for the appearance of the phase transition. Note that the average number of these bonds, pN/2, is much smaller than the total number of bonds, N{sup 2}/2. (author)

  14. Impact of multicollinearity on small sample hydrologic regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Charles N.; Song, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Often hydrologic regression models are developed with ordinary least squares (OLS) procedures. The use of OLS with highly correlated explanatory variables produces multicollinearity, which creates highly sensitive parameter estimators with inflated variances and improper model selection. It is not clear how to best address multicollinearity in hydrologic regression models. Here a Monte Carlo simulation is developed to compare four techniques to address multicollinearity: OLS, OLS with variance inflation factor screening (VIF), principal component regression (PCR), and partial least squares regression (PLS). The performance of these four techniques was observed for varying sample sizes, correlation coefficients between the explanatory variables, and model error variances consistent with hydrologic regional regression models. The negative effects of multicollinearity are magnified at smaller sample sizes, higher correlations between the variables, and larger model error variances (smaller R2). The Monte Carlo simulation indicates that if the true model is known, multicollinearity is present, and the estimation and statistical testing of regression parameters are of interest, then PCR or PLS should be employed. If the model is unknown, or if the interest is solely on model predictions, is it recommended that OLS be employed since using more complicated techniques did not produce any improvement in model performance. A leave-one-out cross-validation case study was also performed using low-streamflow data sets from the eastern United States. Results indicate that OLS with stepwise selection generally produces models across study regions with varying levels of multicollinearity that are as good as biased regression techniques such as PCR and PLS.

  15. Quantifying kinematics of purposeful movements to real, imagined, or absent functional objects: Implications for modelling trajectories for robot-assisted ADL tasks**

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisneski Kimberly J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robotic therapy is at the forefront of stroke rehabilitation. The Activities of Daily Living Exercise Robot (ADLER was developed to improve carryover of gains after training by combining the benefits of Activities of Daily Living (ADL training (motivation and functional task practice with real objects, with the benefits of robot mediated therapy (repeatability and reliability. In combining these two therapy techniques, we seek to develop a new model for trajectory generation that will support functional movements to real objects during robot training. We studied natural movements to real objects and report on how initial reaching movements are affected by real objects and how these movements deviate from the straight line paths predicted by the minimum jerk model, typically used to generate trajectories in robot training environments. We highlight key issues that to be considered in modelling natural trajectories. Methods Movement data was collected as eight normal subjects completed ADLs such as drinking and eating. Three conditions were considered: object absent, imagined, and present. This data was compared to predicted trajectories generated from implementing the minimum jerk model. The deviations in both the plane of the table (XY and the saggital plane of torso (XZ were examined for both reaches to a cup and to a spoon. Velocity profiles and curvature were also quantified for all trajectories. Results We hypothesized that movements performed with functional task constraints and objects would deviate from the minimum jerk trajectory model more than those performed under imaginary or object absent conditions. Trajectory deviations from the predicted minimum jerk model for these reaches were shown to depend on three variables: object presence, object orientation, and plane of movement. When subjects completed the cup reach their movements were more curved than for the spoon reach. The object present condition for the cup

  16. Multiscale measurement error models for aggregated small area health data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregay, Mehreteab; Lawson, Andrew B; Faes, Christel; Kirby, Russell S; Carroll, Rachel; Watjou, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Spatial data are often aggregated from a finer (smaller) to a coarser (larger) geographical level. The process of data aggregation induces a scaling effect which smoothes the variation in the data. To address the scaling problem, multiscale models that link the convolution models at different scale levels via the shared random effect have been proposed. One of the main goals in aggregated health data is to investigate the relationship between predictors and an outcome at different geographical levels. In this paper, we extend multiscale models to examine whether a predictor effect at a finer level hold true at a coarser level. To adjust for predictor uncertainty due to aggregation, we applied measurement error models in the framework of multiscale approach. To assess the benefit of using multiscale measurement error models, we compare the performance of multiscale models with and without measurement error in both real and simulated data. We found that ignoring the measurement error in multiscale models underestimates the regression coefficient, while it overestimates the variance of the spatially structured random effect. On the other hand, accounting for the measurement error in multiscale models provides a better model fit and unbiased parameter estimates.

  17. Optimization of small portable hoist load-capacity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanheng; Yin, Hao; Liang, Zuotang; Xu, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Small Portable Hoist (SPH) is needed in many special occasions; the load-capacity (LC) is one of the most important metrics. There are few researches direct related on SPH and the LC is calculated by Euler's formula in most published related literatures. Because of the SPH's unique, experimental research is carried out on the LC, an optimization of Euler's formula is got by analyzing the effects of wrap angle φ, end tension FB, and relative size of r and R. This optimization is more accurate and it deepens the understanding of the friction between wheel and the bending rope.

  18. Heterogeneous movement of insectivorous Amazonian birds through primary and secondary forest: A case study using multistate models with radiotelemetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, James; Powell, Luke L.; Wolfe, Jared D.; Johnson, Erik l.; Nichols, James D.; Stouffer, Phillip C.

    2015-01-01

    Given rates of deforestation, disturbance, and secondary forest accumulation in tropical rainforests, there is a great need to quantify habitat use and movement among different habitats. This need is particularly pronounced for animals most sensitive to disturbance, such as insectivorous understory birds. Here we use multistate capture–recapture models with radiotelemetry data to determine the successional stage at which within-day movement probabilities of Amazonian birds in secondary forest are similar to those in primary forest. We radio-tracked three common understory insectivore species in primary and secondary forest at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments project near Manaus, Brazil: two woodcreepers, Glyphorynchus spirurus (n = 19) andXiphorhynchus pardalotus (n = 18), and the terrestrial antthrush Formicarius colma(n = 19). Forest age was a strong predictor of fidelity to a given habitat. All three species showed greater fidelity to primary forest than to 8–14-year-old secondary forest, indicating the latter’s relatively poor quality. The two woodcreeper species used 12–18-year-old secondary forest in a manner comparable to continuous forest, but F. colmaavoided moving even to 27–31-year-old secondary forest—the oldest at our site. Our results suggest that managers concerned with less sensitive species can assume that forest reserves connected by 12–18-year-old secondary forest corridors are effectively connected. On the other hand, >30 years are required after land abandonment before secondary forest serves as a primary forest-like conduit for movement by F. colma; more sensitive terrestrial insectivores may take longer still.

  19. Effect of Straight-leg-raising Movement on Epidural Fibrosis in Early Stage after Laminectomy in a Rabbit Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effect of straight-leg-raising (SLR) movement on epidural fibrosis after laminectomy, 40 adult New Zealand rabbits were selected as laminectomy models in the study. They were divided into 2 groups: a SLR group (group S) and a control group (group C) randomly, with each group having 20 animals. All rabbits were subjected to total laminectomy in the site of S1. Every 5 rabbits in each group selected randomly were killed at the 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 8th week after the surgery. Segments of spines from L7 to S2 were removed en bloc. After gross evaluation, specimens were sliced up. The slices were stained by HE and Masson's trichrome methods respectively for histological examination. Our results showed that formation process of scar in group S was retarded as compared with that of group C at the time of the 2nd-week, but there was no statistical difference between groups in the adhesion degree (P≥0.05). At the 4th and 8th week, the epidural fibrosis of group S was more serious than that of group C. Since the 2nd-week, the area of scar in group S was larger than that of group C. The number of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells in group S were larger than those of group C at early stage. But in later stage, there was no statistical significance between the two groups. It is concluded that SLR movement after laminectomy may promote the formation of epidural fibrosis and retard the maturity of scar. SLR movement can also aggravate scar adhesion.

  20. Modeling the amide I bands of small peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas la Cour; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Watson, Tim M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Knoester, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    In this paper different floating oscillator models for describing the amide I band of peptides and proteins are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Models for the variation of the frequency shifts of the oscillators and the nearest-neighbor coupling between them with respect

  1. Binary choices in small and large groups: A unified model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischi, Gian-Italo; Merlone, Ugo

    2010-02-01

    Two different ways to model the diffusion of alternative choices within a population of individuals in the presence of social externalities are known in the literature. While Galam’s model of rumors spreading considers a majority rule for interactions in several groups, Schelling considers individuals interacting in one large group, with payoff functions that describe how collective choices influence individual preferences. We incorporate these two approaches into a unified general discrete-time dynamic model for studying individual interactions in variously sized groups. We first illustrate how the two original models can be obtained as particular cases of the more general model we propose, then we show how several other situations can be analyzed. The model we propose goes beyond a theoretical exercise as it allows modeling situations which are relevant in economic and social systems. We consider also other aspects such as the propensity to switch choices and the behavioral momentum, and show how they may affect the dynamics of the whole population.

  2. Prospective modeling with Hydrus-2D of 50 years Zn and Pb movements in low and moderately metal-contaminated agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinheimer dos Santos, Danilo; Cambier, Philippe; Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; Labanowski, Jérôme; Lamy, Isabelle; Tessier, Daniel; van Oort, Folkert

    2013-02-01

    Results of detailed modeling of in situ redistribution of heavy metals in pedological horizons of low and moderately metal contaminated soils, considering distinctly different long-term land use, are scarcely reported in literature. We used Hydrus-2D software parameterized with abundant available local soil data to simulate future Zn and Pb movements in soils contaminated by metallurgical fallout in the 20th century. In recent work on comparing different modeling hypotheses, we validated a two-site reactive model set with adjusted chemical kinetic constant values by fitting the 2005 Zn and Pb concentration profiles in soils, with estimated 1901-1963 airborne Zn and Pb loads (Mallmann et al., 2012a). In the present work, we used the same approach to simulate 2005-2055 changes in Zn and Pb depth-distribution and soil-solution concentrations, comparing two hypotheses of chemical equilibrium: i) the validated two-site model (one site at equilibrium and the other involved in kinetic reactions with pore water) set with adjusted kinetic EDTA extraction constants, and ii) a non-linear one-surface site adsorption equilibrium model. Simulated transfers were found generally lower and more realistic when using the two-site model. Simulations showed that consistent Zn redistribution and loss occurred in the moderately contaminated soil until 2055, i.e., more than one century after the main metal deposition, but negligible in low contaminated soils. Transfer of Pb was small in the three soils and under both hypotheses. In 2055, simulated Zn outflow concentrations remained under threshold values for drinking water.

  3. Linking movement behavior and fine-scale genetic structure to model landscape connectivity for bobcats (Lynx rufus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn M. Reding; Samuel A. Cushman; Todd E. Gosselink; William R. Clark

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity can constrain the movement of individuals and consequently genes across a landscape, influencing demographic and genetic processes. In this study, we linked information on landscape composition, movement behavior, and genetic differentiation to gain a mechanistic understanding of how spatial heterogeneity may influence movement and gene flow of...

  4. Postulating that our neurological models for musculoskeletal support, movement, and emotional expression come from archetypal forms in early organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, John A

    2006-01-01

    The ability for humans, in principle, to almost effortlessly support themselves against gravity, to move with grace, and to express themselves in subtle and beautiful ways is amazing, given the number of moveable joints, variety of obstacles and intentions, and possible emotions to express. The actual mechanics are obviously astonishing but the models for these activities, in origin, must be simple. The basic hypotheses concerning these models are the following: The neurological model for the control of our musculoskeletal system is a simple support system from early organisms. This model involves a complementary relationship between the dorsal and ventral surfaces. There are three functionally distinct parts of the body, though not visually observable. These parts, named here "the director, motor, and rudder segments," are functionally distinct in optimal posture and movement. Healthy balance, posture, and movement result from their relatively independent yet coordinated actions. Forms of locomotion used by early organisms: peristalsis, lateral undulation, and dorsal-ventral undulation are present in us yet. Four frozen phases of the dorsal-ventral wave, for example, constitute four distinct postural and personality styles. I present these hypotheses together in this short paper as an introduction to a new illustration-dependent way to conceive some of our psychophysical realities. The hypotheses came from efforts to develop mental imagery to assist students in learning the Alexander technique (AT). In addition, a little known theory concerning four basic emotions and personality types, called the Fusion Theory, provided an initial concept of personality types. Four fixed postural patterns that I observed in teaching AT linked well to this personality typology. There is research that supports the use of mental imagery to affect change in body use, mostly in the sports and dance fields, but none exists addressing the specific imagery derived from these hypotheses

  5. Hydrological Modelling of Small Scale Processes in a Wetland Habitat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ole; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Pedersen, Morten Lauge

    2009-01-01

    Numerical modelling of the hydrology in a Danish rich fen area has been conducted. By collecting various data in the field the model has been successfully calibrated and the flow paths as well as the groundwater discharge distribution have been simulated in details. The results of this work have...... shown that distributed numerical models can be applied to local scale problems and that natural springs, ditches, the geological conditions as well as the local topographic variations have a significant influence on the flow paths in the examined rich fen area....

  6. Rhythm, movement, and autism: Using rhythmic rehabilitation research as a model for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blythe eLaGasse

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been increased focus on movement and sensory abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD. This has come from research demonstrating cortical and cerebellar difference in autism, with suggestion of early cerebellar dysfunction. As evidence for an extended profile of ASD grows, there are vast implications for treatment and therapy for individuals with autism. Persons with autism are often provided behavioral or cognitive strategies for navigating their environment; however, these strategies do not consider differences in motor functioning. One accommodation that has not yet been explored in the literature is the use of auditory rhythmic cueing to improve motor functioning in ASD. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential impact of auditory rhythmic cueing for motor functioning in persons with ASD. To this effect, we review research on rhythm in motor rehabilitation, draw parallels to motor dysfunction in ASD, and propose a rationale for how rhythmic input can improve sensorimotor functioning, thereby allowing individuals with autism to demonstrate their full cognitive, behavioral, social, and communicative potential.

  7. Rhythm, movement, and autism: using rhythmic rehabilitation research as a model for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Michelle W; Lagasse, A Blythe

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased focus on movement and sensory abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This has come from research demonstrating cortical and cerebellar differences in autism, with suggestion of early cerebellar dysfunction. As evidence for an extended profile of ASD grows, there are vast implications for treatment and therapy for individuals with autism. Persons with autism are often provided behavioral or cognitive strategies for navigating their environment; however, these strategies do not consider differences in motor functioning. One accommodation that has not yet been explored in the literature is the use of auditory rhythmic cueing to improve motor functioning in ASD. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential impact of auditory rhythmic cueing for motor functioning in persons with ASD. To this effect, we review research on rhythm in motor rehabilitation, draw parallels to motor dysfunction in ASD, and propose a rationale for how rhythmic input can improve sensorimotor functioning, thereby allowing individuals with autism to demonstrate their full cognitive, behavioral, social, and communicative potential.

  8. Small Scale Drop Tower Test for Practice Torpedo Impact Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Table E3. Tensile test results for the aluminium 6061 -T6 model hull plates. 2 coupons were cut with their length parallel to the long side of the...and without stiffeners and aluminium plate without stiffeners. A qualitative comparison of the results for the three model hull forms shows that...stiffeners tend to limit the extent of the dent, that aluminium plate has a greater elastic response than that of both stiffened and unstiffened steel

  9. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  10. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevin, Lotte; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic box model trainers have been used in training curricula for a long time, however data on their impact on skills acquisition is still limited. Our aim was to validate a low cost box model trainer as a tool for the training of skills relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Randomised, controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). University Hospital. Sixteen gynaecologic residents with limited laparoscopic experience were randomised to a group that received a structured box model training curriculum, and a control group. Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using the VR system. Trainees who used the box model trainer showed significant improvement compared to the control group. Box model trainers are valid tools for laparoscopic skills training and should be implemented in the comprehensive training curricula in gynaecology.

  11. Computational approaches for efficiently modelling of small atmospheric clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a comprehensive test set of 205 clusters of atmospheric relevance, we investigate how different DFT functionals (M06-2X, PW91, ωB97X-D) and basis sets (6-311++G(3df,3pd), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d)) affect the thermal contribution to the Gibbs free energy and single point energy. Reducing...... the basis set used in the geometry and frequency calculation from 6-311++G(3df,3pd) → 6-31++G(d,p) implies a significant speed-up in computational time and only leads to small errors in the thermal contribution to the Gibbs free energy and subsequent coupled cluster single point energy calculation....

  12. Issues and Answers in the Rural and Small School Education Movement. Annual Rural Education Conference (2nd, Manhattan, Kansas, November 10-11, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gerald D., Comp.; Scott, Robert E., Comp.

    Conference papers are clustered into three major categories: background--the past and future; current issues in rural and small school education; and individual and group roles in rural and small school education. Papers in the first category provide an overview of the basic changes in rural education, project a picture of rural education in the…

  13. Binaural model for artificial spatial sound localization based on interaural time delays and movements of the interaural axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneip, Laurent; Baumann, Claude

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for sound localization in space using two-microphone devices that possess at least two degrees of freedom. It proves a series of theorems and lemmas that are based on time difference of arrival measurements and movements of the interaural axis, forming a powerful instrument for practical robot applications. For instance, it shows that a single determined rotation of the interaural axis is sufficient to exactly yield the azimuth or the elevation of an immobile sound source in the far field, independently of microphone spacing and the speed of sound and hence of the surrounding medium. It proves that at any moment the knowledge of one value determines the magnitude of the other, with the restriction that the sign of the second value is undefined, which means that, depending on the rotation, either the back-front or the up-down ambiguity is kept unsolved. This paper also shows that parallax motion unlocks essential information about the distance and the Cartesian coordinates of the sound source. Shifting the microphone system sideways fixes the distance and the coordinate on the interaural axis. Combining rotation and translation movements completely solves the localization problem. In order to illustrate the efficacy of the model, this paper presents experiments with a low cost robot developer kit during which the azimuth, the elevation, and the distance of continuous sound sources are determined at a precision of 10 degrees and 0.5 m, respectively. Achieving this performance with low power material demonstrates how easily the model can be implemented into any robotic system.

  14. Small Signal Model for VSC-HVDC Connected DFIG-Based Offshore Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale offshore wind farms are integrated with onshore ac grids through the voltage source converter based high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC transmission system. The impact on the stability of the ac grids will be significant. The small signal model of a wind farm connected with voltage source converter based dc transmission system is studied in this paper. A suitable model for small signal stability analysis is presented. The control system of wind generator and the HVDC system has also been modeled in this model for small signal stability analysis. The impact of the control parameters on the network stability is investigated.

  15. From Large to Small Scales: Global Models of the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A

    2004-01-01

    We review large scale modelling of the ISM with emphasis on the importance to include the disk-halo-disk duty cycle and to use a dynamical refinement of the grid (in regions where steep variations of density and pressure occur) for a realistic modelling of the ISM. We also discuss the necessity of convergence of the simulation results by comparing 0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 pc resolution simulations and show that a minimum grid resolution of 1.25 pc is required for quantitatively reliable results, as there is a rapid convergence for $\\Delta x \\leq 1.1$ pc.

  16. Early Tracking Behavior in Small-field Quintessence Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We study several quintessence models which are exotic at Q = 0, anduse a simple constraint Q ≥ H/2π to check when they enter the tracking regime,disregarding the details of inflation. We find that it can also give strong constraintsfor V = V0Q-α, which has to enter the tracking regime after lnz ~ 10, while forthe supergravity model V = V0Q-αexp(kQ2/2), the constraint is much weaker. Forthe exponential form of inverse power-law potential V = Voexp(λ/Q), it exhibits noconstraints.

  17. Greedy Learning of Graphical Models with Small Girth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    incoherence assumption to guarantee its success. In [18] Bento et al. showed that even for a large class of Ising models the incoherence conditions are not...O ( p2 + p (ξ+1) ) Bento et al. ∆ degree limited, Ising model, correlation decay Ω ( ∆2 (1−2∆ tanh θ)2 log p ) O ( p2 ) TABLE I: Performance...gradually decreases as the path distance between the corresponding nodes increase in the graph G. In [18] Bento et al. showed that learning graphical

  18. A novel theoretical framework for the dynamic stability analysis, movement control, and trajectory generation in a multisegment biomechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simplified characterization of the postural control system that embraces two broad components: one representing the musculoskeletal dynamics in the sagittal plane and the other representing proprioceptive feedback and the central nervous system (CNS). Specifically, a planar four-segment neuromusculoskeletal model consisting of the ankle, knee, and hip degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) is described in this paper. The model includes important physiological constructs such as Hill-type muscle model, active and passive muscle stiffnesses, force feedback from the Golgi tendon organ, muscle length and rate feedback from the muscle spindle, and transmission latencies in the neural pathways. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller for each individual DOF is assumed to represent the CNS analog in the modeling paradigm. Our main hypothesis states that all stabilizing PID controllers for such multisegment biomechanical models can be parametrized and analytically synthesized. Our analytical and simulation results show that the proposed representation adequately shapes a postural control that (a) possesses good disturbance rejection and trajectory tracking, (b) is robust against feedback latencies and torque perturbations, and (c) is flexible to embrace changes in the musculoskeletal parameters. We additionally present detailed sensitivity analysis to show that control under conditions of limited or no proprioceptive feedback results in (a) significant reduction in the stability margins, (b) substantial decrease in the available stabilizing parameter set, and (c) oscillatory movement trajectories. Overall, these results suggest that anatomical arrangement, active muscle stiffness, force feedback, and physiological latencies play a major role in shaping motor control processes in humans.

  19. Stooke Small Body Shape Models V2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooke, P.

    2016-10-01

    This data set contains Philip Stooke shape models for 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, 951 Gaspra, comet Halley, J5 Amalthea, J14 Thebe, N7 Larissa, N8 Proteus, S10 Janus, S11 Epimetheus, S16 Prometheus, and S17 Pandora, based on optical data from the NEAR, Galileo, Giotto, Vega 1, Vega 2, and Voyager missions.

  20. Modeling individual movement decisions of brown hare (Lepus europaeus) as a key concept for realistic spatial behavior and exposure: A population model for landscape-level risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinmann, Joachim U; Wang, Magnus

    2017-09-01

    Spatial behavior is of crucial importance for the risk assessment of pesticides and for the assessment of effects of agricultural practice or multiple stressors, because it determines field use, exposition, and recovery. Recently, population models have increasingly been used to understand the mechanisms driving risk and recovery or to conduct landscape-level risk assessments. To include spatial behavior appropriately in population models for use in risk assessments, a new method, "probabilistic walk," was developed, which simulates the detailed daily movement of individuals by taking into account food resources, vegetation cover, and the presence of conspecifics. At each movement step, animals decide where to move next based on probabilities being determined from this information. The model was parameterized to simulate populations of brown hares (Lepus europaeus). A detailed validation of the model demonstrated that it can realistically reproduce various natural patterns of brown hare ecology and behavior. Simulated proportions of time animals spent in fields (PT values) were also comparable to field observations. It is shown that these important parameters for the risk assessment may, however, vary in different landscapes. The results demonstrate the value of using population models to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment and to better understand which factors determine risk in a landscape context. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2299-2307. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. Modeling Flash Floods in Small Ungaged Watersheds using Embedded GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Knocke, Ethan William

    2006-01-01

    Effective prediction of localized flash flood regions for an approaching rainfall event requires an in-depth knowledge of the land surface and stream characteristics of the forecast area. Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) is currently formulated once or twice a day at the county level by River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the U.S. using modeling systems that contain coarse, generalized land and stream characteristics and hydrologic runoff techniques that often are not calibrated for the forecast regio...

  2. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  3. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  4. The Application of Contagious Disease Epidemiological Models to Known Population Structure and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    periods, such as incubation period and contagious period, versus fully characterized probability density functions,  The model adds a “removed-medical...I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S The Application of Contagious Disease Epidemiological Models to Known Population Structure...2013]. I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5225 The Application of Contagious Disease Epidemiological Models to

  5. Barnes maze testing strategies with small and large rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-02-26

    Spatial learning and memory of laboratory rodents is often assessed via navigational ability in mazes, most popular of which are the water and dry-land (Barnes) mazes. Improved performance over sessions or trials is thought to reflect learning and memory of the escape cage/platform location. Considered less stressful than water mazes, the Barnes maze is a relatively simple design of a circular platform top with several holes equally spaced around the perimeter edge. All but one of the holes are false-bottomed or blind-ending, while one leads to an escape cage. Mildly aversive stimuli (e.g. bright overhead lights) provide motivation to locate the escape cage. Latency to locate the escape cage can be measured during the session; however, additional endpoints typically require video recording. From those video recordings, use of automated tracking software can generate a variety of endpoints that are similar to those produced in water mazes (e.g. distance traveled, velocity/speed, time spent in the correct quadrant, time spent moving/resting, and confirmation of latency). Type of search strategy (i.e. random, serial, or direct) can be categorized as well. Barnes maze construction and testing methodologies can differ for small rodents, such as mice, and large rodents, such as rats. For example, while extra-maze cues are effective for rats, smaller wild rodents may require intra-maze cues with a visual barrier around the maze. Appropriate stimuli must be identified which motivate the rodent to locate the escape cage. Both Barnes and water mazes can be time consuming as 4-7 test trials are typically required to detect improved learning and memory performance (e.g. shorter latencies or path lengths to locate the escape platform or cage) and/or differences between experimental groups. Even so, the Barnes maze is a widely employed behavioral assessment measuring spatial navigational abilities and their potential disruption by genetic, neurobehavioral manipulations, or drug

  6. Stable phase-shift despite quasi-rhythmic movements: a CPG-driven dynamic model of active tactile exploration in an insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin eHarischandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An essential component of autonomous and flexible behaviour in animals is active exploration of the environment, allowing for perception-guided planning and control of actions. An important sensory system involved is active touch. Here, we introduce a general modelling framework of Central Pattern Generators (CPGs for movement generation in active tactile exploration behaviour. The CPG consists of two network levels: (i phase-coupled Hopf oscillators for rhythm generation, and (ii pattern formation networks for capturing the frequency and phase characteristics of individual joint oscillations. The model captured the natural, quasi-rhythmic joint kinematics as observed in coordinated antennal movements of walking stick insects. Moreover, it successfully produced tactile exploration behaviour on a three-dimensional skeletal model of the insect antennal system with physically realistic parameters. The effect of proprioceptor ablations could be simulated by changing the amplitude and offset parameters of the joint oscillators, only. As in the animal, the movement of both antennal joints was coupled with a stable phase difference, despite the quasi-rhythmicity of the joint angle time courses. We found that the phase-lead of the distal scape-pedicel joint relative to the proximal head-scape joint was essential for producing the natural tactile exploration behaviour and, thus, for tactile efficiency. For realistic movement patterns, the phase-lead could vary within a limited range of 10 to 30 degrees only. Tests with artificial movement patterns strongly suggest that this phase sensitivity is not a matter of the frequency composition of the natural movement pattern. Based on our modelling results, we propose that a constant phase difference is coded into the CPG of the antennal motor system and that proprioceptors are acting locally to regulate the joint movement amplitude.

  7. DETERMINED MODEL FOR COORDINATED REGULATION OF MOTOR TRANSPORT MOVEMENT ON HIGHWAY WITH T-SHAPE CROSSROADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Shut

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines variants of higher control efficiency in respect of road traffic by creating coordinated regulation  with the help of a determined module. Model application conditions have been determined for specific traffic situations with due account of transport-pedestrian load. The paper contains proposals for the model optimization directed on reduction of  motor vehicle delay in front of the in-traffic light  stop-line along the main highway direction.

  8. Mental imagery of speech and movement implicates the dynamics of internal forward models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing eTian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical concept of efference copies in the context of internal forward models has stimulated productive research in cognitive science and neuroscience. There are compelling reasons to argue for such a mechanism, but finding direct evidence in the human brain remains difficult. Here we investigate the dynamics of internal forward models from an unconventional angle: mental imagery, assessed while recording high temporal resolution neuronal activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG. We compare two overt and covert tasks; our covert, mental imagery tasks are unconfounded by overt input/output demands – but in turn necessitate the development of appropriate multi-dimensional topographic analyses. Finger tapping (studies 1-2 and speech experiments (studies 3-5 provide temporally constrained results that implicate the estimation of an efference copy. We suggest that one internal forward model over parietal cortex subserves the kinesthetic feeling in motor imagery. Secondly, observed auditory neural activity ~170 ms after motor estimation in speech experiments (studies 3-5 demonstrates the anticipated auditory consequences of planned motor commands in a second internal forward model in imagery of speech production. Our results provide neurophysiological evidence from the human brain in favor of internal forward models deploying efference copies in somatosensory and auditory cortex, in finger tapping and speech production tasks, respectively, and also suggest the dynamics and sequential updating structure of internal forward models.

  9. A search theory model of patch-to-patch forager movement with application to pollinator-mediated gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Martin; Cresswell, James E

    2007-09-07

    We present a spatially implicit analytical model of forager movement, designed to address a simple scenario common in nature. We assume minimal depression of patch resources, and discrete foraging bouts, during which foragers fill to capacity. The model is particularly suitable for foragers that search systematically, foragers that deplete resources in a patch only incrementally, and for sit-and-wait foragers, where harvesting does not affect the rate of arrival of forage. Drawing on the theory of job search from microeconomics, we estimate the expected number of patches visited as a function of just two variables: the coefficient of variation of the rate of energy gain among patches, and the ratio of the expected time exploiting a randomly chosen patch and the expected time travelling between patches. We then consider the forager as a pollinator and apply our model to estimate gene flow. Under model assumptions, an upper bound for animal-mediated gene flow between natural plant populations is approximately proportional to the probability that the animal rejects a plant population. In addition, an upper bound for animal-mediated gene flow in any animal-pollinated agricultural crop from a genetically modified (GM) to a non-GM field is approximately proportional to the proportion of fields that are GM and the probability that the animal rejects a field.

  10. Modeling field-scale vertical movement of zinc and copper in a pig slurry-amended soil in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; dos Santos, Danilo Rheinheimer; Ceretta, Carlos Alberto; Cella, Cesar; Simůnek, Jirka; van Oort, Folkert

    2012-12-01

    Organic amendments often represent a source of trace metals (TMs) in soils, which may partly leach into the groundwater. The objectives of this study were (1) to validate Hydrus-2D for modeling the transport of Zn and Cu in an Alfisol amended with pig slurry (PS) by comparing numerical simulations and experimental field data, and (2) to model the next 50 years of TM movements under scenarios of suspended or continued PS amendments. First, between 2000 and 2008, we collected detailed Zn and Cu data from a soil profile in Santa Maria, Brazil. Two hypotheses about Zn and Cu reactivity with the solid phase were tested, considering physical, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics of six soil layers. Using a two-site sorption model with a sorption kinetic rate adjusted based on laboratory EDTA extractions, Hydrus simulations of the vertical TM transport were found to satisfactorily describe the soil Zn and Cu concentration profiles. Second, the long-term fate of Zn and Cu in the soil was assessed using the validated parameterized model. Numerical simulations showed that Zn and Cu did not present risks for groundwater pollution. However, future Cu accumulation in the surface soil layer would exceed the Brazilian threshold for agricultural soils.

  11. The small intestine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a batch process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Brian C

    2008-11-01

    Faults in a batch process model of the small intestine create the symptoms of all types of irritable bowel syndrome. The model has three sequential processing sections corresponding to the natural divisions of the intestine. It is governed by a brain controller that is divided into four sub-controllers, each with a unique neurotransmitter. Each section has a sub-controller to manage transport. Sensors in the walls of the intestine provide input and output goes to the muscles lining the walls of the intestine. The output controls the speed of the food soup, moves it in both directions, mixes it, controls absorption, and transfers it to the next section at the correct speed (slow). The fourth sub-controller manages the addition of chemicals. It obtains input from the first section of the process via the signalling hormone Cholecystokinin and sends output to the muscles that empty the gall bladder and pancreas. The correct amounts of bile salts and enzymes are then added to the first section. The sub-controllers produce output only when input is received. When output is missing the enteric nervous system applies a default condition. This default condition normally happens when no food is in the intestine. If food is in the intestine and a transport sub-controller fails to provide output then the default condition moves the food soup to the end of that section. The movement is in one direction only (forward), at a speed dependent on the amount and type of fibre present. Cereal, bean and vegetable fibre causes high speeds. This default high speed transport causes irritable bowel syndrome. A barrier is created when a section moving fast at the default speed, precedes a section controlled by a transport sub-controller. Then the sub-controller constricts the intestine to stop the fast flow. The barrier causes constipation, cramping, and bloating. Diarrhoea results when the section terminating the process moves at the fast default speed. Two problems can occur to prevent

  12. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...... levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  13. Continuum modeling and limit equilibrium analysis of slope movement due to rainfall infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Ronaldo; White, Joshua; Wu, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Hydrologically-driven landslides and debris flows are highly destructive events that threaten lives and critical infrastructure worldwide. Despite decades of extensive slope stability model development, the fundamental controls connecting the hydrologic and geotechnical processes that trigger slope failure are not well quantified. We use a fully coupled, physics-based finite element model to address this shortcoming. We develop and test a 3D continuum slope-deformation model that couples solid-deformation with fluid-flow processes in variably saturated soils, and assess the capability of the coupled model to predict stresses and deformation necessary to trigger slope failure. We then compare the continuum model with traditional limit equilibrium solutions based on the modified Bishop method of slices to assess the stability of the slope as a function of rainfall infiltration using a scalar stability indicator called factor of safety. For this assessment, we use extensive measurements from a densely instrumented mountain slope (The Coos Bay Experimental Catchment) where a large, rainfall-triggered slope failure occurred. The use of sophisticated, fully coupled numerical simulations combined with comprehensive field-measurements provides an unprecedented opportunity to advance the state of understanding of landslide failure processes and effective mitigation measures.

  14. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  15. Handling a Small Dataset Problem in Prediction Model by employ Artificial Data Generation Approach: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateh, Masitah Abdul; Kamilah Muda, Azah; Yusof, Zeratul Izzah Mohd; Azilah Muda, Noor; Sanusi Azmi, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    The emerging era of big data for past few years has led to large and complex data which needed faster and better decision making. However, the small dataset problems still arise in a certain area which causes analysis and decision are hard to make. In order to build a prediction model, a large sample is required as a training sample of the model. Small dataset is insufficient to produce an accurate prediction model. This paper will review an artificial data generation approach as one of the solution to solve the small dataset problem.

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Intrinsic stability of an HBT based on a small signal equivalent circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanhu, Chen; Huajun, Shen; Xinyu, Liu; Huijun, Li; Hui, Xu; Ling, Li

    2010-12-01

    Intrinsic stability of the heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) was analyzed and discussed based on a small signal equivalent circuit model. The stability factor of the HBT device was derived based on a compact T-type small signal equivalent circuit model of the HBT. The effect of the mainly small signal model parameters of the HBT on the stability of the HBT was thoroughly examined. The discipline of parameter optimum to improve the intrinsic stability of the HBT was achieved. The theoretic analysis results of the stability were also used to explain the experimental results of the stability of the HBT and they were verified by the experimental results.

  17. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  18. Improved ground hydrology calculations for global climate models (GCMs) - Soil water movement and evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramopoulos, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Choudhury, B.

    1988-01-01

    A physically based ground hydrology model is presented that includes the processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, evaporation from bare soil, infiltration, soil water flow, and runoff. Data from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCM were used as inputs for off-line tests of the model in four 8 x 10 deg regions, including Brazil, Sahel, Sahara, and India. Soil and vegetation input parameters were caculated as area-weighted means over the 8 x 10 deg gridbox; the resulting hydrological quantities were compared to ground hydrology model calculations performed on the 1 x 1 deg cells which comprise the 8 x 10 deg gridbox. Results show that the compositing procedure worked well except in the Sahel, where low soil water levels and a heterogeneous land surface produce high variability in hydrological quantities; for that region, a resolution better than 8 x 10 deg is needed.

  19. Constructing A Small Strain Potential for Multi-Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, A; Cheng, H P; Dufty, J W; Mallik, Aditi; Runge, Keith; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Dufty, James W.; Mallik, Aditi; Runge, Keith; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Dufty, James W.

    2005-01-01

    For problems relating to fracture, a consistent embedding of a quantum (QM) domain in its classical (CM) environment requires that the classical system should yield the same structure and elastic properties as the QM domain for states near equilibrium. It is proposed that an appropriate classical potential can be constructed using ab initio data on the equilibrium and weakly strained configurations calculated from the quantum description, rather than the more usual approach of fitting to a wide range of empirical data. The scheme is illustrated in detail for a model system, silica nanorod that has the proper stiochiometric ratio of Si:O as observed in real silica. The potential is chosen to be pairwise additive, with the same pair potential functional form as familiar phenomenological TTAM potential. Here, the parameters are determined using a genetic algorithm with force data obtained directly from a quantum calculation. The resulting potential gives excellent agreement with properties of the reference quant...

  20. Models for physics of the very small and very large

    CERN Document Server

    Buckholtz, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    This monograph tackles three challenges. First, show math that matches known elementary particles. Second, apply the math to match other known physics data. Third, predict future physics data The math features solutions to isotropic pairs of isotropic quantum harmonic oscillators. This monograph matches some solutions to known elementary particles. Matched properties include spin and types of interactions in which the particles partake Other solutions point to possible elementary particles This monograph applies the math and the extended particle list. Results narrow gaps between physics data and theory. Results pertain to elementary particles, astrophysics, and cosmology For example, this monograph predicts properties for beyond-the-Standard-Model elementary particles, proposes descriptions of dark matter and dark energy, provides new relationships between known physics constants, includes theory that dovetails with the ratio of dark matter to ordinary matter, includes math that dovetails with the number of ...

  1. Continuous opinion model in small world directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gandica, Yérali; Vázquez, Gerardo J; Rojas, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In the compromise model of continuous opinions proposed by Deffuant et al, the states of two agents in a network can start to converge if they are neighbors and if their opinions are sufficiently close to each other, below a given threshold of tolerance $\\epsilon$. In directed networks, if agent i is a neighbor of agent j, j need not be a neighbor of i. In Watts-Strogatz networks we performed simulations to find the averaged number of final opinions $$ and their distribution as a function of $\\epsilon$ and of the network structural disorder. In directed networks $$ exhibits a rich structure, being larger than in undirected networks for higher values of $\\epsilon$, and smaller for lower values of $\\epsilon$.

  2. Corn stover harvest increases herbicide movement to subsurface drains – Root Zone Water Quality Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Removal of crop residues for bioenergy production can alter soil hydrologic properties, but there is little information on its impact on transport of herbicides and their degradation products to subsurface drains. The Root Zone Water Quality Model, previously calibrated using measured fl...

  3. Learning and production of movement sequences: Behavioral, neurophysiological, and modelling perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, Bradley J.; Bullock, Daniel; Verwey, Willem B.; Averbeck, Bruno B.; Page, Michael P.A.

    2004-01-01

    A wave of recent behavioral studies has generated a new wealth of parametric observations about serial order behavior. What was a trickle of neurophysiological studies has grown to a steady stream of probes of neural sites and mechanisms underlying sequential behavior. Moreover, simulation models of

  4. Ca2+ movement in smooth muscle cells studied with one- and two-dimensional diffusion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargacin, G; Fay, F S

    1991-11-01

    Although many of the processes involved in the regulation of Ca2+ in smooth muscle have been studied separately, it is still not well known how they are integrated into an overall regulatory system. To examine this question and to study the time course and spatial distribution of Ca2+ in cells after activation, one- and two-dimensional diffusion models of the cell that included the major processes thought to be involved in Ca regulation were developed. The models included terms describing Ca influx, buffering, plasma membrane extrusion, and release and reuptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. When possible these processes were described with known parameters. Simulations with the models indicated that the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca pump is probably primarily responsible for the removal of cytoplasmic Ca2+ after cell activation. The plasma membrane Ca-ATPase and Na/Ca exchange appeared more likely to be involved in the long term regulation of Ca2+. Pumping processes in general had little influence on the rate of rise of Ca transients. The models also showed that spatial inhomogeneities in Ca2+ probably occur in cells during the spread of the Ca signal following activation and during the subsequent return of Ca2+ to its resting level.

  5. LONG-DISTANCE GM POLLEN MOVEMENT OF CREEPING BENTGRASS USING MODELED WIND TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of understanding the role of atmospheric conditions in pollen dispersal has grown in recent years with increased field-testing of genetically modified (GM) crop plants. An atmospheric model was used to characterize wind trajectories at 10 m and 100 m above GM polle...

  6. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Chang; Xiaojuan Ban; Qing Shen; Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements) and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements), the paper applies the method to the...

  7. Small- and large-signal modeling of InP HBTs in transferred-substrate technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Rudolph, Matthias; Jensen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the small- and large-signal modeling of InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) in transferred substrate (TS) technology is investigated. The small-signal equivalent circuit parameters for TS-HBTs in two-terminal and three-terminal configurations are determined by employing...

  8. The Accuracy of Inference in Small Samples of Dynamic Panel Data Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, M.J.G.; Kiviet, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Through Monte Carlo experiments the small sample behavior is examined of various inference techniques for dynamic panel data models when both the time-series and cross-section dimensions of the data set are small. The LSDV technique and corrected versions of it are compared with IV and GMM regarding

  9. Best Small Library in American 2008: Chelsea District Library--A Michigan Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article features Chelsea District Library (CDL), Michigan, which claims recognition as the 2008 Best Small Library in America, an award sponsored by "Library Journal" and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The aggressively responsive staff of CDL has created a model for small libraries all over America. There, careful…

  10. Influence of Different Connectivity Topologies in Small World Networks Modeling Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINMin; CHENTian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    We introduce the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model on a square lattice with some "rewired" longrange connections having the properties of small world networks. We find that our model displays the power-law behavior, and connectivity topologies are very important to model's avalanche dynamical behaviors. Our model has some behaviors different from the OFC model on a small world network with "added" long-range connections in our previous work [LIN Min, ZHAO Xiao-Wei, and CHEN Tian-Lun, Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 41 (2004) 557.].

  11. Momentum Fractions carried by quarks and gluons in models of proton structure functions at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, D K; Kalita, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports analysis of momentum fractions carried by quarks and gluons in models of Proton structure functions at small $x$. First, we analyze the model proposed by Lastovicka based on self-similarity sometime back. We then make a similar analysis for a second model based on the same notion which is also free from singularity in $x$ : $0models are then compared with a recent QCD based Froissart bound compatible model of proton structure function at small $x$, suggested by Block, Durand, Ha and McKay. The results are then compared with the corresponding study in perturbative and Lattice QCD.

  12. Influence of Different Connectivity Topologies in Small World Networks Modeling Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    We introduce the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model on a squarelattice with some "rewired" long-range connections having the properties of small world networks. We find that our model displays the power-law behavior,and connectivity topologies are very important to model's avalanche dynamical behaviors. Our model has some behaviorsdifferent from the OFC model on a small world network with "added" long-range connections in our previous work [LINMin, ZHAO Xiao-Wei, and CHEN Tian-Lun, Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing, China) 41 (2004) 557.].

  13. A learning scheme for reach to grasp movements: on EMG-based interfaces using task specific motion decoding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J; Manolakos, Elias S

    2013-09-01

    A learning scheme based on random forests is used to discriminate between different reach to grasp movements in 3-D space, based on the myoelectric activity of human muscles of the upper-arm and the forearm. Task specificity for motion decoding is introduced in two different levels: Subspace to move toward and object to be grasped. The discrimination between the different reach to grasp strategies is accomplished with machine learning techniques for classification. The classification decision is then used in order to trigger an EMG-based task-specific motion decoding model. Task specific models manage to outperform "general" models providing better estimation accuracy. Thus, the proposed scheme takes advantage of a framework incorporating both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously in order to split the task space. The proposed learning scheme can be easily used to a series of EMG-based interfaces that must operate in real time, providing data-driven capabilities for multiclass problems, that occur in everyday life complex environments.

  14. Island operation - modelling of a small hydro power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarp, Stefan

    2000-02-01

    Simulation is a useful tool for investigating a system behaviour. It is a way to examine operating situations without having to perform them in reality. If someone for example wants to test an operating situation where the system possibly will demolish, a computer simulation could be a both cheaper and safer way than to do the test in reality. This master thesis performs and analyses a simulation, modelling an electronic power system. The system consists of a minor hydro power station, a wood refining industry, and interconnecting power system components. In the simulation situation the system works in a so called island operation. The thesis aims at making a capacity analysis of the current system. Above all, the goal is to find restrictions in load power profile of the consumer, under given circumstances. The computer software used in simulations is Matlab and its additional program PSB (Power System Blockset). The work has been carried out in co-operation with the power supplier Skellefteaa Kraft, where the problem formulation of this master thesis was founded.

  15. Magnetic field diffusion modeling of a small enclosed firing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.

    1996-01-01

    Intense magnetic fields exist in the immediate vicinity of a lightning strike (and near power lines). Conducting barriers increase the rise time (and thus decrease the rise rate) interior to the barrier, but typically do not prevent penetration of the magnetic field, since the lightning current fall time may be larger than the barrier diffusion time. Thus, substantial energy is present in the interior field, although the degradation of rise rate makes it more difficult to couple into electrical circuits. This report assesses the threat posed by the diffusive magnetic field to interior components and wire loops (where voltages are induced). Analytical and numerical bounding analyses are carried out on a pill box shaped conducting barrier to develop estimates for the worst case magnetic field threats inside the system. Worst case induced voltages and energies are estimated and compared with threshold charge voltages and energies on the output capacitor of the system. Variability of these quantities with respect to design parameters are indicated. The interior magnetic field and induced voltage estimates given in this report can be used as excitations for more detailed interior and component models.

  16. Modeling the effects of different irrigation water salinity on soil water movement, uptake and multicomponent solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakis, E. H.; Antonopoulos, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing irrigation, soil salinization or crop production problems. In this study a mathematical model that describes the water movement and mass transport of individual ions (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+) and overall soil salinity by means of the soil solution electrical conductivity, is used. The mass transport equations of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ have been incorporated as part of the integrated model WANISIM and the soil salinity was computed as the sum of individual ions. The model was calibrated and validated against field data, collected during a three year experiment in plots of maize, irrigated with three different irrigation water qualities, at Thessaloniki area in Northern Greece. The model was also used to evaluate salinization and sodification hazards by the use of irrigation water with increasing electrical conductivity of 0.8, 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1, while maintaining a ratio of Ca2+:Mg2+:Na+ equal to 3:3:2. The qualitative and quantitative procedures for results evaluation showed that there was good agreement between the simulated and measured values of the water content, overall salinity and the concentration of individual soluble cations, at two soil layers (0-35 and 35-75 cm). Nutrient uptake was also taken into account. Locally available irrigation water (ECiw = 0.8 dS m-1) did not cause soil salinization or sodification. On the other hand, irrigation water with ECiw equal to 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1 caused severe soil salinization, but not sodification. The rainfall water during the winter seasons was not sufficient to leach salts below the soil profile of 110 cm. The modified version of model WANISIM is able to predict the effects of irrigation with saline waters on soil and plant growth and it is suitable for irrigation management in areas with scarce and low quality water resources.

  17. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well define...

  18. MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF RIBOSOMAL MOVEMENT AND PROTEIN SYNTHESIS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias von der Haar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Translation or protein synthesis consists of a complex system of chemical reactions, which ultimately result in decoding of the mRNA and the production of a protein. The complexity of this reaction system makes it difficult to quantitatively connect its input parameters (such as translation factor or ribosome concentrations, codon composition of the mRNA, or energy availability to output parameters (such as protein synthesis rates or ribosome densities on mRNAs. Mathematical and computational models of translation have now been used for nearly five decades to investigate translation, and to shed light on the relationship between the different reactions in the system. This review gives an overview over the principal approaches used in the modelling efforts, and summarises some of the major findings that were made.

  19. Knightian uncertainty and stock-price movements: Why the REH present-value model failed empirically

    OpenAIRE

    Frydman, Roman; Michael D. Goldberg; Mangee, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Macroeconomic models that are based on either the rational expectations hypothesis (REH) or behavioral considerations share a core premise: All future market outcomes can be characterized ex ante with a single overarching probability distribution. This paper assesses the empirical relevance of this premise using a novel data set. The authors find that Knightian uncertainty, which cannot be reduced to a probability distribution, underpins outcomes in the stock market. This finding reveals the ...

  20. Hitting a Moving Target: A Model for Malaria Elimination in the Presence of Population Movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Prakash Silal

    Full Text Available South Africa is committed to eliminating malaria with a goal of zero local transmission by 2018. Malaria elimination strategies may be unsuccessful if they focus only on vector biology, and ignore the mobility patterns of humans, particularly where the majority of infections are imported. In the first study in Mpumalanga Province in South Africa designed for this purpose, a metapopulation model is developed to assess the impact of their proposed elimination-focused policy interventions. A stochastic, non-linear, ordinary-differential equation model is fitted to malaria data from Mpumalanga and neighbouring Maputo Province in Mozambique. Further scaling-up of vector control is predicted to lead to a minimal reduction in local infections, while mass drug administration and focal screening and treatment at the Mpumalanga-Maputo border are predicted to have only a short-lived impact. Source reduction in Maputo Province is predicted to generate large reductions in local infections through stemming imported infections. The mathematical model predicts malaria elimination to be possible only when imported infections are treated before entry or eliminated at the source suggesting that a regionally focused strategy appears needed, for achieving malaria elimination in Mpumalanga and South Africa.